WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustical measurements

  1. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  2. Acoustic Communications Measurement Systems (ACOMMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Design and develop adaptive signal processing techniques to improve underwater acoustic communications and networking. Phase coherent and incoherent signal...

  3. Acoustic power measurements of oscillating flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic power of an oscillating flame is measured. A turbulent premixed propane/air flame is situated near a pressure antinode of a standing wave in a laboratory combustion chamber. This standing wave is generated by a piston. The fluctuating heat release of the flame will supply acoustic power

  4. Measuring Norwegian dialect distances using acoustic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, Wilbert; Johnson, Keith; Gooskens, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Levenshtein distance has become a popular tool for measuring linguistic dialect distances, and has been applied to Irish Gaelic, Dutch, German and other dialect groups. The method, in the current state of the art, depends upon phonetic transcriptions, even when acoustic differences are used the numb

  5. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.

  6. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2001-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  7. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  8. Acoustic vs Interferometric Measurements of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Erives, H.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Jensen, D.; Morris, K.

    2015-12-01

    During the summer of 2015 we acquired acoustic and RF data on severalflashes from thunderstorms over Fort Morgan CO. and Langmuir Laboratoryin the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico. The acoustic arrayswere located at a distance of roughly 150 m from the interferometers.Lightning mapping array and slow antenna data were also obtained. Theacoustic arrays consist of arrays of five audio-range and six infrasoundmicrophones operating at 50 KHz and 1 KHz respectively. The lightninginterferometer at Fort Morgan CO. consists of three flat-plate, 13" diameterantennas at the vertices of an equilateral 50 m per side triangle. Theinterferometer at Langmuir Laboratory consists of three 13" dishes separatedby about 15 m. Both interferometers, operating at 180 Megasamples persecond, use the analysis software and digitizer hardware pioneered byStanley, Stock et al. The high data rate allows for excellent spatialresolution of high speed (and typically high current) processes such asK-changes, return strokes and dart-leaders. In previous studies, we haveshown the usefulness of acoustic recordings to locate thunder sources aswell as infrasound pulses from lightning. This work will present acomparison of Acoustic and Interferometric measurements from lightning,using some interesting flashes, including a positive cloud to ground,that occurred in these campaigns.

  9. An acoustic mode measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppa, P. D.

    1984-10-01

    Turbomachinery noise propagates in aircraft jet engine ducts in a complicated manner. Measurement of this propagation is useful both to identify source mechanisms and to design efficient linings. A practical method of making these measurements has been developed, using linear arrays of equally spaced microphones mounted flush with the duct wall. Circumferential or axial arrays are analyzed by spatial Fourier transform, giving sound level as a function of spinning order or axial wavenumber respectively. Complex demodulation is used to acquire data in a modest bandwidth around a high frequency of interest. A joint NASA/Boeing test of the system used 32 microphones in a JT15D turbofan engine inlet. A 400-Hz bandwidth centered at blade passage frequency and at half blade passage frequency was studied. The theoretically predicted modes were clearly seen at blade passage frequency; broadband noise at half blade passage frequency was biased towards modes corotating with the fan. Interference between similar modes was not a significant problem. A lining design study indicated a 15 percent improvement in lining efficiency was possible when mode data were used, for this particular engine. The technique has proven reliable and useful for source diagnostics and lining design.

  10. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  11. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  12. ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS BUBBLES IN BIOLOGICAL TIESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAHINE Georges L.; TANGUAY Michel; LORAINE Greg

    2009-01-01

    An acoustic based instrument,the ABS Acoustic Bubble Spectrometer(R)(C)(ABS),was investigated for the detection and quantification of bubbles in biological media.These include viscoelastic media(blood),materials of varying density(bone in tissue),non-homogenous distribution of bubbles(intravenous bubbly flow),and bubbles migrating in tissue(decompression sickness,DCS).The performance of the ABS was demonstrated in a series of laboratory experiments.Validation of the code was performed using a viscoelastic polymer solution,Polyox,in which the bubble size distribution and void fraction were determined by ABS measurements and with image analysis of high speed videos.These tests showed that the accuracy of the ABS was not significantly affected by viscoelasticity for bubbles smaller than 200 microns.The ABS detection and measurement of non-homogenous bubble distributions was demonstrated using a bubbly flow through a simulated vein surrounded by tissue.The scatter of acoustic signals due to bones in the acoustic pathway was also investigated.These in-vitro experiments were done using meat(beef)as a tissue simulant.Decompression experiments were done using beef meat which was held underwater at high pressure(9.9 atm)then rapidly decompressed.Bubble size distributions and void fraction calculations in these experiments were then validated using image analysis of high speed video.In addition,preliminary experiments were performed with the US Navy Medical Research Center,demonstrating the utility of the modified ABS system in detecting the evolution of bubbles in swine undergoing decompression sickness(DCS).These results indicate that the ABS may be used to detect and quantify the evolution of bubbles in-vivo and aid in the monitoring of DCS.

  13. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  14. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Duvoort, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G.C.; Hoffman, K.D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been

  15. Acoustic CT system for temperature distribution measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinji Ohyama; Toyofumi Oga; Kazuo Oshima; Junya Takayama

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a measurement method for crosssectional temperature distribution is addressed. A novel method based on an acoustic CT technique is proposed. Specifically,the temperature distributions are estimated using the time of flight data of several ultrasonic propagation paths. The times of the flight data contain both temperature and wind effect,and the method to select only temperature component is introduced. A filtered back projection method is applied to reconstruct the temperature distributions from the time of flight data. An experimental system was designed and fabricated to realize simultaneous temperature and wind velocity distribution measurements. Through this system,the effectiveness of the proposed measurement method is confirmed.

  16. Noninvasive fluid property measurements using acoustic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbush, Michael; Chow, Humphrey; Chiao, James; Rose, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    The properties of a fluid are normally determined using invasive methods. These methods may lead to possibly contaminating or consuming the sample. When only very small amounts of a valuable sample exist, noninvasive measurement methods are preferred. The properties of fluids can then be used to deduce additional properties based on known relationships. In one case, the surface tension of a fluid may be used to determine the concentration of a fluid. The authors describe a measurement technique involving excitation of the surface of the fluid and the measurement of its response. An acoustic wave is used to both excite and monitor the surface of the liquid. This technique is used to determine the concentration of DMSO and water in solution, and the result determines the amount of fluid needed to deliver an accurate amount of solute in solution.

  17. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  18. Outdoor Synthetic Aperture Acoustic Ground Target Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    1341 (2003). [11] C. A. Dimarzio, T. Shi, F. J. Blonigen et al., “ Laser -Induced Acoustic Landmine Detection,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society...High Frequency A/S Coupling For Ap Buried Landmine Detection Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers,” Proc. SPIE 5415(1), 35-41 (2004). [16] Bishop, S... Dolphin Echolocation Clicks For Target Discrimination,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America 124(1), 657-666 (2008). [20] Y. Nakamura

  19. Identification of Acoustic-Vibratory System by Acoustic Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuzo Iwatsubo

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for reducing ill-conditioning in a class of identification problems is proposed. The key point of the method is that the identified vibration of the sound source is expressed as a superposition of vibration modes. The mathematical property of the coefficient matrix, the practical error expanding ratio, and the stochastic error expanding ratio are investigated in a numerical example. The mode-superposition method is shown to be an effective tool for acoustic-vibratory inverse analysis.

  20. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations.

  1. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  2. On acoustic intensity measurements in the presence of mean flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical analysis demonstrates that the technique of measuring acoustic intensity by means of cross correlation between nearby microphones cannot, in general, be extended to situations in which there is mean flow. However, it may be possible to use this technique to measure intensities in ducts with mean flow at frequencies below their cutoff frequencies.

  3. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuo, C.W.; Veltin, J.; McLaughlin, D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and t

  4. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  5. Reverberation chamber and its verification for acoustic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drabek Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverberation rooms are useful for measurement of the acoustic quantities of machines that operate in long cycles, however, current reverberation chamber design practices often lead to known issues with reproducibility and repeatability of measured data. The problem is that construction process of these laboratories is performed according to the relevant standards requirements which are mainly focused on the volume of the room or on the absorption coefficient value of the boundary surfaces. Nevertheless, the inner-laboratory reproducibility of acoustic data is very difficult to achieve even when these diffusivity quantifiers are satisfied. This paper presents a verification process of an acoustic laboratory which proportions, shape and construction material of boundary surfaces are not in compliance with standards in every detail.

  6. Measurement of thin films using very long acoustic wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Clement, G T; Adachi, H; Kamakura, T

    2013-01-01

    A procedure for measuring material thickness by means of necessarily-long acoustic wavelengths is examined. The approach utilizes a temporal phase lag caused by the impulse time of wave momentum transferred through a thin layer that is much denser than its surrounding medium. In air, it is predicted that solid or liquid layers below approximately 1/2000 of the acoustic wavelength will exhibit a phase shift with an arctangent functional dependence on thickness and layer density. The effect is verified for thin films on the scale of 10 microns using audible frequency sound (7 kHz). Soap films as thin as 100 nm are then measured using 40 kHz air ultrasound. The method's potential for imaging applications is demonstrated by combining the approach with near-field holography, resulting in reconstructions with sub-wavelength resolution in both the depth and lateral directions. Potential implications at very high and very low acoustic frequencies are discussed.

  7. Advances in non-invasive measures of vocal acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBlance, G R; Steckol, K F; Cooper, M H

    1991-10-01

    Objective assessment of vocal pitch, loudness, and quality is a crucial adjunct to endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of vocal pathology. Historically, this assessment was made through subjective, perceptual measures that were questionable in terms of validity and reliability. Recent advances in electronic technology now permit objective analysis of the acoustic characteristics of voice. Kay Elemetric's Visi-Pitch, DSP 5500 Digital Spectrograph, and Nasometer are representative of these new instruments and are used as illustrations in the discussion of the assessment of speech acoustics.

  8. Tethered acoustic doppler current profiler platforms for measuring streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmel, Michael S.; Stewart, James A.; Morlock, Scott E.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey tested and refined tethered-platform designs for measuring streamflow. Platform specifications were developed, radio-modem telemetry of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data and potential platform-hull sources were investigated, and hulls were tested and evaluated.

  9. Measuring System for Interference Optical Fiber Acoustic Emission①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUQizhu; ZHENGShengxuan

    1997-01-01

    A type of interference optical fiber acoustic emission sensor is described.With 10-10 m level resolution,megahertz-level frequency and response time less than 1 μs,this sensor possesses prominent measuring stability and can be used in state supervision and trouble diagnosis.

  10. A Comparative Study of Two Acoustic Measures of Hypernasality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P.; Ibrahim, Hasherah M.; Reilly, Sheena; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare 2 quantitative acoustic measures of nasality in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and healthy controls using formalized perceptual assessment as a guide. Method: Fifty participants (23 children with CLP and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls) aged between 4 and 12 years produced a variety of…

  11. Acoustic impedances of ear canals measured by impedance tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciric, Dejan; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    During hearing sensitivity tests, the sound field is commonly generated by an earphone placed on a subject ear. One of the factors that can affect the sound transmission in the ear is the acoustic impedance of the ear canal. Its importance is related to the contribution of other elements involved...... in the transmission such as the earphone impedance. In order to determine the acoustic impedances of human ear canals, the standardized method for measurement of complex impedances used for the measurement of the audiometric earphone impedances is applied. It is based on the transfer function between two microphone...... locations in an impedance tube. The end of the tube representing the measurement plane is placed at the ear canal entrance. Thus, the impedance seen from the entrance inward is measured on 25 subjects. Most subjects participated in the previous measurement of the ratio between the pressures at the open...

  12. Broadband acoustic scattering measurements of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucaro, J A; Houston, B H; Saniga, M; Dragonette, L R; Yoder, T; Dey, S; Kraus, L; Carin, L

    2008-02-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for detection and identification of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO) by exploiting their structural acoustic response, we carried out broadband monostatic scattering measurements over a full 360 degrees on UXO's (two mortar rounds, an artillery shell, and a rocket warhead) and false targets (a cinder block and a large rock). The measurement band, 1-140 kHz, includes a low frequency structural acoustics region in which the wavelengths are comparable to or larger than the target characteristic dimensions. In general, there are aspects that provide relatively high target strength levels ( approximately -10 to -15 dB), and from our experience the targets should be detectable in this structural acoustics band in most acoustic environments. The rigid body scattering was also calculated for one UXO in order to highlight the measured scattering features involving elastic responses. The broadband scattering data should be able to support feature-based separation of UXO versus false targets and identification of various classes of UXO as well.

  13. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  14. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jeremiah D. [Physics Department, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45504 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  15. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in workrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1997-01-01

    in the stationary sound field produced by an omnidirectional sound source in the room. The project has shown that there is a need for a new alternative measuring method - the results based on the classical reverberation time measurements do not agree sufficiently well with the actual equivalent absorption areas...... in the rooms. But it has not been possible within the project to establish and verify an alternative method based on a simple measurement in the stationary sound field.......Experimental work has been done in nine halls with volumes ranging from 693 to 123.978 cubic metres. The equivalent absorption area has been determined from absorption coefficients of the surfaces, calculated from reverberation time measurements and estimated from sound pressure level measurements...

  16. Energy Based Acoustic Measurement Senors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research focuses on fully developing energy density sensors that will yield a significant benefit both for measurements of interest to NASA, as well as for...

  17. Acoustic Emissions to Measure Drought-Induced Cavitation in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus De Roo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emissions are frequently used in material sciences and engineering applications for structural health monitoring. It is known that plants also emit acoustic emissions, and their application in plant sciences is rapidly increasing, especially to investigate drought-induced plant stress. Vulnerability to drought-induced cavitation is a key trait of plant water relations, and contains valuable information about how plants may cope with drought stress. There is, however, no consensus in literature about how this is best measured. Here, we discuss detection of acoustic emissions as a measure for drought-induced cavitation. Past research and the current state of the art are reviewed. We also discuss how the acoustic emission technique can help solve some of the main issues regarding quantification of the degree of cavitation, and how it can contribute to our knowledge about plant behavior during drought stress. So far, crossbreeding in the field of material sciences proved very successful, and we therefore recommend continuing in this direction in future research.

  18. A System for Acoustic Field Measurement Employing Cartesian Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczodrak Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A system setup for measurements of acoustic field, together with the results of 3D visualisations of acoustic energy flow are presented in the paper. Spatial sampling of the field is performed by a Cartesian robot. Automatization of the measurement process is achieved with the use of a specialized control system. The method is based on measuring the sound pressure (scalar and particle velocity(vector quantities. The aim of the system is to collect data with a high precision and repeatability. The system is employed for measurements of acoustic energy flow in the proximity of an artificial head in an anechoic chamber. In the measurement setup an algorithm for generation of the probe movement path is included. The algorithm finds the optimum path of the robot movement, taking into account a given 3D object shape present in the measurement space. The results are presented for two cases, first without any obstacle and the other - with an artificial head in the sound field.

  19. DEMON Acoustic Ship Signature Measurements in an Urban Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil Woo Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection, classification, and tracking of small vessels are important tasks for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification, and tracking. This paper presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise DEMON acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship spectra and were measured at distances up to 7 km. The combination of cross-correlation and methods allowed separation of the acoustic signatures of ships in busy urban environments.

  20. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers noncontacting ultrasonic measurements using EMATS

    CERN Document Server

    Hirao, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    This second edition provides comprehensive information on electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs), from the theory and physical principles of EMATs to the construction of systems and their applications to scientific and industrial ultrasonic measurements on materials. The original version has been complemented with selected ideas on ultrasonic measurement that have emerged since the first edition was released. The book is divided into four parts: PART I offers a self-contained description of the basic elements of coupling mechanisms along with the practical designing of EMATs for various purposes. Several implementations to compensate for EMATs’ low transfer efficiency are provided, along with useful tips on how to make an EMAT. PART II describes the principle of electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR), which makes the most of EMATs’ contactless nature and is the most successful amplification mechanism for precise measurements of velocity and attenuation. PART III applies EMAR to studying physical ...

  1. Acoustic property measurements in a photoacoustic imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemink, René G. H.; Manohar, Srirang; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdi; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2007-07-01

    Photoacoustics is a hybrid imaging technique that combines the contrast available to optical imaging with the resolution that is possessed by ultrasound imaging. The technique is based on generating ultrasound from absorbing structures in tissue using pulsed light. In photoacoustic (PA) computerized tomography (CT) imaging, reconstruction of the optical absorption in a subject, is performed for example by filtered backprojection. The backprojection is performed along circular paths in image space instead of along straight lines as in X-ray CT imaging. To achieve this, the speed-of-sound through the subject is usually assumed constant. An unsuitable speed-of-sound can degrade resolution and contrast. We discuss here a method of actually measuring the speed-of- sound distribution using ultrasound transmission through the subject under photoacoustic investigation. This is achieved in a simple approach that does not require any additional ultrasound transmitter. The method uses a passive element (carbon fiber) that is placed in the imager in the path of the illumination which generates ultrasound by the photoacoustic effect and behaves as an ultrasound source. Measuring the time-of-flight of this ultrasound transient by the same detector used for conventional photoacoustics, allows a speed-of-sound image to be reconstructed. This concept is validated on phantoms.

  2. Atypical prosody in Asperger syndrome: perceptual and acoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipe, Marisa G; Frota, Sónia; Castro, São Luís; Vicente, Selene G

    2014-08-01

    It is known that individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) may show no problems with regard to what is said (e.g., lexical content) but tend to have difficulties in how utterances are produced, i.e., they may show prosodic impairments. In the present study, we focus on the use of prosodic features to express grammatical meaning. Specifically, we explored the sentence type difference between statements and questions that is conveyed by intonation, using perceptual and acoustic measurements. Children aged 8 and 9 years with AS (n = 12) were matched according to age and nonverbal intelligence with typically developing peers (n = 17). Although children with AS could produce categorically accurate prosodic patterns, their prosodic contours were perceived as odd by adult listeners, and acoustic measurements showed alterations in duration and pitch. Additionally, children with AS had greater variability in fundamental frequency contours compared to typically developing peers.

  3. Atypical Prosody in Asperger Syndrome: Perceptual and Acoustic Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa G. Filipe; Frota, Sónia; Castro, São Luís; Vicente, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) may show no problems with regard to what is said (e.g., lexical content) but tend to have difficulties in how utterances are produced, i.e., they may show prosodic impairments. In the present study, we focus on the use of prosodic features to express grammatical meaning. Specifically, we explored the sentence type difference between statements and questions that is conveyed by intonation, using perceptual and acoustic measurements. Chil...

  4. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  5. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  6. Determining low-frequency source location from acoustic phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Travis L.; Frisk, George V.

    2002-11-01

    For low-frequency cw sound sources in shallow water, the time rate-of-change of the measured acoustic phase is well approximated by the time rate-of-change of the source-receiver separation distance. An algorithm for determining a locus of possible source locations based on this idea has been developed. The locus has the general form of a hyperbola, which can be used to provide a bearing estimation at long ranges, and an estimate of source location at short ranges. The algorithm uses only acoustic phase data and receiver geometry as input, and can be used even when the source frequency is slightly unstable and/or imprecisely known. The algorithm has been applied to data from low-frequency experiments (20-300 Hz), both for stable and unstable source frequencies, and shown to perform well. [Work supported by ONR and WHOI Academic Programs Office.

  7. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m^3;. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a new measurement method to attain the elastic properties of snow.

  8. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  9. Measuring sound absorption: considerations on the measurement of the active acoustic power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2014-01-01

    Using a local plane wave assumption, one can determine the normal incidence sound absorption coefficient of a surface by measuring the acoustic pressure and the particle velocity normal to that surface. As the measurement surface lies in front of the material surface, the measured active and inciden

  10. Photo-acoustic tomography in a rotating measurement setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Guillaume; Moradifam, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) aims to leverage the photo-acoustic coupling between optical absorption of light sources and ultrasound (US) emission to obtain high contrast reconstructions of optical parameters with the high resolution of sonic waves. Quantitative PAT often involves a two-step procedure: first the map of sonic emission is reconstructed from US boundary measurements; and second optical properties of biological tissues are evaluated. We consider here a practical measurement setting in which such a separation does not apply. We assume that the optical source and an array of ultrasonic transducers are mounted on a rotating frame (in two or three dimensions) so that the light source rotates at the same time as the US measurements are acquired. As a consequence, we no longer have the option to reconstruct a map of sonic emission corresponding to a given optical illumination. We propose here a framework where the two steps are combined into one and an absorption map is directly reconstructed from the available US measurements.

  11. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Goff, J -M Le; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Gott, J Richard; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2014-01-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data. We take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Ly-alpha forest (LyaF) in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III. BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy, and in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Combining BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a 1.7% measurement of $H_0=67.3 \\pm1.1$ km/s/Mpc. This measurement assumes standard pre-recombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat LCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For open LCDM, our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields $\\Omega_m=0.301 \\pm 0.008$ and curvature $\\Omega_k=-0.003 \\pm ...

  12. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics.

  13. Utilization of old vibro-acoustic measuring equipment to grasp basic concepts of vibration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darula, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to show that even old vibro-acoustic (analog) equipment can be used as a very suitable teaching equipment to grasp basic principles of measurements in an era, when measurement equipments are more-or-less treated as ‘black-boxes’, i.e. the user cannot see directly how...

  14. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  15. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wen Kuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  16. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Wen Kuo; Jérémy Veltin; Dennis K. McLaughlin

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. How-ever, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small-and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  17. A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Hongwei; YAO; Lei; ZHAO; Hong; ZHANG; Jichuan; XUE; Zhaohong

    2006-01-01

    A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials is presented.The dynamic mechanical parameters of materials are first measured by using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Apparatus(DMTA) at low frequencies,usually less than 100 Hz; then based on the Principles of Time-Temperature Super position (TTS),these parameters are extended to the frequency range that acousticians are concerned about,usually from hundreds to thousands of hertz; finally the extended dynamic mechanical parameters are transformed into acoustic parameters with the help of acoustic measurement and inverse analysis.To test the feasibility and accuracy,we measure a kind of rubber sample in DMTA and acquire the basic acoustic parameters of the sample by using this method.While applying the basic parameters to calculating characteristics of the sample in acoustic pipe,a reasonable agreement of sound absorption coefficients is obtained between the calculations and measurements in the acoustic pipe.

  18. Instrumentation Suite for Acoustic Propagation Measurements in Complex Shallow Water Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Obtain at-sea measurements to test theoretical and modeling predictions of acoustic propagation in dynamic, inhomogeneous, and nonisotropic shallow water...

  19. Supersonic Relative Velocity Effect on the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uros

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum a...

  20. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  1. Acoustic measurements above a plate carrying Lamb waves

    CERN Document Server

    Talberg, Andreas Sørbrøden

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a set of acoustic measurements conducted on the Statoil funded Behind Casing Logging Set-Up, designed by SINTEF Petroleum Research to resemble an oil well casing. A set of simple simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics were also conducted and the results compared with the measurements. The experiments consists of measuring the pressure wave radiated of a set of Lamb waves propagating in a 3 mm thick steel plate, using the so called pitch-catch method. The Lamb waves were excited by a broadband piezoelectric immersion transducer with center frequency of 1 MHz. Through measurements and analysis the group velocity of the fastest mode in the plate was found to be 3138.5 m/s. Measuring the wave radiated into the water in a grid consisting of 8x33 measuring points, the spreading of the plate wave normal to the direction of propagation was investigated. Comparing the point where the amplitude had decreased 50 % relative to the amplitude measured at the axis pointing straight forward from the tran...

  2. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  3. Application of acoustic doppler velocimeters for streamflow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) principally has used Price AA and Price pygmy mechanical current meters for measurement of discharge. New technologies have resulted in the introduction of alternatives to the Price meters. One alternative, the FlowTracker acoustic Doppler velocimeter, was designed by SonTek/YSI to make streamflow measurements in wadeable conditions. The device measures a point velocity and can be used with standard midsection method algorithms to compute streamflow. The USGS collected 55 quality-assurance measurements with the FlowTracker at 43 different USGS streamflow-gaging stations across the United States, with mean depths from 0.05to0.67m, mean velocities from 13 to 60 cm/s, and discharges from 0.02 to 12.4m3/s. These measurements were compared with Price mechanical current meter measurements. Analysis of the comparisons shows that the FlowTracker discharges were not statistically different from the Price meter discharges at a 95% confidence level. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  4. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  5. Precise measurement technique for the stable acoustic cavitation bubble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei; CHEN Weizhong; LIU Yanan; GAO Xianxian; JIANG Lian; XU Junfeng; ZHU Yifei

    2005-01-01

    Based on the periodic oscillation of the stable acoustic cavitation bubble, we present a precise measurement technique for the bubble evolution. This technique comprises the lighting engineering of pulsing laser beam whose phase can be digitally shifted, and the long distance microphotographics. We used a laser, an acousto-optic modulator, a pulse generator, and a long distance microscope. The evolution of a levitated bubble can be directly shown by a series of bubble's images at different phases. Numerical simulation in the framework of the Rayleigh-Plesset bubble dynamics well supported the experimental result, and the ambient radius of the bubble, an important parameter related to the mass of the gas inside the bubble, was obtained at the same time.

  6. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  7. Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter for Biological Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Wesley Nelson

    In vitro measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are presented for several biological media. With these measurements it is possible to predict the distortion of a finite amplitude wave in biological tissues of current diagnostic and research interest. The measurement method is based on the finite amplitude distortion of a sine wave that is emmitted by a piston source. The growth of the second harmonic component of this wave is measured by a piston receiver which is coaxial with and has the same size as the source. The experimental measurements and theory are compared in order to determine the nonlinearity parameter. The density, sound speed, and attenuation for the medium are determined in order to make this comparison. The theory developed for this study accounts for the influence of both diffraction and attenuation on the experimental measurements. The effects of dispersion, tissue inhomogeneity and gas bubbles within the excised tissues are studied. To test the measurement method, experimental results are compared with established values for the nonlinearity parameter of distilled water, ethylene glycol and glycerol. The agreement between these values suggests that the measurement uncertainty is (+OR-) 5% for liquids and (+OR-) 10% for solid tissues. Measurements are presented for dog blood and bovine serum albumen as a function of concentration. The nonlinearity parameters for liver, kidney and spleen are reported for both human and canine tissues. The values for the fresh tissues displayed little variation (6.8 to 7.8). Measurements for fixed, normal and cirrhotic tissues indicated that the nonlinearity parameter does not depend strongly on pathology. However, the values for fixed tissues were somewhat higher than those of the fresh tissues.

  8. Glacier studies on the basis of acoustic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Epifanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of glacier ice flow studies using the method of acoustic emission (AE in frequency range from 15 Hz to 20 kHz has been considered. A portable acoustic line system has been developed and a number of methodological issues (mounting of acoustic sensors into glacial ice, their location, reliability of acoustic coupling, etc. have been solved. Acoustic studies of glacial ice have been performed; rock fall effect, ice cracking and ice movement on bedrock have been simulated. Correspondences of AE parameters to specific sources have been identified. The results of acoustic studies on Aldegondabreen (Spitsbergen, Central Tuyuksu and Molodezhny glaciers (northern Tien Shan have been summarized. The dependence of the adhesive strength of ice with smooth substrate (serpentenite on the shear rate has been considered; the effect of tor-shaped obstacle on shear force has been estimated. It is shown that the acoustic effects at cohesive ice failure on obstacles are similar to the observed natural acoustic vibrations generated in glaciers from distant sources. The results might be applied in development of the mobile ice lab and system for remote acoustic monitoring the processes in the bottom layers of glaciers.

  9. Acoustic measurements of F-16 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-16 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-16 aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-16 aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB, but were increased over that measured during ground run up. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  10. Postoperative improvement in acoustic rhinometry measurements after septoplasty correlates with long-term satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, N M; Frisch, Thomas; von Buchwald, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Not much is known about long-term satisfaction of septoplasty. Our goal was to compare pre- and postoperative acoustic rhinometry measurements with satisfaction 11 years after surgery.......Not much is known about long-term satisfaction of septoplasty. Our goal was to compare pre- and postoperative acoustic rhinometry measurements with satisfaction 11 years after surgery....

  11. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  12. Acoustic Measurements of an Uninstalled Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Brown, Clifford A.; Shook, Tony D.; Winkel, James; Kolacz, John S.; Podboy, Devin M.; Loew, Raymond A.; Mirecki, Julius H.

    2012-01-01

    Sound pressure measurements were recorded for a prototype of a spacecraft cabin ventilation fan in a test in the NASA Glenn Acoustical Testing Laboratory. The axial fan is approximately 0.089 m (3.50 in.) in diameter and 0.223 m (9.00 in.) long and has nine rotor blades and eleven stator vanes. At design point of 12,000 rpm, the fan was predicted to produce a flow rate of 0.709 cu m/s (150 cfm) and a total pressure rise of 925 Pa (3.72 in. of water) at 12,000 rpm. While the fan was designed to be part of a ducted atmospheric revitalization system, no attempt was made to throttle the flow or simulate the installed configuration during this test. The fan was operated at six speeds from 6,000 to 13,500 rpm. A 13-microphone traversing array was used to collect sound pressure measurements along two horizontal planes parallel to the flow direction, two vertical planes upstream of the fan inlet and two vertical planes downstream of the fan exhaust. Measurements indicate that sound at blade passing frequency harmonics contribute significantly to the overall audible noise produced by the fan at free delivery conditions.

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Measurements of Concentration Distributions in Acoustic Focusing Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K A; Fisher, K; Jung, B; Ness, K; Mariella Jr., R P

    2008-06-16

    We describe a modeling approach to capture the particle motion within an acoustic focusing microfluidic device. Our approach combines finite element models for the acoustic forces with analytical models for the fluid motion and uses these force fields to calculate the particle motion in a Brownian dynamics simulation. We compare results for the model with experimental measurements of the focusing efficiency within a microfabricated device. The results show good qualitative agreement over a range of acoustic driving voltages and particle sizes.

  14. The current status of measurement standards for acoustics and vibration at Inmetro

    OpenAIRE

    Ripper, Gustavo Palmeira; Hoffmann, Walter Erico

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The Division of Acoustics and Vibration (DIAVI) of INMETRO establishes, validates and maintains the Brazilian national measurement standards used for the realization of the units of physical quantities related to the field of acoustics and vibration. The basic vibration quantity realized by DIAVI is translational acceleration, from which the other motion quantities, i.e., velocity and displacement can be derived. Acoustical physical quantities include sound pressure and sound power...

  15. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y. [University Montpellier, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); CNRS, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F. [CEA, DEN, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  16. Acoustic measurements of a liquefied cohesive sediment bed under waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, R.; Groposo, V.; Pedocchi, F.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the response of a cohesive sediment deposit under the action of water waves is studied with the help of laboratory experiments and an analytical model. Under the same regular wave condition three different bed responses were observed depending on the degree of consolidation of the deposit: no bed motion, bed motion of the upper layer after the action of the first waves, and massive bed motion after several waves. The kinematic of the upper 3 cm of the deposit were measured with an ultrasound acoustic profiler, while the pore-water pressure inside the bed was simultaneously measured using several pore pressure sensors. A poro-elastic model was developed to interpret the experimental observations. The model showed that the amplitude of the shear stress increased down into the bed. Then it is possible that the lower layers of the deposit experience plastic deformations, while the upper layers present just elastic deformations. Since plastic deformations in the lower layers are necessary for pore pressure build-up, the analytical model was used to interpret the experimental results and to state that liquefaction of a self consolidated cohesive sediment bed would only occur if the bed yield stress falls within the range defined by the amplitude of the shear stress inside the bed.

  17. Research on the influence and correction method of depth scanning error to the underwater acoustic image measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Jidan; ZHAI Chunpin; WANGYilin; HUI Junying

    2011-01-01

    The technology of underwater acoustic image measurement was a passive locating method with high precision in near field. To improve the precision of underwater acoustic image measurement, the influence of the depth scan error was analyzed and the correcti

  18. PROGRESS OF ACOUSTIC WAVE TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION IN UNDERGROUND PRESSURE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周楚良; 李新元; 张晓龙

    1994-01-01

    This paper carries out the experiment study on the correlation between full stress-strain process of rock samples and the acoustic parameter change of rock by using the measurement system of KS acoustic wave data processing device. On the spot, the stability of surrounding rock is studied by means of experiments on the relationship between the change process (from elastic to plastic failure zone) in surrounding rock of roadway and the change law of acoustic parameters of rock. These acoustic parameters include wave amplitude, spectral amplitude, spectrum area, spectral density, wave velocity and attenuation coefficient etc.

  19. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  20. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  1. Acoustic measurements of F-15 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-15 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no potential sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-15 aircraft structure during operation in the hush house. However, since these acoustic levels were increased over those measuring during run up on a concrete pad, it is recommended that F-15 equipment qualification levels be checked. The data indicated that the noise field within the hush house is diffuse and that the acoustical energy in the hangar area is radiated from the region between the engine exhaust and the hush house muffler front edge toward the forward part of the hangar.

  2. Statistical relations among architectural features and objective acoustical measurements of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G. W.; Chiang, W.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical analysis of architectural features and detailed objective acoustical measurements made in eight concert halls and several multi-use rooms in their concert configuration will be presented. A method for evaluating the architectural features of rooms that affect their acoustical...

  3. Imaging of acoustic attenuation and speed of sound maps using photoacoustic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, G.H.; Manohar, S.; Purwar, Y.; Slump, C.H.; Heijden, van der F.; Leeuwen, van T.G.; McAleavey, S.A.; D'Hooge, J.

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an upcoming medical imaging modality with the potential of imaging both optical and acoustic properties of objects. We present a measurement system and outline reconstruction methods to image both speed of sound and acoustic attenuation distributions of an object using only

  4. Acoustic resonances in HID lamps: model and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, John [Philips Lighting BV, Lightlabs, Mathildelaan 1, 5600 JM Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baumann, Bernd; Wolff, Marcus [Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Institute for Physical Sensors, Berliner Tor 21, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Bhosle, Sounil [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Valdivia Barrientos, Ricardo, E-mail: john.hirsch@philips.co [National Nuclear Research Institute, Highway Mexico-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, CP 52750 (Mexico)

    2010-06-16

    A finite element model including plasma simulation is used to calculate the amplitude of acoustic resonances in HID lamps in a 2D axisymmetric geometry. Simulation results are presented for different operation parameters and are compared with experimental data.

  5. Effects of Various Architectural Parameters on Six Room Acoustical Measures in Auditoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wei-Hwa

    The effects of architectural parameters on six room acoustical measures were investigated by means of correlation analyses, factor analyses and multiple regression analyses based on data taken in twenty halls. Architectural parameters were used to estimate acoustical measures taken at individual locations within each room as well as the averages and standard deviations of all measured values in the rooms. The six acoustical measures were Early Decay Time (EDT10), Clarity Index (C80), Overall Level (G), Bass Ratio based on Early Decay Time (BR(EDT)), Treble Ratio based on Early Decay Time (TR(EDT)), and Early Inter-aural Cross Correlation (IACC80). A comprehensive method of quantifying various architectural characteristics of rooms was developed to define a large number of architectural parameters that were hypothesized to effect the acoustical measurements made in the rooms. This study quantitatively confirmed many of the principles used in the design of concert halls and auditoria. Three groups of room architectural parameters such as the parameters associated with the depth of diffusing surfaces were significantly correlated with the hall standard deviations of most of the acoustical measures. Significant differences of statistical relations among architectural parameters and receiver specific acoustical measures were found between a group of music halls and a group of lecture halls. For example, architectural parameters such as the relative distance from the receiver to the overhead ceiling increased the percentage of the variance of acoustical measures that was explained by Barron's revised theory from approximately 70% to 80% only when data were taken in the group of music halls. This study revealed the major architectural parameters which have strong relations with individual acoustical measures forming the basis for a more quantitative method for advancing the theoretical design of concert halls and other auditoria. The results of this study provide

  6. Measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the clustering of voids

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Yu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal, from voids based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependency of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the meth...

  7. Measuring Turbulence from Moored Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters. A Manual to Quantifying Inflow at Tidal Energy Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thomson, Jim [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Talbert, Joe [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); DeKlerk, Alex [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology for measuring hub height inflow turbulence using moored acoustic Doppler velocimiters (ADVs). This approach is motivated by the shortcomings of alternatives. For example, remote velocity measurements (i.e., from acoustic Doppler profilers) lack sufficient precision for device simulation, and rigid tower-mounted measurements are very expensive and technically challenging in the tidal environment. Moorings offer a low-cost, site-adaptable and robust deployment platform, and ADVs provide the necessary precision to accurately quantify turbulence.

  8. Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night-Vision Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles by Jeremy Gaston, Tim Mermagen, and...SUBTITLE Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study evaluates two different night - vision goggles (NVGs) to determine if the devices meet level II

  9. Underwater hybrid near-field acoustical holography based on the measurement of vector hydrophone array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid near-field acoustical holography(NAH) is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from a cylindrical source in a complex underwater environment. In hybrid NAH,we combine statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography(SONAH) and broadband acoustical holography from intensity measurements(BAHIM) to reconstruct the underwater cylindrical source field. First,the BAHIM is utilized to regenerate as much acoustic pressures on the hologram surface as necessary,and then the acoustic pressures are taken as input to the formulation implemented numerically by SONAH. The main advantages of this technology are that the complex pressure on the hologram surface can be reconstructed without reference signal,and the measurement array can be smaller than the source,thus the practicability and efficiency of this technology are greatly enhanced. Numerical examples of a cylindrical source are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than conventional NAH. Then,an experiment has been carried out with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results show the advantage of hybrid NAH in the reconstruction of an acoustic field and the feasibility of using a vector hydrophone array in an underwater NAH measurement,as well as the identification and localization of noise sources.

  10. Fish Acoustics: Physics-Based Modeling and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    physical scattering mechanisms. To demonstrate this point, the target strength of a canonical gas-filled sphere is computed using a standard...high-frequency sound scattering by swimbladdered fish,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 78, pp. 688-700 (1985). 9. Gauss , R. C

  11. Measurements and Simulation Studies of Piezoceramics for Acoustic Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Salomon, K; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C

    2005-01-01

    Calibration sources are an indispensable tool for all detectors. In acoustic particle detection the goal of a calibration source is to mimic neutrino signatures as expected from hadronic cascades. A simple and promising method for the emulation of neutrino signals are piezo ceramics. We will present results of measruements and simulations on these piezo ceramics.

  12. Simple discrimination method between False Acoustic Emission and Acoustic Emission revealed by piezoelectric sensors, in Gran Sasso mountain measurements (L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodati, Paolo; Piazza, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    Recently it was shown, studying data acquired with in-situ measurements on the Gran Sasso mountain (Italy), for about ten years, by means of a high sensitivity transducer coupled to the free-end section of a stainless steel rod fixed by cement in a rock-drill hole 10 m high, about 2500 m above sea level, that Acoustic Emission (AE) can be affected by more than 90% False Acoustic Emission (FAE) of an electromagnetic origin. A very simple method to solve the problem of the discrimination between AE events due to elastic waves, from FAE signals, due to electromagnetic noise, both coming from the same ``reception-point,'' is presented. The reliability of the obtained separation is confirmed also by the reported amplitude and time distribution of AE events, typical of fracture dynamics and those of FAE events, similar to those of noise.

  13. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude. 4. Experiences with Modifications of the Acoustic Structuring Test. Research Bulletin. No. 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Kai

    Four new versions of an acoustic structuring test were developed, administered, and analyzed in order to produce better tests and to contribute to better understanding of the abilities measured by these tests. The tests consist of tape recordings of patterns of musical notes played on an electric organ or an acoustic guitar. Item analyses and…

  14. Accuracy of measurement of acoustic rhinometry applied to small experimental animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaise, Toshihiko; Ukai, Kotara; Pedersen, Ole Finn;

    1999-01-01

    Nasal obstruction is one of the major symptoms of allergic rhinitis. In the study of the mechanism of nasal obstruction, experiments on animal are useful. In adult humans, acoustic rhinometry has been used to evaluate nasal obstruction by determining nasal cavity dimensions in terms of cross......-sectional areas as a function of the distance from the nostril. We modified the equipment used on humans to assess dimensions of nasal airway geometry of small experimental animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of the modified acoustic rhinometry applied to small...... experimental animals using nasal cavity models and guinea pigs. Measurement of the nasal cavity models (made of cylindrical silicone tubes) showed that the acoustic rhinometry estimated 85.5% of actual area and 79.0% of actual volume. In guinea pigs, nasal cavity volume determined by the acoustic rhinometry...

  15. Measurement of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A of lossy medium in a focused field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An analytical description for the linear and nonlinear acoustic fields in lossy medium of a focusing source is derived. The relationship of pressure amplitudes at focus for fundamental and the second harmonic waves is discussed. At high linear focusing gain G, a new method using the insert substitution method for measuring the acoustic nonlinear parameter B /A of biological tissues is presented. Results for some biological tissues are experimentally obtained.

  16. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  17. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  18. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Ph.D., Jorge O.

    2002-06-10

    The objective of the project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This will be accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging were linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of cores and theoretical modeling.

  19. Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

    CERN Document Server

    British Standards Institution. London

    1998-01-01

    Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

  20. Measurement of the acoustic radiation force on a sphere embedded in a soft solid

    CERN Document Server

    Lidon, Pierre; Taberlet, Nicolas; Manneville, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force exerted on a small sphere located at the focus of an ultrasonic beam is measured in a soft gel. It is proved to evolve quadratically with the local amplitude of the acoustic field. Strong oscillations of the local pressure are observed and attributed to an acoustic Fabry-P{\\'e}rot effect between the ultrasonic emitter and the sphere. Taking this effect into account with a simple model, a quantitative link between the radiation force and the acoustic pressure is proposed and compared to theoretical predictions in the absence of dissipation. The discrepancy between experiment and theory suggests that dissipative effects should be taken into account for fully modeling the observations.

  1. Reproducibility experiments on measuring acoustical properties of rigid-frame porous media (round-robin tests).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Bécot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc; Sgard, Franck; Renault, Amélie; Amirouche, Nesrine; Pompoli, Francesco; Prodi, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Pispola, Giulio; Asdrubali, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the results of reproducibility experiments on the interlaboratory characterization of the acoustical properties of three types of consolidated porous media: granulated porous rubber, reticulated foam, and fiberglass. The measurements are conducted in several independent laboratories in Europe and North America. The studied acoustical characteristics are the surface complex acoustic impedance at normal incidence and plane wave absorption coefficient which are determined using the standard impedance tube method. The paper provides detailed procedures related to sample preparation and installation and it discusses the dispersion in the acoustical material property observed between individual material samples and laboratories. The importance of the boundary conditions, homogeneity of the porous material structure, and stability of the adopted signal processing method are highlighted.

  2. Measurement of acoustic field radiated by low frequency power ultrasonic transducer with laser-interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Menglu; GAO Wen; HU Wenxiang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the piezo-optic effect of medium, the refractive index of medium is the function of its density, and so it's also the function of acoustic pressure. Therefore, acoustic pressure in the optical path everywhere can be determined absolutely by laser-interferometric technique and relative distribution of pressure in the middle and far acoustic field, which can be obtained from theory or experiment respectively. Theory and experiment of measurement of pressure in acoustic field with laser-interferometer are introduced. Distribution of pressure radiated by a power ultrasonic transducer is determined by laser interferometric technique.The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement. The receiving sensitivity of a PVDF (Polyvinylidene fluoride) transducer in free field is also calibrated absolutely due to above results and its sensitivity is -118.5 dB.

  3. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought.

  4. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-05-04

    It is commonly recognized that suspended-sediment concentrations in rivers can change rapidly in time and independently of water discharge during important sediment‑transporting events (for example, during floods); thus, suspended-sediment measurements at closely spaced time intervals are necessary to characterize suspended‑sediment loads. Because the manual collection of sufficient numbers of suspended-sediment samples required to characterize this variability is often time and cost prohibitive, several “surrogate” techniques have been developed for in situ measurements of properties related to suspended-sediment characteristics (for example, turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustics). Herein, we present a new physically based method for the simultaneous measurement of suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended‑sand median grain size in rivers, using multi‑frequency arrays of single-frequency side‑looking acoustic-Doppler profilers. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the incoherent scattering of sound by random suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of theory that relates acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We develop the theory and methods, and demonstrate the application of the method at six study sites on the Colorado River and Rio Grande, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustic attenuation and backscatter measurements over many years. The method produces acoustical measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and suspended-sand concentration (in units of mg/L), and acoustical measurements of suspended-sand median grain size (in units of mm) that are generally in good to excellent agreement with concurrent physical measurements of these quantities in the river cross sections at

  5. Pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zefeng Wang; Yongming Hu; Zhou Meng; Ming Ni

    2008-01-01

    A novel pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for the acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones is described and demonstrated.The measurement principle is introduced in detail.An experimental system,which interrogates an interferometric fiber-optic hydrophone with this method,is designed.The acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of the fiber-optic hydrophone is measured over the frequency range of 20-2500Hz.The measured acoustic sensitivity is about-156.5dB re 1rad/μPa with a fluctuation lower than ±1.2dB,which is in good agreement with the results obtained by the method of phase generated carrier.The experimental results testify the validity of this new method which has the advantages of no electric elements in the sensing head,the simplicity of signal processing,and wide working bandwidth.

  6. Measurement of a broadband negative index with space-coiling acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A

    2013-04-26

    We report the experimental demonstration of a broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the latter case also agree very well with the refractive index obtained in the one-dimensional measurements and numerical simulations. We expect this labyrinthine metamaterial to become the unit cell of choice for practical acoustic metamaterial devices that require broadband and significantly negative indices of refraction.

  7. Measurement of a Broadband Negative Index with Space-Coiling Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A.

    2013-04-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the latter case also agree very well with the refractive index obtained in the one-dimensional measurements and numerical simulations. We expect this labyrinthine metamaterial to become the unit cell of choice for practical acoustic metamaterial devices that require broadband and significantly negative indices of refraction.

  8. Theory and signal processing of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Weiqing; FENG Lei; WANG Changhong; WANG Yuling; QIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model and signal processing of acoustic correlation measurements to estimate current velocity are discussed. The sonar space-time correlation function of vol-ume reverberations within Fraunhofer zone is derived. The function, which is in exponential forms, is the theoretical model of acoustic correlation measurements. The characteristics of the correlation values around the maximum of the amplitude of the correlation function, where most information about current velocity is contained, are primarily analyzed. Localized Least Mean Squares (LLMS) criterion is put forward for velocity estimation. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is adopted as the optimization method. So the systematic sig-nal processing method of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement is established. A prototype acoustic correlation current profiler (ACCP) underwent several sea trials, the results show that theoretical model approximately coincides with experimental re-sults. Current profiles including the speed and direction from ACCP are compared with those from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The current profiles by both instruments agree reasonably well. Also, the standard deviation of velocity measurement by ACCP is statistically calculated and it is a little larger than predicted value.

  9. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  10. Final Report: Geothermal dual acoustic tool for measurement of rock stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A. [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  11. Methods of temperature measurement in a radio-acoustic tropospheric sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. TRIVERO

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of the lower troposphere is inferred
    by measuring with a doppler radar the speed of a powerful acoustic wave,
    capable of periodically perturbing the index of refraction of air. Three
    methods for performing these measurements are described.

  12. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  13. Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  14. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Pertilä

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  15. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertilä Pasi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  16. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations with future SKA surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip; Raccanelli, Alvise; Blake, Chris; Ferreira, Pedro G; Santos, Mario G; Schwarz, Dominik J

    2015-01-01

    The imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in large-scale structure can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history, and hence for testing cosmological models. In this article we briefly describe the scientific background to the BAO technique, and forecast the potential of the Phase 1 and 2 SKA telescopes to perform BAO surveys using both galaxy catalogues and intensity mapping, assessing their competitiveness with current and future optical galaxy surveys. We find that a 25,000 sq. deg. intensity mapping survey on a Phase 1 array will preferentially constrain the radial BAO, providing a highly competitive 2% constraint on the expansion rate at z ~ 2. A 30,000 sq. deg. galaxy redshift survey on SKA2 will outperform all other planned experiments for z < 1.4.

  17. Broadband electrostatic acoustic transducer for ultrasonic measurements in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, J H; Heyman, J S; Yost, W T; Torbett, M A; Breazeale, M A

    1979-01-01

    A broadband capacitive electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) has been developed for use in a liquid environment at megahertz frequencies. The ESAT basically consists of a thin conductive membrane stretched over a metallic housing. The membrane functions as the ground plate of a parallel plate capacitor, the other plate being a dc biased electrode recessed approximately 10 mum from the electrically grounded membrane. An ultrasonic wave incident on the membrane varies the membrane-electrode gap spacing and generates an electrical signal proportional to the wave amplitude. The entire assembly is sealed for immersion in a liquid environment. Calibration of the ESAT with incident ultrasonic waves of constant displacement amplitude from 1 to 15 MHz reveals a decrease in signal response with increasing frequency independent of membrane tension. The use of the ESAT as a broadband ultrasonic transducer in liquids with a predictable frequency response is promising.

  18. Acoustic measurements of the thermodynamic temperature between the triple point of mercury and 380 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, G.; Gavioso, R. M.; Spagnolo, R.; Marcarino, P.; Merlone, A.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the differences between the Kelvin thermodynamic temperature and the temperature of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 on nine isotherms between the triple point of mercury and 380 K, by means of a primary acoustic thermometer. For the present measurements the standard uncertainty of (T - T90) ranges from 0.9 mK at 234 K to 1.7 mK at 380 K. The experimental method is based on the measurement of the acoustic resonance frequencies of an argon-filled spherical cavity and the microwave resonance frequencies of the same cavity when evacuated. The present results agree within the remarkably small combined uncertainties with both NIST acoustic thermometry ([1] Moldover M R et al 1999 J. Res. Natl Inst. Stand. Technol. 104 11-46 [2] Strouse G F et al 2002 Progress in primary acoustic thermometry at NIST: 273 K to 505 K 8th Temperature Symp. (Chicago, 21-24 October 2002)) and UCL acoustic thermometry ([3] Ewing M B and Trusler J P M 2000 J. Chem. Thermodyn. 32 1229-55) in the overlapping temperature range.

  19. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  20. Traveling wave tube measurements for low-frequency properties of underwater acoustic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A traveling wave tube measurement technique for measuring acoustic properties of underwater acoustic materials was developed. Water temperature and pressure environments of the ocean can be simulated in a water-filled tube, and the acoustic parameters of samples of underwater acoustic materials are measured in the range of low-frequency. A tested sample is located at central position of the tube. A pair of projectors is separately located at both ends of the tube. Using an active anechoic technique, the sound wave transmitting the tested sample is hardly reflected by the surface of secondary transducer. So the traveling sound field is built up in the tube. By separately calculating the transfer functions of every pair of double hydrophones in the sound fields from the both sides of the sample, its reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients are obtained. In the measurement system, the inside diameter of the tube is Φ208 mm, the working frequency range is from 100 to 4000 Hz, the maximum pressure is 5 MPa. The reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients of a water layer and a stainless steel layer samples are measured actually and calculated theoretically. The results show that the measured values are in good agreement with the values calculated, and the measurement uncertainty is not greater than 1.5 dB.

  1. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  2. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  3. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations with angular two-point correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaniz, Jailson S; Bernui, Armando; Carvalho, Joel C; Benetti, Micol

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) imprinted a characteristic correlation length in the large-scale structure of the universe that can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history. Here, we discuss the application of the angular two-point correlation function, $w(\\theta)$, to a sample of luminous red galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and derive two new measurements of the BAO angular scale at $z = 0.235$ and $z = 0.365$. Since noise and systematics may hinder the identification of the BAO signature in the $w - \\theta$ plane, we also introduce a potential new method to localize the acoustic bump in a model-independent way. We use these new measurements along with previous data to constrain cosmological parameters of dark energy models and to derive a new estimate of the acoustic scale $r_s$.

  4. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  5. Guidelines for Acoustical Measurements Inside Historical Opera Houses: Procedures and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    POMPOLI, ROBERTO; PRODI, NICOLA

    2000-04-01

    The acoustics of Italian historical theatres is to be regarded as a cultural heritage, which is to be preserved and studied. These actions are imperative for handing down the heritage to future generations and to avoid its loss. In this paper, the technical means for scientific quantification of the acoustical heritage are presented in the form of operative guidelines for acoustical measurements inside historical theatres. The document includes the advice of international experts and is being employed during an extended measurement campaign inside renaissance and baroque historical theatres. A relevant part of the paper deals with the experimental validation of the recommendations given in the guidelines, achieved by a dedicated test session inside the Municipal Theatre of Ferrara.

  6. Acoustic measurements of F-4E aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The primary purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-4E aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-4E aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-4E aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB in the lower frequencies, but were increased over that measured during ground run up on some areas of the aircraft. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment. Recommendations were also made to increase the fatigue life of the aft fuselage.

  7. Acoustic measurements of F100-PW-100 engine operating in hush house NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly AFB Texas during operation of the F100-PW-100 engine to ensure that engine structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F100-PW-100 engine structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an existing F100-PW-100 engine wet-cooled noise suppressor, but were increased over that measured during operation on an open test stand. It was recommended that the acoustic load increases measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for engines which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  8. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Jeremy; Hobbs, Chris; Plotkin, Ken; Pilkey, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Lift-off acoustic environments generated by the future Ares I launch vehicle are assessed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) acoustics team using several prediction tools. This acoustic environment is directly caused by the Ares I First Stage booster, powered by the five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRMV). The RSRMV is a larger-thrust derivative design from the currently used Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Lift-off acoustics is an integral part of the composite launch vibration environment affecting the Ares launch vehicle and must be assessed to help generate hardware qualification levels and ensure structural integrity of the vehicle during launch and lift-off. Available prediction tools that use free field noise source spectrums as a starting point for generation of lift-off acoustic environments are described in the monograph NASA SP-8072: "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." This monograph uses a reference database for free field noise source spectrums which consist of subscale rocket motor firings, oriented in horizontal static configurations. The phrase "subscale" is appropriate, since the thrust levels of rockets in the reference database are orders of magnitude lower than the current design thrust for the Ares launch family. Thus, extrapolation is needed to extend the various reference curves to match Ares-scale acoustic levels. This extrapolation process yields a subsequent amount of uncertainty added upon the acoustic environment predictions. As the Ares launch vehicle design schedule progresses, it is important to take every opportunity to lower prediction uncertainty and subsequently increase prediction accuracy. Never before in NASA s history has plume acoustics been measured for large scale solid rocket motors. Approximately twice a year, the RSRM prime vendor, ATK Launch Systems, static fires an assembled RSRM motor in a horizontal configuration at their test facility

  9. Acoustic absorption measurement of human hair and skin within the audible frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B F

    2000-11-01

    Utilizing the two-microphone impedance tube method, the acoustic absorption of human skin and hair is measured in the frequency range 1-6 kHz. Various locations on a number of human subjects are measured to determine if the presence of bone or an air pocket affects the acoustic absorption of human skin. The absorption coefficient of human hair is also measured. Additional techniques are utilized to minimize errors due to sample mounting methods. Techniques are employed to minimize potential errors in sensor and sample locations. The results of these measurements are compared to relevant historical papers on similar investigations. Results for skin measurements compare well with previous work. Measured hair absorption data do not agree with previous work in the area but do coincide with expected trends, which previous works do not.

  10. Functions of diffraction correction and analytical solutions in nonlinear acoustic measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Alliès, Laurent; Nadi, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical formulation for correcting the diffraction associated to the second harmonic of an acoustic wave, more compact than that usually used. This new formulation, resulting from an approximation of the correction applied to fundamental, makes it possible to obtain simple solutions for the second harmonic of the average acoustic pressure, but sufficiently precise for measuring the parameter of nonlinearity B/A in a finite amplitude method. Comparison with other expressions requiring numerical integration, show the solutions are precise in the nearfield.

  11. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Barth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre.

  12. A Multidimensional Investigation of Children's /r/ Productions: Perceptual, Ultrasound, and Acoustic Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Harriet B.; McAllister Byun, Tara; Davidson, Lisa; Grigos, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored relationships among perceptual, ultrasound, and acoustic measurements of children's correct and misarticulated /r/ sounds. Longitudinal data documenting changes across these parameters were collected from 2 children who acquired /r/ over a period of intervention and were compared with data from children with typical…

  13. On the local plane wave methods for in situ measurement of acoustic absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnant, Y.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address a series of so-called local plane wave methods (LPW) to measure acoustic absorption. As opposed to other methods, these methods do not rely on assumptions of the global sound field, like e.g. a plane wave or diffuse field, but are based on a local plane wave assumption. Ther

  14. Continuous measurements of discharge from a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler in a tidal river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Buschman, F.A.; Vermeulen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be mounted horizontally at a river bank, yielding single-depth horizontal array observations of velocity across the river. This paper presents a semideterministic, semistochastic method to obtain continuous measurements of discharge from horizontal ADCP

  15. Comparisons between Computer Simulations of Room Acoustical Parameters and those Measured in Concert Halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Shiokawa, Hiroyoshi; Christensen, Claus Lynge;

    1999-01-01

    A number of European concert halls were surveyed in 1989. In this paper comparisons are made between measured room acoustical parameters and those obtained from computer simulations using the ODEON program version 3.1 on two concert halls. One is Musikverein in Vienna and the other is Concertgebo...

  16. Acoustic Reflex Measurements in Normal, Cochlear, and Retrocochlear Lesions -Part1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Shahnaz

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available The cut off points of 90th percentile of acoustic reflex thresholds were determined in the normal and sensory hearing loss.All subjects had measurable hearing(ANSI-1969≤110 dBHL in three frequencies of 500,1000 and 2000Hz.While hearing loss was more than 55dB, The cut off point was higher in studies that NR responses was included.In cases that hearing loss was less than 75dB, 90th percentile can be used in diganosis of retrochochlear lesions.Since Acoustic reflexes are absent in both mentioned pathologies in greater amount of hearing loss,It would be less efficient in diffrential diganisis of cochlear and retrochochlear lesions to use acoustic reflex thresholds under the mentioned circumstances.

  17. A measure of acoustic noise generated from transcranial magnetic stimulation coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Kothare, Raveena S; Yu, Camilla; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Anastasio, Elana M; Oberman, Lindsay; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of sound emanating from the discharge of magnetic coils used in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can potentially cause acoustic trauma. Per Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards for safety of noise exposure, hearing protection is recommended beyond restricted levels of noise and time limits. We measured the sound pressure levels (SPLs) from four rTMS coils with the goal of assessing if the acoustic artifact levels are of sufficient amplitude to warrant protection from acoustic trauma per OSHA standards. We studied the SPLs at two frequencies (5 and 10 Hz), three machine outputs (MO) (60, 80 and 100%), and two distances from the coil (5 and 10 cm). We found that the SPLs were louder at closer proximity from the coil and directly dependent on the MO. We also found that in all studied conditions, SPLs were lower than the OSHA permissible thresholds for short (8 h) exposure.

  18. A Monte-Carlo investigation of the uncertainty of acoustic decay measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabo, David Pérez; Seoane, Manuel A. Sobreira; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    , taking into account the influence of the magnitude response and the phase distortion. It will be shown how the error not only depends on the filter but also on the modal density and the position of the resonances of the system under test within the frequency band. A Monte-Carlo computer simulation has...... been be set up: the model function is a model of the acoustic decays, where the modal density, the resonances of the system, and the amplitude and phase of the normal modes may be considered as random variables. Once the random input variables and the model function are defined, the uncertainty...... of acoustic decay measurements can be estimated. Different filters will be analysed: linear phase FIR and IIR filters both in their direct and time-reversed versions. © European Acoustics Association....

  19. Comparisons between computer simulations of room acoustical parameters and those measured in concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Shiokawa, Hiroyoshi; Christensen, Claus Lynge;

    1999-01-01

    A number of European concert halls were surveyed in 1989. In this paper comparisons are made between measured room acoustical parameters and those obtained from computer simulations on concert halls using the odeon program version 3.1. The key parameter compared with measured data is the reverber......A number of European concert halls were surveyed in 1989. In this paper comparisons are made between measured room acoustical parameters and those obtained from computer simulations on concert halls using the odeon program version 3.1. The key parameter compared with measured data...... is the reverberation time, and this is mainly used to adjust the absorption data of the surfaces in the computer model. But five additional parameters are calculated and compared with measured data as well. In order to determine the sensitivity of the computer model, comparisons are also made between the results...

  20. Coupling thermogravimetric and acoustic emission measurements: its application to study the inhibition of catalytic coke deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropital, Francois; Dascotte, Philippe; Marchand, Pierre [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 Avenue Bois Preau, 92952 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Faure, Thierry; Lenain, Jean-Claude; Proust, Alain [Euro Physical Acoustics, 27 Rue Magellan, 94373 Sucy-en-Brie Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to improve the knowledge on the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials, the coupling of several in situ physical analysis methods is a promising way. For this purpose a thermogravimetric balance has been equipped with a specific acoustic emission device in order to continuously measure the mass variation of the corrosion sample and the acoustic emission transient under experimental conditions of temperature and gas phase compositions that are representative of the industrial environments. The catalytic coke deposition condition that is a major problem for the refinery and petrochemical industries, has been studied with such a device. The carbon deposition on reactor walls can induce localised disruption in the process such as heat-transfer reduction and pressure drops. To prevent these perturbations, proper selections of the metallurgical or internal coating compositions of the equipment, or the injection of accurate amount of inhibitors have to be decided. The feasibility of the coupling at high temperature of thermogravimetric and acoustic emission has been demonstrated. This new technique has been applied to study the inhibition of the catalytic coke deposition on pure iron by sulphur additives in the temperature range of 650 deg. C and under different mixed atmospheres of hydrocarbon and hydrogen contents. Good correlation has been obtained between the coking rates measured by thermogravimetric measurements and the intensities of the acoustic emission parameters. (authors)

  1. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  2. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500-2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  3. Method based on broadband compressed pulse superposition to measure properties of underwater acoustic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shui; MIAO Rongxing

    2001-01-01

    A method is proposed for the measurements of the performances of underwater acoustic finite sized large area material samples in a free field by using broadband pulse compression technique. As the result of which, the low-frequency cutoff of the standard tests is obviously reduced, and the broadband measurements are also realized. The experimental system provides measurements of complex reflection and transmission coefficients at continuous frequency points. From the data one can obtain the following acoustic parameters: echo reduction and insertion loss, absorption and attenuation coefficients, etc. The measurements are performed for two actual panels with the size 1 m×1 m in the frequency range from 2-20 kHz.

  4. Determination of efficiency of anechoic or decoupling hull coatings using water tank acoustic measurements

    OpenAIRE

    AUDOLY, Christian

    2012-01-01

    International audience; External anechoic and decoupling hull coatings are used on ships or submarines to reduce acoustic target strength and radiated noise, respectively. Measurement of test panels in a water tank gives only the reflection and transmission coefficients in free field, with respects to frequency. It is shown using simple models that anechoic and decoupling efficiencies can be derived, providing appropriate modulus and phase measurement of the coefficients. Additionnally, the i...

  5. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  6. Underwater Acoustic Measurements to Estimate Wind and Rainfall in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pensieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic ambient noise measurements can be analyzed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about wind and rainfall phenomena over the ocean filling the existing gap of reliable meteorological observations at sea. The Ligurian Sea Acoustic Experiment was designed to collect long-term synergistic observations from a passive acoustic recorder and surface sensors (i.e., buoy mounted rain gauge and anemometer and weather radar to support error analysis of rainfall rate and wind speed quantification techniques developed in past studies. The study period included combination of high and low wind and rainfall episodes and two storm events that caused two floods in the vicinity of La Spezia and in the city of Genoa in 2011. The availability of high resolution in situ meteorological data allows improving data processing technique to detect and especially to provide effective estimates of wind and rainfall at sea. Results show a very good correspondence between estimates provided by passive acoustic recorder algorithm and in situ observations for both rainfall and wind phenomena and demonstrate the potential of using measurements provided by passive acoustic instruments in open sea for early warning of approaching coastal storms, which for the Mediterranean coastal areas constitutes one of the main causes of recurrent floods.

  7. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization′s (WHO guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  8. The acoustic environment of intensive care wards based on long period nocturnal measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The patients in the Intensive Care Units are often exposed to excessive levels of noise and activities. They can suffer from sleep disturbance, especially at night, but they are often too ill to cope with the poor environment. This article investigates the acoustic environment of typical intensive care wards in the UK, based on long period nocturnal measurements, and examines the differences between singlebed and multibed wards, using statistical analysis. It has been shown that the acoustic environment differs significantly every night. There are also significant differences between the noise levels in the singlebed and multibed wards, where acoustic ceilings are present. Despite the similar background noises in both ward types, more intrusive noises tend to originate from the multibed wards, while more extreme sounds are likely to occur in the single wards. The sound levels in the measured wards for each night are in excess of the World Health Organization's (WHO) guide levels by at least 20 dBA, dominantly at the middle frequencies. Although the sound level at night varies less than that in the daytime, the nocturnal acoustic environment is not dependant on any specific time, thus neither the noisiest nor quietest period can be determined. It is expected that the statistical analysis of the collected data will provide essential information for the development of relevant guidelines and noise reduction strategies.

  9. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties.

  10. Acoustic Measurements of Residual Stresses and Grain Sizes in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Martin John

    The theory of acoustoelasticity relates the velocity of an acoustic wave in a solid to the elastic stress state in that solid. This thesis presents new theories, measurement techniques, and methodologies related to the use of longitudinal wave acoustoelasticity in aluminum alloys. A one-dimensional model has been developed to provide a simple understanding of the acoustoelastic effect. A new acoustic device for accurately measuring relative thickness variations has been designed and built. This device is used--in conjunction with a pulse-echo phase measurement device and a computer controlled scanning system--to measure acoustic velocity variations in plastically deformed and non-flat-and-parallel samples. Acoustic velocity variations from point to point in an unstressed sample can sometimes be on the same order as velocity changes due to applied or residual stresses, and this can make stress measurements difficult. A statistical theory has been developed to relate these unstressed velocity variations to the average grain size in the sample and to the active area of the acoustic transducer used. Large transducers and small grain sizes will minimize these variations. This relationship has been verified by tests on a number of aluminum alloys and a new method for non-destructive grain size determination has been suggested. A systematic methodology has been developed and tested for studying the influence of uniaxial plastic deformation on the acoustoelastic response. Samples have been plastically deformed in four-point bending to produce elastic-plastic and residual stress states. Acoustic measurements of these stresses have then been compared directly to theoretical predictions based on the materials' stress-strain curves and simple beam theory. In the aluminum alloys tested (2024-T351 and 7075-T651), the acoustoelastic constants are shown to be virtually unchanged by uniaxial plastic strains of less than 2.5%. Thus, the acoustoelastic technique can be reliably

  11. Clinical value of acoustic voice measures: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Katrin; Voigt, Daniel; Döllinger, Michael; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Lohscheller, Jörg

    2010-08-01

    Within this study a retrospective analysis of clinical voice perturbation measures, Dysphonia Severity Index and subjective perceived hoarseness was performed to determine their value under clinical aspects. The study included the data of 580 healthy and 1,700 pathologic voices, which were investigated under the following aspects. The relevant parameters were identified and their interrelation determined. Group differences between healthy and pathologic voices were figured out and investigated if voice quality measures allowed an automatic diagnosis of voice disorders. The analysis revealed significant changes between the clinical groups, which indicate the diagnostic relevance of voice quality measures. However, an individual diagnosis of the underlying voice disorder failed due to a vast spread of the parameter values within the respective groups. Classification accuracies of 75-90% were achieved. The high misclassification rate of up to 25% implied that in voice disorder diagnosis, the individual interpretation of the parameter values has to be done carefully.

  12. Measurement of ultrasonic nonlinear parameter by using electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhichao; Liu, Suzhen; Zhang, Chuang

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear ultrasonic technology is generally known as an effective method for the microcrack detection. However, most of the previous experimental studies were limited by a contact nonlinearity method. Since measurement by the contact method is affected by the coupling conditions, additional nonlinear coefficient are lead into the measurement. This research presents a novel technique for nonlinear ultrasonic wave measurements that uses a non-contact electromagnetic ultrasonic transducer (EMAT). And for a better understanding and a more in-depth analysis of the macroscopic nonlinear behavior of microcrack, the developed FEM modeling approach was built to simulate microcrack induced nonlinearities manifested in electromagnetic ultrasonic waves and validated experimentally. This study has yielded a quantitative characterization strategy for microcrack using EMAT, facilitating deployment of structural health monitoring by noncontact electromagnetic nondestructive testing.

  13. Acoustical and optical backscatter measurements of sediment transport in the 1988 1989 STRESS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J. F.; Gross, T. F.; Sherwood, C. R.; Irish, J. D.; Brumley, B. H.

    1997-04-01

    During the 1988-1989 Sediment Transport Events on Shelves and Slopes (STRESS) experiment, a 1-MHz acoustic backscatter system (ABSS), deployed in 90 m of water off the California coast measured vertical profiles of suspended sediment concentration from 1.5 to (nominally) 26 meters above bottom (m.a.b.). An 8-week-long time series was obtained, showing major sediment transport events (storms) in late December and early January. Comparison of the acoustics measurements from 1.5 m.a.b. are made with optical backscatter system (OBS) concentration estimates lower in the boundary layer (0.25 m.a.b.). Correlations between ABSS and OBS concentration measurements and the boundary layer forcing functions (waves, currents, and their non-linear interaction) provided a variety of insights into the nature of the sediment transport of the STRESS site. Transport rates and integrated transport are seen to be dominated by the largest storm events.

  14. Measurements of Acoustic Properties of Porous and Granular Materials and Application to Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junhong; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2004-01-01

    For application of porous and granular materials to vibro-acoustic controls, a finite dynamic strength of the solid component (frame) is an important design factor. The primary goal of this study was to investigate structural vibration damping through this frame wave propagation for various poroelastic materials. A measurement method to investigate the vibration characteristics of the frame was proposed. The measured properties were found to follow closely the characteristics of the viscoelastic materials - the dynamic modulus increased with frequency and the degree of the frequency dependence was determined by its loss factor. The dynamic stiffness of hollow cylindrical beams containing porous and granular materials as damping treatment was measured also. The data were used to extract the damping materials characteristics using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The results suggested that the acoustic structure interaction between the frame and the structure enhances the dissipation of the vibration energy significantly.

  15. Improvements in Elimination of Loudspeaker Distortion in Acoustic Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.; Torras Rosell, Antoni; McWalter, Richard Ian

    2015-01-01

    sine signal and is tested on models of memoryless nonlinear systems as well as nonlinear loudspeakers. The method is shown to give a clear benefit over existing methods. Two techniques that improve the signal-to-noise ratio are demonstrated: the first uses more measurement levels than the number...

  16. Measurement of incident sound power using near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    The conventional method of measuring the insertion loss of a partition relies on an assumption of the sound field in the source room being diffuse and the classical relation between the spatial average of the mean square pressure in the source room and the incident sound power per unit area...

  17. The relationship between VHI scores and specific acoustic measures of mildly disordered voice production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Karen M; Collins, Savita P; Sapienza, Christine M

    2006-06-01

    This study was designed to examine the relationship between the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and acoustic measures of voice samples common in clinical practice. Fifty participants, 38 women and 12 men, ranging in age from 19 to 80 years, with a mean age of 49 years, served as participants. Of these 50 participants, 17 participants could be included in the acoustic analysis of voice based on measures of error calculated with the TF32 software. All participants completed the VHI and provided voice samples including three trials of the sustained vowel /A/ at a comfortable loudness level as well as a connected speech sample consisting of the Zoo Passage. Acoustic measures were made with TF32 and Cool Edit software and included fundamental frequency, jitter %, shimmer %, signal-to-noise ratio, mean root-mean-square intensity, fundamental frequency standard deviation, aphonic periods, and breath groups. Results indicate that these measures were not predictive of overall VHI score, and no cohesive or predictable pattern was identified when comparing individual measures with overall VHI or with each subscale item. Likely contributions to this lack of correlation and subsequent clinical implications are discussed, as well as the direction for further research.

  18. Age effects in the human middle ear: Wideband acoustical measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, M. Patrick; Sanford, Chris A.

    2004-12-01

    Studies that have examined age effects in the human middle ear using either admittance measures at 220 or 660 Hz or multifrequency tympanometry from 200 to 2000 Hz have had conflicting results. Several studies have suggested an increase in admittance with age, while several others have suggested a decrease in admittance with age. A third group of studies found no significant age effect. This study examined 226 Hz tympanometry and wideband energy reflectance and impedance at ambient pressure in a group of 40 young adults and a group of 30 adults with age >=60 years. The groups did not differ in admittance measures of the middle ear at 226 Hz. However, significant age effects were found in wideband energy reflectance and impedance. In particular, in older adults there was a comparative decrease in reflectance from 800 to 2000 Hz but an increase near 4000 Hz. The results suggest a decrease in middle-ear stiffness with age. The findings of this study hold relevance for understanding the aging process in the auditory system, for the establishment of normative data for wideband energy reflectance, for the possibility of a conductive component to presbycusis, and for the interpretation of otoacoustic emission measurements. .

  19. Synthetic aperture acoustic measurements of stationary suspended cinderblock and surrogate substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Steven; Woods, Teresa; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2009-05-01

    A synthetic aperture acoustic approach is used as a standoff method to assess material properties of a typical cinder block, referred to as a concrete masonry unit (CMU), and a variety of CMU surrogates. The objective is to identify anomalies in CMU wall surfaces. The acoustic specular return and phase change across the blocks are the fundamental measurements of interest. The CMU surrogates are created from commercially available closed cell expanding foam. Results from three test articles are presented that show potentially exploitable differences in terms of acoustic magnitude and acoustic phase response between the surrogates and typical CMUs. The test articles are; a typical CMU, a foam block, and a foam block with an embedded steel object. All test articles are similar in size and shape, and both foam blocks are covered in grout so that surface appearance closely matches that of a CMU. The results show that each of the test articles has characteristics that may be used for discrimination and anomaly detection.

  20. A novel multipitch measurement algorithm for acoustic signals of moving targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingchang; Guo, Feng; Zu, Xingshui; Li, Haiyan; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel multipitch measurement (MPM) method is proposed for acoustic signals. Starting from the analysis of moving targets' acoustic signatures, a pitch-based harmonics representation model of acoustic signal is put forward. According to the proposed harmonics model, a modified greatest common divisor (MGCD) method is developed to obtain an initial multipitch set (IMS). Subsequently, the harmonic number vector (HNV) associated with the IMS is determined by maximizing the objective function formulated as a multi-impulse-train weighted symmetric average magnitude sum function (SAMSF) of the observed signal. The frequencies of SAMSF are determined by the target acoustic signal, the periods of the multi-impulse-train are governed by the estimated IMS harmonics and the maximization of the objective function is figured out through a time-domain matching of periodicities of the multi-impulse-train with that of the SAMSF. Finally, by using the obtained IMS and its HNV, a precise fundamental frequency set is achieved. Evaluation of the algorithm performances in comparison with state-of-the-art methods indicates that MPM is practical for the multipitch extraction of moving targets.

  1. Acoustic Resuspension Measurement System (ARMS): Announcement of Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    their controlling circuitry to be con,- Z bined in compact, battery -powered packages. These instrument packages can W 0 be contained in rellatively... Station DTIO QUALITY [INSP8•ECTE"•D 4 3909 Halls Ferry Road. Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 tzqq o- ,1TEDOf’ rYCjA" PiosJ Mr. E. Clark McNair, Jr., (601... Prickett and Michelle M. Thevenot. Introduction In order to measure in situ properties of the boundary layer above dredged material mounds in open

  2. Brillouin-scattering measurements of the acoustic absorption coefficient in liquid CS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, R. W.; Detenbeck, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    High-resolution Brillouin spectra were recorded for light scattered at small angles from liquid CS2. The use of a single-mode He-Ne laser, locked in frequency to a Fabry-Perot interferometer, permitted measurements of line widths of the order of 10 MHz for frequencies in the range 300-1000 MHz. These measurements extend previous Brillouin line-width measurements at higher frequencies into the region where relaxation effects are dominant and connect the optical measurements with lower-frequency acoustical data.

  3. Shallow-water acoustic tomography from angle measurements instead of travel-time measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Florian; Nicolas, Barbara; Mars, Jérôme I; Roux, Philippe; Brossier, Romain

    2013-10-01

    For shallow-water waveguides and mid-frequency broadband acoustic signals, ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) is based on the multi-path aspect of wave propagation. Using arrays in emission and reception and advanced array processing, every acoustic arrival can be isolated and matched to an eigenray that is defined not only by its travel time but also by its launch and reception angles. Classically, OAT uses travel-time variations to retrieve sound-speed perturbations; this assumes very accurate source-to-receiver clock synchronization. This letter uses numerical simulations to demonstrate that launch-and-reception-angle tomography gives similar results to travel-time tomography without the same requirement for high-precision synchronization.

  4. Overview of hydro-acoustic current-measurement applications by the U.S. geological survey in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlock, Scott E.; Stewart, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains a network of 170 streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana to collect data from which continuous records of river discharges are produced. Traditionally, the discharge record from a station is produced by recording river stage and making periodic discharge measurements through a range of stage, then developing a relation between stage and discharge. Techniques that promise to increase data collection accuracy and efficiency include the use of hydro-acoustic instrumentation to measure river velocities. The velocity measurements are used to compute river discharge. In-situ applications of hydro-acoustic instruments by the USGS in Indiana include acoustic velocity meters (AVM's) at six streamflow-gaging stations and newly developed Doppler velocity meters (DVM's) at two stations. AVM's use reciprocal travel times of acoustic signals to measure average water velocities along acoustic paths, whereas DVM's use the Doppler shift of backscattered acoustic signals to compute water velocities. In addition to the in-situ applications, three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP's) are used to make river-discharge measurements from moving boats at streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana. The USGS has designed and is testing an innovative unmanned platform from which to make ADCP discharge measurements.

  5. Self-oscillation acoustic system destined to measurement of stresses in mass rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kwasniewski, Janusz; Dominik, Ireneusz; Dorobczynski, Lech

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an electronic self-oscillation acoustic system (SAS) destined to measure of stresses variations in the elastic media. The system consists of piezoelectric detector, amplifier-limiter, pass-band filter, piezoelectric exciter and the frequency meter. The mass rock plays a role of delaying element, in which variations in stresses causing the variations of acoustic wave velocity of propagation, and successive variation in frequency of oscillations generated by system. The laboratory test permitted to estimate variations in frequency caused by variations in stresses of elastic medium. The principles of selection of frequency and other parameters of the electronic system in application to stresses measurement in condition of the mine were presented.

  6. Measurement of low-frequency ultrasonic wave in water using an acoustic fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    An acoustic fiber sensor for measurement of ultrasonic waves, which used the approximate Raman-Nath diffraction effect where light diffraction waves were generated in an optical fiber by strain due to the ultrasonic waves, was proposed and examined. In order to characterize the acoustic fiber sensor as a basic study, measurements of low-frequency ultrasonic waves in water were examined using a step index fiber operating as a detection sensor. The results showed that characteristics of detected signals agreed with the theoretical prediction based on Fraunhofer diffraction. This indicates that our proposed fiber sensor can be used for the detection of low-frequency ultrasonic waves as well as the transmission of light diffraction signals.

  7. Hearing preservation in acoustic neuroma resection: Analysis of petrous bone measurement and intraoperative application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Tanrikulu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Petrous bone measurement by high-resolution MRI data enables safe surgical exposure of the internal acoustic canal with avoidance of injury to the labyrinth and a better postoperative prognosis, especially for intrameatal ANs and for the resection of intrameatal portions of larger neuromas. The prognostic factors enable the patients and the surgeon a better estimation of postoperative results regarding deafness and postoperative hypacusis and support a consolidated treatment planning.

  8. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  9. Acoustical measurements of expression devices in pipe organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Jonas

    2008-03-01

    In this investigation, three different swell systems known in pipe organs, the swell box, the crescendo wheel, and the historic wind swell were measured and compared to each other. The dynamic range of the crescendo wheel was found to be most effective, and for frequencies near 2 kHz the increase in sound pressure level could be up to 50 dB between the softest and the loudest adjustment. The maximum dynamic range for the wind swell and the swell box were found to be 10-20 dB in the same frequency range. With its step-wise crescendo procedure, the crescendo wheel simulates the type of orchestra crescendo which is reached by successively adding further musical instruments. In contrast, the swell box and the wind swell produce a crescendo effect similar to the crescendo in which individual musical instruments perform a dynamic movement. This type of crescendo requires a continuous level increase but allows a smaller dynamic range. The disappearance of the wind swell is not surprising because it offers no advantage over the swell box, while being restricted to stops with free reeds.

  10. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  11. Direct voltage measurements using bulk acoustic wave sensing in LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nishant Bhupendra

    Accurate (impedance effects that can distort the pulse shape, and pickup of extraneous signals resulting from electromagnetic interference effects. A piezoelectric crystal-based bulk acoustic wave sensor using lithium niobate (LiNbO3) that has applications to metrology, research, and power metering was developed to overcome these measurement issues with the factors of scalability, ease of use, and compactness in mind. A Y+36° cut LiNbO3crystal was coupled to two acoustic transducers, where direct current (DC) voltages ranging from 128--1100 V were applied transversely to the crystal. An acoustic wave was used to interrogate the crystal before, during, and after voltage application. Both single and multiple pass measurements were performed and compared to linear piezoelectric theory. A comparison study between Y+36° and 0° X-cut LiNbO3 was performed to evaluate the influence of crystal cut on acoustic propagation. The study was extended to applying alternating current (AC), and pulsed voltages. The measured DC data was compared to a 1-D impedance matrix model that was based on a three port circuit with voltage-induced strain effects inputted as a model parameter. An uncertainty budget was carried out for both crystal cuts and compared. Environmental effects such as pressure and temperature were also measured to determine their influence on the sensor under ambient conditions. Published literature regarding material constants, such as elastic constants and piezoelectric constants, for LiNbO3 do not account for the influence of an electric field. In light of this, measurements of the acoustic velocities and material constants under the presence of a DC electric field were performed up to 896 V. This information was used to develop an uncertainty analysis for the determination of stress-charge form piezoelectric constants e15 and e22. All measured and calculated values were input into a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the error of the strain-charge form

  12. Acoustic harmonic generation measurement applications: Detection of tight cracks in powder metallurgy compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, D. J.; Foley, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Standard linear ultrasonic testing techniques have long been employed for locating and characterizing relatively open cracks in a wide variety of materials, from metallic alloys and ceramics to composites. In all these materials, the detection of open cracks easily accomplished because the void between the two crack surfaces provides sufficient acoustic impedance mismatch to reflect the incident energy. Closed or partially closed cracks, however, may often go undetected because contacting interfaces allow transmission of ultrasound. In the green (unsintered) state, powder metallurgy compacts typically contain high residual stresses that have the ability to close cracks formed during the compaction process, a result of oxide films, improper powder lubricant, mold design, etc. After sintering, the reduction of residual stresses may no longer be sufficient to close the crack. Although the crack may be more easily detected, it is obvious most desirable to discover defects prior to sintering. It has been shown that the displacements of an interface may be highly nonlinear if a stress wave of sufficient intensity propagates across it, a result of the stress wave either opening or closing the interface. Current efforts involve the application of nonlinear acoustic techniques, in particular acoustic harmonic generation measurements, for the detection and characterization of tightly closed cracks in powder metallurgy parts. A description of the equipment and the measurement technique will be discussed and initial experimental results on sintered and green compacts will be presented.—This work was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under USDOE Contract No. W-7405-ENG-82.

  13. Evaluation of stage acoustics in Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall by measuring stage support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Barron, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Stage acoustics is an important characteristic for concert halls, both for the acoustic quality on stage and for the audience. However, relatively little research has been conducted into the question. This study was based on the investigation of an actual concert hall stage, that of the Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall in Korea. The stage acoustics was evaluated in the actual hall, and with two models: a 1:25 scale model and a computer model. The study was based on the stage support parameter ST1 proposed by Gade as a measure of support for individual performers [Acustica 65, 193-203 (1989)]. The variation of support was measured on the empty stage of the actual hall and in the two models. The effect of musicians on stage, the effect of moving the orchestra, the effect of ceiling height and of stage-wall profile were also investigated. Conclusions are drawn both relating to the Seoul Concert Hall stage and stages in general.

  14. Acoustic measurements for the combustion diagnosis of diesel engines fuelled with biodiesels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Dong; Wang, Tie; Gu, Fengshou; Tesfa, Belachew; Ball, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation was carried out on the combustion process of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The effects of biodiesel on the combustion process and engine dynamics were analysed for non-intrusive combustion diagnosis based on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine. The signals of vibration, acoustic and in-cylinder pressure were measured simultaneously to find their inter-connection for diagnostic feature extraction. It was found that the sound energy level increases with the increase of engine load and speed, and the sound characteristics are closely correlated with the variation of in-cylinder pressure and combustion process. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was employed to analyse the non-stationary nature of engine noise in a higher frequency range. Before the wavelet analysis, time synchronous average (TSA) was used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acoustic signal by suppressing the components which are asynchronous. Based on the root mean square (RMS) values of CWT coefficients, the effects of biodiesel fractions and operating conditions (speed and load) on combustion process and engine dynamics were investigated. The result leads to the potential of airborne acoustic measurements and analysis for engine condition monitoring and fuel quality evaluation.

  15. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layer physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Friedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance and acoustic (Love mode surface acoustic wave device real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition and surfactant adsorption, the bound mass and its physical properties – density and optical index – are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70±20% water and are 16±3 to 19±3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 μg/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50±10% water for layer thicknesses in the 6±1.5 to 13±2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 μg/ml range.

  16. A Tool Measuring Remaining Thickness of Notched Acoustic Cavities in Primary Reaction Control Thruster NDI Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yushi; Sun, Changhong; Zhu, Harry; Wincheski, Buzz

    2006-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking in the relief radius area of a space shuttle primary reaction control thruster is an issue of concern. The current approach for monitoring of potential crack growth is nondestructive inspection (NDI) of remaining thickness (RT) to the acoustic cavities using an eddy current or remote field eddy current probe. EDM manufacturers have difficulty in providing accurate RT calibration standards. Significant error in the RT values of NDI calibration standards could lead to a mistaken judgment of cracking condition of a thruster under inspection. A tool based on eddy current principle has been developed to measure the RT at each acoustic cavity of a calibration standard in order to validate that the standard meets the sample design criteria.

  17. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  18. Fish species identification based on its acoustic target strength using in situ measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja-Bidin Raja-Hassan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is fish species identification using acoustic target strength (TS. Insitu measurement has been deployed at the South China Sea of Terengganu Malaysia using Furuno FQ-80 Scientific Echo Sounder which included in the research vessel of KK Senangin II. The transducer isplaced 2.8 meter under sea surface while fish put in the net cage under the vessel. TS data have beencollected independently for commercial fish in Malaysia, there are Selar boops (Oxeye scad, Alepesdjedaba (Shrimp scad, Megalaspis cordyla (Torpedo scad, and Decapterus maruadsi/b> (Japanese scad.TS value, depth, and position of specific target have been observed using echogram. TS of every speciesis different although similar size and at the similar range from transducer. Thus, the specific fish specieshas been identified based on its acoustic target strength.

  19. Tensile strain measurements of ceramic fibers using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Renee M.; Vary, Alex

    1992-01-01

    A noncontacting technique using scanning laser acoustic microscopy for making in situ tensile strain measurements of small diameter fibers was implemented for the tensile strain analysis of individual Nicalon SiC fibers (nominal diameter 15 microns). Stress vs strain curves for the fibers were plotted from the experimental data. The mean elastic modulus of the fibers was determined to be 185.3 GPa. Similar measurements were made for Carborundum SiC fibers (nominal diameter 28 microns) and Saphikon sapphire fibers (nominal diameter 140 microns).

  20. Near-field acoustic holography with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    of particle velocity measurements and combined pressure-velocity measurements in NAH, the relation between the near-field and the far-field radiation from sound sources via the supersonic acoustic intensity, and finally, the reconstruction of sound fields using rigid spherical microphone arrays. Measurement...... of the particle velocity has notable potential in NAH, and furthermore, combined measurement of sound pressure and particle velocity opens a new range of possibilities that are examined in this study. On this basis, sound field separation methods have been studied, and a new measurement principle based on double...... layer measurements of the particle velocity has been proposed. Also, the relation between near-field and far-field radiation from sound sources has been examined using the concept of the supersonic intensity. The calculation of this quantity has been extended to other holographic methods, and studied...

  1. Remote vibration measurement: a wireless passive surface acoustic wave resonator fast probing strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, J-M; Droit, C; Ballandras, S; Alzuaga, S; Martin, G; Sandoz, P

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators can advantageously operate as passive sensors which can be interrogated through a wireless link. Amongst the practical applications of such devices, structural health monitoring through stress measurement and more generally vibration characteristics of mechanical structures benefit from the ability to bury such sensors within the considered structure (wireless and battery-less). However, measurement bandwidth becomes a significant challenge when measuring wideband vibration characteristics of mechanical structures. A fast SAW resonator measurement scheme is demonstrated here. The measurement bandwidth is limited by the physical settling time of the resonator (Q/π periods), requiring only two probe pulses through a monostatic RADAR-like electronic setup to identify the sensor resonance frequency and hence stress on a resonator acting as a strain gauge. A measurement update rate of 4800 Hz using a high quality factor SAW resonator operating in the 434 MHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band is experimentally demonstrated.

  2. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William J; Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Shaw, Peter B; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  3. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF. Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB, 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  4. Multibeam volume acoustic backscatter imagery and reverberation measurements in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet, Timothy C.; deMoustier, Christian P.

    2002-08-01

    Multibeam volume acoustic backscatter imagery and reverberation measurements are derived from data collected in 200-m-deep waters in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, with the Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS), a 68-kHz cylindrical sonar operated by the U.S. Navy's Coastal System Station. The TVSS's 360-degree vertical imaging plane allows simultaneous identification of multiple volume scattering sources and their discrimination from backscatter at the sea surface or the seafloor. This imaging capability is used to construct a three-dimensional representation of a pelagic fish school near the bottom. Scattering layers imaged in the mixed layer and upper thermocline are attributed to assemblages of epipelagic zooplankton. The fine scale patchiness of these scatterers is assessed with the two-dimensional variance spectra of vertical volume scattering strength images in the upper and middle water column. Mean volume reverberation levels exhibit a vertical directionality which is attributed to the volume scattering layers. Boundary echo sidelobe interference and reverberation is shown to be the major limitation in obtaining bioacoustic data with the TVSS. Because net tow and trawl samples were not collected with the acoustic data, the analysis presented is based upon comparison to previous biologic surveys in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and reference to the bioacoustic literature. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  5. Two-dimensional direction finding for low altitude target based on intensity measurement using an acoustic vector-sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huawei; ZHAO Junwei

    2004-01-01

    A method of two-dimensional direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for low altitude target, which is based on intensity measurement using a three-dimensional differential pressure acoustic vector-sensor, is presented. With the perfect characteristics of acoustic vector sensor in the low frequency band, accurate DOA estimation is achieved under small array size. The validity of the proposed method was assessed by experiments on the noise signals radiated by a helicopter. The influence of acoustic sensor size, integral time and signal to noise ratio to the accuracy of DOA estimation were investigated, respectively. The performance comparisons demonstrated that it outperformed the traditional time-delay measurement based method for a small acoustic array.

  6. Angular measurement of acoustic reflection coefficients by the inversion of V(z, t) data with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2012-01-01

    For inspection of mechanical properties and integrity of critical components such as integrated circuits or composite materials by acoustic methodology, it is imperative to evaluate their acoustic reflection coefficients, which are in close correlation with the elastic properties, thickness, density, and attenuation and interface adhesion of these layered structures. An experimental method based on angular spectrum to evaluate the acoustic coefficient as a function of the incident angle, θ, and frequency, ω, is presented with high frequency time-resolved acoustic microscopy. In order to achieve a high spatial resolution for evaluation of thin plates with thicknesses about one or two wavelengths, a point focusing transducer with a nominal center frequency of 25 MHz is adopted. By measuring the V(z, t) data in pulse mode, the reflection coefficient, R(θ, ω), can be reconstructed from its two-dimensional spectrum. It brings simplicity to experimental setup and measurement procedure since only single translation of the transducer in the vertical direction is competent for incident angle and frequency acquisition. It overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional methods requiring the spectroscopy for frequency scanning and/or ultrasonic goniometer for angular scanning. Two substrates of aluminum and Plexiglas and four stainless plates with various thicknesses of 100 μm, 150 μm, 200 μm, and 250 μm were applied. The acoustic reflection coefficients are consistent with the corresponding theoretical calculations. It opened the way of non-destructive methodology to evaluate the elastic and geometrical properties of very thin multi-layers structures simultaneously.

  7. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  8. New acoustic system for continuous measurement of river discharge and water temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyosi KAWANISI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, river discharge is indirectly estimated from water level or streamflow velocity near the water surface. However, these methods have limited applicability. In this study, an innovative system, the fluvial acoustic tomography system (FATS, was used for continuous discharge measurement. Transducers with a central frequency of 30 kHz were installed diagonally across the river. The system’s significant functions include accurate measurement of the travel time of the transmission signal using a GPS clock and the attainment of a high signal-to-noise ratio as a result of modulation of the signal by the 10th order M-sequence. In addition, FATS is small and lightweight, and its power consumption is low. Operating in unsteady streamflow, FATS successfully measured the cross-sectional average velocity. The agreement between FATS and acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs on water discharge was satisfactory. Moreover, the temporal variation of the cross-sectional average temperature deduced from the sound speed of FATS was similar to that measured by a temperature sensor near the bank.

  9. Galaxy bias and its effects on the Baryon acoustic oscillations measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kushal T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Seo, Hee -Jong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Eckel, Jonathan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Metchnik, Marc [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Pinto, Philip [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Xu, Xiaoying [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-05-31

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al. (2009). For the less biased HOD models (b < 3), we do not detect any shift in the acoustic scale relative to the no-bias case, typically 0.10% ± 0.10%. However, the most biased HOD models (b > 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% ± 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1σ systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07%-0.15%.

  10. Heat release and flame structure measurements of self-excited acoustically-driven premixed methane flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin M.; Tuttle, Steven G.; Renfro, Michael W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, 191 Auditorium Rd, U-3139, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); King, Galen B. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    An open-open organ pipe burner (Rijke tube) with a bluff-body ring was used to create a self-excited, acoustically-driven, premixed methane-air conical flame, with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.05. The feed tube velocities corresponded to Re = 1780-4450. Coupled oscillations in pressure, velocity, and heat release from the flame are naturally encouraged at resonant frequencies in the Rijke tube combustor. This coupling creates sustainable self-excited oscillations in flame front area and shape. The period of the oscillations occur at the resonant frequency of the combustion chamber when the flame is placed {proportional_to}1/4 of the distance from the bottom of the tube. In this investigation, the shape of these acoustically-driven flames is measured by employing both OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and chemiluminescence imaging and the images are correlated to simultaneously measured pressure in the combustor. Past research on acoustically perturbed flames has focused on qualitative flame area and heat release relationships under imposed velocity perturbations at imposed frequencies. This study reports quantitative empirical fits with respect to pressure or phase angle in a self-generated pressure oscillation. The OH-PLIF images were single temporal shots and the chemiluminescence images were phase averaged on chip, such that 15 exposures were used to create one image. Thus, both measurements were time resolved during the flame oscillation. Phase-resolved area and heat release variations throughout the pressure oscillation were computed. A relation between flame area and the phase angle before the pressure maximum was derived for all flames in order to quantitatively show that the Rayleigh criterion was satisfied in the combustor. Qualitative trends in oscillating flame area were found with respect to feed tube flow rates. A logarithmic relation was found between the RMS pressure and both the normalized average area and heat release rate

  11. Compressive sensing beamforming based on covariance for acoustic imaging with noisy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Siyang; Wei, Qingkai; Huang, Xun

    2013-11-01

    Compressive sensing, a newly emerging method from information technology, is applied to array beamforming and associated acoustic applications. A compressive sensing beamforming method (CSB-II) is developed based on sampling covariance matrix, assuming spatially sparse and incoherent signals, and then examined using both simulations and aeroacoustic measurements. The simulation results clearly show that the proposed CSB-II method is robust to sensing noise. In addition, aeroacoustic tests of a landing gear model demonstrate the good performance in terms of resolution and sidelobe rejection.

  12. Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC) environmental data base review, evaluation, and upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Skalski, J.R.; Faulkner, L.L.; Rodman, C.W.; Carlile, D.W.; Ecker, R.M.; Nicholls, A.K.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, M.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report summarizes the principal issues of public concern, the adequacy of the environmental data base to answer the issues of concern, and the additional data collection required to support a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the proposed Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC). The report is based on a review of the readily available environmental literature and a site visit. Representatives of local, state, and federal agencies were also interviewed for their personal insights and concerns not discovered during the literature review.

  13. Estimating suspended solids concentrations from backscatter intensity measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler in San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The estimation of mass concentration of suspended solids is one of the properties needed to understand the characteristics of sediment transport in bays and estuaries. However, useful measurements or estimates of this property are often problematic when employing the usual methods of determination from collected water samples or optical sensors. Analysis of water samples tends to undersample the highly variable character of suspended solids, and optical sensors often become useless from biological fouling in highly productive regions. Acoustic sensors, such as acoustic Doppler current profilers that are now routinely used to measure water velocity, have been shown to hold promise as a means of quantitatively estimating suspended solids from acoustic backscatter intensity, a parameter used in velocity measurement. To further evaluate application of this technique using commercially available instruments, profiles of suspended solids concentrations are estimated from acoustic backscatter intensity recorded by 1200- and 2400-kHz broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers located at two sites in San Francisco Bay, California. ADCP backscatter intensity is calibrated using optical backscatterance data from an instrument located at a depth close to the ADCP transducers. In addition to losses from spherical spreading and water absorption, calculations of acoustic transmission losses account for attenuation from suspended sediment and correction for nonspherical spreading in the near field of the acoustic transducer. Acoustic estimates of suspended solids consisting of cohesive and noncohesive sediments are found to agree within about 8-10% (of the total range of concentration) to those values estimated by a second optical backscatterance sensor located at a depth further from the ADCP transducers. The success of this approach using commercially available Doppler profilers provides promise that this technique might be appropriate and useful under certain conditions in

  14. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  15. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments.

  16. In-Situ Measurement of Aerosol Light Absorption Using a Photo Acoustic Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, O.; Andreae, M. O.; Helas, G.; Guyon, P.; Sciare, J.; Arnott, W. P.

    2002-12-01

    A recently developed photo acoustic spectrometer (PAS) (Arnott et al., 1999) has been used for in-situ light absorption measurements on atmospheric aerosol. Measurement campaigns in the Mediterranean and Amazon regions demonstrated the viability of the PAS under field conditions and provided data on the absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosol generated by anthropogenic pollution and biomass burning, respectively. By operating the PAS in series with a nephelometer the scattering albedo of (dry) atmospheric aerosol was determined. Here we discuss the principle of the PAS, describe the calibration technique, and present some field data. Arnott, W. P., H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description, Atmos. Environ, 33, 2845-2852, 1999.

  17. Effects of Noise and Absorption on High Frequency Measurements of Acoustic-Backscatter from Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Furusawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative echosounders operating at multiple frequencies (e.g., 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, 333, and 710 kHz are often used to observe fish and zooplankton and identify their species. At frequencies above 100 kHz, the absorption attenuation increases rapidly and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Also, incomplete compensation for the attenuation may result in measurement error. This paper addresses the effects of the attenuation and noise on high frequency measurements of acoustic backscatter from fish. It is shown that measurements of a fish with target strength of −40 dB at 200 m depth are limited by SNR to frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz, absorption coefficients must be matched to local environmental conditions.

  18. Method and apparatus for background signal reduction in opto-acoustic absorption measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, L. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivity of an opto-acoustic absorption detector is increased to make it possible to measure trace amounts of constituent gases. A second beam radiation path is created through the sample cell identical to a first path except as to length, alternating the beam through the two paths and minimizing the detected pressure difference for the two paths while the beam wavelength is tuned away from the absorption lines of the sample. Then with the beam wavelength tuned to the absorption line of any constituent of interest, the pressure difference is a measure of trace amounts of the constituent. The same improved detector may also be used for measuring the absorption coefficient of known concentrations of absorbing gases.

  19. Feasibility of the left ventricular volume measurement by acoustic quantification method. Comparison with ultrafast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomimoto, Shigehiro; Nakatani, Satoshi; Tanaka, Norio; Uematsu, Masaaki; Beppu, Shintaro; Nagata, Seiki; Hamada, Seiki; Takamiya, Makoto; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic quantification (AQ: the real-time automated boundary detection system) allows instantaneous measurement of cardiac chamber volumes. The feasibility of this method was evaluated by comparing the left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with AQ to those derived from ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT), which enables accurate measurements of LV volumes even in the presence of LV asynergy, in 23 patients (8 with ischemic heart disease, 5 with cardiomyopathy, 3 with valvular heart disease). Both LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes obtained with the AQ method were in good agreement with those obtained with UFCT (y=1.04{chi}-16.9, r=0.95; y=0.87{chi}+15.7, r=0.91; respectively). AQ was reliable even in the presence of LV asynergy. Interobserver variability for the AQ measurement was 10.2%. AQ provides a new, clinically useful method for real-time accurate estimation of the left ventricular volume. (author).

  20. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelberg, Laurence J.; Hall, David G.

    1993-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements of the spinning acoustic mode structure in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) have been completed. These measurements were taken using a unique and previously untried method which was first proposed by T.G. Sofrin. A continuously rotating microphone system was employed. The ADP model was designed and built by Pratt & Whitney and tested in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot Anechoic Wind Tunnel. Three inlet configurations were tested with cut-on and cutoff stator vane sets. The cutoff stator was designed to suppress all modes at the blade passing frequency. Rotating rake measurements indicate that several extraneous circumferential modes were active. The mode orders suggest that their source was an interaction between the rotor and small interruptions in the casing tip treatment. The cut-on stator produced the expected circumferential modes plus higher levels of the unexpected modes seen with the cutoff stator.

  1. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  2. Investigation of An Acoustic Temperature Transducer and its Application for Heater Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.K. Alia

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in temperature measurement have encouraged researchers to develop low-cost, simple structure, computerized generic transducers for environmental monitoring and industrial process control. The research presents a computerized technique which allows to measure temperature according to the variation of acoustic velocity (frequency in a closed waveguide. Signal conditioning and processing was carried out using labVIEW (G Language VIs. In order to evaluate the time characteristic of the transducer its response was compared with that of a reference detector (PT 100 for the same step input. Static characteristics of the transducer show a quasi-linear relationship between the measured temperature and the resonance frequency. Results of practical experiments show that in order to improve the response curve of the transducer and decrease the rising time interval it is advisable to implement thin-wall glass tubes or another material with lower thermal impedance.

  3. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taviarides, Lawrence L.

    2005-06-01

    Our effort in this project is to develop an acoustic monitor for accurate, real-time characterization of the size and weight fractions of solids in slurries for process monitoring and to determine the optimal timing for slurry transfers. This capability will be valuable in the Savannah River Site accelerated clean-up program. Our scientific work during the first research period developed a theory, supported by experiments, to describe sound attenuation of solids in suspensions in the presence of bubbles, which permits us to determine the solid-liquid weight percent. Engineering developments during the second research period led to the design, construction, and demonstration, in our laboratories, of the Syracuse Acoustic Monitor (SAM) system that measures weight percent solids accurately in slurries of 0.5 to 8.0 weight percent on-line and in real-time. Also, we had shown the potential for these measurements in solid-gas-liquid slurries by removing the interference due to the presence of gas bubbles.

  4. A Novel Method to Measure Acoustic Power of Focusing Transducer with Spherical Surface Based on Self-Reciprocity Theorem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Shi-Mei; SHOU Wen-De; HE Pei-Zhong; QIAN De-Chu; XIA Rong-Min

    2005-01-01

    @@ A novel method to measure acoustic power of focusing transducer based on the self-reciprocity theorem of con vergent spherical acoustic wave is proposed. The performance of this reciprocity method is compared with that of the radiation force balance (RFB) method and the admittance circle method. The average deviations of the reciprocity method from RFB in measurements of the acoustic power and the radiation conductance for a focusing transducer of 1.525 MHz are 7.5% and 3.6% respectively, and for another focusing transducer of 5.27MHz,they are 1.7% and 1.1%. The measured radiation conductance deviation by the reciprocity method from the admittance circle method for the focusing transducer of 1.525 MHz is 7.9%. It presents encouraging results even in measuring low acoustic power level. The overall uncertainty of acoustic power measurement using the method is evaluated below 10%, and it has many advantages such as high signal-to-noise ratio, good stability and less interference of bubbles and environment.

  5. Acoustic measures of the abundance and size of pelagic planktivores in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Stephen B.; Mason, Doran M.; Patrick, E. Vincent; Argyle, Ray L.; Wells, L.; Unger, Philip A.; Stewart, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on acoustic data taken at night and vertically stratified by bottom depth (3–110 m only), the total number (± 95% Cl) of pelagic fishes in Lake Michigan was 43.4 ± 10.1 x 109 or 226.0 ± 55.2 kt in spring (mean density 0.7–3.8 fish·m-2 or 1.6–12.8 ga·m-2) and 115.8 ± 18.3 x 109 or 313.2 ± 74.3 kt in late summer, 1987 (mean density 1.1–7.0 fish·m-2 or 3.0–13.2 g·m-2); approximately 30% of this increase in numbers (35% of biomass) occurred within Green Bay. Abundance estimates from horizontally stratified (by water column depth) data were within 9-11% of vertically stratified estimates during spring but over 20% higher during summer. By extrapolation to all water depths, we estimated total pelagic biomass as 274.6 kt for spring and 410.8 kt for summer. During both seasons, smaller fishes were nearer to the surface and nearer shore than larger individuals, and acoustic measures of size approximated the sizes of fishes caught in trawls. Bioenergetic model simulations suggest that 60% of the available production of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) was either consumed by stocked salmonines (52.9%) or commercially harvested (7.1%) in 1987. Underwater acoustics proved a valuable tool for lakewide assessments of fish abundances in the Great Lakes.

  6. Acoustic Measurements for Determination of the Materials Damping Using A Sound Source Localisation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. G(o)ken; J. Swiostek; H. Hurdelbrink; U. Keil

    2013-01-01

    Noise measurements are especially a problem when the object under investigation is largely dimensioned and can only be measured from the distance.To obtain information about the location of noise generation,a measurement technique which makes sound visible in order to introduce further specific technical measures is advantageous.The question is if the time dependence of the signal got from such a non touching and non destructive acoustic method has the potential to calculate the materials damping from.Using a small sound source localization system (MicroflownTM probe),specimens of magnesium alloys with different grain sizes obtained by hydrostatic extrusion were investigated.It has been demonstrated that the fine grained microstructure led to a lower damping and its dependence on the strain was reduced.In this context,acoustic measurements by a sound source localisation system which makes materials characterization possible could be used as a quality tool to detect changes in highly stressed components.This approach allows to promote a selective substitution of conventional materials by more innovative ones.The offshore sector is considered to be a field of application:Wind turbines produce noise emission which stems mainly from turbulences at the tips of the rotor blades and vibrations of components inside the nacelle (e.g.gearbox,generator,…).If the vibration amplitudes are too high,microcracks of components can lead to failure over the long term.The monitoring of microstructural changes using a larger type of a sound source localisation system is considered as an innovative technical approach with respect to maintenance activities.

  7. Phased Acoustic Array Measurements of a 5.75 Percent Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Nathan J.; Horne, William C.; Elmer, Kevin R.; Cheng, Rui; Brusniak, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Detailed acoustic measurements of the noise from the leading-edge Krueger flap of a 5.75 percent Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft model were recently acquired with a traversing phased microphone array in the AEDC NFAC (Arnold Engineering Development Complex, National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The spatial resolution of the array was sufficient to distinguish between individual support brackets over the full-scale frequency range of 100 to 2875 Hertz. For conditions representative of landing and take-off configuration, the noise from the brackets dominated other sources near the leading edge. Inclusion of flight-like brackets for select conditions highlights the importance of including the correct number of leading-edge high-lift device brackets with sufficient scale and fidelity. These measurements will support the development of new predictive models.

  8. Measuring acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis using a simple and rapid light-intensity method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Iranmanesh, Ida; Wiklund, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and rapid method for measuring the acoustic energy density in microchannel acoustophoresis based on light-intensity measurements of a suspension of particles. The method relies on the assumption that each particle in the suspension undergoes single-particle acoustophoresis....... It is validated by the single-particle tracking method, and we show by proper re-scaling that the re-scaled light intensity plotted versus re-scaled time falls on a universal curve. The method allows for analysis of moderate-resolution images in the concentration range encountered in typical experiments......, and it is an attractive alternative to particle tracking and particle image velocimetry for quantifying acoustophoretic performance in microchannels....

  9. Digital image processing of sectorial oscillations for acoustically levitated drops and surface tension measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A type of non-axisymmetric oscillations of acoustically levitated drops is excited by modulating the ultrasound field at proper frequencies. These oscillations are recorded by a high speed camera and analyzed with a digital image processing method. They are demonstrated to be the third mode sectorial oscillations, and their frequencies are found to decrease with the increase of equatorial radius of the drops, which can be described by a modified Rayleigh equation. These oscillations decay exponentially after the cessation of ultrasound field modulation. The decaying rates agree reasonably with Lamb’s prediction. The rotating rate of the drops accompanying the shape oscillations is found to be less than 1.5 rounds per second. The surface tension of aqueous ethanol has been measured according to the modified Rayleigh equation. The results agree well with previous reports, which demonstrates the possible application of this kind of sectorial oscillations in noncontact measurement of liquid surface tension.

  10. Simultaneous surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurements: Electrodeposition and biological interactions monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Francis, L.; Reekmans, G.; De Palma, R.; Campitelli, A.; Sleytr, U. B.

    2004-02-01

    We present results from an instrument combining surface acoustic wave propagation and surface plasmon resonance measurements. The objective is to use two independent methods, the former based on adsorbed mass change measurements and the latter on surface dielectric properties variations, to identify physical properties of protein layers, and more specifically their water content. We display mass sensitivity calibration curves using electrodeposition of copper leading to a sensitivity in liquid of 150±15 cm2/g for the Love mode device used here, and the application to monitoring biological processes. The extraction of protein layer thickness and protein to water content ratio is also presented for S-layer proteins under investigation. We obtain, respectively, 4.7±0.7 nm and 75±15%.

  11. Implications for the thermal regime of acoustic noise measurements in Crater Lake, Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Hurst, A. W.; Poussielgue, N.

    1994-12-01

    Hydrophone measurements of acoustic noise levels in the Crater Lake of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand were made on 18 January 1991 from an inflatable rubber boat on the lake. The greatest sound pressures were recorded in the 1 10 Hz band, with sound levels generally decreasing about 20 dB per decade from 10 Hz to 80 kHz. The low frequency noise did not have an obvious relationship to the tremor observed at a seismic station within 1 km of the lake. The comparatively low levels of middle and high frequency sound meant that at the time of measurement, direct steam input did not make a significant contribution to the heating of Crater Lake. This is consistent with the earlier conclusion that during the last decade a major part of the heat input of Crater Lake has come from lake water that was heated below the lake and recycled back into the lake.

  12. Accelerometer measurements of acoustic-to-seismic coupling above buried objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith; Qin, Qin; Jefferis, Jonathan; Heald, Gary

    2007-12-01

    The surface velocity of sand inside a large PVC container, induced by the sound pressure from either a large loudspeaker radiating into an inverted cone and pipe or a Bruel and Kjaer point source loudspeaker mounted with its axis vertical, has been measured using accelerometers. Results of white noise and stepped frequency excitation are presented. Without any buried object the mass loading of an accelerometer creates resonances in the spectral ratio of sand surface velocity to incident acoustic pressure, i.e., the acoustic-to-seismic (A/S) admittance spectra. The A/S responses above a buried compliant object are larger and distinctive. The linear A/S admittance spectra in the presence of a buried electronic components box have been studied as a function of burial depth and sand state. The nonlinear responses above the buried box have been studied as a function of depth, sand state, and amplitude. Predictions of a modified one-dimensional lumped parameter model have been found to be consistent with the observed nonlinear responses. Also the modified model has been used to explain features of the A/S responses observed when using an accelerometer without any buried object.

  13. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Carbon Dioxide + Ethanol: Experimental Measurements with Acoustic Method and Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mehl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase behavior of systems composed by supercritical carbon dioxide and ethanol is of great interest, especially in the processes involving supercritical extraction in which ethanol is used as a cosolvent. The development of an apparatus, which is able to perform the measurements of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE at high pressure using a combination of the visual and the acoustic methods, was successful and was proven to be suited for determining the isothermal VLE data of this system. The acoustic method, based on the variation of the amplitude of an ultra-sound signal passing through a mixture during a phase transition, was applied to investigate the phase equilibria of the system carbon dioxide + ethanol at temperatures ranging from 298.2 K to 323.2 K and pressures from 3.0 MPa to 9.0 MPa. The VLE data were correlated with Peng-Robinson equation of state combined with two different mixing rules and the SAFT equations of state as well. The compositions calculated with the models are in good agreement with the experimental data for the isotherms evaluated.

  14. Galaxy Bias and its Effects on the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Kushal T; Eckel, Jonathan; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Metchnik, Marc; Pinto, Philip; Xu, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al (2009). For the less biased HOD models (b 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% \\pm 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at ne...

  15. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  16. Measuring the distance-redshift relation with the baryon acoustic oscillations of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Veropalumbo, Alfonso; Moscardini, Lauro; Moresco, Michele; Cimatti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the largest spectroscopic samples of galaxy clusters to date, and provide observational constraints on the distance-redshift relation from baryon acoustic oscillations. The cluster samples considered in this work have been extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at three median redshifts, $z=0.2$, $z=0.3$, and $z=0.5$. The number of objects is $12910$, $42215$, and $11816$, respectively. We detect the peak of baryon acoustic oscillations for all the three samples. The derived distance constraints are: $r_s/D_V(z=0.2)=0.18 \\pm 0.01$, $r_s/D_V(z=0.3)=0.124 \\pm 0.004$ and $r_s/D_V(z=0.5)=0.080 \\pm 0.002$. Combining these measurements, we obtain robust constraints on cosmological parameters. Our results are in agreement with the standard $\\Lambda$ cold dark matter model. Specifically, we constrain the Hubble constant in a $\\Lambda$CDM model, $H_0 = 64_{-9}^{+14} \\, \\mathrm{km} \\, \\mathrm{s}^{-1}\\mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}$, the density of curvature energy, in the $o\\Lambda$CDM context, $\\Omega_K = -0.015_{-0...

  17. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  18. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  19. High-Frequency CTD Measurements for Accurate GPS/acoustic Sea-floor Crustal Deformation Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, K.; Yasuda, K.; Taniguchi, S.; Uemura, Y.; Matsuhiro, K.

    2015-12-01

    The GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement system has developed as a useful tool to observe tectonic deformation especially at subduction zones. One of the factors preventing accurate GPS/acoustic sea-floor crustal deformation measurement is horizontal heterogeneity of sound speed in the ocean. It is therefore necessary to measure the gradient directly from sound speed structure. We report results of high-frequency CTD measurements using Underway CTD (UCTD) in the Kuroshio region. We perform the UCTD measurements on May 2nd, 2015 at two stations (TCA and TOA) above the sea-floor benchmarks installed across the Nankai Trough, off the south-east of Kii Peninsula, middle Japan. The number of measurement points is six at each station along circles with a diameter of 1.8 nautical miles around the sea-floor benchmark. The stations TCA and TOA are located on the edge and the interior of the Kuroshio current, respectively, judging from difference in sea water density measured at the two stations, as well as a satellite image of sea-surface temperature distribution. We detect a sound speed gradient of high speeds in the southern part and low speeds in the northern part at the two stations. At the TCA station, the gradient is noticeable down to 300 m in depth; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 5 m/s. The sound speed difference is as small as +/- 1.3 m/s at depths below 300 m, which causes seafloor benchmark positioning error as large as 1 m. At the TOA station, the gradient is extremely small down to 100 m in depth. The maximum difference in sound speed is less than +/- 0.3 m/s that is negligible small for seafloor benchmark positioning error. Clear gradient of high speed is observed to the depths; the maximum difference in sound speed is +/- 0.8-0.9 m/s, causing seafloor benchmark positioning error of several tens centimeters. The UCTD measurement is effective tool to detect sound speed gradient. We establish a method for accurate sea

  20. Validation of streamflow measurements made with M9 and RiverRay acoustic Doppler current profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Justin A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Surface Water (OSW) previously validated the use of Teledyne RD Instruments (TRDI) Rio Grande (in 2007), StreamPro (in 2006), and Broadband (in 1996) acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for streamflow (discharge) measurements made by the USGS. Two new ADCPs, the SonTek M9 and the TRDI RiverRay, were first used in the USGS Water Mission Area programs in 2009. Since 2009, the OSW and USGS Water Science Centers (WSCs) have been conducting field measurements as part of their stream-gaging program using these ADCPs. The purpose of this paper is to document the results of USGS OSW analyses for validation of M9 and RiverRay ADCP streamflow measurements. The OSW required each participating WSC to make comparison measurements over the range of operating conditions in which the instruments were used until sufficient measurements were available. The performance of these ADCPs was evaluated for validation and to identify any present and potential problems. Statistical analyses of streamflow measurements indicate that measurements made with the SonTek M9 ADCP using firmware 2.00–3.00 or the TRDI RiverRay ADCP using firmware 44.12–44.15 are unbiased, and therefore, can continue to be used to make streamflow measurements in the USGS stream-gaging program. However, for the M9 ADCP, there are some important issues to be considered in making future measurements. Possible future work may include additional validation of streamflow measurements made with these instruments from other locations in the United States and measurement validation using updated firmware and software.

  1. Measurement of Acoustic Intensity Distribution and Radiation Power of Flat-Plate Phased-Array Sound Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tomoki; Takahashi, Kumiko; Seki, Daizaburou; Hasegawa, Akio

    2002-05-01

    The acoustic intensity distribution and radiation power of a flat-plate phased-array sound source consisting of Tonpilz-type transducers were measured. This study shows that the active acoustic intensity is skewed in the direction of wave propagation. In addition, it clarifies that if the measurement is carried out in the immediate vicinity of the sound source, the reactive acoustic intensity distribution is effective for identifying the positions of the individual sound source elements. Experimental values of active radiation power agree well with theoretical values. Conversely, experimental values of reactive radiation power do not agree with theoretical values; it is clear that they fluctuate significantly with distance from the radiating surface. The reason for this is explained in the case of a point sound source.

  2. Structure of water + acetonitrile solutions from acoustic and positron annihilation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerie, Kazimierz [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland); Baranowski, Andrzej [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland); Koziol, Stan [Waters Corp., 34 Maple St., Milford, MA 01757 (United States); Glinski, Jacek [Faculty of Chemistry, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland)]. E-mail: glin@wchuwr.chem.uni.wroc.pl; Burakowski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of WrocIaw, WrocIaw (Poland)

    2005-03-14

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH{sub 3}CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. A new method of calculating the 'ideal' positronium lifetimes is proposed, based on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The results are almost identical with those obtained from molar volumes using the concept of Levay et al. On the other hand, the same calculations performed using the 'bubble' model of annihilation yield very different results. It seems that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  3. Structure of Aqueous Solutions of Acetonitrile Investigated by Acoustic and Positron Annihilation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerie, K.; Baranowski, A.; Koziol, S.; Burakowski, A.

    2005-05-01

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH3CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. The concept of Levay et al. of calculating the "ideal positronium lifetimes is applied, basing on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The same calculations performed using the Tao model of annihilation yield very different results. It can be concluded that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  4. Structure of water + acetonitrile solutions from acoustic and positron annihilation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerie, Kazimierz; Baranowski, Andrzej; Koziol, Stan; Gliński, Jacek; Burakowski, Andrzej

    2005-03-01

    We report the results of acoustic and positron annihilation measurements in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (CH 3CN). Hydrophobicity of the solute is discussed, as well as the possibility of describing the title system in terms of hydrophobic solvation. A new method of calculating the "ideal" positronium lifetimes is proposed, based on the mean volume of cavities (holes) in liquid structure available for positronium pseudoatom. The results are almost identical with those obtained from molar volumes using the concept of Levay et al. On the other hand, the same calculations performed using the "bubble" model of annihilation yield very different results. It seems that either acetonitrile forms with water clathrate-like hydrates of untypical architecture, or it is too weak hydrophobic agent to form clathrate-like hydrates at all. The former interpretation seems to be more probable.

  5. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Ni, Qingwen; Collier, Hughbert A.

    2000-09-22

    This report contains eight sections. Some individual subsections contain lists of references as well as figures and conclusions when appropriate. The first section includes the introduction and summary of the first-year project efforts. The next section describes the results of the project tasks: (1) implementation of theoretical relations between effect dispersion and the stochastic medium, (2) imaging analyses using core and well log data, (3) construction of dispersion and attenuation models at the core and borehole scales in poroelastic media, (4) petrophysics and a catalog of core and well log data from Siberia Ridge field, (5) acoustic/geotechnical measurements and CT imaging of core samples from Florida carbonates, and (6) development of an algorithm to predict pore size distribution from NMR core data. The last section includes a summary of accomplishments, technology transfer activities and follow-on work for Phase II.

  6. Comparison of shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler and moored current measurements in the Equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereskin, T. K.; Regier, L. A.; Halpern, D.

    1987-01-01

    Depth-averaged current shears computed from shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and moored Savonius rotor and vane vector-averaging current meter (VACM) measurements are compared at 35, 62.5, 100 and 140 m depths within 7 km of each other near 0 deg, 140 deg W during a 12-day interval in November 1984. The agreement between the VACM and ADCP shears was excellent. The average root-mean-square difference of hourly shear values was small, approximately 0.0021/s, and the average correlation coefficient was 0.90. Spectral estimates were equivalent to within a 95 percent significance level and the VACM and ADCP shears were 95 percent statistically coherent with zero phase difference for frequencies below 0.2 cycles per hour.

  7. Measurement of porcine haptoglobin in meat juice using surface acoustic wave biosensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Thorsten N; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Perpeet, Markus; Plattes, Susanne; Petersen, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Aim of the study was the application of biosensor technique to measure the concentration of an acute phase protein (APP) within complex matrices from animal origin. For the first time, acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) was detected from unpurified meat juice of slaughter pigs by a label-free biosensor-system, the SAW-based sam®5 system. The system uses a sensor chip with specific antibodies to catch Hp while the mass-related phase shift is measured. The concentration is calculated as a function of these measured phase shifts. The results correlate very well with reference measurement results obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), R=0.98. The robust setup of the surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based system and its ability to measure within very short time periods qualifies it for large-scale analyses and is apt to identify rapidly pigs in the meat production process whose consumption would have an increased risk for consumers.

  8. DIASCoPE: Directly integrated acoustic system combined with pressure experiments—A new method for fast acoustic velocity measurements at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Matthew L.; Baldwin, Kenneth J.; Huebsch, William R.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental system to measure elastic wave velocities in samples in situ under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature in a multi-anvil apparatus has been installed at Beamline 6-BM-B of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This system allows for measurement of acoustic velocities via ultrasonic interferometry, and makes use of the synchrotron beam to measure sample densities via X-ray diffraction and sample lengths using X-radiographic imaging. This system is fully integrated into the automated software controls of the beamline and is capable of collecting robust data on elastic wave travel times in less than 1 s, which is an improvement of more than one to two orders of magnitude over existing systems. Moreover, this fast data collection time has been shown to have no effect on the obtained travel time results. This allows for more careful study of time-dependent phenomena with tighter snapshots in time of processes that would otherwise be lost or averaged out in other acoustic measurement systems.

  9. Measurement of the open porosity of agricultural soils with acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Jeanne; Mercatoris, Benoit; Destain, Marie-France

    2015-04-01

    soil, since there are more voids filled with air and water, increasing the viscous losses. Fellah et al. (2003) showed that porosity can be determined from phase speed and reflection coefficient. The propagation of acoustic waves in soil is investigated to develop a rapid method for the quantification of the porosity level of agricultural soils. In the present contribution, correlations are determined between the acoustic signatures of agricultural soil in function of its structural properties. In laboratory, compression tests are performed on unsaturated soil samples to reproduce different porosity levels. Ultrasonic pulses are sent through the considered samples. The propagated signals are treated in both time and frequency domains in order to determine the speed of the phase velocity and the reflection. Porosity is then determined and compared with water content measured by gravimetric method. Alaoui, A., Lipiec, J. & Gerke, H.H., 2011. A review of the changes in the soil pore system due to soil deformation: A hydrodynamic perspective. Soil and Tillage Research, 115-116, pp.1-15. Fellah Z.E.A., Berger S., Lauriks W., Depollier C., Aristegui C., Chapelon J.Y., 2003. Measuring the porosity and the tortuosity of porous materials via reflected waves at oblique incidence. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113 (5), pp 2424-2433 Hamza, M.A. & Anderson, W.K., 2005. Soil compaction in cropping systems. Soil and Tillage Research, 82(2), pp.121-145. Lu, Z., 2005. Role of hysteresis in propagating acousitcs waves in soils. Geophysical Research Letter, pp.32:1-4. Lu, Z., Hickey, C.J. & Sabatier, J.M., 2004. Effects of compaction on the acoustic velocity in soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 68(1), pp.7-16. Lu, Z. & Sabatier, J.M., 2009. Effects of soil water potential and moisture content on sound speed. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 73(5), pp.1614-1625. Le Maitre, D.C., Kotzee, I.M. & O'Farrell, P.J., 2014. Impacts of land-cover change on

  10. Acoustic backscattering by deepwater fish measured in situ from a manned submersible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Kelley, Christopher D.; Taylor, Christopher

    2003-02-01

    An outstanding problem in fisheries acoustics is the depth dependence of scattering characteristics of swimbladder-bearing fish, and the effects of pressure on the target strength of physoclistous fish remain unresolved. In situ echoes from deepwater snappers were obtained with a sonar transducer mounted on a manned submersible next to a low-light video camera, permitting simultaneous echo recording and identification of species, fish size and orientation. The sonar system, consisting of a transducer, single board computer, hard disk, and analog-to-digital converter, used a 80 μs, broadband signal (bandwidth 35 kHz, center frequency 120 kHz). The observed relationship between fish length and in situ target strength shows no difference from the relationship measured at the surface. No differences in the species-specific temporal echo characteristics were observed between surface and in situ measures. This indicates that the size and shape of the snappers' swimbladders are maintained both at the surface and at depths of up to 250 m. Information obtained through controlled backscatter measurements of tethered, anesthetized fish at the surface can be applied to free-swimming fish at depth. This is the first published account of the use of a manned submersible to measure in situ scattering from identified, individual animals with known orientations. The distinct advantage of this technique compared with other in situ techniques is the ability to observe the target fish, obtaining accurate species, size, and orientation information.

  11. Measurements of high-frequency acoustic scattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Derek R; Sæbo, Torstein

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of acoustic backscattering from glacially-eroded rock outcrops were made off the coast of Sandefjord, Norway using a high-frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) system. A method by which scattering strength can be estimated from data collected by a SAS system is detailed, as well as a method to estimate an effective calibration parameter for the system. Scattering strength measurements from very smooth areas of the rock outcrops agree with predictions from both the small-slope approximation and perturbation theory, and range between -33 and -26 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Scattering strength measurements from very rough areas of the rock outcrops agree with the sine-squared shape of the empirical Lambertian model and fall between -30 and -20 dB at 20$^\\circ$ grazing angle. Both perturbation theory and the small-slope approximation are expected to be inaccurate for the very rough area, and overestimate scattering strength by 8 dB or more for all measurements of very rough surfaces. Supportin...

  12. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, D.S.; Wagner, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment on or near the streambed, and is an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. The integration of a differentially corrected global positioning system (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias, based on the closure error resulting from a two-way crossing of the river, is presented. The uncertainty in the mean moving-bed velocity measured by the loop method is shown to be approximately 0.6cm/s. For the 13 field measurements presented, the loop method resulted in corrected discharges that were within 5% of discharges measured utilizing DGPS to compensate for moving-bed conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  13. Evaluation of photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzer in measuring concentrations of greenhouse gases emitted from feedlot soil/manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzers (PIMAs) are being increasingly utilized to measure concentrations and fluxes of greenhouse gases (i.e., N2O, CO2, and CH4) at the soil surface because of their low cost, portability, and ease of operation. This research evaluated a PIMA in combination with ...

  14. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  15. A Correction of Random Incidence Absorption Coefficients for the Angular Distribution of Acoustic Energy under Measurement Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Most acoustic measurements are based on an assumption of ideal conditions. One such ideal condition is a diffuse and reverberant field. In practice, a perfectly diffuse sound field cannot be achieved in a reverberation chamber. Uneven incident energy density under measurement conditions can cause...... discrepancies between the measured value and the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient. Therefore the angular distribution of the incident acoustic energy onto an absorber sample should be taken into account. The angular distribution of the incident energy density was simulated using the beam...... the theoretical absorption coefficient and the reverberation room measurement. The angle-weighted absorption coefficient, together with the size correction, agrees satisfactorily with the measured absorption data by the reverberation chamber method. At high frequencies and for large samples, the averaged...

  16. Quasi-residual strain and moduli measurements in materials using embedded acoustic waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Ronald T.; Sanjana, Zal N.; Raju, Basavaraju B.

    1996-11-01

    Following the processing and manufacture of resin and composite parts and during their lifetime, the distribution of internal residual strain and any variations in moduli are generally unknown. Real-time information on these parameters would be valuable for improving material performance and reliability. It is believed that measurements related to material residual stresses or strain and moduli can be obtained by measuring the longitudinal wave velocities within acoustic waveguides (AWG) embedded within a material. The concept is that the wave velocities within embedded AWG are related to the material bulk modulus, density and Poisson's Ratio which are all in some degree related to the material state of cure, and finally the internal residual stresses. Based on this concept it is shown that the AWG of different diameters embedded within the same resin part of uniform internal stress distribution, the AWG wave velocities should vary in relation to the square root of the AWG diameter. Experimental results using AWG of 5, 10, 16, 20, 40 and 62 mil diameter Nichrome embedded within Shell 815 clear resin with optically measured uniform strain, demonstrate a direct relationship between AWG velocities and the square root of the AWG diameter. Consequently, it is reasoned that for a part with several embedded AWG, each of the same diameter, then differences in the AWG velocities would yield information on differences in the residual strain and moduli within the part.

  17. A novel acoustic method for gas flow measurement using correlation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuuttila, M. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Industrial Physics

    1997-12-31

    The study demonstrates a new kind of acoustic method for gas flow measurement. The method uses upstream and downstream propagating low frequency plane wave and correlation techniques for volume flow rate determination. The theory of propagating low frequency plane waves in the pipe is introduced and is proved empirically to be applicable for flow measurement. The flow profile dependence of the method is verified and found to be negligible at least in the region of moderate perturbations. The physical principles of the method were applied in practice in the form of a flowmeter with new design concepts. The developed prototype meters were verified against the reference standard of NMI (Nederlands Meetinstituut), which showed that a wide dynamic range of 1:80 is achievable with total expanded uncertainty below 0.3 %. Also the requirements used for turbine meters of linearity, weighted mean error and stability were shown to be well fulfilled. A brief comparison with other flowmeter types shows the new flowmeter to be competitive. The advantages it offers are a small pressure drop over the meter, no blockage of flow in possible malfunction, no pulsation to flow, essentially no moving parts, and the possibility for bidirectional measurements. The introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the telephone network or a radio-modem to read the consumption of gas and report its operation to the user. (orig.) 51 refs.

  18. Absorption measurement of acoustic materials using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlanduit, Steve; Vanherzeele, Joris; Guillaume, Patrick; de Sitter, Gert

    2005-03-01

    In this article a method is proposed to estimate the normal incidence reflection ratio and absorption coefficient of acoustical materials using measurements in a transparent tube excited with a loudspeaker and terminated with the material under investigation. The waveforms are measured at different locations in the tube using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Because the measurement probe (i.e., the laser beam) does not interfere with the wave in the tube, narrow tubes can be used. This means that-in contrast to the standardized wide tube tests using microphones-the proposed experiment could be used for high frequencies (in the paper an 8 mm tube was used, resulting in a 25 kHz upper frequency limit). It is shown based on theoretically known scenarios (i.e., an open tube and a rigid termination) that the absorption coefficient can be obtained with an error of about three percent. In addition, the absorption coefficient of two commonly used absorption materials-glass fiber wool and carpet-were determined and found to be in good agreement with material databases. .

  19. Fiber-optic sensor-based remote acoustic emission measurement of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Wu, Qi; Shigeta, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection functioning at high temperatures could clarify the damage process in high heat-resistant composites. To achieve the high-temperature AE detection, a remote AE measurement based on a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) sensor with a high sensitivity over a broad bandwidth was proposed. The common optical fibers were made from glass with good heat resistance. Hence, in this method, optical fiber was used as the waveguide to propagate the AE in the composite from a high-temperature environment to the room-temperature environment wherein the PS-FBG was located. Owing to the special AE detection configuration, this method was a new adhesive method for remote measurement (ADRM). The experiment and numerical simulation revealed that the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration demonstrated accurate remote sensing for the AE signals. This was because of the good waveguide system provided by the thin optical fiber and the sensitivity of the PS-FBG sensor to the axial strain in the core of the fiber. Consequently, the remote measurement utilizing the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration has a high potential for AE detection in high-temperature conditions.

  20. A New Method to Identify Quaternary Moraine:Acoustic Emission Stress Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhizhong; QIAO Yansong; TIAN Jiaorong; WANG Min; LI Mingze; HE Peiyuan; QIAN Fang

    2006-01-01

    How to effectively identify glacial sediments, especially Quaternary moraine, has been in dispute for decades. The traditional methods, e.g., sedimentary and geomorphologic ones, are facing challenge in eastern China where controversial moraine deposits are dominatingly distributed. Here,for the first time, we introduce the acoustic emission (AE) stress measurement, a kind of historical stress measurement, to identify Quaternary moraine. The results demonstrate that it can be employed to reconstruct stress information of glaciation remaining in gravels, and may shed light on the identification of Quaternary moraine in eastern China. First, we measured the AE stress of gravels of glacial origin that are underlying the Xidatan Glacier, eastern Kunlun Mountains in western China.Second, we calculated the stress according to the actual thickness of the glacier. The almost identical stress values suggest that the glacial gravels can memorize and preserve the overlying glacier-derived aplomb stress. And then we introduce this new approach to the controversial moraine in Mount Lushan, eastern China. The results indicate that the stress is attributed to the Quaternary glacier, and the muddy gravels in the controversial moraine in Mount Lushan are moraine deposits but not others.

  1. Scattering Matrix for the Interaction between Solar Acoustic Waves and Sunspots. I. Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Hsu; Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Assessing the interaction between solar acoustic waves and sunspots is a scattering problem. The scattering matrix elements are the most commonly used measured quantities to describe scattering problems. We use the wavefunctions of scattered waves of NOAAs 11084 and 11092 measured in the previous study to compute the scattering matrix elements, with plane waves as the basis. The measured scattered wavefunction is from the incident wave of radial order n to the wave of another radial order n‧, for n=0{--}5. For a time-independent sunspot, there is no mode mixing between different frequencies. An incident mode is scattered into various modes with different wavenumbers but the same frequency. Working in the frequency domain, we have the individual incident plane-wave mode, which is scattered into various plane-wave modes with the same frequency. This allows us to compute the scattering matrix element between two plane-wave modes for each frequency. Each scattering matrix element is a complex number, representing the transition from the incident mode to another mode. The amplitudes of diagonal elements are larger than those of the off-diagonal elements. The amplitude and phase of the off-diagonal elements are detectable only for n-1≤slant n\\prime ≤slant n+1 and -3{{Δ }}k≤slant δ {k}x≤slant 3{{Δ }}k, where δ {k}x is the change in the transverse component of the wavenumber and Δk = 0.035 rad Mm‑1.

  2. A novel acoustic method for gas flow measurement using correlation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Matti Tapani

    The study demonstrates a new kind of acoustic method for gas flow measurement. The method uses upstream and downstream propagating low frequency plane wave and correlation techniques for volume flow rate determination. The theory of propagating low frequency plane waves in the pipe is introduced and is proved empirically to be applicable for flow measurement. The flow profile dependence of the method is verified and found to be negligible at least in the region of moderate perturbations. The physical principles of the method were applied in practice in the form of a flowmeter with new design concepts. The developed prototype meters were verified against the reference standard of NMI (Nederlands Meetinstituut), which showed that a wide dynamic range of 1:80 is achievable with total expanded uncertainty below 0.3%. Also the requirements used for turbine meters of linearity, weighted mean error and stability were shown to be well fulfilled. A brief comparison with other flowmeter types shows the new flowmeter to be competitive. The advantages it offers are a small pressure drop over the meter, no blockage of flow in possible malfunction, no pulsation to flow, essentially no moving parts, and the possibility for bidirectional measurements. The introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the telephone network or a radio-modem to read the consumption of gas and report its operation to the user.

  3. Measurements of shock-induced guided and surface acoustic waves along boreholes in poroelastic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic experiments on the propagation of guided waves along water-filled boreholes in water-saturated porous materials are reported. The experiments were conducted using a shock tube technique. An acoustic funnel structure was placed inside the tube just above the sample in order to enhance the ex

  4. Numerical simulation and measurements of acoustic transmissions from Heard Island to the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Saran, A.K.; Murty, C.S.

    Simulated acoustic propagation showed a gradual deepening of the ray paths from the southern ocean towards tropics. Also the axis of the sound channel deepens from 150 m to 1600 m. Sudden jumps were noticed in the acoustic ray paths in the vicinity...

  5. Apparatus for measurement of acoustic wave propagation under uniaxial loading with application to measurement of third-order elastic constants of piezoelectric single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, J A; Karim, Md Afzalul

    2013-05-01

    We describe an apparatus for the measurement of acoustic wave propagation under uniaxial loading featuring a special mechanism designed to assure a uniform mechanical load on a cube-shaped sample of piezoelectric material. We demonstrate the utility of the apparatus by determining the effects of stresses on acoustic wave speed, which forms a foundation for the final determination of the third-order elastic constants of langasite and langatate single crystals. The transit time method is used to determine changes in acoustic wave velocity as the loading is varied. In order to minimize error and improve the accuracy of the wave speed measurements, the cross correlation method is used to determine the small changes in the time of flight. Typical experimental results are presented and discussed.

  6. Effects of measurement procedure and equipment on average room acoustic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Bradley, J S; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    . In some of the halls measurements were repeated using the procedures of the other teams to make it possible to separate the effects of different equipment and different procedures. The paper will present position-averaged results from the three teams and will discuss reasons for the differences observed...

  7. An assessment of the FlowCapt acoustic sensor for measuring snowdrift in the Indian Himalayas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Das; P Datt; A Acharya

    2012-12-01

    Wind caused snow drifting plays a dominant role in the redistribution of snow mass that restructures a snowpack. Strong wind activity at the mountain tops results in uneven distribution of snow with erosion on windward side and deposition on leeward areas. Such snowdrift events are responsible for the formation of cornices, increase in the loading of avalanche release zones on the leeward side and consequent increase in the level of avalanche hazard. In this paper, we present the results of snowdrift measurement using an acoustic snow-drift meter, the FlowCapt, built by IAV Engineering, which was used during winter seasons of 2007–2010 at a field research station of Snow and Avalanche Study Establishment (SASE) in the western Himalayas. The aim of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the instrument in measuring snowdrift in the Himalayan weather conditions. Results proved the utility of the instrument as a useful tool to study drifting snow in remote areas. However, in the absence of conventional snow gauges for validation, the quality of the absolute snow flux data could not be ascertained.

  8. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements in coastal and estuarine environments: examples from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewetzer, Silke F. K.; Duck, Robert W.; Anderson, James M.

    1999-08-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a means to measure the components of water current velocities in three dimensions. Such instruments have been used widely by the oil industry in deep offshore waters but their application to nearshore coastal and estuarine environments has been principally confined to the USA. Using examples of ADCP datasets acquired from the macrotidal Tay Estuary, eastern Scotland, the principles of field deployment, data acquisition and forms of output are critically summarised. It is shown, for the first time in the Tay Estuary, that vertical current velocities are significant and are particularly so in downwelling zones associated with the development and passage of axially convergent tidal fronts. The improved understanding of three-dimensional water and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal and estuarine waters is crucial to, inter alia, the sustainable management of effluent discharges and, in more general terms, it is predicted on the basis of the Tay case study, that ADCP measurements afford significant opportunities to refine understanding of geomorphological processes in a variety of aquatic environments worldwide.

  9. Development of an Acoustic Sensor On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Ariessohn

    2008-06-30

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. Following the completion of the initial 3 year project, several continuations

  10. Advances in Fast-response Acoustically Derived Air-temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoev, I.; Jacobsen, L.; Horst, T. W.; Conrad, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity.The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  11. Analogies between the measurement of acoustic impedance via the reaction on the source method and the automatic microwave vector network analyzer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, James; Sutton, Robert; Post, John

    2003-10-01

    One useful method of acoustic impedance measurement involves the measurement of the electrical impedance ``looking into'' the electrical port of a reciprocal electroacoustic transducer. This reaction on the source method greatly facilitates the measurement of acoustic impedance by borrowing highly refined techniques to measure electrical impedance. It is also well suited for in situ acoustic impedance measurements. In order to accurately determine acoustic impedance from the measured electrical impedance, the characteristics of the transducer must be accurately known, i.e., the characteristics of the transducer must be ``removed'' completely from the data. The measurement of acoustic impedance via the measurement of the reaction on the source is analogous to modern microwave measurements made with an automatic vector network analyzer. The action of the analyzer is described as de-embedding the desired data (such as acoustic impedance) from the raw data. Such measurements are fundamentally substitution measurements in that the transducer's characteristics are determined by measuring a set of reference standards. The reaction on the source method is extended to take advantage of improvements in microwave measurement techniques which allow calibration via imperfect standard loads. This removes one of the principal weaknesses of the method in that the requirement of high-quality reference standards is relaxed.

  12. Acoustic Emission Measurement with Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structure Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Walker, James L.; Russell, Sam; Roth, Don; Mabry, Nehemiah; Wilson, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Structural Health monitoring (SHM) is a way of detecting and assessing damage to large scale structures. Sensors used in SHM for aerospace structures provide real time data on new and propagating damage. One type of sensor that is typically used is an acoustic emission (AE) sensor that detects the acoustic emissions given off from a material cracking or breaking. The use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to provide acoustic emission data for damage detection is studied. In this research, FBG sensors are used to detect acoustic emissions of a material during a tensile test. FBG sensors were placed as a strain sensor (oriented parallel to applied force) and as an AE sensor (oriented perpendicular to applied force). A traditional AE transducer was used to collect AE data to compare with the FBG data. Preliminary results show that AE with FBGs can be a viable alternative to traditional AE sensors.

  13. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Mazumdar, A; Ballot, J; Antia, H M; Basu, S; Houdek, G; Mathur, S; Cunha, M S; Aguirre, V Silva; Garcia, R A; Salabert, D; Verner, G A; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Metcalfe, T S; Sanderfer, D T; Seader, S E; Smith, J C; Chaplin, W J

    2013-01-01

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results ...

  14. Comparison of multimicrophone probe design and processing methods in measuring acoustic intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Curtis P; Gee, Kent L; Blotter, Jonathan D; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Giraud, Jarom H

    2014-05-01

    Three multimicrophone probe arrangements used to measure acoustic intensity are the four-microphone regular tetrahedral, the four-microphone orthogonal, and the six-microphone designs. Finite-sum and finite-difference processing methods can be used with such probes to estimate pressure and particle velocity, respectively. A numerical analysis is performed to investigate the bias inherent in each combination of probe design and processing method. Probes consisting of matched point sensor microphones both embedded and not embedded on the surface of a rigid sphere are considered. Results are given for plane wave fields in terms of root-mean-square average bias and maximum bias as a function of angle of incidence. An experimental verification of the analysis model is described. Of the combinations considered and under the stated conditions, the orthogonal probe using the origin microphone for the pressure estimate is shown to have the lowest amount of intensity magnitude bias. Lowest intensity direction bias comes from the six-microphone probe using an average of the 15 intensity components calculated using all microphone pairs. Also discussed are how multimicrophone probes can advantageously use correction factors calculated from a numerical analysis and how the results of such an analysis depend on the chosen definition of the dimensionless frequency.

  15. Measuring the 2D Baryon Acoustic Oscillation signal of galaxies in WiggleZ: Cosmological constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Hinton, Samuel R; Davis, Tamara M; Blake, Chris; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J; Drinkwater, Michael J; Glazebrook, Karl; Jurek, Russel J; Parkinson, David; Pimbblet, Kevin A; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Woods, David

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the 2D anisotropic Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal present in the final dataset from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We analyse the WiggleZ data in two ways: firstly using the full shape of the 2D correlation function and secondly focussing only on the position of the BAO peak in the reconstructed data set. When fitting for the full shape of the 2D correlation function we use a multipole expansion to compare with theory. When we use the reconstructed data we marginalise over the shape and just measure the position of the BAO peak, analysing the data in wedges separating the signal along the line of sight from that parallel to the line of sight. We verify our method with mock data and find the results to be free of bias or systematic offsets. We also redo the pre-reconstruction angle averaged (1D) WiggleZ BAO analysis with an improved covariance and present an updated result. The final results are presented in the form of $\\Omega_c h^2$, $H(z)$, and $D_A(z)$ for three redshift ...

  16. Measuring the 2D baryon acoustic oscillation signal of galaxies in WiggleZ: cosmological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Samuel R.; Kazin, Eyal; Davis, Tamara M.; Blake, Chris; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jurek, Russell J.; Parkinson, David; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Poole, Gregory B.; Pracy, Michael; Woods, David

    2017-02-01

    We present results from the 2D anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal present in the final data set from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We analyse the WiggleZ data in two ways: first using the full shape of the 2D correlation function and secondly focusing only on the position of the BAO peak in the reconstructed data set. When fitting for the full shape of the 2D correlation function we use a multipole expansion to compare with theory. When we use the reconstructed data we marginalize over the shape and just measure the position of the BAO peak, analysing the data in wedges separating the signal along the line of sight from that parallel to the line of sight. We verify our method with mock data and find the results to be free of bias or systematic offsets. We also redo the pre-reconstruction angle-averaged (1D) WiggleZ BAO analysis with an improved covariance and present an updated result. The final results are presented in the form of Ωc h2, H(z), and DA(z) for three redshift bins with effective redshifts z = 0.44, 0.60, and 0.73. Within these bins and methodologies, we recover constraints between 5 and 22 per cent error. Our cosmological constraints are consistent with flat ΛCDM cosmology and agree with results from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey.

  17. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: design/operation/preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J L; Marston, T M; Lee, K; Lopes, J L; Lim, R

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  18. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake - Data collection/analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  19. Acoustic mode measurements in the inlet of a model turbofan using a continuously rotating rake: Data collection/analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David G.; Heidelberg, Laurence; Konno, Kevin

    1993-01-01

    The rotating microphone measurement technique and data analysis procedures are documented which are used to determine circumferential and radial acoustic mode content in the inlet of the Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) model. Circumferential acoustic mode levels were measured at a series of radial locations using the Doppler frequency shift produced by a rotating inlet microphone probe. Radial mode content was then computed using a least squares curve fit with the measured radial distribution for each circumferential mode. The rotating microphone technique is superior to fixed-probe techniques because it results in minimal interference with the acoustic modes generated by rotor-stator interaction. This effort represents the first experimental implementation of a measuring technique developed by T. G. Sofrin. Testing was performed in the NASA Lewis Low Speed Anechoic Wind Tunnel at a simulated takeoff condition of Mach 0.2. The design is included of the data analysis software and the performance of the rotating rake apparatus. The effect of experiment errors is also discussed.

  20. The use of waveguide acoustic probes for void fraction measurement in the evaporator of BN-350-Type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, V.I.; Nigmatulin, B.I.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper deals with some results of the experimental studies which have been carried out to investigate the steam generation dynamics in the Field tubes of sodium-water evaporators used in the BN-350 reactors. The void fraction measurements have been taken with the aid of waveguide acoustic transducers manufactured in accordance with a specially designed technology (waveguide acoustic transducers-WAT technology). Presented in this paper also the transducer design and calibration methods, as well as the diagram showing transducers arrengment in the evaporator. The transducers under test featured a waveguide of about 4 m in length and a 200-mm long sensitive element (probe). Besides, this paper specifies the void fraction data obtained through measurements in diverse points of the evaporator. The studies revealed that the period of observed fluctuations in the void fraction amounted to few seconds and was largely dependent on the level of water in the evaporator.

  1. Acoustic and perceptual parameters relating to connected speech are more reliable measures of hoarseness than parameters relating to sustained vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberstam, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    This report investigates the correlations between acoustic parameters and the perception of hoarseness by trained listeners. Both sustained vowels and connected speech were examined. Fourteen acoustic parameters from samples of sustained vowels and 2 from connected speech were measured. The results show that jitter, shimmer and cepstral peak prominence (CPP) are correlated with the perception of hoarseness in sustained vowels. CPP is strongly correlated with the perception of hoarseness in connected speech. Some evidence is seen that perception of hoarseness in connected speech is more valid than the perception of hoarseness in sustained vowels. It is concluded that CPP for connected speech is a more valid objective measure of hoarseness than jitter, shimmer or CPP for sustained vowels and that perception of hoarseness may be most accurate in connected speech, rather than isolated vowels.

  2. Preclinical evaluation of acoustic radiation force impulse measurements in regions of heterogeneous elasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerieth, Katharina; Moog, Philipp; Vo-Cong, Minh-Truc; Heemann, Uwe [Nephrology Department, Klinikum Rechts der Isar of the Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Gassmann, Bernhard [Meso International GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Wagenpfeil, Stefan [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University, Campus Homburg (Saar), Homburg (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability of ultrasound-based shear wave elastography in regions of homogeneous versus heterogeneous elasticity by using two different probes. Using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, we measured the shear wave velocity (SWV) in different lesions of an elastography phantom with the convex {sub 4}C{sub 1} probe and the linear {sub 9}L{sub 4} probe. The region of interest (ROI) was positioned in such a way that it was partly filled by one of the lesions (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) and partly by the background of the phantom (100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 0%, respectively). The success rate was 98.5%. The measured value and the reference value of SWV correlated significantly (r=0.89, P<0.001). Further, a comparison of the two probes revealed that there was no statistical difference in either the mean or the variance values. However, the deviation of SWV from the reference was higher in the case of the {sub 9}L{sub 4} probe than in the case of the {sub 4}C{sub 1} probe, both overall and in measurements in which the ROI contained structures of different elasticity (P=0.021 and P=0.002). Taking into account all data, for both probes, we found that there was a greater spread and deviation of the SWV from the reference value when the ROI was positioned in structures having different elastic properties (standard deviation, 0.02±0.01 m/sec vs. 0.04±0.04 m/sec; P=0.010; deviation from the reference value, 0.21±0.12 m/sec vs. 0.38±0.27 m/sec; P=0.050). Quantitative ARFI elastography was achievable in structures of different elasticity; however, the validity and the reliability of the SWV measurements decreased in comparison to those of the measurements performed in structures of homogeneous elasticity. Therefore, a convex probe is preferred for examining heterogeneous structures.

  3. Measurement of acoustic glitches in solar-type stars from oscillation frequencies observed by Kepler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumdar, A. [Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, TIFR, V. N. Purav Marg, Mankhurd, Mumbai 400088 (India); Monteiro, M. J. P. F. G.; Cunha, M. S. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Ballot, J. [CNRS, Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, S. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 065208101 (United States); Houdek, G.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Metcalfe, T. S. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Mathur, S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); García, R. A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAp, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Salabert, D. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, F-06304 Nice (France); Verner, G. A.; Chaplin, W. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sanderfer, D. T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Seader, S. E.; Smith, J. C. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    For the very best and brightest asteroseismic solar-type targets observed by Kepler, the frequency precision is sufficient to determine the acoustic depths of the surface convective layer and the helium ionization zone. Such sharp features inside the acoustic cavity of the star, which we call acoustic glitches, create small oscillatory deviations from the uniform spacing of frequencies in a sequence of oscillation modes with the same spherical harmonic degree. We use these oscillatory signals to determine the acoustic locations of such features in 19 solar-type stars observed by the Kepler mission. Four independent groups of researchers utilized the oscillation frequencies themselves, the second differences of the frequencies and the ratio of the small and large separation to locate the base of the convection zone and the second helium ionization zone. Despite the significantly different methods of analysis, good agreement was found between the results of these four groups, barring a few cases. These results also agree reasonably well with the locations of these layers in representative models of the stars. These results firmly establish the presence of the oscillatory signals in the asteroseismic data and the viability of several techniques to determine the location of acoustic glitches inside stars.

  4. Continuous measurements of suspended sediment loads using dual frequency acoustic Doppler profile signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Alessandro; Guerrero, Massimo; Rüther, Nils; Stokseth, Siri

    2016-04-01

    A huge thread to Hydropower plants (HPP) is incoming sediments in suspension from the rivers upstream. The sediments settle in the reservoir and reduce the effective head as well as the volume and reduce consequently the lifetime of the reservoir. In addition are the fine sediments causing severe damages to turbines and infrastructure of a HPP. For estimating the amount of in-coming sediments in suspension and the consequent planning of efficient counter measures, it is essential to monitor the rivers within the catchment of the HPP for suspended sediments. This work is considerably time consuming and requires highly educated personnel and is therefore expensive. Surrogate-indirect methods using acoustic and optic devices have bee developed since the last decades that may be efficiently applied for the continuous monitoring of suspended sediment loads. The presented study proposes therefore to establish a research station at a cross section of a river which is the main tributary to a reservoir of a HPP and equip this station with surrogate as well as with common method of measuring suspended load concentrations and related flow discharge and level. The logger at the research station delivers data automatically to a server. Therefore it is ensured that also large flood events are covered. Data during flood are of high interest to the HPP planners since they carried the most part of the sediment load in a hydrological year. Theses peaks can hardly be measured with common measurement methods. Preliminary results of the wet season 2015/2016 are presented. The data gives insight in the applicable range, in terms of scattering particles concentration-average size and corresponding flow discharge and level, eventually enabling the study of suspended sediment load-water flow correlations during peak events. This work is carried out as part of a larger research project on sustainable hydro power plants exposed to high sediment yield, SediPASS. SediPASS is funded by the

  5. Particle Filter Based Fault-tolerant ROV Navigation using Hydro-acoustic Position and Doppler Velocity Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bo; Blanke, Mogens; Skjetne, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fault tolerant navigation system for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The navigation system uses hydro-acoustic position reference (HPR) and Doppler velocity log (DVL) measurements to achieve an integrated navigation. The fault tolerant functionality is based on a modied...... particle lter. This particle lter is able to run in an asynchronous manner to accommodate the measurement drop out problem, and it overcomes the measurement outliers by switching observation models. Simulations with experimental data show that this fault tolerant navigation system can accurately estimate...

  6. Fire Fountains At Etna Volcano: What Do We Learn From Acoustic Measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergniolle, S.

    Acoustic measurements were performed on Etna volcano (Italy) in July 2001, during two episodes of quasi fire fountains. They last about 4 h, are separated by quiet peri- ods of a few days and consist in a serie of explosions, whose intermittency increases in time from several minutes to several seconds. The waveform of every explosion is very similar to explosions at Stromboli, suggesting that the sound at Etna is also pro- duced by bursting large bubbles. The model for bubble vibration, at work at Stromboli, gives a very good fit between data and theory. When the eruptive episode reaches its climax, a bubble at Etna has a radius of 5 m, a length of 8 m for an overpressure of 0.39 MPa. Rising large expanding bubbles in a conduit distorts the top of the lava column and sloshing waves can be produced. The theoretical frequency is between 0.3 and 0.7 Hz for a radius of 5 m. Recorded acoustic pressure shows these frequen- cies. Their intensity is directly correlated to the intensity for bubble bursting (2 Hz), showing that frequencies between 0.3 Hz and 0.7 Hz are sloshing waves in a conduit radius of 5 m. Furthermore if the source of sound is monopole, gas and ejecta ve- locity is estimated at 92 m/s during episode climax, assuming a conduit radius of 5 m. Simultaneous measurements done with a radar produce exactly the same estimate [Duboclard et al., 2001]. The very good agreement between the synthetic waveform, the theoretical sloshing waves and the estimate of gas velocity shows that fire foun- tains at Etna correspond to a serie of bursting bubbles of radius 5 m, colliding during its climax to form an inner gas jet. The alternance between fire fountains and quiet periods is totally similar between Etna and Kilauea volcanoes (Hawaii). Therefore fire fountains at Etna might also be generated at depth by coalescence of a foam layer trapped at the top of the magma chamber. The total gas volume released by one fire fountain is equal to 7.4 × 106 m3 and has been

  7. Continuous measurements of flow rate in a shallow gravel-bed river by a new acoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanisi, K.; Razaz, M.; Ishikawa, K.; Yano, J.; Soltaniasl, M.

    2012-05-01

    The continuous measurement of river discharge for long periods of time is crucial in water resource studies. However, the accurate estimation of river discharge is a difficult and labor-intensive procedure; thus, a robust and efficient method of measurement is required. Continuous measurements of flowrate have been carried out in a wide, shallow gravel bed river (water depth ≈ 0.6 m under low-flow conditions, width ≈ 115 m) using Fluvial Acoustic Tomography System (FATS) that has 25 kHz broadband transducers with horizontally omnidirectional and vertically hemispherical beam patterns. Reciprocal sound transmissions were performed between the two acoustic stations located diagonally on both sides of the river. The horizontal distance between the transducers was 301.96 m. FATS enabled the measurement of the depth- and range-averaged sound speed and flow velocity along the ray path. In contrast to traditional point/transect measurements of discharge, in a fraction of a second, FATS covers the entire cross section of river in a single measurement. The flow rates measured by FATS were compared to those estimated by moving boat Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and rating curve (RC) methods. FATS estimates were in good agreement with ADCP estimates over a range of 20 to 65 m3 s-1. The RMS of residual between the two measurements was 2.41 m3 s-1. On the other hand the flowrate by RC method fairly agreed with FATS estimates for greater discharges than around 40 m3 s-1. This inconsistency arises from biased RC estimates in low flows. Thus, the flow rates derived from FATS could be considered reliable.

  8. Indirect measurement of cylinder pressure from diesel engines using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghamry, M.; Steel, J. A.; Reuben, R. L.; Fog, T. L.

    2005-07-01

    Indirect measurement of the cylinder pressure from diesel engines is possible using acoustic emission (AE). A method is demonstrated for a large two-stroke marine diesel engine and a small four-stroke diesel engine, which involves reconstructing the cylinder crank angle domain diagram from the AE generated during the combustion phase. Raw AE was used for modelling and reconstructing the pressure waveform in the time domain but this could not be used to model the pressure rise (compression). To overcome this problem the signal was divided into two sections representing the compression part of the signal and the fuel injection/expansion stroke. The compression part of the pressure signal was reconstructed by using polynomial fitting. An auto-regressive technique was used during the injection/expansion stroke. The rms AE signal is well correlated with the pressure signal in the time and frequency domain and complex cepstrum analysis was used to model the pressure signal for the complete combustion phase (compression, injection and expansion). The main advantage of using cepstral analysis is that the model uses the frequency content of the rms AE signal rather than the energy content of the rms AE signal, which gives an advantage when the signal has lower energy content, during the compression process. By calculating the engine running speed from the rms AE signal and selecting the proper cepstrum model correlated to the combustion rms AE energy content, an analytical algorithm was developed to give a wide range of applicability over the different conditions of engine speed, engine type and load. The pressure reconstructed from both AE and acceleration data are compared. AE has the advantage of a much higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved time resolution and is shown to be better than the acceleration.

  9. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

    2006-01-30

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of

  10. A programmable acoustic stimuli and auditory evoked potential measurement system for objective tinnitus diagnosis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Yunseo; Ahn, Joong Woo; Kwon, Chiheon; Suh, Myung-Whan; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Hee Chan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a single platform that records auditory evoked potential synchronized to specific acoustic stimuli of the gap prepulse inhibition method for objective tinnitus diagnosis research. The developed system enables to program various parameters of the generated acoustic stimuli. Moreover, only by simple filter modification, the developed system provides high flexibility to record not only short latency auditory brainstem response but also late latency auditory cortical response. The adaptive weighted averaging algorithm to minimize the time required for the experiment is also introduced. The results show that the proposed algorithm can reduce the number of the averaging repetitions to 70% compared with conventional ensemble averaging method.

  11. Measurement of acoustic and anatomic changes in oral and maxillofacial surgery patients

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, Daniel; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Jääsaari, Päivi; Kivelä, Atle; Kuortti, Juha; Luukinen, Jean-Marc; Malinen, Jarmo; Murtola, Tiina; Parkkola, Riitta; Saunavaara, Jani; Soukka, Tero; Vainio, Martti

    2013-01-01

    We describe an arrangement for simultaneous recording of speech and geometry of vocal tract in patients undergoing surgery involving this area. Experimental design is considered from an articulatory phonetic point of view. The speech and noise signals are recorded with an acoustic-electrical arrangement. The vocal tract is simultaneously imaged with MRI. A MATLAB-based system controls the timing of speech recording and MR image acquisition. The speech signals are cleaned from acoustic MRI noise by a non-linear signal processing algorithm. Finally, a vowel data set from pilot experiments is compared with validation data from anechoic chamber as well as with Helmholtz resonances of the vocal tract volume.

  12. Vector network analyzer measurement of the amplitude of an electrically excited surface acoustic wave and validation by X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, I. S.; Croset, B.; Largeau, L.; Rovillain, P.; Thevenard, L.; Duquesne, J.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves are used in magnetism to initiate magnetization switching, in microfluidics to control fluids and particles in lab-on-a-chip devices, and in quantum systems like two-dimensional electron gases, quantum dots, photonic cavities, and single carrier transport systems. For all these applications, an easy tool is highly needed to measure precisely the acoustic wave amplitude in order to understand the underlying physics and/or to optimize the device used to generate the acoustic waves. We present here a method to determine experimentally the amplitude of surface acoustic waves propagating on Gallium Arsenide generated by an interdigitated transducer. It relies on Vector Network Analyzer measurements of S parameters and modeling using the Coupling-Of-Modes theory. The displacements obtained are in excellent agreement with those measured by a very different method based on X-ray diffraction measurements.

  13. Digital stroboscopic holographic interferometry for power flow measurements in acoustically driven membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keustermans, William; Pires, Felipe; De Greef, Daniël; Vanlanduit, Steve J. A.; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of the eardrum and the ossicles in the hearing chain, it remains an open question how acoustical energy is transmitted between them. Identifying the transmission path at different frequencies could lead to valuable information for the domain of middle ear surgery. In this work a setup for stroboscopic holography is combined with an algorithm for power flow calculations. With our method we were able to accurately locate the power sources and sinks in a membrane. The setup enabled us to make amplitude maps of the out-of-plane displacement of a vibrating rubber membrane at subsequent instances of time within the vibration period. From these, the amplitude maps of the moments of force and velocities are calculated. The magnitude and phase maps are extracted from this amplitude data, and form the input for the power flow calculations. We present the algorithm used for the measurements and for the power flow calculations. Finite element models of a circular plate with a local energy source and sink allowed us to test and optimize this algorithm in a controlled way and without the present of noise, but will not be discussed below. At the setup an earphone was connected with a thin tube which was placed very close to the membrane so that sound impinges locally on the membrane, hereby acting as a local energy source. The energy sink was a little piece of foam carefully placed against the membrane. The laser pulses are fired at selected instants within the vibration period using a 30 mW HeNe continuous wave laser (red light, 632.8 nm) in combination with an acousto-optic modulator. A function generator controls the phase of these illumination pulses and the holograms are recorded using a CCD camera. We present the magnitude and phase maps as well as the power flow measurements on the rubber membrane. Calculation of the divergence of this power flow map provides a simple and fast way of identifying and locating an energy source or sink. In conclusion

  14. Measurement of the acoustic-to-optical phonon coupling in multicomponent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caretta, Antonio; Donker, Michiel C.; Perdok, Diederik W.; Abbaszadeh, Davood; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the acoustic-to-optical up-conversion phonon processes in a multicomponent system. These processes take place during heat transport and limit the efficiency of heat flow. By combining time-resolved optical and heat capacity experiments we quantify the thermal coupling co

  15. Mechanical impedance and acoustic mobility measurement techniques of specifying vibration environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    Method has been developed for predicting interaction between components and corresponding support structures subjected to acoustic excitations. Force environments determined in spectral form are called force spectra. Force-spectra equation is determined based on one-dimensional structural impedance model.

  16. Acoustic determination of cracks in welded joints. [by resonant structural vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltanoiu, M.; Criciotoiu, E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic analysis method permits detection of any cracks that might take place and their manner of propagation. The study deals with the cracks produced in experiments to determine the welding technology for a welded gray cast iron workpiece by using piezoelectric transducers to determine vibration acceleration.

  17. Characterization of Transducer Performance and Narrowband Transient Ultrasonic Fields in Metals by Rayleigh-Sommerfeld Backpropagation of Compression Acoustic Waves Measured with Double-Pulsed Tv Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillo, Cristina; Doval, Ángel F.; Fernández, José L.; Rodríguez-Gómez, Pablo; López-Vázquez, J. Carlos

    2014-10-01

    This article presents a method aimed at the characterization of the narrowband transient acoustic field radiated by an ultrasonic plane transducer into a homogeneous, isotropic and optically opaque prismatic solid, and the assessment of the performance of the acoustic source. The method relies on a previous technique based on the full-field optical measurement of an acoustic wavepacket at the surface of a solid and its subsequent numerical backpropagation within the material. The experimental results show that quantitative transversal and axial profiles of the complex amplitude of the beam can be obtained at any plane between the measurement and excitation surfaces. The reconstruction of the acoustic field at the transducer face, carried out on a defective transducer model, shows that the method could also be suitable for the nondestructive testing of the performance of ultrasonic sources. In all cases, the measurements were performed with the transducer working under realistic loading conditions.

  18. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  19. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  20. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  1. Measurement of the speed of sound in trabecular bone by using a time reversal acoustics focusing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Il [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bok-Kyoung [Maritime Security Research Center, KIOST, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A new method for measuring the speed of sound (SOS) in trabecular bone by using a time reversal acoustics (TRA) focusing system was proposed and validated with measurements obtained by using the conventional pulse-transmission technique. The SOS measured in 14 bovine femoral trabecular bone samples by using the two methods was highly correlated each other, although the SOS measured by using the TRA focusing system was slightly lower by an average of 2.2 m/s. The SOS measured by using the two methods showed high correlation coefficients of r = 0.92 with the apparent bone density, consistent with the behavior in human trabecular bone in vitro. These results prove the efficacy of the new method based on the principle of TRA to measure the SOS in trabecular bone.

  2. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  3. Imaging electrical impedance from acoustic measurements by means of magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Xu, Yuan; He, Bin

    2007-02-01

    We have conducted computer simulation and experimental studies on magnetoacoustic-tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) for electrical impedance imaging. In MAT-MI, the object to be imaged is placed in a static magnetic field, while pulsed magnetic stimulation is applied in order to induce eddy current in the object. In the static magnetic field, the Lorentz force acts upon the eddy current and causes acoustic vibrations in the object. The propagated acoustic wave is then measured around the object to reconstruct the electrical impedance distribution. In the present simulation study, a two-layer spherical model is used. Parameters of the model such as sample size, conductivity values, strength of the static and pulsed magnetic field, are set to simulate features of biological tissue samples and feasible experimental constraints. In the forward simulation, the electrical potential and current density are solved using Poisson's equation, and the acoustic pressure is calculated as the forward solution. The electrical impedance distribution is then reconstructed from the simulated pressure distribution surrounding the sample. The present computer simulation results suggest that MAT-MI can reconstruct conductivity images of biological tissue with high spatial resolution and high contrast. The feasibility of MAT-MI in providing high spatial resolution images containing impedance-related information has also been demonstrated in a phantom experiment.

  4. Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves generated by the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake: Modeling and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Ali; Cecioni, Claudia; Bellotti, Giorgio; Kirby, James T.

    2015-02-01

    Detection of low-frequency hydro-acoustic waves as precursor components of destructive tsunamis can enhance the promptness and the accuracy of Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS). We reconstruct the hydro-acoustic wave field generated by the 2012 Haida Gwaii tsunamigenic earthquake using a 2-D horizontal numerical model based on the integration over the depth of the compressible fluid wave equation and considering a mild sloped rigid seabed. Spectral analysis of the wave field obtained at different water depths and distances from the source revealed the frequency range of low-frequency elastic oscillations of sea water. The resulting 2-D numerical model gave us the opportunity to study the hydro-acoustic wave propagation in a large-scale domain with available computers and to support the idea of deep-sea observatory and data interpretation. The model provides satisfactory results, compared with in situ measurements, in the reproduction of the long-gravitational waves. Differences between numerical results and field data are probably due to the lack of exact knowledge of sea bottom motion and to the rigid seabed approximation, indicating the need for further study of poro-elastic bottom effects.

  5. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the

  6. Intensive sound speed monitoring in ocean and its impact on the GPS/acoustic seafloor geodetic measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Motoyuki

    2016-04-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) technique, based on GPS positioning and acoustic ranging, is now getting a popular tool to measure seafloor crustal movement. Several groups in the world have been intensively conducted campaign surveys in the region of scientifically interest. As the technology of measurement has been matured and plenty of data are accumulated, researchers are now aware of the limit of its precision mainly due to unexpected undulation of sound speed in ocean, which significantly degrades acoustic ranging. If sound speed structure keeps its figure during survey period, e.g., more than a couple of hours, it can be estimated by a moving survey to get sufficient paths from various directions to illustrate the structure. However the sound speed structure often varies quickly with in a hour due to internal gravitational wave excited by interaction of tidal current and seafloor topography. In this case one cannot separate temporal and spatial variations. We revisited our numerous sound speed profile data derived from numbers of XBT measurements, which were concurrently carried out with GPS/A survey along the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench. Among the measurements, we found notably short-period variation in sound speed profile through intensive XBT survey repeatedly cast every 6 minutes for one hour, which also appeared in residuals in traveltime of acoustic ranging. The same feature is also found in more moderate rate for semidiurnal undulation, in which vertical oscillation of the middle of the profile can be clearly seen rather than variation of absolute sound speed. This also reflects traveltime residuals in the GPS/A measurement. These typical frequencies represent dominant wavelengths of spatial sound speed variation. In the latter, local horizontal variation can be negligible in the vicinity of a point survey area and the traditional analysis can be applicable that assumes time-varying stratified sound speed structure. In the former case, on the contrary, local

  7. Shallow water acoustic backscatter and reverberation measurements using a 68-kHz cylindrical array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet, Timothy Cole

    2001-10-01

    The characterization of high frequency, shallow water acoustic backscatter and reverberation is important because acoustic systems are used in many scientific, commercial, and military applications. The approach taken is to use data collected by the Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS), a 68 kHz multibeam sonar capable of 360° imaging in a vertical plane perpendicular to its direction of travel. With this unique capability, acoustic backscatter imagery of the seafloor, sea surface, and horizontal and vertical planes in the volume are constructed from data obtained in 200m deep waters in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico when the TVSS was towed 78m below the surface, 735m astern of a towship. The processed imagery provide a quasi-synoptic characterization of the spatial and temporal structure of boundary and volume acoustic backscatter and reverberation. Diffraction, element patterns, and high sidelobe levels are shown to be the most serious problems affecting cylindrical arrays such as the TVSS, and an amplitude shading method is presented for reducing the peak sidelobe levels of irregular-line and non-coplanar arrays. Errors in the towfish's attitude and motion sensor, and irregularities in the TVSS's transmitted beampattern produce artifacts in the TVSS-derived bathymetry and seafloor acoustic backscatter imagery. Correction strategies for these problems are described, which are unique in that they use environmental information extracted from both ocean boundaries. Sea surface and volume acoustic backscatter imagery are used to explore and characterize the structure of near-surface bubble clouds, schooling fish, and zooplankton. The simultaneous horizontal and vertical coverage provided by the TVSS is shown to be a primary advantage, motivating further use of multibeam sonars in these applications. Whereas boundary backscatter fluctuations are well described by Weibull, K, and Rayleigh mixture probability distributions, those corresponding to volume backscatter are

  8. Acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic air pump with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain analysis and comparison to the measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-12-01

    The direct finite-difference fluid simulation of acoustic streaming on a fine-meshed three-dimensional model using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based calculation array is discussed. Airflows are induced by an acoustic traveling wave when an intense sound field is generated in a gap between a bending transducer and a reflector. The calculation results showed good agreement with measurements in a pressure distribution. Several flow vortices were observed near the boundary layer of the reflector and the transducer, which have often been observed near the boundary of acoustic tubes, but have not been observed in previous calculations for this type of ultrasonic air pump.

  9. Simulation and measurement of different hydrophone components for acoustic particle detection; Simulation und Messung verschiedener Hydrophonkomponenten zur akustischen Teilchendetektion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon, K.S.

    2007-01-26

    A study of piezoceramics as sensitive elements for the use in acoustical astroparticle physics is presented in this work. This study aims to develop underwater microphones (hydrophones) in order to detect thermoacoustic sound pulses, which are produced in neutrino interactions. The sensitive elements of the acoustical detectors, the piezo ceramics, are under investigation in this work. Therefore the equations of a piezo are solved in simulations to derive its macroscopic properties. Especially the impedance and the displacement of the piezo as response to applied voltage are of interest. This is correlated with the electrical and mechanical answer of a piezo when sending. For receiving the resulting voltage or the electrical charge due to applied stress are of interest. In the present studies cylinder and hollow cylinder were analyzed. Insight of the interrelationship between the displacement and the impedance is given. The impedance is fitted with an equivalent circuit, to derive the mechanical analog properties. Furthermore the effect of the piezo geometry to the resonance frequencies is explored. Further calculations were made to reveal the sound field produced by a piezo. Measurements of the impedance with a phase-gain-analyser are made. On the other side the displacement is measured using optical interferometry. Beside the simulation and measurements of the piezosensitive elements a study for a trigger-algorithm using the crosscorrelation is introduced. In this study in situ measurements with low signal amplitudes are used to describe noise. To this noise data signals were added and it was examined how well the signals can be reconstructed. Based on the result of this work and taking commercial available piezoceramic materials into account, the optimal sensitive element of an acoustic neutrino detector is a PZT-5A disc with a diameter of 5 mm and a height of 10 mm. A single detector of this kind is able to detect neutrinos with energies more then one PeV as it

  10. The uncertainties calculation of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of heterogeneous non-metallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaryna O. Golofeyeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effective use of heterogeneous non-metallic materials and structures needs measurement of reliable values of dissipation characteristics, as well as common factors of their change during the loading process. Aim: The aim of this study is to prepare the budget for measurement uncertainty of dissipative properties of composite materials. Materials and Methods: The method used to study the vibrational energy dissipation characteristics based on coupling of vibrations damping decrement and acoustic velocity in a non-metallic heterogeneous material is reviewed. The proposed method allows finding the dependence of damping on vibrations amplitude and frequency of strain-stress state of material. Results: Research of the accuracy of measurement method during the definition of decrement attenuation of fluctuations in synthegran was performed. The international approach for evaluation of measurements quality is used. It includes the common practice international rules for uncertainty expression and their summation. These rules are used as internationally acknowledged confidence measure to the measurement results, which includes testing. The uncertainties budgeting of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of materials were compiled. Conclusions: It was defined that there are two groups of reasons resulting in errors during measurement of materials dissipative properties. The first group of errors contains of parameters changing of calibrated bump in tolerance limits, displacement of sensor in repeated placement to measurement point, layer thickness variation of contact agent because of irregular hold-down of resolvers to control surface, inaccuracy in reading and etc. The second group of errors is linked with density and Poisson’s ratio measurement errors, distance between sensors, time difference between signals of vibroacoustic sensors.

  11. On the measurement of high-energetic neutrinos with the IceCube neutrino telescope and with acoustic detection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunck, Matthias

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, two subjects have been addressed to enhance the detection of astrophysical neutrinos with the existing IceCube neutrino telescope as well as to explore new detection methods, namely the acoustic detection. In the first part of this thesis, the determination of the acoustic attenuation length in South-Pole ice is presented. This is part of a feasibility study to investigate the acoustic neutrino detection as a possibility to enhance the detection of the highest-energy neutrinos. For this, the acoustic properties of the ice have to be known, and the South-Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to determine these. The attenuation length is determined using in-situ measurements with SPATS and a retrievable transmitter (pinger), which was deployed in a depth between 190 and 500 m into the water-filled drilling holes. Even though, the unknown angular-dependent sensitivities of the SPATS sensor channels cannot be avoided and are considered as the dominant systematic effect for these measurements. In this thesis, the acoustic attenuation length is calculated by comparing the energy contents of the pinger pulses recorded by the various SPATS sensor channels for different distances between the pinger and the respective channel. The energy was calculated from the Fourier spectra of the pinger pulses for a frequency range between 5 and 35 kHz. The attenuation coefficient is calculated for each channel individually and the weighted mean over the distribution of all considered channels leads to an attenuation length of 264{sup +52} {sub -37} m. The dependence of the attenuation on both depth and frequency has been investigated, showing no indications for either. In the second part, a new event reconstruction method based on a Top-Down approach is presented. The method has been implemented for the IC40 detector and applied to the muon energy reconstruction. The Top-Down method is based on the direct comparison of single measured events with a large sample

  12. Modelling acoustic propagation beneath Antarctic sea ice using measured environmental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Polly; Duncan, Alec; Bose, Neil; Williams, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are improving and expanding in situ observations of sea ice for the validation of satellite remote sensing and climate models. Missions under sea ice, particularly over large distances (up to 100 km) away from the immediate vicinity of a ship or base, require accurate acoustic communication for monitoring, emergency response and some navigation systems. We investigate the propagation of acoustic signals in the Antarctic seasonal ice zone using the BELLHOP model, examining the influence of ocean and sea ice properties. We processed available observations from around Antarctica to generate input variables such as sound speed, surface reflection coefficient (R) and roughness parameters. The results show that changes in the sound speed profile make the most significant difference to the propagation of the direct path signal. The inclusion of the surface reflected signals from a flat ice surface was found to greatly decrease the transmission loss with range. When ice roughness was added, the transmission loss increased with roughness, in a manner similar to the direct path transmission loss results. The conclusions of this work are that: (1) the accuracy of acoustic modelling in this environment is greatly increased by using realistic sound speed data; (2) a risk averse ranging model would use only the direct path signal transmission; and (3) in a flat ice scenario, much greater ranges can be achieved if the surface reflected transmission paths are included. As autonomous missions under sea ice increase in scale and complexity, it will be increasingly important for operational procedures to include effective modelling of acoustic propagation with representative environmental data.

  13. Acoustic Nondestructive Testing and Measurement of Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members: Part 2 - Field Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    steel beam-and-girder designs, but a significant problem is that the anchor tendons (i.e., rods) are inaccessible for expedient inspection and repair . A...embedded in concrete. Acoustic waves are nondestructive. They can travel long distances through engineered structures and can be used to thoroughly...complete post-tensioned anchorage system includes tendons (bars/rods or strands), anchorage devices or bearing plates, ducts, end caps, grout tubes

  14. A Connection Model between the Positioning Mechanism and Ultrasonic Measurement System via a Web Browser to Assess Acoustic Target Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Ken; Imaizumi, Tomohito; Abe, Koki; Takao, Yoshimi; Tamura, Shuko

    This paper details a network-controlled measurement system for use in fisheries engineering. The target strength (TS) of fish is important in order to convert acoustic integration values obtained during acoustic surveys into estimates of fish abundance. The target strength pattern is measured with the combination of the rotation system for the aspect of the sample and the echo data acquisition system using the underwater supersonic wave. The user interface of the network architecture is designed for collaborative use with researchers in other organizations. The flexible network architecture is based on the web direct-access model for the rotation mechanism. The user interface is available for monitoring and controlling via a web browser that is installed in any terminal PC (personal computer). Previously the combination of two applications was performed not by a web browser but by the exclusive interface program. So a connection model is proposed between two applications by indirect communication via the DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) server and added in the web direct-access model. A prompt report system in the TS measurement system and a positioning and measurement system using an electric flatcar via a web browser are developed. By a secure network architecture, DCOM communications via both Intranet and LAN are successfully certificated.

  15. Microwave measurements of the length and thermal expansion of a cylindrical resonator for primary acoustic gas thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.; Lin, H.; Duan, Y. N.; Duan, Y. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the application of acoustic gas thermometry to determine the Boltzmann constant and thermodynamic temperatures using resonant cavities, the internal dimensions or the thermal expansion of the cavity have to be known accurately. For this purpose, measurement of the microwave resonances has proved to be an accurate and convenient experimental technique for dimensional measurement of acoustic resonators. We report measurements of the length and longitudinal thermal expansion of a prototype cylindrical cavity made of oxygen-free copper. We studied four non-degenerate transverse magnetic modes for three isotherms at 243, 258 and 273 K. Two procedures were investigated for calculating the length and longitudinal thermal expansion of the cavity at the temperatures examined. The results from both methods agree well. The relative standard uncertainties for the measurements of length and longitudinal thermal expansion are less than 0.47  ×  10-6 and 0.04  ×  10-6, respectively, from 243 to 273 K. The low uncertainty achieved here provides confidence to pursue a determination of the Boltzmann constant and thermodynamic temperature with a cylindrical cavity and microwave techniques.

  16. Improved WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey Distance Measurements to z = 1 with Reconstruction of the Baryonic Acoustic Feature

    CERN Document Server

    Kazin, Eyal A; Blake, Chris; Padmanabhan, Nikhil

    2014-01-01

    We present significant improvements in cosmic distance measurements from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, achieved by applying the reconstruction of the baryonic acoustic feature technique. We show using both data and simulations that the reconstruction technique can often be effective despite patchiness of the survey, significant edge effects and shot-noise. We investigate three redshift bins in the redshift range 0.2<$z$<1, and in all three find improvement after reconstruction in the detection of the baryonic acoustic feature and its usage as a standard ruler. We measure model independent distance measures $D_{\\mathrm V}(r_{\\mathrm s}^\\mathrm{fid}/r_{\\mathrm s})$ of 1716 $\\pm$ 83 Mpc, 2221 $\\pm$ 101 Mpc, 2516 $\\pm$ 86 Mpc (68% CL) at effective redshifts z = 0.44, 0.6, 0.73, respectively, where $D_{\\mathrm V}$ is the volume-average-distance, and $r_{\\mathrm s}$ is the sound horizon at the end of the baryon drag epoch. These significantly improved 4.8, 4.5 and 3.4 percent accuracy measurements are equiv...

  17. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  18. [Measurement of evoked acoustic otoemissions: an early screening test of neonatal deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgon, Alain

    2002-01-01

    Every child born with deafness displays a pathological language development. An early and specific approach is mandatory, hence requiring an universal hearing screening. Available evidence indicate that performing acoustic otoemissions prior to six months of age is the most reliable method. The recording of the AOE is performed successfully from the 30th week of conceptual age. To obtain AOE in the newborn, one needs to wait until the 3rd day post delivery in 98% of cases. The reliability of the test, the socio-economical cost, the consequences of the screening and the role of the family have to be discussed.

  19. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droit, C; Martin, G; Ballandras, S; Friedt, J-M

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  20. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the

  1. Using a numerical model to understand the connection between the ocean and acoustic travel-time measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Brian S; Kerry, Colette G; Cornuelle, Bruce D

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of acoustic ray travel-times in the ocean provide synoptic integrals of the ocean state between source and receiver. It is known that the ray travel-time is sensitive to variations in the ocean at the transmission time, but the sensitivity of the travel-time to spatial variations in the ocean prior to the acoustic transmission have not been quantified. This study examines the sensitivity of ray travel-time to the temporally and spatially evolving ocean state in the Philippine Sea using the adjoint of a numerical model. A one year series of five day backward integrations of the adjoint model quantify the sensitivity of travel-times to varying dynamics that can alter the travel-time of a 611 km ray by 200 ms. The early evolution of the sensitivities reveals high-mode internal waves that dissipate quickly, leaving the lowest three modes, providing a connection to variations in the internal tide generation prior to the sample time. They are also strongly sensitive to advective effects that alter density along the ray path. These sensitivities reveal how travel-time measurements are affected by both nearby and distant waters. Temporal nonlinearity of the sensitivities suggests that prior knowledge of the ocean state is necessary to exploit the travel-time observations.

  2. Parametrization of acoustic boundary absorption and dispersion properties in time-domain source/receiver reflection measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hoop, A.T.; Lam, C.H.; Kooij, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form analytic time-domain expressions are obtained for the acoustic pressure associated with the reflection of a monopole point-source excited impulsive acoustic wave by a planar boundary with absorptive and dispersive properties. The acoustic properties of the boundary are modeled as a local

  3. The acoustics of public squares/places: A comparison between results from a computer simulation program and measurements in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paini, Dario; Rindel, Jens Holger; Gade, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    or a band during, for instance, music summer festivals) and the best position for the audience. A further result could be to propose some acoustic adjustments to achieve better acoustic quality by considering the acoustic parameters which are typically used for concert halls and opera houses....

  4. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, J-M; Droit, C; Martin, G; Ballandras, S

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band--selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media--based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  5. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedt, J.-M [SENSeOR, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France); Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST, 32 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band--selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media--based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  6. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  7. Study of baryon acoustic oscillations with SDSS DR12 data and measurement of $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeneisen, B

    2016-01-01

    We define Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distances $\\hat{d}_\\alpha(z, z_c)$, $\\hat{d}_z(z, z_c)$, and $\\hat{d}_/(z, z_c)$ that do not depend on cosmological parameters. These BAO distances are measured as a function of redshift $z$ with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release DR12. From these BAO distances alone, or together with the correlation angle $\\theta_\\textrm{MC}$ of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), we constrain the cosmological parameters in several scenarios. We find $4.3 \\sigma$ tension between the BAO plus $\\theta_\\textrm{MC}$ data and a cosmology with flat space and constant dark energy density $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$. Releasing one and/or the other of these constraints obtains agreement with the data. We measure $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$ as a function of $a$.

  8. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  9. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  10. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  11. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  12. Noise suppression in curved glass shells using macro-fiber-composite actuators studied by the means of digital holography and acoustic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mokrý

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods and experimental results of the semi-active control of noise transmission in a curved glass shell with attached piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC actuators. The semi-active noise control is achieved via active elasticity control of piezoelectric actuators by connecting them to an active electric shunt circuit that has a negative effective capacitance. Using this approach, it is possible to suppress the vibration of the glass shell in the normal direction with respect to its surface and to increase the acoustic transmission loss of the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure. The effect of the MFC actuators connected to the negative capacitance shunt circuit on the surface distribution of the normal vibration amplitude is studied using frequency-shifted digital holography (FSDH. The principle of the used FSDH method is described in the paper. The frequency dependence of the acoustic transmission loss through the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure is estimated using measurements of the specific acoustic impedance of the curved glass shell. The specific acoustic impedance is measured using two microphones and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV. The results from the LDV measurements are compared with the FSDH data. The results of the experiments show that using this approach, the acoustic transmission loss in a glass shell can be increased by 36 dB in the frequency range around 247 Hz and by 25 dB in the frequency range around 258 Hz. The experiments indicate that FSDH measurements provide an efficient tool that can be used for fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic transmission loss in large planar structures.

  13. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  14. Acoustical measurements of sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit inside an historical opera house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin-Ichi; Prodi, Nicola; Sakai, Hiroyuki

    2001-05-01

    To clarify the relationship of the sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit, we conducted acoustical measurements in a typical historical opera house, the Teatro Comunale of Ferrara, Italy. Orthogonal factors based on the theory of subjective preference and other related factors were analyzed. First, the sound fields for a singer on the stage in relation to the musicians in the pit were analyzed. And then, the sound fields for performers in the pit in relation to the singers on the stage were considered. Because physical factors vary depending on the location of the sound source, performers can move on the stage or in the pit to find the preferred sound field.

  15. Resolution of Forces and Strain Measurements from an Acoustic Ground Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald; Waldon, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Conservatism in Typical Vibration Tests was Demonstrated: Vibration test at component level produced conservative force reactions by approximately a factor of 4 (approx.12 dB) as compared to the integrated acoustic test in 2 out of 3 axes. Reaction Forces Estimated at the Base of Equipment Using a Finite Element Based Method were Validated: FEM based estimate of interface forces may be adequate to guide development of vibration test criteria with less conservatism. Element Forces Estimated in Secondary Structure Struts were Validated: Finite element approach provided best estimate of axial strut forces in frequency range below 200 Hz where a rigid lumped mass assumption for the entire electronics box was valid. Models with enough fidelity to represent diminishing apparent mass of equipment are better suited for estimating force reactions across the frequency range. Forward Work: Demonstrate the reduction in conservatism provided by; Current force limited approach and an FEM guided approach. Validate proposed CMS approach to estimate coupled response from uncoupled system characteristics for vibroacoustics.

  16. Measurements of acoustic environments for urban soundscapes: choice of homogeneous periods, optimization of durations, and selection of indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocolini, Laurent; Lavandier, Catherine; Quoy, Mathias; Ribeiro, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    In order to minimize the duration of acoustic measurements and to characterize homogeneous areas from a temporal point of view, a series of six location measurements was carried out continuously during three months in Paris. Around fifty thousand samples of 5-min, 10-min, 15-min, 20-min, 30-min, and 1-h duration measurements were extracted for each location. Each sample is characterized by eleven energy indicators and ten event descriptors. In this paper, analysis of a crossroad location is detailed. Through hierarchical ascendant classification and artificial neural networks classification, it is shown that four homogeneous periods can be detected: two during the night, one during the day, and one transition corresponding either to the awakening or to the moment when the city falls asleep. 10-min measurements are necessary to discriminate these time periods at the crossroad location. At the end of the paper, a comparison with the other locations shows that minimum duration states in between 10 and 20 min. The homogeneous periods are connected to the human activities and depend on the location. Energy indicators such as LAeq, LA10, or LA90 and event indicators are necessary to characterize the different clusters.

  17. Low-frequency sound speed and attenuation in sandy seabottom from long-range broadband acoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lin; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Rogers, Peter H

    2010-08-01

    A joint China-U.S. underwater acoustics experiment was conducted in the Yellow Sea with a very flat bottom and a strong and sharp thermocline. Broadband explosive sources were deployed both above and below the thermocline along two radial lines up to 57.2 km and a quarter circle with a radius of 34 km. Two inversion schemes are used to obtain the seabottom sound speed. One is based on extracting normal mode depth functions from the cross-spectral density matrix. The other is based on the best match between the calculated and measured modal arrival times for different frequencies. The inverted seabottom sound speed is used as a constraint condition to extract the seabottom sound attenuation by three methods. The first method involves measuring the attenuation coefficients of normal modes. In the second method, the seabottom sound attenuation is estimated by minimizing the difference between the theoretical and measured modal amplitude ratios. The third method is based on finding the best match between the measured and modeled transmission losses (TLs). The resultant seabottom attenuation, averaged over three independent methods, can be expressed as alpha=(0.33+/-0.02)f(1.86+/-0.04)(dB/m kHz) over a frequency range of 80-1000 Hz.

  18. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  19. Neutral temperature and electron-density measurements in the lower E region by vertical HF sounding in the presence of an acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, E.

    1982-04-01

    It is noted that an acoustic wave generated at ground level and propagating vertically through the lower ionosphere produces partial reflections of radio waves transmitted by a vertical sounder. The Doppler effect of the radio wave produced by the acoustic wave motion depends on the properties of the atmosphere and ionosphere. It is shown that this permits a determination of both the neutral-temperature and the electron-density profiles of the lower E region. The accuracy and the advantages offered by this method are discussed, and some experimental results are compared with those of other measurement techniques.

  20. Traceability of Acoustic Emission measurements for a proposed calibration method - Classification of characteristics and identification using signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, James

    2015-01-01

    When using Acoustic Emission (AE) technologies, tensile, compressive and shear stress/strain tests can provide a detector for material deformation and dislocations. In this paper improvements are made to standardise calibration techniques for AE against known metrics such as force. AE signatures were evaluated from various calibration energy sources based on the energy from the first harmonic (dominant energy band) [1,2]. The effects of AE against its calibration identity are investigated: where signals are correlated to the average energy and distance of the detected phenomena. In addition, extra tests are investigated in terms of the tensile tests and single grit tests characterising different materials. Necessary translations to the time-frequency domain were necessary when segregating salient features between different material properties. Continuing this work the obtained AE is summarised and evaluated by a Neural Network (NN) regression classification technique which identifies how far the malformation has progressed (in terms of energy/force) during material transformation. Both genetic-fuzzy clustering and tree rule based classifier techniques were used as the second and third classification techniques respectively to verify the NN output giving a weighted three classifier system. The work discussed in this paper looks at both distance and force relationships for various prolonged Acoustic Emission stresses. Later such analysis was realised with different classifier models and finally implemented into the Simulink simulations. Further investigations were made into classifier models for different material interactions in terms of force and distance which add further dimension to this work with different materials based simulation realisations. Within the statistical analysis section there are two varying prolonged stress tests which together offer the mechanical calibration system (automated solenoid and pencil break calibration system). Taking such a

  1. Comparisons of auditorium acoustics measurements as a function of location in halls (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, J. S.; Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    In a measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls measurements were made at 30 or more combinations of source and receiver position in each hall. Each of the three measurement teams (the University of Florida, the Danish Technical University, and the National Research Council of Canada) made paral...

  2. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurement bias from moving-bed conditions without global positioning during the 2004 Glen Canyon Dam controlled flood on the Colorado River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge measurements were made by acoustic Doppler current profiler at two locations on the Colorado River during the 2004 controlled flood from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. Measurement hardware and software have constantly improved from the 1980s such that discharge measurements by acoustic profiling instruments are now routinely made over a wide range of hydrologic conditions. However, measurements made with instruments deployed from moving boats require reliable boat velocity data for accurate measurements of discharge. This is normally accomplished by using special acoustic bottom track pings that sense instrument motion over bottom. While this method is suitable for most conditions, high current flows that produce downstream bed sediment movement create a condition known as moving bed that will bias velocities and discharge to lower than actual values. When this situation exists, one solution is to determine boat velocity with satellite positioning information. Another solution is to use a lower frequency instrument. Discharge measurements made during the 2004 Glen Canyon controlled flood were subject to moving-bed conditions and frequent loss of bottom track. Due to site conditions and equipment availability, the measurements were conducted without benefit of external positioning information or lower frequency instruments. This paper documents and evaluates several techniques used to correct the resulting underestimated discharge measurements. One technique produces discharge values in good agreement with estimates from numerical model and measured hydrographs during the flood. ?? 2007, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  3. Acoustic Doppler current profiler raw measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, 2000-2016, Columbia Environmental Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulliner, Edward A.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    Between the years 2000 and 2016, scientists and technicians from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) have collected over 400 field-days worth of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, primarily for the purposes of assessing physical aquatic habitat for the pallid sturgeon. Scientists and technicians collected data using boat-mounted Teledyne Rio Grande ADCPs, which were processed using customized scripting tools and archived in standardized formats. To assess longitudinal variability in depth and velocity distributions along the Missouri River, as well as compare the Missouri River to its unaltered analog, the Yellowstone River, we compiled the collected datasets into a single comma-separated value (csv) file using a series of data-processing scripts written in Python. To allow for the comparison of measurements collected only within a specific window of flow exceedance, we conducted geospatial analyses to attribute each ADCP measurement by a discharge from the most relevant USGS gage location (with the most relevant gage location being the gage located between the same major tributaries as the measurement, even if it was not the closest spatially), and assigned each measurement a flow exceedance percentile based on the relevant gage's record between 2000 and 2016. We also conducted general quality control on the data, discarding any ADCP returns where the ADCP measured a depth-averaged velocity greater than 3 meters per second or a depth greater than 16 meters; these values were considered to be an approximate upper bounds for realistic values on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers. The presented csv file lists individual ADCP bins for all measurements that have been archived between 2000 and 2016 by CERC scientists along with their three-dimensional velocity components, depth-averaged velocity magnitude for a given ADCP return, average channel depth for a given ADCP

  4. Onset-Duration Matching of Acoustic Stimuli Revisited: Conventional Arithmetic vs. Proposed Geometric Measures of Accuracy and Precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Björn; Heil, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Onsets of acoustic stimuli are salient transients and are relevant in humans for the perception of music and speech. Previous studies of onset-duration discrimination and matching focused on whether onsets are perceived categorically. In this study, we address two issues. First, we revisit onset-duration matching and measure, for 79 conditions, how accurately and precisely human listeners can adjust the onset duration of a comparison stimulus to subjectively match that of a standard stimulus. Second, we explore measures for quantifying performance in this and other matching tasks. The conventional measures of accuracy and precision are defined by arithmetic descriptive statistics and the Euclidean distance function on the real numbers. We propose novel measures based on geometric descriptive statistics and the log-ratio distance function, the Euclidean distance function on the positive-real numbers. Only these properly account for the fact that the magnitude of onset durations, like the magnitudes of most physical quantities, can attain only positive real values. The conventional (arithmetic) measures possess a convexity bias that yields errors that grow with the width of the distribution of matches. This convexity bias leads to misrepresentations of the constant error and could even imply the existence of perceptual illusions where none exist. This is not so for the proposed (geometric) measures. We collected up to 68 matches from a given listener for each condition (about 34,000 matches in total) and examined inter-listener variability and the effects of onset duration, plateau duration, sound level, carrier, and restriction of the range of adjustable comparison stimuli on measures of accuracy and precision. Results obtained with the conventional measures generally agree with those reported in the literature. The variance across listeners is highly heterogeneous for the conventional measures but is homogeneous for the proposed measures. Furthermore, the proposed

  5. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede;

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the acoustic emission activity of cement pastes was investigated during the first day of hydration. Deaired, fresh cement pastes were cast in sealed sample holders designed to minimize friction and restraint. The majority of acoustic emission events occurred in lower water to cemen...

  6. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  7. Acoustic telemetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive acoustic...

  8. A transient method for measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow using acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of measuring the gas volume fraction in a mixed gas-liquid flow by using an acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) method in a transient way is studied theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, the effects of sizes and locations of a single air bubble in a cylindrical cavity with two open ends on resonant frequencies are investigated numerically. Then, a transient measurement system for ARS is established, and the trends of the resonant frequencies (RFs) and resonant amplitudes (RAs) in the cylindrical cavity with gas flux inside are investigated experimentally. The measurement results by the proposed transient method are compared with those by steady-state ones and numerical ones. The numerical results show that the RFs of the cavity are highly sensitive to the volume of the single air bubble. A tiny bubble volume perturbation may cause a prominent RF shift even though the volume of the air bubble is smaller than 0.1% of that of the cavity. When the small air bubble moves, the RF shift will change and reach its maximum value as it is located at the middle of the cavity. As the gas volume fraction of the two-phase flow is low, both the RFs and RAs from the measurement results decrease dramatically with the increasing gas volume, and this decreasing trend gradually becomes even as the gas volume fraction increases further. These experimental results agree with the theoretical ones qualitatively. In addition, the transient method for ARS is more suitable for measuring the gas volume fraction with randomness and instantaneity than the steady-state one, because the latter could not reflect the random and instant characteristics of the mixed fluid due to the time consumption for frequency sweeping. This study will play a very important role in the quantitative measurement of the gas volume fraction of multiphase flows.

  9. Comparative measurements of the level of turbulence atmosphere by optical and acoustic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botugina, N. N.; Gladkih, V. A.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.; Odintsov, S. L.; Torgaev, A. V.

    2014-11-01

    The complex measurements of level of atmospheric turbulence are conducted by the differential measurement device of turbulence (DMT), wave-front sensor (WFS), and also by ultrasonic weather-stations. Daytime measurements of structure parameters of refractive index of atmospheric turbulence carried out on horizontal optical paths on the Base Experimental Complex (BEC) of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS (IOA). A comparative analysis over of the got results is brought.

  10. Study and development of an in situ acoustic absorption measurement method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijs, E.

    2013-01-01

    Sound absorbing materials are used in many applications to attenuate unwanted noise. However, existing measurement methods can only be used on a limited number of material packages and under restricted circumstances. This thesis concerns the study and development of (absorption) measurement methods

  11. Additional acoustic attenuation of coastal turbid water -- Measurements compared with predictions using particle size di

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Hongtao; YANG Yanming; LIU Zhenwen; NIU Fuqiang

    2011-01-01

    Based on reverberation method, the viscous absorptions of 0.2-2.0 kg/m3 sediment and glass bead turbid seawater were measured. It is shown that the measurement results were more consistent with the prediction results using particle size distributions tech

  12. Determination of the symmetries of an experimentally determined stiffness tensor; application to acoustic measurements

    CERN Document Server

    François, Marc Louis Maurice; Berthaud, Yves

    2009-01-01

    For most materials, the symmetry group is known a priori and deduced from the realization process. This allows many simplifications for the measurements of the stiffness tensor. We deal here with the case where the symmetry is a priori unknown, as for biological or geological materials, or when the process makes the material symmetry axis uncertain (some composites, monocrystals). The measurements are then more complicated and the raw stiffness tensor obtained does not exhibit any symmetry in the Voigt's matricial form, as it is expressed in the arbitrarily chosen specimen's base. A complete ultrasonic measurement of the stiffness tensor from redundant measurements is proposed. In a second time, we show how to make a plane symmetry pole figure able to give visual information about the quasi-symmetries of a raw stiffness tensor determined by any measurement method. Finally we introduce the concept of distance from a raw stiffness tensor to one of the eight symmetry classes available for a stiffness tensor. The...

  13. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J;

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  14. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  15. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  16. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  17. Acoustic velocity measurement across the diameter of a liquid metal column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calder, C.A.; Wilcox, W.W.

    1978-05-15

    Present techniques for measuring sound velocity in liquid metals have been limited by the use of transducers which cannot survive in extreme temperature conditions. These methods also require relatively long measurement times. An optical noncontacting method has been developed which may be used for extremely short experimental times and very high temperatures and pressures. This technique is being incorporated into an isobaric expansion apparatus in which a 1 mm diam wire sample in a high pressure argon gas environment is resistively heated to melt within a time period of only a few microseconds. Before instability of the liquid column occurs, thermal expansion, enthalpy, and temperature are measured. The addition of the sound velocity measurement permits a more complete determination of the thermophysical properties of the liquid metal.

  18. High Performance Acousto-Optic Arrays based on Fiber Bragg Gratings for Measuring Launch Acoustics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes to prove the feasibility of innovations in acousto-optic sensor development for measurement of launch...

  19. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  20. Acoustic remote sensing of ocean flows

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.

    Acoustic techniques have become powerful tools for measurement of ocean circulation mainly because of the ability of acoustic signals to travel long distances in water, and the inherently non-invasive nature of measurement. The satellite remote...

  1. Split Hopkinson resonant bar test for sonic-frequency acoustic velocity and attenuation measurements of small, isotropic geological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 °C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described split Hopkinson resonant bar test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples, and a natural rock sample.

  2. Two-Phase Flow Modelling Perspectives Based on Novel High-Resolution Acoustic Measurements of Uniform Steady Sheet-Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauchat, J.; Revil-Baudard, T.; Hurther, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sheet flow is believed to be a major process for morphological evolution of natural systems. An important research effort has been dedicated to laboratory and numerical studies of sheet flow regime that have allowed to make some progress in the understanding of the underlying physical processes. Recent advances made in high resolution measurement techniques allows to give new insights into the small scale physical processes. In this contribution, a novel uniform and steady sheet flow dataset based on an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP) is presented. Profile of colocated velocities (streamwise and wall-normal) and sediment concentration has been measured at high-resolution (3 mm ; 78 Hz for the velocities and 4.9 Hz for the concentration). The measured profiles extend over the whole water column, from the free surface down to the fixed bed and an ensemble averaging over eleven realisations of the same experimental conditions has been used to obtain mean profiles of streamwise velocity, concentration, sediment flux and turbulent shear stress. The present experiment corresponds to a Shields number of θ=0.44 and a suspension number of ws/u*=1.1 corresponding to the lower limit of the no-suspension sheet flow regime. The analysis of the mixing length profile allows to identify two layers, a dilute suspension layer dominated by turbulence and a dense moving bed layer dominated by granular interactions. Our measurements show that the Von Karman parameter is reduced by a factor of more than two and that the Schmidt number is almost constant with a mean value of σs=0.44. Frictional and collisional interactions are encountered in the bed layer. Frictional interactions dominate close to the fixed bed interface whereas collisional interactions seems to control the flow at the transition between the dense and dilute layers. The relevancy of different constitutive laws for two-phase flow models are discussed.

  3. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  4. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A "gentle" nodal suspension for measurements of the acoustic attenuation in materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarini, E; Lorenzini, M; Campagna, E; Martelli, F; Piergiovanni, F; Vetrano, F; Losurdo, G; Cagnoli, G

    2009-05-01

    Loss angle measurements in ultralow mechanical loss materials is normally affected by a large systematic error due to the excess losses introduced by the suspension system used to hold the samples. Crystals such as sapphire and silicon or amorphous materials such as fused silica can have loss angles in the range of 10(-10)-10(-7); such materials are of extreme interest in the detection of small displacements as it is required in quantum measurements, frequency stabilization, Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and gravitational wave research. In the system proposed here the sample is suspended in equilibrium on top of a sphere, touching on one of the nodal points of vibration. The advantage of this system, as compared to others used so far, is twofold: (i) one surface only of the sample is touched and the contact surface is minimized because of the absence of applied forces; (ii) some relevant parameters of the suspension can be measured and eventually varied, giving the experimentalist the possibility to identify whether the measured loss is limited by the suspension system in use or it is an intrinsic property of the sample under investigation. The measurements of a 75 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness disk of Suprasil 311 gave a loss angle phi of 5x10(-8).

  6. Smartphones as experimental tools to measure acoustical and mechanical properties of vibrating rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.

    2016-07-01

    Modern smartphones have calculation and sensor capabilities that make them suitable for use as versatile and reliable measurement devices in simple teaching experiments. In this work a smartphone is used, together with low cost materials, in an experiment to measure the frequencies emitted by vibrating rods of different materials, shapes and lengths. The results obtained with the smartphone have been compared with theoretical calculations and the agreement is good. Alternatively, physics students can perform the experiment described here and use their results to determine the dependencies of the obtained frequencies on the rod characteristics. In this way they will also practice research methods that they will probably use in their professional life.

  7. Measuring fast-temporal sediment fluxes with an analogue acoustic sensor: a wind tunnel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, A.; Minnen, van J.; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Goossens, D.; Seeger, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    In aeolian research, field measurements are important for studying complex wind-driven processes for land management evaluation and model validation. Consequently, there have been many devices developed, tested, and applied to investigate a range of aeolian-based phenomena. However, determining the

  8. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  9. Design and optimization of a noise reduction system for infrasonic measurements using elements with low acoustic impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoverro, Benoit; Le Pichon, Alexis

    2005-04-01

    The implementation of the infrasound network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the enforcement of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) increases the effort in the design of suitable noise reducer systems. In this paper we present a new design consisting of low impedance elements. The dimensioning and the optimization of this discrete mechanical system are based on numerical simulations, including a complete electroacoustical modeling and a realistic wind-noise model. The frequency response and the noise reduction obtained for a given wind speed are compared to statistical noise measurements in the [0.02-4] Hz frequency band. The effects of the constructive parameters-the length of the pipes, inner diameters, summing volume, and number of air inlets-are investigated through a parametric study. The studied system consists of 32 air inlets distributed along an overall diameter of 16 m. Its frequency response is flat up to 4 Hz. For a 2 m/s wind speed, the maximal noise reduction obtained is 15 dB between 0.5 and 4 Hz. At lower frequencies, the noise reduction is improved by the use of a system of larger diameter. The main drawback is the high-frequency limitation introduced by acoustical resonances inside the pipes.

  10. A comparison of acoustic cavitation detection thresholds measured with piezo-electric and fiber-optic hydrophone sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Victoria; Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Ter Haar, Gail

    2013-12-01

    A Fabry-Perot interferometer fiber-optic hydrophone (FOH) was investigated for use as an acoustic cavitation detector and compared with a piezo-ceramic passive cavitation detector (PCD). Both detectors were used to measure negative pressure thresholds for broadband emissions in 3% agar and ex vivo bovine liver simultaneously. FOH-detected half- and fourth-harmonic emissions were also studied. Three thresholds were defined and investigated: (i) onset of cavitation; (ii) 100% probability of cavitation; and (iii) a time-integrated threshold where broadband signals integrated over a 3-s exposure duration, averaged over 5-10 repeat exposures, become statistically significantly greater than noise. The statistical sensitiviy of FOH broadband detection was low compared with that of the PCD (0.43/0.31 in agar/liver). FOH-detected fourth-harmonic data agreed best with PCD broadband (sensitivity: 0.95/0.94, specificity: 0.89/0.76 in agar/liver). The FOH has potential as a cavitation detector, particularly in applications where space is limited or during magnetic resonance-guided studies.

  11. Spatial variation of deep diving odontocetes' occurrence around a canyon region in the Ligurian Sea as measured with acoustic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorli, Giacomo; Neuheimer, Anna; Au, Whitlow

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the distribution of animals is of paramount importance for management and conservation, especially for species that are impacted by anthropogenic threats. In the case of marine mammals there has been a growing concern about the impact of human-made noise, in particular for beaked whales and other deep diving odontocetes. Foraging (measured via echolocation clicks at depth) was studied for Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris), sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) and Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) using three passive acoustics recorders moored to the bottom of the ocean in a canyon area in the Ligurian Sea between July and December 2011. A Generalized Linear Model was used to test whether foraging was influenced by location and day of the year, including the possibility of interactions between predictors. Contrary to previous studies conducted by visual surveys in this area, all species were detected at all locations, suggesting habitat overlapping. However, significant differences were found in the occurrence of each species at different locations. Beaked and sperm whales foraged significantly more in the northern and western locations, while long-finned pilot whales and Risso's dolphins hunted more in the northern and eastern location.

  12. Experimental Method to Measure Low Frequency Sound Radiation - Nearfield Acoustical Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-03

    Interferometric Measurements of the Top Plate Vibrations of a Guitar ," Acustica 25, 95-100 (1971) 10. I. M. Firth, " Physics of the Guitar at the Helmholtz and...rectangular plate) and a complex source (an intact, string excited guitar ). The guitar research revealed some interesting results such as: the rose is...source (an In- tact, string excited guitar ). The guitar research revealed some interesting results such as: the rose is an important source of low

  13. Measurements of acoustic responses of gaseous propellant injectors. [for rocket combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an investigation intended to provide experimental data that can quantitatively describe the way in which various coaxial injector designs affect the stability of gaseous propellant rocket motors. The response factors of configurations that simulate the flow conditions in a gaseous-fuel injector element and a gaseous-oxidizer injector element are measured by using a modified impedance-tube technique and under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in rocket motors with axial instability. The measured injector response factor data are presented and discussed. It is shown that there is reasonable agreement between the measured injector response factors and those predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model (1967), and that the orifice length can be varied to shift the resonant frequency of the injector without any change in the magnitude of the response factor at resonance. A change in the injector open-area ratio is found to have a significant effect on the characteristics of the injector response factor.

  14. High resolution acoustic measurement system and beam pattern reconstruction method for bat echolocation emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Jason E; Kloepper, Laura N; Warnecke, Michaela; Simmons, James A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the transmit beam patterns emitted by echolocating bats have previously been limited to cross-sectional planes or averaged over multiple signals using sparse microphone arrays. To date, no high-resolution measurements of individual bat transmit beams have been reported in the literature. Recent studies indicate that bats may change the time-frequency structure of their calls depending on the task, and suggest that their beam patterns are more dynamic than previously thought. To investigate beam pattern dynamics in a variety of bat species, a high-density reconfigurable microphone array was designed and constructed using low-cost ultrasonic microphones and custom electronic circuitry. The planar array is 1.83 m wide by 1.42 m tall with microphones positioned on a 2.54 cm square grid. The system can capture up to 228 channels simultaneously at a 500 kHz sampling rate. Beam patterns are reconstructed in azimuth, elevation, and frequency for visualization and further analysis. Validation of the array measurement system and post-processing functions is shown by reconstructing the beam pattern of a transducer with a fixed circular aperture and comparing the result with a theoretical model. To demonstrate the system in use, transmit beam patterns of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, are shown.

  15. Acoustic Imaging of Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K. N.; Seshan, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Elliposidal acoustic mirror used to measure sound emitted at discrete points in burning turbulent jets. Mirror deemphasizes sources close to target source and excludes sources far from target. At acoustic frequency of 20 kHz, mirror resolves sound from region 1.25 cm wide. Currently used by NASA for research on jet flames. Produces clearly identifiable and measurable variation of acoustic spectral intensities along length of flame. Utilized in variety of monitoring or control systems involving flames or other reacting flows.

  16. Laboratory Measurements of Multi-Frequency and Broadband Acoustic Scattering from Turbulent and Double-Diffusive Microstructure. High-Frequency Broadband Acoustic Scattering from Non-Linear Internal Waves during SW06

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    1996; Nero et al, 1998; Love et al, 2004). The broadband system developed for this project was used to measure high-frequency broadband acoustic...Wilson, M. A., and Nero , R.W. (2004). "Unusual swimbladder behavior offish in the Cariaco Trench," Deep-Sea Research 151(1): 1-16. Lundgren B., and...propagating shoreward over the continental shelf," J. Phys. Oceanogr. 33, 2093-2112. Nero , R.W., Thompson, C.H., and Love, R.H. (1998). "Low-frequency

  17. In-Situ Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliar, Mikhail [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-03-31

    A gasifier’s temperature is the primary characteristic that must be monitored to ensure its performance and the longevity of its refractory. One of the key technological challenges impacting the reliability and economics of coal and biomass gasification is the lack of temperature sensors that are capable of providing accurate, reliable, and long-life performance in an extreme gasification environment. This research has proposed, demonstrated, and validated a novel approach that uses a noninvasive ultrasound method that provides real-time temperature distribution monitoring across the refractory, especially the hot face temperature of the refractory. The essential idea of the ultrasound measurements of segmental temperature distribution is to use an ultrasound propagation waveguide across a refractory that has been engineered to contain multiple internal partial reflectors at known locations. When an ultrasound excitation pulse is introduced on the cold side of the refractory, it will be partially reflected from each scatterer in the US propagation path in the refractory wall and returned to the receiver as a train of partial echoes. The temperature in the corresponding segment can be determined based on recorded ultrasonic waveform and experimentally defined relationship between the speed of sound and temperature. The ultrasound measurement method offers a powerful solution to provide continuous real time temperature monitoring for the occasions that conventional thermal, optical and other sensors are infeasible, such as the impossibility of insertion of temperature sensor, harsh environment, unavailable optical path, and more. Our developed ultrasound system consists of an ultrasound engineered waveguide, ultrasound transducer/receiver, and data acquisition, logging, interpretation, and online display system, which is simple to install on the existing units with minimal modification on the gasifier or use with new units. This system has been successfully tested

  18. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos, E-mail: triantafillos.koukoulas@npl.co.uk; Piper, Ben [Acoustics Group, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  19. Determination of micelle formation of ketorolac tromethamine in aqueous media by acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savaroglu, Gokhan, E-mail: gsavarog@ogu.edu.tr [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Department of Physics, 26480 Eskisehir (Turkey); Genc, Luetfi [Anadolu University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 26470 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2013-01-20

    Graphical abstract: Value of critical micelle concentration (CMC) were detected by speed of sound and determined by an analytical method based on the Phillips definition of the CMC. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aim of this study was to investigate the aggregation behaviour of KT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of KT concentration and temperature upon volumetric properties was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CMC of KT aqueous solution was determined by using speeds of sound measurements. - Abstract: Density and speed of sound of ketorolac tromethamine in aqueous solutions have been measured as a function of concentration at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15 K. Apparent molar volumes, apparent isentropic compressibility and isentropic compressibility values have also been calculated from the experimental density and speed of sound data. Partial molar volume and partial molar isentropic compressibility are obtained from fitting procedures the data on apparent molar volume, V{sub {phi}}, and apparent isentropic compressibility, K{sub {phi}(S)}. Partial molar volume, V{sub {phi}}{sup 0}, and partial molar isentropic compressibility, k{sub {phi}(S)}{sup 0}, are informative thermodynamic characteristics that reflect solute hydration. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was determined from speed of sound data by an analytical method based on the Phillips definition of the CMC. Using these results, it was possible to establish the solvent-drug interactions.

  20. Boundary layer characterization and acoustic measurements of flow-aligned trailing edge serrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce León, Carlos; Merino-Martínez, Roberto; Ragni, Daniele; Avallone, Francesco; Snellen, Mirjam

    2016-12-01

    Trailing edge serrations designed to reduce airfoil self-noise are retrofitted on a NACA 0018 airfoil. An investigation of the boundary layer flow statistical properties is performed using time-resolved stereoscopic PIV. Three streamwise locations over the edge of the serrations are compared. An analysis of the results indicates that, while there is no upstream effect, the flow experiences significant changes as it convects over the serrations and toward its edges. Among the most important, a reduced shear stress and modifications of the turbulence spectra suggest beneficial changes in the unsteady surface pressure that would result in a reduction of trailing edge noise. Microphone array measurements are additionally performed to confirm that noise reduction is indeed observed by the application of the chosen serration design over the unmodified airfoil.

  1. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  2. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  3. Acoustic biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of ...

  4. Quantifying the Consistency of Wearable Knee Acoustical Emission Measurements During Complex Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toreyin, Hakan; Jeong, Hyeon Ki; Hersek, Sinan; Teague, Caitlin N; Inan, Omer T

    2016-09-01

    Knee-joint sounds could potentially be used to noninvasively probe the physical and/or physiological changes in the knee associated with rehabilitation following acute injury. In this paper, a system and methods for investigating the consistency of knee-joint sounds during complex motions in silent and loud background settings are presented. The wearable hardware component of the system consists of a microelectromechanical systems microphone and inertial rate sensors interfaced with a field programmable gate array-based real-time processor to capture knee-joint sound and angle information during three types of motion: flexion-extension (FE), sit-to-stand (SS), and walking (W) tasks. The data were post-processed to extract high-frequency and short-duration joint sounds (clicks) with particular waveform signatures. Such clicks were extracted in the presence of three different sources of interference: background, stepping, and rubbing noise. A histogram-vector Vn(→) was generated from the clicks in a motion-cycle n, where the bin range was 10°. The Euclidean distance between a vector and the arithmetic mean Vav(→) of all vectors in a recording normalized by the Vav(→) is used as a consistency metric dn. Measurements from eight healthy subjects performing FE, SS, and W show that the mean (of mean) consistency metric for all subjects during SS (μ [ μ (dn)] = 0.72 in silent, 0.85 in loud) is smaller compared with the FE (μ [ μ (dn)] = 1.02 in silent, 0.95 in loud) and W ( μ [ μ (dn)] = 0.94 in silent, 0.97 in loud) exercises, thereby implying more consistent click-generation during SS compared with the FE and W. Knee-joint sounds from one subject performing FE during five consecutive work-days (μ [ μ (dn) = 0.72) and five different times of a day (μ [ μ (dn) = 0.73) suggests high consistency of the clicks on different days and throughout a day. This work represents the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that joint sound consistency has been

  5. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  6. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  7. Fundamental frequency and voice perturbation measures in smokers and non-smokers: An acoustic and perceptual study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Allison

    This research examined the fundamental frequency and perturbation (jitter % and shimmer %) measures in young adult (20-30 year-old) and middle-aged adult (40-55 year-old) smokers and non-smokers; there were 36 smokers and 36 non-smokers. Acoustic analysis was carried out utilizing one task: production of sustained /a/. These voice samples were analyzed utilizing Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP) software, which provided values for fundamental frequency, jitter %, and shimmer %.These values were analyzed for trends regarding smoking status, age, and gender. Statistical significance was found regarding the fundamental frequency, jitter %, and shimmer % for smokers as compared to non-smokers; smokers were found to have significantly lower fundamental frequency values, and significantly higher jitter % and shimmer % values. Statistical significance was not found regarding fundamental frequency, jitter %, and shimmer % for age group comparisons. With regard to gender, statistical significance was found regarding fundamental frequency; females were found to have statistically higher fundamental frequencies as compared to males. However, the relationships between gender and jitter % and shimmer % lacked statistical significance. These results indicate that smoking negatively affects voice quality. This study also examined the ability of untrained listeners to identify smokers and non-smokers based on their voices. Results of this voice perception task suggest that listeners are not accurately able to identify smokers and non-smokers, as statistical significance was not reached. However, despite a lack of significance, trends in data suggest that listeners are able to utilize voice quality to identify smokers and non-smokers.

  8. Use of acoustic wave travel-time measurements to probe the near-surface layers of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Osaki, Y.; Shibahashi, H.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The variation of solar p-mode travel times with cyclic frequency nu is shown to provide information on both the radial variation of the acoustic potential and the depth of the effective source of the oscillations. Observed travel-time data for waves with frequency lower than the acoustic cutoff frequency for the solar atmosphere (approximately equals 5.5 mHz) are inverted to yield the local acoustic cutoff frequency nu(sub c) as a function of depth in the outer convection zone and lower atmosphere of the Sun. The data for waves with nu greater than 5.5 mHz are used to show that the source of the p-mode oscillations lies approximately 100 km beneath the base of the photosphere. This depth is deeper than that determined using a standard mixing-length calculation.

  9. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  10. Acoustics. Noise emitted by machinery and equipment. Measurement of emission sound pressure levels at a work station and at other specified positions. Engineering method in an essentially free field over a reflecting plane

    CERN Document Server

    British Standards Institution. London

    1996-01-01

    Acoustics. Noise emitted by machinery and equipment. Measurement of emission sound pressure levels at a work station and at other specified positions. Engineering method in an essentially free field over a reflecting plane

  11. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, S. Reynold; Allen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the project is to develop an acoustic modeling capability, based on commercial off-the-shelf software, to be used as a tool for oversight of the future manned Constellation vehicles. The use of such a model will help ensure compliance with acoustic requirements. Also, this project includes modeling validation and development feedback via building physical mockups and conducting acoustic measurements to compare with the predictions.

  12. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  13. Noise reduction in acoustic measurements with a particle velocity sensor by means of a cross-correlation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honschoten, van J.W.; Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Kuipers, H.; Raangs, R.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a method is presented to reduce the noise level of a particle velocity sensor, a thermal two-wire sensor sensitive to acoustic particle velocities, which yields a reduction of the noise of 30 dB. The method is based on utilisation of cross- instead of auto-correlation spectra of two of

  14. Quantitative measurements of acoustical beats by means of the 'improper' use of sound card software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganci, S [Museo di Fisica e Meteo-sismologia ' G Sanguineti-G Leonardini' , Piazza N S dell' Orto, 8, 16043 Chiavari (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    Low-cost experiments on acoustical beats are carried out on a personal computer using standard software for a sound card in a non-canonical way, which provides a useful teaching method for a traditional classroom experiment. (letters and comments)

  15. Apparatus to Determine the Complex Mass of a Viscous Fluid Contained in a Rigid Porous Solid from Acoustic Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Philps Driver. the cavity. Overall test chamber length was limited to three inches to avoid acoustic resonances in the experimental frequency range of...tests, the sample cavity was filled with various amounts of Fluorinert FC-72 non-polar electronic liquid (3M Corporation, St. Paul , Mn.). Fluorinert was

  16. Validation of an Aero-Acoustic Wind Turbine Noise Model Using Advanced Noise Source Measurements of a 500kW Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of a 500 kW stall-regulated wind turbine is investigated. Microphones located relatively close to the wind turbine are used to measure its acoustic emission. The operational conditions of the turbine, such as wind speed, are simultaneously monitored. In parallel, a wind turbine....... A good qualitative agreement is found. When wind speed increases, the rotor noise model shows that at high frequencies the stall noise becomes dominant. It also shows that turbulent inflow noise is dominant at low frequencies for all wind speeds and that trailing edge noise is dominant at low wind speeds...... and at frequencies above 200 Hz....

  17. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  18. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  19. Acoustic backscatter measurements with a 153 kHz ADCP in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: determination of dominant zooplankton and micronekton scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressler, Patrick H.

    2002-11-01

    A 153 kHz narrowband acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was used to measure volume backscattering strength ( Sv) during a deepwater oceanographic survey of cetacean and seabird habitat in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Sv was positively related to zooplankton and micronekton biomass (wet displacement volume) in 'sea-truth' net hauls made with a 1 m 2 Multiple Opening-Closing Net Environmental Sensing System (MOCNESS). A subset of these MOCNESS tows was used to explore the relationship between the numerical densities of various taxonomic categories of zooplankton and the ADCP backscatter signal. Crustaceans, small fish, and fragments of non-gas-bearing siphonophores in the net samples all showed significant, positive correlations with the acoustic signal, while other types of gelatinous zooplankton, pteropod and atlantid molluscs, and gas-filled siphonophore floats showed no significant correlation with Sv. Previously published acoustic scattering models for zooplankton were used to calculate expected scattering for several general zooplankton types and sizes for comparison with the field data. Even though gelatinous material often made up a large fraction of the total biomass, crustaceans, small fish, and pteropods were most likely the important scatterers. Since only crustacean and small fish densities were significantly correlated with Sv, it is suggested that Sv at 153 kHz can be used as a relative proxy for the abundance of these organisms in the Gulf of Mexico.

  20. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  1. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  2. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  3. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  4. Location of an acoustic window in dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y

    1990-01-15

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to sound clicks from sources in different positions were recorded in dolphins Inia geoffrensis. The position of the acoustic window was determined by measurement of acoustic delays. The acoustic window was found to lie close to the auditory meatus and the bulla rather than on the lower jaw.

  5. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  6. Acoustic/Magnetic Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, J. S.; Namkung, M.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution sensor fast, portable, does not require permanent bonding to structure. Sensor measures nondestructively type (compressive or tensile) and magnitude of stresses and stress gradients present in class of materials. Includes precise high-resolution acoustic interferometer, sending acoustic transducer, receiving acoustic transducer, electromagnet coil and core, power supply, and magnetic-field-measuring device such as Hall probe. This measurement especially important for construction and applications where steel is widely used. Sensor useful especially for nondestructive evaluation of stress in steel members because of portability, rapid testing, and nonpermanent installation.

  7. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser

  8. An Integrated Laser-Induced Piezoelectric/Differential Confocal Surface Acoustic Wave System for Measurement of Thin Film Young’s Modulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotang Hu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the design and development results of a system setup for measuring Young’s modulus of thin films by laser-induced surface acoustic waves based on the integration of two detection methods, namely, piezoelectric transducer detection and differential confocal detection, which may be used for conducting consecutive or simultaneous measurements. After demonstrating the capabilities of each detection approach, it is shown how, depending on a wider range of applications, sample materials and measurement environments, the developed integrated system inherits and harnesses the main characteristics of its detection channels, resulting in an more practical and flexible equipment for determining Young’s modulus than traditional nanoindentation equipment, and also suitable for cross-validation purposes.

  9. Acoustic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  10. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  11. Droplets Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Dahan, Raphael; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to their capillary resonances (Rayleigh, 1879) and their optical resonances (Ashkin, 1977), droplets acoustical resonances were rarely considered. Here we experimentally excite, for the first time, the acoustical resonances of a droplet that relies on sound instead of capillary waves. Droplets vibrations at 37 MHz rates and 100 quality factor are optically excited and interrogated at an optical threshold of 68 microWatt. Our vibrations span a spectral band that is 1000 times higher when compared with drops previously-studied capillary vibration.

  12. Simultaneously measuring thickness, density, velocity and attenuation of thin layers using V(z,t) data from time-resolved acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-02-01

    To meet the need of efficient, comprehensive and automatic characterization of the properties of thin layers, a nondestructive method using ultrasonic testing to simultaneously measure thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation through V(z,t) data, recorded by time-resolved acoustic microscopy is proposed. The theoretical reflection spectrum of the thin layer at normal incidence is established as a function of three dimensionless parameters. The measured reflection spectrum R(θ,ω) is obtained from V(z,t) data and the measured thickness is derived from the signals when the lens is focused on the front and back surface of the thin layer, which are picked up from the V(z,t) data. The density, sound velocity and attenuation are then determined by the measured thickness and inverse algorithm utilizing least squares method to fit the theoretical and measured reflection spectrum at normal incidence. It has the capability of simultaneously measuring thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation of thin layer in a single V(z,t) acquisition. An example is given for a thin plate immersed in water and the results are satisfactory. The method greatly simplifies the measurement apparatus and procedures, which improves the efficiency and automation for simultaneous measurement of basic mechanical and geometrical properties of thin layers.

  13. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  14. The noise environment of a school classroom due to the operation of utility helicopters. [acoustic measurements of helicopter noise during flight over building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. A.; Pegg, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Noise measurements under controlled conditions have been made inside and outside of a school building during flyover operations of four different helicopters. The helicopters were operated at a condition considered typical for a police patrol mission. Flyovers were made at an altitude of 500 ft and an airspeed of 45 miles per hour. During these operations acoustic measurements were made inside and outside of the school building with the windows closed and then open. The outside noise measurements during helicopter flyovers indicate that the outside db(A) levels were approximately the same for all test helicopters. For the windows closed case, significant reductions for the inside measured db(A) values were noted for all overflights. These reductions were approximately 20 db(A); similar reductions were noted in other subjective measuring units. The measured internal db(A) levels with the windows open exceeded published classroom noise criteria values; however, for the windows-closed case they are in general agreement with the criteria values.

  15. Factors associated with the impossibility to obtain reliable liver stiffness measurements by means of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography—Analysis of a cohort of 1031 subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bota, Simona, E-mail: bota_simona1982@yahoo.com; Sporea, Ioan, E-mail: isporea@umft.ro; Sirli, Roxana, E-mail: roxanasirli@gmail.com; Popescu, Alina, E-mail: alinamircea.popescu@gmail.com; Danila, Mirela, E-mail: mireladanila@gmail.com; Jurchis, Ana, E-mail: ana.jurchis@yahoo.com; Gradinaru-Tascau, Oana, E-mail: bluonmyown@yahoo.com

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography is a non-invasive technique for liver fibrosis assessment. Aim: To assess the feasibility of ARFI elastography in a large cohort of subjects and to identify factors associated with impossibility to obtain reliable liver stiffness (LS) measurements by means of this technique. Methods: Our retrospective study included 1031 adult subjects with or without chronic liver disease. In each subject LS was assessed by means of ARFI elastography. Failure of ARFI measurements was defined if no valid measurement was obtained after at least 10 shots and unreliable in the following situations: fewer than 10 valid shots; or median value of 10 valid measurements with a success rate (SR) < 60% and/or an interquartile range interval (IQR) ≥ 30%. Results: Failure of LS measurements by means of ARFI was observed in 4 subjects (0.3%), unreliable measurements in 66 subjects (6.4%), so reliable measurements were obtained in 961 subjects (93.3%). In univariant analysis, the following risk factors were associated with failed and unreliable measurements: age over 58 years (OR = 0.49; 95% CI 0.30–0.80, p = 0.005), male gender (OR = 0.58; 95% CI 0.34–0.94, p = 0.04), BMI > 27.7 kg/m{sup 2} (OR = 0.23, 95% CI 0.13–0.41, p < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis all the factors mentioned above were independently associated with the risk of failed and unreliable measurements. Conclusions: Reliable LS measurements by means of ARFI elastography were obtained in 93.3% of cases. Older age, higher BMI and male gender were associated with the risk of failed and unreliable measurements, but their influence is limited as compared with Transient Elastography.

  16. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  17. Medidas vocais acústicas na doença de Parkinson: estudo de casos Vocal acoustic measures in Parkinson disease: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: características vocais acústicas de indivíduos com Doença de Parkinson (DP. PROCEDIMENTOS: estudo de casos, estatística descritiva; cinco pares de parkinsonianos e controle, três masculinos e dois femininos, entre 36 e 63 anos. Avaliação otorrinolaringológica, fonoaudiológica, voz analisada pelo Multi-Dimensional Voice Program Advanced Model 5105 da Kay Pentax®. RESULTADOS: a f0 das mulheres adultas de meia-idade com DP ficou na faixa masculina e a f0 dos controles no limite inferior da faixa feminina. Nos demais sujeitos, que eram homens de diferentes idades, a f0 foi normal; houve aumento de todas as medidas acústicas principalmente nos sujeitos com DP de todas as faixas etárias estudadas. CONCLUSÃO: o processo de envelhecimento e suas consequências parecem atuar como fator interferente nas modificações acústicas da voz, mas, aparentemente, a DP e a idade precoce de seu aparecimento podem acentuar tais alterações, repercutindo de forma negativa na fonação.BACKGROUND: vocal acoustic measures in individuals with Parkinson Disease (PD. PROCEDURES: case studies, descriptive statistics; five pairs of Parkinson patients and control group, three male and two female subjects, between 36 and 63-year old. Evaluations on otorhinolaryngology, speech therapy, voice analyzed by the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program Advanced Model 5105 by Kay Pentax®. RESULTS: f0 in women adults of middle age with PD, was in full male and f0 of the controls on the bottom of the band of women. In other subjects, who were men of different ages, f0 was normal; there was an increase for all acoustic measures, mainly, in the subjects with PD of all studied age groups. CONCLUSION: aging process and its consequences seem to act as an interference factor in the changes of acoustic voice, but apparently, PD and the early age of its appearance may come to enhance these changes, reflecting a negative impact on phonation.

  18. Profile measurements and data from the 2011 Optics, Acoustics, and Stress In Situ (OASIS) project at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2012-01-01

    This report documents data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Coastal Model Applications and Field Measurements project under the auspices of the U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research Optics, Acoustics, and Stress In Situ (OASIS) Project. The objective of the measurements was to relate optical and acoustic properties of suspended particles to changes in particle size, concentration, and vertical distribution in the bottom boundary layer near the seafloor caused by wave- and current-induced stresses. This information on the physics of particle resuspension and aggregation and light penetration and water clarity will help improve models of sediment transport, benthic primary productivity, and underwater visibility. There is well-established technology for acoustic profiling, but optical profiles are more difficult to obtain because of the rapid attenuation of light in water. A specially modified tripod with a moving arm was designed to solve this problem by moving instruments vertically in the bottom boundary layer, between the bottom and about 2 meters above the seafloor. The profiling arm was designed, built, and tested during spring and summer 2011 by a team of USGS scientists, engineers, and technicians. To accommodate power requirements and the large data files recorded by some of the optical instruments, the tripod was connected via underwater cable to the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory, operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). This afforded real-time Internet communication with the embedded computers aboard the tripod. Instruments were mounted on the profiling arm, and additional instruments were mounted elsewhere on the tripod and nearby on the seafloor. The tripod and a small mooring for a profiling current meter were deployed on September 17, 2011, at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory 12-meter-deep underwater node about 2 kilometers south of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. Divers assisted in the

  19. Studies of a full-scale mechanical prototype line for the ANTARES neutrino telescope and tests of a prototype instrument for deep-sea acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageron, M. [CPPM-Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Aguilar, J.A. [IFIC-Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Edificios Investigacion de Paterna, CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Apdo. de Correos 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Albert, A. [GRPHE-Groupe de Recherche en Physique des Hautes Energies, Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 Rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Ameli, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' e Sezione INFN, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Anghinolfi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita e Sezione INFN, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F. [DSM/DAPNIA-Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, Laboratoire de Recherche sur les lois Fondamentales de l' Univers, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J. [CPPM-Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite de la Mediterranee, 163 Avenue de Luminy, Case 902, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Auer, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Barbarito, E. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica e Sezione INFN, Via E. Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Basa, S. [LAM-Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, CNRS/INSU et Universite de Provence, Traverse du Siphon-Les Trois Lucs, BP 8, 13012 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Battaglieri, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita e Sezione INFN, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Bazzotti, M.; Becherini, Y. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita e Sezione INFN, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy)] (and others)

    2007-11-01

    A full-scale mechanical prototype line was deployed to a depth of 2500 m to test the leak tightness of the electronics containers and the pressure-resistant properties of an electromechanical cable under evaluation for use in the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope. During a month-long immersion study, line parameter data were taken using miniature autonomous data loggers and shore-based optical time domain reflectometry. Details of the mechanical prototype line, the electromechanical cable and data acquisition are presented. Data taken during the immersion study revealed deficiencies in the pressure resistance of the electromechanical cable terminations at the entry points to the electronics containers. The improvements to the termination, which have been integrated into subsequent detection lines, are discussed. The line also allowed deep-sea acoustic measurements with a prototype hydrophone system. The technical setup of this system is described, and the first results of the data analysis are presented.

  20. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation of compounds affected during optoacoustic monitoring of thermal therapies measured in the temperature range from 5°C to 60°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruganti, Tanmayi; Petrova, Elena; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.

    2015-03-01

    Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging is being adopted for monitoring tissue temperature during hypothermic and hyperthermic cancer treatments. The technique's accuracy benefits from the knowledge of speed of sound (SoS) and acoustic coefficient of attenuation (AcA) as they change with temperature in biological tissues, blood, and acoustic lens of an ultrasound probe. In these studies we measured SoS and AcA of different ex vivo tissues and blood components (plasma and erythrocyte concentrates) in the temperature range from 5°C to 60°C. We used the technique based on measurements of time-delay and spectral amplitude of pressure pulses generated by wideband planar acoustic waves propagating through the interrogated medium. Water was used as a reference medium with known acoustic properties. In order to validate our experimental technique, we measured the temperature dependence of SoS and AcA for aqueous NaCl solution of known concentration and obtained the results in agreement with published data. Similar to NaCl solution and pure water, SoS in blood and plasma was monotonously increasing with temperature. However, SoS of erythrocyte concentrates displayed abnormalities at temperatures above 45°C, suggesting potential effects from hemoglobin denaturation and/or hemolysis of erythrocytes. On the contrary to aqueous solutions, the SoS in polyvinyl-chloride (plastisol) - a material frequently used for mimicking optical and acoustic properties of tissues - decreased with temperature. We also measured SoS and AcA in silicon material of an acoustic lens and did not observe temperature-related changes of SoS.

  1. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  2. A Martian acoustic anemometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Don; Schindel, David W; Tarr, Steve; Dissly, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    An acoustic anemometer for use on Mars has been developed. To understand the processes that control the interaction between surface and atmosphere on Mars, not only the mean winds, but also the turbulent boundary layer, the fluxes of momentum, heat and molecular constituents between surface and atmosphere must be measured. Terrestrially this is done with acoustic anemometers, but the low density atmosphere on Mars makes it challenging to adapt such an instrument for use on Mars. This has been achieved using capacitive transducers and pulse compression, and was successfully demonstrated on a stratospheric balloon (simulating the Martian environment) and in a dedicated Mars Wind Tunnel facility. This instrument achieves a measurement accuracy of ∼5 cm/s with an update rate of >20 Hz under Martian conditions.

  3. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  4. Constraints on dark energy from the Ly α forest baryon acoustic oscillations measurement of the redshift 2.3 Hubble parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooq, Omer, E-mail: omer@phys.ksu.edu; Ratra, Bharat, E-mail: ratra@phys.ksu.edu

    2013-06-10

    We use the Busca et al. (2012) [11] measurement of the Hubble parameter at redshift z=2.3 in conjunction with 21 lower z measurements, from Simon, Verde, and Jimenez (2005) [81], Gaztañaga, Cabré, and Hui (2009) [33], Stern et al. (2010) [85], and Moresco et al. (2012) [52], to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving dark energy cosmological models. The inclusion of the new Busca et al. (2012) [11] measurement results in H(z) constraints significantly more restrictive than those derived by Farooq, Mania, and Ratra (2013) [31]. These H(z) constraints are now more restrictive than those that follow from current Type Ia supernova (SNIa) apparent magnitude measurements Suzuki et al. (2012) [86]. The H(z) constraints by themselves require an accelerating cosmological expansion at about 2 σ confidence level, depending on cosmological model and Hubble constant prior used in the analysis. A joint analysis of H(z), baryon acoustic oscillation peak length scale, and SNIa data favors a spatially-flat cosmological model currently dominated by a time-independent cosmological constant but does not exclude slowly-evolving dark energy density.

  5. Evaluation of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to Measure Discharge at New York Power Authority's Niagara Power Project, Niagara Falls, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajd, Henry J.

    2007-01-01

    The need for accurate real-time discharge in the International Niagara River hydro power system requires reliable, accurate and reproducible data. The U.S. Geological Survey has been widely using Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) to accurately measure discharge in riverine channels since the mid-1990s. The use of the ADCP to measure discharge has remained largely untested at hydroelectric-generation facilities such as the New York Power Authority's (NYPA) Niagara Power Project in Niagara Falls, N.Y. This facility has a large, engineered diversion channel with the capacity of high volume discharges in excess of 100,000 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Facilities such as this could benefit from the use of an ADCP, if the ADCP discharge measurements prove to be more time effective and accurate than those obtained from the flow-calculation techniques that are currently used. Measurements of diversion flow by an ADCP in the 'Pant Leg' diversion channel at the Niagara Power Project were made on November 6, 7, and 8, 2006, and compared favorably (within 1 percent) with those obtained concurrently by a conventional Price-AA current-meter measurement during one of the ADCP measurement sessions. The mean discharge recorded during each 2-hour individual ADCP measurement session compared favorably with (3.5 to 6.8 percent greater than) the discharge values computed by the flow-calculation method presently in use by NYPA. The use of ADCP technology to measure discharge could ultimately permit increased power-generation efficiency at the NYPA Niagara Falls Power Project by providing improved predictions of the amount of water (and thus the power output) available.

  6. Study of baryon acoustic oscillations with SDSS DR12 data and measurements of $\\Omega_k$ and $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$. Part II

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeneisen, B

    2016-01-01

    We define Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) observables $\\hat{d}_\\alpha(z, z_c)$, $\\hat{d}_z(z, z_c)$, and $\\hat{d}_/(z, z_c)$ that do not depend on any cosmological parameter. From each of these observables we recover the BAO correlation length $d_\\textrm{BAO}$ with its respective dependence on cosmological parameters. These BAO observables are measured as a function of redshift $z$ with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release DR12. From the BAO measurements alone, or together with the correlation angle $\\theta_\\textrm{MC}$ of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), we constrain the curvature parameter $\\Omega_k$ and the dark energy density $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$ as a function of the expansion parameter $a$ in several scenarios. These observables are further constrained with external measurements of $h$ and $\\Omega_\\textrm{b} h^2$. We find some tension between the data and a cosmology with flat space and constant dark energy density $\\Omega_\\textrm{DE}(a)$.

  7. Comments on "Precise model measurements versus theoretical prediction of barrier insertion loss in presence of the ground" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 73, 44–54 (1983)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1983-01-01

    Some of the theoretical curves in the article by J. Nicolas et al. [J. Acoust. soc. Am. 73, 44–54 (1983)] appear to be erroneous.......Some of the theoretical curves in the article by J. Nicolas et al. [J. Acoust. soc. Am. 73, 44–54 (1983)] appear to be erroneous....

  8. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  9. Acoustic Characterization of Grass-cover Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    absorption in the higher frequency limits of the acoustic impedance measurements system compared to dried soil . THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA ...Catholic University of America In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree Master of Science By Chelsea Good Washington, D.C 2014...and Hadj Benkreira. Acoustic properties of low grow- ing plants. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America , 133(5):2554–2565, 2013. [4] Jq

  10. Memory-Effect on Acoustic Cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    Yavaṣ, Oğuz; Leiderer, Paul; Park, Hee K.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Poon, Chie C.; Tam, Andrew C.

    1994-01-01

    The formation of bubbles at a liquid-solid interface due to acoustic cavitation depends particularly on the preconditions of the interface. Here, it wiIl be shown that following laser-induced bubble formation at the interface the acoustic cavitation efficiency is strongly enhanced. Optical reflectance measurements reveal that this observed enhancement of acoustic cavitation due to preceding laser-induced bubble formation, which could be termed as memory effect, decays in a few hundred microse...

  11. ACOUSTIC EMISSION ANALYZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Almeida-Pérez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper appears a solution for acoustic emission analysis commonly known as noise. For the accomplishmentof this work a personal computer is used, besides sensors (microphones and boards designed and built for signalconditioning. These components are part of a virtual instrument used for monitoring the acoustical emission. Themain goal of this work is to develop a virtual instrument that supplies many important data as the result of ananalysis allowing to have information in an easy and friendly way. Moreover this information is very useful forstudying and resolving several situations in planning, production and testing areas.The main characteristics of the virtual instrument are: signal analysis in time, effective power measurement inDecibels (dB, average intensity taken from the principle of paired microphones, as well as the data analysis infrequency. These characteristics are included to handle two information channels.

  12. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  13. First results from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements of meltwater flux in a large supraglacial river in western Greenland compared with downstream proglacial river outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, L. H.; Smith, L. C.; Overstreet, B. T.; Chu, V. W.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Cooper, M. G.; Gleason, C. J.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    A vast network of seasonally evolving, thermally eroding supraglacial rivers on the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is the preeminent transporter of meltwater across this area of the ablation zone. Supraglacial rivers are important for estimating surface water storage and transport into moulins and into the en-, sub-, and proglacial environments. Yet, little is known about their role in the GrIS cryo-hydrologic system. To that end, supraglacial river discharge in a large river, the "Rio Behar" (67.05°, -49.02°; ~75 km from the Kangerlussuaq International Airport), was measured in situ over 300 times: approximately four times per hour over three consecutive days from July 19 - 22, 2015. The Rio Behar drains a ~ 70 km2 ice catchment and enters a large moulin in the Watson River land-ice watershed in western Greenland. River discharge was measured using a Sontek M9 Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler. Each profile records water temperature, depth-integrated velocity, channel width and channel bathymetry. This novel dataset can be used to assess diurnal variations in river discharge, slope, velocity, stream power, and channel incision in order to enhance process-level understanding of GrIS meltwater routing, storage and transport. Future work will compare supraglacial river discharge in the Rio Behar with in situ estimates of proglacial river outflow upstream of the Watson River bridge in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland.

  14. LDV measurement of small nonlinearities in flat and curved membranes. A model for eardrum nonlinear acoustic behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Gladiné; Pieter, Muyshondt; Joris, Dirckx

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry is an intrinsic highly linear measurement technique which makes it a great tool to measure extremely small nonlinearities in the vibration response of a system. Although the measurement technique is highly linear, other components in the experimental setup may introduce nonlinearities. An important source of artificially introduced nonlinearities is the speaker, which generates the stimulus. In this work, two correction methods to remove the effects of stimulus nonlinearity are investigated. Both correction methods were found to give similar results but have different pros and cons. The aim of this work is to investigate the importance of the conical shape of the eardrum as a source of nonlinearity in hearing. We present measurements on flat and indented membranes. The data shows that the curved membrane exhibit slightly higher levels of nonlinearity compared to the flat membrane.

  15. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  16. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  17. Observations on some acoustic methods used in studying the elastic properties of metals. [resonant frequency measurements on metal beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velceanu, C. I.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental setup is reported that permits very accurate measurements of the resonance frequencies of long cylindrical beams fixed in the middle and whose size can vary within wide limits. It also permits measurement of the width of the resonance curve. It is shown that the Poisson effect can be brought to light for relatively long beams and for relatively short beams. Poisson ratio, values obtained with this method argue in favor of using the low frequency region for determining elastic constants of solids.

  18. Acoustic cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  19. Nasal cavity dimensions in guinea pig and rat measured by acoustic rhinometry and fluid-displacement method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straszek, Sune; Pedersen, O.F.

    2004-01-01

    the potential of AR in pharmacological research with these animals. We measured the area-distance relationships by AR of nasal cavities postmortem in five guinea pigs (Duncan Hartley, 400 g) and five rats (Wistar, 250 g) by using custom-made equipment scaled for the purpose. Nosepieces were made from plastic...

  20. Ocean currents measured by Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (SADCP) from global oceans accumulated at Joint Archive for SADCP from 2004 to 2013 (NODC Accession 0123302)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Absolute U- and V-component ocean current vectors from Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (SADCP), as both a high-frequency sampling (nominally 5 minutes...

  1. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  2. Acoustics in rock and pop music halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders Christian

    2007-01-01

    The existing body of literature regarding the acoustic design of concert halls has focused almost exclusively on classical music, although there are many more performances of rhythmic music, including rock and pop. Objective measurements were made of the acoustics of twenty rock music venues...

  3. An acoustical model based monitoring network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the approach for an acoustical model based monitoring network is demonstrated. This network is capable of reconstructing a noise map, based on the combination of measured sound levels and an acoustic model of the area. By pre-calculating the sound attenuation within the network the noi

  4. Experimental Verification of Acoustic Impedance Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永刚; 王宁; 林俊轩

    2003-01-01

    Well controlled model experiments were carried out to verify acoustic impedance inversion scheme, and different methods of extracting impulse responses were investigated by practical data. The acoustic impedance profiles reconstructed from impulse responses are in good agreement with the measured value and theoretical value.

  5. Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies IV: Baryon Acoustic Peak in the Line-of-Sight Direction and a Direct Measurement of H(z)

    CERN Document Server

    Gaztanaga, Enrique; Hui, Lam

    2008-01-01

    This is the 4th paper in a series where we study the clustering of LRG galaxies in the latest spectroscopic SDSS data release, DR6, which has 75000 LRG galaxies sampling 1.1 (Gpc/h)^3 to z=0.47. Here we study the 2-point correlation function, separated in perpendicular (sigma) and line-of-sight (pi) directions. We find a significant detection of a peak at r=110 Mpc/h, which shows as a circular ring in the sigma-pi plane. There is also a significant detection of the peak along the line-of-sight (LOS) direction both in sub-samples at low, z=0.15-30, and high redshifts, z=0.40-0.47. The overall shape and location of the peak is consistent with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The amplitude in the line-of-sight direction, however, is larger than conventional expectations. We argue this is due to magnification bias. Because the data is shot noise dominated, a lensing boost in signal translates into a boost in S/N. We take advantage of this high S/N to produce, for the first time, a direct measurement of the Hub...

  6. Acoustic phenomena in the latent period of skeletal muscle: a simple method for in-vivo measurement of the electro-mechanic latency (EML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufschmidt, A

    1985-05-01

    An in-vivo method for the assessment of the latency of muscular contraction is presented. It is based on acoustic registration of muscular thickening by a microphone. It was found that the recorded sound wave is often preceded by a small wave of opposite polarity (flattening of the muscle belly) which is an acoustic correlate of the latency relaxation. Strong direct stimulation produced another small sound wave at the beginning of the latent period. The physiological significance of these findings is discussed.

  7. Assessing the performance of the photo-acoustic infrared gas monitor for measuring CO(2), N(2)O, and CH(4) fluxes in two major cereal rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirol-Padre, Agnes; Rai, Munmun; Gathala, Mahesh; Sharma, Sheetal; Kumar, Virender; Sharma, Parbodh C; Sharma, Dinesh K; Wassmann, Reiner; Ladha, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Rapid, precise, and globally comparable methods for monitoring greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes are required for accurate GHG inventories from different cropping systems and management practices. Manual gas sampling followed by gas chromatography (GC) is widely used for measuring GHG fluxes in agricultural fields, but is laborious and time-consuming. The photo-acoustic infrared gas monitoring system (PAS) with on-line gas sampling is an attractive option, although it has not been evaluated for measuring GHG fluxes in cereals in general and rice in particular. We compared N2 O, CO2 , and CH4 fluxes measured by GC and PAS from agricultural fields under the rice-wheat and maize-wheat systems during the wheat (winter), and maize/rice (monsoon) seasons in Haryana, India. All the PAS readings were corrected for baseline drifts over time and PAS-CH4 (PCH4 ) readings in flooded rice were corrected for water vapor interferences. The PCH4 readings in ambient air increased by 2.3 ppm for every 1000 mg cm(-3) increase in water vapor. The daily CO2 , N2 O, and CH4 fluxes measured by GC and PAS from the same chamber were not different in 93-98% of all the measurements made but the PAS exhibited greater precision for estimates of CO2 and N2 O fluxes in wheat and maize, and lower precision for CH4 flux in rice, than GC. The seasonal GC- and PAS-N2 O (PN2 O) fluxes in wheat and maize were not different but the PAS-CO2 (PCO2 ) flux in wheat was 14-39% higher than that of GC. In flooded rice, the seasonal PCH4 and PN2 O fluxes across N levels were higher than those of GC-CH4 and GC-N2 O fluxes by about 2- and 4fold, respectively. The PAS (i) proved to be a suitable alternative to GC for N2 O and CO2 flux measurements in wheat, and (ii) showed potential for obtaining accurate measurements of CH4 fluxes in flooded rice after making correction for changes in humidity.

  8. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  9. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time-distance helioseismology pipeline has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time-distance helioseismology: a Gabor wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, 2004). Using Doppler velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference travel-time perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (1997) and Gizon and Birch (2002). We investigated the relationships among these three travel-time definitions, their sensitivities to fitting parameters, and estimated the random errors they produce

  10. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Solar Dynamics Observatory-Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler-velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time - distance helioseismology pipeline (Zhao et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2010) has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross-covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time - distance helioseismology: a Gabor-wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004). Using Doppler-velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument onboard SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference traveltime perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet-Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997) and Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002). We investigated the relationships among

  11. Speed of sound measurements and mixing characterization of underexpanded fuel jets with supercritical reservoir condition using laser-induced thermal acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baab, S.; Förster, F. J.; Lamanna, G.; Weigand, B.

    2016-11-01

    The four-wave mixing technique laser-induced thermal acoustics was used to measure the local speed of sound in the farfield zone of extremely underexpanded jets. N-hexane at supercritical injection temperature and pressure (supercritical reservoir condition) was injected into quiescent subcritical nitrogen (with respect to the injectant). The technique's capability to quantify the nonisothermal, turbulent mixing zone of small-scale jets is demonstrated for the first time. Consistent radially resolved speed of sound profiles are presented for different axial positions and varying injection temperatures. Furthermore, an adiabatic mixing model based on nonideal thermodynamic properties is presented to extract mixture composition and temperature from the experimental speed of sound data. High fuel mass fractions of up to 94 % are found for the centerline at an axial distance of 55 diameters from the nozzle followed by a rapid decay in axial direction. This is attributed to a supercritical fuel state at the nozzle exit resulting in the injection of a high-density fluid. The obtained concentration data are complemented by existing measurements and collapsed in a similarity law. It allows for mixture prediction of underexpanded jets with supercritical reservoir condition provided that nonideal thermodynamic behavior is considered for the nozzle flow. Specifically, it is shown that the fuel concentration in the farfield zone is very sensitive to the thermodynamic state at the nozzle exit. Here, a transition from supercritical fluid to subcritical vapor state results in strongly varying fuel concentrations, which implies high impact on the mixture formation and, consequently, on the combustion characteristics.

  12. Inverting Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) touchdown signals to measure the elastic modulus of comet material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W.; Faber, C.; Knapmeyer, M.; Witte, L.; Schröder, S.; Tune, J.; Möhlmann, D.; Roll, R.; Chares, B.; Fischer, H.; Seidensticker, K.

    2014-07-01

    The landing of Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is scheduled for November 11, 2014. Each of the three landing feet of Philae house a triaxial acceleration sensor of CASSE, which will thus be the first sensors to be in mechanical contact with the cometary surface. CASSE will be in listening mode to record the deceleration of the lander, when it impacts with the comet at a velocity of approx. 0.5 m/s. The analysis of this data yields information on the reduced elastic modulus and the yield stress of the comet's surface material. We describe a series of controlled landings of a lander model. The tests were conducted in the Landing & Mobility Test Facility (LAMA) of the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen, Germany, where an industrial robot can be programmed to move landers or rovers along predefined paths, allowing to adapt landing procedures with predefined velocities. The qualification model of the Philae landing gear was used in the tests. It consists of three legs manufactured of carbon fiber and metal joints. A dead mass of the size and mass of the lander housing is attached via a damper above the landing gear to represent the lander structure as a whole. Attached to each leg is a foot with two soles and a mechanically driven fixation screw (''ice screw'') to secure the lander on the comet. The right soles, if viewed from the outside towards the lander body, house a Brüel & Kjaer DeltaTron 4506 triaxial piezoelectric accelerometer as used on the spacecraft. Orientation of the three axes was such that one of the axes, here the X-axis of the accelerometer, points downwards, while the Y- and Z-axes are horizontal. Data were recorded at a sampling rate of 8.2 kHz within a time gate of 2 s. In parallel, a video sequence was taken, in order to monitor the touchdown on the sand and the movement of the ice screws. Touchdown measurements were conducted on three types of ground with landing velocities between 0.1 to 1.1 m/s. Landings with low velocities were

  13. Measurement system for wind turbine acoustic noise assessment based on IEC standard and Qin′s model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Lei; Qin Shuren; Bo Lin; Xu Liping; Stephan Joeckel

    2008-01-01

    A novel measurement system specially used in noise emission assessment and verification of wind turbine generator systems is presented that complies with specifications given in IEC 61400-11 to ensure the process consistency and accuracy. Theory elements of the calculation formula used for the sound power level of wind turbine have been discussed for the first time, and detailed calculation procedure of tonality and audibility integrating narrowband analysis and psychoacoustics is described. With a microphone and two PXI cards inserted into a PC, this system is designed in Qin′s model using VMIDS development system. Benefiting from the virtual instrument architecture, it′s the first time that all assessment process have been integrated into an organic whole, which gives full advantages of its efficiency, price, and facility. Mass experiments show that its assessment results accord with the ones given by MEASNET member.

  14. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  15. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  16. Measurement of the ultrasonic properties of human coronary arteries in vitro with a 50-MHz acoustic microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Machado

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic attenuation coefficient, wave propagation speed and integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC of human coronary arteries were measured in vitro over the -6 dB frequency bandwidth (36 to 67 MHz of a focused ultrasound transducer (50 MHz, focal distance 5.7 mm, f/number 1.7. Corrections were made for diffraction effects. Normal and diseased coronary artery sub-samples (N = 38 were obtained from 10 individuals at autopsy. The measured mean ± SD of the wave speed (average over the entire vessel wall thickness was 1581.04 ± 53.88 m/s. At 50 MHz, the average attenuation coefficient was 4.99 ± 1.33 dB/mm with a frequency dependence term of 1.55 ± 0.18 determined over the 36- to 67-MHz frequency range. The IBC values were: 17.42 ± 13.02 (sr.m-1 for thickened intima, 11.35 ± 6.54 (sr.m-1 for fibrotic intima, 39.93 ± 50.95 (sr.m-1 for plaque, 4.26 ± 2.34 (sr.m-1 for foam cells, 5.12 ± 5.85 (sr.m-1 for media and 21.26 ± 31.77 (sr.m-1 for adventitia layers. The IBC results indicate the possibility for ultrasound characterization of human coronary artery wall tissue layer, including the situations of diseased arteries with the presence of thickened intima, fibrotic intima and plaque. The mean IBC normalized with respect to the mean IBC of the media layer seems promising for use as a parameter to differentiate a plaque or a thickened intima from a fibrotic intima.

  17. Application of holography in jet acoustic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Pundarika; R Lakshminarayana; T S Sheshadri

    2004-08-01

    Source strength distribution on a jet boundary was obtained from measurements using the principle of acoustic holography. Measurements were conducted in an open field. Measurement of acoustic pressure on a cylindrical twodimensional contour located close to the vibrating jet boundary was used to obtain the acoustic source strength distribution at the jet boundary. Particular attention was focussed on back projection of the sound field on to a cylindrical surface. A jet emanating from 5 mm convergent nozzle was used for the holography experiments, assuming axisymmetry. Experimental results were compared with results obtained from holography

  18. Wind turbine acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Harvey H.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1990-12-01

    Available information on the physical characteristics of the noise generated by wind turbines is summarized, with example sound pressure time histories, narrow- and broadband frequency spectra, and noise radiation patterns. Reviewed are noise measurement standards, analysis technology, and a method of characterizing wind turbine noise. Prediction methods are given for both low-frequency rotational harmonics and broadband noise components. Also included are atmospheric propagation data showing the effects of distance and refraction by wind shear. Human perception thresholds, based on laboratory and field tests, are given. Building vibration analysis methods are summarized. The bibliography of this report lists technical publications on all aspects of wind turbine acoustics.

  19. Current situation of the study on Kaiser effect of rock acoustic emission in in-situ stress measurement%声发射Kaiser效应在地应力测量中的应用现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李利峰; 邹正盛; 张庆

    2011-01-01

    Based on periodical literature, the statistics of papers on accoustic emission since recent twenty years were made. The principle and mechanism of acoustic emission, space positioning for the samples were presented.With the theory of elastic mechanics, six direction and four direction methods in space for in-sim measurement using the rock acoustic emission were derived. There are two sampling methods according to the different methods.Influence factors of acoustic emission in in-sim stress measurement, determining method of Kaiser Point and treatment technique for signal and noise were systematically expounded. Two methods which are different from the traditional in-situ measurement are introduced. Problems and research trend of the in-situ stress measurement using acoustic emission were analyzed.%对近20年来岩石声发射测量地应力的研究现状进行了分析,介绍了声发射的原理和机理及试样的空间定位方法.利用弹性力学原理推导了声发射方法测定地应力的空间6向和4向的计算过程,对应有两种常用的取样方式.系统地阐述了影响声发射地应力测量的因素、Kaiser点的确定方法以及信噪处理技术,简单介绍了不同于传统利用声发射测量地应力的另外两种方法.对声发射测量地应力中存在的问题和研究趋势进行了分析.

  20. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  1. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  2. Acoustic vocal measures in women without voice complaints and with normal larynxes Medidas vocais acústicas de mulheres sem queixas de voz e com laringe normal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Susana Finger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is important to establish normal voice standards in order to help guide voice professionals. AIM: to describe acoustic voice measures of adult young women with normal larynxes and without voice complaints. METHOD: 56 women underwent ENT evaluation and speech screening. The "A" vowel utterance was digitally recorded and analyzed by means of the Praat (Version 4.6.10 software. The data was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and by the Shapiro-Wilk test with a 5% significance level. The study was cross-section and exploratory. RESULTS: normal distribution measures were: fundamental frequency; Jitter (local; Jitter (local, absolute; Jitter (ppq5; Jitter (ddp. The Jitter (rap, all the Shimmer, the noise/harmonic ratio (NHR and the harmonic/noise ratio (HNR values did not follow a normal distribution. CONCLUSION: It seems that the measures which followed the normal distribution can be used as base-normal values for the interpretation of acoustic voice analysis of those women with and without laryngeal disorders. All the values with and without normal distribution showed results similar to the ones present in the national and international literature.O estabelecimento de padrões de base da normalidade é importante para guiar os profissionais na área da voz. OBJETIVO: Descrever as medidas acústicas de vozes de mulheres adultas jovens, com laringe normal e sem queixas de voz. MÉTODO: 56 mulheres realizaram avaliação otorrinolaringológica e triagem fonoaudiológica. A emissão da vogal /a/ foi gravada digitalmente e analisada por meio do software Praat (versão 4.6.10. Os dados foram analisados por meio da estatística descritiva, e pelo teste Shapiro-Wilk, em nível de significância de 5%. O estudo foi transversal e exploratório. RESULTADOS: Medidas com distribuição normal foram: Frequência fundamental; Jitter (local; Jitter (local, absoluto; Jitter (ppq5; Jitter (ddp. As medidas de Jitter (rap; todas as de Shimmer; a Propor

  3. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms.

  4. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  5. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  6. Density-near-zero using the acoustically induced transparency of a Fano acoustic resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Elayouch, A.

    2017-01-05

    We report experimental results of near-zero mass density involving an acoustic metamaterial supporting Fano resonance. For this, we designed and fabricated an acoustic resonator with two closely coupled modes and measured its transmission properties. Our study reveals that the phenomenon of acoustically induced transparency is accompanied by an effect of near-zero density. Indeed, the dynamic effective parameters obtained from experimental data show the presence of a frequency band where the effective mass density is close to zero, with high transmission levels reaching 0.7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such effective parameters lead to wave guiding in a 90-degrees-bent channel. This kind of acoustic metamaterial can, therefore, give rise to acoustic functions like controlling the wavefront, which may lead to very promising applications in acoustic cloacking or imaging.

  7. Ionic association and solvation of the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride in molecular solvents revealed by vapor pressure osmometry, conductometry, volumetry, and acoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Ebrahimi, Nosaibah

    2011-11-17

    A systematic study of osmotic coefficient, conductivity, volumetric and acoustic properties of solutions of ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(6)mim][Cl]) in various molecular solvents has been made at different temperatures in order to study of ionic association and solvation behavior of [C(6)mim][Cl] in different solutions. Precise measurements on electrical conductances of solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and acetonitrile at 293.15, 298.15, and 303.15 K are reported and analyzed with Barthel's low-concentration chemical model (lcCM) to obtain the limiting molar conductivities and association constants of this ionic liquid in the investigated solvents. Strong ion pairing was found for the ionic liquid in 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-propanol, whereas ion association in acetonitrile, methanol and ethanol is rather weak and in water the ionic liquid is fully dissociated. In the second part of this work, the apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-butanol are obtained at the 288.15-313.15 K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from the precise measurements of density and sound velocity. The infinite dilution apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values of the free ions and ion pairs of [C(6)mim][Cl] in the investigated solvents as well as the excess molar volume of the investigated solutions are determined and their variations with temperature and type of solvents are also studied. Finally, the experimental measurements of osmotic coefficient at 318.15 K for binary solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile are taken using the vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) method and from which the values of the solvent activity, vapor pressure, activity coefficients, and Gibbs free energies are calculated. The results are

  8. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  9. Three-dimensional nonlinear acoustical holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaying

    Nearfield Acoustical Holography (NAH) is an acoustic field visualization technique that can be used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3-D) acoustic fields by projecting two-dimensional (2-D) data measured on a hologram surface. However, linear NAH algorithms developed and improved by many researchers can result in significant reconstruction errors when they are applied to reconstruct 3-D acoustic fields that are radiated from a high-level noise source and include significant nonlinear components. Here, planar, nonlinear acoustical holography procedures are developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D, nonlinear acoustic fields radiated from a high-level noise source based on 2-D acoustic pressure data measured on a hologram surface. The first nonlinear acoustic holography procedure is derived for reconstructing steady-state acoustic pressure fields by applying perturbation and renormalization methods to nonlinear, dissipative, pressure-based Westervelt Wave Equation (WWE). The nonlinear acoustic pressure fields radiated from a high-level pulsating sphere and an infinite-size, vibrating panel are used to validate this procedure. Although the WWE-based algorithm is successfully validated by those two numerical simulations, it still has several limitations: (1) Only the fundamental frequency and its second harmonic nonlinear components can be reconstructed; (2) the application of this algorithm is limited to mono-frequency source cases; (3) the effects of bent wave rays caused by transverse particle velocities are not included; (4) only acoustic pressure fields can be reconstructed. In order to address the limitations of the steady-state, WWE-based procedure, a transient, planar, nonlinear acoustic holography algorithm is developed that can be used to reconstruct 3-D nonlinear acoustic pressure and particle velocity fields. This procedure is based on Kuznetsov Wave Equation (KWE) that is directly solved by using temporal and spatial Fourier Transforms. When compared

  10. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  11. Inverse potential scattering in duct acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B; Aktosun, Tuncay

    2006-01-01

    The inverse problem of the noninvasive measurement of the shape of an acoustical duct in which one-dimensional wave propagation can be assumed is examined within the theoretical framework of the governing Klein-Gordon equation. Previous deterministic methods developed over the last 40 years have all required direct measurement of the reflectance or input impedance but now, by application of the methods of inverse quantum scattering to the acoustical system, it is shown that the reflectance can be algorithmically derived from the radiated wave. The potential and area functions of the duct can subsequently be reconstructed. The results are discussed with particular reference to acoustic pulse reflectometry.

  12. Acoustic Monitoring for Spaceflight Vehicle Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will develop and demonstrate acoustic sensor technology enabling real-time, remotely performed measuring and monitoring of sound pressure levels and noise...

  13. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    develop and demonstrate emerging undersea acoustic communication technologies at operationally useful ranges and data rates. The secondary objective...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine...moderate data rate acoustic communications capability for tactical use between submarines, surface combatants, unmanned undersea vehicles (UUVs), and other

  14. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  15. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  16. Photoacoustic cell using elliptical acoustic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritier, J.-M.; Fouquet, J. E.; Siegman, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell has been developed in the form of an elliptical cylinder in which essentially all the acoustic energy generated by a laser beam passing down one axis is focused onto a cylindrical acoustic tranducer located along the other axis. Preliminary measurements on a liquid-filled cell of this design show high sensitivity and a notably clean impulse response. A similar design may be useful for photoacoustic measurements in vapors as well.

  17. Acoustic and Perceptual Measures of SATB Choir Performances on Two Types of Portable Choral Riser Units in Three Singer-Spacing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, James F.; Manternach, Jeremy N.; Brunkan, Melissa C.

    2013-01-01

    Under controlled conditions, we assessed acoustically (long-term average spectra) and perceptually (singer survey, listener survey) six performances of an soprano, alto, tenor, and bass (SATB) choir ("N" = 27) as it sang the same musical excerpt on two portable riser units (standard riser step height, taller riser step height) with…

  18. ISAT: The mega-fauna acoustic tracking system

    KAUST Repository

    De la Torre, Pedro

    2013-06-01

    The acoustic tracking module of the Integrated Satellite and Acoustic Telemetry (iSAT) system is discussed in detail. iSAT is capable of detecting the relative direction of an acoustic source by measuring the order of arrival (OOA) of the acoustic signal to each hydrophone in a triangular array. The characteristics of the hydrophones, the projector, and the target acoustic signal used for iSAT are described. Initially it is designed to study the movements of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus), but it could potentially be used to describe high resolution movements of other marine species. © 2013 IEEE.

  19. Subjective evaluation of restaurant acoustics in a virtual sound environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nicolaj Østergaard; Marschall, Marton; Santurette, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    surveys report that noise complaints are on par with poor service. This study investigated the relation between objective acoustic parameters and subjective evaluation of acoustic comfort at five restaurants in terms of three parameters: noise annoyance, speech intelligibility, and privacy. At each...... location, customers filled out questionnaire surveys, acoustic parameters were measured, and recordings of restaurant acoustic scenes were obtained with a 64-channel spherical array. The acoustic scenes were reproduced in a virtual sound environment (VSE) with 64 loudspeakers placed in an anechoic room...

  20. Acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hua; Qu Shao-Bo; Xu Zhuo; Wang Jia-Fu

    2009-01-01

    By making a comparison between the acoustic equations and the 2-dimensional (2D) Maxwell equations, we obtain the material parameter equations (MPE) for acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks. Both the theoretical results and the numerical results indicate that an elliptical cylindrical cloak can realize perfect acoustic invisibility when the spatial distributions of mass density and bulk modulus are exactly configured according to the proposed equations. The present work is the meaningful exploration of designing acoustic cloaks that are neither sphere nor circular cylinder in shape, and opens up possibilities for making complex and multiplex acoustic cloaks with simple models such as spheres, circular or elliptic cylinders.

  1. Indoor acoustic gain design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  2. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  3. Measurement and Analysis of Coherent Flow Structures over Sand Dunes in the Missouri River near St. Louis, MO, by means of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler and a Multibeam Echo Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, J.; Oberg, K. A.; Best, J. L.; Parsons, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The topology, magnitude, and sediment transport capabilities of large-scale turbulence generated over alluvial sand dunes is influential in creating and maintaining dune morphology and in dominating both the flow field and the transport of suspended sediment above dune-covered beds. Combined measurements by means of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and a multibeam echo sounder (MBES) were made in order to examine flow over a series of sand dunes in the Missouri River, near St. Louis, MO, USA in October 2007. The bed topography of the Missouri River was mapped using a RESON 7125 MBES immediately before the ADCP data collection. Time series of velocity and acoustic backscatter were measured using a down-looking 1200 kHz ADCP while anchored at two locations in the dune field. The ADCP used in this study has a sampling rate of 2-3 Hz with 20-25 cm bin sizes. Two time series were collected having durations of 712 and 589 seconds at one location, while the third time series, collected about 4 meters upstream, was 2,270 seconds in duration. Measured streamwise velocities ranged from 0.1 to 2.7 ms-1 for all three stationary time series. Sediment concentration profiles were obtained at the same two locations as the stationary ADCP data using a P-61 sediment sampler and were compared to ADCP acoustic backscatter. Characteristics of turbulent flow structures in a sand bed river are presented. This paper presents data that can be used to investigate the issue of obtaining reliable estimates of turbulence parameters with an ADCP. The analyses will include mean velocity profiles, turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stresses, quadrant analysis, power spectra, cross-correlation, and frequency analysis. Semi-periodic patterns were observed in each time series, characterized by periods of elevated acoustic backscatter with positive vertical velocities, followed by reduced acoustic backscatter with negative vertical velocities. The utility and limitations of combined

  4. Acoustics and Hearing

    CERN Document Server

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  5. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  6. Dyke leakage localization and hydraulic permeability estimation through self-potential and hydro-acoustic measurements: Self-potential 'abacus' diagram for hydraulic permeability estimation and uncertainty computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolève, A.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Grangeon, J.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we propose the combination of two geophysical techniques, which we have applied to a dyke located in southeastern France that has a visible downstream flood area: the self-potential (SP) and hydro-acoustic methods. These methods are sensitive to two different types of signals: electric signals and water-soil pressure disturbances, respectively. The advantages of the SP technique lie in the high rate of data acquisition, which allows assessment of long dykes, and direct diagnosis in terms of leakage area delimitation and quantification. Coupled with punctual hydro-acoustic cartography, a leakage position can be precisely located, therefore allowing specific remediation decisions with regard to the results of the geophysical investigation. Here, the precise localization of leakage from an earth dyke has been identified using SP and hydro-acoustic signals, with the permeability of the preferential fluid flow area estimated by forward SP modeling. Moreover, we propose a general 'abacus' diagram for the estimation of hydraulic permeability of dyke leakage according to the magnitude of over water SP anomalies and the associated uncertainty.

  7. A modular guitar for teaching musical acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In order to keep students activated in a course on musical acoustics, they were asked to build a modular guitar, designed to be updated throughout the course. In the first stage, dedicated to the physics of strings, a guitar was made out of three strings attached to a long piece of wood. The stud......In order to keep students activated in a course on musical acoustics, they were asked to build a modular guitar, designed to be updated throughout the course. In the first stage, dedicated to the physics of strings, a guitar was made out of three strings attached to a long piece of wood....... The students measured the effect of the place of plucking on the mode of the vibrations of the strings. The second stage was dedicated to the acoustic resonances. Using a laser cutter, the students built a wooden box that was coupled to their guitar using straps. New acoustical measurements were made to study...

  8. Opto-Acoustic Biosensing with Optomechanofluidic Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Kaiyuan; Carmon, Tal; Fan, Xudong; Bahl, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Opto-mechano-fluidic resonators (OMFRs) are a unique optofluidics platform that can measure the acoustic properties of fluids and bioanalytes in a fully-contained microfluidic system. By confining light in ultra-high-Q whispering gallery modes of OMFRs, optical forces such as radiation pressure and electrostriction can be used to actuate and sense structural mechanical vibrations spanning MHz to GHz frequencies. These vibrations are hybrid fluid-shell modes that entrain any bioanalyte present inside. As a result, bioanalytes can now reflect their acoustic properties on the optomechanical vibrational spectrum of the device, in addition to optical property measurements with existing optofluidics techniques. In this work, we investigate acoustic sensing capabilities of OMFRs using computational eigenfrequency analysis. We analyze the OMFR eigenfrequency sensitivity to bulk fluid-phase materials as well as nanoparticles, and propose methods to extract multiple acoustic parameters from multiple vibrational modes. ...

  9. Habilidades auditivas e medidas da imitância acústica em crianças de 4 a 6 anos de idade Auditory abilities and acoustic immittance measures in children from 4 to 6 year old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Della Giacoma Prado Toscano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar o desempenho em habilidades auditivas e as condições de orelha média de crianças de 4 a 6 anos de idade. MÉTODO: foram aplicados os testes de detecção sonora (audiômetro pediátrico em 20dBNA, a Avaliação Simplificada do Processamento Auditivo (ASPA e as medidas de imitância acústica (handtymp com tom de 226Hz em 61 crianças com média de idade de 5,65 anos. Para comparar os resultados das provas de habilidades auditivas e das medidas da imitância acústica foi aplicado o teste exato de Fisher com nível de significância de pPURPOSE: to evaluate the performance of auditory abilities and conditions in the middle ear of children from 4 to 6 year old. METHOD: we applied the tests in order to detect sound (pediatric audiometer in 20dBHL, the Simplified Assessment of Auditory Processing (SAAP and the acoustic immittance measures (handtymp with a probe of 226Hz. In order to compare the results from the tests of auditory abilities and measures of acoustic impedance we applied Fisher's exact test with significance level of p <0.05. RESULTS: the study involved 61 children with a mean age of 5.65 years. There was some alteration in at least one of the investigated auditory skills in 24.6% of the children. Tympanometry was altered in 34.4% of the children and 64% were classified on the "fail" criterion for the measure of ipsilateral acoustic reflex. Younger children had higher incidence of middle ear disorders, but with no significant statistical difference between different ages as for the tests. CONCLUSION: younger children showed a higher occurrence of alterations in the tests of auditory abilities and measures of acoustic immittance. Research and monitoring programs for the conditions of the middle ear and auditory skills in preschool and school age can eliminate or minimize events that would alter the socio-linguistic development.

  10. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  11. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  12. Localized acoustic surface modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  13. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  14. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  15. Uncertainty analysis in acoustic investigations

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The problem of uncertainty assessment in acoustic investigations is presented in the hereby paper. The aspect of the uncertainty asymmetry in processing of data obtained in the measuring test of sound levels, determined in decibels, was sketched. On the basis of the analysis of data obtained in the continuous monitoring of road traffic noise in Krakow typical probability distributions for a day, evening and night were determined. The method of the uncertainty assessment based on the propagati...

  16. Acoustical characterization of portuguese libraries

    OpenAIRE

    António Pedro Oliveira de Carvalho; António Eduardo Batista da Costa

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the acoustical characterization of the main reading room of 28 public li-braries in Portugal. In situ measurements were held regarding the interior sound pressure lev-els (background noise, with and without the HVAC equipment working), the Noise Criteria and Noise Rating values (NC/NR), the objective speech intelligibility using the Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI) and Reverberation Time (125 to 4k Hz). Two groups of librar-ies were formed (Classic and Modern librar...

  17. APL - North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Flatté’s statistical acoustic code to Mike Porter at HLS Research for inclusion in the OALIB website. PUBLICATIONS Andrew, Rex K., James A...show the MCPE confidence intervals and curves with diamonds show confidence intervals on the measured values. Diamonds indicate the depths at which...left, except that only depths from 800 to 1400 m are shown. The diamond -shaped symbols show the arrival depth and corresponding intensity of rays with

  18. Development of the seafloor acoustic ranging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Y.; Kido, M.; Fujimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a seafloor acoustic ranging system, which simulates an operation with the DONET (Development of Dense Ocean-floor Network System for Earthquake and Tsunami) cable, to monitor seafloor crustal movement. The seafloor acoustic ranging system was based on the precise acoustic transponder (PXP). We have a few problems for the improvement of the resolution. One thing is the variation of sound speed. Another is the bending of ray path. A PXP measures horizontal distances on the seafloor from the round trip travel times of acoustic pulses between pairs of PXP. The PXP was equipped with the pressure, temperature gauge and tilt-meter. The variation of sound speed in seawater has a direct effect on the measurement. Therefore we collect the data of temperature and pressure. But we don't collect the data of salinity because of less influence than temperature and pressure. Accordingly a ray path of acoustic wave tends to be bent upward in the deep sea due to the Snell's law. As the acoustic transducer of each PXPs held about 3.0m above the seafloor, the baseline is too long for altitude from the seafloor. In this year we carried out the experiment for the seafloor acoustic ranging system. We deployed two PXPs at about 750m spacing on Kumano-nada. The water depth is about 2050m. We collected the 660 data in this experiment during one day. The round trip travel time show the variation with peak-to-peak amplitude of about 0.03msec. It was confirmed to explain the majority in this change by the change in sound speed according to the temperature and pressure. This results shows the resolution of acoustic measurements is +/-2mm. Acknowledgement This study is supported by 'DONET' of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  19. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  20. 基于声相关测速的舰船旋回航迹参数研究%Track Parameter Research Based on Acoustic Correlation Measuring Speed in Marine Gyre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马驰新; 杜辉

    2012-01-01

    舰船在做旋回航行时,可能造成GPS、平台罗经和惯导等导航设备出现较大误差,甚至导致不能给出正常导航参数,这对处于复杂航道行驶或处于高度机动作战的舰船可能带来灾难。针对这种情况,文章通过对声相关测速理论的研究、分析,论证设计了舰船在做旋回航行时的航迹参数的确定方法,来弥补这些不足,并进而简化声相关测速设备的设计。%When marine is in gyre, it probably appears error for the navigation equipment, such as GPS, compass, inertial navigation system, which probably brings disaster for the marine in complicated sea-route or high mobile campaign. The shortcoming was made up through researching and analyzing acoustic correlation measuring speed theory, demonstrating and designing the ascertained method of marine track parameter in gyre, and predigest design of the acoustic correlation measuring speed equipment.

  1. Experimental study of geo-acoustic inversion uncertainty due to ocean sound-speed fluctuations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siderius, M.; Nielsen, P.L.; Sellschopp, J.; Snellen, M.; Simons, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic data measured in the ocean fluctuate due to the complex time-varying properties of the channel. When measured data are used for model-based, geo-acoustic inversion, how do acoustic fluctuations impact estimates for the seabed properties? In May 1999 SACLANT Undersea Research Center and TNO-

  2. Relation between Local Acoustic Parameters and Protein Distribution in Human and Porcine Eye Lenses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, de C.L.; Steen, van der A.F.W.; Thijssen, J.M.; Duindam, J.J.; Otto, Cees; Puppels, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the eye lens (human, porcine) by acoustic measurements and to investigate whether relations exist with the local protein content. The acoustic measurements were performed with a 'scanning acoustic microscope' (SAM), operating at a frequency of 20 MHz. At

  3. Acoustic estimation of suspended sediment concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Weiqing(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Morse, P. H. , Theoretical Acoustics, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co. , 1968.[2]Skudrjuk, E., Die Grundlagen der Akustik, Wien: Springer-Verlag, 1954.[3]Olshevskii, V. V., Statistical Characteristics of Sea Reverberation, Moscow: Nauka Publisher, 1966.[4]Thorne, P. D., Hardcastl, P. J., Soulsby, R. L., Analysis of acoustic measurements of suspended sediments, J. Geop.Res. , 1993, 98: 899.[5]Guo Jijie, Ren Laifa, Li Yunwu, ln-situ calibration of acoustic measurement of suspended sedienmt, Acta Oceanologica Sini-ca, 1998, (20): 120-125.[6]Zhang Shuying, Li Yunwu, Development and application of an acoustic suspended sediemnt monitoring system, Acta Oceanologica Sinica, 1998, (20): 114-119.[7]Zhang Shuying, Li Yunwu, A theoretical analysis of acoustic suspended sediment obsvervation, Acta Acoustica, 1999, (24):267-274.[8]Zhu Weiqing, Pan Feng, Zhu Min et al. , IOA-1 Multi-function Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (MADCP), OCEAN'2000,Rhode Island, USA.

  4. Basin Acoustic Seamount Scattering Experiment (BASSEX) Data Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Kauai source at various ranges and bearings. OBJECTIVES The primary objective of this work is to measure aspects of acoustic propagation that...range-dependent environments. The primary goal is to understand the physics of the acoustic propagation in complex environments. Three specific...During the test acoustic transmissions from sources used in the SPICEX and LOAPEX experiments (PI: Dr. Peter Worcester, SIO and Dr. Jim Mercer, APL-UW

  5. Vibration and acoustic environments for payload/cargo integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R. E.; Coody, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Shuttle orbiter launch vibration and acoustic environments for cargo bay/payload interfaces are predicted. Data acquired during Shuttle flight tests are compared with the preflight estimates. Vibration response data for payload attachment locations are presented, along with acoustic data in the form of noise-level spectra measured at various locations in the cargo bay and space averages of the noise levels. It is shown that the payload-bay vibration and acoustic environments are generally less severe than predicted.

  6. Reconstruction and prediction of multi-source acoustic field with the distributed source boundary point method based nearfield acoustic holography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI; Chuanxing; CHEN; Jian; CHEN; Xinzhao

    2004-01-01

    In a multi-source acoustic field, the actual measured pressure is a scalar sum of pressures from all the sources. The pressure belonging to every source cannot be separated out with the existing techniques. Consequently, routine formulas cannot be used to reconstruct the acoustic source and predict the acoustic field directly. In this paper, a novel theoretical model of reconstruction and prediction of multi-source acoustic field in the distributed source boundary point method (DSBPM) based nearfield acoustic holography (NAH) is established. Three different methods, namely combination method with single surface measurement, combination method with multi-surface measurement and elimination method with multi-surface measurement, are proposed to realize the holographic reconstruction of sources. With these methods, the problem of reconstruction and prediction of acoustic field existing multiple coherent sources synchronously is solved effectively. Using the particular solutions constructed by the DSBPM to establish the vibro-acoustic transfer matrix, the calculation time, calculation precision and calculation stability are improved. These methods are valuable in localizing acoustic source and predicting acoustic field in engineering field.

  7. Acoustic fluidization for earthquakes?

    OpenAIRE

    Sornette, D.; Sornette, A.

    2000-01-01

    Melosh [1996] has suggested that acoustic fluidization could provide an alternative to theories that are invoked as explanations for why some crustal faults appear to be weak. We show that there is a subtle but profound inconsistency in the theory that unfortunately invalidates the results. We propose possible remedies but must acknowledge that the relevance of acoustic fluidization remains an open question.

  8. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  9. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  10. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  11. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  12. ACOUSTIC EMISSION (AE) STRESS MEASUREMENTS FOR AN UNDERGROUND MINE FEASIBILITY STUDY IN AUSTRALIA%澳大利亚地下采矿可行性研究中的声发射应力测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Villaescusa Ernesto; Li Jianping; Baird Graham; Seto Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Reliable evaluation of in-situ stress is an important issue for the analysis and design of underground excavations, particularly for evaluating the stability of underground structures to prevent failure or collapse. A low-cost and reliable technique for the estimation of the full stress tensor based on acoustic emission (the Kaiser effect) has been developed at the WA School of Mines over last five years. This paper presents the results for a feasibility study where four AE measurements for an Australian mine have been carried out. The results are compared well with those obtained by the conventional hollow inclusion over-coring method (HI Ceil). The advantages of the AE technique are that it is relatively cheap, non-time consuming and is applicable to in-situ stress measurements at depth in remote regions.

  13. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying, E-mail: ying.wu@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-10-03

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating.

  14. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  15. Acoustic Emission of Deformation Twinning in Magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyang Mo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Acoustic Emission of deformation twinning in Magnesium is investigated in this article. Single crystal testing with combined full field deformation measurements, as well as polycrystalline testing inside the scanning electron microscope with simultaneous monitoring of texture evolution and twin nucleation were compared to testing at the laboratory scale with respect to recordings of Acoustic Emission activity. Single crystal testing revealed the formation of layered twin boundaries in areas of strain localization which was accompanied by distinct changes in the acoustic data. Testing inside the microscope directly showed twin nucleation, proliferation and growth as well as associated crystallographic reorientations. A post processing approach of the Acoustic Emission activity revealed the existence of a class of signals that appears in a strain range in which twinning is profuse, as validated by the in situ and ex situ microscopy observations. Features extracted from such activity were cross-correlated both with the available mechanical and microscopy data, as well as with the Acoustic Emission activity recorded at the laboratory scale for similarly prepared specimens. The overall approach demonstrates that the method of Acoustic Emission could provide real time volumetric information related to the activation of deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys, in spite of the complexity of the propagation phenomena, the possible activation of several deformation modes and the challenges posed by the sensing approach itself when applied in this type of materials evaluation approach.

  16. Distributed acoustic sensing with Michelson interferometer demodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Chen; Shang, Ying; Wang, Chang; Zhao, Wenan; Peng, Gangding; Wang, Hongzhong

    2016-12-01

    The distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) has been extensively studied and widely used. A distributed acoustic sensing system based on the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with phase generated carrier (PGC) demodulation was designed and tested. The system could directly obtain the phase, amplitude, frequency response, and location information of sound wave at the same time and measurement at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously. Experiments showed that the system successfully measured the acoustic signals with a phase-pressure sensitivity about-148 dB (re rad/μPa) and frequency response ripple less than 1.5 dB. The further field experiment showed that the system could measure signals at all points along the sensing fiber simultaneously.

  17. Acoustic analysis of aft noise reduction techniques measured on a subsonic tip speed 50.8 cm (twenty inch) diameter fan. [quiet engine program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpert, D. L.; Clemons, A.

    1977-01-01

    Sound data which were obtained during tests of a 50.8 cm diameter, subsonic tip speed, low pressure ratio fan were analyzed. The test matrix was divided into two major investigations: (1) source noise reduction techniques; and (2) aft duct noise reduction with acoustic treatment. Source noise reduction techniques were investigated which include minimizing second harmonic noise by varying vane/blade ratio, variation in spacing, and lowering the Mach number through the vane row to lower fan broadband noise. Treatment in the aft duct which includes flow noise effects, faceplate porosity, rotor OGV treatment, slant cell treatment, and splitter simulation with variable depth on the outer wall and constant thickness treatment on the inner wall was investigated. Variable boundary conditions such as variation in treatment panel thickness and orientation, and mixed porosity combined with variable thickness were examined. Significant results are reported.

  18. Depth dependent modification of optical constants arising from H+ implantation in n-type 4H-SiC measured using coherent acoustic phonons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Baydin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is a promising material for new generation electronics including high power/high temperature devices and advanced optical applications such as room temperature spintronics and quantum computing. Both types of applications require the control of defects particularly those created by ion bombardment. In this work, modification of optical constants of 4H-SiC due to hydrogen implantation at 180 keV and at fluences ranging from 1014 to 1016 cm−2 is reported. The depth dependence of the modified optical constants was extracted from coherent acoustic phonon spectra. Implanted spectra show a strong dependence of the 4H-SiC complex refractive index depth profile on H+ fluence. These studies provide basic insight into the dependence of optical properties of 4H silicon carbide on defect densities created by ion implantation, which is of relevance to the fabrication of SiC-based photonic and optoelectronic devices.

  19. Potential of acoustic emissions from three point bending tests as rock failure precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Agioutantis Z.; Kaklis K.; Mavrigiannakis S.; Verigakis M.; Vallianatos F.; Saltas V.

    2016-01-01

    Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. This paper presents results from acoustic emission mea-surements obtained during three point bending tests on Nestos marble under laboratory conditions. Acoustic emission activity was monitored using piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors, and the potential for accurate prediction of rock damage based on acoustic emission data was investigated. Damage local-ization was determined based on acoustic emissions generated from the critically stressed region as scat-tered events at stresses below and close to the strength of the material.

  20. Acoustic sensors for fission gas characterization: R and D skills devoted to innovative instrumentation in MTR, non-destructive devices in hot lab facilities and specific transducers for measurements of LWR rods in nuclear plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrandis, J.Y.; Leveque, G.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Augereau, F.; Combette, P. [University Montpellier, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); CNRS, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France)

    2015-07-01

    First of all, we will present the main principle of the method. A piezoelectric transducer, driven by a pulse generator, generates the acoustic waves in a cavity that may be the fuel rod or a chamber connected to an instrumented rod. The composition determination consists in measuring the time of flight of the acoustic signal emitted. The pressure can be estimated by a calibration process, above the measurement of the amplitude of the signal. Two projects will then be detailed. The first project consists in the development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor. It constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. This acoustic method was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). As a first step of the development program, we performed in-pile tests on the most sensitive component, i.e., the piezoelectric transducer. For this purpose, the active part of this sensor has been qualified on gamma and neutron radiations and at high temperature. Various industrial piezo-ceramics were exposed to a high activity Cobalt source for few days. The cumulated dose was ranged from 50 kGy up to 2 MGy. Next, these devices were placed inside a Material Test Reactor to investigate their reliability towards neutron fluence. The final fluence after 150 days of irradiation was up to 1.6.10{sup 21}n/cm{sup 2} (for thermal neutron). Irreversible variations have been measured. Next, a specific sensor has been implemented on an instrumented fuel rod and tested in the frame of a REMORA 3 Irradiation test. It was the first experiment under high mixed, temperature neutron and gamma flux. A first irradiation phase took place in March 2010 in the OSIRIS reactor and in November 2010 for the second step of the