WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic-radiation-force-driven shear wave

  1. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Ruigrok, Elmer; Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal component for S waves. More importantly, Earth's rotation leads to a slow rotation of the transverse polarization of S waves; during the propagation of S waves the particle motion behaves just like a Foucault pendulum. The polarization plane of shear waves counteracts Earth's rotation and rotates clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere. The rotation rate is independent of the wave frequency and is purely geometric, like the Berry phase. Using the polarization of ScS and ScS2 waves, we show that the Foucault-like rotation of the S wave polarization can be observed. This can affect the determination of source mechanisms and the interpretation of observed SKS splitting.

  2. A new method for shear wave speed estimation in shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Aaron J; Bashford, Gregory R

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of mechanical properties of tissue can aid in noninvasive pathology diagnosis. Shear wave elastography (SWE) measures the elastic properties of soft tissues by estimation of local shear wave propagation speed. In this paper, a new robust method for estimation of shear wave speed is introduced which has the potential for simplifying continuous filtering and real-time elasticity processing. Shear waves were generated by external mechanical excitation and imaged at a high frame rate. Three homogeneous phantoms of varying elastic moduli and one inclusion phantom were imaged. Waves propagating in separate directions were filtered and shear wave speed was estimated by inversion of the 1-D first-order wave equation. Final 2-D shear wave speed maps were constructed by weighted averaging of estimates from opposite traveling directions. Shear wave speed results for phantoms with gelatin concentrations of 5%, 7%, and 9% were 1.52 ± 0.10 m/s, 1.86 ± 0.10 m/s, and 2.37 ± 0.15 m/s, respectively, which were consistent with estimates computed from three other conventional methods, as well as compression tests done with a commercial texture analyzer. The method was shown to be able to reconstruct a 2-D speed map of an inclusion phantom with good image quality and variance comparable to conventional methods. Suggestions for further work are given. PMID:26670851

  3. Propagation of waves in shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrikant, A L

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in a theory of oscillatory and wave phenomena in hydrodynamical flows is presented in this book. A unified approach is used for waves of different physical origins. A characteristic feature of this approach is that hydrodynamical phenomena are considered in terms of physics; that is, the complement of the conventionally employed formal mathematical approach. Some physical concepts such as wave energy and momentum in a moving fluid are analysed, taking into account induced mean flow. The physical mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instability of shear flows are conside

  4. Fan-structure waves in shear ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation introduces a recently identified shear rupture mechanism providing a paradoxical feature of hard rocks - the possibility of shear rupture propagation through the highly confined intact rock mass at shear stress levels significantly less than frictional strength. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength), self-sustaining stress intensification in the rupture tip (providing easy formation of new slabs), and self-unbalancing conditions in the fan-head (making the failure process inevitably spontaneous and violent). An important feature of the fan-mechanism is the fact that for the initial formation of the fan-structure an enhanced local shear stress is required, however, after completion of the fan-structure it can propagate as a dynamic wave through intact rock mass at shear stresses below the frictional strength. Paradoxically low shear strength of pristine rocks provided by the fan-mechanism determines the correspondingly low transient strength of the lithosphere, which favours generation of new earthquake faults in the intact rock mass adjoining pre-existing faults in preference to frictional stick-slip instability along these faults. The new approach reveals an alternative role of pre-existing faults in earthquake activity: they represent local stress concentrates in pristine rock adjoining the fault where special conditions for the fan-mechanism nucleation are created, while further dynamic propagation of the new fault (earthquake) occurs at low field stresses even below the frictional strength.

  5. Surface Shear, Persistent Wave Groups and Rogue Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Chafin, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of waves with surface flows by considering the full set of conserved quantities, subtle but important surface elevations induced by wave packets and by directly considering the necessary forces to prevent packet spreading in the deep water limit. Narrow surface shear flows are shown to exert strong localizing and stabilizing forces on wavepackets to maintain their strength and amplify their intensity even in the linear regime. Necessary criticisms of some earlier notions of stress and angular momentum of waves are included and we argue that nonlinearity enters the system in a way that makes the formation of rogue waves nonperturbative. Quantitative bounds on the surface shear flow necessary to stabilize packets of any wave amplitude are given.

  6. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  7. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  8. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  9. Shear stresses and mean flow in shoaling and breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stive, M.J.F.; De Vriend, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the vertical, wave averaged distributions of shear stresses and Eulerian flow in normally incident, shoaling and breaking waves. It is found that shear stresses are solely due to wave amplitude variations, which can be caused by shoaling, boundary layer dissipation and/or breaking wav

  10. From supersonic shear wave imaging to full-field optical coherence shear wave elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahas, Amir; Tanter, Mickaël; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Fink, Mathias; Claude Boccara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Elasticity maps of tissue have proved to be particularly useful in providing complementary contrast to ultrasonic imaging, e.g., for cancer diagnosis at the millimeter scale. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) offers an endogenous contrast based on singly backscattered optical waves. Adding complementary contrast to OCT images by recording elasticity maps could also be valuable in improving OCT-based diagnosis at the microscopic scale. Static elastography has been successfully coupled with full-field OCT (FF-OCT) in order to realize both micrometer-scale sectioning and elasticity maps. Nevertheless, static elastography presents a number of drawbacks, mainly when stiffness quantification is required. Here, we describe the combination of two methods: transient elastography, based on speed measurements of shear waves induced by ultrasonic radiation forces, and FF-OCT, an en face OCT approach using an incoherent light source. The use of an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner and an ultrafast camera working at 10,000 to 30,000 images/s made it possible to follow shear wave propagation with both modalities. As expected, FF-OCT is found to be much more sensitive than ultrafast ultrasound to tiny shear vibrations (a few nanometers and micrometers, respectively). Stiffness assessed in gel phantoms and an ex vivo rat brain by FF-OCT is found to be in good agreement with ultrasound shear wave elastography.

  11. Shear wave elastography with a new reliability indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive methods for liver stiffness assessment have been introduced over recent years. Of these, two main methods for estimating liver fibrosis using ultrasound elastography have become established in clinical practice: shear wave elastography and quasi-static or strain elastography. Shear waves are waves with a motion perpendicular (lateral) to the direction of the generating force. Shear waves travel relatively slowly (between 1 and 10 m/s). The stiffness of the liver tissue can be assessed based on shear wave velocity (the stiffness increases with the speed). The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology has published Guidelines and Recommendations that describe these technologies and provide recommendations for their clinical use. Most of the data available to date has been published using the Fibroscan (Echosens, France), point shear wave speed measurement using an acoustic radiation force impulse (Siemens, Germany) and 2D shear wave elastography using the Aixplorer (SuperSonic Imagine, France). More recently, also other manufacturers have introduced shear wave elastography technology into the market. A comparison of data obtained using different techniques for shear wave propagation and velocity measurement is of key interest for future studies, recommendations and guidelines. Here, we present a recently introduced shear wave elastography technology from Hitachi and discuss its reproducibility and comparability to the already established technologies. PMID:27679731

  12. Triad resonance between gravity and vorticity waves in vertical shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivas, Theodore D.; Wunsch, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Weakly nonlinear theory is used to explore the effect of vertical shear on surface gravity waves in three dimensions. An idealized piecewise-linear shear profile motivated by wind-driven profiles and ambient currents in the ocean is used. It is shown that shear may mediate weakly nonlinear resonant triad interactions between gravity and vorticity waves. The triad results in energy exchange between gravity waves of comparable wavelengths propagating in different directions. For realistic ocean shears, shear-mediated energy exchange may occur on timescales of minutes for shorter wavelengths, but slows as the wavelength increases. Hence this triad mechanism may contribute to the larger angular spreading (relative to wind direction) for shorter wind-waves observed in the oceans.

  13. BOTTOM SHEAR STRESS UNDER WAVE-CURRENT INTERACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bing-chen; LI Hua-jun; LEE Dong-yong

    2008-01-01

    The present work adopts the COHERENS-SWAN model developed by the first author through coupling three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (COHERENS) and third-generation wave model (SWAN). Inside the COHERENS-SWAN, the SWAN is regarded as a subroutine and the time- and space-varying current velocity and surface elevation are obtained from the COHERENS. Wave-enhanced bottom shear stress, wave induced surface mixing length and wave dependent surface drag coefficient have been introduced into the COHERENS. Secondly, as wave-enhanced bottom shear stress ("bottom shear stress" described as BSS sometimes in this article) is concerned, a modified bottom shear stress Grant and Madsen model which introduces random wave field is given and introduced to COHERENS-SWAN. COHERENS-SWAN is also adopted to simulate three-dimensional flow in the Yellow River Delta with wave-current co-existing. Four numerical experiments were given to study the effects of wave-current interaction on enhancing bottom shear stress. The simulated current velocities, wave height and wave period match well with field measurement data. The simulated significant wave height and wave period for the case with considering the effects of current can give better agreement with measurement data than the case without involving the effects of current. The introduction of random wave generates lower the bottom shear stress than the case without introducing it. There are obvious differences between bottom shear stress of two way interaction and one way interaction. Velocity field obtained by the COHERENS-SWAN is reasonable according to previous studies and measurements.

  14. Quantitative imaging of nonlinear shear modulus by combining static elastography and shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; De Brosses, Emilie; Tanter, Mickaël

    2012-04-01

    The study of new tissue mechanical properties such as shear nonlinearity could lead to better tissue characterization and clinical diagnosis. This work proposes a method combining static elastography and shear wave elastography to derive the nonlinear shear modulus by applying the acoustoelasticity theory in quasi-incompressible soft solids. Results demonstrate that by applying a moderate static stress at the surface of the investigated medium, and by following the quantitative evolution of its shear modulus, it is possible to accurately and quantitatively recover the local Landau (A) coefficient characterizing the shear nonlinearity of soft tissues.

  15. Shear waves in vegetal tissues at ultrasonic frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariñas, M. D.; Sancho-Knapik, D.; Peguero-Pina, J. J.; Gil-Pelegrín, E.; Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, T. E.

    2013-03-01

    Shear waves are investigated in leaves of two plant species using air-coupled ultrasound. Magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient around the first two orders of the thickness resonances (normal and oblique incidence) have been measured. A bilayer acoustic model for plant leaves (comprising the palisade parenchyma and the spongy mesophyll) is proposed to extract, from measured spectra, properties of these tissues like: velocity and attenuation of longitudinal and shear waves and hence Young modulus, rigidity modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Elastic moduli values are typical of cellular solids and both, shear and longitudinal waves exhibit classical viscoelastic losses. Influence of leaf water content is also analyzed.

  16. Shear waves in a fluid saturated elastic plate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Pradhan; S K Samal; N C Mahanti

    2002-12-01

    In the present context, we consider the propagation of shear waves in the transverse isotropic fluid saturated porous plate. The frequency spectrum for SH-modes in the plate has been studied. It is observed that the frequency of the propagation is damped due to the two-phase character of the porous medium. The dimensionless phase velocities of the shear waves have also been calculated and presented graphically. It is interesting to note that the frequency and phase velocity of shear waves in porous media differ significantly in comparison to that in isotropic elastic media.

  17. Short wave stability of homogeneous shear flows with variable topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦华书; V. GANESH

    2014-01-01

    For the stability problem of homogeneous shear flows in sea straits of arbitrary cross section, a sufficient condition for stability is derived under the condition of inviscid flow. It is shown that there is a critical wave number, and if the wave number of a normal mode is greater than this critical wave number, the mode is stable.

  18. Excitation of fundamental shear horizontal wave by using face-shear (d36) piezoelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongchen; Dong, Shuxiang; Li, Faxin

    2016-05-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is extremely useful for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) as it is non-dispersive. However, currently, the SH0 wave is usually excited by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) whose energy conversion efficiency is fairly low. The face-shear ( d 36 ) mode piezoelectrics is more promising for SH0 wave excitation, but this mode cannot appear in conventional piezoelectric ceramics. Recently, by modifying the symmetry of poled PbZr1-xTixO3 (PZT) ceramics via ferroelastic domain engineering, we realized the face-shear d 36 mode in both soft and hard PZT ceramics. In this work, we further improved the face-shear properties of PZT-4 and PZT-5H ceramics via lateral compression under elevated temperature. It was found that when bonded on a 1 mm-thick aluminum plate, the d 36 type PZT-4 exhibited better face-shear performance than PZT-5H. We then successfully excite SH0 wave in the aluminum plate using a face-shear PZT-4 square patch and receive the wave using a face-shear 0.72[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]-0.28[PbTiO3] (PMN-PT) patch. The frequency response and directionality of the excited SH0 wave were also investigated. The SH0 wave can be dominated over the Lamb waves (S0 and A0 waves) from 160 kHz to 280 kHz. The wave amplitude reaches its maxima along the two main directions (0° and 90°). The amplitude can keep over 80% of the maxima when the deviate angle is less than 30°, while it vanishes quickly at the 45° direction. The excited SH0 wave using piezoelectric ceramics could be very promising in the fields of NDT and SHM.

  19. Effect of shear on failure waves in soda lime glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of in-material stress gauges, failure waves in shock-compressed soda lime glass have been shown to be distinguished by a marked reduction in shear stress. To explore further the relation between failure waves and shearing resistance, a series of pressure-shear impact experiments have been performed involving the impact of a glass plate by a steel flyer plate and vice versa. The latter configuration is designed to allow direct measurements of the shearing resistance of the failed material. In both configurations, the normal and transverse motion of the free surface of the target is monitored using laser interferometry. The transverse velocity-time profiles show a pronounced loss in shearing resistance of the glass at impact velocities above the threshold for failure waves to occur

  20. On acoustic wave generation in uniform shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoberidze, G.

    2016-07-01

    The linear dynamics of acoustic waves and vortices in uniform shear flow is studied. For flows with very low shear rates, the dynamics of perturbations is adiabatic and can be described by the WKB approximation. However, for flows with moderate and high shear rates the WKB approximation is not appropriate, and alternative analysis shows that two important phenomena occur: acoustic wave over-reflection and wave generation by vortices. The later phenomenon is a known linear mechanisms for sound generation in shear flows, a mechanism that is related to the continuous spectrum that arises in linear shear flow dynamics. A detailed analytical study of these phenomena is performed and the main quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the radiated acoustic field are obtained and analyzed.

  1. Convertion Shear Wave Velocity to Standard Penetration Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madun, A.; Tajuddin, S. A. A.; Abdullah, M. E.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Sani, S.; Siang, A. J. L. M.; Yusof, M. F.

    2016-07-01

    Multichannel Analysis Surface Wave (MASW) measurement is one of the geophysics exploration techniques to determine the soil profile based on shear wave velocity. Meanwhile, borehole intrusive technique identifies the changes of soil layer based on soil penetration resistance, i.e. standard penetration test-number of blows (SPT-N). Researchers across the world introduced many empirical conversions of standard penetration test blow number of borehole data to shear wave velocity or vice versa. This is because geophysics test is a non-destructive and relatively fast assessment, and thus should be promoted to compliment the site investigation work. These empirical conversions of shear wave velocity to SPT-N blow can be utilised, and thus suitable geotechnical parameters for design purposes can be achieved. This study has demonstrated the conversion between MASW and SPT-N value. The study was conducted at the university campus and Sejagung Sri Medan. The MASW seismic profiles at the University campus test site and Sejagung were at a depth of 21 m and 13 m, respectively. The shear wave velocities were also calculated empirically using SPT-N value, and thus both calculated and measured shear wave velocities were compared. It is essential to note that the MASW test and empirical conversion always underestimate the actual shear wave velocity of hard layer or rock due to the effect of soil properties on the upper layer.

  2. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    ) < ~ 10 sup (5)). Measurements were carried out where the wave height to water depth (h/d) ratio varied between 0.12 and 0.68; maximum near bed velocity varied between 0.16 m/s and 0.51 m/s and the maximum total shear stress (sum of skin shear stress...

  3. Shear-wave splitting of Sichuan Regional Seismic Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-jiu; GAO Yuan; SHI Yu-tao; CHENG Wan-zheng

    2008-01-01

    Using seismic data recorded by the Chengdu Digital Seismic Network from May 1, 2000 to December 31, 2006, we obtain the dominant polarization directions of fast shear-waves at eight digital seismic stations adopting the SAM technique. The results show that the dominant directions of polarizations of fast shear-waves at most of sta- tions are mainly in nearly NE,-SW or NW-SE direction in Sichuan. The dominant polarization directions of the fast shear-waves at stations located at the active faults or intersection of several active faults are consistent with the strikes of active faults which control the earthquakes used in the analysis, and are basically consistent with the directions of regional compression axis. However, several stations show that the fast shear-waves are not consis- tent with the strikes of active faults and the directions of regional compression axis, due to the influence of local complicated crustal structure.

  4. Shear wave propagation in anisotropic soft tissues and gels

    OpenAIRE

    Namani, Ravi; Bayly, Philip V.

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of shear waves in soft tissue can be visualized by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) [1] to characterize tissue mechanical properties. Dynamic deformation of brain tissue arising from shear wave propagation may underlie the pathology of blast-induced traumatic brain injury. White matter in the brain, like other biological materials, exhibits a transversely isotropic structure, due to the arrangement of parallel fibers. Appropriate mathematical models and well-characterized...

  5. Shear-Wave Elastography of Segmental Infarction of the Testis

    OpenAIRE

    Kantarci, Fatih; Cebi Olgun, Deniz; Mihmanli, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Segmental testicular infarction (STI) is a rare cause of acute scrotum. The spectrum of findings on gray-scale and color Doppler ultrasonography differ depending on the time between the onset of testicular pain and the ultrasonography examination. We are not aware of the usefulness of shear-wave elastography for the diagnosis of STI. We report the shear-wave elastography features in a case of STI and discuss the role of this diagnostic modality in the differential diagnosis.

  6. Simulation of Random Waves and Associated Laminar Bottom Shear Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Lin SHEN; Ching-Jer HUANG

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a new approach for simulating the random waves in viscous fluids and the associated bottom shear stresses. By generating the incident random waves in a numerical wave flume and solving the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations and the fully nonlinear free surface boundary conditions for the fluid flows in the flume, the viscous flows and laminar bottom shear stresses induced by random waves are determined. The deterministic spectral amplitude method implemented by use of the fast Fourier transform algorithm was adopted to generate the incident random waves. The accuracy of the numerical scheme is confirmed by comparing the predicted wave spectrum with the target spectrum and by comparing the numerical transfer function between the shear stress and the surface elevation with the theoretical transfer function. The maximum bottom shear stress caused by random waves, computed by this wave model, is compared with that obtained by Myrhaug's model (1995). The transfer function method is also employed to determine the maximum shear stress, and is proved accurate.

  7. On Shear Wave Speed Estimation for Agar-Gelatine Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan M. Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional imaging of diagnostic ultrasound is widely used. Although it makes the differences in the soft tissues echogenicities’ apparent and clear, it fails in describing and estimating the soft tissue mechanical properties. It cannot portray their mechanical properties, such as the elasticity and stiffness. Estimating the mechanical properties increases chances of the identification of lesions or any pathological changes. Physicians are now characterizing the tissue’s mechanical properties as diagnostic metrics. Estimating the tissue’s mechanical properties is achieved by applying a force on the tissue and calculating the resulted shear wave speed. Due to the difficulty of calculating the shear wave speed precisely inside the tissue, it is estimated by analyzing ultrasound images of the tissue at a very high frame rate. In this paper, the shear wave speed is estimated using finite element analysis. A model is constructed to simulate the tissue’s mechanical properties. For a generalized soft tissue model, Agar-gelatine model is used because it has properties similar to that of the soft tissue. A point force is applied at the center of the proposed model. As a result of this force, a deformation is caused. Peak displacements are tracked along the lateral dimension of the model for estimating the shear wave speed of the propagating wave using the Time-To-Peak displacement (TTP method. Experimental results have shown that the estimated speed of the shear wave is 5.2 m/sec. The speed value is calculated according to shear wave speed equation equals about 5.7 m/sec; this means that our speed estimation system’s accuracy is about 91 %, which is reasonable shear wave speed estimation accuracy with a less computational power compared to other tracking methods.

  8. Shear wave anisotropy in D" region beneath the western Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhi-yang; LIU Bin; WANG Xiao-xiang; ZHA Xian-jie; ZHANG Hu; YANG Feng-qin

    2007-01-01

    Using seismic shear phases from 47 Tonga-Fiji and its adjacent region events recorded by the CENC and IRIS, and from 26 northeast Asia and north Pacific events recorded by IRIS, we studied the shear wave anisotropy in D" region beneath the western Pacific utilizing the ScS-S differential travel time method and obtained the splitting time values between the radial and transverse components of each ScS wave corresponding to each core-mantle boundary (CMB) reflection point. We found that most shear waves involved horizontally polarized shear wave components traveling faster than vertically polarized shear wave components through the D" region. The splitting time values of ScS wave range from (0.91 s to 3.21 s with an average value of 1.1 s. The strength of anisotropy varies from (0.45% to 1.56% with an average value of 0.52%. The observations and analyses show that in the D" region beneath the western Pacific the lateral flow is expected to be dominant and the vertical transverse isotropy may be the main anisotropic structure. This structure feature may be explained by the shape preferred orientation of the CMB chemical reaction products or partial melt and the lattice preferred orientation of the lower mantle materials caused by the lateral flow at lowermost mantle.

  9. Shear Flow Dispersion Under Wave and Current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The longitudinal dispersion of solute in open channel flow with short period progressive waves is investigated. The waves induce second order drift velocity in the direction of propagation and enhance the mixing process in concurrent direction. The 1-D wave-period-averaged dispersion equation is derived and an expression for the wave-current induced longitudinal dispersion coefficient (WCLDC) is proposed based on Fischer's expression (1979) for dispersion in unidirectional flow. The result shows that the effect of waves on dispersion is mainly due to the cross-sectional variation of the drift velocity. Furthermore, to obtain a more practical expression of the WCLDC, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient due to Seo and Cheong (1998) is modified to incluee the effect of drift velocity. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to verify the proposed expression. The experimental results, together with dimensional analysis, show that the wave effect can be reflected by the ratio between the wave amplitude and wave period. A comparative study between the cases with and without waves demonstrates that the magnitude of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient is increased under the presence of waves.

  10. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: I. shear wave thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-02-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is today hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to the 2-D mapping of temperature changes during HIFU treatments. This new concept of shear wave thermometry is experimentally implemented here using conventional ultrasonic imaging probes. HIFU treatment and monitoring were, respectively, performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single-element transducer focused at 30 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Thermocouple measurements and ultrasound-based thermometry were used as a gold standard technique and were combined with SWI on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created using 100-μs pushing beams at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Elasticity and temperature mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to realtime monitoring of the treatment. Tissue stiffness was found to decrease in the focal zone for temperatures up to 43°C. Ultrasound-based temperature estimation was highly correlated to stiffness variation maps (r² = 0.91 to 0.97). A reversible calibration phase of the changes of elasticity with temperature can be made locally using sighting shots. This calibration process allows for the derivation of temperature maps from shear wave imaging. Compared with conventional ultrasound-based approaches, shear wave thermometry is found to be much more robust to motion artifacts. PMID:21342822

  11. Seismic shear waves as Foucault pendulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snieder, Roel; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Ruigrok, E.; Shiomi, K.

    2016-01-01

    Earth's rotation causes splitting of normal modes. Wave fronts and rays are, however, not affected by Earth's rotation, as we show theoretically and with observations made with USArray. We derive that the Coriolis force causes a small transverse component for P waves and a small longitudinal compone

  12. Wave propagation in carbon nanotubes under shear deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the results of an investigation on the effect of shear deformations on wave propagation in carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic matrix. A multi-walled carbon nanotube is considered as a multiple shell coupled together through van der Waals forces between two adjacent tubes. The surrounding matrix is considered as a spring element defined by the Winkler model. Using the variational calculus of Hamilton's principle, dynamic governing equations considering the shear deformation and rotary inertia terms are derived. Numerical examples describe the effects of shear deformation, rotary inertia and elastic matrix on the velocity, the critical frequency, the cut-off frequency and the amplitude ratio of wave propagation in multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic matrix, respectively. The results obtained show that wave propagation in carbon nanotubes appears in a critical frequency or a cut-off frequency for different wave modes; the effect of shear deformation decreases the value of critical frequency; the critical frequency increases as the matrix stiffness increases; the inertia rotary has an obvious influence on the wave velocity for some wave modes in the higher frequency region

  13. Could linear hysteresis contribute to shear wave losses in tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kevin J

    2015-04-01

    For nearly 100 y in the study of cyclical motion in materials, a particular phenomenon called "linear hysteresis" or "ideal hysteretic damping" has been widely observed. More recently in the field of shear wave elastography, the basic mechanisms underlying shear wave losses in soft tissues are in question. Could linear hysteresis play a role? An underlying theoretical question must be answered: Is there a real and causal physical model that is capable of producing linear hysteresis over a band of shear wave frequencies used in diagnostic imaging schemes? One model that can approximately produce classic linear hysteresis behavior, by examining a generalized Maxwell model with a specific power law relaxation spectrum, is described here. This provides a theoretical plausibility for the phenomenon as a candidate for models of tissue behavior.

  14. Probing the shear-band formation in granular media with sound waves

    OpenAIRE

    KHIDAS, Yacine; Jia, X.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the mechanical responses of dense granular materials, using a direct shear box combined with simultaneous acoustic measurements. Measured shear wave speeds evidence the structural change of the material under shear, from the jammed state to the flowing state. There is a clear acoustic signature when the shear band is formed. Subjected to cyclic shear, both shear stress and wave speed show the strong hysteretic dependence on the shear strain, likely associated with the geometry ...

  15. A Hammer-Impact, Aluminum, Shear-Wave Seismic Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.

    2007-01-01

    Near-surface seismic surveys often employ hammer impacts to create seismic energy. Shear-wave surveys using horizontally polarized waves require horizontal hammer impacts against a rigid object (the source) that is coupled to the ground surface. I have designed, built, and tested a source made out of aluminum and equipped with spikes to improve coupling. The source is effective in a variety of settings, and it is relatively simple and inexpensive to build.

  16. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    OpenAIRE

    M. von Steht; B. Jaskolla; Ritter, J.R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp) s...

  17. Shear Alfven wave excitation by direct antenna coupling and fast wave resonant mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antenna coupling to the shear Alfven wave by both direct excitation and fast wave resonant mode conversion is modelled analytically for a plasma with a one dimensional linear density gradient. We demonstrate the existence of a shear Alfven mode excited directly by the antenna. For localised antennas, this mode propagates as a guided beam along the steady magnetic field lines intersecting the antenna. Shear Alfven wave excitation by resonant mode conversion of a fast wave near the Alfven resonance layer is also demonstrated and we prove that energy is conserved in this process. We compare the efficiency of these two mechanisms of shear Alfven wave excitation and present a simple analytical formula giving the ratio of the coupled powers. Finally, we discuss the interpretation of some experimental results. 45 refs., 7 figs

  18. Advantages of Shear Wave Seismic in Morrow Sandstone Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paritosh Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Morrow sandstones in the western Anadarko Basin have been prolific oil producers for more than five decades. Detection of Morrow sandstones is a major problem in the exploration of new fields and the characterization of existing fields because they are often very thin and laterally discontinuous. Until recently compressional wave data have been the primary resource for mapping the lateral extent of Morrow sandstones. The success with compressional wave datasets is limited because the acoustic impedance contrast between the reservoir sandstones and the encasing shales is small. Here, we have performed full waveform modeling study to understand the Morrow sandstone signatures on compressional wave (P-wave, converted-wave (PS-wave and pure shear wave (S-wave gathers. The contrast in rigidity between the Morrow sandstone and surrounding shale causes a strong seismic expression on the S-wave data. Morrow sandstone shows a distinct high amplitude event in pure S-wave modeled gathers as compared to the weaker P- and PS-wave events. Modeling also helps in understanding the adverse effect of interbed multiples (due to shallow high velocity anhydrite layers and side lobe interference effects at the Morrow level. Modeling tied with the field data demonstrates that S-waves are more robust than P-waves in detecting the Morrow sandstone reservoirs.

  19. Shear wave arrival time estimates correlate with local speckle pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcaleavey, Stephen A; Osapoetra, Laurentius O; Langdon, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    We present simulation and phantom studies demonstrating a strong correlation between errors in shear wave arrival time estimates and the lateral position of the local speckle pattern in targets with fully developed speckle. We hypothesize that the observed arrival time variations are largely due to the underlying speckle pattern, and call the effect speckle bias. Arrival time estimation is a key step in quantitative shear wave elastography, performed by tracking tissue motion via cross-correlation of RF ultrasound echoes or similar methods. Variations in scatterer strength and interference of echoes from scatterers within the tracking beam result in an echo that does not necessarily describe the average motion within the beam, but one favoring areas of constructive interference and strong scattering. A swept-receive image, formed by fixing the transmit beam and sweeping the receive aperture over the region of interest, is used to estimate the local speckle pattern. Metrics for the lateral position of the speckle are found to correlate strongly (r > 0.7) with the estimated shear wave arrival times both in simulations and in phantoms. Lateral weighting of the swept-receive pattern improved the correlation between arrival time estimates and speckle position. The simulations indicate that high RF echo correlation does not equate to an accurate shear wave arrival time estimate-a high correlation coefficient indicates that motion is being tracked with high precision, but the location tracked is uncertain within the tracking beam width. The presence of a strong on-axis speckle is seen to imply high RF correlation and low bias. The converse does not appear to be true-highly correlated RF echoes can still produce biased arrival time estimates. The shear wave arrival time bias is relatively stable with variations in shear wave amplitude and sign (-20 μm to 20 μm simulated) compared with the variation with different speckle realizations obtained along a given tracking

  20. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  1. Theoretical Analysis of Shear Wave Interference Patterns by Means of Dynamic Acoustic Radiation Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic radiation forces associated with high intensity focused ultrasound stimulate shear wave propagation allowing shear wave speed and shear viscosity estimation of tissue structures. As wave speeds are meters per second, real time displacement tracking over an extend field-of-view using ultrasound is problematic due to very high frame rate requirements. However, two spatially separated dynamic external sources can stimulate shear wave motion leading to shear wave interference patterns. Advantages are shear waves can be imaged at lower frame rates and local interference pattern spatial properties reflect tissue's viscoelastic properties. Here a theoretical analysis of shear wave interference patterns by means of dynamic acoustic radiation forces is detailed. Using a viscoelastic Green's function analysis, tissue motion due to a pair of focused ultrasound beams and associated radiation forces are presented. Overall, this paper theoretically demonstrates shear wave interference patterns can be stimulated using dynamic acoustic radiation forces and tracked using conventional ultrasound imaging.

  2. SHEAR WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY OF THE ARTERIAL WALL – WHERE WE ARE TODAY

    OpenAIRE

    Widman, Erik; Maksuti, Elira; Larsson, Matilda; Bjällmark, Anna; Nordenfur, Tim; Caidahl, Kenneth; D’hooge, Jan

    2013-01-01

    1.  Introduction Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) is a recently developed noninvasive method for elastography assessment using ultrasound. The technique consists of sending an acoustic radiation force (pushing sequence) into the tissue that in turn generates an orthogonal low frequency propagating shear wave. The shear wave propagation is measured real time by high speed B-mode imaging. From the B-mode images, the shear wave is tracked via normalized cross-correlation and the speed is calculate...

  3. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, A.; Nasraoui, S.

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N3. For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004), 10.1086/420972]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δm=(3√3 /16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N3/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  4. Prediction of the Shear Wave Velocity from Compressional Wave Velocity for Gachsaran Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvizi Saeed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shear and compressional wave velocities, coupled with other petrophysical data, are very important for hydrocarbon reservoir characterization. In situ shear wave velocity (Vs is measured by some sonic logging tools. Shear velocity coupled with compressional velocity is vitally important in determining geomechanical parameters, identifying the lithology, mud weight design, hydraulic fracturing, geophysical studies such as VSP, etc. In this paper, a correlation between compressional and shear wave velocity is obtained for Gachsaran formation in Maroon oil field. Real data were used to examine the accuracy of the prediction equation. Moreover, the genetic algorithm was used to obtain the optimal value for constants of the suggested equation. Furthermore, artificial neural network was used to inspect the reliability of this method. These investigations verify the notion that the suggested equation could be considered as an efficient, fast, and cost-effective method for predicting Vs from Vp.

  5. Triple point shear-layers in gaseous detonation waves

    OpenAIRE

    Massa, L.; Austin, J. M.; Jackson, T. L.

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown intriguing regions of intense luminescence or ‘hotspots’ in the vicinity of triple-point shear layers in propagating gaseous detonation waves. Localized explosions have also been observed to develop in these fronts. These features were observed in higher effective activation energy mixtures, but not in lower effective activation energy mixtures. The increased lead shock oscillation through a cell cycle in higher activation energy mixtures may result in a signific...

  6. SHEAR WAVES IN PERIODIC WAVEGUIDE WITH ALTERNATING BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Piliposyan D.G.; Ghazaryan R.A.; Ghazaryan K.B.

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of shear waves in elastic waveguide of periodic structure consisting of three different materials with alternating along the guide walls boundary conditions is investigated. Using the transfer matrix approach the problem is reduced to the solution of a block transfer matrix eigenvalue problem. Bloth the dispersion and the band gap structure analysis have been carried out numerically. It is shown that for alternating boundary conditions along the waveguide walls, by modulating ...

  7. Phase Aberration and Attenuation Effects on Acoustic Radiation Force-Based Shear Wave Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascal, Carolina Amador; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    Elasticity is measured by shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) methods using acoustic radiation force to create the shear waves. Phase aberration and tissue attenuation can hamper the generation of shear waves for in vivo applications. In this study, the effects of phase aberration and attenuation in ultrasound focusing for creating shear waves were explored. This includes the effects of phase shifts and amplitude attenuation on shear wave characteristics such as shear wave amplitude, shear wave speed, shear wave center frequency, and bandwidth. Two samples of swine belly tissue were used to create phase aberration and attenuation experimentally. To explore the phase aberration and attenuation effects individually, tissue experiments were complemented with ultrasound beam simulations using fast object-oriented C++ ultrasound simulator (FOCUS) and shear wave simulations using finite-element-model (FEM) analysis. The ultrasound frequency used to generate shear waves was varied from 3.0 to 4.5 MHz. Results: The measured acoustic pressure and resulting shear wave amplitude decreased approximately 40%-90% with the introduction of the tissue samples. Acoustic intensity and shear wave displacement were correlated for both tissue samples, and the resulting Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.99 and 0.97. Analysis of shear wave generation with tissue samples (phase aberration and attenuation case), measured phase screen, (only phase aberration case), and FOCUS/FEM model (only attenuation case) showed that tissue attenuation affected the shear wave generation more than tissue aberration. Decreasing the ultrasound frequency helped maintain a focused beam for creation of shear waves in the presence of both phase aberration and attenuation.

  8. Driven transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)], E-mail: banerjee_pintu2002@yahoo.com; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P.K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2008-08-11

    The linear dispersion properties of transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma are experimentally studied in a DC discharge device by exciting them in a controlled manner with a variable frequency external source. The dusty plasma is maintained in the strongly coupled fluid regime with (1<{gamma}<<{gamma}{sub c}) where {gamma} is the Coulomb coupling parameter and {gamma}{sub c} is the crystallization limit. A dispersion relation for the transverse waves is experimentally obtained over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz and found to show good agreement with viscoelastic theoretical results.

  9. Shear flow induced wave couplings in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poedts, S. [KULeuven, Heverlee (Belgium). Centre for Plasma Astrophysics; Rogava, A.D. [Tbilisi State Univ. (Georgia). Dept. of Physics]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies]|[International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    1998-01-01

    A sheared background flow in a plasma induces coupling between different MHD wave modes, resulting in their mutual transformations with corresponding energy redistributing between the modes. In this way, the energy can be transfered from one wave mode to the other, but energy can also be added to or extracted from the background flow. In the present paper it is investigated whether the wave coupling and energy transfer mechanisms can operate under solar wind conditions. It is shown that this is indeed the case. Hence, the long-period waves observed in the solar wind at r > 0.3 AU might be generated by much faster periodic oscillations in the photosphere of the Sun. Other possible consequences for observable beat phenomena in the wind and the acceleration of the solar wind particles are also discussed.

  10. Histoscanning and shear wave ultrasound elastography for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Amosov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The shear wave ultrasound elastography is a recently developed ultrasound-based method in the clinical practice, which allows the qualitative visual and quantitative measurements of tissue stiffness. In the 2010 this technology of the shear wave was called Shear Wave Elastograhpy. Due to the front of the shear waves the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the tissue stiffness is possible.Objective is to examine the efficacy of the shear wave ultrasound elastography in the evaluation of the prevalence of the oncological disease in patients with the prostate cancer and to compare the obtained results with the routine method X-ray diagnostics.Materials and methods. From the april 2015 in the I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University Urology Clinic there were conducted 314 shear wave ultrasound elastography examinations of the prostate. The ultrasound system Aixplorer® by SuperSonic Imagine was used. This system provides information provided by B-mode and shear wave ultrasound elastography mode. The transrectal echograms were made in 6 dimensions, so called Q-boxes (3 demensions in the every lobe on the segments from the base to the apex, according to the biopsy zone. The unit of measurement was the mean value in the kilopaskals (kPa. All the patients were randomized into 3 groups. There were 146 men with the possible prostate cancer in the first group (prospective study, 120 men with the certain diagnosis of the prostate cancer in the second group (retrospective study and 48 healthy men in the third group (control study. In all the patients of the first and the second groups the routine complete examination, including the prostate specific antigen (PSA level examination, digital rectal examination (DRE, doppler transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS, histoscanning and ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE, was conducted. In the 229 patients of the first and the second groups the prostatectomy with the

  11. Shear wave velocity structure in West Java, Indonesia as inferred from surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggono, Titi; Syuhada

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the crust and upper mantle of West Java, Indonesia by measuring the group velocity dispersion of surface waves. We analyzed waveform from four teleseismic earthquake recorded at three 3-component broadband seismometers. We analyzed fundamental mode of Rayleigh and Love waves from vertical, radial, and transverse components using multiple filter technique. We inverted the measured group velocity to obtain shear wave velocity profile down to 200 km depth. We observed low shear wave velocity zone at depth of about 20 km. Shear velocity reduction is estimated to be 18% compared to the upper and lower velocity layer. The low velocity zone might be associated with the subducting slab of Indo-Australian Plate as similar characteristics of low velocity zones also observed at other subducting regions.

  12. Magnetic resonance elastography of slow and fast shear waves illuminates differences in shear and tensile moduli in anisotropic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J L; Tweten, D J; Benegal, A N; Walker, C H; Portnoi, T E; Okamoto, R J; Garbow, J R; Bayly, P V

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical anisotropy is an important property of fibrous tissues; for example, the anisotropic mechanical properties of brain white matter may play a key role in the mechanics of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The simplest anisotropic material model for small deformations of soft tissue is a nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material characterized by three parameters: minimum shear modulus (µ), shear anisotropy (ϕ=µ1µ-1) and tensile anisotropy (ζ=E1E2-1). These parameters can be determined using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) to visualize shear waves, if the angle between the shear-wave propagation direction and fiber direction is known. Most MRE studies assume isotropic material models with a single shear (µ) or tensile (E) modulus. In this study, two types of shear waves, "fast" and "slow", were analyzed for a given propagation direction to estimate anisotropic parameters µ, ϕ, and ζ in two fibrous soft materials: turkey breast ex vivo and aligned fibrin gels. As expected, the speed of slow shear waves depended on the angle between fiber direction and propagation direction. Fast shear waves were observed when the deformations due to wave motion induced stretch in the fiber direction. Finally, MRE estimates of anisotropic mechanical properties in turkey breast were compared to estimates from direct mechanical tests. PMID:26920505

  13. Shear Wave Splitting Inversion in a Complex Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Shear wave splitting (SWS) inversion presents a method whereby the upper crust can be interrogated for fracture density. It is caused when a shear wave traverses an area of anisotropy, splits in two, with each wave experiencing a different velocity resulting in an observable separation in arrival times. A SWS observation consists of the first arrival polarization direction and the time delay. Given the large amount of data common in SWS studies, manual inspection for polarization and time delay is considered prohibitively time intensive. All automated techniques used can produce high amounts of observations falsely interpreted as SWS. Thus introducing error into the interpretation. The technique often used for removing these false observations is to manually inspect all SWS observations defined as high quality by the automated routine, and remove false identifications. We investigate the nature of events falsely identified compared to those correctly identified. Once this identification is complete we conduct a inversion for crack density from SWS time delay. The current body of work on linear SWS inversion utilizes an equation that defines the time delay between arriving shear waves with respect to fracture density. This equation makes the assumption that no fluid flow occurs as a result of the passing shear wave, a situation called squirt flow. We show that the assumption is not applicable in all geological situations. When it is not true, its use in an inversion produces a result which is negatively affected by the assumptions. This is shown to be the case at the test case of 6894 SWS observations gathered in a small area at Puna geothermal field, Hawaii. To rectify this situation, a series of new time delay formulae, applicable to linear inversion, are derived from velocity equations presented in literature. The new formula use a 'fluid influence parameter' which indicates the degree to which squirt flow is influencing the SWS. It is found that accounting for

  14. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  15. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Nonlinear physics of shear Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonca, Fulvio; Chen, Liu

    2014-02-01

    Shear Alfvén waves (SAW) play fundamental roles in thermonuclear plasmas of fusion interest, since they are readily excited by energetic particles in the MeV range as well as by the thermal plasma components. Thus, understanding fluctuation induced transport in burning plasmas requires understanding nonlinear SAW physics. There exist two possible routes to nonlinear SAW physics: (i) wave-wave interactions and the resultant spectral energy transfer; (ii) nonlinear wave-particle interactions of SAW instabilities with energetic particles. Within the first route, it is advantageous to understand and describe nonlinear processes in term of proximity of the system to the Alfvénic state, where wave-wave interactions are minimized due to the cancellation of Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. Here, various wave-wave nonlinear dynamics are elucidated in terms of how they break the Alfvénic state. In particular, we discuss the qualitative and quantitative modification of the SAW parametric decay process due to finite ion compressibility and finite ion Larmor radius. We also show that toroidal geometry plays a crucial role in the nonlinear excitation of zonal structures by Alfvén eigenmodes. Within the second route, the coherent nonlinear dynamics of structures in the energetic particle phase space, by which secular resonant particle transport can occur on meso- and macro-scales, must be addressed and understood. These "nonlinear equilibria" or "phase-space zonal structures" dynamically evolve on characteristic (fluctuation induced) turbulent transport time scales, which are generally of the same order of the nonlinear time scale of the underlying fluctuations. In this work, we introduce the general structure of nonlinear Schrödinger equations with complex integro-differential nonlinear terms, which govern these physical processes. To elucidate all these aspects, theoretical analyses are presented together with numerical simulation results.

  17. The velocity of shear waves in unsaturated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Whalley, W. R.; Jenkins, M; Attenborough, K.

    2012-01-01

    The velocities of shear waves Vs in two soils, a loamy sand and a sandy clay loam, were measured at various matric potentials and confining pressures. We used a combination of Haines apparatus, pressure plate apparatus and a Bishop and Wesley tri-axial cell to obtain a range of saturation and consolidation states. We proposed a single effective stress variable based on a modification to Bishop’s equation which could be used in a published empirical model (Santamarina et al., 2001) to relate s...

  18. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    be considered in pipeline routing. 10.6. Future directions Bed shear stresses due to N-shaped waves were estimated using the method described in this thesis. However, due to want of time, this data was not considered in this thesis. The data pertaining to N....K.C. and Erali, D.R., 1974. Large diameter underwater pipeline for nuclear power plant designed against soil liquefaction. Offshore Technology Conference, Dallas, p.^pp. 597-606. Cokgor, S., 2002. Hydrodynamic forces on a partly buried cylinder exposed...

  19. SHEAR WAVES IN PERIODIC WAVEGUIDE WITH ALTERNATING BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piliposyan D.G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of shear waves in elastic waveguide of periodic structure consisting of three different materials with alternating along the guide walls boundary conditions is investigated. Using the transfer matrix approach the problem is reduced to the solution of a block transfer matrix eigenvalue problem. Bloth the dispersion and the band gap structure analysis have been carried out numerically. It is shown that for alternating boundary conditions along the waveguide walls, by modulating the ratio of the length of the unit cell to the width of the waveguide, the minimum widths of the stop bands can be moved to the middle of the Brillouin zone

  20. Seismic Waves in Finely Layered VTI Media: Poroelasticity, Thomsen Parameters, and Fluid Effects on Shear Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J G

    2004-02-24

    Layered earth models are well justified by experience, and provide a simple means of studying fairly general behavior of the elastic and poroelastic characteristics of seismic waves in the earth. Thomsen's anisotropy parameters for weak elastic and poroelastic anisotropy are now commonly used in exploration, and can be conveniently expressed in terms of the layer averages of Backus. Since our main interest is usually in the fluids underground, it would be helpful to have a set of general equations relating the Thomsen parameters as directly as possible to the fluid properties. This end can be achieved in a rather straightforward fashion for these layered earth models, and the present paper develops and then discusses these relations. Furthermore, it is found that, although there are five effective shear moduli for any layered VTI medium, one and only one effective shear modulus for the layered system contains all the dependence of pore fluids on the elastic or poroelastic constants that can be observed in vertically polarized shear waves in VTI media. The effects of the pore fluids on this effective shear modulus can be substantial - an increase of shear wave speed on the order of 10% is shown to be possible when circumstances are favorable -when the medium behaves in an undrained fashion, and the shear modulus fluctuations are large (resulting in strong anisotropy). These effects are expected to be seen at higher frequencies such as sonic and ultrasonic waves for well-logging or laboratory experiments, or at seismic wave frequencies for low permeability regions of reservoirs, prior to hydrofracing. Results presented are strictly for velocity analysis.

  1. An experimental phantom study on the effect of calcifications on ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Adriana; Bayat, Mahdi; Denis, Max; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of single macrocalcifications and groups of microcalcifications on shear wave elastography. Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity when they are evaluated by shear wave elastography. PMID:26737132

  2. Surface waves on arbitrary vertically-sheared currents

    CERN Document Server

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of arbitrary depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation, and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past in 2D, and we herein extend and apply it to 3D problems. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving Fourier transformations in the horizontal plane. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile, and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between a concave down profile when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. New insight is given concerning the nature of extra spurious solution...

  3. A NEW MEASURE FOR DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE BED SHEAR STRESS OF WAVE BOUNDARY LAYER IN WAVE FLUME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a shear plate was mounted on the bottom in a wave flume and direct measurements of the smooth and rough bed shear stress under regular and irregular waves were conducted with the horizontal force exerted on the shear plates by the bottom shear stress in the wave boundary layer. Under immobile bed condition, grains of sand were glued uniformly and tightly onto the shear plate, being prevented from motion with the fluid flow and generation of sand ripples. The distribution of the bottom mean shear stress varying with time was measured by examining the interaction between the shear plate and shear transducers. The relation between the force measured by the shear transducers and its voltage is a linear one. Simultaneous measurements of the bottom velocity were carried out by an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), while the whole process was completely controlled by computers, bottom shear stress and velocity were synchronously measured. Based on the experimental results, it can be concluded that (1) the friction coefficient groews considerably with the increase of the Reynolds number, (2) the shear stress is a function varying with time and linearly proportional to the velocity. Compared with theoretical results and previous experimental data, it is shown that the experimental method is feasible and effective, A further study on the bed shear stress under regular or irregular waves can be carried out. And applicability to the laboratory studies on the initiation of sediments and the measurement of the shear stress after sediment imigration.

  4. Utility of Shear Wave Elastography for Diagnosing Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Fukuhara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the utility of shear wave elastography (SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI for diagnosing chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT and to verify the effect of fibrotic thyroid tissue on shear wave velocity (SWV. The subjects were 229 patients with 253 normal thyroid lobes (controls and 150 CAT lobes. The SWV for CAT (2.47 ± 0.57 m/s was significantly higher than that for controls (1.59 ± 0.41 m/s (P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve for CAT was 0.899, and the SWV cut-off value was 1.96 m/s. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 87.4%, 78.7%, and 85.1%, respectively. Levels of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies and thyroid isthmus thickness were correlated with tissue stiffness in CAT. However, there was no correlation between levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and tissue stiffness. Quantitative SWE is useful for diagnosing CAT, and it is possible that SWE can be used to evaluate the degree of fibrosis in patients with CAT.

  5. Shear Wave Splitting Observations Beneath Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, N. E.; Christensen, D. H.; Moore-Driskell, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Anisotropy in the upper mantle is often associated with mantle flow direction through the lattice preferred orientation of anisotropic minerals such as olivine in the upper mantle material. The flow of the mantle around subduction zones can be particularly complex, and thus difficult to explain. Because of its relationship to anisotropy, analysis of shear wave splitting measurements can help to answer questions regarding the upper mantle flow that surrounds subducting slabs. Here we present SK(K)S shear wave splitting measurements from a temporary broadband network (PLUTONS) of 33 stations deployed from April 2009 to October 2012 on the Altiplano plateau around Uturuncu volcano in Bolivia. The stations are spaced 10-20 km apart, providing a high spatial resolution of the region of the mantle directly below Uturuncu volcano. Despite the lack of numerous splitting results to analyze, preliminary measurements indicate a relatively consistent pattern of fast-polarization directions in a NW-SE orientation of about N80ºW. We think that it is likely that these observations come from anisotropy in the mantle wedge above the subducting Nazca plate indicating a direction of flow in the mantle wedge that is sub-parallel to the subduction direction of the Nazca plate. Although W-E flow beneath the subducting Nazca plate cannot be completely ruled out, these results appear to be consistent with the simple model of two-dimensional corner flow in the mantle wedge and slab-entrained mantle flow beneath the slab.

  6. Study on Correlation and Quantitative Error Estimation Method Among the Splitting Shear Wave Identification Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiqiang; Zhou Huilan; Li Hong; Gai Dianguang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the propagation characteristics of shear wave in the anisotropic layers, thecorrelation among several splitting shear-wave identification methods hasbeen studied. Thispaper puts forward the method estimating splitting shear-wave phases and its reliability byusing of the assumption that variance of noise and useful signal data obey normaldistribution. To check the validity of new method, the identification results and errorestimation corresponding to 95% confidence level by analyzing simulation signals have beengiven.

  7. In vivo quantification of the shear modulus of the human Achilles tendon during passive loading using shear wave dispersion analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein-Didier, C.; Andrade, R. J.; Brum, J.; Hug, F.; Tanter, M.; Nordez, A.; Gennisson, J.-L.

    2016-03-01

    The shear wave velocity dispersion was analyzed in the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion using a phase velocity method in order to obtain the tendon shear modulus (C 55). Based on this analysis, the aims of the present study were (i) to assess the reproducibility of the shear modulus for different ankle angles, (ii) to assess the effect of the probe locations, and (iii) to compare results with elasticity values obtained with the supersonic shear imaging (SSI) technique. The AT shear modulus (C 55) consistently increased with the ankle dorsiflexion (N  =  10, p  SSI was always lower than C55 and the difference increased with the ankle dorsiflexion. However, shear modulus values provided by both methods were highly correlated (R  =  0.84), indicating that the conventional shear wave elastography technique (SSI technique) can be used to compare tendon mechanical properties across populations. Future studies should determine the clinical relevance of the shear wave dispersion analysis, for instance in the case of tendinopathy or tendon tear.

  8. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  9. Wave blocking phenomenon of surface waves on a shear flow with a constant vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïssa, Philippe; Rousseaux, Germain; Stepanyants, Yury

    2016-03-01

    Propagation of gravity-capillary surface waves on a background shear flow with a constant vorticity is studied and compared with the case when the background flow is uniform in depth. Under the assumption that the background flow gradually varies in the horizontal direction, the primary attention is paid to the wave blocking phenomenon; the effect of vorticity on this phenomenon is studied in detail. The conditions for wave blocking are obtained and categorized for different values of the governing dimensionless parameters: Froude number, dimensionless vorticity, and surface tension.

  10. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. von Steht

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55–65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45–0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  11. Near surface shear wave velocity in Bucharest, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Steht, M.; Jaskolla, B.; Ritter, J. R. R.

    2008-12-01

    Bucharest, the capital of Romania with nearly 2 1/2 million inhabitants, is endangered by the strong earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone. To obtain information on the near surface shear-wave velocity Vs structure and to improve the available microzonations we conducted seismic refraction measurements in two parks of the city. There the shallow Vs structure is determined along five profiles, and the compressional-wave velocity (Vp) structure is obtained along one profile. Although the amount of data collected is limited, they offer a reasonable idea about the seismic velocity distribution in these two locations. This knowledge is useful for a city like Bucharest where seismic velocity information so far is sparse and poorly documented. Using sledge-hammer blows on a steel plate and a 24-channel recording unit, we observe clear shear-wave arrivals in a very noisy environment up to a distance of 300 m from the source. The Vp model along profile 1 can be correlated with the known near surface sedimentary layers. Vp increases from 320 m/s near the surface to 1280 m/s above 55 65 m depth. The Vs models along all five profiles are characterized by low Vs (<350 m/s) in the upper 60 m depth and a maximum Vs of about 1000 m/s below this depth. In the upper 30 m the average Vs30 varies from 210 m/s to 290 m/s. The Vp-Vs relations lead to a high Poisson's ratio of 0.45 0.49 in the upper ~60 m depth, which is an indication for water-saturated clayey sediments. Such ground conditions may severely influence the ground motion during strong Vrancea earthquakes.

  12. Generation of remote adaptive torsional shear waves with an octagonal phased array to enhance displacements and reduce variability of shear wave speeds: comparison with quasi-plane shear wavefronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method based on adaptive torsional shear waves (ATSW) is proposed to overcome the strong attenuation of shear waves generated by a radiation force in dynamic elastography. During the inward propagation of ATSW, the magnitude of displacements is enhanced due to the convergence of shear waves and constructive interferences. The proposed method consists in generating ATSW fields from the combination of quasi-plane shear wavefronts by considering a linear superposition of displacement maps. Adaptive torsional shear waves were experimentally generated in homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue mimicking phantoms, and compared to quasi-plane shear wave propagations. Results demonstrated that displacement magnitudes by ATSW could be up to 3 times higher than those obtained with quasi-plane shear waves, that the variability of shear wave speeds was reduced, and that the signal-to-noise ratio of displacements was improved. It was also observed that ATSW could cause mechanical inclusions to resonate in heterogeneous phantoms, which further increased the displacement contrast between the inclusion and the surrounding medium. This method opens a way for the development of new noninvasive tissue characterization strategies based on ATSW in the framework of our previously reported shear wave induced resonance elastography (SWIRE) method proposed for breast cancer diagnosis. (paper)

  13. Drift-wave spectra in plasmas with magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear radial eigenmode equation governing the evolution of drift waves in a weakly turbulent state is obtained under the assumption that ion nonlinear scattering (nonlinear ion Landau damping) is the dominant saturation mechanism. The poloidal spectrum is to be derived from the eigenvalue equation. The local character of the interaction in frequencies allows the transformation of the otherwise integral wave kinetic equation (i.e., the eigenvalue equation) into a system of two first-order differential equations coupling the spectra I(k/sub theta/) and I(k/sup dagger//sub theta/) if ω(k/sup dagger//sub theta/) = ω(k/sub theta/). The density fluctuation spectrum is obtained analytically in the limit of the small temperature ratio T/sub i//T/sub e/. Some features are: (i) the spectral index at high mode numbers agrees well with experimental values; (ii) the long-wavelength spectrum peaks at k/sub theta/a/sub s/approx. =0.62 (a/sub s/ equivalentsound Larmor radius), (iii) the cross-field diffusion is mostly induced by the high-mode-number fluctuations, whereas the major contribution to the density fluctuations is in the long wavelengths; (iv) the frequency spectrum of the beat waves peaks at ω = 0 (they then have a convective cell character); and (v) the turbulence level is a factor L/sub n//L/sub s/ (ratio of density and shear lengths) smaller than with former theories

  14. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W H; Yang, Victor X D; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  15. Laboratory measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through methane hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W B; Waite, WF; Pinkston, J C; Stern, L A; Kirby, S H; Helgerud, M B; Nur, A

    1999-10-25

    Simultaneous measurements of compressional and shear wave speeds through polycrystalline methane hydrate have been made. Methane hydrate, grown directly in a wave speed measurement chamber, was uniaxially compacted to a final porosity below 2%. At 277 K, the compacted material's compressional wave speed was 3650 {+-} 50 m/s. The shear wave speed, measured simultaneously, was 1890 {+-} 30 m/s. From these wave speed measurements, we derive Vp/Vs, Poisson's Ratio, bulk, shear and Young's moduli.

  16. Ship waves on uniform shear current at finite depth: wave resistance and critical velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive theory for linear gravity-driven ship waves in the presence of a shear current with uniform vorticity, including the effects of finite water depth. The wave resistance in the presence of shear current is calculated for the first time, containing in general a non-zero lateral component. While formally apparently a straightforward extension of existing deep water theory, the introduction of finite water depth is physically non-trivial, since the surface waves are now affected by a subtle interplay of the effects of the current and the sea bed. This becomes particularly pronounced when considering the phenomenon of critical velocity, the velocity at which transversely propagating waves become unable to keep up with the moving source. The phenomenon is well known for shallow water, and was recently shown to exist also in deep water in the presence of a shear current [Ellingsen, J.~Fluid Mech.\\ {\\bf 742} R2 (2014)]. We derive the exact criterion for criticality as a function of an intrin...

  17. [INVITED] Laser generation and detection of ultrafast shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeril, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the up-to-date findings related to ultrafast shear acoustic waves. Recent progress obtained for the laser generation and detection of picosecond shear acoustic waves in solids and liquids is reviewed. Examples in which the transverse isotropic symmetry of the sample structure is broken in order to permit shear acoustic wave generation through sudden laser heating are described in detail. Alternative photo-induced mechanisms for ultrafast shear acoustic generation in metals, semiconductors, insulators, magnetostrictive, piezoelectric and electrostrictive materials are reviewed as well. With reference to key experiments, an all-optical technique employed to probe longitudinal and shear structural dynamics in the GHz frequency range in ultra-thin liquid films is described. This technique, based on specific ultrafast shear acoustic transducers, has opened new perspectives that will be discussed for ultrafast shear acoustic probing of viscoelastic liquids at the nanometer scale.

  18. Analysis shear wave velocity structure obtained from surface wave methods in Bornova, Izmir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamuk, Eren; Özdaǧ, Özkan Cevdet; Akgün, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Properties of the soil from the bedrock is necessary to describe accurately and reliably for the reduction of earthquake damage. Because seismic waves change their amplitude and frequency content owing to acoustic impedance difference between soil and bedrock. Firstly, shear wave velocity and depth information of layers on bedrock is needed to detect this changing. Shear wave velocity can be obtained using inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods (MASW- the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves, ReMi-Refraction Microtremor, SPAC-Spatial Autocorrelation). While research depth is limeted in active source study, a passive source methods are utilized for deep depth which is not reached using active source methods. ReMi method is used to determine layer thickness and velocity up to 100 m using seismic refraction measurement systems.The research carried out up to desired depth depending on radius using SPAC which is utilized easily in conditions that district using of seismic studies in the city. Vs profiles which are required to calculate deformations in under static and dynamic loads can be obtained with high resolution using combining rayleigh wave dispersion curve obtained from active and passive source methods. In the this study, Surface waves data were collected using the measurements of MASW, ReMi and SPAC at the İzmir Bornova region. Dispersion curves obtained from surface wave methods were combined in wide frequency band and Vs-depth profiles were obtained using inversion. Reliability of the resulting soil profiles were provided by comparison with theoretical transfer function obtained from soil paremeters and observed soil transfer function from Nakamura technique and by examination of fitting between these functions. Vs values are changed between 200-830 m/s and engineering bedrock (Vs>760 m/s) depth is approximately 150 m.

  19. Passive elastography: shear-wave tomography from physiological-noise correlation in soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallot, Thomas; Catheline, Stefan; Roux, Philippe; Brum, Javier; Benech, Nicolas; Negreira, Carlos

    2011-06-01

    Inspired by seismic-noise correlation and time reversal, a shear-wave tomography of soft tissues using an ultrafast ultrasonic scanner is presented here. Free from the need for controlled shear-wave sources, this passive elastography is based on Green's function retrieval and takes advantage of the permanent physiological noise of the human body. PMID:21693392

  20. Imaging mechanical shear waves induced by piezoelectric ceramics in magnetic resonance elastography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive technique to measure elasticity of tissues in vivo. In this paper, a mechanical shear wave MR imaging system experiment is set for MRE. A novel actuator is proposed to generate mechanical shear waves propagating inside a gel phantom. The actuator is made of piezoelectric ceramics, and fixed on a plexiglass bracket. Both of the gel phantom and the actuator are put into a head coil inside the MR scanner's bore. The actuator works synchronously with an MR imaging sequence running on the MR scanner. The sequence is modified from a FLASH sequence into a motion-sensitizing phase- contrast sequence for shear wave MR imaging. Shear wave images are presented, and these effects on the shear wave MR imaging system, including the stiffness of phantoms, the frequency of the actuator, the parameters of the motion-sensitizing gradient, and the oscillation of the patient bed, are discussed.

  1. Modelling study of challenges in sinkhole detection with shear wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burschil, Thomas; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    The detection of cavities with reflection seismics is a difficult task even if high impedance contrasts are assumed. Especially the shear wave reflection method with a higher resolution potential trough lower velocities and short wavelength has come into focus of investigation. But shear wave propagation fails if material exists that partially has no shear strength. The shear wave does not propagate into or through those voids. Here, we evaluate the influence of a possible fracture zone above a cavity. We simulate shear wave propagation with finite difference modelling for two reference models, with and without cavity, and various sets of input models with a fracture zone above the cavity. Reflections and multiples of the reference models image the subsidence structure and the cavity. For the fracture input models, we implemented a fracture network, derived from numerical crack propagation modelling (Schneider-Löbens et al., 2015). The cracks possess the minimum possible aperture of one grid point (i.e. 0.1 m) and no shear stiffness. The seismic modelling exhibits that the shear wave does not pass through the fracture zone and shadows the subjacent cavity. Sequences of randomly discontinuous cracks, cf. displacement discontinuity model with zero crack stiffness, approximate partially seismic connected rock on both sides of the crack. The amount of these seismic pathways determines whether a reflection of the cavity can be detected at the surface or not. Cracks with higher aperture, e.g. two or three grid points, need a higher amount of intact rock/defective cracks, since more connected grid points are necessary to create seismic pathways. Furthermore, it turns out that the crack filling is important for shear wave transmission. While a mineralized fracture zone, implemented with high velocity, facilitate shear wave propagation, water or air-filled cracks avoid shear wave transmission. Crack orientation affects the shear wave propagation through the geometry. A

  2. Flow shear suppression of turbulence using externally driven ion Bernstein and Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of externally-launched radio-frequency waves as a means of active confinement control through the generation of sheared poloidal flows is explored. For low-frequency waves, kinetic Alfven waves are proposed, and are shown to drive sheared E x B flows as a result of the radial variation in the electromagnetic Reynolds stress. In the high frequency regime, ion Bernstein waves are considered, and shown to generate sheared poloidal rotation through the ponderomotive force. In either case, it is shown that modest amounts of absorbed power (∼ few 100 kW) are required to suppress turbulence in a region of several cm radial width. 9 refs

  3. A wave interaction approach to studying non-modal homogeneous and stratified shear instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Guha, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Resonant interaction between two (or more) progressive interfacial waves produce exponentially growing instabilities in idealized, homogeneous and density stratified, inviscid shear layers (Holmboe 1962). Resonance occurs when the two waves attain a "phase-locked" configuration. In this paper we have generalized the mechanistic picture of shear instabilities described in Holmboe (1962). Unlike Holmboe, we do not initially assume the wave type (e.g. vorticity wave or gravity wave), nor do we impose the normal-mode waveform (which only accounts for exponential growth). Starting from the first principles, we demonstrate that two oppositely propagating interfacial waves, having arbitrary initial amplitudes (which are small enough to satisfy linearity) and phases, eventually phase-lock, provided they satisfy a certain condition. We show it to be the necessary and sufficient condition for exponentially growing instabilities in idealized shear layers. We investigate three types of shear instabilities - Kelvin Helmho...

  4. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  5. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W. H.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by w...

  6. Propagation of Shear Waves Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force in Nondissipative Inhomogeneous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ming-Zhu; LIU Xue-Jin; SHI Yu; KANG Yan-Ni; GUAN Yu-Bo; WAN Ming-Xi

    2012-01-01

    We concentrate on the nondissipative mechanism induced shear wave in inhomogenous tissue.The shear wave equation of radiation force in inhomogeneous media is solved numerically with a finite-difference time-domain method.A rarely studied nondissipative mechanism of shear displacement due to a smooth medium inhomogeneity is evaluated.It is noted that unlike the dissipative effect,the nondissipative action on a localized inhomogeneity with its hardness parameter changing smoothly along the beam axis,compresses or stretches the focus area.The shear waves in nondissipative inhomogeneous media remain the property of sharp turn with 100% peak positive displacement and 64% peak negative displacement.This action is useful in discerning the water-like lesion.%We concentrate on the nondissipative mechanism induced shear wave in inhomogenous tissue. The shear wave equation of radiation force in inhomogeneous media is solved numerically with a finite-difference time-domain method. A rarely studied nondissipative mechanism of shear displacement due to a smooth medium inhomogeneity is evaluated. It is noted that unlike the dissipative effect, the nondissipative action on a localized inhomogeneity with its hardness parameter changing smoothly along the beam axis, compresses or stretches the focus area. The shear waves in nondissipative inhomogeneous media remain the property of sharp turn with 100% peak positive displacement and 64% peak negative displacement. This action is useful in discerning the water-like lesion.

  7. Shear Wave Splitting Across Eastern, Western and Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyblade, A.; Ramirez, C.; Bagley, B. C.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The expansion of the AfricaArray network across eastern, western and southern Africa, in conjunction with seismic data from many PASSCAL deployments over the past 20 years, is helping to fill in major gaps in the global coverage of shear wave splitting measurements. New results from stations in Ghana, Nigeria, Mozambique, Botswana, Angola, Namibia and South Africa are presented in this study that when combined with previously published measurements help to map the pattern of seismic anisotropy over much of the African continent. A general pattern of fast polarization directions, characterized by NE orientations, is found, and superimposed on this subcontinental-scale pattern is local and regional variability, most notably around the Archean Tanzania craton in eastern Africa. The subcontinental-scale pattern, as well as local and regional variations in this pattern, are interpreted in terms of large-scale mantle flow from the African Superplume, fossil anisotropy in the lithosphere, and shape anisotropy in magmatic regions of the East African rift system.

  8. Third harmonic generation of shear horizontal guided waves propagation in plate-like structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei Bin [School of Aerospace Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Xu, Chun Guang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing (China); Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The use of nonlinear ultrasonics wave has been accepted as a promising tool for monitoring material states related to microstructural changes, as it has improved sensitivity compared to conventional non-destructive testing approaches. In this paper, third harmonic generation of shear horizontal guided waves propagating in an isotropic plate is investigated using the perturbation method and modal analysis approach. An experimental procedure is proposed to detect the third harmonics of shear horizontal guided waves by electromagnetic transducers. The strongly nonlinear response of shear horizontal guided waves is measured. The accumulative growth of relative acoustic nonlinear response with an increase of propagation distance is detected in this investigation. The experimental results agree with the theoretical prediction, and thus providing another indication of the feasibility of using higher harmonic generation of electromagnetic shear horizontal guided waves for material characterization.

  9. Systematic Analysis Method of Shear-Wave Splitting:SAM Software System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yuan; Liu Xiqiang; Liang Wei; Hao Ping

    2004-01-01

    In order to make a more effective use of the data from regional digital seismograph networks and to promote the study on shear wave splitting and its application to earthquake stressforecasting, SAM software system, i.e., the software on systematic analysis method of shear wave splitting has been developed. This paper introduces the design aims, system structure,function and characteristics about the SAM software system and shows some graphical interfaces of data input and result output. Lastly, it discusses preliminarily the study of shear wave splitting and its application to earthquake forecasting.

  10. Contactless Remote Induction of Shear Waves in Soft Tissues Using a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Device

    CERN Document Server

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear wave induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitude of 5 and 0.5 micrometers were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method.

  11. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  12. Nonlinear shear wave in a non Newtonian visco-elastic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, D.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Chaudhuri, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    An analysis of nonlinear transverse shear wave has been carried out on non-Newtonian viscoelastic liquid using generalized hydrodynamic model. The nonlinear viscoelastic behavior is introduced through velocity shear dependence of viscosity coefficient by well known Carreau-Bird model. The dynamical feature of this shear wave leads to the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem. Numerical solution has been obtained which shows that initial periodic solutions reoccur after passing through several patterns of periodic waves. A possible explanation for this periodic solution is given by constructing modified Korteweg de Vries equation. This model has application from laboratory to astrophysical plasmas as well as in biological systems.

  13. Nonlinear Shear Wave in a Non Newtonian Visco-elastic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Janaki, D Banerjee M S; Chaudhuri, M

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of nonlinear transverse shear wave has been carried out on non-Newtonian viscoelastic liquid using generalized hydrodynamic(GH) model. The nonlinear viscoelastic behavior is introduced through velocity shear dependence of viscosity coefficient by well known Carreau -Bird model. The dynamical feature of this shear wave leads to the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) problem. Numerical solution has been obtained which shows that initial periodic solutions reoccur after passing through several patterns of periodic waves. A possible explanation for this periodic solution is given by constructing modified Korteweg de Vries (mKdV) equation. This model has application from laboratory to astrophysical plasmas as well as biological systems.

  14. Generating Shear Waves in the Human Brain for Ultrasound Elastography: A new Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Emmanuel; Callé, Samuel; Remenieras, Jean-Pierre

    One of the challenges of brain elastography is the generation of the shear waves inside the brain. The generation system has to bypass the body's natural protection while keeping a good level of comfort for the patient. We propose a shear wave inducing system for brain ultrasound elastography. In this paper we will validate this system in vitro on a tissue mimicking phantom by doing shear wave velocity measurements. The system proves to work well on phantoms and to be comfortable for the patient. Further work will include measurements in vivo.

  15. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Hashemiyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort.

  16. Estimation of Shear Wave Velocity in Seafloor Sediment by Seismo-Acoustic Interface Waves:. a Case Study for Geotechnical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hefeng; Hovem, Jens M.; Frivik, Svein Arne

    2006-10-01

    Estimates of shear wave velocity profiles in seafloor sediments can be obtained from inversion of measured dispersion relations of seismo-acoustic interface waves propagating along the seabed. The interface wave velocity is directly related to shear wave velocity with value of between 87-96% of the shear wave velocity, dependent on the Poission ratio of the sediments. In this paper we present two different techniques to determine the dispersion relation: a single-sensor method used to determine group velocity and a multi-sensor method used to determine the phase velocity of the interface wave. An inversion technique is used to determine shear wave velocity versus depth and it is based on singular value decomposition and regularization theory. The technique is applied to data acquired at Steinbåen outside Horten in the Oslofjorden (Norway) and compared with the result from independent core measurements taken at the same location. The results show good agreement between the two ways of determining shear wave velocity.

  17. Estimation of material parameters from slow and fast shear waves in an incompressible, transversely isotropic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweten, Dennis J; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Garbow, Joel R; Bayly, Philip V

    2015-11-26

    This paper describes a method to estimate mechanical properties of soft, anisotropic materials from measurements of shear waves with specific polarization and propagation directions. This method is applicable to data from magnetic resonance elastography (MRE), which is a method for measuring shear waves in live subjects or in vitro samples. Here, we simulate MRE data using finite element analysis. A nearly incompressible, transversely isotropic (ITI) material model with three parameters (shear modulus, shear anisotropy, and tensile anisotropy) is used, which is appropriate for many fibrous, biological tissues. Both slow and fast shear waves travel concurrently through such a material with speeds that depend on the propagation direction relative to fiber orientation. A three-parameter estimation approach based on directional filtering and isolation of slow and fast shear wave components (directional filter inversion, or DFI) is introduced. Wave speeds of each isolated shear wave component are estimated using local frequency estimation (LFE), and material properties are calculated using weighted least squares. Data from multiple finite element simulations are used to assess the accuracy and reliability of DFI for estimation of anisotropic material parameters. PMID:26476762

  18. Variations of shear wave splitting in the 2008 Wen chuan earthquake region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING ZhiFeng; WU Yan; WANG Hui; ZHOU XiaoFeng; LI GuiYin

    2008-01-01

    Through the analysis of S-wave particle motion of local events in the shear wave window, the polarization directions of the faster shear wave and the delay times between the faster and the slower shear waves were derived from seismic recordings at the stations near the fault zones. The shear wave splitting results of seven stations in the area of Longmenshan fault zone reveal spatial variation of the polarization directions of the fast shear wave. The directions at stations in the southeastern side of the Longmenshan fault zone (in the Sichuan Basin area) are in the NE direction, whereas the direction at station PWU (in the Plateau), which is in the northwestern side of the faults, is in the EW direction.Systematic changes of the time delays between two split shear waves were also observed. At station L5501 in the southern end of the aftershock zone, the delay times of the slower shear wave decrease systematically after the main shock. After the main shock, the delay times at station PWU were longer than those before the earthquake. Seismic shear wave splitting is caused mostly by stress-aligned microcracks in the rock below the stations. The results demonstrate changes of local stress field during the main-shock and the aftershocks. The stress in the southern part of Wenchuan seismogenic zone was released by the main-shock and the aftershocks. The crustal stresses were transferred to the northeastern part of the zone, resulting in stress increase at station PWU after the main-shock.

  19. Variations of shear wave splitting in the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Through the analysis of S-wave particle motion of local events in the shear wave window, the polariza-tion directions of the faster shear wave and the delay times between the faster and the slower shear waves were derived from seismic recordings at the stations near the fault zones. The shear wave split-ting results of seven stations in the area of Longmenshan fault zone reveal spatial variation of the po-larization directions of the fast shear wave. The directions at stations in the southeastern side of the Longmenshan fault zone (in the Sichuan Basin area) are in the NE direction, whereas the direction at station PWU (in the Plateau), which is in the northwestern side of the faults, is in the EW direction. Systematic changes of the time delays between two split shear waves were also observed. At station L5501 in the southern end of the aftershock zone, the delay times of the slower shear wave decrease systematically after the main shock. After the main shock, the delay times at station PWU were longer than those before the earthquake. Seismic shear wave splitting is caused mostly by stress-aligned microcracks in the rock below the stations. The results demonstrate changes of local stress field dur-ing the main-shock and the aftershocks. The stress in the southern part of Wenchuan seismogenic zone was released by the main-shock and the aftershocks. The crustal stresses were transferred to the northeastern part of the zone, resulting in stress increase at station PWU after the main-shock.

  20. An omnidirectional shear horizontal wave transducer based on ring array of face-shear (d24) piezoelectric ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Hongchen; Wang, Qiangzhong; Li, Faxin

    2016-01-01

    The non-dispersive fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) wave in plate-like structures is of practical importance in non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM). Theoretically, an omnidirectional SH0 transducer phased array system can be used to inspect defects in a large plate in the similar manner to the phased array transducers used in medical B-scan ultrasonics. However, very few omnidirectional SH transducers have been proposed so far. In this work, an omnidirectional SH wave piezoelectric transducer (OSH-PT) was proposed which consists of a ring array of twelve face-shear (d24) trapezoidal PZT elements. Each PZT element can produce face-shear deformation under applied voltage, resulting in circumferential shear deformation in the OSH-PT and omnidirectional SH waves in the hosting plate. Both finite element simulations and experiments were conducted to examine the performance of the proposed OSH-PT. Experimental testing shows that the OSH-PT exhibits good omnidirectional properties,...

  1. The effect of subducting slabs in global shear wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chang; Grand, Stephen P.

    2016-05-01

    Subducting slabs create strong short wavelength seismic anomalies in the upper mantle where much of Earth's seismicity is located. As such, they have the potential to bias longer wavelength seismic tomography models. To evaluate the effect of subducting slabs in global tomography, we performed a series of inversions using a global synthetic shear wave traveltime data set for a theoretical slab model based on predicted thermal anomalies within slabs. The spectral element method was applied to predict the traveltime anomalies produced by the 3-D slab model for paths corresponding to our current data used in actual tomography models. Inversion tests have been conducted first using the raw traveltime anomalies to check how well the slabs can be imaged in global tomography without the effect of earthquake mislocation. Our results indicate that most of the slabs can be identified in the inversion result but with smoothed and reduced amplitude. The recovery of the total mass anomaly in slab regions is about 88 per cent. We then performed another inversion test to investigate the effect of mislocation caused by subducting slabs. We found that source mislocation largely removes slab signal and significantly degrades the imaging of subducting slabs-potentially reducing the recovery of mass anomalies in slab regions to only 41 per cent. We tested two source relocation procedures-an iterative relocation inversion and joint relocation inversion. Both methods partially recover the true source locations and improve the inversion results, but the joint inversion method worked significantly better than the iterative method. In all of our inversion tests, the amplitudes of artefact structures in the lower mantle caused by the incorrect imaging of slabs (up to ˜0.5 per cent S velocity anomalies) are comparable to some large-scale lower-mantle heterogeneities seen in global tomography studies. Based on our inversion tests, we suggest including a-priori subducting slabs in the

  2. Effects of shallow density structure on the inversion for crustal shear wave speeds in surface wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guangchi; Niu, Fenglin; Chen, Min; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-05-01

    Surface wave tomography routinely uses empirically scaled density model in the inversion of dispersion curves for shear wave speeds of the crust and uppermost mantle. An improperly selected empirical scaling relationship between density and shear wave speed can lead to unrealistic density models beneath certain tectonic formations such as sedimentary basins. Taking the Sichuan basin east to the Tibetan plateau as an example, we investigate the differences between density profiles calculated from four scaling methods and their effects on Rayleigh wave phase velocities. Analytical equations for 1-D layered models and adjoint tomography for 3-D models are used to examine the trade-off between density and S-wave velocity structures at different depth ranges. We demonstrate that shallow density structure can significantly influence phase velocities at short periods, and thereby affect the shear wave speed inversion from phase velocity data. In particular, a deviation of 25 per cent in the initial density model can introduce an error up to 5 per cent in the inverted shear velocity at middle and lower crustal depths. Therefore one must pay enough attention in choosing a proper velocity-density scaling relationship in constructing initial density model in Rayleigh wave inversion for crustal shear velocity structure.

  3. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  4. Experimental validation of acoustic radiation force induced shear wave interference patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Hah, Zaegyoo; Hazard, Chris; Parker, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    A novel elasticity imaging system founded on the use of acoustic radiation forces from a dual beam arrangement to generate shear wave interference patterns is described. Acquired pulse-echo data and correlation-based techniques were used to estimate the resultant deformation and to visualize tissue viscoelastic response. The use of normal versus axicon focal configurations was investigated for effects on shear wave generation. Theoretical models were introduced and shown in simulation to accurately predict shear wave propagation and interference pattern properties. In a tissue-mimicking phantom, experimental results are in congruence with theoretical predictions. Using dynamic acoustic radiation force excitation, results confirm that shear wave interference patterns can be produced remotely in a particular tissue region of interest (ROI). Overall, preliminary results are encouraging and the system described may prove feasible for interrogating the viscoelastic properties of normal and diseased tissue types.

  5. Improvement of Shear Wave Motion Detection Using Harmonic Imaging in Healthy Human Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Carolina; Song, Pengfei; Meixner, Duane D; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W

    2016-05-01

    Quantification of liver elasticity is a major application of shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) to non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis stages. SWEI measurements can be highly affected by ultrasound image quality. Ultrasound harmonic imaging has exhibited a significant improvement in ultrasound image quality as well as for SWEI measurements. This was previously illustrated in cardiac SWEI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate liver shear wave particle displacement detection and shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements with fundamental and filter-based harmonic ultrasound imaging. In a cohort of 17 patients with no history of liver disease, a 2.9-fold increase in maximum shear wave displacement, a 0.11 m/s decrease in the overall interquartile range and median SWV and a 17.6% increase in the success rate of SWV measurements were obtained when filter-based harmonic imaging was used instead of fundamental imaging. PMID:26803391

  6. Finite difference modelling to evaluate seismic P wave and shear wave field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Burschil

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution reflection seismic methods are an established non-destructive tool for engineering tasks. In the near surface, shear wave reflection seismic measurements usually offer a higher spatial resolution in the same effective signal frequency spectrum than P wave data, but data quality varies more strongly. To discuss the causes of these differences, we investigated a P wave and a SH wave reflection seismic profile measured at the same location on Föhr island, and applied reflection seismic processing to the field data as well as finite difference modelling of the seismic wavefield (SOFI FD-code. The simulations calculated were adapted to the acquisition field geometry, comprising 2 m receiver distance and 4 m shot distance along the 1.5 km long P wave and 800 m long SH wave profiles. A Ricker-Wavelet and the use of absorbing frames were first order model parameters. The petrophysical parameters to populate the structural models down to 400 m depth are taken from borehole data, VSP measurements and cross-plot relations. The first simulation of the P wave wavefield was based on a simplified hydrogeological model of the survey location containing six lithostratigraphic units. Single shot data were compared and seismic sections created. Major features like direct wave, refracted waves and reflections are imaged, but the reflectors describing a prominent till layer at ca. 80 m depth was missing. Therefore, the P wave input model was refined and 16 units assigned. These define a laterally more variable velocity model (vP = 1600–2300 m s−1 leading to a much better reproduction of the field data. The SH wave model was adapted accordingly but only led to minor correlation with the field data and produced a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we suggest to consider for future simulations additional features like intrinsic damping, thin layering, or a near surface weathering layer. These may lead to a better understanding of key

  7. Shear Horizontal Wave Propagation Speed in Mylar Sheet and Coated Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, M.; Karppinen, T.; Hæggström, E.; Stor-Pellinen, J.

    2006-03-01

    Soft plate-like membranes find application e.g. as pill or paper coatings, bio-filter membranes, and gas seals in food products. For these applications the integrity and the mechanical properties of the membrane are important. Mechanical properties of these products can be determined by stretching or bending tests, but such methods can damage these fragile products. We propose a rapid nondestructive acoustic method to estimate mechanical film characteristics with shear horizontal (in-plane shear) waves. A 23 kHz, 1-cycle square signal was excited into a thin foil with a piezoceramic pickup and received with an inductive pickup. The SNR (power) was 20 dB in 1 kHz -50 kHz bandwidth. This actuation-detection scheme can be used to excite in-plane longitudinal, shear and even elliptic waves in a thin foil. The method was validated by measuring in-plane shear wave and longitudinal wave time-of-flight TOF at different actuator-receiver separations and calculating the corresponding longitudinal and shear modulus. The samples were Mylar® sheet and coated paper. The anisotropy of MOE for Mylar sheet was close to the manufacturer specifications. For coated paper a maximum shear modulus anisotropy of 5% and a shear modulus dependence on temperature of 0.7 MPa/°C were found. Laser doppler vibrometry showed that the excited waves were confined in-plane.

  8. SHEAR FLOQUET WAVES IN MAGNETO-ELECTRO-ELASTIC SOLID WITH PERIODIC INTERFACES OF IMPERFECT CONTACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasparyan D.K.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at investigating the shear waves propagation in magneto-electro-elastic piezo active homogeneous solid of the one-dimensional periodic structure of imperfect contact interfaces. In the framework of the Floquet theory the dispersion equations are obtained defining shear wave frequency pass and gap band structure. For three kinds of imperfect contact conditions the analysis of dispersion relations is presented.

  9. Comparison of shear-wave velocity measurements by crosshole, downhole and seismic cone penetration test methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suthaker, N.; Tweedie, R. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Shear wave velocity measurements are an integral part of geotechnical studies for major structures and are an important tool in their design for site specific conditions such as site-specific earthquake response. This paper reported on a study in which shear wave velocities were measured at a proposed petrochemical plant site near Edmonton, Alberta. The proposed site is underlain by lacustrine clay, glacial till and upper Cretaceous clay shale and sandstone bedrock. The most commonly used methods for determining shear wave velocity include crosshole seismic tests, downhole seismic tests, and seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT). This paper presented the results of all 3 methods used in this study and provided a comparison of the various test methods and their limitations. The crosshole test results demonstrated a common trend of increasing shear wave velocity with depth to about 15 m, below which the velocities remained relatively constant. An anomaly was noted at one site, where the shear wave velocity was reduced at a zone corresponding to clay till containing stiff high plastic clay layers. The field study demonstrated that reasonable agreement in shear wave velocity measurements can be made using crosshole, downhole and seismic tests in the same soil conditions. The National Building Code states that the shear wave velocity is the fundamental method for determining site classification, thus emphasizing the importance of obtaining shear wave velocity measurements for site classification. It was concluded that an SCPT program can be incorporated into the field program without much increase in cost and can be supplemented by downhole or crosshole techniques. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  10. Measurement of shear-wave velocity by ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S.; Antich, P.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    There exists a growing body of research that relates the measurement of pressure-wave velocity in bone to different physiological conditions and treatment modalities. The shear-wave velocity has been less studied, although it is necessary for a more complete understanding of the mechanical properties of bone. Ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive technique previously used to measure pressure-wave velocities both in vitro and in vivo. This note describes its application to the measurement of shear-wave velocity in bone, whether directly accessible or covered by soft tissue.

  11. Linking the viscous grain-shearing mechanism of wave propagation in marine sediments to fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikash; Holm, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    An analogy is drawn between the diffusion-wave equations derived from the fractional Kelvin-Voigt model and those obtained from Buckingham's grain-shearing (GS) model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2796-2815 (2000)] of wave propagation in saturated, unconsolidated granular materials. The material impulse response function from the GS model is found to be similar to the power-law memory kernel which is inherent in the framework of fractional calculus. The compressional wave equation and shear wave equation derived from the GS model turn out to be the Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative wave equation and the fractional diffusion-wave equation respectively. Also, a physical interpretation of the characteristic fractional-order present in the Kelvin-Voigt fractional derivative wave equation and time-fractional diffusion-wave equation is inferred from the GS model. The shear wave equation from the GS model predicts both diffusion and wave propagation in the fractional framework. The overall goal is intended to show that fractional calculus is not just a mathematical framework which can be used to curve-fit the complex behavior of materials, but rather it can be justified from real physical process of grain-shearing as well.

  12. Seismic anisotropy of the crust in Yunnan,China: Polarizations of fast shear-waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yu-tao; GAO Yuan; WU Jing; LUO Yan; SU You-jin

    2006-01-01

    Using seismic data recorded by Yunnan Telemetry Seismic Network from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2003,the dominant polarization directions of fast shear-waves are obtained at l0 digital seismic stations by SAM technique, a systematic analysis method on shear-wave splitting, in this study. The results show that dominant directions of polarizations of fast shear-waves at most stations are mainly at nearly N-S or NNW direction in Yunnan.The dominant polarization directions of fast shear-waves at stations located on the active faults are consistent with the strike of active faults, directions of regional principal compressive strains measured from GPS data, and basically consistent with regional principal compressive stress. Only a few of stations show complicated polarization pattern of fast shear-waves, or are not consistent with the strike of active faults and the directions of principal GPS compressive strains, which are always located at junction of several faults. The result reflects complicated fault distribution and stress field. The dominant polarization direction of fast shear-wave indicates the direction of the in-situ maximum principal compressive stress is controlled by multiple tectonic aspects such as the regional stress field and faults.

  13. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic MHD shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Uchava, E S; Tevzadze, A G; Poedts, S

    2014-01-01

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic MHD flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model, that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy, but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also impor...

  14. Dispersion relation of drift-wave instability in a collisionless plasma with sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed measurements are performed on drift-wave instability in a collisionless plasma column under a sheared magnetic field. The instability is found to be destabilized by the small magnetic shear and has a maximum amplitude at the shear length, where the electron thermal speed is nearly equal to the axial phase velocity (controlled by the shear) of the instability. The dispersion relation of the instability agrees with the local theory, which yields almost the same results as the non-local theory taking into account the measured radial density profile of a slender plasma column. (author)

  15. Magnetic-Field Generation by Randomly Forced Shearing Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Schekochihin, A A; Kleeorin, N; Lesur, G; Mallet, A; McWilliams, J C; Rogachevskii, I; Yousef, T A

    2008-01-01

    A rigorous theory for the generation of a large-scale magnetic field by random nonhelically forced motions of a conducting fluid combined with a linear shear is presented in the analytically tractable limit of Rm << Re << 1. This is a minimal proof-of-concept calculation aiming to put the shear dynamo, a new effect recently reported in a number of numerical experiments, on a firm physical and analytical footing. Numerically observed scalings of the wavenumber and growth rate of the fastest growing mode, previously not understood, are derived analytically. The simplicity of the model suggests that shear dynamo may be a generic property of shear flows -- with ubiquitous relevance to astrophysical systems.

  16. Determination of Shear Properties in the Upper Seafloor Using Seismo-acoustic Interface Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frivik, Svein Arne

    1998-12-31

    This thesis develops methods for recording and analysis of seismo-acoustic interface waves for determination of shear wave velocity as a function of depth and includes this in standard refraction seismic surveying. It investigates different techniques for estimation of dispersion characteristics of the interface waves and demonstrates that multi sensor spectral estimation techniques improve the dispersion estimates. The dispersion estimate of the fundamental interface wave mode is used as input to an object function for a model based linearized inversion. The inversion scheme provides an estimate of the shear wave velocity as a function of depth. Three field surveys were performed. Data were acquired with a standard bottom deployed refraction seismic hydrophone array containing 24 or 48 receivers, with a receiver spacing of 2.5 m. Explosive charges were used as sources. The recording time was increased from 0.5 to 8 s, compared to standard refraction seismic surveys. Shear wave velocity and shear modulus estimates were obtained from all the sites. At one of the sites, geotechnically obtained shear wave parameters were available, and a comparison between the two techniques were performed. the result of the comparison is promising and shows the potential of the technique. Although the result of applying the processing scheme to all three data sets is promising, it appears that survey parameters, like source-array spacing, receiver spacing and type of source might have been optimized for better performance. Based on this limitation, a new processing scheme and a new array configuration is proposed for surveys which integrates the recording and processing of both compressional waves and shear waves. 89 refs., 65 refs., 19 tabs.

  17. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration

  18. Modified ion-acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with field-aligned shear flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, H. [Department of Space Science, Institute of Space Technology, 1-Islamabad Highway, Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, S. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Haque, Q. [Theoretical Research Institute, Pakistan Academy of Sciences, 3-Constitution Avenue G-5/3, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in a plasma having field-aligned shear flow. A Korteweg-deVries-type nonlinear equation for a modified ion-acoustic wave is obtained which admits a single pulse soliton solution. The theoretical result has been applied to solar wind plasma at 1 AU for illustration.

  19. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in MCF7 cell modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) in MCF7 cell modules (comprised of MCF7 cells and collagen) and based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with an OCT swept source wavelength sweep imaging system. Acoustic radiation force was applied to the MCF7 cell constructs. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the acoustic radiation force, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these modules. The OCT phase maps are acquired with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. We also calculated the tissue mechanical properties based on the propagating shear waves in the MCF7 + collagen phantoms using the Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) of an ultrasound transducer, and measured the shear wave speed with the OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future studies of mechanical property measurements of breast cancer structures, with applications in the study of breast cancer pathologies.

  20. Propagation of shear waves in viscoelastic heterogeneous layer overlying an initially stressed half space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Mita; Dhua, Sudarshan; Chattopadhyay, Amares

    2015-12-01

    The present paper is concerned with the propagation of shear waves in an isotropic, viscoelastic, heterogeneous layer lying over a homogeneous half space under initial stress. For the layer the inhomogeneity associated to rigidity, internal friction and density is assumed to be linear function of depth. The dispersion equation of shear waves has been obtained in closed form. The dimensionless phase velocity and damping velocity have been plotted against dimensionless wave number for different values of inhomogeneity parameter and initial stress. The effects of inhomogeneity and initial stress have been shown in the dispersion curves.

  1. Analytical Solution for Wave-Induced Response of Seabed with Variable Shear Modulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A plane strain analysis based on the generalized Biot's equation is utilized to investigate the wave-induced response of a poro-elastic seabed with variable shear modulus. By employing integral transform and Frobenius methods, the transient and steady solutions for the wave-induced pore water pressure, effective stresses and displacements are analytically derived in detail. Verification is available through the reduction to the simple case of homogeneous seabed. The numerical results indicate that the inclusion of variable shear modulus significantly affects the wave-induced seabed response.

  2. Reduced Imaging Rate in Liver Elastometery Using Shear Wave Interference Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soozande, Mehdi; Arabalibeik, Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Inducing interference patterns of shear wave is one of the proposed methods for reducing the frame rate in measuring wave speed during tissue elastography. Previously, the Nyquist rate must be met in order to provide an appropriate image for extracting the patterns with a reasonable accuracy. In this article we propose a technique based on image registration, and apply it to ultrasound images acquired before and after inducing the shear waves to estimate the amplitude of displacement. The displacement of the tissue is then used to form the interference pattern of shear waves. The method does not induce any restrictions on the time interval between images, so the tissue elasticity can be calculated independent of the imaging rate. The average error in measuring the elasticity of the simulated phantom is 13.7%.

  3. Connecting the grain-shearing mechanism of wave propagation in marine sediments to fractional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, Vikash

    2015-01-01

    An analogy is drawn between the diffusion-wave equations derived from the fractional Kelvin-Voigt model and those obtained from Buckingham's grain-shearing (GS) model [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2796-2815 (2000)] of wave propagation in saturated, unconsolidated granular materials. The material impulse response function from the GS model is found to be similar to the power-law memory kernel which is inherent in the framework of fractional calculus. The compressional wave equation and shear wave equation derived from the GS model turn out to be the Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative wave equation and the fractional diffusion-wave equation respectively. Also, a physical interpretation of the characteristic fractional-order present in the Kelvin-Voigt fractional derivative wave equation and time-fractional diffusion-wave equation is inferred from the GS model. The shear wave equation from the GS model predicts both diffusion and wave propagation in the fractional framework. The overall goal is intended to show that...

  4. Prediction of shear wave velocity using empirical correlations and artificial intelligence methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Shahoo; Moradzadeh, Ali; Riabi, Reza Ghavami; Gholami, Raoof; Sadeghzadeh, Farhad

    2014-06-01

    Good understanding of mechanical properties of rock formations is essential during the development and production phases of a hydrocarbon reservoir. Conventionally, these properties are estimated from the petrophysical logs with compression and shear sonic data being the main input to the correlations. This is while in many cases the shear sonic data are not acquired during well logging, which may be for cost saving purposes. In this case, shear wave velocity is estimated using available empirical correlations or artificial intelligent methods proposed during the last few decades. In this paper, petrophysical logs corresponding to a well drilled in southern part of Iran were used to estimate the shear wave velocity using empirical correlations as well as two robust artificial intelligence methods knows as Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Back-Propagation Neural Network (BPNN). Although the results obtained by SVR seem to be reliable, the estimated values are not very precise and considering the importance of shear sonic data as the input into different models, this study suggests acquiring shear sonic data during well logging. It is important to note that the benefits of having reliable shear sonic data for estimation of rock formation mechanical properties will compensate the possible additional costs for acquiring a shear log.

  5. Nature and dynamics of overreflection of Alfven waves in MHD shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gogichaishvili, D; Chanishvili, R; Lominadze, J

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to gain new insights into the physics of wave overreflection phenomenon in MHD nonuniform/shear flows changing the existing trend/approach of the phenomenon study. The performed analysis allows to separate from each other different physical processes, grasp their interplay and, by this way, construct the basic physics of the overreflection in incompressible MHD flows with linear shear of mean velocity, ${\\bf U}_0=(Sy,0,0)$, that contain two different types of Alfv${\\rm \\acute{e}}$n waves. These waves are reduced to pseudo- and shear shear-Alfv${\\rm \\acute{e}}$n waves when wavenumber along $Z$-axis equals zero (i.e., when $k_z=0$). Therefore, for simplicity, we labelled these waves as: P-Alfv${\\rm \\acute{e}}$n and S-Alfv${\\rm \\acute{e}}$n waves (P-AWs and S-AWs). We show that: (1) the linear coupling of counter-propagating waves determines the overreflection, (2) counter-propagating P-AWs are coupled with each other, while counter-propagating S-AWs are not coupled with each other, but are asymmetri...

  6. Radially anisotropic 3-D shear wave structure of the Australian lithosphere and asthenosphere from multi-mode surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, K.

    2014-10-01

    A new radially anisotropic shear wave speed model for the Australasian region is constructed from multi-mode phase dispersion of Love and Rayleigh waves. An automated waveform fitting technique based on a global optimization with the Neighbourhood Algorithm allows the exploitation of large numbers of three-component broad-band seismograms to extract path-specific dispersion curves covering the entire continent. A 3-D shear wave model is constructed including radial anisotropy from a set of multi-mode phase speed maps for both Love and Rayleigh waves. These maps are derived from an iterative inversion scheme incorporating the effects of ray-path bending due to lateral heterogeneity, as well as the finite frequency of the surface waves for each mode. The new S wave speed model exhibits major tectonic features of this region that are in good agreement with earlier shear wave models derived primarily from Rayleigh waves. The lateral variations of depth and thickness of the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition (LAT) are estimated from the isotropic (Voigt average) S wave speed model and its vertical gradient, which reveals correlations between the lateral variations of the LAT and radial anisotropy. The thickness of the LAT is very large beneath the Archean cratons in western Australia, whereas that in south Australia is thinner. The radial anisotropy model shows faster SH wave speed than SV beneath eastern Australia and the Coral Sea at the lithospheric depth. The faster SH anomaly in the lithosphere is also seen in the suture zone between the three cratonic blocks of Australia. One of the most conspicuous features of fast SH anisotropy is found in the asthenosphere beneath the central Australia, suggesting anisotropy induced by shear flow in the asthenosphere beneath the fast drifting Australian continent.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation of Scattered Light with Shear Waves Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force for Acousto-Optic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo method of multiple scattered coherent light with the information of shear wave propagation in scattering media is presented. The established Monte-Carlo algorithm is mainly relative to optical phase variations due to the acoustic-radiation-force shear-wave-induced displacements of light scatterers. Both the distributions and temporal behaviors of optical phase increments in probe locations are obtained. Consequently, shear wave speed is evaluated quantitatively. It is noted that the phase increments exactly track the propagations of shear waves induced by focus-ultrasound radiation force. In addition, attenuations of shear waves are demonstrated in simulation results. By using linear regression processing, the shear wave speed, which is set to 2.1 m/s in simulation, is estimated to be 2.18 m/s and 2.35 m/s at time sampling intervals of 0.2 ms and 0.5 ms, respectively

  8. Shear Wave Splitting Analysis to Estimate Fracture Orientation and Frequency Dependent Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholami Raoof

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave splitting is a well-known method for indication of orientation, radius, and length of fractures in subsurface layers. In this paper, a three component near offset VSP data acquired from a fractured sandstone reservoir in southern part of Iran was used to analyse shear wave splitting and frequency-dependent anisotropy assessment. Polarization angle obtained by performing rotation on radial and transverse components of VSP data was used to determine the direction of polarization of fast shear wave which corresponds to direction of fractures. It was shown that correct implementation of shear wave splitting analysis can be used for determination of fracture direction. During frequency-dependent anisotropy analysis, it was found that the time delays in shear-waves decrease as the frequency increases. It was clearly demonstrated throughout this study that anisotropy may have an inverse relationship with frequency. The analysis presented in this paper complements the studied conducted by other researchers in this field of research.

  9. Research on definition of hard rock shear wave velocity of site for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The definition of hard rock shear wave velocity is one of the most critical issues in the work of site selection. Purpose: To make a definition of hard rock site on which the model can be assumed as fixed-base condition, a series of research had been done. Several possible hard rock site soil models were developed. Methods: Shear wave velocity of hard rock had been assumed from 1100 m/s to 3200 m/s. For each case, free field analysis and soil structure analysis had been performed. And responses in soil and key nodes of structure were compared. Results: In free field analysis, responses of models that shear wave velocity below 2400 m/s decreased a lot. In SSI analysis, structure responses didn't change much when shear wave velocity was above 2400 m/s. Conclusions: 2400 m/s was the lowest shear wave velocity for hard rock site for fixed-base assumption. (authors)

  10. Modeling transversely isotropic, viscoelastic, incompressible tissue-like materials with application in ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Bo; Brigham, John C; Aristizabal, Sara; Greenleaf, James F; Zhang, Xiaoming; Urban, Matthew W

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to model the shear wave propagation in transversely isotropic, viscoelastic and incompressible media. The targeted application is ultrasound-based shear wave elastography for viscoelasticity measurements in anisotropic tissues such as the kidney and skeletal muscles. The proposed model predicts that if the viscoelastic parameters both across and along fiber directions can be characterized as a Voigt material, then the spatial phase velocity at any angle is also governed by a Voigt material model. Further, with the aid of Taylor expansions, it is shown that the spatial group velocity at any angle is close to a Voigt type for weakly attenuative materials within a certain bandwidth. The model is implemented in a finite element code by a time domain explicit integration scheme and shear wave simulations are conducted. The results of the simulations are analyzed to extract the shear wave elasticity and viscosity for both the spatial phase and group velocities. The estimated values match well with theoretical predictions. The proposed theory is further verified by an ex vivo tissue experiment measured in a porcine skeletal muscle by an ultrasound shear wave elastography method. The applicability of the Taylor expansion to analyze the spatial velocities is also discussed. We demonstrate that the approximations from the Taylor expansions are subject to errors when the viscosities across or along the fiber directions are large or the maximum frequency considered is beyond the bandwidth defined by radii of convergence of the Taylor expansions.

  11. Spatial bandwidth enlargement and field enhancement of shear horizontal waves in finite graded piezoelectric layered media

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    Shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in finite graded piezoelectric layered media is investigated by transfer matrix method. Different from the previous studies on SH wave propagation in completely periodic layered media, calculations on band structure and transmission in this paper show that the graded layered media possess very large band gaps. Harmonic wave simulation by finite element method (FEM) confirms that the reason of bandwidth enlargement is that waves within the band gap ranges are spatially enhanced and stopped by the corresponding graded units. The study suggests that the graded structure possesses the property of manipulating elastic waves spatially, which shows potential applications in strengthening energy trapping and harvesting. © 2015.

  12. The study of laser array generation of elastic shear wave and surface wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle of laser light generation of ultrasound is the result of the absorption of light energy by the sample medium that is converted into thermal stress. From literature survey, single laser-generated ultrasound has some limitations. First, the high energy from laser light may cause the ablation on the material surface. Second, the single laser beam generation method is hard to control the beam-width and focusing direction of ultrasound. Third, the single laser-generated ultrasound is unable to enhance the ultrasound signal. The optical fiber phased array generation of ultrasound offer the improvement of the control of the beam-width and focusing direction, and to increase the amplitude of the generated ultrasound in the thermoelastic range. This research investigated the directivity pattern from the in-phased laser array generation of shear wave and surface wave in comparison with old and improved theoretical model. The theoretical data which was filtered by the electronic instruments were compared with the literature data, also.

  13. Shear wave identification near by shallow seismic source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Rudajev, Vladimír.; Živor, Roman

    2010-05-01

    Interference of P- and S-waves occurs during the first period of P-wave when the shallow seismic measurement is realized near the seismic source (the distance is less or equal to one P-wave wavelength). Polarization analysis method (particle motion) is suitable for the determination of S-wave arrival time in these conditions. Three component geophones are usually used in this case for the registration of seismic waves generated by a hammer blow. With regard to P- and S-waves polarization it is advantageous to orientate the three component orthogonal system of geophones so that separate components make an angle of 35.26° to horizontal plane (Galperin geophone configuration). Azimuth angle between separate components is 120° in this case. This configuration insures the equivalent gravity force moments affect all the three components in the same way. It is in the contrast to the standard arrangement of the three component geophone with two horizontal and one vertical component. The inclined arrangement results in equal frequency responses for all the three components. Phase and amplitude characteristics between the components should therefore be the same. This facilitates the S-wave arrival detection. An example of application of this method to the determination of seismic wave propagation velocity anisotropy is presented.

  14. The high resolution shear wave seismic reflection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the state-of-the-art of the high resolution S-wave reflection technique. Published and unpublished literature has been reviewed and discussions have been held with experts. Result is to confirm that the proposed theoretical and practical basis for identifying aquifer systems using both P- and S-wave reflections is sound. Knowledge of S-wave velocity and P-wave velocity is a powerful tool for assessing the fluid characteristics of subsurface layers. Material properties and lateral changes in material properties such as change from clay to sand, can be inferred from careful dual evaluation of P and S-wave records. The high resolution S-wave reflection technique has seen its greatest application to date as part of geotechnical studies for building foundations in the Far East. Information from this type of study has been evaluated and will be incorporated in field studies. In particular, useful information regarding S-wave sources, noise suppression and recording procedures will be incorporated within the field studies. Case histories indicate that the best type of site for demonstrating the power of the high resolution S-wave technique will be in unconsolidated soil without excessive structural complexities. More complex sites can form the basis for subsequent research after the basic principles of the technique can be established under relatively uncomplicated conditions

  15. Inertia-gravity waves in inertially stable and unstable shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Lott, François; Vanneste, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An inertia-gravity wave (IGW) propagating in a vertically sheared, rotating stratified fluid interacts with the pair of inertial levels that surround the critical level. An exact expression for the form of the IGW is derived here in the case of a linear shear and used to examine this interaction in detail. This expression recovers the classical values of the transmission and reflection coefficients $|T|=\\exp(-\\pi \\mu )$ and $|R|=0$, where $\\mu^2=J(1+\

  16. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Dae Woo Park

    2016-01-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE-) based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model...

  17. A novel two-dimensional quantitative shear wave elastography for differentiating malignant from benign breast lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Li; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Bo, Xiao-Wan; LIU, BO-JI; Li, Xiao-Long; Wu, Rong; Li, Dan-Dan; Fang, Lin; Xiao-hong XU

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a novel quantitative shear wave elastography (SWE) of virtual touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ) in diagnosis of breast lesions. Methods: The conventional ultrasound (US) and VTIQ images of 133 pathologically proven breast lesions in 98 patients were assessed. The breast lesions were classified by US breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) category. The maximum, minimum, mean and median shear...

  18. Guided wave generation, sensing and damage detection using in-plane shear piezoelectric wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents guided wave generation, sensing, and damage detection in metallic plates using in-plane shear (d36 type) piezoelectric wafers as actuators and sensors. The conventional lead zirconate titanate (PZT) based on induced in-plane normal strain (d31 type) has been widely used to excite and receive guided waves in plates, pipes or thin-walled structures. The d36 type of piezoelectric wafer, however, induces in-plane (or called face) shear deformation in the plane normal to its polarization direction. This form of electromechanical coupling generates more significant shear horizontal (SH) waves in certain wave propagation directions, whose amplitudes are much greater than those of Lamb waves. In this paper, an analysis of SH waves generated using in-plane shear electromechanical coupling is firstly presented, followed by a multiphysics finite element analysis for comparison purposes. Voltage responses of both the conventional d31 and the new d36 sensors are obtained for comparison purposes. Results indicate that this type of wafer has the potential to provide a simple quantitative estimation of damage in structural health monitoring. (paper)

  19. Horizontal shear wave scattering from a nonwelded interface observed by magnetic resonance elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, S.; Hamhaber, U.; Braun, J.; Sack, I.

    2007-02-01

    A method based on magnetic resonance elastography is presented that allows measuring the weldedness of interfaces between soft tissue layers. The technique exploits the dependence of shear wave scattering at elastic interfaces on the frequency of vibration. Experiments were performed on gel phantoms including differently welded interfaces. Plane wave excitation parallel to the planar interface with corresponding motion sensitization enabled the observation of only shear-horizontal (SH) wave scattering. Spatio-temporal filtering was applied to calculate scattering coefficients from the amplitudes of the incident, transmitted and reflected SH-waves in the vicinity of the interface. The results illustrate that acoustic wave scattering in soft tissues is largely dependent on the connectivity of interfaces, which is potentially interesting for imaging tissue mechanics in medicine and biology.

  20. Surface-mounted bender elements for measuring horizontal shear wave velocity of soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-guo ZHOU; Yun-min CHEN; Yoshiharu ASAKA; Tohru ABE

    2008-01-01

    The bender element testing features its in-plane directivity,which allows using bender elements to measure the shear wave velocities in a wider range of in-plane configurations besides the standard tip-to-tip alignment.This paper proposed a novel bender element testing technique for measuring the horizontal shear wave velocity of soils,where the bender elements are surface-mounted and the axes of the source and receiver elements are parallel to each other.The preliminary tests performed on model ground of silica sand showed that,by properly determining the travel distance and time of the shear waves,the surface-mounted bender elements can perform as accurately as the conventional "tip-to-tip" configuration.Potentially,the present system provides a promising nondestructive tool for characterizing geomaterials and site conditions both in laboratory and in the fields.

  1. The Character of Shear-wave Splitting in Marble in the Critical State of Rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yuan

    2001-01-01

    This paper mainly observed and analyzed the character of shear-wave splitting in rock specimens while they were in the critical state of rupture. The rock specimens for study are made of Laizhou marble from Shandong, China. A series of records were obtained from two rock specimens when they were in the critical state of rupture. The result shows that, in the critical state just before rock rupture, there may be the phenomenon of rise and fall in the time delay of shear-wave splitting, even though the load was kept constant. That is to say, the time delay of shear-wave splitting may have a falling process before rock rupture.

  2. Imaging of shear waves induced by Lorentz force in soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasland-Mongrain, P; Souchon, R; Cartellier, F; Zorgani, A; Chapelon, J Y; Lafon, C; Catheline, S

    2014-07-18

    This study presents the first observation of elastic shear waves generated in soft solids using a dynamic electromagnetic field. The first and second experiments of this study showed that Lorentz force can induce a displacement in a soft phantom and that this displacement was detectable by an ultrasound scanner using speckle-tracking algorithms. For a 100 mT magnetic field and a 10 ms, 100 mA peak-to-peak electrical burst, the displacement reached a magnitude of 1 μm. In the third experiment, we showed that Lorentz force can induce shear waves in a phantom. A physical model using electromagnetic and elasticity equations was proposed. Computer simulations were in good agreement with experimental results. The shear waves induced by Lorentz force were used in the last experiment to estimate the elasticity of a swine liver sample.

  3. Twisted shear Alfvén waves with orbital angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, P.K., E-mail: profshukla@yahoo.de [International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences and Institute for Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Centre for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    It is shown that a dispersive shear Alfvén wave (DSAW) in a magnetized plasma can propagate as a twisted Alfvén vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). We obtain a wave equation from the generalized ion vorticity equation and the magnetic field-aligned electron momentum equation that couple the scalar and vector potentials of the DSAW. A twisted shear Alfvén vortex beam can trap and transport plasma particles and energy in magnetoplasmas, such as those in the Earth's auroral zone, in the solar atmosphere, and in Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at University of California, Los Angeles. -- Highlights: ► We present dispersive shear Alfvén waves (DSAWs) with a twist. ► DSAWs carry orbital angular momentum. ► Twisted DSAWs can transport particles and energy in space and laboratory plasmas.

  4. Twisted shear Alfvén waves with orbital angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that a dispersive shear Alfvén wave (DSAW) in a magnetized plasma can propagate as a twisted Alfvén vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). We obtain a wave equation from the generalized ion vorticity equation and the magnetic field-aligned electron momentum equation that couple the scalar and vector potentials of the DSAW. A twisted shear Alfvén vortex beam can trap and transport plasma particles and energy in magnetoplasmas, such as those in the Earth's auroral zone, in the solar atmosphere, and in Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at University of California, Los Angeles. -- Highlights: ► We present dispersive shear Alfvén waves (DSAWs) with a twist. ► DSAWs carry orbital angular momentum. ► Twisted DSAWs can transport particles and energy in space and laboratory plasmas.

  5. Imaging of Shear Waves Induced by Lorentz Force in Soft Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Cartellier, Florian; Zorgani, Ali; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril; Catheline, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the first observation of elastic shear waves generated in soft solids using a dynamic electromagnetic field. The first and second experiments of this 5 study showed that Lorentz force can induce a displacement in a soft phantom and that this displacement was detectable by an ultrasound scanner using speckle-tracking algorithms. For a 100 mT magnetic field and a 10 ms, 100 mA peak-to-peak electrical burst, the displacement reached a magnitude of 1 um. In the third experiment, we showed that Lorentz force can induce shear waves in a phantom. A physical model 10 using electromagnetic and elasticity equations was proposed. Computer simulations were in good agreement with experimental results. The shear waves induced by Lorentz force were used in the last experiment to estimate the elasticity of a swine liver sample.

  6. Quantification of muscle co-contraction using supersonic shear wave imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiteri, Brent J; Hug, François; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-02-01

    Muscle stiffness estimated using shear wave elastography can provide an index of individual muscle force during isometric contraction and may therefore be a promising method for quantifying co-contraction. We estimated the shear modulus of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle using supersonic shear wave imaging and measured its myoelectrical activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) during graded isometric contractions of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion (n=7). During dorsiflexion, the average shear modulus was 26 ± 6 kPa at peak sEMG amplitude, which was significantly less (P=0.02) than that measured at the same sEMG level during plantar flexion (42 ± 10 kPa). The passive tension during contraction was estimated using the passive LG muscle shear modulus during a passive ankle rotation measured at an equivalent ankle angle to that measured during contraction. The passive shear modulus increased significantly (Pmuscle shear modulus due to active contraction was significantly greater (Pmuscle, despite measured sEMG activity of 19% of maximal voluntary plantar flexion contraction. This strongly suggests that the sEMG activity recorded from the LG muscle during isometric dorsiflexion was primarily due to cross-talk. However, it is clear that passive muscle tension changes can contribute to joint torque during isometric dorsiflexion.

  7. Variable aspect ratio method in the Xu–White model for shear-wave velocity estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shear-wave velocity logs are useful for various seismic interpretation applications, including bright spot analyses, amplitude-versus-offset analyses and multicomponent seismic interpretations. This paper presents a method for predicting the shear-wave velocity of argillaceous sandstone from conventional log data and experimental data, based on Gassmann's equations and the Xu–White model. This variable aspect ratio method takes into account all the influences of the matrix nature, shale content, porosity size and pore geometry, and the properties of pore fluid of argillaceous sandstone, replacing the fixed aspect ratio assumption in the conventional Xu–White model. To achieve this, we first use the Xu–White model to derive the bulk and shear modulus of dry rock in a sand–clay mixture. Secondly, we use Gassmann's equations to calculate the fluid-saturated elastic properties, including compressional and shear-wave velocities. Finally, we use the variable aspect ratio method to estimate the shear-wave velocity. The numerical results indicate that the variable aspect ratio method provides an important improvement in the application of the Xu–White model for sand–clay mixtures and allows for a variable aspect ratio log to be introduced into the Xu–White model instead of the constant aspect ratio assumption. This method shows a significant improvement in predicting velocities over the conventional Xu–White model. (paper)

  8. High resolution shear wave reflection surveying for hydrogeological investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high resolution S-wave method has been developed to be a powerful tool in mapping subsurface lithology and in conducting groundwater investigations. The research has demonstrated that the resolution obtainable using S-waves in a Coastal Plain environment is more than double than that obtained using conventional reflection, which already offers a higher resolution than any other surface method. Where the mapping of thin clay layers functioning as aquitards or thin sand layers functioning as aquifers are critical to the understanding of groundwater flow, S-wave reflections offer unparalleled possibilities for nondestructive exploration. The field experiment at Cooke Crossroads, South Carolina enabled the detection and mapping of beds in the thickness range of one to three feet. The S-wave reflection technique, in combination with conventional P-wave reflection, has potential to directly detect confined and unconfined aquifers. This is a breakthrough technology that still requires additional research before it can be applied on a commercial basis. Aquifer systems were interpreted from the test data at Cooke Crossroads consistent with theoretical model. Additional research is need in assessing the theoretical response of P- and S-waves to subsurface interfaces within unconsolidated sediments of varying moisture content and lithology. More theoretical modeling and in situ testing are needed to bring our knowledge of these phenomena to the level that oil and gas researchers have done for fluids in sandstones

  9. Fracture characterization at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility using shear-wave anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, S.A. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); MacBeth, C.D.; Queen, J.; Rizer, W.D.

    1995-12-31

    Two multi-component near-offset VSP experiments are used, in conjunction with borehole data, to characterise the subsurface fracture system at the Conoco Borehole Test Facility, Oklahoma. Time delays between the fast and slow split shear-waves are observed to correlate with the heavily fractured sandstone formations. Inversion of the shear-wave splitting estimates is achieved using a Genetic Algorithm which incorporates an anisotropic ray tracing scheme. The inversion results suggest that the fracture orientation is sub-vertical. A method of determining fracture dip using an opposite azimuth VSP method is suggested.

  10. Existence of Shear Horizontal Surface Waves in a Magneto-Electro-Elastic Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Wei-Yi; LIU Jin-Xi; FANG Dai-Ning

    2009-01-01

    The existence of shear horizontal surface waves in a magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) half-space with hexagonal (6mm) symmetry is investigated.The surface of the MEE half-space is mechanically free, but subjected to four types of electromagnetic boundary conditions.These boundary conditions are electrically open/magnetically closed, electrically open/magnetically open, electrically closed/magnetically open and electrically closed/magnetically closed.It is shown that except for the electrically open/magnetically closed condition, the three other sets of electromagnetic boundary conditions allow the propagation of shear horizontal surface waves.

  11. On System-Dependent Sources of Uncertainty and Bias in Ultrasonic Quantitative Shear-Wave Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yufeng; Rouze, Ned C; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasonic quantitative shear-wave imaging methods have been developed over the last decade to estimate tissue elasticity by measuring the speed of propagating shear waves following acoustic radiation force excitation. This work discusses eight sources of uncertainty and bias arising from ultrasound system-dependent parameters in ultrasound shear-wave speed (SWS) measurements. Each of the eight sources of error is discussed in the context of a linear, isotropic, elastic, homogeneous medium, combining previously reported analyses with Field II simulations, full-wave 2-D acoustic propagation simulations, and experimental studies. Errors arising from both spatial and temporal sources lead to errors in SWS measurements. Arrival time estimation noise, speckle bias, hardware fluctuations, and phase aberration cause uncertainties (variance) in SWS measurements, while pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and beamforming errors, as well as coupling medium sound speed mismatch, cause biases in SWS measurements (accuracy errors). Calibration of the sources of bias is an important step in the development of shear-wave imaging systems. In a well-calibrated system, where the sources of bias are minimized, and averaging over a region of interest (ROI) is employed to reduce the sources of uncertainty, an SWS error can be expected. PMID:26886980

  12. Turbulent mixing driven by mean-flow shear and internal gravity waves in oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01

    This study starts with balances deduced by Baumert and Peters (2004, 2005) from results of stratified-shear experiments made in channels and wind tunnels by Itsweire (1984) and Rohr and Van Atta (1987), and of free-decay experiments in a resting stratified tank by Dickey and Mellor (1980). Using a modification of Canuto's (2002) ideas on turbulence and waves, these balances are merged with an (internal) gravity-wave energy balance presented for the open ocean by Gregg (1989), without mean-flow shear. The latter was augmented by a linear (viscous) friction term. Gregg's wave-energy source is interpreted on its long-wave spectral end as internal tides, topography, large-scale wind, and atmospheric low-pressure actions. In addition, internal eigen waves, generated by mean-flow shear, and the aging of the wave field from a virginal (linear) into a saturated state are taken into account. Wave packets and turbulence are treated as particles (vortices, packets) by ensemble kinetics so that the loss terms in all thre...

  13. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikezoe, R., E-mail: ikezoe@prc.tsukuba.ac.jp; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  14. Second-harmonic generation in shear wave beams with different polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coupled pair of nonlinear parabolic equations was derived by Zabolotskaya [1] that model the transverse components of the particle motion in a collimated shear wave beam propagating in an isotropic elastic solid. Like the KZK equation, the parabolic equation for shear wave beams accounts consistently for the leading order effects of diffraction, viscosity and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity includes a cubic nonlinear term that is equivalent to that present in plane shear waves, as well as a quadratic nonlinear term that is unique to diffracting beams. The work by Wochner et al. [2] considered shear wave beams with translational polarizations (linear, circular and elliptical), wherein second-order nonlinear effects vanish and the leading order nonlinear effect is third-harmonic generation by the cubic nonlinearity. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the quadratic nonlinear term present in the parabolic equation for shear wave beams by considering second-harmonic generation in Gaussian beams as a second-order nonlinear effect using standard perturbation theory. In order for second-order nonlinear effects to be present, a broader class of source polarizations must be considered that includes not only the familiar translational polarizations, but also polarizations accounting for stretching, shearing and rotation of the source plane. It is found that the polarization of the second harmonic generated by the quadratic nonlinearity is not necessarily the same as the polarization of the source-frequency beam, and we are able to derive a general analytic solution for second-harmonic generation from a Gaussian source condition that gives explicitly the relationship between the polarization of the source-frequency beam and the polarization of the second harmonic

  15. Second-harmonic generation in shear wave beams with different polarizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spratt, Kyle S., E-mail: sprattkyle@gmail.com; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F. [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, P. O. Box 8029, Austin, Texas 78713–8029, US (United States)

    2015-10-28

    A coupled pair of nonlinear parabolic equations was derived by Zabolotskaya [1] that model the transverse components of the particle motion in a collimated shear wave beam propagating in an isotropic elastic solid. Like the KZK equation, the parabolic equation for shear wave beams accounts consistently for the leading order effects of diffraction, viscosity and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity includes a cubic nonlinear term that is equivalent to that present in plane shear waves, as well as a quadratic nonlinear term that is unique to diffracting beams. The work by Wochner et al. [2] considered shear wave beams with translational polarizations (linear, circular and elliptical), wherein second-order nonlinear effects vanish and the leading order nonlinear effect is third-harmonic generation by the cubic nonlinearity. The purpose of the current work is to investigate the quadratic nonlinear term present in the parabolic equation for shear wave beams by considering second-harmonic generation in Gaussian beams as a second-order nonlinear effect using standard perturbation theory. In order for second-order nonlinear effects to be present, a broader class of source polarizations must be considered that includes not only the familiar translational polarizations, but also polarizations accounting for stretching, shearing and rotation of the source plane. It is found that the polarization of the second harmonic generated by the quadratic nonlinearity is not necessarily the same as the polarization of the source-frequency beam, and we are able to derive a general analytic solution for second-harmonic generation from a Gaussian source condition that gives explicitly the relationship between the polarization of the source-frequency beam and the polarization of the second harmonic.

  16. Shear Wave Propagation in Multilayered Medium including an Irregular Fluid Saturated Porous Stratum with Rigid Boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation is concerned with the study of propagation of shear waves in an anisotropic fluid saturated porous layer over a semi-infinite homogeneous elastic half-space lying under an elastic homogeneous layer with irregularity present at the interface with rigid boundary. The rectangular irregularity has been taken in the half-space. The dispersion equation for shear waves is derived by using the perturbation technique followed by Fourier transformation. Numerically, the effect of irregularity present is analysed. It is seen that the phase velocity is significantly influenced by the wave number and the depth of the irregularity. The variations of dimensionless phase velocity against dimensionless wave number are shown graphically for the different size of rectangular irregularities with the help of MATLAB.

  17. The instability of counter-propagating kernel gravity waves in a constant shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Umurhan, O M; Harnik, N; Lott, F

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism describing the recently developed notion of kernel gravity waves (KGWs) is reviewed and such structures are employed to interpret the unstable dynamics of an example stratified plane parallel shear flow. This flow has constant vertical shear, is infinite in the vertical extent, and characterized by two density jumps of equal magnitude each decreasing successively with height, in which the jumps are located symmetrically away from the midplane of the system. We find that for a suitably defined bulk-Richardson number there exists a band of horizontal wavenumbers which exhibits normal-mode instability. The instability mechanism closely parallels the mechanism responsible for the instability seen in the problem of counter-propagating Rossby waves. In this problem the instability arises out of the interaction of counter-propagating gravity waves. We argue that the instability meets the Hayashi-Young criterion for wave instability. We also argue that the instability is the simplest one that can arise ...

  18. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Periodic 2D surface water waves propagating steadily on a rotational current have been studied by many authors (see [1] and references therein). Although the recent important theoretical developments have confirmed that periodic waves can exist over flows with arbitrary vorticity, their stability and their nonlinear evolution have not been much studied extensively so far. In fact, even in the rather simple case of uniform vorticity (linear shear), few papers have been published on the effect of a vertical shear current on the side-band instability of a uniform wave train over finite depth. In most of these studies [2-5], asymptotic expansions and multiple scales method have been used to obtain envelope evolution equations, which allow eventually to formulate a condition of (linear) instability to long modulational perturbations. It is noted here that this instability is often referred in the literature as the Benjamin-Feir or modulational instability. In the present study, we consider the linear stability of finite amplitude two-dimensional, periodic water waves propagating steadily on the free surface of a fluid with constant vorticity and finite depth. First, the steadily propagating surface waves are computed with steepness up to very close to the highest, using a Fourier series expansions and a collocation method, which constitutes a simple extension of Fenton's method [6] to the cases with a linear shear current. Then, the linear stability of these permanent waves to infinitesimal 2D perturbations is developed from the fully nonlinear equations in the framework of normal modes analysis. This linear stability analysis is an extension of [7] to the case of waves in the presence of a linear shear current and permits the determination of the dominant instability as a function of depth and vorticity for a given steepness. The numerical results are used to assess the accuracy of the vor-NLS equation derived in [5] for the characteristics of modulational

  19. Correlation of liquefaction resistance with shear wave velocity based on laboratory study using bender element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-guo; CHEN Yun-min; KE Han

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies using field case history data yielded new criteria for evaluating liquefaction potential in saturated granular deposits based on in situ, stress-corrected shear wave velocity. However, the conditions of relatively insufficient case histories and limited site conditions in this approach call for additional data to more reliably define liquefaction resistance as a function of shear wave velocity. In this study, a series of undrained cyclic triaxial tests were conducted on saturated sand with shear wave velocity Vs measured by bender element. By normalizing the data with respect to minimum void ratio, the test results, incorporated with previously published laboratory data, statistically revealed good correlation of cyclic shear strength with small-strain shear modulus for sandy soils, which is almost irrespective of soil types and confining pressures. The consequently determined cyclic resistance ratio, CRR, was found to be approximately proportional to Vs4. Liquefaction resistance boundary curves were established by applying this relationship and compared to liquefaction criteria derived from seismic field measurements. Although in the range of Vs1>200 m/s the presented curves are moderately conservative, they are remarkably consistent with the published field performance criteria on the whole.

  20. Added value of Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the ultrasound assessment of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianculescu, Victor; Ciolovan, Laura Maria [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dunant, Ariane [Department of Statistics, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Vielh, Philippe [Department of Biopathology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Mazouni, Chafika [Department of Surgery, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Delaloge, Suzette [Department of Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Dromain, Clarisse [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Blidaru, Alexandru [Department of Surgery, Bucharest Institute of Oncology, Bucharest (Romania); Balleyguier, Corinne, E-mail: corinne.balleyguier@gustaveroussy.fr [Radiology Department, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); UMR 8081, IR4M, Paris-Sud University, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods: Conventional B-mode and elasticity imaging were used to evaluate 110 breast lesions. Elastographic assessment of breast tissue abnormalities was done using a shear wave based technique, Virtual Touch IQ (VTIQ), implemented on a Siemens Acuson S3000 ultrasound machine. Tissue mechanical properties were interpreted as two-dimensional qualitative and quantitative colour maps displaying relative shear wave velocity. Wave speed measurements in m/s were possible at operator defined regions of interest. The pathologic diagnosis was established on samples obtained by ultrasound guided core biopsy or fine needle aspiration. Results: BIRADS based B-mode evaluation of the 48 benign and 62 malignant lesions achieved 92% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity. Subsequently performed VTIQ elastography relying on visual interpretation of the colour overlay displaying relative shear wave velocities managed similar standalone diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity and 64.6% specificity. Lesion and surrounding tissue shear wave speed values were calculated and a significant difference was found between the benign and malignant populations (Mann–Whitney U test, p < 0.0001). By selecting a lesion cut-off value of 3.31 m/s we achieved 80.4% sensitivity and 73% specificity. Applying this threshold only to BIRADS 4a masses, we reached overall levels of 92% sensitivity and 72.9% specificity. Conclusion: VTIQ qualitative and quantitative elastography has the potential to further characterise B-mode detected breast lesions, increasing specificity and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies.

  1. Added value of Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the ultrasound assessment of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Virtual Touch IQ shear wave elastography in the discrimination of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and methods: Conventional B-mode and elasticity imaging were used to evaluate 110 breast lesions. Elastographic assessment of breast tissue abnormalities was done using a shear wave based technique, Virtual Touch IQ (VTIQ), implemented on a Siemens Acuson S3000 ultrasound machine. Tissue mechanical properties were interpreted as two-dimensional qualitative and quantitative colour maps displaying relative shear wave velocity. Wave speed measurements in m/s were possible at operator defined regions of interest. The pathologic diagnosis was established on samples obtained by ultrasound guided core biopsy or fine needle aspiration. Results: BIRADS based B-mode evaluation of the 48 benign and 62 malignant lesions achieved 92% sensitivity and 62.5% specificity. Subsequently performed VTIQ elastography relying on visual interpretation of the colour overlay displaying relative shear wave velocities managed similar standalone diagnostic performance with 92% sensitivity and 64.6% specificity. Lesion and surrounding tissue shear wave speed values were calculated and a significant difference was found between the benign and malignant populations (Mann–Whitney U test, p < 0.0001). By selecting a lesion cut-off value of 3.31 m/s we achieved 80.4% sensitivity and 73% specificity. Applying this threshold only to BIRADS 4a masses, we reached overall levels of 92% sensitivity and 72.9% specificity. Conclusion: VTIQ qualitative and quantitative elastography has the potential to further characterise B-mode detected breast lesions, increasing specificity and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies

  2. Development of a low frequency shear horizontal piezoelectric transducer for the generation of plane SH waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guillaume; Viens, Martin; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The shear horizontal guided wave fundamental mode (SH0) has the particularity of being the only non-dispersive plate guided wave mode. This characteristic makes this ultrasonic guided wave mode very attractive in non-destructive testing, facilitating signal processing for long range inspections. It is, however, difficult to generate only a single guided wave mode when using piezoelectric transduction. This work aims to develop a piezoelectric transducer capable of generating a virtually pure plane zeroth order shear horizontal wave. The chosen material was the PZT-5H for its dominant d15 piezoelectric constant, which makes it a perfect candidate for SH-wave generation. The transducer dimensions were optimised using an analytical model based on the Huygens' principle of superposition and the dipole pattern of a shear point source. A 3D multiphysics finite element model was then used to validate the analytical model results. Experimental validation was finally conducted with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) system. Excellent agreement between the analytical model, finite element model and experimental validation was seen.

  3. An improved method of evaluating liquefaction potential with the velocity of shear-waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Han; CHEN Yun-min

    2000-01-01

    According to the results of cyclic triaxial tests, a linear correlation is presented between liquefaction resistance and elastic shear modulus, which shows the relation of Gmax (kPa) with (s d/2)1/2(kPa)1/2. When applied to soils from different sites, the correlation can be normalized in reference to its minimum void ratio (emin). Accordingly, an improved method is established to evaluate the liquefaction potential with shear-wave velocity. The critical shear-wave velocity of liquefaction is in linear relation with 1/4 power of depth and the maximum acceleration during earthquakes, which can be used to explain the phenomenon that the possibility of liquefaction decreases with the increment of the depth. Compared with previous methods this method turns out simple and effective, which is also verified by the results of cyclic triaxial tests,.

  4. Convective and Diffusive Energetic Particle Losses Induced by Shear Alfven Waves in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hicks, N.; van Voornveld, R.; Classen, I.G.J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bruedgam, M.; Fahrbach, H. U.; Igochine, V.; Jaemsae, S.; Maraschek, M.; Sassenberg, K.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the first phase-space characterization of convective and diffusive energetic particle losses induced by shear Alfven waves in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. While single toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and Alfven cascades (AC) eject resonant fast ions in a convective process

  5. Shear-wave polarization alignment on the eastern flank of Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vilardo

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, with the improvement of three-component seismic networks, studies revealing anisotropic characteristics in different regions have assumed great interest. In a complex volcanic area like Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy, the existence of both iso-oriented fault systems and intrusive bodies consisting of olivine and clinopyroxene suggest the presence of anisotropic structures. In order to investigate this we analyzed the physical phenomenon of shear-wave splitting since under certain constraints, shear waves are less sensitive to local heterogeneity. The aims of this paper are: 1 to evaluate if in a structural complex situation like that at Mt. Etna the signal crossing an anisotropic volume could be enhanced in spite of effects due to undirectional properties along the source-receiver path; 2 to investigate the correlations, if any, between polarization direction of the leading shear wave and the patterns of compressive stress acting on the investigated area. Therefore we measured time-delays between the S-onsets on the horizontal components of 3D seismograms to reveal the possible seismic anisotropy in the Etnean region; moreover, we analyzed the polarization vector of shear-waves seismic data recorded during a survey carried out in the spring-summer 1988. We found clear evidence of splitting that we attributed to the presence of an anisotropic volume not homogeneously distributed on the eastern slope of Mt. Etna volcano.

  6. Seismic Anisotropy in Eastern Tibet from Shear-Wave Splitting Reveals Changes in Lithosphere Deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lev, E.; Long, M.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge about seismic anisotropy can provide important insight into the deformation of the crust and upper mantle beneath tectonically active regions. Here we focus on the southeastern part of the Tibetan plateau, in Sichuan and Yunnan provinces, SW China. We measured shear wave splitting of core-

  7. Variational characteristics of shear-wave splitting on the 2001 Shidian earthquakes in Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高原; 梁维; 丁香; 薛艳; 蔡明军; 刘希强; 苏有锦; 彭立国

    2004-01-01

    In 2001 three earthquakes occurred in Shidian in Yunnan Province, which were the MS=5.2 on April 10, the MS=5.9 on April 12 and the MS=5.3 on June 8. Based on the data from the station Baoshan of Yunnan Telemetry Digital Seismograph Network, the variational characteristics of shear-wave splitting on these series of strong earthquakes has been studied by using the systematic analysis method (SAM) of shear-wave splitting. The result shows the time delays of shear-wave splitting basically increase with earthquake activity intensifying. However the time delays abruptly decrease immediately before strong aftershocks. It accords with the stress relaxation before earthquakes, which was found recently in study on shear-wave splitting. The result suggests it is significant for reducing the harm degree of earthquakes to develop the stress-forecasting on earthquake in strong active tectonic zones and economic developed regions or big cities under the danger of strong earthquakes.

  8. Shear wave velocities from noise correlation at local scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nisco, G.; Nunziata, C.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-01

    Cross correlations of ambient seismic noise recordings have been studied to infer shear seismic velocities with depth. Experiments have been done in the crowded and noisy historical centre of Napoli over inter-station distances from 50 m to about 400 m, whereas active seismic spreadings are prohibitive, even for just one receiver. Group velocity dispersion curves have been extracted with FTAN method from the noise cross correlations and then the non linear inversion of them has resulted in Vs profiles with depth. The information of near by stratigraphies and the range of Vs variability for samples of Neapolitan soils and rocks confirms the validity of results obtained with our expeditious procedure. Moreover, the good comparison of noise H/V frequency of the first main peak with 1D and 2D spectral amplifications encourages to continue experiments of noise cross-correlation. If confirmed in other geological settings, the proposed approach could reveal a low cost methodology to obtain reliable and detailed Vs velocity profiles.

  9. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf;

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953...

  10. Feasibility of waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for shallow shear-wave velocity using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Tsoflias, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional surface wave inversion for shallow shear (S)-wave velocity relies on the generation of dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. This constrains the method to only laterally homogeneous (or very smooth laterally heterogeneous) earth models. Waveform inversion directly fits waveforms on seismograms, hence, does not have such a limitation. Waveforms of Rayleigh waves are highly related to S-wave velocities. By inverting the waveforms of Rayleigh waves on a near-surface seismogram, shallow S-wave velocities can be estimated for earth models with strong lateral heterogeneity. We employ genetic algorithm (GA) to perform waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves for S-wave velocities. The forward problem is solved by finite-difference modeling in the time domain. The model space is updated by generating offspring models using GA. Final solutions can be found through an iterative waveform-fitting scheme. Inversions based on synthetic records show that the S-wave velocities can be recovered successfully with errors no more than 10% for several typical near-surface earth models. For layered earth models, the proposed method can generate one-dimensional S-wave velocity profiles without the knowledge of initial models. For earth models containing lateral heterogeneity in which case conventional dispersion-curve-based inversion methods are challenging, it is feasible to produce high-resolution S-wave velocity sections by GA waveform inversion with appropriate priori information. The synthetic tests indicate that the GA waveform inversion of Rayleigh waves has the great potential for shallow S-wave velocity imaging with the existence of strong lateral heterogeneity. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the additional nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation. PMID:26482394

  12. A Kramers-Kronig-based quality factor for shear wave propagation in soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, M W; Greenleaf, J F

    2009-10-01

    Shear wave propagation techniques have been introduced for measuring the viscoelastic material properties of tissue, but assessing the accuracy of these measurements is difficult for in vivo measurements in tissue. We propose using the Kramers-Kronig relationships to assess the consistency and quality of the measurements of shear wave attenuation and phase velocity. In ex vivo skeletal muscle we measured the wave attenuation at different frequencies, and then applied finite bandwidth Kramers-Kronig equations to predict the phase velocities. We compared these predictions with the measured phase velocities and assessed the mean square error (MSE) as a quality factor. An algorithm was derived for computing a quality factor using the Kramers-Kronig relationships.

  13. Analytical and numerical modeling of non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziyin; Nagy, Peter B.; Hassan, Waled

    2016-02-01

    Non-collinear shear wave mixing at an imperfect interface between two solids can be exploited for nonlinear ultrasonic assessment of bond quality. In this study we developed two analytical models for nonlinear imperfect interfaces. The first model uses a finite nonlinear interfacial stiffness representation of an imperfect interface of vanishing thickness, while the second model relies on a thin nonlinear interphase layer to represent an imperfect interface region. The second model is actually a derivative of the first model obtained by calculating the equivalent interfacial stiffness of a thin isotropic nonlinear interphase layer in the quasi-static approximation. The predictions of both analytical models were numerically verified by comparison to COMSOL finite element simulations. These models can accurately predict the excess nonlinearity caused by interface imperfections based on the strength of the reflected and transmitted mixed longitudinal waves produced by them under non-collinear shear wave interrogation.

  14. Stability of steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on arbitrary shear currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seez, William; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A versatile solver for the two-dimensional Euler equations with an unknown free-surface has been developed. This code offers the possibility to calculate two-dimensional, steady rotational water-waves of finite amplitude on an arbitrary shear current. Written in PYTHON the code incorporates both pseudo-spectral and finite-difference methods in the discretisation of the equations and thus allows the user to capture waves with large steepnesses. As such it has been possible to establish that, in a counter-flowing situation, the existence of wave solutions is not guaranteed and depends on a pair of parameters representing mass flux and vorticity. This result was predicted, for linear solutions, by Constantin. Furthermore, experimental comparisons, both with and without vorticity, have proven the precision of this code. Finally, waves propagating on top of highly realistic shear currents (exponential profiles under the surface) have been calculated following current profiles such as those used by Nwogu. In addition, a stability analysis routine has been developed to study the stability regimes of base waves calculated with the two-dimensional code. This linear stability analysis is based on three dimensional perturbations of the steady situation which lead to a generalised eigenvalue problem. Common instabilities of the first and second class have been detected, while a third class of wave-instability appears due to the presence of strong vorticity. {1} Adrian Constantin and Walter Strauss. {Exact steady periodic water waves with vorticity}. Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 57(4):481-527, April 2004. Okey G. Nwogu. {Interaction of finite-amplitude waves with vertically sheared current fields}. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 627:179, May 2009.

  15. Measurement of the viscosity-density product using multiple reflections of ultrasonic shear horizontal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret S; Adamson, Justus D; Bond, Leonard J

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14 MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45-90 degrees fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo was obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid, and the reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface was obtained. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. The viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14s and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank. PMID:16793108

  16. The effect of wind shear on the formation of roll waves in flows down an incline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we investigate the effect of a prescribed superficial shear stress on the generation and structure of roll waves developing from infinitesimal disturbances on the surface of a fluid layer flowing down an incline. The unsteady equations of motion are depth integrated according to the von Karman momentum integral method to obtain a nonhomogeneous system of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws governing the average flow rate and the thickness of the fluid layer. By conducting a linear stability analysis we obtain an analytical formula for the critical conditions for the onset of instability of a uniform and steady flow in terms of the prescribed surface shear stress. A nonlinear analysis is performed by numerically calculating the nonlinear evolution of a perturbed flow. The calculation is carried out using a TVD finite volume scheme. The source term is handled by implementing the quasi-steady wave propagation algorithm. Conclusions are drawn regarding the effect of the applied surface shear stress parameter and flow conditions on the development and characteristics of the roll waves arising from the instability. In the particular case of zero shear stress applied at the surface, the results are compared with those yielded by an analytical procedure. (author)

  17. Correlation of densities with shear wave velocities and SPT N values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Uday, Anjali; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.

    2016-06-01

    Site effects primarily depend on the shear modulus of subsurface layers, and this is generally estimated from the measured shear wave velocity (V s) and assumed density. Very rarely, densities are measured for amplification estimation because drilling and sampling processes are time consuming and expensive. In this study, an attempt has been made to derive the correlation between the density (dry and wet density) and V s/SPT (standard penetration test) N values using measured data. A total of 354 measured V s and density data sets and 364 SPT N value and density data sets from 23 boreholes have been used in the study. Separate relations have been developed for all soil types as well as fine-grained and coarse-grained soil types. The correlations developed for bulk density were compared with the available data and it was found that the proposed relation matched well with the existing data. A graphical comparison and validation based on the consistency ratio and cumulative frequency curves was performed and the newly developed relations were found to demonstrate good prediction performance. An attempt has also been made to propose a relation between the bulk density and shear wave velocity applicable for a wide range of soil and rock by considering data from this study as well as that of previous studies. These correlations will be useful for predicting the density (bulk and dry) of sites having measured the shear wave velocity and SPT N values.

  18. Shear wave seismic interferometry for lithospheric imaging: Application to southern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, J. G.; Ruigrok, E. N.; Wapenaar, K.

    2014-07-01

    Seismic interferometry allows for the creation of new seismic traces by cross correlating existing ones. With sufficient sampling of remote-source positions, it is possible to create a virtual source record by transforming a receiver location into a virtual source. The imaging technique developed here directly retrieves reflectivity information from the subsurface. Other techniques, namely receiver-function and tomography, rely on mode-converted energy and perturbations in a velocity field, respectively, to make inferences regarding structure. We select shear phases as an imaging source because of their lower propagation velocity, sensitivity to melt, and ability to treat vertical shear and horizontal shear wavefields independently. Teleseismic shear phases approximate a plane wave due to the extent of wavefront spread compared to a finite receiver array located on the free surface. The teleseismic shear phase transmission responses are used as input to the seismic interferometry technique. We create virtual shear source records by converting each receiver in the array into a virtual source. By cross correlating the received signals, the complex source character of distant earthquakes is imprinted on the virtual source records as the average autocorrelation of individual source-time functions. We demonstrate a technique that largely removes this imprint by filtering in the common-offset domain. A field data set was selected from the Meso-America Subduction Experiment. Despite the suboptimal remote-source sampling, an image of the lithosphere was produced that confirms features of the subduction zone that were previously found with the receiver-function technique.

  19. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  20. Constraints on Shear Velocity in the Cratonic Upper Mantle From Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, A. C.; Dalton, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the prevailing notion of Precambrian continental lithosphere as a thick boundary layer (200-300 km), defined by a depleted composition and a steady-state conductively cooled temperature structure, has been challenged by several lines of seismological evidence. One, profiles of shear velocity with depth beneath cratons exhibit lower wave speed at shallow depths and higher wave speed at greater depths than can be explained by temperature alone. These profiles are also characterized by positive or flat velocity gradients with depth and anomalously high attenuation in the uppermost mantle, both of which are difficult to reconcile with the low temperatures and large thermal gradient expected with a thermal boundary layer. Two, body-wave receiver-function studies have detected a mid-lithospheric discontinuity that requires a large and abrupt velocity decrease with depth in cratonic regions that cannot be achieved by thermal gradients alone. Here, we used forward-modeling to identify the suite of shear-velocity profiles that are consistent with phase-velocity observations made for Rayleigh waves that primarily traversed cratons in North America, South America, Africa, and Australia. We considered two approaches; with the first, depth profiles of shear velocity were predicted from thermal models of the cratonic upper mantle that correspond to a range of assumed values of mantle potential temperature, surface heat flow, and radiogenic heat production in the crust and upper mantle. With the second approach, depth profiles of shear velocity were randomly generated. In both cases, Rayleigh wave phase velocity was calculated from the Earth models and compared to the observed values. We show that it is very difficult to match the observations with an Earth model containing a low-velocity zone in the upper mantle; instead, the best-fit models contain a flat or positive velocity gradient with depth. We explore the implications of this result for the thermal and

  1. Shear wave velocity structure of northern and North-Eastern Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-linear inversion technique known as hedgehog is utilized to define the average crustal structure of North and North-Eastern Ethiopia. To accomplish the task a two dimensional frequency-time analysis is performed to obtain Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves. Six earthquakes recorded by the broad-band digital seismograph installed at the Geophysical Observatory of Addis Ababa University are utilized. The crustal structure between the Gulf of Tadjura (western Gulf of Aden) and Addis Ababa crossing southern Afar (path I) can be approximated by a total thickness of about 22 km with average S-wave velocity in the range 2.3 - 3.9 km/s. The crust-mantle transition is poorly developed at greater depths and the shear wave velocity ranges from 4.0 km/s to 4.3 km/s. If the effect of the plateau part is taken into account the average total crustal thickness is found to be less than 18 km and the average S-wave velocity varies in the range 2.4 - 3.9 km/s. The low shear wave velocity under the Afar crust is consistent with the result of other geophysical studies. For path II, which passes through the border of the Western Ethiopian plateau, the average crustal structure is found to be approximated by a thickness of about 40 km and average S-wave velocity between 3.0 km/s and 3.9 km/s. The crust overlies a lithospheric mantle with a shear wave velocity in the range 4.1-4.4 km/s. (author). 37 refs, 11 figs, 4 tabs

  2. On the possibility of wave-induced chaos in a sheared, stably stratified fluid layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Zimmermann

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear flow in a stable stratification provides a waveguide for internal gravity waves. In the inviscid approximation, internal gravity waves are known to be unstable below a threshold in Richardson number. However, in a viscous fluid, at low enough Reynolds number, this threshold recedes to Ri = 0. Nevertheless, even the slightest viscosity strongly damps internal gravity waves when the Richardson number is small (shear forces dominate buoyant forces. In this paper we address the dynamics that approximately govern wave propagation when the Richardson number is small and the fluid is viscous. When Ri ξ = λ1A + λ2Aξξ + λ3Aξξξ + λ4AAξ + b(ξ where ξ is the coordinate of the rest frame of the passing temperature wave whose horizontal profile is b(ξ. The parameters λi are constants that depend on the Reynolds number. The above dynamical system is know to have limit cycle and chaotic attrators when forcing is sinusoidal and wave attenuation negligible.

  3. Observation of fast-ion Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance with shear Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance (ω-kzvz=Ωf) between fast ions and shear Alfven waves is experimentally investigated (ω, wave frequency; kz, axial wavenumber; vz, fast-ion axial speed; Ωf, fast-ion cyclotron frequency). A test particle beam of fast ions is launched by a Li+ source in the helium plasma of the LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)], with shear Alfven waves (SAW) (amplitude δ B/B up to 1%) launched by a loop antenna. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer measures the nonclassical spreading of the beam, which is proportional to the resonance with the wave. A resonance spectrum is observed by launching SAWs at 0.3-0.8ωci. Both the magnitude and frequency dependence of the beam-spreading are in agreement with the theoretical prediction using a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that launches fast ions with an initial spread in real/velocity space and random phases relative to the wave. Measured wave magnetic field data are used in the simulation.

  4. Excitation and detection of shear horizontal waves with electromagnetic acoustic transducers for nondestructive testing of plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingzeng; Jiao, Jingpin; Hu, Ping; Zhong, Xi; Wu, Bin; He, Cunfu

    2014-03-01

    The fundamental shear horizontal(SH0) wave has several unique features that are attractive for long-range nondestructive testing(NDT). By a careful design of the geometric configuration, electromagnetic acoustic transducers(EMATs) have the capability to generate a wide range of guided wave modes, such as Lamb waves and shear-horizontal(SH) waves in plates. However, the performance of EMATs is influenced by their parameters. To evaluate the performance of periodic permanent magnet(PPM) EMATs, a distributed-line-source model is developed to calculate the angular acoustic field cross-section in the far-field. Numerical analysis is conducted to investigate the performance of such EMATs with different geometric parameters, such as period and number of magnet arrays, and inner and outer coil widths. Such parameters have a great influence on the directivity of the generated SH0 waves that arises mainly in the amplitude and width of both main and side lobes. According to the numerical analysis, these parameters are optimized to obtain better directivity. Optimized PPM EMATs are designed and used for NDT of strip plates. Experimental results show that the lateral boundary of the strip plate has no perceivable influence on SH0-wave propagation, thus validating their used in NDT. The proposed model predicts the radiation pattern of PPM EMATs, and can be used for their parameter optimization.

  5. Ultrasound Shear Wave Simulation of Breast Tumor Using Nonlinear Tissue Elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Woo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI can assess the elasticity of tissues, but the shear modulus estimated in SWEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of the stiffness that produces only small mechanical contrast to the background tissues. Because most soft tissues exhibit mechanical nonlinearity that differs in tissue types, mechanical contrast can be enhanced if the tissues are compressed. In this study, a finite element- (FE- based simulation was performed for a breast tissue model, which consists of a circular (D: 10 mm, hard tumor and surrounding tissue (soft. The SWEI was performed with 0% to 30% compression of the breast tissue model. The shear modulus of the tumor exhibited noticeably high nonlinearity compared to soft background tissue above 10% overall applied compression. As a result, the elastic modulus contrast of the tumor to the surrounding tissue was increased from 0.46 at 0% compression to 1.45 at 30% compression.

  6. Experimental verification of nanofluid shear-wave reconversion in ultrasonic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Derek Michael; Huang, Jinrui; Pinfield, Valerie J; Luppé, Francine

    2016-03-14

    Here we present the verification of shear-mediated contributions to multiple scattering of ultrasound in suspensions. Acoustic spectroscopy was carried out with suspensions of silica of differing particle sizes and concentrations in water to find the attenuation at a broad range of frequencies. As the particle sizes approach the nanoscale, commonly used multiple scattering models fail to match experimental results. We develop a new model, taking into account shear mediated contributions, and find excellent agreement with the attenuation spectra obtained using two types of spectrometer. The results determine that shear-wave phenomena must be considered in ultrasound characterisation of nanofluids at even relatively low concentrations of scatterers that are smaller than one micrometre in diameter. PMID:26763173

  7. Three-dimensional shear wave imaging based on full-field laser speckle contrast imaging with one-dimensional mechanical scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Pei-Yu; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-08-22

    The high imaging resolution and motion sensitivity of optical-based shear wave detection has made it an attractive technique in biomechanics studies with potential for improving the capabilities of shear wave elasticity imaging. In this study we implemented laser speckle contrast imaging for two-dimensional (X-Z) tracking of transient shear wave propagation in agarose phantoms. The mechanical disturbances induced by the propagation of the shear wave caused temporal and spatial fluctuations in the local speckle pattern, which manifested as local blurring. By mechanically moving the sample in the third dimension (Y), and performing two-dimensional shear wave imaging at every scan position, the three-dimensional shear wave velocity distribution of the phantom could be reconstructed. Based on comparisons with the reference shear wave velocity measurements obtained using a commercial ultrasound shear wave imaging system, the developed system can estimate the shear wave velocity with an error of less than 6% for homogeneous phantoms with shear moduli ranging from 1.52 kPa to 7.99 kPa. The imaging sensitivity of our system makes it capable of measuring small variations in shear modulus; the estimated standard deviation of the shear modulus was found to be less than 0.07 kPa. A submillimeter spatial resolution for three-dimensional shear wave imaging has been achieved, as demonstrated by the ability to detect a 1-mm-thick stiff plate embedded inside heterogeneous agarose phantoms. PMID:27557169

  8. Mode selective generation of guided waves by systematic optimization of the interfacial shear stress profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piezoelectric transducers are commonly used in structural health monitoring systems to generate and measure ultrasonic guided waves (GWs) by applying interfacial shear and normal stresses to the host structure. In most cases, in order to perform damage detection, advanced signal processing techniques are required, since a minimum of two dispersive modes are propagating in the host structure. In this paper, a systematic approach for mode selection is proposed by optimizing the interfacial shear stress profile applied to the host structure, representing the first step of a global optimization of selective mode actuator design. This approach has the potential of reducing the complexity of signal processing tools as the number of propagating modes could be reduced. Using the superposition principle, an analytical method is first developed for GWs excitation by a finite number of uniform segments, each contributing with a given elementary shear stress profile. Based on this, cost functions are defined in order to minimize the undesired modes and amplify the selected mode and the optimization problem is solved with a parallel genetic algorithm optimization framework. Advantages of this method over more conventional transducers tuning approaches are that (1) the shear stress can be explicitly optimized to both excite one mode and suppress other undesired modes, (2) the size of the excitation area is not constrained and mode-selective excitation is still possible even if excitation width is smaller than all excited wavelengths, and (3) the selectivity is increased and the bandwidth extended. The complexity of the optimal shear stress profile obtained is shown considering two cost functions with various optimal excitation widths and number of segments. Results illustrate that the desired mode (A0 or S0) can be excited dominantly over other modes up to a wave power ratio of 1010 using an optimal shear stress profile. (paper)

  9. Near-surface characterization of a geotechnical site in north-east Missouri using shear-wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A.; Anderson, N.

    2007-01-01

    Shear-wave velocity (Vs) as a function of soil stiffness is an essential parameter in geotechnical characterization of the subsurface. In this study, multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) and downhole methods were used to map the shear-wave velocity-structure and depth to the bed-rock surface at a 125m ?? 125m geotechnical site in Missouri. The main objective was to assess the suitability of the site for constructing a large, heavy building. The acquired multichannel surface wave data were inverted to provide 1D shear-wave velocity profile corresponding to each shot gather. These 1D velocity profiles were interpolated and contoured to generate a suite of 2D shear-wave velocity sections. Integrating the shear-wave velocity data from the MASW method with the downhole velocity data and the available borehole lithologic information enabled us to map shear-wave velocity-structure to a depth on the order of 20m. The bedrock surface, which is dissected by a significant cut-and-fill valley, was imaged. The results suggest that the study site will require special consideration prior to construction. The results also demonstrate the successful use of MASW methods, when integrated with downhole velocity measurements and borehole lithologic information, in the characterization of the near surface at the geotechnical sites. ?? 2007 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  10. Correlation between Shear Wave Velocity and Porosity in Porous Solids and Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kováčik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shear wave velocity dependence on porosity was modelled using percolation theory model for the shear modulus porosity dependence. The obtained model is not a power law dependence (no simple scaling with porosity, but a more complex equation. Control parameters of this equation are shear wave velocity of bulk solid, percolation threshold of the material and the characteristic power law exponent for shear modulus porosity dependence. This model is suitable for all porous materials, mortars and porous rocks filled with liquid or gas. In the case of pores filled with gas the model can be further simplified: The term for the ratio of the gas density to the density of solid material can be omitted in the denominator (the ratio is usually in the range of (10−4, 10−3 for all solids. This simplified equation was then tested on the experimental data set for porous ZnO filled with air. Due to lack of reasonable data the scientists are encouraged to test the validity of proposed model using their experimental data.

  11. Development of a low frequency omnidirectional piezoelectric shear horizontal wave transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Pierre; Boivin, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) may offer an alternative to time based maintenance of safety critical components. Ultrasonic guided waves have recently emerged as a prominent option because their propagation carries information regarding the location, severity and types of damage. The fundamental shear horizontal ultrasonic guided wave mode has recently attracted interest in SHM because of its unique properties. This mode is not dispersive and has no attenuation due to fluid loading. In order to cover large areas using an SHM system, omnidirectional transduction is desired. Omnidirectional transduction of SH0 is challenging because of the required torsional surface stress. This paper presents a concept based on the discretisation of a torsional surface stress source using shear piezoelectric trapezoidal elements. Finite element simulation and experimental results are used to demonstrate the performance of this concept. The experimental modal selectivity is 17 dB and the transducer has a true omnidirectional behaviour.

  12. Finite-amplitude shear-Alfv\\'en waves do not propagate in weakly magnetized collisionless plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Squire, J; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that low-collisionality plasmas cannot support linearly polarized shear-Alfv\\'en fluctuations above a critical amplitude $\\delta B_{\\perp}/B_{0} \\sim \\beta^{\\,-1/2}$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure. Above this cutoff, a developing fluctuation will generate a pressure anisotropy that is sufficient to destabilize itself through the parallel firehose instability. This causes the wave frequency to approach zero, interrupting the fluctuation before any oscillation. The magnetic field lines rapidly relax into a sequence of angular zig-zag structures. Such a restrictive bound on shear-Alfv\\'en-wave amplitudes has far-reaching implications for the physics of magnetized turbulence in the high-$\\beta$ conditions prevalent in many astrophysical plasmas, as well as for the solar wind at $\\sim 1 \\mathrm{AU}$ where $\\beta \\gtrsim 1$.

  13. Simultaneous inversion of layered compressional velocity and shear velocity by using plane wave seismogram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋海斌; 马在田; 张关泉

    1996-01-01

    A layer-stripping method is presented for simultaneous inversion of compressional velocity and shear velocity in layered medium from single precritical-incident-angle data of P-P and P-SV plane wave seismogram. A finite bandwidth algorithm is provided and results obviously better than previous research work are obtained by the numerical experiments for band-limited seismogram and synthetic data including noise.

  14. Effect of Shear on Ultrasonic Flow Measurement Using Nonaxisymmetric Wave Modes

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Chen; Yiyong Huang; Xiaoqian Chen; Dengpeng Hu

    2014-01-01

    Nonaxisymmetric wave propagation in an inviscid fluid with a pipeline shear flow is investigated. Mathematical equation is deduced from the conservations of mass and momentum, leading to a second-order differential equation in terms of the acoustic pressure. Meanwhile a general boundary condition is formulated to cover different types of wall configurations. A semianalytical method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory is provided to transform the differential equation to algebraic equations. Nu...

  15. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  16. Propagation of shear elastic and electromagnetic waves in one dimensional piezoelectric and piezomagnetic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, P; Chen, C Q; Zou, W N

    2015-01-01

    Coupled shear (SH) elastic and electromagnetic (EM) waves propagating oblique to a one dimensional periodic piezoelectric and piezomagnetic composite are investigated using the transfer matrix method. Closed-form expression of the dispersion relations is derived. We find that the band structures of the periodic composite show simultaneously the features of phononic and photonic crystals. Strong interaction between the elastic and EM waves near the center of the Brillouin zone (i.e., phonon-polariton) is revealed. It is shown the elastic branch of the band structures is more sensitive to the piezoelectric effect while the phonon-polariton is more sensitive to the piezomagnetic effect of the composite. PMID:25200701

  17. Radiation of a Plane Shear Wave from an Elastic Waveguide to a Composite Elastic Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoryan E.Kh.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The radiation of a plane shear wave from an elastic strip (waveguide to an elastic space is investigated in this paper. The strip is embedded into a space and is partially bonded with it. A given plane shear wave propagates from the free part of the strip and radiates into the composite space. The problem’s solution is led to a system of two uncoupled functional Wiener-Hopf type equations which are solved via the method of factorization. Closed form expressions are obtained which determine the wavefield in all the parts of the strip and space. Asymptotic expressions are provided which represent the wavefield in the far field and in the neighborhood of the contact zones. From these formulas it follows that: a in the cases of several values of the ratio of the wave numbers of the strip and space the order of vanishing of the volume wave in the strip becomes less and equal to the one in the case of a homogeneous material, b the radiated volume wave in the strip has a velocity of propagation equal to the volume wave’s velocity in the space.

  18. Directional Filtering Due to Mesospheric Wind Shear on the Propagation of Acoustic-gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yonghui; CHEN Wei; WANG Yachong

    2013-01-01

    Gravity waves with periods close to the Brunt-V(a)is(a)l(a) period of the upper troposphere are often observed at mesopause altitudes as short period,quasi-monochromatic waves.The assumption that these short period waves originate in the troposphere may be problematic because their upward propagation to the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region could be significantly impeded due to an extended region of strong evanescence above the stratopause.To reconcile this apparent paradox,an alternative explanation is proposed in this paper.The inclusion of mean winds and their vertical shears is sufficient to allow certain short period waves to remain internal above the stratopause and to propagate efficiently to higher altitudes.A time-dependent numerical model is used to demonstrate the feasibility of this and to determine the circumstances under which the mesospheric wind shears play a role in the removal and directional filtering of short period gravity waves.Finally this paper concludes that the combination of the height-dependent mean winds and the mean temperature structure probably explains the existence of short period,quasi-monochromatic structures observed in airglow images of mesopause region.

  19. Shear horizontal surface acoustic waves in a magneto-electro-elastic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Shahin; Shodja, Hossein M.

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of shear horizontal surface acoustic waves (SHSAWs) within a functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic (FGMEE) half-space was previously presented (Shodja HM, Eskandari S, Eskandari M. J. Eng. Math. 2015, 1-18) In contrast, the current paper considers propagation of SHSAWs in a medium consisting of an FGMEE layer perfectly bonded to a homogeneous MEE substrate. When the FGMEE layer is described by some special inhomogeneity functions - all the MEE properties have the same variation in depth which may or may not be identical to that of the density - we obtain the exact closed-form solution for the MEE fields. Additionally, certain special inhomogeneity functions with monotonically decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth are considered, and the associated boundary value problem is solved using power series solution. This problem in the limit as the layer thickness goes to infinity collapses to an FGMEE half-space with decreasing bulk shear wave velocity in depth. It is shown that in such a medium SHSAW does not propagate. Using power series solution we can afford to consider some FGMEE layers of practical importance, where the composition of the MEE obeys a prescribed volume fraction variation. The dispersive behavior of SHSAWs in the presence of such layers is also examined.

  20. Measurements of frequency dependent shear wave attenuation in sedimentary basins using induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of peak ground velocity caused by induced earthquakes requires detailed knowledge about seismic attenuation properties of the subsurface. Especially shear wave attenuation is important, because shear waves usually show the largest amplitude in high frequency seismograms. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 2 Hz and 50 Hz. The geothermal plants are located in the sedimentary basins of the upper Rhine graben (Insheim and Landau) and the Molasse basin (Unterhaching). The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of induced earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections, and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. We performed the inversion at the three sites for events with a magnitude between 0.7 and 2. We determined a transport mean free path of 70 km for Unterhaching. For Landau and Insheim the transport mean free path depends on frequency. It ranges from 2 km (at 2 Hz) to 30 km (at 40 Hz) for Landau and from 9 km to 50 km for Insheim. The quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz at all three sites. It is around 100 for Unterhaching and 200 for Landau and Insheim with higher values above 10 Hz.

  1. Variation of shear and compressional wave modulus upon saturation for pure pre-compacted sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, M. H.; Holt, R. M.

    2016-07-01

    Gassmann's fluid substitution theory is commonly used to predict seismic velocity change upon change in saturation, and is hence essential for 4-D seismic and AVO studies. This paper addresses the basics assumptions of the Gassmann theory, in order to see how well they are fulfilled in controlled laboratory experiments. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of shear modulus to fluid saturation, and the predictability of Gassmann's fluid substitution theory for P-wave modulus. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in dry and saturated (3.5 wt per cent NaCl) unconsolidated clean sands (Ottawa and Columbia) were measured in an oedometer test system (uniaxial strain conditions) over a range of 0.5-10 MPa external vertical stress. This study shows shear modulus hardening upon brine saturation, which is consistent with previous data found in the literature. Analysis of the data shows that most of the hardening of the ultrasonic shear modulus may be explained by Biot dispersion. Isotropic Gassmann's fluid substitution is found to underestimate the P-wave modulus upon fluid saturation. However, adding the Biot dispersion effect improves the prediction. More work is required to obtain good measurements of parameters influencing dispersion, such as tortuosity, which is very ambiguous and challenging to measure accurately.

  2. Quantitative shear wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) with acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) induced by phase array transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Shear Wave Optical Coherence Elastography (SW-OCE) uses the speed of propagating shear waves to provide a quantitative measurement of localized shear modulus, making it a valuable technique for the elasticity characterization of tissues such as skin and ocular tissue. One of the main challenges in shear wave elastography is to induce a reliable source of shear wave; most of nowadays techniques use external vibrators which have several drawbacks such as limited wave propagation range and/or difficulties in non-invasive scans requiring precisions, accuracy. Thus, we propose linear phase array ultrasound transducer as a remote wave source, combined with the high-speed, 47,000-frame-per-second Shear-wave visualization provided by phase-sensitive OCT. In this study, we observed for the first time shear waves induced by a 128 element linear array ultrasound imaging transducer, while the ultrasound and OCT images (within the OCE detection range) were triggered simultaneously. Acoustic radiation force impulses are induced by emitting 10 MHz tone-bursts of sub-millisecond durations (between 50 μm - 100 μm). Ultrasound beam steering is achieved by programming appropriate phase delay, covering a lateral range of 10 mm and full OCT axial (depth) range in the imaging sample. Tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentration of 0.5% and 1% was used in the SW-OCE measurements as the only imaging samples. The results show extensive improvements over the range of SW-OCE elasticity map; such improvements can also be seen over shear wave velocities in softer and stiffer phantoms, as well as determining the boundary of multiple inclusions with different stiffness. This approach opens up the feasibility to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative measurement of tissue biomechanical property.

  3. On the theory of MHD waves in a shear flow of a magnetized turbulent plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishonov, Todor M.; Maneva, Yana G.; Dimitrov, Zlatan D.; Hristov, Tihomir S.

    The set of equations for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in a shear flow is consecutively derived. This investigation is devoted on the wave heating of space plasmas. The proposed scenario involves the presence of a self-sustained turbulence and magnetic field. In the framework of Langevin--Burgers approach the influence of the turbulence is described by an additional external random force in the MHD system. Kinetic equation for the spectral density of the slow magnetosonic (Alfvénic) mode is derived in the short wavelength (WKB) approximation. The results show a pressing need for conduction of numerical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with a random driver to take into account the influence of the long wavelength modes and to give a more precise analytical assessment of the short ones. Realistic MC calculations for the heating rate and shear stress tensor should give an answer to the perplexing problem for the missing viscosity in accretion disks and reveal why the quasars are the most powerful sources of light in the universe. It is supposed that the heating mechanism by alfvén waves absorption is common for many kinds of space plasmas from solar corona to active galactic nuclei and the solution of these longstanding puzzles deserves active interdisciplinary research. The work is illustrated by typical solutions of MHD equations and their spectral densities obtained by numerical calculations or by analytical solutions with the help of Heun functions. The amplification coefficient of slow magnetosonic wave in shear flow is analytically calculated. Pictorially speaking, if in WKB approximation we treat Alfvén waves as particles -- this amplification is effect of ``lasing of alfvons.''

  4. Cluster observations of Shear-mode surface waves diverging from Geomagnetic Tail reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, L.; Wygant, J. R.; Dombeck, J. P.; Cattell, C. A.; Thaller, S. A.; Mouikis, C.; Balogh, A.; Reme, H.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first Cluster spacecraft study of the intense (δB/B~0.5, δE/VAB~0.5) equatorial plane surface waves diverging from magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail at ~17 Re. Using phase lag analysis with multi-spacecraft measurements, we quantitatively determine the wavelength and phase velocity of the waves with spacecraft frame frequencies from 0.03 Hz to 1 Hz and wavelengths from much larger (4Re) than to comparable to the H+ gyroradius (~300km). The phase velocities track the strong variations in the equatorial plane projection of the reconnection outflow velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation direction and wavelength of the observed surface waves resemble those of flapping waves of the magnetotail current sheet, suggesting a same origin shared by both of these waves. The observed waves appear ubiquitous in the outflows near magnetotail reconnection. Evidence is found that the observed waves are associated with velocity shear in reconnection outflows. Analysis shows that observed waves are associated with strong field-aligned Alfvenic Poynting flux directed away from the reconnection region toward Earth. These observations present a scenario in which the observed surface waves are driven and convected through a velocity-shear type instability by high-speed (~1000km) reconnection outflows tending to slow down due to power dissipation through Poynting flux. The mapped Poynting flux (100ergs/cm2s) and longitudinal scales (10-100 km) to 100km altitude suggest that the observed waves and their motions are an important boundary condition for night-side aurora. Figure: a) The BX-GSM in the geomagnetic tail current sheet. b) The phase difference wavelet spectrum between Bz_GSM from SC2 and SC3, used to determine the wave phase velocity, is correlated with the reconnection outflow velocity (represented by H+ VX-GSM) c) The spacecraft trajectory through magnetotail reconnection. d) The observed equatorial plane surface wave

  5. On the Dynamics of Two-Dimensional Capillary-Gravity Solitary Waves with a Linear Shear Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dali Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical study of the dynamics of two-dimensional capillary-gravity solitary waves on a linear shear current is presented in this paper. The numerical method is based on the time-dependent conformal mapping. The stability of different kinds of solitary waves is considered. Both depression wave and large amplitude elevation wave are found to be stable, while small amplitude elevation wave is unstable to the small perturbation, and it finally evolves to be a depression wave with tails, which is similar to the irrotational capillary-gravity waves.

  6. The Peano-series solution for modeling shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Ghozlen M.H.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The shear horizontal (SH wave devices have been widely used in electroacoustic. To improve their performance, the phase velocity dispersion and the electromechanical coupling coefficient of the Lamb wave should be calculated exactly in the design. Therefore, this work is to analyze exactly the Lamb waves polarized in the SH direction in homogeneous plate pie.zoelectric material (PZT-5H. An alternative method is proposed to solve the wave equation in such a structure without using the standard method based on the electromechanical partial waves. This method is based on an analytical solution, the matricant explicitly expressed under the Peano series expansion form. Two types of configuration have been addressed, namely the open circuited and the short circuited. Results confirm that the SH wave provides a number of attractive properties for use in sensing and signal processing applications. It has been found that the phase velocity remains nearly constant for all values of h/λ (h is the plate thickness, λ the acoustic wavelength. Secondly the SH0 wave mode can provide very high electromechanical coupling. Graphical representations of electrical and mechanical amounts function of depth are made, they are in agreement with the continuity rules. The developed Peano technique is in agreement with the classical approach, and can be suitable with cylindrical geometry.

  7. An analytic, Fourier domain description of shear wave propagation in a viscoelastic medium using asymmetric Gaussian sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouze, Ned C; Palmeri, Mark L; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2015-08-01

    Recent measurements of shear wave propagation in viscoelastic materials have been analyzed by constructing the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) of the spatial-temporal shear wave signal and using an analysis procedure derived under the assumption the wave is described as a plane wave, or as the asymptotic form of a wave expanding radially from a cylindrically symmetric source. This study presents an exact, analytic expression for the 2D-FT description of shear wave propagation in viscoelastic materials following asymmetric Gaussian excitations and uses this expression to evaluate the bias in 2D-FT measurements obtained using the plane or cylindrical wave assumptions. A wide range of biases are observed depending on specific values of frequency, aspect ratio R of the source asymmetry, and material properties. These biases can be reduced significantly by weighting the shear wave signal in the spatial domain to correct for the geometric spreading of the shear wavefront using a factor of x(p). The optimal weighting power p is found to be near the theoretical value of 0.5 for the case of a cylindrical source with R = 1, and decreases for asymmetric sources with R > 1.

  8. Measurement of elastic constants by simultaneously sensing longitudinal and shear waves as an overlapped signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ho Geon; Song, Dong Gi; Jhang, Kyoung Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Measurement of elastic constants is crucial for engineering aspects of predicting the behavior of materials under load as well as structural health monitoring of material degradation. Ultrasonic velocity measurement for material properties has been broadly used as a nondestructive evaluation method for material characterization. In particular, pulse-echo method has been extensively utilized as it is not only simple but also effective when only one side of the inspected objects is accessible. However, the conventional technique in this approach measures longitudinal and shear waves individually to obtain their velocities. This produces a set of two data for each measurement. This paper proposes a simultaneous sensing system of longitudinal waves and shear waves for elastic constant measurement. The proposed system senses both these waves simultaneously as a single overlapped signal, which is then analyzed to calculate both the ultrasonic velocities for obtaining elastic constants. Therefore, this system requires just half the number of data to obtain elastic constants compared to the conventional individual measurement. The results of the proposed simultaneous measurement had smaller standard deviations than those in the individual measurement. These results validate that the proposed approach improves the efficiency and reliability of ultrasonic elastic constant measurement by reducing the complexity of the measurement system, its operating procedures, and the number of data.

  9. Areal and Shear Strain Coupling of PBO Borehole Strainmeters From Teleseismic Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeloffs, E.; McCausland, W.

    2007-12-01

    In order to compare borehole strainmeter data with tectonic models, we must know the coupling parameters relating elastic deformation of the strainmeter to strain in the surrounding rock. At least two coupling parameters are required: the ratios of instrument areal and shear strain to formation areal and shear strain, respectively. These coupling parameters depend on the relative elastic moduli of the formation, grout, and strainmeter, and typical elastic moduli yield nominal coupling parameters of 1.5 and 3. More accurate coupling parameters must be determined by analyzing each strainmeter's response to a known deformation source after the instrument has been grouted into the borehole. Borehole strainmeters installed by the National Science Foundation-funded Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) consist of four gauges, sampled at 20 Hz, that measure extension along distinct azimuths. Teleseismic Love and Rayleigh waves that produce fractional gauge elongations > 10-7 , such as those from the M8.3 Kuril Islands earthquake of November 15, 2006, can be used to constrain the coupling parameters. A planar Love or Rayleigh wave is expected to have a simple strain field that produces the same waveform on all four gauges of a strainmeter. The two-parameter coupling model is consistent with the variation of surface wave amplitudes as functions of azimuth for the borehole strainmeter data analyzed to date, although most of the PBO strainmeters require that differences in the relative gains of the four gauges be estimated as well. Fits to the data can be improved for some strainmeters by allowing for two distinct shear strain coupling parameters, and/or for a small (grout with a relatively low elastic modulus. Surface waves are well recorded by some strainmeters that do not record earth tides, demonstrating that for some borehole strainmeter installations, coupling may decrease at long periods.

  10. Shallow shear-wave reflection seismics in the tsunami struck Krueng Aceh River Basin, Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Polom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the project "Management of Georisk" (MANGEONAD of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR, Hanover, high resolution shallow shear-wave reflection seismics was applied in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam, North Sumatra in cooperation with the Government of Indonesia, local counterparts, and the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hanover. The investigations were expected to support classification of earthquake site effects for the reconstruction of buildings and infrastructure as well as for groundwater exploration. The study focussed on the city of Banda Aceh and the surroundings of Aceh Besar. The shear-wave seismic surveys were done parallel to standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests to support subsequent site specific statistical calibration. They were also partly supplemented by shallow p-wave seismics for the identification of (a elastic subsurface parameters and (b zones with abundance of groundwater. Evaluation of seismic site effects based on shallow reflection seismics has in fact been found to be a highly useful method in Aceh province. In particular, use of a vibratory seismic source was essential for successful application of shear-wave seismics in the city of Banda Aceh and in areas with compacted ground like on farm tracks in the surroundings, presenting mostly agricultural land use areas. We thus were able to explore the mechanical stiffness of the subsurface down to 100 m depth, occasionally even deeper, with remarkably high resolution. The results were transferred into geotechnical site classification in terms of the International Building Code (IBC, 2003. The seismic images give also insights into the history of the basin sedimentation processes of the Krueng Aceh River delta, which is relevant for the exploration of new areas for construction of safe foundations of buildings and for identification of fresh water aquifers in the tsunami

  11. Subsurface structure of the Nojima fault from dipole shear velocity/anisotropy and borehole Stoneley wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan); Yamamoto, H.; Brie, A.

    1996-10-01

    Fracture and permeability in the fault zone of the active fault drilling at the Nojima fault were evaluated from acoustic waveforms. There were several permeable intervals in the fault zone. There was strong Stoneley wave attenuation, very large S-Se below the fault and in the interval above the fault. In the fault zone, there were also several short intervals where S-Se was very large; 667 m-674 m and 706 m-710 m. In these intervals, the Stoneley attenuation was large, but there was no Stoneley reflection from within the interval. Reflections were observed at the upper and lower boundaries, going away from the bed up above, and down below. In this well, the shear wave was very strongly attenuated at and below the fault zone. The fast shear azimuth changed at the fault. The slowness anisotropy was fairly strong above the fault from 602 m to 612 m, but smaller below the fault. The changes in fast shear azimuth were much more pronounced near the fault, which suggested a strong influence of the fault. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  12. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0–35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s−1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively. (paper)

  13. Forced vibrations of a layer of a viscoelastic material under the action of a convective wave of shear stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, V. M.

    2014-11-01

    A two-dimensional problem of deformation of a layer of a viscoelastic material glued to a solid base by a traveling wave of shear stress is solved. Analytical expressions for two shear compliance components corresponding to two surface displacement components are obtained. It is shown that the dimensionless compliance components depend only on the viscoelastic properties of the material, the ratio of the wavelength to the layer thickness λ/H, and the ratio of the wave velocity to the propagation rate of shear vibrations V/C {/t 0}. Data on the dynamic compliance in the ranges 0.2 layer are presented.

  14. Characterizing Wave- and Current-Induced Bottom Shear Stress: U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, S.; Butman, B.

    2011-12-01

    The combined action of waves and currents at the seabed creates bottom shear stress, impacting local geology, habitat, and anthropogenic use. In this study, a methodology is developed to characterize the magnitude of benthic disturbance based on spatially and seasonally-resolved statistics (mean, standard deviation, 95th percentile) of wave-current bottom shear stress. The frequency of stress forcing is used to distinguish regions dominated by storms (return interval longer than 33 hours) from those dominated by the tides (periods shorter than 33 hours). In addition, the relative magnitude of the contribution to stress from waves, tides, and storm-driven currents is investigated by comparing wave stress, tidal current stress, and stress from the residual current (currents with tides removed), as well as through cross-correlation of wave and current stress. The methodology is applied to numerical model time-series data for the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) off the U.S. East Coast for April 2010 to April 2011; currents are provided from the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) operational hydrodynamic forecast Experimental System for Predicting Shelf and Slope Optics (ESPreSSO) and waves are provided from a Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) hindcast developed for this project. Spatial resolution of the model is about 5 km and time-series wave and current data are at 1 and 2-hours respectively. Regions of the MAB delineated by stress characteristics include a tidally-dominated shallow region with relative high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves; a region dominated by waves and wind-driven currents offshore of the Outer Banks of North Carolina; and a low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the "Mud Patch". Comparison of the stress distribution with surface sediment texture data shows that

  15. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  16. Stochastic ion heating by an electrostatic wave in a sheared magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, Y.; Nakach, R.

    1980-08-01

    Effects of the shear of the magnetic field on the stochastic acceleration of ions due to an electrostatic wave with a frequency in the lower-hybrid range are considered. An appropriate Hamiltonian formalism is used to analyze the equations of motion numerically and theoretically. The surface of section method is used to visualize the solutions and to compare these with the theoretical predictions. From this analysis it appears that there exists an upper adiabatic barrier for the stochastic region which seems to be responsible for the formation of a hot tail in the ion velocity distribution. In addition to lowering the threshold for the onset of stochasticity, the effect of shear is to shift the tail structure to lower values of the velocities. Consequently, these results might help to improve the efficiency of heating by external radiation in the lower-hybrid frequency range.

  17. Effect of Stress and Saturation on Shear Wave Anisotropy: Laboratory Observations Using Laser Doppler Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, M.; Collet, O.; Bona, A.; Gurevich, B.

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of hydrocarbon and water resources as well as reservoir management during production are the main challenges facing the resource recovery industry nowadays. The recently discovered reservoirs are not only deep but they are also located in complicated geological formations. Hence, the effect of anisotropy on reservoir imaging becomes significant. Shear wave (S-wave) splitting has been observed in the field and laboratory experiments for decades. Despite the fact that S-wave splitting is widely used for evaluation of subsurface anisotropy, the effects of stresses as well fluid saturation on anisotropy have not been understood in detail. In this paper we present the laboratory study of the effect of stress and saturation on S-wave splitting for a Bentheim sandstone sample. The cubic sample (50mm3), porosity 22%, density 1890kg/m3) was placed into a true-triaxial cell. The sample was subjected to several combinations of stresses varying from 0 to 10MPa and applied to the sample in two directions (X and Y), while no stress was applied to the sample in the Z-direction. The sample's bedding was nearly oriented parallel to Y-Z plane. The ultrasonic S-waves were exited at a frequency of 0.5MHz by a piezoelectric transducer and were propagating in the Z-direction. Upon wave arrival onto the free surface the displacement of the surface was monitored by a Laser Doppler interferometer. Hodograms of the central point of the dry sample (Fig. 1) demonstrate how S-wave polarizations for both "fast" and "slow" S-waves change when increasing the stress in the X direction, while the stress in direction Y is kept constant at 3 MPa. Polarization of the fast S wave is shifted towards the X-axis (axis of the maximum stress). While both S-wave velocities increase with stress, the anisotropy level remains the same. No shift of polarization of fast wave was observed when the stress along the Y-axis was kept at 3 MPa, while the stress along the X-axis was increasing. However, in

  18. A shear wave ground surface vibration technique for the detection of buried pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Papandreou, B.

    2014-07-01

    A major UK initiative, entitled 'Mapping the Underworld' aims to develop and prove the efficacy of a multi-sensor device for accurate remote buried utility service detection, location and, where possible, identification. One of the technologies to be incorporated in the device is low-frequency vibro-acoustics; the application of this technology for detecting buried infrastructure, in particular pipes, is currently being investigated. Here, a shear wave ground vibration technique for detecting buried pipes is described. For this technique, shear waves are generated at the ground surface, and the resulting ground surface vibrations measured. Time-extended signals are employed to generate the illuminating wave. Generalized cross-correlation functions between the measured ground velocities and a reference measurement adjacent to the excitation are calculated and summed using a stacking method to generate a cross-sectional image of the ground. To mitigate the effects of other potential sources of vibration in the vicinity, the excitation signal can be used as an additional reference when calculating the cross-correlation functions. Measurements have been made at two live test sites to detect a range of buried pipes. Successful detection of the pipes was achieved, with the use of the additional reference signal proving beneficial in the noisier of the two environments.

  19. Shear-Wave Velocity Structure Around the Korean Peninsula Using the Rayleigh Wave Signature of the North Korea Underground Nuclear Explosion on May 25, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G.; Shin, J.; Chi, H. C.; Sheen, D.; Park, J.; Cho, C.

    2011-12-01

    The crustal structure around the Korean Peninsula was investigated by analyzing the Rayleigh waves generated from the 2nd North Korea underground nuclear explosion on May 25, 2009. Group velocity dispersion curves were measured from vertical component waveforms of 20 broadband stations in the range of 194 to 1183 km from the test site. The measured dispersion curves were inverted to get shear-wave velocity models for depths from 0 to 50 km. The dispersion curves and the velocity models clearly show lateral variations in the crustal structure, which could be more clearly classified into the North Korea-Northeast China group, the Western Margin of the East Sea group, and the Japan Basin group. For each group, an averaged dispersion curve and an averaged velocity model were measured. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the North Korea-Northeast China group shows that the mean shear-wave velocity of the Moho discontinuity, which is known to be located at approximately 35 km, is 4.37 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.15 km/s. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Japan Basin group shows a mean shear-wave velocity of 4.26 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.14 km/s in the layer between 16 and 22 km. The averaged shear-wave velocity model of the Western Margin of the East Sea group shows characteristics of a transition zone between the North Korea-Northeast China group, which represents continental crust, and the Japan Basin group, which represents oceanic crust. The mean shear-wave velocity in the layer between 16 and 22 km is 4.12 km/s with a standard deviation of 0.05 km/s.

  20. Anisotropic Shear-wave Velocity Structure of East Asian Upper Mantle from Waveform Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J.; Yuan, H.; French, S. W.; Romanowicz, B. A.; Ni, S.

    2012-12-01

    East Asia is a seismically active region featuring active tectonic belts, such as the Himalaya collision zone, western Pacific subduction zones and the Tianshan- Baikal tectonic belt. In this study, we applied full waveform time domain tomography to image 3D isotropic, radially and azimuthally anisotropic upper mantle shear velocity structure of East Asia. High quality teleseismic waveforms were collected for both permanent and temporary stations in the target and its adjacent regions, providing good ray path coverage of the study region. Fundamental and overtone wave packets, filtered down to 60 sec, were inverted for isotropic and radially anisotropic shear wave structure using normal mode asymptotic coupling theory (NACT: Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Joint inversion of SKS measurements and seismic waveforms was then carried out following the methodology described in (Marone and Romanowicz, 2007). The 3D velocity model shows strong lateral heterogeneities in the target region, which correlate well with the surface geology in East Asia. Our model shows that Indian lithosphere has subducted beneath Tibet with a different northern reach from western to eastern Tibet,. We also find variations of the slab geometry in Western Pacific subduction zones. Old and stable regions, such as, Indian shield, Siberia platform, Tarim and Yangtze blocks are found to have higher shear wave velocity in the upper mantle. Lower velocity anomalies are found in regions like Baikal rift, Tienshan, Indochina block, and the regions along Japan island-Ryukyu Trench and Izu-bonin Trench. The dominant fast and slow velocity boundaries in the study region are well correlated with tectonic belts, such as the central Asian orogenic belt and Alty/Qilian-Qinling/Dabie orogenic belt. Our radially anisotropic model shows Vsh> Vsv in oceanic regions and at larger depths(>300km), and Vsv > Vsh in some orogenic zones.. We'll show preliminary results of azimuthally anisotropic joint inversion of SKS

  1. Concurrent Visualization of Acoustic Radiation Force Displacement and Shear Wave Propagation with 7T MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available Manual palpation is a common and very informative diagnostic tool based on estimation of changes in the stiffness of tissues that result from pathology. In the case of a small lesion or a lesion that is located deep within the body, it is difficult for changes in mechanical properties of tissue to be detected or evaluated via palpation. Furthermore, palpation is non-quantitative and cannot be used to localize the lesion. Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS can also be used to evaluate the properties of biological tissues non-invasively. In this study, an MRgFUS system combines high field (7T MR and 3 MHz focused ultrasound to provide high resolution MR imaging and a small ultrasonic interrogation region (~0.5 x 0.5 x 2 mm, as compared with current clinical systems. MR-Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI provides a reliable and efficient method for beam localization by detecting micron-scale displacements induced by ultrasound mechanical forces. The first aim of this study is to develop a sequence that can concurrently quantify acoustic radiation force displacements and image the resulting transient shear wave. Our motivation in combining these two measurements is to develop a technique that can rapidly provide both ARFI and shear wave velocity estimation data, making it suitable for use in interventional radiology. Secondly, we validate this sequence in vivo by estimating the displacement before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU ablation, and we validate the shear wave velocity in vitro using tissue-mimicking gelatin and tofu phantoms. Such rapid acquisitions are especially useful in interventional radiology applications where minimizing scan time is highly desirable.

  2. Potential use of point shear wave elastography for the pancreas: A single center prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawada, Natsuko, E-mail: kawada-na@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Tanaka, Sachiko, E-mail: sachi686@cocoa.plala.or.jp [Osaka Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, 1-6-107, Morinomiya, Johtoh, Osaka 536-8588 (Japan); Uehara, Hiroyuki, E-mail: uehara-hi@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Ohkawa, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: okawa-ka@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Yamai, Takuo, E-mail: yamai-ta@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Takada, Ryoji, E-mail: takada-ry@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan); Shiroeda, Hisakazu, E-mail: shiroeda@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Arisawa, Tomiyasu, E-mail: tarisawa@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Tomita, Yasuhiko, E-mail: tomota-ya@mc.pref.osaka.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari, Osaka 537-8511 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    Aim: Clinical use of point shear wave elastography for the liver has been established, however, few studies demonstrated its usefulness for the pancreas. A prospective study was conducted to clarify its feasibility for the pancreas and its usefulness for the identification of high risk group for pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods: Consecutive eighty-five patients underwent point shear wave elastography for the pancreas. The success rate of shear wave velocity (SWV) measurement, that is the number of successful measurements over total 10 measurements, was recorded. The SWV of the pancreas measured at non-tumorous area was compared between patients with and without pancreatic cancer. Factors associated with high SWV were determined by logistic regression model. Results: Sixty patients were included, of these 18 had pancreatic cancer. The success rate of 100% was achieved at the head, the body and the tail of the pancreas in 80%, 83%, and 68% of the patients, respectively. The success rate of ≥80% was achieved in 100%, 100%, and 96% of the patients, respectively. Although mean SWV of the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer tended to be higher compared with that of the pancreas without cancer (1.51 ± 0.45 m/s vs 1.43 ± 0.28 m/s), they did not reach statistical significance. Multivariate analysis showed that increased amount of alcohol intake was associated with high SWV. Conclusion: The SWV of the pancreas was measured with excellent success rate. However, tendency of higher SWV obtained from the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer needed to be further investigated.

  3. Potential use of point shear wave elastography for the pancreas: A single center prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Clinical use of point shear wave elastography for the liver has been established, however, few studies demonstrated its usefulness for the pancreas. A prospective study was conducted to clarify its feasibility for the pancreas and its usefulness for the identification of high risk group for pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods: Consecutive eighty-five patients underwent point shear wave elastography for the pancreas. The success rate of shear wave velocity (SWV) measurement, that is the number of successful measurements over total 10 measurements, was recorded. The SWV of the pancreas measured at non-tumorous area was compared between patients with and without pancreatic cancer. Factors associated with high SWV were determined by logistic regression model. Results: Sixty patients were included, of these 18 had pancreatic cancer. The success rate of 100% was achieved at the head, the body and the tail of the pancreas in 80%, 83%, and 68% of the patients, respectively. The success rate of ≥80% was achieved in 100%, 100%, and 96% of the patients, respectively. Although mean SWV of the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer tended to be higher compared with that of the pancreas without cancer (1.51 ± 0.45 m/s vs 1.43 ± 0.28 m/s), they did not reach statistical significance. Multivariate analysis showed that increased amount of alcohol intake was associated with high SWV. Conclusion: The SWV of the pancreas was measured with excellent success rate. However, tendency of higher SWV obtained from the pancreas harboring pancreatic cancer needed to be further investigated

  4. Reproducibility of real-time shear wave elastography in the evaluation of liver elasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraioli, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.ferraioli@unipv.it [Ultrasound Unit, Infectious Diseases Department, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 5, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Tinelli, Carmine, E-mail: ctinelli@smatteo.pv.it [Clinical Epidemiology and Biometric Unit, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, Viale Golgi 19, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Zicchetti, Mabel, E-mail: mabel.zicchetti@unipv.it [Ultrasound Unit, Infectious Diseases Department, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 5, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Above, Elisabetta, E-mail: betta.above@gmail.com [Ultrasound Unit, Infectious Diseases Department, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 5, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Poma, Gianluigi, E-mail: gigi.poma@libero.it [Ultrasound Unit, Infectious Diseases Department, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 5, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Di Gregorio, Marta, E-mail: martadigregorio@virgilio.it [Ultrasound Unit, Infectious Diseases Department, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 5, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Filice, Carlo, E-mail: carfil@unipv.it [Ultrasound Unit, Infectious Diseases Department, IRCCS San Matteo Hospital Foundation, University of Pavia, Via Taramelli 5, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of real-time shear wave elastography in assessing liver elasticity in healthy volunteers. Methods: Forty-two volunteers were studied in day 1. Shear wave elastography studies were performed by using the ultrasound system Aixplorer Trade-Mark-Sign (SuperSonic Imagine S.A., Aix-en-Provence, France) with a convex broadband probe. Measurements were carried by two operators, an expert (operator 1) and a novice (operator 2). Examinations were performed on the right lobe of the liver. Each operator performed 10 consecutive measurements in each volunteer. In a subset of volunteers (n = 18) measurements were performed twice on two different days (day 1 and day 2). Intraobserver and interobserver agreement were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient. Results: Intraobserver agreement between measurements performed in the same subject in the same day (day 1 or day 2) showed intraclass correlation coefficient values of 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.93-0.98) and 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.90-0.96) for operator 1 and operator 2, respectively. Intraobserver agreement between measurements performed in the same subject in different days showed intraclass correlation coefficient values of 0.84 (95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.98) and 0.65 (95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.91) for operator 1 and operator 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.94). Conclusions: The results of this study show that shear wave elastography is a reliable and reproducible noninvasive method for the assessment of liver elasticity. Expert operator had higher reproducibility of measurements over time than novice operator.

  5. Lithospheric deformation in the Canadian Appalachians: evidence from shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Amy; Bastow, Ian D.; Watson, Emma; Darbyshire, Fiona A.; Levin, Vadim; Menke, William; Lane, Victoria; Hawthorn, David; Boyce, Alistair; Liddell, Mitchell V.; Petrescu, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Plate-scale deformation is expected to impart seismic anisotropic fabrics on the lithosphere. Determination of the fast shear wave orientation (φ) and the delay time between the fast and slow split shear waves (δt) via SKS splitting can help place spatial and temporal constraints on lithospheric deformation. The Canadian Appalachians experienced multiple episodes of deformation during the Phanerozoic: accretionary collisions during the Palaeozoic prior to the collision between Laurentia and Gondwana, and rifting related to the Mesozoic opening of the North Atlantic. However, the extent to which extensional events have overprinted older orogenic trends is uncertain. We address this issue through measurements of seismic anisotropy beneath the Canadian Appalachians, computing shear wave splitting parameters (φ, δt) for new and existing seismic stations in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Average δt values of 1.2 s, relatively short length scale (≥100 km) splitting parameter variations, and a lack of correlation with absolute plate motion direction and mantle flow models, demonstrate that fossil lithospheric anisotropic fabrics dominate our results. Most fast directions parallel Appalachian orogenic trends observed at the surface, while δt values point towards coherent deformation of the crust and mantle lithosphere. Mesozoic rifting had minimal impact on our study area, except locally within the Bay of Fundy and in southern Nova Scotia, where fast directions are subparallel to the opening direction of Mesozoic rifting; associated δt values of >1 s require an anisotropic layer that spans both the crust and mantle, meaning the formation of the Bay of Fundy was not merely a thin-skinned tectonic event.

  6. Shear Wave Reflection Seismics Image Internal Structure of Quick-Clay Landslides in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Malehmir, A.

    2014-12-01

    Covering many different sizes of scale, landslides are widespread and pose a severe hazard in many areas as soon as humans or infrastructure are affected. In order to provide geophysical tools and techniques to better characterize sites prone to sliding, a geophysical assessment working towards a geotechnical understanding of landslides is necessary. As part of a joint project studying clay-related landslides in Nordic countries by a suite of geophysical methods, we therefore tested the use of shear wave reflection seismics to survey shallow structures that are known to be related to quick-clay landslide processes in southern Sweden. On two crossing profiles, a land streamer consisting of 120 SH-geophones with 1 m spacing was deployed, and an ELVIS micro-vibrator was shaking every 4 m to generate the shear wave signal. SH-wave data of high quality were thereby acquired to resolve the gaps between P-wave data and electrical and surface wave based methods of lower resolution. After quality control, correlation, subtractive stack, and geometry setup, single shot gathers already demonstrate the high data quality gained in the region, especially on a gravel road. The migrated depth sections image the structural inventory down to ca. 50 m depth with vertical resolution of less than 1 m. Horizontally layered sediments are visible in the upper 40 m of soft (marine) sediments, followed by top basement with a rough topography varying between ca. 20-40 m depth. The imaged, bowl-shaped basement morphology centres near the profile crossing, and basement is exposed at three sides of the profiles. Three distinct sediment sequences are separated by high-amplitude unconformities. The quick-clay layer may be located above the marked reflection set that lies on top of the more transparent sequence that levels out the basement. Located between 15-20 m depth, this correlates with the height of the last scarp that occurred in the area. In addition, shear wave velocities are determined

  7. Modulation of Atmospheric Nonisothermality and Wind Shears on the Propagation of Seismic Tsunami-Excited Gravity Waves

    OpenAIRE

    John Z. G. Ma

    2016-01-01

    We study the modulation of atmospheric nonisothermality and wind shears on the propagation of seismic tsunami-excited gravity waves by virtue of the vertical wavenumber, m (with its imaginary and real parts, m i and m r , respectively), within a correlated characteristic range of tsunami wave periods in tens of minutes. A ge...

  8. Plasma turbulence driven by transversely large-scale standing shear Alfvén waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we study generation of turbulence consisting of transversely small-scale dispersive Alfvén and electrostatic waves when plasma is driven by a large-scale standing shear Alfvén wave (LS-SAW). The standing wave is set up by reflecting a propagating LS-SAW. The ponderomotive force of the standing wave generates transversely large-scale density modifications consisting of density cavities and enhancements. The drifts of the charged particles driven by the ponderomotive force and those directly caused by the fields of the standing LS-SAW generate non-thermal features in the plasma. Parametric instabilities driven by the inherent plasma nonlinearities associated with the LS-SAW in combination with the non-thermal features generate small-scale electromagnetic and electrostatic waves, yielding a broad frequency spectrum ranging from below the source frequency of the LS-SAW to ion cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies and beyond. The power spectrum of the turbulence has peaks at distinct perpendicular wave numbers (k⊥) lying in the range de−1-6de−1, de being the electron inertial length, suggesting non-local parametric decay from small to large k⊥. The turbulence spectrum encompassing both electromagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations is also broadband in parallel wave number (k||). In a standing-wave supported density cavity, the ratio of the perpendicular electric to magnetic field amplitude is R(k⊥) = |E⊥(k⊥)/|B⊥(k⊥)| ≪ VA for k⊥de A is the Alfvén velocity. The characteristic features of the broadband plasma turbulence are compared with those available from satellite observations in space plasmas.

  9. Comparison between 3D Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography and Magnetic Resonance Elastography: a preliminary experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Jinlong; Tardieu, Marion; Julea, Felicia; Chami, Linda; Lucidarme, Olivier; Maître, Xavier; Pellot-Barakat, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound Supersonic Shear Wave Elastog-raphy (SSWE) as well as Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) allow accessing the mechanical properties of human tissues. SSWE is usually performed using a 2D probe. 3D SSWE is now available but needs to be validated. We compared 3D SSWE with both 2D SSWE and MRE which is inherently 3D on a breast phantom. We found that 3D SSWE is reproducible and provides elasticity estimates comparable to those obtained with the validated 2D SSWE. We also showed that...

  10. Tomoelastography by multifrequency wave number recovery from time-harmonic propagating shear waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Guo, Jing; Dittmann, Florian; Hirsch, Sebastian; Barnhill, Eric; Jöhrens, Korinna; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2016-05-01

    Palpation is one of the most sensitive, effective diagnostic practices, motivating the quantitative and spatially resolved determination of soft tissue elasticity parameters by medical ultrasound or MRI. However, this so-called elastography often suffers from limited anatomical resolution due to noise and insufficient elastic deformation, currently precluding its use as a tomographic modality on its own. We here introduce an efficient way of processing wave images acquired by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography (MMRE), which relies on wave number reconstruction at different harmonic frequencies followed by their amplitude-weighted averaging prior to inversion. This results in compound maps of wave speed, which reveal variations in tissue elasticity in a tomographic fashion, i.e. an unmasked, slice-wise display of anatomical details at pixel-wise resolution. The method is demonstrated using MMRE data from the literature including abdominal and pelvic organs such as the liver, spleen, uterus body and uterus cervix. Even in small regions with low wave amplitudes, such as nucleus pulposus and spinal cord, elastic parameters consistent with literature values were obtained. Overall, the proposed method provides a simple and noise-robust strategy of in-plane wave analysis of MMRE data, with a pixel-wise resolution producing superior detail to MRE direct inversion methods. PMID:26845371

  11. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic regionn, California ( USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C.; Ho-Liu, P.; Rinn, D.; Hiroo, Kanamori

    1988-01-01

    We use seismograms of local earthquakes to image relative shear wave attenuation structure in the shallow crust beneath the region containing the Coso volcanic-geothermal area of E California. Seismograms of 16 small earthquakes show SV amplitudes which are greatly diminished at some azimuths and takeoff angles, indicating strong lateral variations in S wave attenuation in the area. 3-D images of the relative S wave attenuation structure are obtained from forward modeling and a back projection inversion of the amplitude data. The results indicate regions within a 20 by 30 by 10 km volume of the shallow crust (one shallower than 5 km) that severely attenuate SV waves passing through them. These anomalies lie beneath the Indian Wells Valley, 30 km S of the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about 5 km depth. Geologic relations and the coincidence of anomalously slow P wave velocities suggest that the attenuation anomalies may be related to magmatism along the E Sierra front.-from Authors

  12. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  13. Asymmetric first order shear horizontal guided waves propagation in a tapered plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, through numerical simulation of the first order shear horizontal guided waves propagation in a homogeneous tapered plate, we have realized sound unidirectional transmission based on the mode conversion mechanism. We also find that the contrast transmission ratio of unidirectional transmission is highly influenced by the slope angle of tapered edge. And the working frequency range of the asymmetric transmission can be easily controlled by the height of tapered surface or the thickness of slab. This asymmetric system shows potentially significant applications in various sound devices. - Highlights: • We study the sound unidirectional transmission for SH1 guided wave in a homogeneous tapered plate. • The contrast transmission ratio of unidirectional transmission is highly influenced by the slope angle. • The working frequency range of unidirectional transmission can be easily controlled by structure parameters

  14. Effect of Shear on Ultrasonic Flow Measurement Using Nonaxisymmetric Wave Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonaxisymmetric wave propagation in an inviscid fluid with a pipeline shear flow is investigated. Mathematical equation is deduced from the conservations of mass and momentum, leading to a second-order differential equation in terms of the acoustic pressure. Meanwhile a general boundary condition is formulated to cover different types of wall configurations. A semianalytical method based on the Fourier-Bessel theory is provided to transform the differential equation to algebraic equations. Numerical analysis of phase velocity and wave attenuation in water is addressed in the laminar and turbulent flow. Meanwhile comparison among different kinds of boundary condition is given. In the end, the measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter is demonstrated.

  15. Comparison of Shear-wave Profiles for a Compacted Fill in a Geotechnical Test Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain, M. B.; Pando, M. A.; Whelan, M.; Bents, D.; Park, C.; Ogunro, V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the use of common methods for geological seismic site characterization including: i) multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW),ii) crosshole seismic surveys, and iii) seismic cone penetrometer tests. The in-situ tests were performed in a geotechnical test pit located at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte High Bay Laboratory. The test pit has dimensions of 12 feet wide by 12 feet long by 10 feet deep. The pit was filled with a silty sand (SW-SM) soil, which was compacted in lifts using a vibratory plate compactor. The shear wave velocity values from the 3 techniques are compared in terms of magnitude versus depth as well as spatially. The comparison was carried out before and after inducing soil disturbance at controlled locations to evaluate which methods were better suited to captured the induced soil disturbance.

  16. Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance of fast ions with circularly polarized shear Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance between fast ions and shear Alfven waves (SAWs) has been experimentally investigated with a test-particle fast-ion (Li+) beam launched in the helium plasma of the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. Left- or right-hand circularly polarized SAWs are launched by an antenna with four current channels. A collimated fast-ion energy analyzer characterizes the resonance by measuring the nonclassical spreading of the averaged beam signal. Left-hand circularly polarized SAWs resonate with the fast ions but right-hand circularly polarized SAWs do not. The measured fast-ion profiles are compared with simulations by a Monte Carlo Lorentz code that uses the measured wave field data.

  17. Comparison between shear wave ultrasonic examination and radiographic examination of some austenitic stainless steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares the results of the ultrasonic and radiographic examinations of five austenitic pipe to pipe welds, which contained different types of intentional weld defects. Both the ultrasonic and radiographic examinations were made under laboratory conditions, and thus the results cannot directly be generalized to workshop examinations. The ultrasonic examination was performed using a conventional shear wave angle beam technique due to the geometric conditions of the welds. Longitudinal wave angle beam probes were not used in this work. Comparison between the results of the ultrasonic and radiographic examinations leads to the conclusion that neither method gives quite satisfactory results. Both methods missed some defects and the correlation between the results of the methods was not very good. In the ultrasonic examination the most difficult problem was the evaluation of the defects. (author)

  18. Solar Wind Driving of Magnetospheric ULF Waves: Pulsations Driven by Velocity Shear at the Magnetopause

    CERN Document Server

    Claudepierre, S G; Wiltberger, M; 10.1029/2007JA012890

    2010-01-01

    We present results from global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction. These MHD simulations are used to study ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere driven by shear instabilities at the flanks of the magnetopause. We drive the simulations with idealized, constant solar wind input parameters, ensuring that any discrete ULF pulsations generated in the simulation magnetosphere are not due to fluctuations in the solar wind. The simulations presented in this study are driven by purely southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, changing only the solar wind driving velocity while holding all of the other solar wind input parameters constant. We find surface waves near the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause and show that these waves are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. We also find that two KH modes are generated near the magnetopause boundary. One mode, the magnetopause KH mode, propagates tailwa...

  19. Anomalous absorption of bulk shear sagittal acoustic waves in a layered structure with viscous fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Gramotnev, D K; Nieminen, T A; Gramotnev, Dmitri K.; Mather, Melissa L.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that the absorptivity of bulk shear sagittal waves by an ultra-thin layer of viscous fluid between two different elastic media has a strong maximum (in some cases as good as 100%) at an optimal layer thickness. This thickness is usually much smaller than the penetration depths and lengths of transverse and longitudinal waves in the fluid. The angular dependencies of the absorptivity are demonstrated to have significant and unusual structure near critical angles of incidence. The effect of non-Newtonian properties and non-uniformities of the fluid layer on the absorptivity is also investigated. In particular, it is shown that the absorption in a thin layer of viscous fluid is much more sensitive to non-zero relaxation time(s) in the fluid layer than the absorption at an isolated solid-fluid interface.

  20. Estimating site effects for seismic hazard assessment in Portugal using shear wave and geotechnical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela Pinto, C.; Carvalho, J.; Vilanova, S.; Borges, J.

    2012-04-01

    The estimation of seismic ground motion requires a simultaneous understanding of the effects of earthquake sources, propagation effects in the earth and local geological site conditions. In this work we address the latter issue in Portugal mainland. The SCENE project has the main goal to improve the seismic hazard assessment in Portugal by taking into account the site effects. To achieve this purpose, the project was divided into two main goals: 1) to estimate the shear-wave profiles at the seismic stations in order to correct the recorded ground motions for site effects and 2)to produce a regional soil classification based on shear-wave velocity averaged on the upper 30m (VS30) that will be used to include first order site effects in seismic hazard maps. This parameter was calculated using seismic refraction and reflection data, interpreted with the aid of nearby wells. The refraction interpretation was carried out using the generalized reciprocal and first break tomographic methods. Using reflection seismic software, the velocities measured from the reflection hyperbolae occasionally observed in the shot gathers were used to obtain an average velocity until the respective reflector and complement the refraction data. The soil classification is based on the eurocode 8, which uses only shear wave velocities, but the classification presented here includes also standard penetration test (SPT) data. The seismic acquisition was carried out next to the accelerometer and broadband stations located in the regions center and south of Portugal. To produce a soil classification, 30 P-wave and 30 S-wave profiles were acquired and data collected under the scope of other projects was also used. The classification takes into consideration not only the geological units on which the seismic profiles were acquired but lithological information and has been generalized to each unit using 1: 200.000 scale geological cartography. This classification for southern Portugal is presented

  1. Algebraic processing technique for extracting frequency-dependent shear-wave splitting parameters in an anisotropic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai-Feng; Zeng, Xin-Wu

    2011-06-01

    Based on the dual source cumulative rotation technique in the time-domain proposed by Zeng and MacBeth (1993), a new algebraic processing technique for extracting shear-wave splitting parameters from multi-component VSP data in frequency-dependent medium has been developed. By using this dual source cumulative rotation technique in the frequency-domain (DCTF), anisotropic parameters, including polarization direction of the shear-waves and timedelay between the fast and slow shear-waves, can be estimated for each frequency component in the frequency domain. It avoids the possible error which comes from using a narrow-band filter in the current commonly used method. By using synthetic seismograms, the feasibility and validity of the technique was tested and a comparison with the currently used method was also given. The results demonstrate that the shear-wave splitting parameters frequency dependence can be extracted directly from four-component seismic data using the DCTF. In the presence of larger scale fractures, substantial frequency dependence would be found in the seismic frequency range, which implies that dispersion would occur at seismic frequencies. Our study shows that shear-wave anisotropy decreases as frequency increases.

  2. Shear wave elastography for detection of prostate cancer: A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the diagnostic value of shear wave elastography (SWE) for prostate cancer detection. In this retrospective study, 87 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen > 4 ng/mL and abnormal digital rectal examination) underwent a protocol-based systematic 12-core biopsy followed by targeted biopsy at hypoechoic areas on grey-scale ultrasound. Prior to biopsy, SWE was performed by placing two circular 5 mm-sized regions of interest (ROIs) along the estimated biopsy tract in each sector and one ROI for hypoechoic lesions. SWE parameters, S (mean stiffness) and R (mean stiffness ratio), were calculated and compared regarding different histopathologic tissues and their accuracy for diagnosing prostate cancer was analyzed. SWE parameters were correlated with Gleason score and were compared between indolent ( 43.9 kPa and 60.8%, 66.4%, and 0.653, respectively, for R > 3. Both, S and R showed a significant correlation with Gleason score (r ≥ 0.296, p ≤ 0.008) and were significantly different between indolent and aggressive prostate cancer (p ≤ 0.006). Shear wave elastographic parameters are significantly different between prostate cancer and benign prostate tissue and correlate with Gleason score.

  3. Crustal shear-wave velocity structure beneath Sumatra from receiver function modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Dipok K.; Borah, Kajaljyoti; Goyal, Ayush

    2016-05-01

    We estimated the shear-wave velocity structure and Vp/Vs ratio of the crust beneath the Sumatra region by inverting stacked receiver functions from five three-component broadband seismic stations, located in diverse geologic setting, using a well known non-linear direct search approach, Neighborhood Algorithm (NA). Inversion results show significant variation of sediment layer thicknesses from 1 km beneath the backarc basin (station BKNI and PMBI) to 3-7 km beneath the coastal part of Sumatra region (station LHMI and MNAI) and Nias island (station GSI). Average sediment layer shear velocity (Vss) beneath all the stations is observed to be less (∼1.35 km/s) and their corresponding Vp/Vs ratio is very high (∼2.2-3.0). Crustal thickness beneath Sumatra region varies between 27 and 35 km, with exception of 19 km beneath Nias island, with average crustal Vs ∼3.1-3.4 km/s (Vp/Vs ∼1.8). It is well known that thick sediments with low Vs (and high Vp/Vs) amplify seismic waves even from a small-magnitude earthquake, which can cause huge damage in the zone. This study can provide the useful information of the crust for the Sumatra region. Since, Sumatra is an earthquake prone zone, which suffered the strong shaking of Great Andaman-Sumatra earthquake; this study can also be helpful for seismic hazard assessment.

  4. Doppler ultrasound detection of shear waves remotely induced in tissue phantoms and tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barannik, E A; Girnyk, A; Tovstiak, V; Marusenko, A I; Emelianov, S Y; Sarvazyan, A P

    2002-05-01

    In shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI), mechanical excitation within the tissue is remotely generated using radiation force of focused ultrasound. The induced shear strain is subsequently detected to estimate visco-elastic properties of tissue and thus aid diagnostics. In this paper, the mechanical response of tissue to radiation force was detected using a modified ultrasound Doppler technique. The experiments were performed on tissue mimicking and tissue containing phantoms using a commercial diagnostic scanner. This scanner was modified to control both the pushing and probing beams. The pushing beam was fired repetitively along a single direction while interlaced probing beams swept the surrounding region of interest to detect the induced motion. The detectability of inhomogeneous inclusions using ultrasonic Doppler SWEI method has been demonstrated in this study. The displacement fields measured in elastic phantoms clearly reveal the oscillatory nature of the mechanical relaxation processes in response to impulsive load due to the boundary effects. This relaxation dynamics was also present in cooked muscle tissue, but was not detected in more viscous and less elastic phantom and raw muscles. Presence of a local heterogeneity in the vicinity of the focal region of the pushing beam results in generation of a standing wave field pattern which is manifested in the oscillatory response of the excited region of the tissue. There has been made an assumption that dynamic characteristics of the relaxation process may be used for visualization of inhomogeneities. PMID:12160057

  5. Use of shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, A.; Rus, G.; Saffari, N.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains as a major healthcare issue. Limitations in current diagnosis and treatment monitoring techniques imply that there is still a need for improvements. The efficacy of prostate cancer diagnosis is still low, generating under and over diagnoses. High intensity focused ultrasound ablation is an emerging treatment modality, which enables the noninvasive ablation of pathogenic tissue. Clinical trials are being carried out to evaluate its longterm efficacy as a focal treatment for prostate cancer. Successful treatment of prostate cancer using non-invasive modalities is critically dependent on accurate diagnostic means and is greatly benefited by a real-time monitoring system. While magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for prostate imaging, its wider implementation for prostate cancer diagnosis remains prohibitively expensive. Conventional ultrasound is currently limited to guiding biopsy. Elastography techniques are emerging as a promising real-time imaging method, as cancer nodules are usually stiffer than adjacent healthy prostatic tissue. In this paper, a new transurethral approach is proposed, using shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer. A finite-difference time domain model is developed for studying the feasibility of the method, and an inverse problem technique based on genetic algorithms is proposed for reconstructing the location, size and stiffness parameters of the tumour. Preliminary results indicate that the use of shear waves for diagnosis and monitoring ablation of prostate cancer is feasible.

  6. Effect of Vertically Propagating Shear Waves on Seismic Behavior of Circular Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohid Akhlaghi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic design loads for tunnels are characterized in terms of the deformations imposed on the structure by surrounding ground. The free-field ground deformations due to a seismic event are estimated, and the tunnel is designed to accommodate these deformations. Vertically propagating shear waves are the predominant form of earthquake loading that causes the ovaling deformations of circular tunnels to develop, resulting in a distortion of the cross sectional shape of the tunnel lining. In this paper, seismic behavior of circular tunnels has been investigated due to propagation of shear waves in the vertical direction using quasi-static analytical approaches as well as numerical methods. Analytical approaches are based on the closed-form solutions which compute the forces in the lining due to equivalent static ovaling deformations, while the numerical method carries out dynamic, nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis. Based on comparisons made, the accuracy and reliability of the analytical solutions are evaluated and discussed. The results show that the axial forces determined using the analytical approaches are in acceptable agreement with numerical analysis results, while the computed bending moments are less comparable and show significant discrepancies. The differences between the analytical approaches are also investigated and addressed.

  7. Shear wave anisotropy beneath the Andes from the BANJO, SEDA, and PISCO experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, J.; Silver, P. G.; Beck, S.; Wallace, T.; Zandt, G.; Ruppert, S.; Kind, R.; Rudloff, A.

    2000-03-01

    We present the results of a detailed shear wave splitting analysis of data collected by three temporary broadband deployments located in central western South America: the Broadband Andean Joint experiment (BANJO), a 1000-km-long east-west line at 20°S, and the Projecto de Investigacion Sismologica de la Cordillera Occidental (PISCO) and Seismic Exploration of the Deep Altiplano (SEDA), deployed several hunderd kilometers north and south of this line. We determined the splitting parameters ϕ (fast polarization direction) and δt (splitting delay time) for waves that sample the above- and below-slab regions: teleseismic *KS and S, ScS waves from local deep-focus events, as well as S waves from intermediate-focus events that sample only the above-slab region. All but one of the *KS stacks for the BANJO stations show E-W fast directions with δt varying between 0.4 and 1.5 s. However, for *KS recorded at most of the SEDA and PISCO stations, and for local deep-focus S events north and south of BANJO, there is a rotation of ϕ to a more nearly trench parallel direction. The splitting parameters for above-slab paths, determined from events around 200 km deep to western stations, yield small delay times (≤0.3 s) and N-S fast polarization directions. Assuming the anisotropy is limited to the top 400 km of the mantle (olivine stability field), these data suggest the following spatial distribution of anisotropy. For the above-slab component, as one goes from east (where *KS reflects the above-slab component) to west, ϕ changes from E-W to N-S, and delay times are substantially reduced. This change may mark the transition from the Brazilian craton to actively deforming (E-W shortening) Andean mantle. We see no evidence for the strain field expected for either corner flow or shear in the mantle wedge associated with relative plate motion. The small delay times for above-slab paths in the west require the existence of significant, spatially varying below-slab anisotropy to

  8. The Upper Mantle Anisotropy around the Ordos Block in China from Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Mi, N.; Huang, Z.; Xu, M.; Li, H.; Yu, D.

    2010-12-01

    Affected by the India-Eurasia collision and subsequent intrusion of the India plate into the Eurasia plate during the Cenozoic, the western China manifests mainly as intense shortening and uplifting, while the eastern China shows widespread extension caused by the subduction of the western Pacific plate. The Ordos is a stable block lies between the Eastern China and Western China, which is surrounded by active thrust belts and extensional graben systems. Investigations on the uppermantle deformation and flowing pattern beneath the Ordos will help to illuminate how those two different geodynamical processes affect the intracontinental deformation in China. Based on the seismic data from five portable broadband seismic arrays deployed in the southern Ordos from 2004 to 2010, we implemented the technology of Silver and Chan [1991] to investigate the upper mantle anisotropy in this area. Well-recorded SKS and SKKS phases are used to estimate the shear wave splitting parameters. The calculation results show distinct anisotropy in the upper mantle beneath the Ordos area. The anisotropy in different tectonic units gives different characteristics. To the southwest of the Ordos, the orientations of anisotropy are NNW-SSE, which are subparallel to the thrust belt and boundary faults between the Ordos and the Northeast Tibetan Plateau, mapping a clockwise mantle flow induced by the eastward extrusion of the Northeast Tibetan Plateau and deflected by the stable Ordos block. To the south of the Ordos, mantle flow direction is nearly E-W, parallel to the strike-slip direction of the Weihe graben system, indicating an eastward mantle flow from the NE Tibetan plateau to the eastern part of China. To the east of the Ordos, the direction of fast S-wave is changing slowly from NWW-SSE to E-W, perpendicular to the main tectonic direction in Shanxi graben system, showing an extension feature similar to that of the North China. Above results illuminate much information on the mass

  9. Solar wind driving of magnetospheric ULF waves: Pulsations driven by velocity shear at the magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Elkington, S. R.; Wiltberger, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present results from global, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction. These MHD simulations are used to study ultra low frequency (ULF) pulsations in the Earth's magnetosphere driven by shear instabilities at the flanks of the magnetopause. We drive the simulations with idealized, constant solar wind input parameters, ensuring that any discrete ULF pulsations generated in the simulation magnetosphere are not due to fluctuations in the solar wind. The simulations presented in this study are driven by purely southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, changing only the solar wind driving velocity while holding all of the other solar wind input parameters constant. We find surface waves near the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause and show that these waves are generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. We also find that two KH modes are generated near the magnetopause boundary. One mode, the magnetopause KH mode, propagates tailward along the magnetopause boundary. The other mode, the inner KH mode, propagates tailward along the inner edge of the boundary layer (IEBL). We find large vortical structures associated with the inner KH mode that are centered on the IEBL. The phase velocities, wavelengths, and frequencies of the two KH modes are computed. The KH waves are found to be fairly monochromatic with well-defined wavelengths. In addition, the inner and magnetopause KH modes are coupled and lead to a coupled oscillation of the low-latitude boundary layer. The boundary layer thickness, d, is computed and we find maximum wave growth for kd = 0.5-1.0, where k is the wave number, consistent with the linear theory of the KH instability. We comment briefly on the effectiveness of these KH waves in the energization and transport of radiation belt electrons.

  10. Water Waves from General, Time-Dependent Surface Pressure Distribution in the Presence of a Shear Current

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We obtain a general solution for the water waves resulting from a general, time-dependent surface pressure distribution, in the presence of a shear current of uniform vorticity beneath the surface, in three dimensions. Linearized governing equations and boundary conditions including the effects of gravity, a distributed external pressure disturbance, and constant finite depth, are solved analytically, and particular attention is paid to classic initial value problems: an initial pressure impulse and a steady pressure distribution which appears suddenly. In the present paper, good agreement with previous results is demonstrated. We subsequently show both analytically and numerically how transient waves from a suddenly appearing steady pressure distribution vanis for large times, and steady ship waves remain. The transient contribution to wave resistance was derived. The results show that a shear current has significant impact on the transient wave motions, resulting in asymmetry between upstream and downstream...

  11. Rayleigh wave phase velocities, shear wave structure and azimuthal anisotropy beneath southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Forsyth, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    We use normal mode Rayleigh wave phase and amplitude data recorded at the TriNet network in southern California to invert for phase velocities at periods from 25 to 143 s. These phase velocities were used to obtain 3-D S-wave velocity structure in the upper mantle. Phase velocities on the Pacific plate side of the plate boundary are systematically higher than on the North American side, suggesting that seismic velocity contrast between these two plates extends to the upper mantle. In the upper mantle, there is a pronounced low velocity anomaly beneath the Long Valley/Mono Lake region, which has not been observed by previous tomographic studies. This low velocity anomaly is consistent with melting extending to the base of the crust beneath this part of the western Basin and Range province, as suggested based on the composition of late Cenozoic basalts (Wang et al., JGT, 2002). There is a high velocity anomaly under the Transverse Range and a slightly slow velocity anomaly under the Salton Trough, both of which have been observed in previous body and/or surface wave tomographic studies. Assuming uniform anisotropic structure in the whole study area, the strength of anisotropy is about 2.5% at all periods. However, the fast direction varies with period. The fast direction of apparent anisotropy is nearly W-E at periods less than 50 s, consistent with the fast polarization axis of SKS splitting measurements in Southern California. At periods larger than 67s, the fast direction changes to NW-SE, subparallel to the plate boundary. This two-layer azimuthal anisotropy structure is in contrast to the one-layer SKS splitting model for southern California, implying that lateral heterogeneity may affect the apparent anisotropy of long-period surface waves. If anisotropy is allowed to vary laterally in our models, we find a minimum in azimuthal anisotropy in the vicinity of the Transverse Range, suggesting possible more vertical alignment of the olivine a-axis in a region of

  12. Waves from an oscillating point source with a free surface in the presence of a shear current

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2016-01-01

    We investigate analytically the linearized water wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged point source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface. A constant depth is taken into account and the shear flow increases linearly with depth. The surface velocity relative to the source is taken to be zero, so that Doppler effects are absent. We solve the linearized Euler equations to calculate the resulting wave field as well as its far-field asymptotics. For values of the Froude number $F^2=\\omega^2 D/g$ ($\\omega$: oscillation frequency, $D$ submergence depth) below a resonant value $F^2_\\text{res}$ the wave field splits cleanly into separate contributions from regular dispersive propagating waves and non-dispersive "critical waves" resulting from a critical layer-like street of flow structures directly downstream of the source. In the sub-resonant regime the regular waves behave like sheared ring waves while the critical layer wave forms a street of a constant width of order $D\\sqrt{S/\\omega}$ ($S$ i...

  13. Modulation of Atmospheric Nonisothermality and Wind Shears on the Propagation of Seismic Tsunami-Excited Gravity Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Z. G. Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modulation of atmospheric nonisothermality and wind shears on the propagation of seismic tsunami-excited gravity waves by virtue of the vertical wavenumber, m (with its imaginary and real parts, m i and m r , respectively, within a correlated characteristic range of tsunami wave periods in tens of minutes. A generalized dispersion relation of inertio-acoustic-gravity (IAG waves is obtained by relaxing constraints on Hines’ idealized locally-isothermal, shear-free and rotation-free model to accommodate a realistic atmosphere featured by altitude-dependent nonisothermality (up to 100 K/km and wind shears (up to 100 m/s per km. The obtained solutions recover all of the known wave modes below the 200-km altitude where dissipative terms are assumed negligible. Results include: (1 nonisothermality and wind shears divide the atmosphere into a sandwich-like structure of five layers within the 200-km altitude in view of the wave growth in amplitudes: Layer I (0–18 km, Layer II (18–87 km, Layer III (87–125 km, Layer IV (125–175 km and Layer V (175–200 km; (2 in Layers I, III and V, the magnitude of m i is smaller than Hines’ imaginary vertical wavenumber ( m i H , referring to an attenuated growth in the amplitudes of upward propagating waves; on the contrary, in Layers II and IV, the magnitude of m i is larger than that of m i H , providing a pumped growth from Hines’ model; (3 nonisothermality and wind shears enhance m r substantially at an ∼100-km altitude for a tsunami wave period T t s longer than 30 min. While Hines’ model provides that the maximal value of m r 2 is ∼0.05 (1/km 2 , this magnitude is doubled by the nonisothermal effect and quadrupled by the joint nonisothermal and wind shear effect. The modulations are weaker at altitudes outside 80–140-km heights; (4 nonisothermality and wind shears expand the definition of the observation-defined “damping factor”, β: relative to Hines’ classical wave

  14. Shear wave velocity structure in North America from large-scale waveform inversions of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsina, D.; Woodward, R.L.; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    A two-step nonlinear and linear inversion is carried out to map the lateral heterogeneity beneath North America using surface wave data. The lateral resolution for most areas of the model is of the order of several hundred kilometers. The most obvious feature in the tomographic images is the rapid transition between low velocities in the technically active region west of the Rocky Mountains and high velocities in the stable central and eastern shield of North America. The model also reveals smaller-scale heterogeneous velocity structures. A high-velocity anomaly is imaged beneath the state of Washington that could be explained as the subducting Juan de Fuca plate beneath the Cascades. A large low-velocity structure extends along the coast from the Mendocino to the Rivera triple junction and to the continental interior across the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. Its shape changes notably with depth. This anomaly largely coincides with the part of the margin where no lithosphere is consumed since the subduction has been replaced by a transform fault. Evidence for a discontinuous subduction of the Cocos plate along the Middle American Trench is found. In central Mexico a transition is visible from low velocities across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) to high velocities beneath the Yucatan Peninsula. Two elongated low-velocity anomalies beneath the Yellowstone Plateau and the eastern Snake River Plain volcanic system and beneath central Mexico and the TMVB seem to be associated with magmatism and partial melting. Another low-velocity feature is seen at depths of approximately 200 km beneath Florida and the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The inversion technique used is based on a linear surface wave scattering theory, which gives tomographic images of the relative phase velocity perturbations in four period bands ranging from 40 to 150 s. In order to find a smooth reference model a nonlinear inversion based on ray theory is first performed. After

  15. Compressional and Shear Wave Velocities of an Antigorite Rock at 1 GPa up to 550C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, H.; Watanabe, T.; Yoneda, A.

    2008-12-01

    Serpentines play key roles in the water transportation in a subduction zone, the slab-mantle coupling and the generation of slab earthquakes. Geophysical mapping of serpentinized regions is important for understanding of subduction zone processes. There are three major forms of serpentine: antigorite, lizardite and chrysotile. Antigorite is stable up to 600°C at 1 GPa, while lizardite and chrysotile are stable below 300°C. Watanabe et al. (2007) showed that High-T type (containing antigorite) serpentinized peridotites have distinctive higher velocity and lower Poisson's ratio than Low-T type (containing lizardite and/or chrysotile) with the same density. Seismological observations on warm subduction zones like Costa Rica should be interpreted on the basis of antigorite properties. However, our knowledge on elastic properties of antigorite is still lacking. We have measured compressional and shear wave velocities on an antigorite rock at 1 GPa up to 550°C. The rock sample is mostly composed of antigorite (>95 vol.%) and grains are well aligned. The lineation is interpreted to be parallel to crystallographic b-axis, and cleavages normal to c-axis. Measuremens were made with various directions of propagation and oscillation. Reflecting the crystallographic structure, the sample shows strong anisotropy of velocity. The fastest direction of compressional wave is the b-axis direction (8.39±0.04 km/s at 550°C), and the slowest the c-axis direction (5.78±0.06 km/s at 550°C). No significant temperature dependence of Vp is observed in the b-axis direction, while Vp decreases by 3.3% from room temperature to 550°C in the c-axis direction. Shear wave velocity propagating in the c-axis direction at 550°C is 3.15±0.05 km/s and 3.44±0.03 km/s for oscillating parallel to the a- and b-axes, respectively. We can estimate elastic moduli of an antigorite single crystal from measured velocities on the assumption of orthorhombic symmetry of elasticity, and then calculate

  16. Physical modelling of the effect of fractures on compressional and shear wave velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Boris; Lebedev, Maxim; Glubokovskikh, Stanislav; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena; Vialle, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic measurements were performed on a sample of polyester resin permeated by multiple fractures. The samples were prepared by mixing high doses of catalyst, about 7-10 % with the liquid resin base. The mix was then heated in an oven at 60° C for a period of 1 hour. This operation produced many shrinkage cracks varying in size from 8 mm to 20 mm (Sahouryeh et al., 2002). The produced samples were parallelepiped 50 mm x 50 mm in cross-section with height of 100 mm. Micro-CT scanning of the sample reveals many open fractures with apertures 0.2 - 0.4 mm. Elastic properties of the fractured samples were derived from ultrasonic measurements using piezo-electric transducers. These measurements give compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities of 2450 and 1190 m/s, respectively, giving Vp/Vs = 2.04. At the same time the velocities in the intact resin are Vp=2460 and Vs=1504 m/s, respectively, with Vp/Vs = 1.63. Thus we see that the fractures have a negligible effect on the Vp (within the measurement error) but a dramatic effect on Vs (about 20%). This contradicts the common understanding that the effects of dry fractures on Vp and Vs are similar in magnitude. Indeed, assuming very roughly that the distribution of fractures is isotropic, we can estimate the cumulative normal fracture compliance from the difference between shear moduli of the intact and fractured resin to be 0.30 GPa‑1 and fracture density of 0.41. This value can be used to estimate the effective bulk modulus of the fractured material. The corresponding p-wave velocity, Vp = 1860 m/s, is significantly lower that the observed value. The results suggest that an equivalent medium approximation is not applicable in this case, probably due to the fact that the long-wave approximation is inadequate. Indeed the fractures are larger than the wavelength that corresponds to the peak frequencies of the power spectrum of the signal. This suggests a strong influence of diffraction. Furthermore, the

  17. Science Letters: New solutions of shear waves in piezoelectric cubic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZAKHARENKO A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in piezoelectric crystals of classes 43m and 23 is studied. The crystals Tl3VS4 and Tl3TaSe4 (-43m) of the Chalcogenide family and the crystal Bi12TiO20 (23) possess strong piezoelectric effect. Because the surface Bleustein-Gulyaev waves cannot exist in piezoelectric cubic crystals, it was concluded that new solutions for shear-horizontal surface acoustic waves (SH-SAWs) are found in the monocrystals using different electrical boundary conditions such as electrically "short" and "open" free-surfaces for the unique [ 101] direction of wave propagation. For the crystal Tl3TaSe4 with coefficient of electromechanical coupling (CEMC) Ke2=e2/(C×g)~1/3, the phase velocity Vph for the new SH-SAWs can be calculated with the following formula: Vph=(Va+Vt)/2, where Vt is the speed of bulk SH-wave, Vt=Vt4(1+Ke2)1/2, Va=aKVt4, aK=2[Ke(1+Ke2)1/2-Ke2]1/2,and Vt4=(C44/ρ)1/2. It was found that the CEMC K2 evaluation for Tl3TaSe4 gave the value of K2=2(Vf-Vm)/Vf~O.047 (~4.7%),where Vf~848 m/s and Vm~828 m/s are the new-SAW velocities for the free and metallized surfaces, respectively. This high value of K2(Tl3TaSe4) is significantly greater than K2(Tl3VS4)~3% and about five times that of K2(Bi12TiO20).

  18. Middle and upper crust shear-wave velocity structure of the Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Mei; AN Mei-jian

    2007-01-01

    In order to give a more reliable shallow crust model for the Chinese mainland, the present study collected many short-period surface wave data which are better sensitive to shallow earth structures. Different from traditional two-step surface wave tomography, we developed a new linearized surface wave dispersion inversion method to directly get a 3D S-wave velocity model in the second step instead of inverting for 1D S-velocity profile cell by cell. We convert all the regionalized dispersions into linear constraints for a 3D S-velocity model. Checkerboard tests show that this method can give reasonable results. The distribution of the middle- and upper-crust shear-wave velocity of the Chinese mainland in our model is strongly heterogeneous and related to different geotectonic terrains. Low-velocity anomalies delineated very well most of the major sedimentary basins of China. And the variation of velocities at different depths gives an indication of basement depth of the basins. The western Tethyan tectonic domain (on the west of the 95°E longitude) is characterized by low velocity, while the eastern Tethyan domain does not show obvious low velocity. Since petroleum resources often distribute in sedimentary basins where low-velocity anomaly appears, the low velocity anomalies in the western Tethyan domain may indicate a better petroleum prospect than in its eastern counterpart. Besides, low velocity anomaly in the western Tethyan domain and around the Xing'an orogenic belt may be partly caused by high crustal temperature. The weak low-velocity belt along ~105°E longitude corresponds to the N-S strong seismic belt of central China.

  19. Interaction between mountain waves and shear flow in an inertial layer

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Jin-Han

    2016-01-01

    Mountain-generated inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) affect the dynamics of both the atmosphere and the ocean through the mean force they exert as they interact with the flow. A key to this interaction is the presence of critical-level singularities or, when planetary rotation is taken into account, inertial-level singularities, where the Doppler-shifted wave frequency matches the local Coriolis frequency. We examine the role of the latter singularities by studying the steady wavepacket generated by a multiscale mountain in a rotating linear shear flow at low Rossby number. Using a combination of WKB and saddle-point approximations, we provide an explicit description of the form of the wavepacket, of the mean forcing it induces, and of the mean-flow response. We identify two distinguished regimes of wave propagation: Regime I applies far enough from a dominant inertial level for the standard ray-tracing approximation to be valid; Regime II applies to a thin region where the wavepacket structure is controlled by th...

  20. Shear wave splitting in the Isparta Angle, southwestern Turkey: Anisotropic complexity in the mantle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aslihan Şapaş; Aysun Boztepe-G\\ddot{u}ney

    2009-02-01

    This study presents shear wave splitting analysis results observed at ISP (Isparta)broadband station in the Isparta Angle,southwestern Turkey.We selected 21 good quality seismic events out of nearly 357 earthquakes and calculated splitting parameters (polarization direction of fast wave, and delay time between fast and slow waves, ) from mainly SKS and a few SKKS phases of the selected 21 seismic events. Then, we compared calculated splitting parameters at ISP station (56° ≤ ≤ 205° ; 0.37s ≤ t ≤ 4s) with those previously calculated at ANTO (Ankara) and ISK (˙Istanbul)stations (27° ≤ ≤ 59°; 0.6s ≤ t ≤ 2.4s and 26° ≤ ≤ 54° ;0.6s ≤ t ≤ 1.5s) which are located at 230 and 379 km away from ISP station in central and northwestern Turkey, respectively.The backazimuthal variations of the splitting parameters at ISP station indicate a different and complex mantle polarization anisotropy for the Isparta Angle in southwestern Turkey compared to those obtained for Ankara and Īstanbul stations.

  1. Reynolds averaged theory of turbulent shear flows over undulating beds and formation of sand waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sujit K; Dey, Subhasish

    2009-09-01

    Based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and the time-averaged continuity equation, a theory of turbulent shear flow over an undulating sand bed is developed addressing the instability criterion of plane sand beds in free-surface flows leading to the formation of sand waves. In the analysis, the integration of RANS equations leads to generalized Saint Venant equations, in which the time-averaged streamwise velocity is characterized by a power law obtained from turbulence closure, treating the curvilinear streamlines by the Boussinesq approximation. As a consequence, the modified pressure distribution has a departure from the traditionally linear hydrostatic pressure distribution. The instability analysis of a plane sand bed yields the curves of the Froude number versus nondimensional wave number, determining an instability zone for which at lower Froude numbers (less than 0.8), the plane bed becomes unstable with the formation of dunes; whereas at higher Froude numbers, the plane bed becomes unstable with the formation of standing waves and antidunes. For higher Froude numbers, the experimental data for antidunes lie within the unstable zone; while for lower Froude numbers, the same is found for dunes with some experimental scatter. PMID:19905209

  2. Observations of neutral winds, wind shears, and wave structure during a sporadic-E/QP event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Tsunoda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The second Sporadic E Experiment over Kyushu (SEEK-2 was carried out on 3 August 2002, during an active sporadic-E event that also showed quasi-periodic (QP echoes. Two rockets were launched into the event from Kagoshima Space Center in southern Japan 15 min apart. Both carried a suite of instruments, but the second rocket also released a trimethyl aluminum (TMA trail to measure the neutral winds and turbulence structure. In a number of earlier measurements in similar conditions, large winds and shears that were either unstable or close to instability were observed in the altitude range where the ionization layer occurred. The SEEK-2 wind measurements showed similar vertical structure, but unlike earlier experiments, there was a significant difference between the up-leg and down-leg wind profiles. In addition, wave or billow-like fluctuations were evident in the up-leg portion of the trail, while the lower portion of the down-leg trail was found to have extremely strong turbulence that led to a rapid break-up of the trail. The large east-west gradient in the winds and the strong turbulence have not been observed before. The wind profiles and shears, as well as the qualitative characteristics of the strong turbulence are presented, along with a discussion of the implications of the dynamical features. Keywords. Ionosphere (Mid-latitude ionosphere; Ionospheric irregularities; Electric field and currents

  3. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, K. J.; Ormachea, J.; McAleavey, S. A.; Wood, R. W.; Carroll-Nellenback, J. J.; Miller, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure.

  4. Ion waves driven by shear flow in a relativistic degenerate astrophysical plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KHAN SHABBIR A; BAKHTIAR-UD-DIN; ILYAS MUHAMMAD; WAZIR ZAFAR

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the existence and propagation of low-frequency (in comparison to ion cyclotron frequency) electrostatic ion waves in highly dense inhomogeneous astrophysical magnetoplasma comprising relativistic degenerate electrons and non-degenerate ions. The dispersion equation is obtained by Fourier analysis under mean-field quantum hydrodynamics approximationfor various limits of the ratio of rest mass energy to Fermi energy of electrons, relevant to ultrarelativistic, weakly-relativistic and non-relativistic regimes. It is found that the system admits an oscillatory instability under certain condition in the presence of velocity shear parallel to ambient magnetic field. The dispersive role of plasma density and magnetic field is also discussed parametrically in the scenario of dense and degenerate astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  6. Mantle Flow Implications across Easter and Southern Africa from Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.; Bagley, B. C.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D.; van der Meijde, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present new shear wave splitting results from broadband seismic stations in Botswana and Namibia, and combine them with previous results from stations in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Angola to further examine the pattern of seismic anisotropy across southern Africa. The new results come from stations in northern Namibia and Botswana, which help to fill in large gaps in data coverage. Our preliminary results show that fast polarization directions overall trend in a NE orientation. The most noticeable measurements that deviate from this pattern are located around the Archean Tanzania Craton in eastern Africa. The general NE pattern of fast polarization directions is attributed to mantle flow linked to the African superplume. Smaller scale variations from this general direction can be explained by shape anisotropy in the lithosphere in magmatic regions in the East African rift system and to fossil anisotropy in the Precambrian lithosphere.

  7. Variability and origin of seismic anisotropy across eastern Canada: Evidence from shear wave splitting measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, F. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Forte, A. M.; Hobbs, T. E.; Calvel, A.; Gonzalez-Monteza, A.; Schow, B.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of seismic anisotropy in continental regions are frequently interpreted with respect to past tectonic processes, preserved in the lithosphere as "fossil" fabrics. Models of the present-day sublithospheric flow (often using absolute plate motion as a proxy) are also used to explain the observations. Discriminating between these different sources of seismic anisotropy is particularly challenging beneath shields, whose thick (≥200 km) lithospheric roots may record a protracted history of deformation and strongly influence underlying mantle flow. Eastern Canada, where the geological record spans ˜3 Ga of Earth history, is an ideal region to address this issue. We use shear wave splitting measurements of core phases such as SKS to define upper mantle anisotropy using the orientation of the fast-polarization direction ϕ and delay time δt between fast and slow shear wave arrivals. Comparison with structural trends in surface geology and aeromagnetic data helps to determine the contribution of fossil lithospheric fabrics to the anisotropy. We also assess the influence of sublithospheric mantle flow via flow directions derived from global geodynamic models. Fast-polarization orientations are generally ENE-WSW to ESE-WNW across the region, but significant lateral variability in splitting parameters on a ≤100 km scale implies a lithospheric contribution to the results. Correlations with structural geologic and magnetic trends are not ubiquitous, however, nor are correlations with geodynamically predicted mantle flow directions. We therefore consider that the splitting parameters likely record a combination of the present-day mantle flow and older lithospheric fabrics. Consideration of both sources of anisotropy is critical in shield regions when interpreting splitting observations.

  8. Shear wave elastography for detection of prostate cancer: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sung Min; Kim, Sang Youn; Cho, Jeong Yeon; KIm, Seung Hyup [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To assess the diagnostic value of shear wave elastography (SWE) for prostate cancer detection. In this retrospective study, 87 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen > 4 ng/mL and abnormal digital rectal examination) underwent a protocol-based systematic 12-core biopsy followed by targeted biopsy at hypoechoic areas on grey-scale ultrasound. Prior to biopsy, SWE was performed by placing two circular 5 mm-sized regions of interest (ROIs) along the estimated biopsy tract in each sector and one ROI for hypoechoic lesions. SWE parameters, S (mean stiffness) and R (mean stiffness ratio), were calculated and compared regarding different histopathologic tissues and their accuracy for diagnosing prostate cancer was analyzed. SWE parameters were correlated with Gleason score and were compared between indolent (< 8) and aggressive (≥ 8) tissues in prostate cancer patients. Prostate cancer was detected in 7.5% of 1058 cores in 29.9% of 87 patients. Seven (43.8%) of 16 hypoechoic lesions were confirmed as prostate cancer. SWE parameters were significantly different among the histopathologic entities (p < 0.001). Prostate cancer was stiffer than benign tissues (p ≤ 0.003). Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic curve area for diagnosing cancer were 43%, 80.8%, and 0.599, respectively, for a cutoff of S > 43.9 kPa and 60.8%, 66.4%, and 0.653, respectively, for R > 3. Both, S and R showed a significant correlation with Gleason score (r ≥ 0.296, p ≤ 0.008) and were significantly different between indolent and aggressive prostate cancer (p ≤ 0.006). Shear wave elastographic parameters are significantly different between prostate cancer and benign prostate tissue and correlate with Gleason score.

  9. Assessment of impact factors on shear wave based liver stiffness measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wenwu; Lu, Qiang; Quan, Jierong; Ma, Lin; Luo, Yan

    2013-02-01

    Shear wave based ultrasound elastographies have been implemented as non-invasive methods for quantitative assessment of liver stiffness. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies that have investigated impact factors on liver stiffness measurement (LSM). Moreover, standard examination protocols for LSM are still lacking in clinical practice. Our study aimed to assess the impact factors on LSM to establish its standard examination protocols in clinical practice. We applied shear wave based elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) in 21 healthy individuals to determine the impact of liver location (segments I-VIII), breathing phase (end-inspiration and end-expiration), probe position (sub-costal and inter-costal position) and examiner on LSM. Additional studies in 175 healthy individuals were also performed to determine the influence of gender and age on liver stiffness. We found significant impact of liver location on LSM, while the liver segment V displayed the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 21%). The liver stiffness at the end-expiration was significantly higher than that at the end-inspiration (P=2.1E-05). The liver stiffness was 8% higher in men than in women (3.8 ± 0.7 kPa vs. 3.5 ± 0.4 kPa, P=0.0168). In contrast, the liver stiffness was comparable in the different probe positions, examiners and age groups (P>0.05). In conclusion, this study reveals significant impact from liver location, breathing phase and gender on LSM, while furthermore strengthening the necessity for the development of standard examination protocols on LSM. PMID:23116805

  10. Ultrasound and Point Shear Wave Elastography in Livers of Patients with Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjelle, Anders Batman; Mulabecirovic, Anesa; Hausken, Trygve; Havre, Roald Flesland; Gilja, Odd Helge; Vesterhus, Mette

    2016-09-01

    Point shear wave elastography (pSWE) is an ultrasound-based method for non-invasive quantification of liver fibrosis. The objective of this study was to explore liver pSWE in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) for assessment of fibrosis. Fifty-five non-transplant patients with PSC (38 males, 17 females; mean age: 46.4 y) were included and compared with 24 matched controls. Median (range) PSC duration was 8.1 (0-33) y. Ultrasonographic scanning followed by liver stiffness measurement by pSWE was performed using a conventional ultrasound system (Philips iU22). Signs of liver fibrosis on B-mode were identified in 21 patients (38%). Splenomegaly was found in 19 patients (35%) and ascites in two patients (4%). Successful pSWE measurements were achieved in the right liver lobe of all individuals and in the left liver lobe of 36 patients (65.5%). PSC patients had significantly higher median shear wave velocity (SWV) than controls in the right liver (median [range] SWV 1.26 [0.73-2.57] m/s vs. 1.09 [0.88-1.25] m/s, p liver lobe and spleen did not differ between PSC patients and controls. Our findings indicate that PSC patients have increased median SWV, indicating more fibrosis compared with controls; however, a wide range of SWV values were obtained among PSC patients, possibly reflecting the various stages in disease development. PMID:27262519

  11. Reynolds stresses and mean fields generated by pure waves: applications to shear flows and convection in a rotating shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaut, E.; Lebranchu, Y.; Simitev, R.; Busse, F. H.

    A general reformulation of the Reynolds stresses created by two-dimensional waves breaking a translational or a rotational invariance is described. This reformulation emphasizes the importance of a geometrical factor: the slope of the separatrices of the wave flow. Its physical relevance is illustrated by two model systems: waves destabilizing open shear flows; and thermal Rossby waves in spherical shell convection with rotation. In the case of shear-flow waves, a new expression of the Reynolds-Orr amplification mechanism is obtained, and a good understanding of the form of the mean pressure and velocity fields created by weakly nonlinear waves is gained. In the case of thermal Rossby waves, results of a three-dimensional code using no-slip boundary conditions are presented in the nonlinear regime, and compared with those of a two-dimensional quasi-geostrophic model. A semi-quantitative agreement is obtained on the flow amplitudes, but discrepancies are observed concerning the nonlinear frequency shifts. With the quasi-geostrophic model we also revisit a geometrical formula proposed by Zhang to interpret the form of the zonal flow created by the waves, and explore the very low Ekman-number regime. A change in the nature of the wave bifurcation, from supercritical to subcritical, is found.

  12. Explicit use of the Biot coefficient in predicting shear-wave velocity of water-saturated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the shear-wave (S-wave) velocity is important in seismic modelling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration and engineering applications. Under the low-frequency approximation, the classical Biot-Gassmann theory relates the Biot coefficient to the bulk modulus of water-saturated sediments. If the Biot coefficient under in situ conditions can be estimated, the shear modulus or the S-wave velocity can be calculated. The Biot coefficient derived from the compressional-wave (P-wave) velocity of water-saturated sediments often differs from and is less than that estimated from the S-wave velocity, owing to the interactions between the pore fluid and the grain contacts. By correcting the Biot coefficients derived from P-wave velocities of water-saturated sediments measured at various differential pressures, an accurate method of predicting S-wave velocities is proposed. Numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agreewell with measured velocities. ?? 2006 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  13. No steady water waves of small amplitude are supported by a shear flow with still free surface

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, Vladimir; Kuznetsov, Nikolay

    2012-01-01

    The two-dimensional free-boundary problem describing steady gravity waves with vorticity on water of finite depth is considered. It is proved that no small-amplitude waves are supported by a horizontal shear flow whose free surface is still in a coordinate frame such that the flow is time-independent in it. The class of vorticity distributions for which such flows exist includes all positive constant distributions, as well as linear and quadric ones with arbitrary positive coefficients.

  14. Three-dimensional shear wave velocity structure in the Atlantic upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Esther Kezia Candace

    Oceanic lithosphere constitutes the upper boundary layer of the Earth's convecting mantle. Its structure and evolution provide a vital window on the dynamics of the mantle and important clues to how the motions of Earth's surface plates are coupled to convection in the mantle below. The three-dimensional shear-velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Atlantic Ocean is investigated to gain insight into processes that drive formation of oceanic lithosphere. Travel times are measured for approximately 10,000 fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves, in the period range 30-130 seconds, traversing the Atlantic basin. Paths with >30% of their length through continental upper mantle are excluded to maximize sensitivity to the oceanic upper mantle. The lateral distribution of Rayleigh wave phase velocity in the Atlantic upper mantle is explored with two approaches. One, phase velocity is allowed to vary only as a function of seafloor age. Two, a general two-dimensional parameterization is utilized in order to capture perturbations to age-dependent structure. Phase velocity shows a strong dependence on seafloor age, and removing age-dependent velocity from the 2-D maps highlights areas of anomalously low velocity, almost all of which are proximal to locations of hotspot volcanism. Depth-dependent variations in vertically-polarized shear velocity (Vsv) are determined with two sets of 3-D models: a layered model that requires constant VSV in each depth layer, and a splined model that allows VSV to vary continuously with depth. At shallow depths (˜75 km) the seismic structure shows the expected dependence on seafloor age. At greater depths (˜200 km) high-velocity lithosphere is found only beneath the oldest seafloor; velocity variations beneath younger seafloor may result from temperature or compositional variations within the asthenosphere. The age-dependent phase velocities are used to constrain temperature in the mantle and show that, in contrast to previous results for

  15. Identification and analysis of shear waves recorded by three-component OBSs in northeastern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minghui Zhao; Xuelin Qiu; Shaohong Xia; Ping Wang; Kanyuan Xia; Huilong Xu

    2008-01-01

    Structure models associated with P- and S-wave velocities contain considerable amount of information on lithology and geophysical properties, which can be used to better understand the complexity of the deep crustal structure. However, records of converted shear waves are less due to the speciality of seismic survey at sea and the rigorous generated conditions. The study on shear waves has always been a weakness for studying the deep crustal structures of South China Sea (SCS). In this paper, eleven three-component OBSs were deployed along the Profile OBS-2001 in northeastern SCS. After the data processing of polarization and band-pass filter, converted Swave phases were identified in the radical component records of nine OBSs. Taking the OBS7 as an example, identification and analysis of converted shear waves were presented and discussed in detail. A few phase groups, such as PwSc, PgSs, PnSc, PmS, and PwSn, were found coming from the deep crust or Moho interface by simple theoretical model calculation and ray-tracing simulation. The results not only provide the underlying basis for studies of S-wave velocity structure and Poisson's ratio structure, but also reveal the relationship between crustal petrology and seismology, which will be of importance for making full use of S-wave information in the future.

  16. Rossby-Khantadze Electromagnetic Planetary Waves Driven by Sheared Zonal Winds in the E-Layer Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T.

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations are carried out for planetary scale [ >1000 km] electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a sheared zonal flow in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer. A variety of sheared flow profiles are studied. We shown that the nonlinear dynamics with the sheared zonal flows provides an energy source into the vortex structures. The energy transfer through the Reynolds stress tensor produces growth of the stable vortices under a variety of conditions. The energy accumulation breaks the vortex structure into multiple species according to the non-uniformity of profile of the external zonal shear flows. S. Futatani, W. Horton, T. D. Kaladze, Phys. Plasmas 20, 102903 (2013). T. D. Kaladze, L. Z. Kahlon, W. Horton. O Pokhotelov, and O. Onishenchenko, EPL 106, A05302 (2014).

  17. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  18. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futatani, S. [Department of Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (CASE), Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona (Spain); Horton, W. [Applied Research Laboratory and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Kahlon, L. Z. [Department of Physics, Forman Christian College, Ferozepur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Kaladze, T. D. [Physics Department, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); I. Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 2 University str., 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  19. Shear wave splitting from local events beneath the Ryukyu arc : Trench-parallel anisotropy in the mantle wedge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, Maureen D.; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2006-01-01

    We present shear wave splitting measurements from local slab earthquakes at eight seismic stations of the Japanese F-net array located in the Ryukyu arc. We obtained high-quality splitting measurements for 70 event-station pairs and found that the majority of the measured fast directions were parall

  20. Bulk Shear-Wave Transduction Experiments Using Magnetostrictive Transducers with a Thin Fe-Co Alloy Patch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the results of many studies have clarified the successful performance of magnetostrictive transducers in which a ferromagnetic patch is used for the transduction of guided shear waves; this is because a thin ferromagnetic patch with strong magnetostriction is very useful for generating and detecting shear wave. This investigation deals with bulk shear wave transduction by means of magnetostriction; on the other hand, the existing studies have been focused on guided shear waves. A modular transducer was developed: this transducer comprised a coil, magnets, and a thin ferromagnetic patch that was made of Fe-Co alloy. Some experiments were conducted to verify the performance of the developed transducer. Radiation directivity pattern of the developed transducer was obtained, and a test to detect the damage on a side drill hole of a steel block specimen was carried out. From the results of these tests, the good performance of the transducer for nondestructive testing was verified on the basis of the signal-to-noise ratio and narrow beam directivity

  1. Drift wave spectra and enhanced transport in plasmas with magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the potentialities of nonlinear scattering of waves off ions as a stabilizing mechanism of drift turbulence in plasmas with magnetic shear. The failure of the random phase averaging procedure and the local character of the interaction in frequency space are the starting point of a reformulation of weak turbulence theory. In particular, the usual integral equation is transformed into a system of two first order differential equations coupling the spectra I(ksub(theta)) and I(ksub(theta)-1). The density fluctuation spectrum, which is obtained analytically, has some desirable features in reference to experiment. Firstly, |eta tilde|ksub(theta)2 behaves asymptotically (ksub(theta) → infinity) as ksub(theta)-4; secondly, the high mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) >1) contribute about 80% to the cross field diffusion while the low mode numbers (ksub(theta)asub(s) <1) provide about 80% of the squared density fluctuation. In discussing the transport properties we emphasize the possible role of anomalous heat transfer from electrons to ions. The spectrum of convective cells formed in the interaction of drift waves is obtained; their contribution to the diffusion is found to be negligible, at least in the plasma core. (author)

  2. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng; Julià, Jordi; Zahran, Hani; Mai, P. Martin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  3. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Zheng

    2016-05-11

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  4. Analytical study of dispersion relations for shear horizontal wave propagation in plates with periodic stubs

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-08-01

    The coupled mode theory with coupling of diffraction modes and waveguide modes is usually used on the calculations of transmission and reflection coefficients for electromagnetic waves traveling through periodic sub-wavelength structures. In this paper, I extend this method to derive analytical solutions of high-order dispersion relations for shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in elastic plates with periodic stubs. In the long wavelength regime, the explicit expression is obtained by this theory and derived specially by employing an effective medium. This indicates that the periodical stubs are equivalent to an effective homogenous layer in the long wavelength. Notably, in the short wavelength regime, high-order diffraction modes in the plate and high-order waveguide modes in the stubs are considered with modes coupling to compute the band structures. Numerical results of the coupled mode theory fit pretty well with the results of the finite element method (FEM). In addition, the band structures\\' evolution with the height of the stubs and the thickness of the plate shows clearly that the method can predict well the Bragg band gaps, locally resonant band gaps and high-order symmetric and anti-symmetric thickness-twist modes for the periodically structured plates. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Improving the shear wave velocity structure beneath Bucharest (Romania) using ambient vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Elena Florinela; Michel, Clotaire; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Radulian, Mircea; Balan, Florin Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Large earthquakes from the intermediate-depth Vrancea seismic zone are known to produce in Bucharest ground motion characterized by predominant long periods. This phenomenon has been interpreted as the combined effect of both seismic source properties and site response of the large sedimentary basin. The thickness of the unconsolidated Quaternary deposits beneath the city is more than 200 m, the total depth of sediments is more than 1000 m. Complex basin geometry and the low seismic wave velocities of the sediments are primarily responsible for the large amplification and long duration experienced during earthquakes. For a better understanding of the geological structure under Bucharest, a number of investigations using non-invasive methods have been carried out. With the goal to analyse and extract the polarization and dispersion characteristics of the surface waves, ambient vibrations and low-magnitude earthquakes have been investigated using single station and array techniques. Love and Rayleigh dispersion curves (including higher modes), Rayleigh waves ellipticity and SH-wave fundamental frequency of resonance (f0SH) have been inverted simultaneously to estimate the shear wave velocity structure under Bucharest down to a depth of about 8 km. Information from existing borehole logs was used as prior to reduce the non-uniqueness of the inversion and to constrain the shallow part of the velocity model (Physics and by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology during 10 months in the period 2003-2004. The array consisted of 32 three-component seismological stations, deployed in the urban area of Bucharest and adjacent zones. The large size of the array and the broad-band nature of the available sensors gave us the possibility to characterize the surface wave dispersion at very low frequencies (0.05-1 Hz) using frequency-wavenumber techniques. This is essential to explore and resolve the deeper portions of the basin. The horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (H/V) curves

  6. PICASSO: Shear velocities in the Western Mediterranean from Rayleigh Wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Mediterranean has been affected by complex subduction and slab rollback, simultaneously with compression due to African-European convergence. The deformed region occupies a wide area from the intra-continental Atlas mountain belt in Morocco to the southern Iberian Massif in Spain. Evolutionary models of the Western Mediterranean invoke extensive slab rollback and compression in the Cenozoic, as well as likely upper mantle delamination scenarios during formation of the Alboran domain, the Betics, Rif, and Atlas Mountains. PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) is a multidisciplinary, international investigation of the Alboran System and surrounding areas. In this study we have analyzed data from the 95 PICASSO broadband stations with data from the Spanish IberArray and Siberia Array in Spain and Morocco, the University of Muenster array in the Atlas Mountains and the permanent Spanish and Portuguese networks. We present Rayleigh wave tomography results made from 168 teleseimic events recorded by 237 stations from April 2009 to April 2011. We measured Rayleigh phase velocities using the two-plane-wave method to remove complications due to multi-pathing, and finite-frequency kernels to improve lateral resolution. Phase velocities were then inverted for shear velocity structure on a grid of 0.5 by 0.5 degree to form a well-resolved 3D shear velocity model to 230 km depth. Our results show low S-velocities (2.9 km/s) in the crust beneath the Gibraltar Strait. Low upper mantle S-velocities are mapped beneath the Middle and High Atlas at ~60 km depth suggesting an elevated asthenosphere beneath these young mountain belts, in agreement with receiver functions analysis (Thurner et al, this session). Beneath the Western Alboran Sea, upper-mantle velocities change laterally from high velocities (>4.5 km/s) in the east to lower velocities to the west (~4.3 km/s). The Rayleigh wave tomography is consistent with P-tomography that

  7. Comparison of Non-Axisymmetric Dynamic Response of Imperfectly Bonded Buried Orthotropic Thick and Thin Fluid filled Cylindrical Shell due to Incident Shear Wave (SH Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Singh Rajput,

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effect of fluid presence on the non-axisymmetric dynamic response of imperfectly bonded buried orthotropic thick and thin fluid filled pipeline due to incident horizontal shear wave. In the thin shell theory the effect of shear deformation and rotary inertia is not considered. The pipeline has been modeled as an infinite cylindrical shell imperfectly bonded to surrounding. An approach similar to Dwivedi and Upadhyay (1989 has been followed wherein a thin layer is assumed between the shell and the surrounding medium (soil such that this layer possesses the properties of stiffness and damping both. The degree of imperfection of the bond is varied by changing the stiffness and the damping parameters of this layer. Although a general formulation including P-, SV- and SHwave excitations has been presented, numerical results are given for the case of incident SH-waves only. When it is excited by seismic-wave there are two types of soil movements that take place at the time of earthquake both around the epicenter. One is vertical movement (up and down of the soil and due to this movement the shearwave (S-V and S-H is developed on the surface of the pipe and other is horizontal movement (compressive or extend of the soil due to this the longitudinal wave or pressure wave or P-wave is developed on the surface of the pipe. Since it is not possible to condense the results for P-, SV- and SH-waves into one paper, in this paper theresults concerning only the shear waves (SH Wave are to be presented..With increasing urban population and its dependence on utility services, dynamic response of pipelines to seismic excitation has become a subject of importance.

  8. Reflection and Transmission Coefficients for an Incident Plane Shear Wave at an Interface Separating Two Dissimilar Poroelastic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2014-09-01

    Using Biot's poroelasticity theory, we derive expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients for a plane shear wave incident on an interface separating two different poroelastic solids. The coefficients are formulated as a function of the wave incidence angle, frequency and rock properties. Specific cases calculated include the boundary between water-saturated sand and water-saturated sandstone and the gas-water interface in sand. The results show a very different interface response to that of an incident P wave. Plane SV wave incidence does not significantly excite the Biot slow P wave if the frequency of the wave is below the transition frequency. Above this frequency, an incident plane SV wave can generate a mode-converted slow Biot P wave which is actually a normal propagating wave and not highly attenuating as in the usual (diffusive) case. For an incident SV wave onto a gas-water interface, even at very high frequency, there is no significant Biot second P wave produced. For small incident angles, the gas-water interface is essentially transparent. With increasing angles, there can arise an unusual "definitive angle" in the reflection/transmission coefficient curves which is related to the change of fluid viscosity on both sides of the interface and provides a possible new means for underground fluid assessment.

  9. Performance of shear wave elastography for differentiation of benign and malignant solid breast masses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiling Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To perform a meta-analysis assessing the ability of shear wave elastography (SWE to identify malignant breast masses. METHODS: PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the ISI Web of Knowledge were searched for studies evaluating the accuracy of SWE for identifying malignant breast masses. The diagnostic accuracy of SWE was evaluated according to sensitivity, specificity, and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC curves. An analysis was also performed according to the SWE mode used: supersonic shear imaging (SSI and the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI technique. The clinical utility of SWE for identifying malignant breast masses was evaluated using analysis of Fagan plot. RESULTS: A total of 9 studies, including 1888 women and 2000 breast masses, were analyzed. Summary sensitivities and specificities were 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.94 and 0.82 (95% CI, 0.75-0.87 by SSI and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.81-0.94 and 0.91 (95% CI, 0.84-0.95 by ARFI, respectively. The HSROCs for SSI and ARFI were 0.92 (95% CI, 0.90-0.94 and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93-0.97, respectively. SSI and ARFI were both very informative, with probabilities of 83% and 91%, respectively, for correctly differentiating between benign and malignant breast masses following a "positive" measurement (over the threshold value and probabilities of disease as low as 10% and 11%, respectively, following a "negative" measurement (below the threshold value when the pre-test probability was 50%. CONCLUSIONS: SWE could be used as a good identification tool for the classification of breast masses.

  10. A threshold value in Shear Wave elastography to rule out malignant thyroid nodules: A reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyrieres, J.-B., E-mail: jbveyrieres@hotmail.fr [Département d’imagerie médicale, Hôpital d’Instruction des Armées St Anne, Bd Saint Anne, BP 20545 Toulon cedex (France); Albarel, F., E-mail: frederique.albarel@ap-hm.fr [Département médical d’endocrinologie et des pathologies métaboliques, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Lombard, J. Vaillant, E-mail: Josiane.vaillant@ap-hm.fr [Département d’imagerie médicale, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Berbis, J., E-mail: Julie.berbis@ap-hm.fr [Département de santé publique, Université de Médecine, 27, Bd Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); Sebag, F., E-mail: frederic.sebag@ap-hm.fr [Département de chirurgie des pathologies endocriniennes et métaboliques, Hôpital Universitaire la Timone, Assistance publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 rue Saint Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To evaluate hability of a threshold value in ShearWave™ elastography to rule out malignant thyroid nodules while studying its pertinence in association with morphological signs. Equipment and methods: 148 patients (110 women and 38 men; 52.5 y.o. 15.8) referred for surgery of thyroid nodules underwent standard ultrasound as well as elastography. Characteristics of the morphological signs and maximum elastographic index were calculated in relation to histology. Association of morphological signs alone and then of elastography was also evaluated. One hundred and fifty one nodules were studied on a double-blind basis. Results: 297 nodules were studied. Thirty-five cancers were detected (11.6%). Elastographic index was higher in malignant nodules (115 kPa 60.4) than in benign nodules (41 kPa 25.8) (p < 0.001, Student's t-test). Cut off value of 66 kPa was the best to discriminate malignant nodules with a sensitivity of 80% (CI 95%, 62.5; 90.9) and a specificity of 90.5% (CI 95%, 86.1; 93.6) (p = 0.0001). Association of elastography and morphological ultrasound signs presented a sensitivity of 97% (CI 95%, 83.3; 99.8) and a negative predictive value of 99.5% (CI 95%, 95.6; 99.9). Interobserver reproducibility proved to be excellent with an interclass correlation of 0.97 (CI 95%, 0.96; 0.98) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The 66 kPa threshold in Shear Wave elastography is the best ultrasound sign to rule out malignant thyroid nodules. The method is simple, quantitative, reproducible and usable in the study of nodules larger than 3 cm. Progress must still be made in the study of calcified nodules and follicular tumors.

  11. Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamir, Dilekcan; Abgarmi, Bizhan; Arda Özacar, A.

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of Seismic Anisotropy Across Central Anatolia by Shear Wave Splitting Dilekcan Pamir, Bizhan Abgarmi, A. Arda Özacar Department of Geological Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU), Dumlupinar Bulvari 1, 06800 Ankara, Turkey Central Anatolia holds the key to connect the theories about the ongoing tectonic escape, the African Plate subduction along Cyprus Arc and the indenter-style collision of Arabian Plate along Bitlis Suture. However, the shear wave splitting measurements which are needed to characterize seismic anisotropy are very sparse in the region. Recently, seismic data recorded by national seismic networks (KOERI, ERI-DAD) with dense coverage, provided a unique opportunity to analyze the effect of present slab geometry (slab tears, slab break-off) on mantle deformation and test different models of anisotropy forming mechanisms. In this study, the anisotropic structure beneath the Central Anatolia is investigated via splitting of SKS and SKKS phases recorded at 46 broadband seismic stations. Our measurements yielded 1171 well-constrained splitting and 433 null results. Overall, the region displays NE-SW trending fast splitting directions and delay times on the order of 1 sec. On the other hand, a large number of stations which are spatially correlated with Cyprus Slab, Neogene volcanism and major tectonic structures present significant back azimuthal variations on splitting parameters that cannot be explained by one-layered anisotropy with horizontal symmetry. Thus, we have modeled anisotropy for two-layered structures using a forward approach and identified NE-SW trending fast splitting directions with delay times close to 1 sec at the lower layer and N-S, NW-SE trending fast splitting with limited time delays (0.1 - 0.3 sec) at the upper layer. Fast directions and delay times of the lower layer are similar to one-layered anisotropy and parallel or sub-parallel to the absolute plate motions which favors asthenospheric flow model

  12. A method for inversion of layered shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy from Rayleigh wave dispersion using the Neighborhood Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huajian Yao

    2015-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy provides important constraints on deformation patterns of Earth's material.Rayleigh wave dispersion data with azimuthal anisotropy can be used to invert for depth-dependent shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy,therefore reflecting depth-varying deformation patterns in the crust and upper mantle.In this study,we propose a two-step method that uses the Neighborhood Algorithm (NA) for the point-wise inversion of depth-dependent shear wavespeeds and azimuthal anisotropy from Rayleigh wave azimuthally anisotropic dispersion data.The first step employs the NA to estimate depthdependent Vsv (or the elastic parameter L) as well as their uncertainties from the isotropic part Rayleigh wave dispersion data.In the second step,we first adopt a difference scheme to compute approximate Rayleigh-wave phase velocity sensitivity kernels to azimuthally anisotropic parameters with respect to the velocity model obtained in the first step.Then we perform the NA to estimate the azi.muthally anisotropic parameters Gc/L and Gs/L at depths separately from the corresponding cosine and sine terms of the azimuthally anisotropic dispersion data.Finally,we compute the depth-dependent magnitude and fast polarization azimuth of shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy.The use of the global search NA and Bayesian analysis allows for more reliable estimates of depth-dependent shear wavespeeds and azimuthal anisotropy as well as their uncertainties.We illustrate the inversion method using the azimuthally anisotropic dispersion data in SE Tibet,where we find apparent changes of fast axes of shear wavespeed azimuthal anisotropy between the crust and uppermost mantle.

  13. The Temporal Evolution of Shear wave Splitting and Geoelectrical Anisotropy During Yongdeng Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruan Aiguo; Li Qinghe; Rong Dailu; Zhao Heyun

    2001-01-01

    The temporal evolution of shear-wave splitting and geoelectrical anisotropy of earth media during the preparation and occurrence of the Yongdeng Ms5.8 earthquake is studied based on the digital seismic data and continuous magnetotelluric (MT) records. The results show that the direction of polarization of the fast S-wave gradually rotated from north by east to north by west before the Yongdeng earthquake and returned to north by east after the earthquake.Moreover, the time delay between the fast S wave and slow S wave increased to the largest until the earthquake occurred. On the other hand, the directions of geoelectrical principal axes also changed before earthquake, and exhibited identical characteristics in the frequency domain. The direction of the axis (ρxy), which was originally perpendicular to the fault near station, varied from N17°E to N15°W before earthquake, and returned to north by east after the earthquake. Correspondingly, the change of ρxy was most obvious in the period range of 160 s to 226 s, but the variation of ρyx was less obvious. The focal mechanism solution of the earthquake showed that the direction of P-axis was N15°W. Conclusions are: (1) The fast Swave polarization, one of the geoelectrical principal axes and the P-axis were in agreement in orientation during earthquake preparation, which is the result of the alignment of EDA cracks;(2) The fact that the geoelectrical axes identically varied with frequency demonstrated that EDA is really widespread in the crust; (3) The variation of MT apparent resistivity also showed the existence of anisotropy and has its own features: The static anisotropy of resistivity is controlled by the tectonic conditions of the station, while the dynamic anisotropy is caused and affected by the seismic stress field; The resistivity along the axis parallel to the P-axis showed the most obvious variation, while the difference in variation with frequency shows that the variation of resistivity depends not

  14. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  15. Deep learning based classification of breast tumors with shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Wei; Suo, Jingfeng; Wang, Congzhi; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to build a deep learning (DL) architecture for automated extraction of learned-from-data image features from the shear-wave elastography (SWE), and to evaluate the DL architecture in differentiation between benign and malignant breast tumors. We construct a two-layer DL architecture for SWE feature extraction, comprised of the point-wise gated Boltzmann machine (PGBM) and the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). The PGBM contains task-relevant and task-irrelevant hidden units, and the task-relevant units are connected to the RBM. Experimental evaluation was performed with five-fold cross validation on a set of 227 SWE images, 135 of benign tumors and 92 of malignant tumors, from 121 patients. The features learned with our DL architecture were compared with the statistical features quantifying image intensity and texture. Results showed that the DL features achieved better classification performance with an accuracy of 93.4%, a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.947. The DL-based method integrates feature learning with feature selection on SWE. It may be potentially used in clinical computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer.

  16. Does motion affect liver stiffness estimates in shear wave elastography? Phantom and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Chami, Linda; Correas, Jean Michel; Lefort, Muriel; Lucidarme, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of free-breathing (FB) vs. Apnea on Shear-wave elastography (SWE) measurements. Quantitative liver-stiffness measurements were obtained during FB and Apnea for 97 patients with various body-morphologies and liver textures. Quality indexes of FB and Apnea elasticity maps (percentage of non-filling (PNF), temporal (TV) and spatial (SV) variabilities) were computed. SWE measurements were also obtained from an homogeneous phantom at rest and during a mechanically-induced motion. Liver-stiffness values estimated from FB and Apnea acquisitions were correlated, particularly for homogeneous livers (r=0.76, PFB values were consistently 20-25% lower than Apnea ones (PFB also systematically resulted in degradation of TV (PFB measurements are highly correlated, although FB data quality is degraded compared to Apnea and estimated stiffness in FB is systematically lower than in Apnea. These discrepancies between rest and motion states were observed for patients but not for phantom data, suggesting that patient breath-holding impacts liver stiffness.

  17. Shear wave attenuation and micro-fluidics in water-saturated sand and glass beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotiros, Nicholas P; Isakson, Marcia J

    2014-06-01

    An improvement in the modeling of shear wave attenuation and speed in water-saturated sand and glass beads is introduced. Some dry and water-saturated materials are known to follow a constant-Q model in which the attenuation, expressed as Q(-1), is independent of frequency. The associated loss mechanism is thought to lie within the solid frame. A second loss mechanism in fluid-saturated porous materials is the viscous loss due to relative motion between pore fluid and solid frame predicted by the Biot-Stoll model. It contains a relaxation process that makes the Q(-1) change with frequency, reaching a peak at a characteristic frequency. Examination of the published measurements above 1 kHz, particularly those of Brunson (Ph.D. thesis, Oregon State University, Corvalis, 1983), shows another peak, which is explained in terms of a relaxation process associated with the squirt flow process at the grain-grain contact. In the process of deriving a model for this phenomenon, it is necessary to consider the micro-fluidic effects associated with the flow within a thin film of water confined in the gap at the grain-grain contact and the resulting increase in the effective viscosity of water. The result is an extended Biot model that is applicable over a broad band of frequencies. PMID:24907791

  18. Assessment of HIFU lesions by shear-wave elastography: Initial in-vivo results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquez, Jeremie; Corréas, Jean-Michel; Criton, Aline; Lacoste, François; Yon, Sylvain

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) as a tool to visualize HIFU lesions in an acute in-vivo setting. Extracorporeal HIFU sonications of liver were performed on 14 rabbits in 19 consecutive, adjacent pulses, with in situ energies between 75 J and 228 J. A set of images of the sonicated area was acquired prior and post HIFU ablation: 2 orthogonal SWE images (transverse and sagittal) and contrast enhanced CT scan. SWE images were acquired with theAixplorer® device (SuperSonic Imagine, Aix, France). Prior to the treatment, the liver elasticity appeared homogeneous, with a elasticity comprised between 5 and 11 kPa. The lesion extents were manually segmented on post-treatment SWE images and their areas A(SWE)T (transverse) and A(SWE)S (sagittal) were computed. On 3D CT the lesions were segmented as a hypo intense (devascularized) region on 3D CT images, and considered as "ground truth". The transverse and sagittal planes passing by their centers of mass were extracted. The lesion areas were computed for each plane, respectively A(CT)T and A(CT)S. The ratios A(CT)T/A(SWE)T and A(CT)S/A(SWE)S were computed for all the 14 cases. SWE appear to underestimate the lesion extent in the sagittal orientation with respect to CT images, while a good matching is obtained in the transverse orientation.

  19. Deep learning based classification of breast tumors with shear-wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Wei; Suo, Jingfeng; Wang, Congzhi; Shi, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to build a deep learning (DL) architecture for automated extraction of learned-from-data image features from the shear-wave elastography (SWE), and to evaluate the DL architecture in differentiation between benign and malignant breast tumors. We construct a two-layer DL architecture for SWE feature extraction, comprised of the point-wise gated Boltzmann machine (PGBM) and the restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). The PGBM contains task-relevant and task-irrelevant hidden units, and the task-relevant units are connected to the RBM. Experimental evaluation was performed with five-fold cross validation on a set of 227 SWE images, 135 of benign tumors and 92 of malignant tumors, from 121 patients. The features learned with our DL architecture were compared with the statistical features quantifying image intensity and texture. Results showed that the DL features achieved better classification performance with an accuracy of 93.4%, a sensitivity of 88.6%, a specificity of 97.1%, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.947. The DL-based method integrates feature learning with feature selection on SWE. It may be potentially used in clinical computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:27529139

  20. Asymptotic Analysis of Vertical Branch-Cut Integral of Shear Waves in a Fluid-Filled Borehole Utilizing the Steepest-Descent Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Gui-Jin; SONG Ruo-Long; WANG Ke-Xie

    2008-01-01

    We obtaln an asymptotic solution to the vertical branch-cut integral of shear waves excited by an impulsive pressure point source in a fluid-filled borehole,by taking the effect of the infinite singularity of the Hankel functions related to shear waves in the integrand at the shear branch point into account and using the method of steepest-descent to expand the vertical branch-cut integral of shear waves.It is theoretically proven that the saddle point of the integrand is locared at ks-i/z,where ks and z are the shear branch point and the offset.The continuous and smooth amplitude spectra and the resonant peaks of shear waves are numerically calculated from the asymptotic solution.These asymptotic results are generally in agreement with the numerical integral results.It is also found by the comparison and analysis of two results that the resonant factor and the effect of the normal and leaking mode poles around the shear branch point lead to the two-peak characteristics of the amplitude spectra of shear waves in the resonant peak zones from the numerical integral calculations.

  1. Influence of Food Intake on 2-D Shear Wave Elastography Assessment of Liver Stiffness in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, Mariana M; Badea, Radu; Lenghel, Lavinia M; Vasilescu, Dan; Botar-Jid, Carolina; Dudea, Sorin M

    2016-06-01

    Transient elastography and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse imaging are useful non-invasive methods for liver stiffness estimation, although both are influenced by food intake. The aim of the work described here was to identify liver stiffness variation after a standardized meal using 2-D shear wave elastography. Liver stiffness was estimated in 31 apparently healthy subjects, under fasting conditions and after a standardized meal (20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 min after food intake). In most of the cases, liver stiffness values increased between 20 and 40 min after the meal (p food intake, liver stiffness values were significantly lower compared with liver stiffness values under fasting conditions (p food intake (p food intake on liver stiffness estimation, 2-D shear wave elastography should be performed only under fasting conditions. PMID:26947447

  2. Analyzing the Impact of Increasing Mechanical Index and Energy Deposition on Shear Wave Speed Reconstruction in Human Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yufeng; Palmeri, Mark L; Rouze, Ned C; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Abdelmalek, Manal F; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2015-07-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) has found success in liver fibrosis staging. This work evaluates hepatic SWEI measurement success as a function of push pulse energy using two mechanical index (MI) values (1.6 and 2.2) over a range of pulse durations. Shear wave speed (SWS) was measured in the livers of 26 study subjects with known or potential chronic liver diseases. Each measurement consisted of eight SWEI sequences, each with different push energy configurations. The rate of successful SWS estimation was linearly proportional to the push energy. SWEI measurements with higher push energy were successful in patients for whom standard push energy levels failed. The findings also suggest that liver capsule depth could be used prospectively to identify patients who would benefit from elevated output. We conclude that there is clinical benefit to using elevated acoustic output for hepatic SWS measurement in patients with deeper livers.

  3. Scalar evolution equations for shear waves in incompressible solids: a simple derivation of the Z, ZK, KZK and KP equations

    KAUST Repository

    Destrade, M.

    2010-12-08

    We study the propagation of two-dimensional finite-amplitude shear waves in a nonlinear pre-strained incompressible solid, and derive several asymptotic amplitude equations in a simple, consistent and rigorous manner. The scalar Zabolotskaya (Z) equation is shown to be the asymptotic limit of the equations of motion for all elastic generalized neo-Hookean solids (with strain energy depending only on the first principal invariant of Cauchy-Green strain). However, we show that the Z equation cannot be a scalar equation for the propagation of two-dimensional shear waves in general elastic materials (with strain energy depending on the first and second principal invariants of strain). Then, we introduce dispersive and dissipative terms to deduce the scalar Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP), Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) and Khokhlov- Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equations of incompressible solid mechanics. © 2010 The Royal Society.

  4. 转换波AVO反演速度比各横波反射系数%Converted wave AVO inversion for average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏修成; 陈天胜; 季玉新

    2008-01-01

    Based on the empirical Gardner equation describing the relationship between density and compressional wave velocity, the converted wave reflection coefficient extrema attributes for AVO analysis are proposed and the relations between the extrema position and amplitude, average velocity ratio across the interface, and shear wave reflection coefficient are derived. The extrema position is a monotonically decreasing function of average velocity ratio, and the extrema amplitude is a function of average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient. For theoretical models, the average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient are inverted from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function to converted wave AVO curves. Shear wave reflection coefficient sections have clearer physical meaning than conventional converted wave stacked sections and establish the theoretical foundation for geological structural interpretation and event correlation. 'The method of inverting average velocity ratio and shear wave reflection coefficient from the extrema position and amplitude obtained from fitting a power function is applied to real CCP gathers. The inverted average velocity ratios are consistent with those computed from compressional and shear wave well logs.

  5. Quaternary layer anomalies around the Carlsberg Fault zone mapped with high-resolution shear-wave seismics south of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Nielsen, Lars;

    . In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. This finding contrasts the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image structures in Quaternary layers in the Carlsberg...... as well as the Quaternary successions. We conclude that such investigations are critical for judgment regarding whether or not faults in the study area affect recently deposited strata and if the zone is tectonically active....

  6. Urban Reflection Seismics: A High-resolution Shear-wave Survey in the Trondheim harbour area, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Charlotte; Polom, Ulrich; L'Heureux, Jean-Sebastien; Hansen, Louise; Lecomte, Isabelle; Longva, Oddva

    2010-05-01

    A shallow reflection shear-wave seismic survey was carried out in mid summer 2008 in the harbour area of Trondheim, Norway, that suffers from prominent landslide events in the last decades. The harbour has been built on man-made land fillings at the coast of the Trondheim Fjord in several expansions implicated in some submarine landslides, which are reported since about 100 years. Whereas high-resolution marine seismic methods mapped the fjord area in detail in the range of decimeters, the seismic investigation below the infilled and paved harbour area was a difficult challenge. Therefore, SH-polarized shear-wave reflection seismics was applied experimentally, and the field configuration was especially adapted for the application on paved surfaces with underlying soft soil of estimated more than 150 m thickness. A land streamer system of 120 channels (geophone interval of 1 m) was used in combination with LIAG's newly developed shear-wave vibrator buggy of 30 kN peak force. This mini truck is designed for full environment-friendly urban use and enables fast and sensitive operation within a seismic survey area. The sweep parameters were configured to 25-100 Hz range, 10 s duration, using 14 s recording time sampled by 1 ms interval. Shear wave frequencies above the used frequency range, which can also be generated by the seismic source, were avoided consciously to prevent disturbing air wave reflections during operation. For an advantageous solution for the seismic imaging of the subsoil down to the bedrock a grid of 4.2 profile-km was gathered. The data recorded experimentally in the initial seismic survey stage achieved finally a highly resolved image of the structure of the sediment body with ca. 1 m vertical resolution, clear detection of the bedrock, and probably deeper structures. The profiles were processed up to FD time migration, and indicate that slip planes, turbidity masses and other features relevant for geohazards are present within the top of the

  7. Urban Shear-wave Reflection Seismics: A High-resolution Survey in the Landslide-affected Trondheim Harbour Area, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, C. M.; Polom, U.; Hansen, L.; L'Heureux, J.; Longva, O.; Lecomte, I.

    2009-12-01

    A shallow reflection shear-wave seismic survey was carried out in mid summer 2008 in the harbour area of Trondheim, Norway, that suffers from prominent landslide events in the last decades. The harbour has been built on man-made land fillings at the coast of the Trondheim Fjord in several expansions implicated in some submarine landslides. Whereas high-resolution marine seismic methods mapped the fjord area in detail, common seismic investigation of the infilled, paved harbour area was a difficult challenge. Therefore, SH-polarized shear-wave reflection seismics was applied experimentally, and the field configuration was especially adapted for the application on paved surfaces with underlying soft soil of more than 100 m thickness. A land streamer system of 120 channels (geophone interval of 1 m) was used in combination with LIAG's newly developed shear-wave vibrator buggy of 30 kN peak force. This mini truck is full environment-friendly for urban use and enables fast operation within a seismic survey area. The sweep parameters were configured to 25-100 Hz range, 10 s duration, using 14 s recording time sampled by 1 ms interval. Shear wave frequencies above the used frequency range, which can also be generated by the seismic source, were avoided consciously to prevent disturbing air wave reflections during operation. For an advantageous solution for the seismic imaging of the subsoil down to the bedrock ca. 4 km of 2.5-D profiles were gathered. The data recorded experimentally in the initial seismic survey stage achieved finally a highly resolved image of the structure of the sediment body with 1 m vertical resolution, clear detection of the bedrock, and probably deeper structures. These were processed up to FD time migration, and indicate that slip planes are present within the top of the bedrock. Due to the clear and continuous reflection events, also the shear-wave velocity could be calculated at least down to the bedrock to indicate the dynamic stiffness of the

  8. Specimen ferromagnetism and the behaviour of electromagnetic ultrasonic shear-wave transducers below and above the Curie point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in the potentialities of electromagnetic ultrasonic transducers for non-destructive testing was re-awakened about 1968 and since then a goodly number of articles have appeared concerning transducers design, performance and use. The aim of this report is to fill a gap by describing the relations between theoretical and actual performance of shear-wave transducers, used on magnetic and on non-magnetic specimens: in particular to trace the phenomena occuring as the temperature of a magnetic specimen (mild steel) is raised through the Curie point. At the transmitting transducer generation of ultrasonic wave is almost exclusively by Lorentz forces applied to the skin of the specimen; at the receiver transduction is via Faraday induction. Wave attenuation in mild steel above the curie point hampers the use of shear waves, but does not render unusable there. An anomaly in performance with mild steel specimens just above the Curie temperature is discussed, which necessitates a brief consideration of electromagnetic longitudinal wave transducers, where the need to invoke magnetostriction as a dominant phenomenon is expressed. (Auhtor)

  9. Anisotropic polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel phantom for shear wave elastography in fibrous biological soft tissue: a multimodality characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shear wave elastography imaging techniques provide quantitative measurement of soft tissues elastic properties. Tendons, muscles and cerebral tissues are composed of fibers, which induce a strong anisotropic effect on the mechanical behavior. Currently, these tissues cannot be accurately represented by existing elastography phantoms. Recently, a novel approach for orthotropic hydrogel mimicking soft tissues has been developed (Millon et al 2006 J. Biomed. Mater. Res. B 305–11). The mechanical anisotropy is induced in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel by stretching the physical crosslinks of the polymeric chains while undergoing freeze/thaw cycles. In the present study we propose an original multimodality imaging characterization of this new transverse isotropic (TI) PVA hydrogel. Multiple properties were investigated using a large variety of techniques at different scales compared with an isotropic PVA hydrogel undergoing similar imaging and rheology protocols. The anisotropic mechanical (dynamic and static) properties were studied using supersonic shear wave imaging technique, full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) strain imaging and classical linear rheometry using dynamic mechanical analysis. The anisotropic optical and ultrasonic spatial coherence properties were measured by FFOCT volumetric imaging and backscatter tensor imaging, respectively. Correlation of mechanical and optical properties demonstrates the complementarity of these techniques for the study of anisotropy on a multi-scale range as well as the potential of this TI phantom as fibrous tissue-mimicking phantom for shear wave elastographic applications. (paper)

  10. Mantle lithosphere transition from the East European Craton to the Variscan Bohemian Massif imaged by shear-wave splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vecsey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse splitting of teleseismic shear-wave recorded during the PASSEQ passive experiment (2006–2008 focussed on the upper mantle structure across the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ. 1009 pairs of the delay times of the slow split-shear waves and orientations of the polarized fast-shear waves exhibit lateral variations across the array, as well as backazimuth dependences of measurements at individual stations. While a distinct regionalization of the splitting parameters exists in the Phanerozoic part of Europe, a correlation with the large-scale tectonics around the TESZ and in the East European Craton (EEC is less evident. No general and abrupt change in the splitting parameters (anisotropic structure can be related to the Teisseyre–Tornquist Zone (TTZ, marking the edge of the Precambrian province on the surface. Instead, regional variations of anisotropic structure were found along the TESZ/TTZ. We suggest a south-westward continuation of the Precambrian mantle lithosphere beneath the TESZ and the adjacent Phanerozoic part of Europe, probably as far as towards the Bohemian Massif.

  11. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Shallow Shear-Wave Velocities for Las Vegas, Nevada, Using Sediment Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara Luke; Helena Murvosh; Wanda Taylor; Jeff Wagoner

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of near-surface shear-wave velocity in the deep alluvial basin underlying the metropolitan area of Las Vegas, Nevada (USA), is being developed for earthquake site response projections. The velocity dataset, which includes 230 measurements, is interpolated across the model using depth-dependent correlations of velocity with sediment type. The sediment-type database contains more than 1 400 well and borehole logs. Sediment sequences reported in logs are assigned to one of four units. A characteristic shear-wave velocity profile b developed for each unit by analyzing closely spaced pairs of velocity profiles and well or borehole logs. The resulting velocity model exhibits reasonable values and patterns, although it does not explicitly honor the measured shear-wave velocity profiles. Site response investigations that applied a preliminary version of the velocity model support a two-zone ground-shaking hazard model for the valley. Areas in which clay predominates in the upper 30 m are predicted to have stronger ground motions than the rest of the basin.

  12. Compressive stress field in the crust deduced from shear-wave anisotropy: an example in capital area of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yuan; WU Jing

    2008-01-01

    The rocks in the crust are pervaded by stress-aligned fluid-saturated microcracks, and the complex fault tectonics and stress control the configuration of the microcracks, however shear-wave splitting could indicate this kind of characteristics. In this paper, Capital Area Seismograph Network (CASN), the widest scope and highest density of regional seismograph network presently in China, is adopted to deduce the principal compressive stress field distribution pattern from polarizations of fast shear-waves, based on shear-wave splitting analysis. The principal compressive stress in capital area of China is at NE85.7°±41.0° in this study. Compared with the results of principal compressive stress field in North China obtained from other methods, the results in this study are reliable in the principal com-pressive stress field distribution in capital area. The results show that it is an effective way, although it is the first time to directly obtain crustal stress field from seismic anisotropy. It is effectively applied to the zones with dense seismograph stations.

  13. Study on shear wave splitting in the aftershock region of the Yao'an earthquake in 2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-ling; LIU Jie; ZHANG Guo-min; MA Hong-sheng; WANG Hui

    2006-01-01

    After Ms=6.5 Yao'an earthquake on January 15, 2000, a large amount of aftershock waveforms were recorded by the Near Source Digital Seismic Network (NSSN) installed by Earthquake Administration of Yunnan Province in the aftershock region. It provides profuse data to systematically analyze the features of Yao'an earthquake. The crustal anisotropy is realized by shear wave splitting propagating in the upper crust. Based on the accurate aftershock relocations, the shear wave splitting parameters are determined with the cross-correlation method, and the results of different stations and regions are discussed in this paper. These conclusions are obtained as follows:firstly, the average fast directions of aftershock region are controlled by the regional stress field and parallel to the maximum horizontal compressive stress direction; secondly, the average fast directions of disparate stations and regions are different and vary with the structural settings and regional stress fields; finally, delay time value is affected by all sorts of factors, which is affinitive with the shear wave propagating medium, especially.

  14. Investigation of the effects of myocardial anisotropy for shear wave elastography using impulsive force and harmonic vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Matthew W.; Qiang, Bo; Song, Pengfei; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The myocardium is known to be an anisotropic medium where the muscle fiber orientation changes through the thickness of the wall. Shear wave elastography methods use propagating waves which are measured by ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of various tissues. Ultrasound- or MR-based methods have been used and the excitation frequency ranges for these various methods cover a large range from 24-500 Hz. Some of the ultrasound-based methods have been shown to be able to estimate the fiber direction. We constructed a model with layers of elastic, transversely isotropic materials that were oriented at different angles to simulate the heart wall in systole and diastole. We investigated the effect of frequency on the wave propagation and the estimation of fiber direction and wave speeds in the different layers of the assembled models. We found that waves propagating at low frequencies such as 30 or 50 Hz showed low sensitivity to the fiber direction but also had substantial bias in estimating the wave speeds in the layers. Using waves with higher frequency content (>200 Hz) allowed for more accurate fiber direction and wave speed estimation. These results have particular relevance for MR- and ultrasound-based elastography applications in the heart.

  15. Wave propagation against current : a study of the effects of vertical shears of the mean current on the geometrical focusing of water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland, Jenna; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Wave propagation against current : a study of the effects of vertical shears of the mean current on the geometrical focusing of water waves J. Charland * **, J. Touboul **, V. Rey ** jenna.charland@univ-tln.fr * Direction Générale de l'Armement, CNRS Délégation Normandie ** Université de Toulon, 83957 La Garde, France Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) Aix Marseille Université, 13288 Marseille, France CNRS/INSU, IRD, MIO, UM 110 In the nearshore area, both wave propagation and currents are influenced by the bathymetry. For a better understanding of wave - current interactions in the presence of a 3D bathymetry, a large scale experiment was carried out in the Ocean Basin FIRST, Toulon, France. The 3D bathymetry consisted of two symmetric underwater mounds on both sides in the mean wave direction. The water depth at the top the mounds was hm=1,5m, the slopes of the mounds were of about 1:3, the water depth was h=3 m elsewhere. For opposite current conditions (U of order 0.30m/s), a huge focusing of the wave up to twice its incident amplitude was observed in the central part of the basin for T=1.4s. Since deep water conditions are verified, the wave amplification is ascribed to the current field. The mean velocity fields at a water depth hC=0.25m was measured by the use of an electromagnetic current meter. The results have been published in Rey et al [4]. The elliptic form of the "mild slope" equation including a uniform current on the water column (Chen et al [1]) was then used for the calculations. The calculated wave amplification of factor 1.2 is significantly smaller than observed experimentally (factor 2). So, the purpose of this study is to understand the physical processes which explain this gap. As demonstrated by Kharif & Pelinovsky [2], geometrical focusing of waves is able to modify significantly the local wave amplitude. We consider this process here. Since vertical velocity profiles measured at some locations have shown significant

  16. Preliminary results of near-surface shear-wave velocities derived from inverting surface-wave dispersion curves in Wonju, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. Y.; Jung, J.; Kim, C.; Ali, A.

    2013-12-01

    To estimate near-surface shear-wave velocities (Vs) in Wonju, Korea, active and passive surface-wave data were recorded at 4 and 6 sites, respectively, using 24 4.5-Hz vertical geophones and an engineering seismograph. An 8-kg wooden hammer was used for the active seismic source. The ground motions of 8.2 s length at each geophone location were digitized at a 2-ms sample rate. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods were used for the active and passive data to derive dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves. Shear-wave profiles inverted from the dispersion curves indicate that 182 < Vs < 557 ms/ in the unconsolidated overburden layer and 375 < Vs < 1128 m/s in the consolidated rock. The basement depths are estimated at depths between 13 and 25 m. Average Vs to a 30 m depth (Vs30) were also computed using Vs values in the overburden and underlying basement layers. The estimated Vs30 are in the range of 224-602 m/s, with an average of 415 m/s. Most of the Wonju area is thus in NEHRP Site Class C ('Very dense soil and soft rock') defined by the velocity interval 360 < Vs30 < 760 m/s.

  17. Shear wave splitting analyses in Tian Shan: Geodynamic implications of complex seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherie, Solomon G.; Gao, Stephen S.; Liu, Kelly H.; Elsheikh, Ahmed A.; Kong, Fansheng; Reed, Cory A.; Yang, Bin B.

    2016-06-01

    The Tian Shan is a tectonically complex intracontinental orogenic belt situated between the Tarim Basin and the Kazakh Shield. The vast majority of the previous shear wave splitting (SWS) measurements were presented as station averages, which are only valid when the anisotropy structure can be approximated by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry, i.e., a model of simple anisotropy. A variety of anisotropy-forming hypotheses have been proposed based on the station-averaged measurements. In this study, we measure the splitting parameters at 25 stations that recorded high-quality data from a wide back azimuthal range for the purpose of identifying and characterizing complex anisotropy. Among the 25 stations, 15 of them show systematic azimuthal variations in the observed splitting parameters with a 90° periodicity that is consistent with a model of two-layered anisotropy. The fast orientations of the upper layer range from 50° to 90° measured clockwise from the north, which are subparallel to the strike of the orogenic belt, and the splitting times are between 0.9 and 1.9 s. The corresponding values for the lower layer are -45° to -85° and 1.2-2.2 s, respectively. The remaining 10 stations demonstrate azimuthally invariant splitting parameters with strike-parallel fast orientations, and can be represented by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry. We propose that the strike-parallel anisotropy is caused by lithospheric shortening, and anisotropy in the lower layer is associated with WNW-ward flow of asthenospheric material sandwiched between the subducting Tarim lithosphere and the thick Kazakh lithospheric root.

  18. Near Surface Shear Wave Velocity Model of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, S.; Craig, M. S.; Hayashi, K.; Galvin, J. L.; Deqiang, C.; Jones, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface wave measurements (MASW) and microtremor array measurements (MAM) were performed at twelve sites across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to obtain high resolution shear wave velocity (VS) models. Deeper surveys were performed at four of the sites using the two station spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. For the MASW and MAM surveys, a 48-channel seismic system with 4.5 Hz geophones was used with a 10-lb sledgehammer and a metal plate as a source. Surveys were conducted at various locations on the crest of levees, the toe of the levees, and off of the levees. For MASW surveys, we used a record length of 2.048 s, a sample interval of 1 ms, and 1 m geophone spacing. For MAM, ambient noise was recorded for 65.536 s with a sampling interval of 4 ms and 1 m geophone spacing. VS was determined to depths of ~ 20 m using the MASW method and ~ 40 m using the MAM method. Maximum separation between stations in the two-station SPAC surveys was typically 1600 m to 1800 m, providing coherent signal with wavelengths in excess of 5 km and depth penetration of as much as 2000 m. Measured values of VS30 in the study area ranged from 97 m/s to 257 m/s, corresponding to NEHRP site classifications D and E. Comparison of our measured velocity profiles with available geotechnical logs, including soil type, SPT, and CPT, reveals the existence of a small number of characteristic horizons within the upper 40m in the Delta: levee fill material, peat, transitional silty sand, and eolian sand at depth. Sites with a peat layer at the surface exhibited extremely low values of VS. Based on soil borings, the thickness of peat layers were approximately 0 m to 8 m. The VS for the peat layers ranged from 42 m/s to 150 m/s while the eolian sand layer exhibited VS ranging from of 220 m/s to 370 m/s. Soft near surface soils present in the region pose an increased earthquake hazard risk due to the potential for high ground accelerations.

  19. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in determining the value of lithospheric VS and QS. At 100 km depth, where the resolution of seismic models is the highest, we compare observed seismic VS and QS with theoretical VST and QST values, respectively, that are calculated solely from temperature anomalies and constrained by experimental data on temperature dependencies of velocity and attenuation. This comparison shows that temperature variations alone are sufficient to explain seismic VS and QS in ca 50 per cent of continental regions. We hypothesize that compositional anomalies resulting from Fe depletion can explain the misfit between seismic and theoretical VS in cratonic lithosphere. In regions of active tectonics, temperature effects alone cannot explain seismic VS and QS in the lithosphere. It is likely that partial melts and/or fluids may affect seismic parameters in these regions. This study demonstrates

  20. Advantages of using multichannel analysis of Love waves (MALW) in determining near-surface shear-wave velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Miller, R. D.; Cakir, R.

    2011-12-01

    Surface-wave techniques have been given increasingly more attention by the near-surface community with applications to a variety of problems. Studies on high-frequency surface-wave techniques have been focused primarily on Rayleigh waves. There is much less attention on utilizing Love waves than Rayleigh waves in the near-surface community. Recent improvements in data-acquisition techniques and development of software make SH-wave data acquisition and processing easier. In addition, Love-wave analysis only results in SH-wave velocities, which suggests that we may benefit from analyzing SH-wave data using Love-wave inversion. Numerical results of SH waves and data from Kansas, Wyoming, Arizona, Washington, and Wuhan, China demonstrated three advantages of analyzing SH-wave data using multichannel analysis of Love waves (MALW). 1) Generally images of Love-wave energy are cleaner and sharper than those generated from Rayleigh waves. Owing to a long geophone spread commonly used in an SH-wave refraction survey, images of Love-wave energy are even much cleaner and sharper, which makes picking phase velocities of Love waves easier and more accurate. 2) Numerical results showed that because Love waves are independent of P-wave velocity, dispersion curves of Love waves are simpler than Rayleigh waves. "Mode kissing" (suggested by Robert Stewart) is an undesired and frequently occurred phenomenon in Rayleigh-wave analysis that causes mode misidentification. Fortunately, this phenomenon is less common in images of Love-wave energy than Rayleigh waves. 3) Real-world examples showed that inversion of Love-wave dispersion curves is less dependent on initial models and more stable than Rayleigh waves. This is because of being independent of P-wave velocity fewer unknowns in the MALW method not only make dispersion curves of Love waves simpler also reduces the degree of nonuniqueness, which leads to more stable inversion of Love-wave dispersion curves. Results also demonstrated

  1. Frequency- and stress-dependent changes in shear-wave velocity dispersion in water-saturated, unconsolidated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, R.

    2009-04-01

    Anelastic processes in the earth causes dissipation of seismic energy. Because of the fundamental laws of causality, the dissipation effects demand a frequency-dependent change of elastic moduli, and therefore, dispersion in elastic wave velocities. Assessing the dispersion of seismic shear waves in the unconsolidated subsoil is important for at least 3 reasons: 1) shear-wave velocity (Vs) is a key parameter in all dynamic loading problems; the frequency of the observed shear waves in field, downhole and laboratory measurements varies widely (20 Hz - 10 kHz), and consequently an uncertainty resulting from an unknown or poorly known estimate of dispersion may translate into erroneous evaluation and potential risks, 2) generally Vs-dispersion is considered negligible for the frequency range of practical interest; it is important to check this assumption and modify the site evaluation results, if necessary, and 3) the underlying soil-physics of any observed dispersion can be useful in estimating an unknown soil physical parameter. In the present research, we have concentrated on Vs dispersion in saturated sand in laboratory, under varying vertical and horizontal stress levels that are realistic in the context of shallow subsoil investigations. We explored theoretical models to obtain insight from our experimental findings. Laboratory experiments involving array seismic measurements and accurate stress control present clear evidence of dispersive shear-wave velocity in saturated sand in the frequency range 2-16 kHz. The change of Vs as a function of frequency is clearly nonlinear. For low frequencies, as observed in the field data, our result indicates significant dispersion and, therefore, nonlinear variation of attenuation. This has important implication on site evaluation using Vs. Significantly, the data allows us to distinguish a frequency-dependence of the velocity dispersion. The relative importance of fluid motion relative to the skeleton frame (Biot theory

  2. Comparison of bed shear under non-breaking and breaking solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    varying between 0.12 and 0.69. Analytical modeling was carried out to predict shear stresses using Fourier and convolution integration methods. This paper presents comparison of the measured and predicted bed shear stress or skin friction stress, together...

  3. Global Subducting Slab Entrainment of Oceanic Asthenosphere: Re-examination of Sub-Slab Shear-Wave Splitting Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, T.; Liu, L.; Kawakatsu, H.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanic asthenosphere is characterized as a low seismic velocity, low viscosity, and strongly anisotropic channel separating from the oceanic lithosphere through a sharp shear wave velocity contrast. It has been a great challenge to reconcile all these observations and ultimately illuminate the fate of oceanic asthenosphere near convergent plate margins. Sub-slab shear wave splitting patterns are particularly useful to address the fate of oceanic asthenosphere since they are directly linked to deformation induced by the mantle flow beneath the subducting slab. To address slab entrainment of oceanic asthenosphere through shear wave splitting, it is important to recognize that oceanic asthenosphere is characterized by azimuthal anisotropy (1-3%) as well as strong P wave and S wave radial anisotropy (3-7%) for horizontally travelling P wave (VPH > VPV) and S wave (VSH > VSV), making it effectively an orthorhombic medium. Here we show that entrained asthenosphere predicts sub-slab SKS splitting pattern, where the fast splitting direction changes from predominantly trench-normal under shallow subduction zones to predominantly trench-parallel under relatively steep subduction zones. This result can be recognized by the 90 degrees shift in the polarization of the fast wave at about 20 degrees incident angle, where VSH equals to VSV forming a classical point singularity (Crampin, 1991). The thickness of the entrained asthenosphere is estimated to be on the order of 100 km, which predicts SKS splitting time varying from 0.5 seconds to 2 seconds. After briefly discussing improvement of the millefeuille model (Kawakatsu et al. 2009) of the asthenosphere upon this new constraint and long wave Backus averaging of orthorhombic solid and melt, we will illustrate that, in the range of observed trench migration speed, dynamic models of 2-D mantle convection with temperature-dependent viscosity do support thick subducting slab entrainment of asthenosphere under ranges of

  4. Higher-order Korteweg-de Vries models for internal solitary waves in a stratified shear flow with a free surface

    OpenAIRE

    Grimshaw, R.; E. Pelinovsky; Poloukhina, O.

    2002-01-01

    A higher-order extension of the familiar Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for internal solitary waves in a density- and current-stratified shear flow with a free surface. All coefficients of this extended Korteweg-de Vries equation are expressed in terms of integrals of the modal function for the linear long-wave theory. An illustrative example of a two-layer shear flow is considered, for which we discuss the parameter dependence of t...

  5. Wave propagation in a viscous fluid with a pipeline shear mean flow and application for ultrasonic flow meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2013-11-01

    This paper deals with the problem of wave propagation in a compressible viscous fluid confined by a rigid-walled circular pipeline in the presence of a shear mean flow. On the assumption of isentropic and axisymmetric wave propagation, the convected acoustic equations are mathematically deduced from the conservations of continuity and momentum, leading to a set of coupled second-order differential equations with respect of the acoustic pressure and velocity components in radial and axial directions. A solution based on the Fourier-Bessel theory, which is complete and orthogonal in Lebesgue space, is introduced to transform the differential equations to an infinite set of homogeneous algebraic equations, thus the wave number can be calculated due to the existence condition of a non-trivial solution. After the discussion of the method's convergence, the cut-off frequency of the wave mode is theoretically analyzed. Furthermore, wave attenuation of the first four wave modes due to fluid viscosity is numerically studied in the presence of the laminar and turbulent flow profiles. Meanwhile, the measurement performance of an ultrasonic flow meter based on the difference of downstream and upstream wave propagations is parametrically addressed.

  6. Shear Wave Splitting Intensity of the Maule, Chile Rupture Zone: Results from Teleseismic and Local Aftershock Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpey, M. E.; Russo, R. M.; Chevrot, S.

    2015-12-01

    We calculated the shear wave splitting intensity (SI) of the Maule, Chile rupture zone (32°S-39°S) to constrain the seismic anisotropy of the region. Our data are from 80 of the temporary seismometers deployed as part of the IMAD (International Maule Aftershock Deployment) geophysical networks to capture the aftershocks of the Mw 8.8 megathrust event in 2010. We implemented the multichannel analysis method of Chevrot (2000) to measure the SI of 64 teleseismic SKS phases in addition to the fast orientations ϕ and splitting delays δt measured with the method of Silver & Chan (1991). To measure the SI of local aftershocks, we modified the method to allow for use of the upgoing S phase from local events in and above the Nazca slab after correcting for the initial event polarization. We compared our results with other measurement methods (Silver and Chan 1991, Wolfe and Silver 1998) that solve for splitting parameters to examine the robustness of the shear wave splitting intensity method, particularly for local datasets. The results we obtained using the splitting intensity method for the teleseismic data show an overall fast direction that is parallel to the absolute plate motion of the Nazca plate that is subducting beneath the South American plate. These results are consistent with the results we calculated using the Wolfe and Silver method. SI deriving from S waves that originate in the Nazca slab or deeper SA lithosphere are likely to reveal patterns of crustal fabric, and hence differ from the SI of the teleseismic shear waves.

  7. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  8. On The Propagation, Reflexion, Transmission and Stability of Atmospheric Rossby-Gravity Waves on a Beta-Plane in the Presence of Latitudinally Sheared Zonal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, B. M.; Eltayeb, I. A.

    1980-08-01

    The propagation properties of Rossby-gravity waves in an isothermal atmosphere on a beta-plane are investigated in the presence of a latitudinally sheared zonal flow. The perturbation equation is found to possess seven regular singularities provided the fluid is non-Boussinesq, and only five for Boussinesq fluids. In slowly varying shear a local dispersion relation is derived and used to study the wave normal surfaces and ray trajectories. The cross sections of the wave normal surfaces in horizontal planes possess three critical latitudes occurring where the intrinsic frequency hat{ω} takes the values 0, ± N, where N is the Brunt-Vaisalla frequency. The former is the usual Rossby wave critical latitude (R.w.c.l.) and the latter are essentially gravity wave critical latitudes (g.w.c.l.). Waves can propagate only on one side of a R.w.c.l. while propagation is possible on both sides of a g.w.c.l. provided the vertical wavenumber, m, there is real and non-zero. Also for real values of m and provided the atmosphere is non-Boussinesq the g.w.c.l. exhibits valve-like behaviour. Such valve behaviour is shown to be responsible for aiding high frequency waves (i.e. gravity waves) to penetrate jet-like wind streams and may facilitate the transfer of energy and momentum across latitudes. The full wave treatment shows that the system possesses a wave-invariant which has a simple physical interpretation only when m is real in which case it represents the conservation of the total northward wave energy flux. The invariant is used, together with the legitimate solutions near the critical latitudes, to study the influence of each of the critical latitudes on the intensity of the wave. It is found that the R.w.c.l. can be associated with energy absorption or emission, depending on certain specified conditions, but the g.w.c.l. is always associated with energy absorption although the amount of energy absorbed depends crucially on whether m is real or imaginary. The reflexion

  9. Shear wave elastography of thyroid nodules for the prediction of malignancy in a large scale study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ah Young; Son, Eun Ju [Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa [Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Gangnam Medical Research Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Youk, Ji Hyun [Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong-Ah, E-mail: chrismd@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Cheong Soo [Department of Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Elasticity indices of malignant thyroid nodules were higher than those of benign. •High elasticity indices were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. •SWE evaluation could be useful as adjunctive tool for thyroid cancer diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study is to validate the usefulness of shear wave elastography (SWE) in predicting thyroid malignancy with a large-scale quantitative SWE data. Methods: This restrospective study included 476 thyroid nodules in 453 patients who underwent gray-scale US and SWE before US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA) or surgical excision were included. Gray-scale findings and SWE elasticity indices (EIs) were retrospectively reviewed and compared between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. The optimal cut-off values of EIs for predicting malignancy were determined. The diagnostic performances of gray-scale US and SWE for predicting malignancy were analyzed. The diagnostic performance was compared between the gray-scale US findings only and the combined use of gray-scale US findings with SWEs. Results: All EIs of malignant thyroid nodules were significantly higher than those of benign nodules (p ≤ .001). The optimal cut-off value of each EI for predicting malignancy was 85.2 kPa of E{sub mean}, 94.0 kPa of E{sub max}, 54.0 kPa of E{sub min}. E{sub mean} (OR 3.071, p = .005) and E{sub max} (OR 3.015, p = .003) were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. Combined use of gray-scale US findings and each EI showed elevated sensitivity (95.0–95.5% vs 92.9%, p ≤ .005) and AUC (0.820–0.834 vs 0.769, p ≤ .005) for predicting malignancy, compared with the use of only gray-scale US findings. Conclusions: Quantitative parameters of SWE were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy and SWE evaluation combined with gray-scale US was adjunctive to the diagnostic performance of gray-scale US for predicting thyroid malignancy.

  10. Shear wave elastography of thyroid nodules for the prediction of malignancy in a large scale study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Elasticity indices of malignant thyroid nodules were higher than those of benign. •High elasticity indices were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. •SWE evaluation could be useful as adjunctive tool for thyroid cancer diagnosis. -- Abstract: Objectives: The purpose of this study is to validate the usefulness of shear wave elastography (SWE) in predicting thyroid malignancy with a large-scale quantitative SWE data. Methods: This restrospective study included 476 thyroid nodules in 453 patients who underwent gray-scale US and SWE before US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA) or surgical excision were included. Gray-scale findings and SWE elasticity indices (EIs) were retrospectively reviewed and compared between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. The optimal cut-off values of EIs for predicting malignancy were determined. The diagnostic performances of gray-scale US and SWE for predicting malignancy were analyzed. The diagnostic performance was compared between the gray-scale US findings only and the combined use of gray-scale US findings with SWEs. Results: All EIs of malignant thyroid nodules were significantly higher than those of benign nodules (p ≤ .001). The optimal cut-off value of each EI for predicting malignancy was 85.2 kPa of Emean, 94.0 kPa of Emax, 54.0 kPa of Emin. Emean (OR 3.071, p = .005) and Emax (OR 3.015, p = .003) were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy. Combined use of gray-scale US findings and each EI showed elevated sensitivity (95.0–95.5% vs 92.9%, p ≤ .005) and AUC (0.820–0.834 vs 0.769, p ≤ .005) for predicting malignancy, compared with the use of only gray-scale US findings. Conclusions: Quantitative parameters of SWE were the independent predictors of thyroid malignancy and SWE evaluation combined with gray-scale US was adjunctive to the diagnostic performance of gray-scale US for predicting thyroid malignancy

  11. Investigation of lithospheric deformation and mantle anisotropy beneath Central Anatolia from Shear Wave Splitting Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoman, U.; Polat, G.; Sandvol, E. A.; Turkelli, N.; Kahraman, M.; Özacar, A.; Beck, S. L.; Delph, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    With the primary objective of investigating the upper mantle anisotropy beneath central Anatolia-Turkey, we have performed shear wave splitting analysis and calculated the fast polarization directions and time-delays benefiting from teleseismic earthquakes recorded by a dense temporary seismic network consisting of 65 broadband sensors that were deployed in early May 2013 and operated for two years as a part of CD-CAT project (Continental Dynamics Central Anatolian Tectonics, funded by NSF with instruments supplied by PASSCAL depository). To further enhance the station coverage in the region, we also included data from 45 permanent broadband stations of Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI). During the analysis, we have used the SplitLab software to determine splitting parameters of the records from only SKS and SKKS phases. Our initial results were derived from teleseismic earthquakes (with magnitudes greater than 5.8) that occurred within the time period from May-2013 to 2014. The average fast polarization directions obtained from stations located in the vicinity of the East Anatolia Fault Zone are well aligned with the fault trend indicating NE-SW orientations. Furthermore, we did not observe significant variations in the polarization directions and the delay times along the fault zone. Stations deployed in the vicinity of Central Anatolian fault zone exhibit N-S fast directions in good agreement with the fault trend. The average delay time for the whole study area is slightly higher than 1 second. Rapid spatial variations in splitting parameters are observed only in Adana region and the surrounding area. This probably suggests that the contribution of crustal anisotropy to mantle anisotropy is quite high. This observation is also consistent with the known tectonic structure of this region, which is presumably related to fabrics within deep crustal rocks preserving a record of deformation. This point should also need to be supported with

  12. Analysis of Shear-horizontal Vibrations of Crystal Plates for Acoustic Wave Resonators and Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, theoretical analysis of shear-horizontal vibrations of crystal plates under lateral electric field excitation (LFE) without and with a fluid layer is presented. A crystal plate with separated electrodes under thickness electric field excitation (TFE) in contact with a fluid layer is also analyzed.We have started with analyzing the coupled face-shear (FS) and thickness-twist (TT) motions of piezoelectric plates with lateral electric fields, using the Mindlin's first-order theory ...

  13. Velocity and attenuation of shear waves in the phantom of a muscle-soft tissue matrix with embedded stretched fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theory of the elasticity moduli and dissipative properties of a composite material: a phantom simulating muscle tissue anisotropy. The model used in the experiments was made of a waterlike polymer with embedded elastic filaments imitating muscle fiber. In contrast to the earlier developed phenomenological theory of the anisotropic properties of muscle tissue, here we obtain the relationship of the moduli with characteristic sizes and moduli making up the composite. We introduce the effective elasticity moduli and viscosity tensor components, which depend on stretching of the fibers. We measure the propagation velocity of shear waves and the shear viscosity of the model for regulated tension. Waves were excited by pulsed radiation pressure generated by modulated focused ultrasound. We show that with increased stretching of fibers imitating muscle contraction, an increase in both elasticity and viscosity takes place, and this effect depends on the wave propagation direction. The results of theoretical and experimental studies support our hypothesis on the protective function of stretched skeletal muscle, which protects bones and joints from trauma.

  14. Temporal variation of shear-wave splitting parameters before and after the 2008 Movri Mountain earthquake in northwest Peloponnese (Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Giannopoulos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available On June 8, 2008, at 12:25 GMT, a Mw 6.4 earthquake, the Movri Mountain earthquake, occurred in the area of northwest Peloponnese, western Greece. The epicenter was located in the municipality of Movri, 35 km southwest of Patras. For this study, a crustal anisotropy analysis was performed in the epicentral area of the Movri Mountain earthquake. Specifically, the shear-wave splitting phenomenon and its temporal evolution in relation to the Movri Mountain earthquake was studied, using the cross-correlation method. The data analysis revealed the presence of shear-wave splitting in the study area. Both before and after the Movri Mountain earthquake, the polarization directions of the fast component of the shear waves followed a general NNW-SSE direction. The observed mean fast polarization direction was not consistent with the regional stress field, which showed a general E-W direction of the maximum horizontal compressive stress. The differences between the estimated fast polarization directions and the properties of the regional stress field suggest the presence of a local stress field in the area around the fault. An increase in time delays was observed soon after the Movri Mountain earthquake. The average value of the delay times before the earthquake was ca. 18 ±2.6 ms, while after the earthquake this was ca. 40 ±4.6 ms. This increase in the time delay indicates changes in the crustal properties, which were possibly caused by variations in the pre-existing micro-crack system characteristics related to the Movri Mountain earthquake, and the possible involvement of over-pressured fluids.

  15. A Study on Shear Wave Splitting for the Sequence of the Aftershocks of the Yao'an Ms6.5 Earthquake in Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Xiaodong; Li Baiji; Qin Jiazheng

    2003-01-01

    The shear wave splitting study is based on data of the 3-component digital seismograms. This was recorded at 3 sets of stations, which were set up after the Yao'an M_s6.5 earthquake, near its epicenter. The results indicate the following: ①Shear wave splitting has been observed through analyzing 236 aftershock recordings within the shear wave window. ②The time delay was mostly in the range of 3.5~10.5ms/km and the average was 7.0ms/km.③The polarization direction of the fast split S-wave was mostly in the range of N140°E~N164°E and the average was N152.4°E. ④The preferred polarization direction for the fast shear wave was different from the direction of the seismogenic structure of the mainshock (Maweijing fault) and the direction of the rupture of the aftershocks, but similar to the principal compressional amis of the regional stress field. ⑤Shear wave splitting for sequence of the aftershocks of the Yao'an earthuake was the result of anisotropy of EDA cracks controlled by stress field.

  16. Mantle lithosphere transition from the East European Craton to the Variscan Bohemian Massif imaged by shear-wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, L.; Plomerová, J.; Babuška, V.

    2014-08-01

    We analyse splitting of teleseismic shear waves recorded during the PASSEQ passive experiment (2006-2008) focused on the upper mantle structure across and around the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ). Altogether 1009 pairs of the delay times of the slow split shear waves and orientations of the polarized fast shear waves exhibit lateral variations across the array, as well as back-azimuth dependences of measurements at individual stations. Variable components of the splitting parameters can be associated with fabrics of the mantle lithosphere of tectonic units. In comparison with a distinct regionalization of the splitting parameters in the Phanerozoic part of Europe that particularly in the Bohemian Massif (BM) correlate with the large-scale tectonics, variations of anisotropic parameters around the TESZ and in the East European Craton (EEC) are smooth and of a transitional character. No general and abrupt change in the splitting parameters (anisotropic structure) can be related to the Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone (TTZ), marking the edge of the Precambrian province on the surface. Instead, regional variations of anisotropic structure were found along the TESZ/TTZ. The coherence of anisotropic signals evaluated beneath the northern part of the Brunovistulian in the eastern rim of the BM and the pattern continuation to the NE towards the TTZ, support the idea of a common origin of the lithosphere micro-plates, most probably related to Baltica. Smooth changes in polarizations of the core-mantle boundary refracted shear waves (SKS), polarizations, or even a large number of null splits northward of the BM and further across the TESZ towards the EEC indicate less coherent fabrics and a transitional character of structural changes in the mantle beneath the surface trace of the TESZ/TTZ. The narrow and near-vertical TTZ in the crust does not seem to have a steep continuation in the mantle lithosphere. The mantle part of the TESZ, whose crust was formed by an assemblage of

  17. Drift-wave spectra obtained from the theory of nonlinear ion-Landau damping in sheared magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local character, in poloidal mode-number space, of the resonant nonlinear interaction of drift waves with ions in a sheared magnetic field permits an analytical determination of the spectrum. Important processes underlying the stabilization are energy cascade and transfer, respectively, in ''close'' (k'/sub Theta/approx. =k/sub Theta/) and ''distant'' (k'/sub Theta/a/sub s/approx. =1/k/sub Theta/a/sub s/) interactions. The spectral index n = 4 of the high-mode-number tail is independent of the excitation mechanism

  18. Feasibility of transient elastography versus real-time two-dimensional shear wave elastography in difficult-to-scan patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staugaard, Benjamin; Christensen, Peer Brehm; Mössner, Belinda;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Transient elastography (TE) is hampered in some patients by failures and unreliable results. We hypothesized that real time two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2D-SWE), the FibroScan XL probe, and repeated TE exams, could be used to obtain reliable liver stiffness...... skin-capsule distance (OR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.67-0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Transient elastography can be accomplished in nearly all patients by use of the FibroScan XL probe and repeated examinations. In difficult-to-scan patients, the feasibility of TE is superior to 2D-SWE....

  19. The dynamic behavior of two collinear cracks in magneto-electro-elastic composites under harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-guo; WU Lin-zhi

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of two collinear cracks in magneto-electro-elastic composites under harmonic anti-plane shear waves is studied using the Schmidt method for the permeable crack surface conditions. By using the Fourier transform, the problem can be solved with a set of triple integral equations in which the unknown variable is the jump of the displacements across the crack surfaces. In solving the triple integral equations, the jump of the displacements across the crack surface is expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. It can be obtained that the stress field is independent of the electric field and the magnetic flux.

  20. Preliminary Results of Near-Surface Shear-Wave Velocity Models and Seismic Site Conditions in Gangneung, Korea Using Rayleigh-Wave Dispersion Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Kim, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    To determine the near-surface shear wave velocities (Vs) and seismic site characteristics in densely populated areas in Gangneung on the eastern coast of Korea, passive and active surface waves were recorded at 117 sites of low altitude using twelve or twenty four 4.5-Hz geophones and a 24-channel engineering seismograph during this year. An 8-kg wooden hammer was used as an active source. The seismic waves were recorded for 8 to 30 s and digitized at 125 to 500 Hz sample rates. Dispersion images of the Rayleigh waves were obtained by the extended spatial autocorrelation (ESPAC) method. At 46 recording sites, the overburden layer was too thick to investigate bedrock with this shallow geophysical method. Shear-wave velocity models were derived from the estimated dispersion curves using the damped least-squares inversion scheme. From these 1-D velocity models, estimated mean values of Vs at the top of bedrock, depth to the bedrock, average Vs of the overburden layer, and average Vs of the top 30-m depth (Vs30) are 672±37 m/s, 17±0.5 m, 253±9 m/s, and 343±15 m/s, respectively, in the 95% confidence range. The estimated values from the inverted profiles were interpolated to yield maps for the entire low altitude area. Most of the investigated areas in Gangneung belong to NEHRP site class D (58%), C (34%), E (4%), and B (4%). In downtown area, both the lower estimates of Vs30 and thick overburden layer make it more prone to significant ground amplifications. The computed correlation coefficients (r) of Vs30 with elevation and topographic gradient, on linear scales, are 0.7 and 0.6, respectively.

  1. Pearson相关系数法快慢横波波场分离%Wave filed separation of fast-slow shear waves by Pearson correlation coefficient method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 冯晅; 刘财

    2012-01-01

    横波分裂是各向异性介质的重要特征,当横波或转换波穿过各向异性介质到达地面时,地面三分量检波器的x分量和y分量接收到的地震记录中都会同时存在快横波和慢横波.将快横波和慢横波进行分离,进而计算介质的各向异性参数是多分量数据处理中重要的一步.将数学中的Pearson相关系数引入到多分量地震勘探中,提出了Pearson相关系数法进行旋转角度识别,进而分离快、慢横波波场.相比于传统的互相关法,Pearson相关系数法从精度、抗噪性能和计算效率上都有提高.%Shear-wave splitting is an important characteristic of anisotropic media. Generally, when S or P-SV waves reach to the ground through anisotropic media, the seismic record received by x component and y component of three-component detector contains fast wave and slow wave simultaneously- Separating fast wave and slow wave and then calculating the anisotropic parameters of media are an important step in multi-component data processing. The authors introduce the Pearson correlation coefficients into multi-component seismic exploration and propose the Pearson correlation coefficients to detect the rotation angle and then separate the fast wave and slow wave. Compared with the traditional cross-correlation method, the Pearson correlation coefficient method is better in accuracy, noise immunity and computational efficiency.

  2. SCATTERING OF ANTI-PLANE SHEAR WAVES IN A FUNCTIONALLY GRADED MATERIAL STRIP WITH AN OFF-CENTER VERTICAL CRACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; ZHOU Zhen-gong; WANG Biao

    2006-01-01

    The scattering problem of anti-plane shear waves in a functionally graded material strip with an off-center crack is investigated by use of Schmidt method. The crack is vertically to the edge of the strip. By using the Fourier transform, the problem can be solved with the help of a pair of dual integral equations that the unknown variable is the jump of the displacement across the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the jump of the displacement across the crack surfaces was expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Numerical examples were provided to show the effects of the parameter describing the functionally graded materials, the position of the crack and the frequency of the incident waves upon the stress intensity factors of the crack.

  3. A new impulsive seismic shear wave source for near-surface (0-30 m) seismic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Estimates of elastic moduli and fluid content in shallow (0-30 m) natural soils below artificial flood containment structures can be particularly useful in levee monitoring as well as seismic hazard studies. Shear wave moduli may be estimated from horizontally polarized, shear wave experiments. However, long profiles (>10 km) with dense receiver and shot spacings (hammer blows to ground-planted stationary targets. Our source is coupled to the ground with steel spikes and the powder charge can be detonated mechanically or electronically. Electrical fuses show repeatability in start times of seismic amplitudes equivalent to three 4-kg sledge-hammer blows. We test this device to elucidate near subsurface sediment properties at former levee breach sites in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Our radio-telemetric seismic acquisition system uses an in-house landstreamer, consisting of 14-Hz horizontal component geophones, coupled to steel plates. Reflected, refracted and surface arrivals resulting from a single shot of this seismic source are comparable in signal, noise, and frequency composition to three stacked hammer blows to a ground-planted stationary target.

  4. Measurement of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of shear waves in two sedimentary basins and comparison to crystalline sites in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    We developed an improved method for the separation of intrinsic and scattering attenuation of seismic shear waves by envelope inversion called Qopen. The method optimizes the fit between Green's functions for the acoustic, isotropic radiative transfer theory and observed energy densities of earthquakes. The inversion allows the determination of scattering and intrinsic attenuation, site corrections and spectral source energies for the investigated frequency bands. Source displacement spectrum and the seismic moment of the analysed events can be estimated from the obtained spectral source energies. We report intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients of shear waves near three geothermal reservoirs in Germany for frequencies between 1 and 70 Hz. The geothermal reservoirs are located in Insheim, Landau (both Upper Rhine Graben) and Unterhaching (Molasse basin). We compare these three sedimentary sites to two sites located in crystalline rock with respect to scattering and intrinsic attenuation. The inverse quality factor for intrinsic attenuation is constant in sediments for frequencies smaller than 10 Hz and decreasing for higher frequencies. For crystalline rock, it is on a lower level and strictly monotonic decreasing with frequency. Intrinsic attenuation dominates scattering except for the Upper Rhine Graben, where scattering is dominant for frequencies below 10 Hz. Observed source displacement spectra show a high-frequency fall-off greater than or equal to 3.

  5. Site response, shallow shear-wave velocity, and damage in Los Gatos, California, from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, S.; Carver, D.; Williams, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Aftershock records of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake are used to calculate site response in the frequency band of 0.5-10 Hz at 24 locations in Los Gatos, California, on the edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Two different methods are used: spectral ratios relative to a reference site on rock and a source/site spectral inversion method. These two methods complement each other and give consistent results. Site amplification factors are compared with surficial geology, thickness of alluvium, shallow shear-wave velocity measurements, and ground deformation and structural damage resulting from the Loma Prieta earthquake. Higher values of site amplification are seen on Quaternary alluvium compared with older Miocene and Cretaceous units of Monterey and Franciscan Formation. However, other more detailed correlations with surficial geology are not evident. A complex pattern of alluvial sediment thickness, caused by crosscutting thrust faults, is interpreted as contributing to the variability in site response and the presence of spectral resonance peaks between 2 and 7 Hz at some sites. Within the range of our field measurements, there is a correlation between lower average shear-wave velocity of the top 30 m and 50% higher values of site amplification. An area of residential homes thrown from their foundations correlates with high site response. This damage may also have been aggravated by local ground deformation. Severe damage to commercial buildings in the business district, however, is attributed to poor masonry construction.

  6. Seismic surface-wave dispersion profiling versus shear-wave refraction tomography on a granite-micaschists contact at Plœmeur hydrological observatory (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, S.; Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Guérin, R.; Longuevergne, L.; Faycal, R.

    2013-12-01

    Despite well-known generation and detection issues, shear (S-) wave-related techniques grow in popularity with the increase of multicomponent data acquisitions in hydrocarbon exploration. In the meantime, recent studies demonstrated that pressure (P-) wave reflection, P-wave refraction and surface-wave dispersion data could be simultaneously acquired and analyzed for the characterization of the investigated medium. Retrieving 2D P-wave velocity (Vp) and S-wave velocity (Vs) sections with a single standard acquisition setup appears promising and attractive in terms of time and equipment costs, more particularly in the context of near-surface applications (at depth lower than 100 m). The literature even shows recent attempts of using Vp/Vs ratio to estimate hydrological parameters of aquifer systems. But refraction tomography and surface-wave dispersion inversion obviously involve distinct characteristics of the wavefield and different assumptions about the medium. The methods consequently provide results of different resolutions and investigation depths. We addressed these issues thanks to a seismic survey conducted on a well-known granite-micaschists contact at Plœmeur hydrological observatory (France). We performed simultaneous P-wave refraction tomography and surface-wave profiling, along with SH-wave refraction tomography, on a line intersecting the contact zone. The combined interpretation of Vp and Vs sections retrieved from refraction tomography helps defining the lateral extent of the contact zone, when only one section is insufficient. As for surface-wave profiling, we used offset moving windows and dispersion stacking techniques to extract a collection of local dispersion measurements along the line. We then inverted each dispersion curve separately and reconstructed a pseudo-2D Vs section along the profile. Three different window sizes were tested. They provide sections evidently different in terms of lateral resolution and investigation depth. To select

  7. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  8. Shear wave velocity profile estimation by integrated analysis of active and passive seismic data from small aperture arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontsi, A. M.; Ohrnberger, M.; Krüger, F.

    2016-07-01

    We present an integrated approach for deriving the 1D shear wave velocity (Vs) information at few tens to hundreds of meters down to the first strong impedance contrast in typical sedimentary environments. We use multiple small aperture seismic arrays in 1D and 2D configuration to record active and passive seismic surface wave data at two selected geotechnical sites in Germany (Horstwalde & Löbnitz). Standard methods for data processing include the Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method that exploits the high frequency content in the active data and the sliding window frequency-wavenumber (f-k) as well as the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) methods that exploit the low frequency content in passive seismic data. Applied individually, each of the passive methods might be influenced by any source directivity in the noise wavefield. The advantages of active shot data (known source location) and passive microtremor (low frequency content) recording may be combined using a correlation based approach applied to the passive data in the so called Interferometric Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (IMASW). In this study, we apply those methods to jointly determine and interpret the dispersion characteristics of surface waves recorded at Horstwalde and Löbnitz. The reliability of the dispersion curves is controlled by applying strict limits on the interpretable range of wavelengths in the analysis and further avoiding potentially biased phase velocity estimates from the passive f-k method by comparing to those derived from the SPatial AutoCorrelation method (SPAC). From our investigation at these two sites, the joint analysis as proposed allows mode extraction in a wide frequency range (~ 0.6-35 Hz at Horstwalde and ~ 1.5-25 Hz at Löbnitz) and consequently improves the Vs profile inversion. To obtain the shear wave velocity profiles, we make use of a global inversion approach based on the neighborhood algorithm to invert the interpreted branches of the

  9. Study on Shear Wave Velocity Structure and Velocity Ratio Beneath Ordos Block and Its Eastern and Southern Margins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xuemin; Diao Guiling; Shu Peiyi

    2004-01-01

    Using pure S wave fitting method, we studied the shear wave velocity structures under the Ordos block and its eastern and southern marginal areas. The results show that the velocity structure beneath Yulin station in the interior of Ordos block is relatively stable, where no apparent change between high and low velocity layers exists and the shear wave velocity increases steadily with the depth. There is a 12km thick layer at the depth of 25km under this station, with an S wave velocity ( Vs = 3.90km/s) lower than that at the same depth in its eastern and southern areas (Vs ≥ 4.00km/s). The crust under the eastern margin of Ordos block is thicker than that of the Yulin station, and the velocity structures alternate between the high and Iow velocity layers, with more low velocity layers. It has the same characteristic as having a 10km-thick low velocity layer ( Vs = 3.80km/s) in the lower crust but buried at a depth of about 35km. Moreover, we studied the Vi/Vs ratio under each station in combination with the result of P wave velocity inversion. The results show that, the average velocity ratio of the Yulin station at the interior of Ordos block is only 1.68, with a very low ratio (about 1.60)in the upper crust and a stable ratio of about 1.73 in the mid and lower crust, which indicates the media under this station is homogenous and stable, being in a state of rigidity. But at the stations in the eastern and southern margins of the Ordos block, several layers of high velocity ratio (about 1.80) have been found, in which the average velocity ratio under Kelan and Lishi stations at the eastern margin is systemically higher than that of the general elastical body waves (1.732). This reflects that the crust under the marginal areas is more active relatively,and other materials may exist in these layers. Finally, we discussed the relationship among earthquakes, velocity structures beneath stations and faults.

  10. AN INVESTIGATION TO DOCUMENT MORROW RESERVOIRS THAT CAN BE BETTER DETECTED WITH SEISMIC SHEAR (S) WAVES THAN WITH COMPRESSIONAL (P) WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Cottman

    2001-10-19

    Pennsylvanian-age Morrow reservoirs are a key component of a large fluvial-deltaic system that extends across portions of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. A problem that operators have to solve in some Morrow plays in this multi-state area is that many of the fluvial channels within the Morrow interval are invisible to seismic compressional (P) waves. This P-wave imaging problem forces operators in such situations to site infill, field-extension, and exploration wells without the aid of 3-D seismic technology. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate seismic technology that can improve drilling success in Morrow plays. Current P-wave technology commonly results in 80-percent of Morrow exploration wells not penetrating economic reservoir facies. Studies at Colorado School of Mines have shown that some of the Morrow channels that are elusive as P-wave targets create robust shear (S) wave reflections (Rampton, 1995). These findings caused Visos Energy to conclude that exploration and field development of Morrow prospects should be done by a combination of P-wave and S-wave seismic imaging. To obtain expanded information about the P and S reflectivity of Morrow facies, 9-component vertical seismic profile (9-C VSP) data were recorded at three locations along the Morrow trend. These data were processed to create P and S images of Morrow stratigraphy. These images were then analyzed to determine if S waves offer an alternative to P waves, or perhaps even an advantage over P waves, in imaging Morrow reservoir targets. The study areas where these field demonstrations were done are defined in Figure 1. Well A was in Sherman County, Texas; well B in Clark County, Kansas; and well C in Cheyenne County, Colorado. Technology demonstrated at these sites can be applied over a wide geographical area and influence operators across the multi-state region spanned by Morrow channel plays. The scope of the investigation described here is significant on the

  11. Wide Angle Converted Shear Wave Analysis of North Atlantic Volcanic Rifted Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccles, J. D.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    High-quality, wide-angle, ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data have been acquired with a low frequency (9 Hz) seismic source across the Faroes and Hatton Bank volcanic rifted continental margins in the North Atlantic. In these regions thick Tertiary flood basalt sequences provide a challenge to deep seismic imaging. S-wave arrivals, which are dominantly converted from P- to S-waves at the sediment-top basalt interface, were recorded at 170 4-component OBS locations. Variation in the conversion efficiency was observed along the profiles. Tomographic inversion of over 70,000 converted S-wave crustal diving waves and Moho reflections was performed to produce S-wave velocity models and hence, when combined with pre-existing P-wave velocity models, a measure of the Vp/Vs ratio structure of the crust. Resolution testing shows the structure of the oceanic crust and continent-ocean transition is generally well resolved on both profiles. Lateral and vertical changes in Vp/Vs resolves changing crustal composition within, and between, oceanic and continental crust, including regions in the lower crust at the continent-ocean transition with high P-wave velocities of up to 7.5 km/s and low Vp/Vs ratios of ~ 1.75 associated with intense high-temperature intrusion at the time of break-up. Vp/Vs ratios of 1.75-1.80 at the base of the thickened oceanic crust are also lower than generally reported in normal oceanic crust. The P-wave travel-time tomography revealed a low velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the basalt on the Faroes margin and additional constraint on the Vp/Vs of the LVZ beneath the Fugloy Ridge has been gained by analysing the relative travel-time delays between basalt and basement refractions for P- and S-waves. This approach is less subject to the velocity-depth ambiguity associated with velocity inversions than is the determination of P- or S- wave velocity alone. Comparison of the calculated Vp/Vs ratio and P-wave velocity with measurements from relevant lithologies

  12. Anisotropic upper crust above the aftershock zone of the 2013 Ms 7.0 Lushan earthquake from the shear wave splitting analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Haijiang; Zhang, Xin; Pei, Shunping; An, Meijian; Dong, Shuwen

    2015-10-01

    We have conducted a systematic shear wave splitting analysis using 1000 selected aftershocks with M > 2 from the 2013 Ms 7.0 Lushan earthquake along the Longmenshan fault system in southwest China. Polarization directions of fast shear waves show a bimodal distribution with one dominant direction approximately parallel to the fault strike and the other close to the regional maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. This indicates that in this area mechanisms causing crustal seismic anisotropy are both stress induced and fault zone structure controlled. Delay times between fast and slow shear waves do not show a clear trend of increase for deeper events, suggesting the anisotropic zone is mostly above the aftershocks, which are generally located below 8 km. We further applied a shear wave splitting tomography method to measured delay times to characterize the spatial distribution of seismic anisotropy. The three-dimensional anisotropic percentage model shows strong anisotropy above 8 km but low anisotropy below it. The mainshock slip zone and its aftershocks are associated with very low or negligible anisotropy and high velocity, indicating that the zones with high anisotropy and low velocity above 8 km are mechanically weak and it is difficult for stress to accumulate there. The main and back reverse fault zones are associated with high anisotropic anomalies above ˜8 km, likely caused by shear fabric or microfractures aligned parallel to the fault zone.

  13. Wave-current bottom shear stresses and sediment re-suspension in the mouth bar of the Modaomen Estuary during the dry season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Liangwen; REN Jie; NIE Dan; CHEN Benzhong; LV Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of the measurement data pertaining to waves, current, and sediment in February 2012 in the mouth bar of the Modaomen Estuary, the Soulsby formulae with an iterative method are applied to calculat-ing bottom shear stresses (BSS) and their effect on a sediment re-suspension. Swell-induced BSS have been found to be the most important part of the BSS. In this study, the correlation coefficient between a wave-current shear stress and SSC is 0.86, and that between current shear stresses and SSC is only 0.40. The peaks of the SSC are consistent with the height and the BSS of the swell. The swell is the main mechanism for the sediment re-suspension, and the tidal current effect on sediment re-suspension is small. The peaks of the SSC are centered on the high tidal level, and the flood tide enhances the wave shear stresses and the SSC near the bottom. The critical shear stress for sediment re-suspension at the observation station is between 0.20 and 0.30 N/m2. Tidal currents are too weak to stir up the bottom sediment into the flow, but a WCI (wave-current interaction) is strong enough to re-suspend the coarse sediment.

  14. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics Talk: On Nonlinear Physics of Shear Alfv'en Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liu

    2012-10-01

    Shear Alfv'en Waves (SAW) are electromagnetic oscillations prevalent in laboratory and nature magnetized plasmas. Due to its anisotropic propagation property, it is well known that the linear wave propagation and dispersiveness of SAW are fundamentally affected by plasma nonuniformities and magnetic field geometries; for example, the existence of continuous spectrum, spectral gaps, and discrete eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas. This talk will discuss the crucial roles that nonuniformity and geometry could also play in the physics of nonlinear SAW interactions. More specifically, the focus will be on the Alfv'enic state and its breaking up by finite compressibility, non-ideal kinetic effects, and geometry. In the case of compressibility, finite ion-Larmor-radius effects are shown to qualitatively and quantitatively modify the three-wave parametric decays via the ion-sound perturbations. In the case of geometry, the spontaneous excitation of zonal structures by toroidal Alfv'en eigenmodes is investigated; demonstrating that, for realistic tokamak geometries, zonal current dominates over zonal flow. [4pt] Present address: Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

  15. Teleseismic shear-wave splitting in SE Tibet: Insight into complex crust and upper-mantle deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhouchuan; Wang, Liangshu; Xu, Mingjie; Ding, Zhifeng; Wu, Yan; Wang, Pan; Mi, Ning; Yu, Dayong; Li, Hua

    2015-12-01

    We measured shear-wave splitting of teleseismic XKS phases (i.e., SKS, SKKS and PKS) recorded by more than 300 temporary ChinArray stations in Yunnan of SE Tibet. The first-order pattern of XKS splitting measurements shows that the fast polarization directions (φ) change (at ∼26-27°N) from dominant N-S in the north to E-W in the south. While splitting observations around the eastern Himalayan syntax well reflect anisotropy in the lithosphere under left-lateral shear deformation, the dominant E-W φ to the south of ∼26°N is consistent with the maximum extension in the crust and suggest vertically coherent pure-shear deformation throughout the lithosphere in Yunnan. However, the thin lithosphere (<80 km) could account for only part (<0.7 s) of the observed splitting delay times (δt, 0.9-1.5 s). Anisotropy in the asthenosphere is necessary to explain the NW-SE and nearly E-W φ in these regions. The NE-SW φ can be explained by the counter flow caused by the subduction and subsequent retreat of the Burma slab. The E-W φ is consistent with anisotropy due to the absolute plate motion in SE Tibet and the eastward asthenospheric flow from Tibet to eastern China accompanying the tectonic evolution of the plateau. Our results provide new information on different deformation fields in different layers under SE Tibet, which improves our understanding on the complex geodynamics related to the tectonic uplift and southeastward expansion of Tibetan material under the plateau.

  16. Seismic response due to travelling shear wave including soil-structure interaction with base-mat uplift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic response due to a travelling shear wave is investigated. The resulting input consists of a translational- and a torsional-acceleration time history. The combined result of the translational and torsional elastic response (the latter arises even in an axisymmetric structure) will not, in general, be larger than that encountered in the case of a spatially uniform earthquake. If the footing slips or becomes partially separated from the soil, a nonlinear dynamic analysis is performed. Substantial motions in all three directions will take place. A nuclear-reactor building is used for illustration. The peak structural responses and the floor - response spectra are found to be highly nonlinear for high acceleration input values

  17. Retrieval of Moho-reflected shear wave arrivals from ambient seismic noise

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Zhongwen; Ni, Sidao; Helmberger, Don V.; Clayton, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical studies on ambient seismic noise (ASN) predict that complete Green's function between seismic stations can be retrieved from cross correlation. However, only fundamental mode surface waves emerge in most studies involving real data. Here we show that Moho-reflected body wave (SmS) and its multiples can be identified with ASN for station pairs near their critical distances in the short period band (1–5 s). We also show that an uneven distribution of noise sources, such as mining ac...

  18. Classification of earthquake site effects by shallow reflection seismics using a shear-wave land-streamer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, U.; Arsyad, I.; Wiyono, S.; Krawczyk, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Touched in the SW by the Great Sumatra Fault, the densely populated delta of the Krueng Aceh River consists mainly of young alluvial sediments of clay, sand and gravel with partially high organic content. The depth of this sediment body and its internal structure are widely unknown. Whereas traditional timber constructed buildings are mostly unaffected by strong earthquakes, the change to concrete building techniques added a significant new and locally unknown seismic risk in this region. The classification of earthquake site effects in the city of Banda Aceh and the surrounding region of Aceh Besar was the aim of a high-resolution shear-wave reflection seismic survey in the Indonesian province Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. In cooperation with the Government of Indonesia and local counterparts, this was part of the Project "Management of Georisk" of the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources. Using shear-wave reflection seismics in combination with a land streamer has proven to be an enormously useful method in the sedimentary regions of the Aceh province with an easy and fast recording operation. In addition, the specialized seismic system accounts for compacted soil surfaces which allows a wide range of applications within cities, industrial sites, paved roads and also on small dirt roads. Using a vibrator seismic source, this technique was applied successfully also in areas of high building density in the city of Banda Aceh or in the surrounding mostly agricultural environment. Combined with standard geoengineering investigations like cone penetrometer tests, it was possible to evaluate the soil stiffness in populated urban areas down to 100 m depth in terms of the IBC2003. This is important for the exploration of new areas for save building foundation and groundwater aquifer detection in the tsunami-flooded region.

  19. Generation of intermediately-long sea waves by weakly sheared winds

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyavski, V M; Golbraikh, E; Mond, M

    2010-01-01

    The present work concerns the numeric modeling of the sea-wave instability under the effect of the logarithmic-wind profile at hurricane conditions. Non-linear effects, such as wave breaking, foam production, etc. Powell et al. (2003), Shtemler et al. (2010) are ignored. The central point of the study is the calculation of the wave growth rate, which is proportional to the fractional input energy from the wind to the wave exponentially varied with time. The present modeling demonstrates that the Miles-type model applying Charnock's formula for roughness to the hurricane-wind parameters underestimates the growth rate from 5 to 40 times as compared with the model employing the roughness and friction velocity adopted from experimental data for hurricane winds.1 This occurs due to Charnock's formula fails at large wind speeds. The stability characteristics found on the base of the hurricane-wind experimental parameters are consistent with the other results of the observations. Obtained in the present study a maxi...

  20. Generation of intermediately-long sea waves by weakly sheared winds

    CERN Document Server

    Chernyavski, V M; Golbraikh, E; Mond, M

    2010-01-01

    The present work concerns the numeric modeling of the sea-wave instability under the effect of the logarithmic wind at hurricane conditions (ignoring non-linear effects, such as wave breaking, foam production, etc. Powell et al. (2003)^1, Shtemler et al. (2003)^2. The central point of the study is the calculation of the growth rate, which is proportional to the fractional input energy from the wind to the wave exponentially varied with time. The present modeling demonstrates that the Miles-type model applying Charnock's formula Charnock (1955)^3 for roughness to the hurricane -wind parameters underestimates the growth rate of the wind waves 5-40 times as compared with the model employing the roughness and friction velocity adopted from experimental data for hurricane winds.^1 This occurs due to Charnock's formula fails at large wind speeds. The stability characteristics obtained on the base of the hurricane-wind experimental parameters are self-consistent with the other results of the observations. A maximum ...

  1. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    measurements in the core material: (1) core material with an idealized armour layer made out of spherical objects that also allowed for detailed velocity measurements between and above the armour, and (2) core material with real rock armour stones. The same core material was applied through the entire......This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... pressure gradients were found which exerted a lift force up to ≈60% of the submerged weight of the core material. These maximum outward directed pressure gradients were linked to the maximum run-down event and were in general situated at, or slightly below, the maximum run-down level. Detailed velocity...

  2. An automatic differentiation-based gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in magnetic resonance elastography: specific application in fibrous soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelin, Simon; Charpentier, Isabelle; Corbin, Nadège; Meylheuc, Laurence; Vappou, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative and accurate measurement of in vivo mechanical properties using dynamic elastography has been the scope of many research efforts over the past two decades. Most of the shear-wave-based inverse approaches for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) make the assumption of isotropic viscoelasticity. In this paper, we propose a quantitative gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in anisotropic media derived from a full waveform description using analytical viscoelastic Green formalism and automatic differentiation. The abilities and performances of the proposed identification method are first evaluated on numerical phantoms calculated in a transversely isotropic medium, and subsequently on experimental MRE data measured on an isotropic hydrogel phantom, on an anisotropic cryogel phantom and on an ex vivo fibrous muscle. The experiments are carried out by coupling circular shear wave profiles generated by acoustic radiation force and MRE acquisition of the wave front. Shear modulus values obtained by our MRE method are compared to those obtained by rheometry in the isotropic hydrogel phantom, and are found to be in good agreement despite non-overlapping frequency ranges. Both the cryogel and the ex vivo muscle are found to be anisotropic. Stiffness values in the longitudinal direction are found to be 1.8 times and 1.9 times higher than those in the transverse direction for the cryogel and the muscle, respectively. The proposed method shows great perspectives and substantial benefits for the in vivo quantitative investigation of complex mechanical properties in fibrous soft tissues.

  3. Evaluation of healthy muscle tissue by strain and shear wave elastography – Dependency on depth and ROI position in relation to underlying bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Carlsen, Jonathan Frederik; Christiansen, Iben Riishede;

    2016-01-01

    and methods: Ten healthy volunteers (five males and five females) had their biceps brachii, gastrocnemius, and quadriceps muscle examined with strain- and shear wave elastography at three different depths and in regions located above bone and beside bone. Strain ratios were averaged from cine-loops of 10 s...

  4. An automatic differentiation-based gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in magnetic resonance elastography: specific application in fibrous soft tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelin, Simon; Charpentier, Isabelle; Corbin, Nadège; Meylheuc, Laurence; Vappou, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative and accurate measurement of in vivo mechanical properties using dynamic elastography has been the scope of many research efforts over the past two decades. Most of the shear-wave-based inverse approaches for magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) make the assumption of isotropic viscoelasticity. In this paper, we propose a quantitative gradient method for inversion of the shear wave equation in anisotropic media derived from a full waveform description using analytical viscoelastic Green formalism and automatic differentiation. The abilities and performances of the proposed identification method are first evaluated on numerical phantoms calculated in a transversely isotropic medium, and subsequently on experimental MRE data measured on an isotropic hydrogel phantom, on an anisotropic cryogel phantom and on an ex vivo fibrous muscle. The experiments are carried out by coupling circular shear wave profiles generated by acoustic radiation force and MRE acquisition of the wave front. Shear modulus values obtained by our MRE method are compared to those obtained by rheometry in the isotropic hydrogel phantom, and are found to be in good agreement despite non-overlapping frequency ranges. Both the cryogel and the ex vivo muscle are found to be anisotropic. Stiffness values in the longitudinal direction are found to be 1.8 times and 1.9 times higher than those in the transverse direction for the cryogel and the muscle, respectively. The proposed method shows great perspectives and substantial benefits for the in vivo quantitative investigation of complex mechanical properties in fibrous soft tissues.

  5. Tunnel effect of fractal fault and transient S-wave velocity rupture (TSVR) of in-plane shear fault

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Transient S-wave velocity rupture (TSVR) means the velocity of fault rupture propagation is between S-wave velocity βand P-wave velocity α. Its existing in the rupture of in-plane (i.e. strike-slip) fault has been proved, but in 2-dimensional classical model, there are two difficulties in transient S-wave velocity rupture, i.e., initialization difficulty and divergence difficulty in interpreting the realization of TSVR. The initialization difficulty means, when v↑vR (Rayleigh wave velocity), the dynamic stress strength factor K2(t)→+0, and changes from positive into negative in the interval (vR,β). How v transit the forbidden of (vR,β)? The divergence difficulty means K2(t)→+ when v↓. Here we introduce the concept of fractal and tunnel effect that exist everywhere in fault. The structure of all the faults is fractal with multiple cracks. The velocity of fault rupture is differentiate of the length of the fault respect to time, so the rupture velocity is also fractal. The tunnel effect means the dynamic rupture crosses over the interval of the cracks, and the coalescence of the intervals is slower than the propagation of disturbance. Suppose the area of earthquake nucleation is critical or sub-critical propagation everywhere, the arriving of disturbance triggers or accelerates the propagation of cracks tip at once, and the observation system cannot distinguish the front of disturbance and the tip of fracture. Then the speed of disturbance may be identified as fracture velocity, and the phenomenon of TSVR appears, which is an apparent velocity. The real reason of apparent velocity is that the mathematics model of shear rupture is simplified of complex process originally. The dual character of rupture velocity means that the apparent velocity of fault and the real velocity of micro-crack extending, which are different in physics, but are unified in rupture criterion. Introducing the above-mentioned concept to the calculation of K2 (t), the difficulty of

  6. Inversion of surface wave data for subsurface shear wave velocity profiles characterized by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterized by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (traveltime average sear wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterized by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  7. Source study of local coalfield events using the modal synthesis of shear and surface waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacBeth, C.D.; Redmayne, D.W.

    1989-10-01

    Results from the BGS LOWNET array from the Midlothian coalfield in Scotland have been studied. Vertical component seismograms have been analysed using a waveform matching technique based on the modal summation method for constructing synthetic seismograms. Results of the analysis are applied to S and surface wave portions of the seismogram. Effects of different earth structures, source depths, source orientation, and type of event, rockburst or triggered earthquake 2-3 km from the mine workings, can be evaluated.

  8. Topographically forced long waves on a sheared coastal current. Part 1. The weakly nonlinear response

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, S. R.; Johnson, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The flow of a constant-vorticity current past coastal topography is investigated in the long-wave weakly nonlinear limit. In contrast to other near-critical weakly nonlinear systems this problem does not exhibit hydraulically controlled solutions. It is shown that near criticality the evolution of the vorticity interface is governed by a forced BDA (Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos) equation. The solutions of this equation are discussed and two distinct near-critical flow regimes are identified. Owing ...

  9. Near-Surface Shear Wave Velocity Versus Depth Profiles, VS30, and NEHRP Classifications for 27 Sites in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odum, Jack K.; Williams, Robert A.; Stephenson, William J.; Worley, David M.; von Hillebrandt-Andrade, Christa; Asencio, Eugenio; Irizarry, Harold; Cameron, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN), Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program (PRSMP) and the Geology Department at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to study near-surface shear-wave (Vs) and compressional-wave (Vp) velocities in and around major urban areas of Puerto Rico. Using noninvasive seismic refraction-reflection profiling techniques, we acquired velocities at 27 locations. Surveyed sites were predominantly selected on the premise that they were generally representative of near-surface materials associated with the primary geologic units located within the urbanized areas of Puerto Rico. Geologic units surveyed included Cretaceous intrusive and volcaniclastic bedrock, Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic units, and Quaternary unconsolidated eolian, fluvial, beach, and lagoon deposits. From the data we developed Vs and Vp depth versus velocity columns, calculated average Vs to 30-m depth (VS30), and derived NEHRP (National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program) site classifications for all sites except one where results did not reach 30-m depth. The distribution of estimated NEHRP classes is as follows: three class 'E' (VS30 below 180 m/s), nine class 'D' (VS30 between 180 and 360 m/s), ten class 'C' (VS30 between 360 and 760 m/s), and four class 'B' (VS30 greater than 760 m/s). Results are being used to calibrate site response at seismograph stations and in the development of regional and local shakemap models for Puerto Rico.

  10. Piezoceramic omnidirectional transduction of the fundamental shear horizontal guide wave mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Pierre; Boivin, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are now routinely used in non-destructive evaluation. In plate-like structures, three fundamental modes can propagate, namely A0, S0 and SH0. Most of the guided wave literature has thus far focused on the use of A0 and/or S0 because these modes are easy to generate in plate-like structures using standard piezoceramic transducers. Yet, at low frequency, A0 and S0 are dispersive. The consequence of dispersion is that signal processing becomes complex for long propagation distances. SH0, on the other hand, has the particularity of being the only non-dispersive guided wave mode. Omnidirectional transduction of SH0 requires a rotational surface stress which cannot be easily generated using standard piezoceramic transducers. This paper presents a transducer concept based on piezoceramic patches assembled to form a discretized circle. The external diameter of the discretized circle was chosen to be half the SH0 wavelength at the desired centre frequency. Finite element simulations using the Comsol Multiphysics environment showed that in a 1.6 mm aluminium plate the modal selectivity of the transducer was more than 25 dB at 100 kHz. A full transducer was built for experimental validation. The experimental modal selectivity was in the region of 20 dB.

  11. Sheared stably stratified turbulence and large-scale waves in a lid driven cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, N; Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I

    2014-01-01

    We investigated experimentally stably stratified turbulent flows in a lid driven cavity with a non-zero vertical mean temperature gradient in order to identify the parameters governing the mean and turbulent flows and to understand their effects on the momentum and heat transfer. We found that the mean velocity patterns (e.g., the form and the sizes of the large-scale circulations) depend strongly on the degree of the temperature stratification. In the case of strong stable stratification, the strong turbulence region is located in the vicinity of the main large-scale circulation. We detected the large-scale nonlinear oscillations in the case of strong stable stratification which can be interpreted as nonlinear internal gravity waves. The ratio of the main energy-containing frequencies of these waves in velocity and temperature fields in the nonlinear stage is about 2. The amplitude of the waves increases in the region of weak turbulence (near the bottom wall of the cavity), whereby the vertical mean temperat...

  12. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  13. SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Beecherl; Bob A. Hardage

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical geologic condition in a more optimal way than

  14. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  15. Compressional and Shear Wave Structure of the Upper Crust Beneath the Endeavour Segment, Juan De Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Weekly, R. T.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We present tomographic images of the compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocity structure of the upper crust beneath the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This ridge segment is bounded by the Endeavour and Cobb overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) to the north and south, respectively. Near the segment center an axial magma chamber (AMC) reflector underlies 5 hydrothermal vent fields. Our analysis uses data from the Endeavour tomography (ETOMO) experiment. A prior study of the Vp structure indicates that the shallow crust of the Endeavour segment is strongly heterogeneous [Weekly et al., 2014]. Beneath the OSCs Vp is anomalously low, indicating tectonic fracturing. Near the segment center, upper crustal Vp is relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields, likely due to infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed immediately above the AMC, reflecting increased fracturing or higher temperatures. Anisotropic tomography reveals large amplitude ridge-parallel seismic anisotropy on-axis (>10%), but decreases in the off-axis direction over 5-10 km. Here we use crustal S-wave phases (Sg) — generated by P-to-S conversions near the seafloor — to better constrain crustal properties. Over half the OBSs in the ETOMO experiment recorded horizontal data on two channels that are of sufficiently high quality that we can orient the geophones using the polarizations of water waves from shots within 12 km. For these OBSs, crustal Sg phases are commonly visible out to ranges of ~20-25 km. We invert the Sg data separately for Vs structure, and also jointly invert Pg and Sg data to constrain the Vp/Vs ratio. Preliminary inversions indicate that Vs and Vp/Vs varies both laterally and vertically. These results imply strong lateral variations in both the physical (e.g., crack density and aspect ratio) and chemical (e.g., hydration) properties of oceanic crust.

  16. Interaction of Water Waves and a Submerged Parabolic Obstacle in the Presence of a Following Uniform/Shear Current Using RANS Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Lung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper simulates regular waves propagating over a submerged parabolic obstacle in the presence of a uniform/shear current using a two-dimensional numerical model, named COBRAS (Cornell Breaking and Structure. The numerical model solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations and the free surface deformation is tracked using the volume of fluid method (VOF. The capability of the numerical model to simulate regular waves with a uniform or shear current over a constant water depth is first validated with available analytical solutions and experimental data. Comparisons among the experimental data, analytical solutions, and present numerical results show good agreements. Then, regular waves propagating over a submerged parabolic obstacle with a following current are investigated. Detailed discussions including those on the velocity and vorticity fields and the relation between free surface and vorticity are given.

  17. Shear Bloch waves and coupled phonon-polariton in periodic piezoelectric waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piliposyan, D G; Ghazaryan, K B; Piliposian, G T

    2014-02-01

    Coupled electro-elastic SH waves propagating in a periodic piezoelectric finite-width waveguide are considered in the framework of the full system of Maxwell's electrodynamic equations. We investigate Bloch-Floquet waves under homogeneous or alternating boundary conditions for the elastic and electromagnetic fields along the guide walls. Zero frequency stop bands, trapped modes as well as some anomalous features due to piezoelectricity are identified. For mixed boundary conditions, by modulating the ratio of the length of the unit cell to the width of the waveguide, the minimum widths of the stop bands can be moved to the middle of the Brillouin zone. The dispersion equation has been investigated also for phonon-polariton band gaps. It is shown that for waveguides at acoustic frequencies, acousto-optic coupling gives rise to polariton behavior at wavelengths much larger than the length of the unit cell but at optical frequencies polariton resonance occurs at wavelengths comparable with the period of the waveguide. PMID:24139302

  18. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  19. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  20. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganau, Sergi, E-mail: sganau@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Andreu, Francisco Javier, E-mail: xandreu@tauli.cat [Pathology Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Escribano, Fernanda, E-mail: fescribano@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Martín, Amaya, E-mail: amartino@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Tortajada, Lidia, E-mail: ltortajada@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Villajos, Maite, E-mail: mvillajos@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  1. New process model for the Dead Sea sinkholes at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, derived from shear-wave reflection seismics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Charlotte M.; Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    In October 2013 a shear wave reflection seismic pilot study was carried out at the most destructive sinkhole site in Jordan, close to the village of Ghor Al Haditha at the South-East end of the Dead Sea. The investigation is part of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association, designed as a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ, and their partners. Since nearly 30 years - apparently contemporaneous to the rapid decrease of the Dead Sea level - ongoing unknown sinkhole processes in the subsurface continuously compromise farming areas, housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure at the investigation site, resulting in massive destructions. Similar processes are observed also at the western border of the Dead Sea. Although many geophysical studies have been carried out at the site since more than 20 years, the subsurface structure and the process itself is quite unknown until yet. In recent years, a massive salt layer at 40 m depth or more was proposed below alluvial fan deposits, which was the target of this reflection seismic pilot study. We spent 10 days in the field and acquired four shear-wave reflection seismic profiles of 1.8 km total length to yield a high-resolution structural image of the subsurface. The lines cover in NW-SE and NE-SW direction the sinkhole-affected area as close as possible to recent collapse structures. There is no evidence for the hypothesized shallow salt layer, at least not down to 100 m probably up to 200 m depth. Instead, the detected subsurface structures show a complex interlock of alluvial fan deposits and marine sedimentation layers of the Dead Sea between 0-200 m depth. Therefore, we propose a new hypothesis for the sinkhole processes in the region: salt-rich marine clay layers are present in the fresh water contact zones inside the alluvial fan, which are destabilized and mobilized by dissolution of the salt contained

  2. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  3. Non-linear 3D Born Shear Wave Tomography in Southeastern Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, A.; Panning, M.; Kim, A.; Romanowicz, B.

    2007-12-01

    We have developed a 3D radially anisotropic shear velocity model of the upper mantle in southeastern Asia from the inversion of long period seismic multimode waveforms. Our approach is based on normal mode perturbation theory, specifically, on a recent modification of the Born approximation, which we call "N-Born", and which includes a non-linear term that allows the accurate inclusion of accumulated phase shifts which arise when the wavepath traverses a spatially extended region with a smooth velocity anomaly of constant sign. We apply the N-Born approximation in the forward modeling part and calculate linear 3D Born kernels in the inverse part. Our starting model is a 3D radially anisotropic model which we derived from a large dataset of teleseismic multimode long period waveforms in the period range 60 to 400 s, using a finite-frequency 2D approximation (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). This model covered a larger region of East Asia (longitude 30 to 150 degrees and latitude -10 to 60 degrees), while our N-Born model is restricted to a smaller subregion (longitude 75 to 150 degrees and latitude 0 to 45 degrees) for computational efficiency. In this subregion, our N-Born isotropic and anisotropic models are both parameterized at relatively short wavelengths corresponding to a spherical spline level 6 (~200km). Our N-Born model can fit waveforms as well as the NACT model, with up to ~ 83% variance reduction. While the models agree in general, the N-Born isotropic model shows a stronger fast velocity anomaly beneath the Tibetan plateau in the depth range of 150 km to 250 km, which disappears at greater depth, consistent with other studies. More importantly, the N-Born anisotropic model can recover well the downwelling structure associated with subducted slabs. Beneath the Tibet plateau, radial anisotropy shows VSH>VSV, which is indicative of horizontal rather than vertical flow and may help distinguish between end member models of the tectonics of Tibet.

  4. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography for Liver Disease. A Critical Appraisal of the Many Actors on the Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscaglia, F; Salvatore, V; Mulazzani, L; Cantisani, V; Schiavone, C

    2016-02-01

    In the last 12 - 18 months nearly all ultrasound manufacturers have arrived to implement ultrasound shear wave elastography modality in their equipment for the assessment of chronic liver disease; the few remaining players are expected to follow in 2016.When all manufacturers rush to a new technology at the same time, it is evident that the clinical demand for this information is of utmost value. Around 1990, there was similar demand for color Doppler ultrasound; high demand for contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was evident at the beginning of this century, and around 2010 demand increased for strain elastography. However, some issues regarding the new shear wave ultrasound technologies must be noted to avoid misuse of the resulting information for clinical decisions. As new articles are expected to appear in 2016 reporting the findings of the new technologies from various companies, we felt that the beginning of this year was the right time to present an appraisal of these issues. We likewise expect that in the meantime EFSUMB will release a new update of the existing guidelines 1 2.The first ultrasound elastography method became available 13 years ago in the form of transient elastography with Fibroscan(®) 3. It was the first technique providing non-invasive quantitive information about the stiffness of the liver and hence regarding the amount of fibrosis in chronic liver disease 3. The innovation was enormous, since a non-invasive modality was finally available to provide findings otherwise achievable only by liver biopsy. In fact, prior to ultrasound elastography, a combination of conventional and Doppler ultrasound parameters were utilized to inform the physician about the presence of cirrhosis and portal hypertension 4. However, skilled operators were required, reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy were suboptimal, and it was not possible to differentiate the pre-cirrhotic stages of fibrosis. All these limitations were substantially improved by

  5. c-Axis zig-zag ZnO film ultrasonic transducers for designing longitudinal and shear wave resonant frequencies and modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagitani, Takahiko; Morisato, Naoki; Takayanagi, Shinji; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2011-05-01

    A method for designing frequencies and modes in ultrasonic transducers above the very-high-frequency (VHF) range is required for ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation and acoustic mass sensors. To obtain the desired longitudinal and shear wave conversion loss characteristics in the transducer, we propose the use of a c-axis zig-zag structure consisting of multilayered c-axis 23° tilted ZnO piezoelectric films. In this structure, every layer has the same thickness, and the c-axis tilt directions in odd and even layers are symmetric with respect to the film surface normal. c-axis zig-zag crystal growth was achieved by using a SiO(2) low-temperature buffer layer. The frequency characteristics of the multilayered transducer were predicted using a transmission line model based on Mason's equivalent circuit. We experimentally demonstrated two types of transducers: those exciting longitudinal and shear waves simultaneously at the same frequency, and those exciting shear waves with suppressed longitudinal waves. PMID:21622061

  6. Staging of Hepatic Fibrosis: Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in the Same Individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To cross-validate liver stiffness (LS) measured on shear wave elastography (SWE) and on magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the same individuals. We included 94 liver transplantation (LT) recipients and 114 liver donors who underwent either MRE or SWE before surgery or biopsy. We determined the technical success rates and the incidence of unreliable LS measurements (LSM) of SWE and MRE. Among the 69 patients who underwent both MRE and SWE, the median and coefficient of variation (CV) of the LSM from each examination were compared and correlated. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in both examinations were calculated in order to exclude the presence of hepatic fibrosis (HF). The technical success rates of MRE and SWE were 96.4% and 92.2%, respectively (p = 0.17), and all of the technical failures occurred in LT recipients. SWE showed 13.1% unreliable LSM, whereas MRE showed no such case (p < 0.05). There was moderate correlation in the LSM in both examinations (r = 0.67). SWE showed a significantly larger median LSM and CV than MRE. Both examinations showed similar diagnostic performance for excluding HF (Az; 0.989, 1.000, respectively). MRE and SWE show moderate correlation in their LSMs, although SWE shows higher incidence of unreliable LSMs in cirrhotic liver

  7. Monitoring Radiofrequency Ablation Using Ultrasound Envelope Statistics and Shear Wave Elastography in the Periablation Period: An In Vitro Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Wan, Yung-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive method for treating tumors. Shear wave elastography (SWE) has been widely applied in evaluating tissue stiffness and final ablation size after RFA. However, the usefulness of periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA remains unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the correlation between periablation SWE imaging and final ablation size. An in vitro porcine liver model was used for experimental validation (n = 36). During RFA with a power of 50 W, SWE images were collected using a clinical ultrasound system. To evaluate the effects of tissue temperature and gas bubbles during RFA, changes in the ablation temperature were recorded, and image echo patterns were measured using B-mode and ultrasound statistical parametric images. After RFA, the gross pathology of each tissue sample was compared with the region of change in the corresponding periablation SWE image. The experimental results showed that the tissue temperature at the ablation site varied between 70°C and 100°C. Hyperechoic regions and changes were observed in the echo amplitude distribution induced by gas bubbles. Under this condition, the confounding effects (including the temperature increase, tissue stiffness increase, and presence of gas bubbles) resulted in artifacts in the periablation SWE images, and the corresponding region correlated with the estimated final ablation size obtained from the gross pathology (r = 0.8). The findings confirm the feasibility of using periablation SWE imaging in assessing RFA. PMID:27603012

  8. Shear Wave Elastography May Add a New Dimension to Ultrasound Evaluation of Thyroid Nodules: Case Series with Comparative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Z. Slapa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although elastography can enhance the differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, its diagnostic performance is not ideal at present. Further improvements in the technique and creation of robust diagnostic criteria are necessary. The purpose of this study was to compare the usefulness of strain elastography and a new generation of elasticity imaging called supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE in differential evaluation of thyroid nodules. Six thyroid nodules in 4 patients were studied. SSWE yielded 1 true-positive and 5 true-negative results. Strain elastography yielded 5 false-positive results and 1 false-negative result. A novel finding appreciated with SSWE, were punctate foci of increased stiffness corresponding to microcalcifications in 4 nodules, some not visible on B-mode ultrasound, as opposed to soft, colloid-inspissated areas visible on B-mode ultrasound in 2 nodules. This preliminary paper indicates that SSWE may outperform strain elastography in differentiation of thyroid nodules with regard to their stiffness. SSWE showed the possibility of differentiation of high echogenic foci into microcalcifications and inspissated colloid, adding a new dimension to thyroid elastography. Further multicenter large-scale studies of thyroid nodules evaluating different elastographic methods are warranted.

  9. The nonlocal solution of two parallel cracks in functionally graded materials subjected to harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liang; Shiping Wu; Shanyi Du

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic interaction of two parallel cracks in functionally graded materials (FGMs) is investigated by means of the non-local theory. To make the analysis tractable, the shear modulus and the material den-sity are assumed to vary exponentially with the coordinate vertical to the crack. To reduce mathematical difficulties, a one-dimensional non-local kemel is used instead of a two-dimensional one for the dynamic problem to obtain stress fields near the crack tips. By use of the Fourier transform,the problem can be solved with the help of two pairs of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variables are the jumps of displacements across the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the jumps of displace-ments across the crack surfaces are expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Unlike the classical elasticity solu-tions, it is found that no stress singularity is present at the crack tips. The non-local elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at the crack tips. The present result provides theoret-ical references helpful for evaluating relevant strength and preventing material failure of FGMs with initial cracks. The magnitude of the finite stress field depends on relevant param-eters, such as the crack length, the distance between two parallel cracks, the parameter describing the FGMs, the fre-quency of the incident waves and the lattice parameter of materials.

  10. Acoustic radiation force impulse induced strain elastography and point shear wave elastography for evaluation of thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xian; Guo, Le-Hang; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Gong, Xue-Hao; Liu, Bo-Ji; Xu, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Yi-Feng; Li, Xiao-Long; Li, Dan-Dan; Qu, Shen; Fang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) induced strain elastography (SE), point shear wave elastography (p-SWE), and their combined use in differentiating thyroid nodules. This retrospective study included 155 thyroid nodules (94 benign and 61 malignant) in 136 patients. Ultrasound, ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE were performed on each nodule. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic efficacy of ARFI-induced SE, p-SWE and their combined use to distinguish benign from malignant thyroid nodules with histological results used as the reference standard. The areas under the ROC for ARFI-induced SE, p-SWE, and their combined use were 0.828, 0.829, and 0.840, respectively (both P > 0.05). The specificity of ARFI-induced SE was higher than that of p-SWE as well as their combined use (both P 10 mm, there were no significant differences in sensitivity and NPV among the three methods in differentiating thyroid nodules (all P > 0.05). In conclusions, ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE are both valuable tools for detecting malignant thyroid nodules. The combined use of ARFI-induced SE and p-SWE improves the diagnostic sensitivity and NPV significantly whereas ARFI-induced SE alone achieves the highest specificity.

  11. Staging of Hepatic Fibrosis: Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Elastography and Shear Wave Elastography in the Same Individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Sik; Yu, Mi Hye; Joo, Ijin; Lee, Eun Sun; Sohn, Ji Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Boon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To cross-validate liver stiffness (LS) measured on shear wave elastography (SWE) and on magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the same individuals. We included 94 liver transplantation (LT) recipients and 114 liver donors who underwent either MRE or SWE before surgery or biopsy. We determined the technical success rates and the incidence of unreliable LS measurements (LSM) of SWE and MRE. Among the 69 patients who underwent both MRE and SWE, the median and coefficient of variation (CV) of the LSM from each examination were compared and correlated. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve in both examinations were calculated in order to exclude the presence of hepatic fibrosis (HF). The technical success rates of MRE and SWE were 96.4% and 92.2%, respectively (p = 0.17), and all of the technical failures occurred in LT recipients. SWE showed 13.1% unreliable LSM, whereas MRE showed no such case (p < 0.05). There was moderate correlation in the LSM in both examinations (r = 0.67). SWE showed a significantly larger median LSM and CV than MRE. Both examinations showed similar diagnostic performance for excluding HF (Az; 0.989, 1.000, respectively). MRE and SWE show moderate correlation in their LSMs, although SWE shows higher incidence of unreliable LSMs in cirrhotic liver.

  12. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cañas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence.

  13. Inversion of surface-wave data for subsurface shear-wave velocity profiles characterised by a thick buried low-velocity layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2016-05-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four-layer sequence of limestones and clays. A common feature found in the western half of the archipelago is Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. The BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, implying that the VS30 (travel-time average shear-wave velocity (VS) in the upper 30 m) parameter is not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may produce amplification effects, however might not be included in the VS30 calculations. In this investigation, VS profiles at seven sites characterised by such a lithological sequence are obtained by a joint inversion of the single-station Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios (H/V or HVSR) and effective dispersion curves from array measurements analysed using the Extended Spatial Auto-Correlation (ESAC) technique. The lithological sequence gives rise to a ubiquitous H/V peak between 1 and 2 Hz. All the effective dispersion curves obtained exhibit a `normal' dispersive trend at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at higher frequencies. This shape is tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are commonly present in such scenarios. Comparisons made with the results obtained at the only site in Malta where the BC is missing below the UCL suggest that the characteristics observed at the other seven sites are due to the presence of the soft layer. The final profiles reveal a variation in the VS of the clay layer with respect to the depth of burial and some regional variations in the UCL layer. This study presents a step towards a holistic seismic risk assessment that includes the implications on the site effects induced by the buried clay layer. Such assessments have not yet been done for Malta.

  14. Upper mantle shear wave velocity structure beneath northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Volcanism and uplift in the northern Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, Jordan H.; Adams, Aubreya N.; Hansen, Samantha E.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Hackworth, Lauren; Park, Yongcheol

    2016-09-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) are the largest non-compressional mountain range on Earth, and while a variety of uplift mechanisms have been proposed, the origin of the TAMs is still a matter of great debate. Most previous seismic investigations of the TAMs have focused on a central portion of the mountain range, near Ross Island, providing little along-strike constraint on the upper mantle structure, which is needed to better assess competing uplift models. Using data recorded by the recently deployed Transantarctic Mountains Northern Network, as well as data from the Transantarctic Mountains Seismic Experiment and from five stations operated by the Korea Polar Research Institute, we investigate the upper mantle structure beneath a previously unexplored portion of the mountain range. Rayleigh wave phase velocities are calculated using a two-plane wave approximation and are inverted for shear wave velocity structure. Our model shows a low velocity zone (LVZ; ∼4.24 km s-1) at ∼160 km depth offshore and adjacent to Mt. Melbourne. This LVZ extends inland and vertically upwards, with more lateral coverage above ∼100 km depth beneath the northern TAMs and Victoria Land. A prominent LVZ (∼4.16-4.24 km s-1) also exists at ∼150 km depth beneath Ross Island, which agrees with previous results in the TAMs near the McMurdo Dry Valleys, and relatively slow velocities (∼4.24-4.32 km s-1) along the Terror Rift connect the low velocity anomalies. We propose that the LVZs reflect rift-related decompression melting and provide thermally buoyant support for the TAMs uplift, consistent with proposed flexural models. We also suggest that heating, and hence uplift, along the mountain front is not uniform and that the shallower LVZ beneath northern Victoria Land provides greater thermal support, leading to higher bedrock topography in the northern TAMs. Young (0-15 Ma) volcanic rocks associated with the Hallett and the Erebus Volcanic Provinces are situated directly

  15. Downhole Measurements of Shear- and Compression-Wave Velocities in Boreholes C4993, C4996, C4997 and C4998 at the Waste Treatment Plant DOE Hanford Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redpath, Bruce B.

    2007-04-27

    This report describes the procedures and the results of a series of downhole measurements of shear- and compression-wave velocities performed as part of the Seismic Boreholes Project at the site of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The measurements were made in several stages from October 2006 through early February 2007. Although some fieldwork was carried out in conjunction with the University of Texas at Austin (UT), all data acquired by UT personnel are reported separately by that organization.

  16. Elastic consequences of a single plastic event: Towards a realistic account of structural disorder and shear wave propagation in models of flowing amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Alexandre; Puosi, Francesco; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-01

    Shear transformations (i.e., localized rearrangements of particles resulting in the shear deformation of a small region of the sample) are the building blocks of mesoscale models for the flow of disordered solids. In order to compute the time-dependent response of the solid material to such a shear transformation, with a proper account of elastic heterogeneity and shear wave propagation, we propose and implement a very simple Finite-Element (FE)-based method. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a binary Lennard-Jones glass are used as a benchmark for comparison, and information about the microscopic viscosity and the local elastic constants is directly extracted from the MD system and used as input in FE. We find very good agreement between FE and MD regarding the temporal evolution of the disorder-averaged displacement field induced by a shear transformation, which turns out to coincide with the response of a uniform elastic medium. However, fluctuations are relatively large, and their magnitude is satisfactorily captured by the FE simulations of an elastically heterogeneous system. Besides, accounting for elastic anisotropy on the mesoscale is not crucial in this respect. The proposed method thus paves the way for models of the rheology of amorphous solids which are both computationally efficient and realistic, in that structural disorder and inertial effects are accounted for.

  17. Crack Features and Shear-Wave Splitting Associated with Fracture Extension during Hydraulic Stimulation of the Geothermal Reservoir in Soultz-sous-Forêts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelinet M.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent tomography results obtained within the scope of the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS European Soultz project led us to revisit the meso-fracturing properties of Soultz test site. In this paper, we develop a novel approach coupling effective medium modeling and shear-wave splitting to characterize the evolution of crack properties throughout the hydraulic stimulation process. The stimulation experiment performed in 2000 consisted of 3 successive injection steps spanning over 6 days. An accurate 4-D tomographic image was first carried out based upon the travel-times measured for the induced seismicity [Calò M., Dorbath C., Cornet F.H., Cuenot N. (2011 Large-scale aseismic motion identified through 4-D P-wave tomography, Geophys. J. Int. 186, 1295-1314]. The current study shows how to take advantage of the resulting compressional wave (Calò et al., 2011 and shear-wave velocity models. These are given as input data to an anisotropic effective medium model and converted into crack properties. In short, the effective medium model aims to estimate the impact of cracks on velocities. It refers to a crack-free matrix and 2 families of penny-shaped cracks with orientations in agreement with the main observed geological features: North-South strike and dip of 65°East and 65°West [Genter A., Traineau H. (1996 Analysis of macroscopic fractures in granite in the HDR geothermal well EPS-1, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France, J. Vol. Geoth. Res. 72, 121-141], respectively. The resulting output data are the spatial distributions of crack features (lengths and apertures within the 3-D geological formation. We point out that a flow rate increase results in a crack shortening in the area imaged by both compressional and shear waves, especially in the upper part of the reservoir. Conversely, the crack length, estimated during continuous injection rate phases, is higher than during the increasing injection rate phases. A possible explanation for this is that

  18. Generation of Shear Alfvén Waves by Repetitive High Power Microwave Pulses Near the Electron Plasma Frequency - A laboratory study of a ``Virtual Antenna''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhou; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-11-01

    ELF / ULF waves are important in terrestrial radio communications but difficult to launch using ground-based structures due to their enormous wavelengths. In spite of this generation of such waves by field-aligned ionospheric heating modulation was first demonstrated using the HAARP facility. In the future heaters near the equator will be constructed and laboratory experiments on cross-field wave propagation could be key to the program's success. Here we report a detailed laboratory study conducted on the Large Plasma Device (LaPD) at UCLA. In this experiment, ten rapid pulses of high power microwaves (250 kW X-band) near the plasma frequency were launched transverse to the background field, and were modulated at a variable fraction (0.1-1.0) of fci. Along with bulk electron heating and density modification, the microwave pulses generated a population of fast electrons. The field-aligned current carried by the fast electrons acted as an antenna that radiated shear Alfvén waves. It was demonstrated that a controllable arbitrary frequency (f shear Alfvén wave can be generated by this method. The radiation pattern, frequency variation and power dependence of the virtual antenna is also presented. This work is supported by an AFOSR MURI award, and conducted at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA funded by DoE and NSF.

  19. Shear Wave Velocity and Site Amplification Factors for 25 Strong-Motion Instrument Stations Affected by the M5.8 Mineral, Virginia, Earthquake of August 23, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert; Carkin, Bradley; Corbett, Skye; Zangwill, Aliza; Estevez, Ivan; Lai, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Vertical one-dimensional shear wave velocity (Vs) profiles are presented for 25 strong-motion instrument sites along the Mid-Atlantic eastern seaboard, Piedmont region, and Appalachian region, which surround the epicenter of the M5.8 Mineral, Virginia, Earthquake of August 23, 2011. Testing was performed at sites in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, the District of Columbia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. The purpose of the study is to determine the detailed site velocity profile, the average velocity in the upper 30 meters of the profile (VS,30), the average velocity for the entire profile (VS,Z), and the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classification. The Vs profiles are estimated using a non-invasive continuous-sine-wave method for gathering the dispersion characteristics of surface waves. A large trailer-mounted active source was used to shake the ground during the testing and produce the surface waves. Shear wave velocity profiles were inverted from the averaged dispersion curves using three independent methods for comparison, and the root-mean square combined coefficient of variation (COV) of the dispersion and inversion calculations are estimated for each site.

  20. Comparison of diagnostic value of conventional ultrasonography and shear wave elastography in the prediction of thyroid lesions malignancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Szczepanek-Parulska

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thyroid nodular disease (TND is a very common disorder. However, since the rate of malignancy is reported to be 3-10%, only a minority of patients require aggressive surgical treatment. As a result, there is a need for diagnostic tools which would allow for a reliable differentiation between benign and malignant nodules. Although a number of conventional ultrasonographic (US features are proved to be markers of malignancy, Shear Wave Elastography (SWE is considered to be an improvement of conventional US. The aim of this study was to compare conventional US markers and SWE diagnostic values in the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients referred for thyroidectomy, irrespective of the indications, underwent a US thyroid examination prospectively. Patients with TND were included into the study. Results of the US and SWE examinations were compared with post-surgical histopathology. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty two patients with 393 thyroid nodules were included into the study. Twenty two patients were diagnosed with cancer. SWE turned out to be a predictor of malignancy superior to any other conventional US markers (OR=54.5 using qualitative scales and 40.8 using quantitative data on maximal stiffness with a threshold of 50 kPa. CONCLUSIONS: Although most conventional US markers of malignancy prove to be significant, none of them are characterized by both high sensitivity and specificity. SWE seems to be an important step forward, allowing for a more reliable distinction of benign and malignant thyroid nodules. Our study, assessing SWE properties on the highest number of thyroid lesions at the time of publication, confirms the high diagnostic value of this technique. It also indicates that a quantitative evaluation of thyroid lesions is not superior to simpler qualitative methods.

  1. Comparisons of polymer/gas partition coefficients calculated from responses of thickness shear mode and surface acoustic wave vapor sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, J W; Kaganove, S N; Bhethanabotla, V R

    1998-01-01

    Apparent partition coefficients, K, for the sorption of toluene by four different polymer thin films on thickness shear mode (TSM) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are compared. The polymers examined were poly(isobutylene) (PIB), poly(epichlorohydrin) (PECH), poly(butadiene) (PBD), and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Independent data on partition coefficients for toluene in these polymers were compiled for comparison, and TSM sensor measurements were made using both oscillator and impedance analysis methods. K values from SAW sensor measurements were about twice those calculated from TSM sensor measurements when the polymers were PIB and PECH, and they were also at least twice the values of the independent partition coefficient data, which is interpreted as indicating that the SAW sensor responds to polymer modulus changes as well as to mass changes. K values from SAW and TSM measurements were in agreement with each other and with independent data when the polymer was PBD. Similarly, K values from the PDMS-coated SAW sensor were not much larger than values from independent measurements. These results indicate that modulus effects were not contributing to the SAW sensor responses in the cases of PBD and PDMS. However, K values from the PDMS-coated TSM device were larger than the values from the SAW device or independent measurements, and the impedance analyzer results indicated that this sensor using our sample of PDMS at the applied thickness did not behave as a simple mass sensor. Differences in behavior among the test polymers on SAW devices are interpreted in terms of their differing viscoelastic properties. PMID:21644612

  2. Assessment of Liver and Spleen Stiffness in Patients With Myelofibrosis Using FibroScan and Shear Wave Elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Muriel; Shibolet, Oren; Halpern, Zamir; Nagar, Meital; Amariglio, Ninette; Levit, Stella; Steinberg, David M; Santo, Erwin; Salomon, Ophira

    2015-09-01

    Liver stiffness and spleen stiffness in patients with myelofibrosis have traditionally been assessed through manual palpation and thus influenced by interobserver variability. In this article, for the first time, liver stiffness and spleen stiffness of patients with myelofibrosis were evaluated through FibroScan and shear wave elastography (SWE). Nine patients with myelofibrosis comprised the study group. They were compared with 11 patients with liver cirrhosis and 8 healthy volunteers. Before the FibroScan study, all patients underwent ultrasound study to delineate the left intercostal space for validated measurements. In patients with myelofibrosis, the mean stiffness of the spleen was 41.3 and 32.9 kilopascals (kPa) through FibroScan and SWE, respectively. The mean stiffness of the liver was 7.8 kPa through FibroScan and 10.4 kPa through SWE. The stiffness of the spleen in patients with cirrhosis was even higher, reaching a mean of 58.5 kPa through FibroScan and 40.5 kPa through SWE. The means were considerably lower among the healthy controls (13.5 and 18.1 kPa, respectively). The correlation between spleen stiffness among the patients with cirrhosis is negative and opposite in direction (r = -0.35) in comparison with the patients with myelofibrosis (r = 0.78). Among the patients with liver cirrhosis and myelofibrosis, spleen size was weakly related to spleen stiffness as assessed through SWE (r = 0.49) but had almost no relation to the FibroScan measure (r = 0.13). The FibroScan and SWE of the spleen have little ability to distinguish between the patients with myelofibrosis and cirrhosis, but they do differentiate both patient groups from the healthy controls. The stiffness of spleen and liver as measured through FibroScan and SWE was not correlated to the longevity of myelofibrosis.

  3. Liver shear-wave velocity and serum fibrosis markers to diagnose hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic viral hepatitis B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian Xue; Ji, Yong Hao; Zhao Junzhi; Zhang, Yao Ren; Dun, Guo Liang; Ning, Bo [Dept. of Ultrasonography, Baoji Central Hospital, Baoji (China); Ai, Hong [Dept. of Ultrasonography, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2016-06-15

    To compare several noninvasive indices of fibrosis in chronic viral hepatitis B, including liver shear-wave velocity (SWV), hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen type IV (CIV), procollagen type III (PCIII), and laminin (LN). Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) was performed in 157 patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and in 30 healthy volunteers to measure hepatic SWV (m/s) in a prospective study. Serum markers were acquired on the morning of the same day of the ARFI evaluation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the accuracies of SWV and serum markers using METAVIR scoring from liver biopsy as a reference standard. The most accurate test for diagnosing fibrosis F ≥ 1 was SWV with the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.913, followed by LN (0.744), HA (0.701), CIV (0.690), and PCIII (0.524). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 2 was SWV (AUC of 0.851), followed by CIV (0.671), HA (0.668), LN (0.562), and PCIII (0.550). The best test for diagnosing F ≥ 3 was SWV (0.854), followed by CIV (0.693), HA (0.675), PCIII (0.591), and LN (0.548). The best test for diagnosing F = 4 was SWV (0.965), followed by CIV (0.804), PCIII (0.752), HA (0.744), and LN (0.662). SWV combined with HA and CIV did not improve diagnostic accuracy (AUC = 0.931 for F ≥ 1, 0.863 for F ≥ 2, 0.855 for F ≥ 3, 0.960 for F = 4). The performance of SWV in diagnosing liver fibrosis is superior to that of serum markers. However, the combination of SWV, HA, and CIV does not increase the accuracy of diagnosing liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

  4. Modeling, design, packing and experimental analysis of liquid-phase shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Thomas B

    Recent advances in microbiology, computational capabilities, and microelectromechanical-system fabrication techniques permit modeling, design, and fabrication of low-cost, miniature, sensitive and selective liquid-phase sensors and lab-on-a-chip systems. Such devices are expected to replace expensive, time-consuming, and bulky laboratory-based testing equipment. Potential applications for devices include: fluid characterization for material science and industry; chemical analysis in medicine and pharmacology; study of biological processes; food analysis; chemical kinetics analysis; and environmental monitoring. When combined with liquid-phase packaging, sensors based on surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) technology are considered strong candidates. For this reason such devices are focused on in this work; emphasis placed on device modeling and packaging for liquid-phase operation. Regarding modeling, topics considered include mode excitation efficiency of transducers; mode sensitivity based on guiding structure materials/geometries; and use of new piezoelectric materials. On packaging, topics considered include package interfacing with SAW devices, and minimization of packaging effects on device performance. In this work novel numerical models are theoretically developed and implemented to study propagation and transduction characteristics of sensor designs using wave/constitutive equations, Green's functions, and boundary/finite element methods. Using developed simulation tools that consider finite-thickness of all device electrodes, transduction efficiency for SAW transducers with neighboring uniform or periodic guiding electrodes is reported for the first time. Results indicate finite electrode thickness strongly affects efficiency. Using dense electrodes, efficiency is shown to approach 92% and 100% for uniform and periodic electrode guiding, respectively; yielding improved sensor detection limits. A numerical sensitivity analysis is presented targeting viscosity

  5. Shear wave velocity inversion and its influence on seismic site response: case studies from Malta and Catania (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline; Panzera, Francesco; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to study some particular geological sequences on the Maltese islands and in the city of Catania (Southern Italy). Geologically the two sites are quite different but several measurement points in both localities are characterised by sequences that represent a significant shear wave velocity inversion. The Maltese islands in the Central Mediterranean are composed of a simple 4-layer sedimentary sequence of Oligocene-Miocene limestones and clays. In particular, limestones overlying a clayey formation represent the shallower lithotypes that characterize the surficial geology in a large portion of the Maltese archipelago. On the contrary, the present geologic features of the Catania area are the result of tectonic uplift, sea level changes and lava flows originating from Etna eruptions. The area shows complex features with lateral heterogeneities at a local scale, due to the presence of volcanic and sedimentary units. In this study we make use of ambient noise recordings as well as moderate magnitude earthquakes in order to study the role of local geology on the site response in Catania. The recorded data were processed through standard and horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios. Results of ambient noise and earthquake analysis, although showing significant differences in amplitude, are comparable in frequency. On the lava flows spectral ratios, significant amplification of the vertical component, that appear related to velocity inversion, were observed. Our findings appear linked to the complex wave-field generated by the lithologic heterogeneities existing in the area which seem to be related to alternating outcropping sediments and basaltic lavas. On the Maltese islands the main aim of this study was to identify any differences in site response, both in frequency and amplification, observed on different outcrops. All the investigated sites exhibit a clear and consistent peak in the frequency range of 1 Hz to 2 Hz. This is tentatively

  6. Low-level vertical wind shear effects on the gravity wave breaking over an isolated two-dimensional orography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Wei Bao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Flow regimes of dry, stratified flow passing over an isolated two-dimensional (2-D orography mainly concentrate at two stagnation points. One occurs on the upslope of the orography owing to flow blocking; another is related to gravity wave breaking (GWB over the leeside. Smith (1979 put forward a hypothesis that the occurring of GWB is suppressed when the low-level vertical wind shear (VWS exceeds some value. In the present study, a theoretical solution in a two-layer linear model of orographic flow with a VWS over a bell-shaped 2-D orography is developed to investigate the effect of VWS on GWB's occurring over a range of surface Froude number Fr0=U0/Nh (U0 is surface wind speed, h is orography height and N is stability parameter, over which the GWB occurs first and the upstream flow blocking is excluded. Based on previous simulations and experiments, the range of surface Froude number selected is 0.6 ≤ Fr0≤2.0. Based on this solution, the conditions of surface wind speed (U0 and one-to-one matching critical VWS (Δuc for GWB's occurring are discussed. Over the selected range of Fr0, GWB's occurring will be suppressed if the VWS (Δu is larger than Δuc at given U0. Moreover, there is a maximum value of Δuc over the selected range of Fr0, which is labelled as Δumax, and its matching surface wind speed by U0m. Once the Δu is larger than Δumax, the flow will pass over the orography without GWB's occurring. That means, over the selected range of Fr0, the flow regime of 2-D orographic flow related to GWB occurring primarily will be absent when Δu > Δumax, regardless of the value for U0. In addition, the vertical profile of atmospheric stability and height of VWS could result in different features of mountain wave, which leads to different Δuc and Δumax for the GWB's occurring. The possible inaccuracy of estimated Δuc in the present linear model is also discussed.

  7. Inversion of surface wave data for shear wave velocity profiles: Case studies of thick buried low-velocity layers in Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniela; Paolucci, Enrico; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Galea, Pauline

    2015-04-01

    The islands composing the Maltese archipelago (Central Mediterranean) are characterised by a four layer sequence of limestones and clays, with the Lower Coralline Limestone being the oldest exposed layer. The hard Globigerina Limestone (GL) overlies this layer and is found outcropping in the eastern part of Malta and western part of Gozo. The rest of the islands are characterised by Upper Coralline Limestone (UCL) plateaus and hillcaps covering a soft Blue Clay (BC) layer which can be up to 75 m thick. Thus the BC layer introduces a velocity inversion in the stratigraphy, and makes the Vs30 parameter not always suitable for seismic microzonation purposes. Such a layer may still produce amplification effects, however would not contribute to the numerical mean of Vs in the upper 30m. Moreover, buildings are being increasingly constructed on this type of geological foundation. Obtaining the shear wave (Vs) profiles of the different layers around the islands is the first step needed for a detailed study of local seismic site response. A survey of Vs in each type of lithology and around the islands has never been undertaken. Array measurements of ambient noise using vertical geophones were carried out at six sites in Malta and one in Gozo, characterised by the buried low-velocity layer. The array was set up in an L-shaped configuration and the Extended Spatial Autocorrelation (ESAC) technique was used to extract Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. The effective dispersion curve obtained at all the sites exhibited a 'normal' dispersive trend (i.e. velocity decreases with increasing frequency) at low frequencies, followed by an inverse dispersive trend at high frequencies. Such a shape can be tentatively explained in terms of the presence of higher mode Rayleigh waves, which are generally present when a stiff layer overlies a softer layer. Additionally a series of three-component ambient noise measurements were taken at each of the sites and H/V curves obtained. The

  8. Study on the application of shear-wave elastography to thin-layered media and tubular structure: Finite-element analysis and experiment verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jun-keun; Kondo, Kengo; Namita, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Shear-wave elastography (SWE) enables the noninvasive and quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of human soft tissue. Generally, shear-wave velocity (C S) can be estimated using the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Young’s modulus is then calculated directly from the estimated C S. However, because shear waves in thin-layered media propagate as guided waves, C S cannot be accurately estimated using the conventional TOF method. Leaky Lamb dispersion analysis (LLDA) has recently been proposed to overcome this problem. In this study, we performed both experimental and finite-element (FE) analyses to evaluate the advantages of LLDA over TOF. In FE analysis, we investigated why the conventional TOF is ineffective for thin-layered media. In phantom experiments, C S results estimated using the two methods were compared for 1.5 and 2% agar plates and tube phantoms. Furthermore, it was shown that Lamb waves can be applied to tubular structures by extracting lateral waves traveling in the long axis direction of the tube using a two-dimensional window. Also, the effects of the inner radius and stiffness (or shear wavelength) of the tube on the estimation performance of LLDA were experimentally discussed. In phantom experiments, the results indicated good agreement between LLDA (plate phantoms of 2 mm thickness: 5.0 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.2 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 2 mm inner radius: 5.1 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.0 m/s for 2% agar; tube phantoms with 2 mm thickness and 4 mm inner radius: 5.3 m/s for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s for 2% agar) and SWE measurements (bulk phantoms: 5.3 m/s ± 0.27 for 1.5% agar and 7.3 m/s ± 0.54 for 2% agar).

  9. Review article "Remarks on factors influencing shear wave velocities and their role in evaluating susceptibilities to earthquake-triggered slope instability: case study for the Campania area (Italy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Paoletti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shear wave velocities have a fundamental role in connection with the mitigation of seismic hazards, as their low values are the main causes of site amplification phenomena and can significantly influence the susceptibility of a territory to seismic-induced landslides. The shear wave velocity (Vs and modulus (G of each lithological unit are influenced by factors such as the degree of fracturing and faulting, the porosity, the clay amount and the precipitation, with the latter two influencing the unit water content. In this paper we discuss how these factors can affect the Vs values and report the results of different analyses that quantify the reduction in the rock Vs and shear modulus values connected to the presence of clay and water. We also show that significant results in assessing seismic-induced slope failure susceptibility for land planning targets could be achieved through a careful evaluation, based only on literature studies, of the geo-lithological and geo-seismic features of the study area.

  10. Improved Dead Sea sinkhole site characterization at Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan, based on repeated shear wave reflection seismic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polom, Ulrich; Alrshdan, Hussam; Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Sawarieh, Ali; Dahm, Torsten; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2016-04-01

    In October 2014 a high-resolution shallow shear wave reflection seismic survey was carried out at the Dead Sea sinkhole site Ghor Al Haditha, Jordan. It extended a survey undertaken in 2013, also in order to gather time-lapse profiles. In the framework of the DEad SEa Research Venue (DESERVE), a virtual institute of the Helmholtz Association and international partners, this investigation is part of a cross-disciplinary and cooperative international project of the Helmholtz Centers KIT, GFZ, and UFZ. At the investigation site, characterized by alluvial fan deposits, ongoing subsidence and sinkhole processes in the subsurface create massive reshaping of farming areas, including the destruction of housings, industrial sites, and infrastructure. The sinkhole hazard at the Dead Sea is significant, since similar processes are observed at several coastal segments of the Dead Sea. The new survey (in total 2.1 profile km) was targeted to improve the knowledge about the subsurface structures and to confine the results of the initial survey (1.8 km profile km), with respect to the presence or non-presence of a massive salt layer proposed at nearly 40 m depth. This salt layer is the central part of a widely established process hypothesis to generate shallow cavities by salt subrosion, which subsequently collapse to sinkholes at the surface. Results of the initial survey carried out in 2013 highlighted a new process hypothesis of subsurface mass transport by Dead Sea mud mobilization enclosed in the alluvial fan, so that an extended survey was undertaken in 2014. This, indeed, confirmed that there are no reflection seismic signal responses that would be expected to occur in the presence of a massive salt layer. Since evaluation of both hypothesis by new drilling could not be carried out due to safety reasons and permissions, it remained unclear which hypothesis is valid for the investigation site. However, we combined the 2013 and 2014 reflection seismic profiles and the

  11. Quantitative measurement of elasticity of the appendix using shear wave elastography in patients with suspected acute appendicitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Whan Cha

    Full Text Available Shear wave elastography (SWE has not been studied for diagnosing appendicitis. We postulated that an inflamed appendix would become stiffer than a normal appendix. We evaluated the elastic modulus values (EMV by SWE in healthy volunteers, patients without appendicitis, and patients with appendicitis. We also evaluated diagnostic ability of SWE for differentiating an inflamed from a normal appendix in patients with suspected appendicitis.Forty-one patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis and 11 healthy volunteers were prospectively enrolled. Gray-scale ultrasonography (US, SWE and multi-slice computed tomography (CT were performed. The EMV was measured in the anterior, medial, and posterior appendiceal wall using SWE, and the highest value (kPa was recorded.Patients were classified into appendicitis (n = 30 and no appendicitis groups (n = 11. One case of a negative appendectomy was detected. The median EMV was significantly higher in the appendicitis group (25.0 kPa compared to that in the no appendicitis group (10.4 kPa or in the healthy controls (8.3 kPa (p<0.001. Among SWE and other US and CT features, CT was superior to any conventional gray-scale US feature or SWE. Either the CT diameter criterion or combined three CT features predicted true positive in 30 and true negative in 11 cases and yielded 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. An EMV of 12.5 kPa for the stiffest region of the appendix predicted true positive in 28, true negative in 11, and false negative in two cases. The EMV (≥12.5 kPa yielded 93% sensitivity and 100% specificity.Our results suggest that EMV by SWE helps distinguish an inflamed from a normal appendix. Given that SWE has high specificity, quantitative measurement of the elasticity of the appendix may provide complementary information, in addition to morphologic features on gray-scale US, in the diagnosis of appendicitis.

  12. A self-consistent synthesis description of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and scale-dependent auroral process using shear Alfvén wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, A.; Amm, O.; Vanhamäki, H.; Fujii, R.

    2011-08-01

    In order to correctly describe the dynamical behavior of the magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling system and the scale-dependent auroral process, we develop a synthesis formulation that combines the process of (1) the inverse Walen separation of MHD disturbance into parallel- and antiparallel-propagating shear Alfvén wave to the ambient magnetic field, (2) the shear Alfvén wave reflection process including (3) the scale-dependent electrostatic coupling process through the linearized Knight relation, (4) two-layer ionosphere model, and (5) dynamic conductance variations. A novel procedure that applies the inverse Walen relation to the incompressional MHD disturbances at the inner boundary of the MHD region enables to extract the component of the shear Alfvén wave incident to the ionosphere. The extracted incident electric field supplies an electromotive force for the generation of the MI coupling system, and the reflected electric field is generated such that it totally satisfies the synthesis MI-coupling equation. A three-dimensional ionospheric current system is represented by a two-layer model in which the Pedersen and the Hall current are confined in the separated layers, which are connected by field-aligned currents driven by the linear current-voltage relation between two layers. Hence, our scheme possibly reproduces two types of the scale-dependent MI-decoupling process of the perpendicular potential structure: due to the parallel potential drop at the auroral acceleration region and the other due to the parallel potential differences inside the ionosphere. Our newly formulation may be well suited for description of scale-dependent auroral process and mesoscale ionospheric electrodynamics interlocked with the dynamical development of magnetospheric processes.

  13. High-resolution shear-wave seismics across the Carlsberg Fault zone south of Copenhagen - Implications for linking Mesozoic and late Pleistocene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Janina; Hübscher, Christian; Boldreel, Lars Ole; Nielsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The Carlsberg Fault zone (CFZ) is a NNW-SSE striking structure close to the transition zone between the Danish Basin and the Baltic Shield. We examine the fault evolution by combining very-high-resolution onshore shear-wave seismic data, one conventional onshore seismic profile and marine reflection seismic profiles. The faulting geometry indicates a strong influence of Triassic subsidence and rifting in the Central European Basin System. Growth strata within the CFZ surrounding Höllviken Graben reveal syntectonic sedimentation in the Lower Triassic, indicating the opening to be a result of Triassic rifting. In the Upper Cretaceous growth faulting documents continued rifting. These findings contrast the Late Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion tectonics in neighboring structures, such as the Tornquist Zone. The high-resolution shear-wave seismic method was used to image faulting in Quaternary and Danian layers in the CFZ. The portable compact vibrator source ElViS III S8 was used to acquire a 1150 m long seismic section on the island Amager, south of Copenhagen. The shallow subsurface in the investigation area is dominated by Quaternary glacial till deposits in the upper 5-11 m and Danian limestone below. In the shear-wave profile, we imaged the uppermost 30 m of the western part of CFZ. The complex fault zone comprises normal block faults and one reverse block fault. The observed faults cut through the Danian as well as the Quaternary overburden. Hence, there are strong indicators for ongoing faulting, like mapped faulting in Quaternary sediments and ongoing subsidence of the eastern block of the CFZ as interpreted by other authors. The lack of earthquakes localized in the fault zone implies that either the frequency of occurring earthquakes is too small to be recorded in the observation time-span, or that the movement of the shallow sub-surface layers may be due to other sources than purely tectonic processes.

  14. A new electrical and mechanically detonatable shear wave source for near surface (0-30 m) seismic acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, J. M.; Lorenzo, J. M.; Harris, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    We present a new, impulsive, horizontal shear source capable of performing long shot profiles in a time-efficient and repeatable manner. The new shear source is ground-coupled by eight 1/2″ (1.27 cm) × 2″ (5.08 cm) steel spikes. Blank shotshells (12-gauge) used as energy sources can be either mechanically or electrically detonated. Electrical fuses have a start time repeatability of shotshell holder is surrounded by a protective 6″ (15.24 cm)-thick barrel, a push-and-twist-locked breach, and a safety pin. We conducted field tests at the 17th Street Canal levee breach site in New Orleans, Louisiana (30.017° N 90.121° W) and at an instrumented test borehole at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi (32.325° N 93.182° W) to compare our new source and a traditional hammer impact source. The new shear source produces a broader-band of frequencies (30-100 Hz cf. 30-60 Hz). Signal generated by the new shear source has signal-to-noise ratios equivalent to ~ 3 stacked hammer blows to the hammer impact source. Ideal source signals must be broadband in frequency, have a high SNR, be consistent, and have precise start times; all traits of the new shear source.

  15. Generation of a pseudo-2D shear-wave velocity section by inversion of a series of 1D dispersion curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Liu, J.; Xu, Y.; Liu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves utilizes a multichannel recording system to estimate near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities from high-frequency Rayleigh waves. A pseudo-2D S-wave velocity (vS) section is constructed by aligning 1D models at the midpoint of each receiver spread and using a spatial interpolation scheme. The horizontal resolution of the section is therefore most influenced by the receiver spread length and the source interval. The receiver spread length sets the theoretical lower limit and any vS structure with its lateral dimension smaller than this length will not be properly resolved in the final vS section. A source interval smaller than the spread length will not improve the horizontal resolution because spatial smearing has already been introduced by the receiver spread. In this paper, we first analyze the horizontal resolution of a pair of synthetic traces. Resolution analysis shows that (1) a pair of traces with a smaller receiver spacing achieves higher horizontal resolution of inverted S-wave velocities but results in a larger relative error; (2) the relative error of the phase velocity at a high frequency is smaller than at a low frequency; and (3) a relative error of the inverted S-wave velocity is affected by the signal-to-noise ratio of data. These results provide us with a guideline to balance the trade-off between receiver spacing (horizontal resolution) and accuracy of the inverted S-wave velocity. We then present a scheme to generate a pseudo-2D S-wave velocity section with high horizontal resolution using multichannel records by inverting high-frequency surface-wave dispersion curves calculated through cross-correlation combined with a phase-shift scanning method. This method chooses only a pair of consecutive traces within a shot gather to calculate a dispersion curve. We finally invert surface-wave dispersion curves of synthetic and real-world data. Inversion results of both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate that

  16. Maslov shear-waveforms in highly anisotropic shales and implications for shear-wave splitting analyses; Formes d`onde transversales de Maslov dans les argiles fortement anisotropes et implications dans les analyses de birefringence des ondes transversales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caddick, J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Kendall, J.M.; Raymer, D.G. [Western Geophysical, Middlesex (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1998-09-01

    Shales are the most common sedimentary rocks in hydrocarbon environments often forming the source rock and trapping rock for a reservoir. Due to the platy nature of the constituent grains, shales are commonly anisotropic. In this paper we calculate seismic waveforms for highly anisotropic shales using Maslow asymptotic theory (MAT). This theory is an extension of classical ray theory which provides valid waveforms in regions of caustics (wavefront folding) where ray theory amplitudes are unstable. Asymptotic ray theory (ART) is based on the Fermat or geometrical ray which connects the source and receiver. In contrast, the Maslov solution integrates the contributions from neighbouring non-Fermat rays. Ray-paths, travel-times, amplitudes and synthetic seismograms are presented for three highly anisotropic shales using a very simple 1D model comprised of an anisotropic shale overlying an isotropic shale. The ART waveforms fail to account for complex waveform effects due to triplications. In comparison, the MAT waveforms predict nonsingular amplitudes at wavefront cusps and it predicts the diffracted signals from these cusps. A Maslov solution which integrates ray contributions over a single slowness component will break down when rays focus in 3D (at a point rather than along a line). One of the tested shales shows such a point caustic and integration over 2 slowness components is required to remove the amplitude singularity. Finally, we examine the effects of wavefront triplications on Alford rotations which are used to estimate shear-wave splitting. In such cases, the rotation successfully finds the fast shear-wave polarization, but it can be unreliable in its estimate of the time separation. (authors) 21 refs.

  17. SCATTERING OF ANTI-PLANE SHEAR WAVES BY A SINGLE CRACK IN AN UNBOUNDED TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC ELECTRO-MAGNETO-ELASTIC MEDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜建科; 沈亚鹏; 高波

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of the scattering of anti-plane shear (SH) waves is provided by a single crack in an unbounded transversely isotropic electro-magneto-elastic medium. Based on the differential equations of equilibrium, electric displacement and magnetic induction intensity differential equations, the governing equations for SH waves were obtained. By means of a linear transform, the governing equations were reduced to one Helmholtz and two Laplace equations. The Cauchy singular integral equations were gained by making use of Fourier transform and adopting electro-magneto impermeable boundary conditions. The closed form expression for the resulting stress intensity factor at the crack was achieved by solving the appropriate singular integral equations using Chebyshev polynomial. Typical examples are provided to show the loading frequency upon the local stress fields around the crack tips. The study reveals the importance of the electromagneto-mechanical coupling terms upon the resulting dynamic stress intensity factor.

  18. Ground-motion site effects from multimethod shear-wave velocity characterization at 16 seismograph stations deployed for aftershocks of the August 2011 Mineral, Virginia earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, William J.; Odum, Jackson K.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Williams, Robert A.; Angster, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    We characterize shear-wave velocity versus depth (Vs profile) at 16 portable seismograph sites through the epicentral region of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Mineral (Virginia, USA) earthquake to investigate ground-motion site effects in the area. We used a multimethod acquisition and analysis approach, where active-source horizontal shear (SH) wave reflection and refraction as well as active-source multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and passive-source refraction microtremor (ReMi) Rayleigh wave dispersion were interpreted separately. The time-averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30 m (Vs30), interpreted bedrock depth, and site resonant frequency were estimated from the best-fit Vs profile of each method at each location for analysis. Using the median Vs30 value (270–715 m/s) as representative of a given site, we estimate that all 16 sites are National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site class C or D. Based on a comparison of simplified mapped surface geology to median Vs30 at our sites, we do not see clear evidence for using surface geologic units as a proxy for Vs30 in the epicentral region, although this may primarily be because the units are similar in age (Paleozoic) and may have similar bulk seismic properties. We compare resonant frequencies calculated from ambient noise horizontal:vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) at available sites to predicted site frequencies (generally between 1.9 and 7.6 Hz) derived from the median bedrock depth and average Vs to bedrock. Robust linear regression of HVSR to both site frequency and Vs30 demonstrate moderate correlation to each, and thus both appear to be generally representative of site response in this region. Based on Kendall tau rank correlation testing, we find that Vs30 and the site frequency calculated from average Vs to median interpreted bedrock depth can both be considered reliable predictors of weak-motion site effects in the epicentral region.

  19. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves and Down-Hole Tests in the Archeological "Palatine Hill" Area (Rome, Italy): Evaluation and Influence of 2D Effects on the Shear Wave Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, V.; Cavuoto, G.; Tarallo, D.; Punzo, M.; Evangelista, L.

    2016-05-01

    A joint analysis of down-hole (DH) and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) measurements offers a complete evaluation of shear wave velocity profiles, especially for sites where a strong lateral variability is expected, such as archeological sites. In this complex stratigraphic setting, the high "subsoil anisotropy" (i.e., sharp lithological changes due to the presence of anthropogenic backfill deposits and/or buried man-made structures) implies a different role for DH and MASW tests. This paper discusses some results of a broad experimental program conducted on the Palatine Hill, one of the most ancient areas of the city of Rome (Italy). The experiments were part of a project on seismic microzoning and consisted of 20 MASW and 11 DH tests. The main objective of this study was to examine the difficulties related to the interpretation of the DH and MASW tests and the reliability limits inherent in the application of the noninvasive method in complex stratigraphic settings. As is well known, DH tests provide good determinations of shear wave velocities (Vs) for different lithologies and man-made materials, whereas MASW tests provide average values for the subsoil volume investigated. The data obtained from each method with blind tests were compared and were correlated to site-specific subsurface conditions, including lateral variability. Differences between punctual (DH) and global (MASW) Vs measurements are discussed, quantifying the errors by synthetic comparison and by site response analyses. This study demonstrates that, for archeological sites, VS profiles obtained from the DH and MASW methods differ by more than 15 %. However, the local site effect showed comparable results in terms of natural frequencies, whereas the resolution of the inverted shear wave velocity was influenced by the fundamental mode of propagation.

  20. Investigation of Soil Liquefaction Potential around Efteni Lake in Duzce Turkey: Using Empirical Relationships between Shear Wave Velocity and SPT Blow Count (N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ateş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the liquefaction potential of a liquefaction-prone area is important for geotechnical earthquake engineering, both for assessment for site selection and for planning and new constructions. The liquefaction potential index for the city of Duzce in northwestern Turkey using the empirical relationships between the Standard Penetration Test (SPT and the Shear Wave Velocity Test (VS was investigated in this study. After, VS values based on SPT blow counts (N were obtained from the alluvial soils in the city of Duzce. The liquefaction potential indexes of the soils were determined using the empirical relationships between the Standard Penetration Test (SPT and the Shear Wave Velocity Test (VS calculating for a probable earthquake of MW=7.2. In the result of the study, the liquefaction potential index (LPI values were interpreted and compared evaluating the SPT N blow count values obtained from the study area. Based on the empirical relationships assumed for the soils, it was observed that there was not a perfect agreement between the results of the two methods. The liquefaction potential index values using the SPT N blow counts were found to be lower than those of the VS method.

  1. Shear wave splitting as a proxy for stress forecast of the case of the 2006 Manyas-Kus Golu (Mb = 5.3 earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ergintav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The 2006 Mb = 5.3 Manyas-Kus Golu (Manyas earthquake has been retrospectively "stress-forecasted" using variations in time-delays of seismic shear wave splitting to evaluate the time and magnitude at which stress-modified microcracking reaches fracture criticality within the stressed volume where strain is released. We processed micro earthquakes recorded by 29 TURDEP (Multi-Disciplinary Earthquake Research in High Risk Regions of Turkey and 33 KOERI (Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute stations in the Marmara region by using the aspect-ratio cross-correlation and systematic analysis of crustal anisotropy methods. The aim of the analysis is to determine changes in delay-times, hence changes in stress, before and after the 2006 Manyas earthquake. We observed that clear decreases in delay times before the impending event, especially at the station GEMT are consistent with the anisotropic poro-elasticity (APE model of fluid-rock deformation, but we could not observe similar changes at other stations surrounding the main event. The logarithms of the duration of the stress-accumulation are proportional (self-similar to the magnitude of the impending event. Although time and magnitude of th 2005 Manyas earthquake could have been stress-forecasted, as has been recognized elsewhere, shear-wave splitting does not appear to provide direct information about the location of impending earthquakes.

  2. Ultra-wideband ladder filters using zero-th shear mode plate wave in ultrathin LiNbO3 plate with apodized interdigital transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Michio; Tanaka, Shuji

    2016-07-01

    There are two kinds of plate waves propagating in a thin plate, Lamb and shear horizontal (SH) waves. The former has a velocity higher than 15,000 m/s when the plate is very thin. On the contrary, 0th SH (SH0) mode plate wave in an ultrathin LiNbO3 plate has an electro-mechanical coupling factor larger than 50%. Authors fabricated an ultra-wideband T-type ladder filter with a relative bandwidth (BW) of 41% using the SH0 mode plate wave. Although the BW of the filter fully covers the digital TV band in Japan, it does not have sufficient margin at the lower and higher end of BW. Besides, periodic small ripples due to transverse mode in pass-band of the filter were observed. In this study π-type ladder filters were fabricated by changing the pitch ratio of interdigital transducer (IDT) of parallel and series arm resonators (PR(IDT)) to control the BW, and by apodizing IDTs to improve the periodic small ripples due to transverse mode. Ultra-wideband filters without periodic small transverse mode with ultrawide bandwidth from 41 to 49% were fabricated. The BWs fully cover ultrawide digital television bands in Japan and U.S.A. These filters with an ultrawide BW and a steep characteristic show the possibility to be applied to a reported cognitive radio system and other communication systems requiring an ultrawide BW.

  3. Sensitivity of growth characteristics of tidal sand ridges and long bed waves to formulations of bed shear stress, sand transport and tidal forcing: A numerical model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing; de Swart, Huib E.; Panadès, Carles

    2016-09-01

    Tidal sand ridges and long bed waves are large-scale bedforms that are observed on continental shelves. They differ in their wavelength and in their orientation with respect to the principal direction of tidal currents. Previous studies indicate that tidal sand ridges appear in areas where tidal currents are above 0.5 m s-1, while long bed waves occur in regions where the maximum tidal current velocity is slightly above the critical velocity for sand erosion and the current is elliptical. An idealized nonlinear numerical model was developed to improve the understanding of the initial formation of these bedforms. The model governs the feedbacks between tidally forced depth-averaged currents and the sandy bed on the outer shelf. The effects of different formulations of bed shear stress and sand transport, tidal ellipticity and different tidal constituents on the characteristics of these bedforms (growth rate, wavelength, orientation of the preferred bedforms) during their initial formation were examined systematically. The results show that the formulations for bed shear stress and slope-induced sand transport are not critical for the initial formation of these bedforms. For tidal sand ridges, under rectilinear tidal currents, increasing the critical bed shear stress for sand erosion decreases the growth rate and the wavelength of the preferred bedforms significantly, while the orientation angle slightly decreases. The dependence of the growth rate, wavelength and the orientation of the preferred bedforms on the tidal ellipticity is non-monotonic. A decrease in tidal frequency results in preferred bedforms with larger wavelength and smaller orientation angle, while their growth rate hardly changes. In the case of joint diurnal and semidiurnal tides, or spring-neap tides, the characteristics of the bedforms are determined by the dominant tidal constituent. For long bed waves, the number of anticyclonically/cyclonically oriented bedforms with respect to the principal

  4. A new approach to obtaining a 3D shear wave velocity model of the crust and upper mantle: An application to eastern Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delph, Jonathan R.; Zandt, George; Beck, Susan L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion data and receiver functions by utilizing Common Conversion Point (CCP) stacking to reconcile the different sampling domains of the two datasets. Utilizing CCP stacking allows us to suppress noise in the data by waveform stacking, and correct for backazimuthal variations and complex crustal structure by mapping receiver functions back to their theoretical location. When applied to eastern Turkey, this approach leads to a higher resolution image of the subsurface and clearly delineates different tectonic features in eastern Turkey that were not apparent using other approaches. We observe that the slow seismic velocities near the Karliova Triple Junction correlate to moderate strain rates and high heat flow, which leads to a rheologically weak crust that has allowed for the upward propagation of Miocene and younger volcanics near the triple junction. We find seismically fast, presumably rigid blocks located in the southeastern Anatolian Plate and Arabian Plate are separated by a band of low shear wave velocities that correspond to the East Anatolian Fault Zone, which is consistent with the presence of fluids in the fault zone. We observe that the Arabian Plate has underthrust the Eurasian Plate as far as the northern boundary of the Bitlis Massif, which can explain the high exhumation rates in the Bitlis Massif as a result of slab break-off of the Arabian oceanic lithosphere. We also find a shallow (~ 33 km) anomaly beneath eastern Turkey that we interpret as a localized wedge of mantle that was underthrust by a crustal fragment during the collision of Arabia and Eurasia. These observations are possible because of the high-resolution images obtained by combining common conversion point receiver function stacks with ambient noise dispersion data to create a data-driven three-dimensional shear wave velocity model.

  5. High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Bevin L.

    S-wave reflection profiling has many theoretical advantages, when compared to P-wave profiling, such as high-resolution potential, greater sensitivities to lithologic changes and insensitivity to the water table and pore fluids, and could be particularly useful in near-surface settings. However, S-wave surveys can be plagued by processing pitfalls unique to near-surface studies such as interference of Love waves with reflections, and the stacking of Love waves as coherent noise, leading to possible misinterpretations of the subsurface. Two lines of S-wave data are processed and used to locate previously unknown faults in Quaternary sediments in a region where earthquake activity poses a threat to surface structures. This study provides clear examples of processing pitfalls such as Love waves with hyperbolic appearances on shot gathers, and a CMP section with coherent noise that is easily misinterpreted as reflections. This study demonstrates pros and cons of using SH reflection data in the near surface.

  6. Multitude of Core-Localized Shear Alfvén Waves in a High-Temperature Fusion Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Berk, H. L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Doyle, E. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Fonck, R. J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Holcomb, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kramer, G. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Jayakumar, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); La Haye, R. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McKee, G. R. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Makowski, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Peebles, W. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rhodes, T. L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Solomon, W. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); VanZeeland, M. A. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zeng, L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Evidence is provided for a multitude of discrete frequency Alfvén waves in the core of magnetically confined high-temperature fusion plasmas. Multiple diagnostic instruments verify wave excitation over a wide spatial range from the device size at the longest wavelengths down to the thermal ion Larmor radius. At the shortest scales, the poloidal wavelengths are like the scale length of electrostatic drift wave turbulence. Theoretical analysis verifies a dominant interaction of the modes with particles in the thermal ion distribution traveling well below the Alfvén velocity.

  7. Use of Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) technique for the determination of 1-D shear wave velocity in a landslide area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, S.; Del Gaudio, V.; Venisti, N.; Wasowski, J.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of an ongoing study on seismic response of landslide-prone hill-slopes in Central Italy (area of Caramanico Terme), we tested the applicability of the Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) analysis technique (Louie, 2001) to obtain geometrical and physical parameters needed for numerical modelling. In particular, we used this technique to determine one-dimensional shear-wave velocity profiles (Vs) at sites located on and close to a recent landslide that mobilized 30-40 m thick Quaternary colluvium overlying Pliocene mudstones. The use of this technique in unstable slope areas presents difficulties related to rough topography and lateral lithological heterogeneities, which prevent the extension of geophone array up to the minimum lengths (100 - 200 m) commonly adopted in standard applications. Moreover, sites distant from anthropic sources of microtremors can have unfavourable noise conditions in comparison with other well established cases of application. To check the stability of the ReMi data in these operative conditions and the confidence level of the results, three ReMi campaigns were conducted at different times using different acquisition parameters (seismograph channel number, geophone frequency and spacing). We also tested simultaneous noise recording along orthogonal arrays to investigate a possible presence of directional variations of soil properties. The Rayleigh wave velocity dispersion data derived from picking carried out on p (slowness)-f (frequency) matrix showed the presence in noise recordings of different Rayleigh wave vibration modes (fundamental and first two higher modes), which prevail at different frequency intervals. This indicates that it is essential to correctly identify the different vibration modes to avoid erroneous data interpretation (e.g. fictitious identification of velocity decrease with depth). An analysis of the influence of changing environmental conditions and of different acquisition parameters was conducted through

  8. Design and Production on Shear Wave Demonstrator%横波演示仪的设计与制作

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Transverse wave is a kind of typical mechanical wave ,and it is also one of the im portant and difficult points of physics teaching in middle school .In order to helping students with a better understanding of the process of formation and transmission about the transverse wave ,We have discussed a kind of design and fabrication of transverse wave demonstration apparatus which is based on the characteristics of the transverse wave .It can be truly demonstrated the process of formation and transmission about the transverse wave .%机械波可分为横波和纵波,在中学物理教学中横波是重点和难点,为了帮助学生更好地理解横波的形成与传播过程,基于横波的特点讨论了一种横波演示仪的设计与制作,它能够真实地演示出横波的形成与传播过程。

  9. Stochastic resonance in a nonlinear model of a rotating, stratified shear flow, with a simple stochastic inertia-gravity wave parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Williams

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a numerical study of the impact of short, fast inertia-gravity waves on the large-scale, slowly-evolving flow with which they co-exist. A nonlinear quasi-geostrophic numerical model of a stratified shear flow is used to simulate, at reasonably high resolution, the evolution of a large-scale mode which grows due to baroclinic instability and equilibrates at finite amplitude. Ageostrophic inertia-gravity modes are filtered out of the model by construction, but their effects on the balanced flow are incorporated using a simple stochastic parameterization of the potential vorticity anomalies which they induce. The model simulates a rotating, two-layer annulus laboratory experiment, in which we recently observed systematic inertia-gravity wave generation by an evolving, large-scale flow. We find that the impact of the small-amplitude stochastic contribution to the potential vorticity tendency, on the model balanced flow, is generally small, as expected. In certain circumstances, however, the parameterized fast waves can exert a dominant influence. In a flow which is baroclinically-unstable to a range of zonal wavenumbers, and in which there is a close match between the growth rates of the multiple modes, the stochastic waves can strongly affect wavenumber selection. This is illustrated by a flow in which the parameterized fast modes dramatically re-partition the probability-density function for equilibrated large-scale zonal wavenumber. In a second case study, the stochastic perturbations are shown to force spontaneous wavenumber transitions in the large-scale flow, which do not occur in their absence. These phenomena are due to a stochastic resonance effect. They add to the evidence that deterministic parameterizations in general circulation models, of subgrid-scale processes such as gravity wave drag, cannot always adequately capture the full details of the nonlinear interaction.

  10. Relative excitation of the seismic shear waves Sn and Lg as a function of source depth and their propagation from Melanesia and Banda arcs to Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLIVER

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY. - Seismic activity associated with the collision of the continental
    part of the Australian plate with the oceanic Melanesian arcs along Papua New
    Guinea and the Banda arc provides an unusual opportunity to study the relative
    excitation of the seismic shear waves Sn and Lg. These waves are produced by
    earthquakes located along the arcs in the upper 200 km of the earth and are
    recorded by the Australian WWSSN Stations at Charters Towers (CTA and Alice
    Springs (ASP. The paths to these stations are predominantly continental. The data
    clearly show that for events located at crustal depths, Lg is the predominant phase
    on the records and Sn is either absent or very weak. For events deeper than about
    50-70 km, Sn becomes the predominant phase on the records. These observations
    arc in qualitative agreement with the explanations of Sn and Lg as higher
    modes of surface waves, for the particle displacement amplitudes are maximum
    within the crust for Lg and maximum within the lid of the lithospheric mantle
    for Sn. The data suggest that either the crustal wave guide for Lg is more
    efficient than that for Sn, or that Lg is more easily excited than Sn. No clear
    Lg is observed from shallow earthquakes when the length of the segment of the
    path crossing oceanic structure is greater than about 200 km. Also, widespread
    Quaternary volcanism within the « stable » area of central Papua New Guinea
    to the south of the mobile belt does not seem to affect the efficient transmission
    of high-frequency (1 Hz shear energy.
    The paths from events located along the New Hebrides, Solomon, and New
    Britain arcs to Australia traverse oceanic structure, and no Lg is observed from
    these paths. The inefficient propagation of Sn along these paths from both
    shallow and intermediate-depth events can be explained as follows: 1 For
    the New Hebrides case, the

  11. Non-local dynamic solution of two parallel cracks in a functionally graded piezoelectric material under harmonic anti-plane shear wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Sang, Jian-Bing; Zhou, Zhen-Gong

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates a functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) containing two parallel cracks under harmonic anti-plane shear stress wave based on the non-local theory. The electric permeable boundary condition is considered. To overcome the mathematical difficulty, a one-dimensional non-local kernel is used instead of a two-dimensional one for the dynamic fracture problem to obtain the stress and the electric displacement fields near the crack tips. The problem is formulated through Fourier transform into two pairs of dual-integral equations, in which the unknown variables are jumps of displacements across the crack surfaces. Different from the classical solutions, that the present solution exhibits no stress and electric displacement singularities at the crack tips.

  12. Reprocessing of seismic shear wave and tidem data collected at the A&M areas of the Savannah River Plant. Final report, September 1992--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The upper aquifers in the A&M area of the Savannah River Site are known to be contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Remediation plans depend critically on continuity of a confining zone known as the Crouch Branch Confining Unit (C8CU), which occurs at depths between about 250 feet and 300 feet. Under DOE Contract No: DE-AC21-92MC29, administered by Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) surface and borehole geophysical methods were tested and further developed between 1993 and 1995 to map the lithology (clay content) and stratigraphy of the CBCU. It was found that time domain electromagnetics (TDEM) soundings were effective in mapping lithology and changes in lithology, and shear (S-) wave reflection surveys were effective in mapping stratigraphy. An integrated interpretation of the two methods yielded a rather complete image of lithology and stratigraphy of the CBCU.

  13. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  14. On the spatial linear growth of gravity-capillary water waves sheared by a laminar air flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsai, Y.S.; Grass, A.J.; Simons, R.R.

    2005-01-01

    The initial growth of mechanically generated small amplitude water waves below a laminar air stream was examined numerically and experimentally in order to explore the primary growth mechanism, that is, the interfacial instability of coupled laminar air and water flows. Measurements of the laminar v

  15. The 3-D structure of shear wave in South China and the southward extension of Tanlu fault

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By processing the CSND Rayleigh wave data with the matched filterFTAN technique, Rayleigh wave disper- sion for southeast China is obtained. The 4°×4°S wave dispersion of the pure path is calculated using random inversion scheme, and 3-D S wave velocity structure is set up. Incorporating the above-mentioned results with wide angle seismic sounding data, we studied structure framework and the extending of faults in this area, which demonstrates that the depth of Moho in South China varies from 30 to 40 km, shallower from west to east. The depth of Moho varies from 25 to 28 km for the offshore. The depth of the asthenosphere in upper mantle varies from 60 to 100 km. The depth difference of layers at the two sides of Tanlu fault is more than 10 km at the south part of the Yangtze River, and the fault extends downward more than 170 km. The fault exceeds the main land at Hainan Island and slips into the southern China Sea. Both Tanlu fault and the huge bend of gravity gradient anomaly are influenced by deep latent tectonics.

  16. Final report for DOE-FG02-02ER54688: Study of nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating shear Alfven waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, T A

    2006-11-16

    Final report for DOE Plasma Physics Junior Faculty Development award DOE-FG02-02ER54688. Reports on research undertaken from 8/1/2002 until 5/15/2006, investigating nonlinear interactions between Alfven waves in a laboratory experiment.

  17. The non-local theory solution of a Griffith crack in functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic stress field near crack tips in the functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear stress waves was investi- gated by means of the non-local theory. The traditional concepts of the non-local theory were extended to solve the fracture problem of functionally graded materials. To make the analysis tractable, it was assumed that the material properties vary exponentially with coordinate parallel to the crack. By use of the Fourier transform, the problem can be solved with the help of a pair of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variable was the displacement on the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the displacement on the crack surfaces was expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Unlike the classical elasticity solutions, it is found that no stress singularities are present at crack tips. The non-local elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at crack tips, thus allowing us to use the maximum stress as a fracture criterion. The magnitude of the finite dynamic stress field depends on the crack length, the parameter describing the functionally graded materials, the circular frequency of the incident waves and the lattice parameter of materials.

  18. The non-local theory solution of a Griffith crack in functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG PeiWei; ZHOU ZhenGong; WU LinZhi

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic stress field near crack tips in the functionally graded materials subjected to the harmonic anti-plane shear stress waves was investigated by means of the non-local theory. The traditional concepts of the non-local theory were extended to solve the fracture problem of functionally graded materials.To make the analysis tractable, it was assumed that the material properties vary exponentially with coordinate parallel to the crack. By use of the Fourier transform,the problem can be solved with the help of a pair of dual integral equations, in which the unknown variable was the displacement on the crack surfaces. To solve the dual integral equations, the displacement on the crack surfaces was expanded in a series of Jacobi polynomials. Unlike the classical elasticity solutions, it is found that no stress singularities are present at crack tips. The non-local elastic solutions yield a finite hoop stress at crack tips, thus allowing us to use the maximum stress as a fracture criterion. The magnitude of the finite dynamic stress field depends on the crack length, the parameter describing the functionally graded materials, the circular frequency of the incident waves and the lattice parameter of materials.

  19. Shear Wave Structure of Umbria and Marche, Italy, Strong Motion Seismometer Sites Affected by the 1997-98 Umbria-Marche, Italy, Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert; Scasserra, Giuseppe; Stewart, Jonathan P.; Lanzo, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    A long sequence of earthquakes, eight with magnitudes between 5 and 6, struck the Umbria and Marche regions of central Italy between September 26, 1997 and July 1998. The earthquake swarm caused severe structural damage, particularly to masonry buildings, and resulted in the loss of twelve lives and about 150 injuries. The source of the events was a single seismogenic structure that consists of several faults with a prevailing northwest-southeast strike and crosses the Umbria-Marche border. The focal mechanism of the largest shocks indicates that the events were the product of shallow extensional normal faulting along a NE-SW extension perpendicular to the trend of the Apennines. The network of analog seismometer stations in the Umbria and Marche regions recorded motions of the main September and October 1997 events and a dense array of mobile digital stations, installed since September 29, recorded most of the swarm. The permanent national network Rete Accelerometrica Nazionale (RAN) is administered and maintained by Dipartimento delle Protezione Civile (DPC: Civil Protection Department); the temporary array was managed by Servizio Sismico Nazionale (SSN) in cooperation with small agencies and Universities. ENEA, the operator of many seismometer stations in Umbria, is the public Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment. Many of the temporary and permanent stations in the Italian seismic network have little or no characterization of seismic velocities. In this study, we investigated 17 Italian sites using an active-source approach that employs low frequency harmonic waves to measure the dispersive nature of surface waves in the ground. We used the Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave (SASW) approach, coupled with an array of harmonic-wave electro-mechanical sources that are driven in-phase to excite the ground. An inversion algorithm using a non-linear least-squares best-fit method is used to compute shear wave velocities for up to 100

  20. The coupling between internal waves and shear-induced turbulence in stellar radiation zones: the critical layer

    CERN Document Server

    Alvan, Lucie; Decressin, Thibaut

    2013-01-01

    Internal gravity waves (hereafter IGWs) are known as one of the candidates for explaining the angular velocity profile in the Sun and in solar-type main-sequence and evolved stars, due to their role in the transport of angular momentum. Our bringing concerns critical layers, a process poorly explored in stellar physics, defined as the location where the local relative frequency of a given wave to the rotational frequency of the fluid tends to zero (i.e that corresponds to co-rotation resonances). IGW propagate through stably-stratified radiative regions, where they extract or deposit angular momentum through two processes: radiative and viscous dampings and critical layers. Our goal is to obtain a complete picture of the effects of this latters. First, we expose a mathematical resolution of the equation of propagation for IGWs in adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases near critical layers. Then, the use of a dynamical stellar evolution code, which treats the secular transport of angular momentum, allows us to appl...

  1. Rayleigh-wave imaging of upper-mantle shear velocities beneath the Malawi Rift; Preliminary results from the SEGMeNT experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, N. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Shillington, D. J.; Nyblade, A.; Ebinger, C. J.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Mulibo, G. D.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.; Kamihanda, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Malawi Rift (MR) is an immature rift located at the southern tip of the Western branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). Pronounced border faults and tectonic segmentation are seen within the upper crust. Surface volcanism in the region is limited to the Rungwe volcanic province located north of Lake Malawi (Nyasa). However, the distribution of extension and magma at depth in the crust and mantle lithosphere is unknown. As the Western Rift of the EARS is largely magma-poor except for discrete volcanic provinces, the MR presents the ideal location to elucidate the role of magmatism in early-stage rifting and the manifestation of segmentation at depth. This study investigates the shear velocity of the crust and mantle lithosphere beneath the MR to constrain the thermal structure, the amount of total crustal and lithospheric thinning, and the presence and distribution of magmatism beneath the rift. Utilizing 55 stations from the SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) passive-source seismic experiment operating in Malawi and Tanzania, we employed a multi-channel cross-correlation algorithm to obtain inter-station phase and amplitude information from Rayleigh wave observations between 20 and 80 s period. We retrieve estimates of phase velocity between 9-20 s period from ambient noise cross-correlograms in the frequency domain via Aki's formula. We invert phase velocity measurements to obtain estimates of shear velocity (Vs) between 50-200 km depth. Preliminary results reveal a striking low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the Rungwe volcanic province with Vs ~4.2-4.3 km/s in the uppermost mantle. Low velocities extend along the entire strike of Lake Malawi and to the west where a faster velocity lid (~4.5 km/s) is imaged. These preliminary results will be extended by incorporating broadband data from seven "lake"-bottom seismometers (LBS) to be retrieved from Lake Malawi in October of this year. The crust and mantle modeling will be

  2. In Vivo Evaluation of Cervical Stiffness Evolution during Induced Ripening Using Shear Wave Elastography, Histology and 2 Photon Excitation Microscopy: Insight from an Animal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Peralta

    Full Text Available Prematurity affects 11% of the births and is the main cause of infant mortality. On the opposite case, the failure of induction of parturition in the case of delayed spontaneous birth is associated with fetal suffering. Both conditions are associated with precocious and/or delayed cervical ripening. Quantitative and objective information about the temporal evolution of the cervical ripening may provide a complementary method to identify cases at risk of preterm delivery and to assess the likelihood of successful induction of labour. In this study, the cervical stiffness was measured in vivo in pregnant sheep by using Shear Wave Elastography (SWE. This technique assesses the stiffness of tissue through the measurement of shear waves speed (SWS. In the present study, 9 pregnant ewes were used. Cervical ripening was induced at 127 days of pregnancy (term: 145 days by dexamethasone injection in 5 animals, while 4 animals were used as control. Elastographic images of the cervix were obtained by two independent operators every 4 hours during 24 hours after injection to monitor the cervical maturation induced by the dexamethasone. Based on the measurements of SWS during vaginal ultrasound examination, the stiffness in the second ring of the cervix was quantified over a circular region of interest of 5 mm diameter. SWS was found to decrease significantly in the first 4-8 hours after dexamethasone compared to controls, which was associated with cervical ripening induced by dexamethasone (from 1.779 m/s ± 0.548 m/s, p < 0.0005, to 1.291 m/s ± 0.516 m/s, p < 0.000. Consequently a drop in the cervical elasticity was quantified too (from 9.5 kPa ± 0.9 kPa, p < 0.0005, to 5.0 kPa ± 0.8 kPa, p < 0.000. Moreover, SWE measurements were highly reproducible between both operators at all times. Cervical ripening induced by dexamethasone was confirmed by the significant increase in maternal plasma Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, as evidenced by the assay of its

  3. Shear-wave velocity structure at Mt. Etna from inversion of Rayleigh-wave dispersion patterns (2 s < T < 20 s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Scarpa

    2010-05-01

    -ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;} @page Section1 {size:612.0pt 792.0pt; margin:70.85pt 2.0cm 2.0cm 2.0cm; mso-header-margin:36.0pt; mso-footer-margin:36.0pt; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} -->

    In the present study, we investigated the dispersion characteristics of medium-to-long period Rayleigh waves (2 s < T < 20 s using both single-station techniques (multiple-filter analysis, and phase-match filter and multichannel techniques (horizontal slowness [p] and angular frequency [~] stack, and cross-correlation to determine the velocity structure for the Mt. Etna volcano. We applied these techniques to a dataset of teleseisms, as regional and local earthquakes recorded by two broad-band seismic arrays installed at Mt. Etna in 2002 and 2005, during two seismic surveys organized by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV, sezione di Napoli. The dispersion curves obtained showed phase velocities ranging from 1.5 km/s to 4.0 km/s in the frequency band 0.05 Hz to 0.45 Hz. We inverted the average phase velocity dispersion curves using a non-linear approach, to obtain a set of shear-wave velocity

  4. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  5. Shear-wave velocity characterization of the USGS Hawaiian strong-motion network on the Island of Hawaii and development of an NEHRP site-class map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, I.G.; Stokoe, K.H., II; Cox, B.R.; Yuan, J.; Knudsen, K.-L.; Terra, F.; Okubo, P.; Lin, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the level and nature of ground shaking in Hawaii for the purposes of earthquake hazard mitigation and seismic design, empirical groundmotion prediction models are desired. To develop such empirical relationships, knowledge of the subsurface site conditions beneath strong-motion stations is critical. Thus, as a first step to develop ground-motion prediction models for Hawaii, spectralanalysis-of-surface-waves (SASW) profiling was performed at the 22 free-field U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) strong-motion sites on the Big Island to obtain shear-wave velocity (VS) data. Nineteen of these stations recorded the 2006 Kiholo Bay moment magnitude (M) 6.7 earthquake, and 17 stations recorded the triggered M 6.0 Mahukona earthquake. VS profiling was performed to reach depths of more than 100 ft. Most of the USGS stations are situated on sites underlain by basalt, based on surficial geologic maps. However, the sites have varying degrees of weathering and soil development. The remaining strong-motion stations are located on alluvium or volcanic ash. VS30 (average VS in the top 30 m) values for the stations on basalt ranged from 906 to 1908 ft/s [National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classes C and D], because most sites were covered with soil of variable thickness. Based on these data, an NEHRP site-class map was developed for the Big Island. These new VS data will be a significant input into an update of the USGS statewide hazard maps and to the operation of ShakeMap on the island of Hawaii.

  6. Method for improving data collection SNR of shear waves at shallow strata%提高浅层横波数据采集信噪比的方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李铭铭; 孔庆河; 张文德; 王晓娇

    2012-01-01

    为了取得信噪比较高的野外采集数据,根据浅层横波的激发与接收特点,通过对横波偏振特性分析、震源重量分析、激发面积(震源组合)分析,得出在野外采集时,利用横波偏振特性进行反向激发相减,可以提高浅层横波资料的信噪比;通过试验选取最佳的激发面积和选择合适的震源重量也能提高横波资料的信噪比.%In order to achieve a high SNR field data collection, based on the exciting and receiving characteristics of shallow shear waves, this study analyzes the polarization properties, source weight, and exciting area. It found that using transverse wave polarization properties, the reverse excitation phase reduction can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of shallow shear wave data. In addition, optimal stimulation area and appropriate source weight can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the shear wave data.

  7. Optimal Elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy to Pathological Fibrotic patients employing Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation in Liver Shear Wave Elastography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Skouroliakou, Aikaterini; Theotokas, Ioannis; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos S.; Kagadis, George C.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine an optimal elasticity cut-off value for discriminating Healthy from Pathological fibrotic patients by means of Fuzzy C-Means automatic segmentation and maximum participation cluster mean value employment in Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) images. The clinical dataset comprised 32 subjects (16 Healthy and 16 histological or Fibroscan verified Chronic Liver Disease). An experienced Radiologist performed SWE measurement placing a region of interest (ROI) on each subject's right liver lobe providing a SWE image for each patient. Subsequently Fuzzy C-Means clustering was performed on every SWE image utilizing 5 clusters. Mean Stiffness value and pixels number of each cluster were calculated. The mean stiffness value feature of the cluster with maximum pixels number was then fed as input for ROC analysis. The selected Mean Stiffness value feature an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of 0.8633 with Optimum Cut-off value of 7.5 kPa with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.8438 and 0.875 and balanced accuracy of 0.8594. Examiner's classification measurements exhibited sensitivity, specificity and balanced accuracy value of 0.8125 with 7.1 kPa cutoff value. A new promising automatic algorithm was implemented with more objective criteria of defining optimum elasticity cut-off values for discriminating fibrosis stages for SWE. More subjects are needed in order to define if this algorithm is an objective tool to outperform manual ROI selection.

  8. Combined plate motion and density driven flow in the asthenosphere beneath Saudi Arabia: Evidence from shear-wave splitting and seismic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S; Schwartz, S

    2006-02-08

    A comprehensive study of mantle anisotropy along the Red Sea and across Saudi Arabia was performed by analyzing shear-wave splitting recorded by stations from three different seismic networks: the largest, most widely distributed array of stations examined across Saudi Arabia to date. Stations near the Gulf of Aqaba display fast orientations that are aligned parallel to the Dead Sea Transform Fault, most likely related to the strike-slip motion between Africa and Arabia. However, most of our observations across Saudi Arabia are statistically the same, showing a consistent pattern of north-south oriented fast directions with delay times averaging about 1.4 s. Fossilized anisotropy related to the Proterozoic assembly of the Arabian Shield may contribute to the pattern but is not sufficient to fully explain the observations. We feel that the uniform anisotropic signature across Saudi Arabia is best explained by a combination of plate and density driven flow in the asthenosphere. By combining the northeast oriented flow associated with absolute plate motion with the northwest oriented flow associated with the channelized Afar plume along the Red Sea, we obtain a north-south oriented resultant that matches our splitting observations and supports models of active rifting processes. This explains why the north-south orientation of the fast polarization direction is so pervasive across the vast Arabian Plate.

  9. Blind shear-wave velocity comparison of ReMi and MASW results with boreholes to 200 m in Santa Clara Valley: Implications for earthquake ground-motion assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, W.J.; Louie, J.N.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.

    2005-01-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and refraction microtremor (ReMi) are two of the most recently developed surface acquisition techniques for determining shallow shear-wave velocity. We conducted a blind comparison of MASW and ReMi results with four boreholes logged to at least 260 m for shear velocity in Santa Clara Valley, California, to determine how closely these surface methods match the downhole measurements. Average shear-wave velocity estimates to depths of 30, 50, and 100 m demonstrate that the surface methods as implemented in this study can generally match borehole results to within 15% to these depths. At two of the boreholes, the average to 100 m depth was within 3%. Spectral amplifications predicted from the respective borehole velocity profiles similarly compare to within 15 % or better from 1 to 10 Hz with both the MASW and ReMi surface-method velocity profiles. Overall, neither surface method was consistently better at matching the borehole velocity profiles or amplifications. Our results suggest MASW and ReMi surface acquisition methods can both be appropriate choices for estimating shearwave velocity and can be complementary to each other in urban settings for hazards assessment.

  10. Assessment of liver fibrosis with 2-D shear wave elastography in comparison to transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Ludmila; Kasper, Daniela; Fitting, Daniel; Knop, Viola; Vermehren, Annika; Sprinzl, Kathrin; Hansmann, Martin L; Herrmann, Eva; Bojunga, Joerg; Albert, Joerg; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Friedrich-Rust, Mireen

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional shear wave elastography (2-D SWE) is an ultrasound-based elastography method integrated into a conventional ultrasound machine. It can evaluate larger regions of interest and, therefore, might be better at determining the overall fibrosis distribution. The aim of this prospective study was to compare 2-D SWE with the two best evaluated liver elastography methods, transient elastography and acoustic radiation force impulse (point SWE using acoustic radiation force impulse) imaging, in the same population group. The study included 132 patients with chronic hepatopathies, in which liver stiffness was evaluated using transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and 2-D SWE. The reference methods were liver biopsy for the assessment of liver fibrosis (n = 101) and magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography for the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis (n = 31). No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy, assessed as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), was found between the three elastography methods (2-D SWE, transient elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse imaging) for the diagnosis of significant and advanced fibrosis and liver cirrhosis in the "per protocol" (AUROCs for fibrosis stages ≥2: 0.90, 0.95 and 0.91; for fibrosis stage [F] ≥3: 0.93, 0.95 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.92, 0.96 and 0.92) and "intention to diagnose" cohort (AUROCs for F ≥2: 0.87, 0.92 and 0.91; for F ≥3: 0.91, 0.93 and 0.94; for F = 4: 0.88, 0.90 and 0.89). Therefore, 2-D SWE, ARFI imaging and transient elastography seem to be comparably good methods for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis. PMID:26116161

  11. The inversion of shear wave slowness's radial variations based on the dipole flexural mode dispersion%基于偶极弯曲波频散的横波慢度径向分布反演

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明明; 陈浩; 何晓; 王秀明

    2013-01-01

    本文针对地层横波慢度径向分层模型,分析了地层横波慢度的径向非均匀性对弯曲波频散的影响.基于径向非均匀与均匀模型之间弯曲波频散的差异,结合微扰法和Backus-Gilbert (BG)理论建立了反演横波慢度径向分布的方程,求取了地层横波慢度的径向分布.在无噪声和参数误差时,反演结果较好地反映了实际地层横波慢度的径向分布,当井孔流体或井外地层纵波慢度的选取误差在10%内变化时,反演结果基本保持不变;存在信噪比(SNR)为20 dB(信号的功率为噪声的100倍)或10 dB(信号的功率为噪声的10倍)噪声时,反演结果没有发生明显的改变,其相对误差基本控制在10%以内,可见噪声对反演结果的影响不大.以上反演结果说明,本文采用的结合微扰法和BG理论的反演方法来估测地层横波慢度的径向分布时,具有很好的鲁棒性,可以被用于现场了解井壁周围的地层性质.%Abstract The effect of shear wave slowness's radial heterogeneities on dipole flexural mode dispersions is analyzed for shear wave slowness's radially layered model.Perturbation method and Backus-Gilbert(BG) theory are used for the inversion of shear wave slowness radial variations based on the difference of flexural wave dispersions between radially heterogeneous and homogeneous formations.When there is no noise and error of other parameters,the radial variations of the inverted shear wave slowness agree very well with the assumed radial profile.When the choice of slowness for the borehole fluid or formation compressional wave has a deviation from the true value within 10 percent,the inverted radial variations of shear wave slowness almost remains unchanged.When there exists noise with SNR (Signal Noise Ratio) of 20 dB or 10 dB,the relative error of the inversion results is within 10 percent,which means the impact of noise on the inversion results is little.From the inversion results described

  12. 不同波高的波折板连接件的抗剪性能试验研究%Experimental study on shearing behavior of different height of wave corrugated perforated plate connectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤元宝; 刘凡; 韩伟; 陈建兵

    2011-01-01

    The corrugated perforated plate was a new type of shear connector.This paper presented the results from static push-out tests on six corrugated perforated plate connectors and two perfobond plate connectors,which had been designed and made.The effects of the different height of wave on shearing behavior were mainly studied.The load versus-slip curve,the load-stress curve,the load-strain curve of transverse rebar and the failure modes of the two shear connectors were obtained.The conclusions showed that the load versus slip curve of the corrugated perforated plate shear connectors approximately included no slip stage,the elastic stage and the plastic-developing stage.Increasing the height of wave could enhance the bearing capacity and shearing rigidity.Compared with the perforated shear connectors,the corrugated perforated plate shear connectors had advantages of higher bearing capacity,better slide-resistant behavior and ductility and so on.%波折开孔板连接件是一种新型剪力连接件。通过对设计、制作的6个波折板连接件和两个平开孔板连接件试件在单调静力荷载作用下的推出试验,主要研究波高不同对连接件抗剪性能的影响。得出了两种连接件试件的荷载一滑移曲线、荷载一应力曲线、横向贯穿钢筋的荷载一应变曲线及破坏形态。结果表明:波折板连接件的荷载一滑移曲线大致可分为无滑移阶段、弹性阶段和塑性发展阶段;其受剪承载力和抗剪刚度随着波高的增加而增大;与平板连接件相比,具有承载力更高、抗滑移性能更好、延性较好等优点。

  13. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Apoutou N'Djin, W.; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion’s extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n=11 ) and mapped (n= 7 ). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n= 2 ) and ventricular (left n=1 , right n=1 ) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8   ±   13

  14. Cardiac shear-wave elastography using a transesophageal transducer: application to the mapping of thermal lesions in ultrasound transesophageal cardiac ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Wojciech; Bessière, Francis; Colas, Elodie Constanciel; N'Djin, W Apoutou; Tanter, Mickaël; Lafon, Cyril; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-10-21

    Heart rhythm disorders, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia can be treated by catheter-based thermal ablation. However, clinically available systems based on radio-frequency or cryothermal ablation suffer from limited energy penetration and the lack of lesion's extent monitoring. An ultrasound-guided transesophageal device has recently successfully been used to perform High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in targeted regions of the heart in vivo. In this study we investigate the feasibility of a dual therapy and imaging approach on the same transesophageal device. We demonstrate in vivo that quantitative cardiac shear-wave elastography (SWE) can be performed with the device and we show on ex vivo samples that transesophageal SWE can map the extent of the HIFU lesions. First, SWE was validated with the transesophageal endoscope in one sheep in vivo. The stiffness of normal atrial and ventricular tissues has been assessed during the cardiac cycle (n = 11) and mapped (n = 7). Second, HIFU ablation has been performed with the therapy-imaging transesophageal device in ex vivo chicken breast samples (n  =  3), then atrial (left, n = 2) and ventricular (left n = 1, right n = 1) porcine heart tissues. SWE provided stiffness maps of the tissues before and after ablation. Areas of the lesions were obtained by tissue color change with gross pathology and compared to SWE. During the cardiac cycle stiffness varied from 0.5   ±   0.1 kPa to 6.0   ±   0.3 kPa in the atrium and from 1.3   ±   0.3 kPa to 13.5   ±   9.1 kPa in the ventricles. The thermal lesions were visible on all SWE maps performed after ablation. Shear modulus of the ablated zones increased to 16.3   ±   5.5 kPa (versus 4.4   ±   1.6 kPa before ablation) in the chicken breast, to 30.3   ±   10.3 kPa (versus 12.2   ±   4.3 kPa) in the atria and to 73.8

  15. 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_95th_perc.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  16. Median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_median.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  17. High-Q energy trapping of temperature-stable shear waves with Lamé cross-sectional polarization in a single crystal silicon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizian, R.; Daruwalla, A.; Ayazi, F.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-port electrostatically driven silicon acoustic cavity is implemented that efficiently traps the energy of a temperature-stable eigen-mode with Lamé cross-sectional polarization. Dispersive behavior of propagating and evanescent guided waves in a ⟨100⟩-aligned single crystal silicon waveguide is used to engineer the acoustic energy distribution of a specific shear eigen-mode that is well known for its low temperature sensitivity when implemented in doped single crystal silicon. Such an acoustic energy trapping in the central region of the acoustic cavity geometry and far from substrate obviates the need for narrow tethers that are conventionally used for non-destructive and high quality factor (Q) energy suspension in MEMS resonators; therefore, the acoustically engineered waveguide can simultaneously serve as in-situ self-oven by passing large uniformly distributed DC currents through its body and without any concern about perturbing the mode shape or deforming narrow supports. Such a stable thermo-structural performance besides large turnover temperatures than can be realized in Lamé eigen-modes make this device suitable for implementation of ultra-stable oven-controlled oscillators. 78 MHz prototypes implemented in arsenic-doped single crystal silicon substrates with different resistivity are transduced by in- and out-of-plane narrow-gap capacitive ports, showing high Q of ˜43k. The low resistivity device shows an overall temperature-induced frequency drift of 200 ppm over the range of -20 °C to 80 °C, which is ˜15× smaller compared to overall frequency drift measured for the similar yet high resistivity device in the same temperature range. Furthermore, a frequency tuning of ˜2100 ppm is achieved in high resistivity device by passing 45 mA DC current through its body. Continuous operation of the device under such a self-ovenizing current over 10 days did not induce frequency instability or degradation in Q.

  18. Periodically sheared 2D Yukawa systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovács, Anikó Zsuzsa [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege Miklós str. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Hartmann, Peter [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege Miklós str. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER), One Bear Place 97310, Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Donkó, Zoltán [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege Miklós str. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Physics Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 20467 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation studies on the dynamic (complex) shear viscosity of a 2D Yukawa system. We have identified a non-monotonic frequency dependence of the viscosity at high frequencies and shear rates, an energy absorption maximum (local resonance) at the Einstein frequency of the system at medium shear rates, an enhanced collective wave activity, when the excitation is near the plateau frequency of the longitudinal wave dispersion, and the emergence of significant configurational anisotropy at small frequencies and high shear rates.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Steel Thinning Defect Detection of Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer Shear Wave%电磁超声横波检测钢板减薄缺陷的有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文峰; 赵建平

    2016-01-01

    The shear waves in measured specimen excitated by EMAT(electromagnetic acoustic transduc-er)can be applied to detect thickness and internal defect of specimen.Finite element analysis was applied to simulate the mechanism of electromagnetic ultrasonic excitation of shear wave.Through the es-tablishment of three-dimensional model of EMAT and electromagnetism coupling calculation,the distribu-tion of the surface magnetic field,eddy current and Lorenz force were obtained,the results show the mech-anism of EMAT wave excitation,which provides reference for the design of the electromagnetic ultrasonic transducer.With the coupling of electromagnetics and structural dynamics calculation,the propagation of shear waves in the specimen thickness direction was obtained,results show that the shear wave propagates in the specimen along the thickness direction,and the energy is attenuated trend.In addition,the structure dynamics analysis of the defective plate provides that the wave fluctuations occur obvious change and decay when they encounter the defect.It proves the wave excitation of EMAT can effectively detect the de-fects inside the specimen.According to the results of simulation and experiments,the method of quantitati-ving defect by shear wave detection was put forward.%电磁超声换能器(EMAT)在试件中激发的横波(剪切波)能够应用于试件厚度和内部缺陷检测,为了研究电磁超声激发横波的机理,采用有限元分析的方法,对其进行仿真分析。通过建立EMAT三维模型,进行电磁学耦合计算,获得被测试件表面磁场、涡流、洛伦兹力的分布规律,显示了EMAT激发横波的机理过程,为电磁超声换能器的设计提供参考;通过电磁学与动力学的耦合计算,获得横波在试件厚度方向的传播规律,结果表明,横波在试件中沿厚度方向传播,并且能量呈衰减趋势;对含缺陷钢板进行结构动力学分析,发现当波传播遇到缺

  20. Study on influence of soil liquefaction on shear-wave velocity of soil-stone mixture%细粒土液化对土石混合料剪切波速的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宇辉; 张献民

    2011-01-01

    To study the shear-wave velocity variation law of soil-stone mixtures due to alteration of water content and mass percent of stone, by using sandy soil, silt containing sand and low liquid - limit clay, large laboratory vibration compaction equipment was designed and the test was conducted under the condition of different water content and different soil-stone proportion. The model of correlation between dry density of fine-grained soil and shear-wave velocity during the course of increasing of water content was was proposed. The influencing law of soil with different water content on shear-wave velocity of soil - stone mixture with connatural soil. The results show that when the dry density remains unchanged, the shear-wave velocity of soil decreases along with water content increases. When the water content remains unchanged, shear-wave velocity of soil increases with increaseing of water content while water content is small, the velocity of mixture increases, and the velocity varies comparable gibbous parabolically with the increasing of dry density while water content is close to liquefaction point, then the trend of velocity of mixture is similar to the one of soil with the lagging of turning point. The change of velocity of mixture caused by water ratio decreases with increasing of stone content. This conclusion is valuable in compaction degree evaluation of soil-stone mixture by the shear-wave velocity.%设计室内大型振动击实仪,对砂土、含砂粉土、低液限黏性土3种土样的纯土试件和土石混合试件进行了不同含水量、不同含石量情况下试件剪切波速对比试验.建立细粒土随含水率增大至液化过程中,细粒土干密度与剪切波速相关模型.研究不同含水率细粒土对同性质土体土石混填料剪切波速的影响规律.结果表明:干密度一定时,细粒土剪切波速随含水率的增大而减小.含水率相同,当含水率较小时,细粒土剪切波速随干密度的增大而

  1. Gelation under shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, B.D.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Straty, G.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Muzny, C.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    An experimental small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of dense silica gels, prepared from suspensions of 24 nm colloidal silica particles at several volume fractions {theta} is discussed. Provided that {theta}{approx_lt}0.18, the scattered intensity at small wave vectors q increases as the gelation proceeds, and the structure factor S(q, t {yields} {infinity}) of the gel exhibits apparent power law behavior. Power law behavior is also observed, even for samples with {theta}>0.18, when the gel is formed under an applied shear. Shear also enhances the diffraction maximum corresponding to the inter-particle contact distance of the gel. Difficulties encountered when trying to interpret SANS data from these dense systems are outlined. Results of computer simulations intended to mimic gel formation, including computations of S(q, t), are discussed. Comments on a method to extract a fractal dimension characterizing the gel are included.

  2. Lateral shear interferometry with holo shear lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joenathan, C.; Mohanty, R. K.; Sirohi, R. S.

    1984-12-01

    A simple method for obtaining lateral shear using holo shear lenses (HSL) has been discussed. This simple device which produces lateral shears in the orthogonal directions has been used for lens testing. The holo shear lens is placed at or near the focus of the lens to be tested. It has also been shown that HSL can be used in speckle shear interferometry as it performs both the functions of shearing and imaging.

  3. Assessment of plantar fasciitis using shear wave elastography%剪切波弹性成像评价足底筋膜炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立宁; 万文博; 张立海; 肖红雨; 罗渝昆; 费翔; 郑志新; 唐佩福

    2014-01-01

    目的:利用剪切波弹性成像技术比较不同年龄段正常人及足底筋膜炎患者的足底筋膜的厚度和硬度。方法对23名足底筋膜炎患者和30例健康志愿者进行剪切波弹性超声检查,测量足底筋膜跟骨止点及距离跟骨止点1 cm处的厚度和弹性模量值。结果老年组足底筋膜明显比年轻组厚(P=0.005),弹性模量值明显比年轻组小(P=0.000)。足底筋膜炎组足底筋膜厚度明显比老年组厚(P=0.001),弹性模量值明显比老年组小(P=0.000)。足底筋膜炎组的足底筋膜跟骨止点处弹性模量值比距离跟骨止点处1 cm的筋膜弹性值低(P=0.000),而健康志愿者年轻组和老年组的两个位置的弹性模量差异无统计学意义(P=0.172, P=0.126)。结论剪切波弹性成像能定量评估足底筋膜的硬度,足底筋膜的硬度随年龄增加而变小,足底筋膜炎的筋膜硬度较正常筋膜变小。%Objective To assess the stiffness and thickness of the plantar fascia using shear wave elastography (SWE) in healthy volunteers of different ages and in patients with plantar fasciitis. Methods The bilateral feet of 30 healthy volunteers and 23 patients with plantar fasciitis were examined with SWE. The plantar fascia thickness and elasticity modulus value were measured at the insertion of the calcaneus and at 1 cm from the insertion. Results The elderly volunteers had a significantly greater plantar fascia thickness measured using conventional ultrasound (P=0.005) and a significantly lower elasticity modulus value than the young volunteers (P=0.000). The patients with fasciitis had a significantly greater plantar fascia thickness (P=0.001) and a lower elasticity modulus value than the elderly volunteers (P=0.000). The elasticity modulus value was significantly lower at the calcaneus insertion than at 1 cm from the insertion in patients with fasciitis (P=0.000) but showed no significantly difference between the

  4. Shear wave splitting of the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence: fluid saturated microcracks and crustal fractures in the Abruzzi region (Central Apennines, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccheschi, P.; Pastori, M.; Margheriti, L.; Piccinini, D.

    2016-03-01

    The Abruzzi region is located in the Central Apennines Neogene fold-and-thrust belt and has one of the highest seismogenic potential in Italy, with high and diffuse crustal seismicity related to NE-SW oriented extension. In this study, we investigate the detailed spatial variation in shear wave splitting providing high-resolution anisotropic structure beneath the L'Aquila region. To accomplish this, we performed a systematic analysis of crustal anisotropic parameters: fast polarization direction (ϕ) and delay time (δt). We benefit from the dense coverage of seismic stations operating in the area and from a catalogue of several accurate earthquake locations of the 2009 L'Aquila seismic sequence, related to the Mw 6.1 2009 L'Aquila main shock, to describe in detail the geometry of the anisotropic volume around the active faults that ruptured. The spatial variations both in ϕ and δt suggest a complex anisotropic structure beneath the region caused by a combination of both structural- and stress-induced mechanisms. The average ϕ is NNW-SSE oriented (N141°), showing clear similarity both with the local fault strike and the SHmax. In the central part of the study area fast axes are oriented NW-SE, while moving towards the northeastern and northwestern sectors the fast directions clearly diverge from the general trend of NW-SE and rotate accordingly to the local fault strikes. The above-mentioned fault-parallel ϕ distribution suggests that the observed anisotropy is mostly controlled by the local fault-related structure. Toward the southeast fast directions become orthogonal both to strike of the local mapped faults and to the SHmax. Here, ϕ are predominantly oriented NE-SW; we interpret this orientation as due to the presence of a highly fractured and overpressurized rock volume which should be responsible of the 90° flips in ϕ and the increase in δt. Another possible mechanism for NE-SW orientation of ϕ in the southeastern sector could be ascribed to the

  5. Shear wave velocity for the upper 30 m: Combining a 3D voxel model and seismic CPTS for the Groningen gas field, the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambrink, Roula; Gunnink, Jan; Stafleu, Jan; de Lange, Ger; Kruiver, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    The Groningen gas field in the Netherlands is one of the largest gas fields of Europe and has been in production since the 1960's. Due to the progressive depletion of the reservoir, induced seismic activity has increased in recent years. In 2012, an earthquake of magnitude 3.6 initiated further research in prediction and management of risks related to man-induced earthquakes. Last year the government decided to reduce the gas extraction for this reason. One of the topics of concern is the large difference in earthquake-related damage to buildings which, in addition to the distance to the epicenter, appears to be also related to the composition of the shallow subsurface. To improve the spatial distribution of Shear Wave Velocities (Vs) in the shallow subsurface, used for hazard prediction, the Geological Survey of the Netherlands and Deltares constructed a Vs30 map of the upper 30 m of the gas field. In this map a high-resolution geological model (GeoTOP) is combined with seismic cone penetration tests (SCPT) from the area. The GeoTOP model is a 3D voxel model of the upper 50 m, in which each voxel (100x100x0.5 m) is attributed with lithostratigraphy and the most likely lithological class (peat, clay, fine sand, etc.). To obtain statistical distributions (with mean and standard deviation) of Vs for each combination of lithostratigraphical unit and lithoclass, 60 SCPTs were analyzed. In this way, it was possible to assign a specific Vs to each voxel in the model. For each voxel in the stack of voxels that covers the upper 30 m (i.e. 60 voxels), a Vs value was randomly drawn from the statistical distribution of the lithostratigraphical - lithoclass combination it belongs to. The Vs30 for each voxelstack is then calculated using the harmonic mean of the Vs of the 60 voxels. By repeating this procedure 100 times, an (average) Vs30 map and the uncertainty in Vs30 has been constructed. Using the procedure described above we were able to delineate zones with distinct Vs30

  6. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...... times smaller it remains very high. For example, whilst there is enough potential wave power off the UK to supply the electricity demands several times over, the economically recoverable resource for the UK is estimated at 25% of current demand; a lot less, but a very substantial amount nonetheless....

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF SHEAR WAVE ELASTOGRAPHY AND RADIONUCLIDE SPECT IN THYROID CANCER%超声剪切波弹性成像与核素SPECT显像对甲状腺癌诊断的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳向柳; 郑立春; 刘晓玲; 张晓明; 张文军; 王艳滨

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Objective To compare the diagnostic value of shear wave elastography and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)99m TcO4 - imaging in thyroid cancer. Methods All 148 thyroid nodules as research subjects were checked by shear wave elastography and radionuclide SPECT imaging,based by the pathology as the gold standard,two methods for calculating the diagnosis of thyroid cancer sensitivity,specificity,accuracy,positive predictive value and negative predictive value were compared.Results All of the 148 thyroid nodules,there were 39 malignant nodules (26.35%),109 benign nodules (73.65%).About the sensitivity, specificity,accuracy,positive predictive value and negative predictive value,shear wave elastography in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in a variety of indicators were higher than SPECT 99m TcO4 - imaging.Conclusion Shear wave elastography in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer is higher than radionuclide SPECT 99m TcO4 - imaging,and shear wave elastography should be preferred for first clinical use.The combination of the two methods will increase the value in the diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma.%目的:比较超声剪切波弹性成像与单光子发射型计算机断层摄影(single-photon emission computed tomography,SPECT)高锝酸盐(99m TcO4-)显像2种检查方法对甲状腺癌的诊断价值。方法148个甲状腺结节均行超声剪切波弹性成像及核素 SPECT 99m TcO4-显像,以病理为金标准,计算2种方法诊断甲状腺癌的灵敏度、特异度、准确度、阳性预测值及阴性预测值。结果病理诊断148个甲状腺结节中,恶性结节39个(26.35%),良性结节109个(73.65%)。超声剪切波弹性成像诊断甲状腺癌的灵敏度、特异度、准确度、阳性预测值及阴性预测值均高于 SPECT 99m TcO4-显像。结论超声剪切波弹性成像对甲状腺癌的诊断价值高于核素 SPECT 99m TcO4-显像,在临床应用中应以超声为首选,

  8. 3-D Shear Wave Velocity Model of Mexico and South US: Bridging Seismic Networks with Ambient Noise Cross-Correlations (C1) and Correlation of Coda of Correlations (C3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group travel times are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  9. 3-D shear wave velocity model of Mexico and South US: bridging seismic networks with ambient noise cross-correlations (C1) and correlation of coda of correlations (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Calò, Marco; Legrand, Denis; Córdoba-Montiel, Francisco; Iglesias, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an innovative strategy to enhance the resolution of surface wave tomography obtained from ambient noise cross-correlation (C1) by bridging asynchronous seismic networks through the correlation of coda of correlations (C3). Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves show consistent results between synchronous and asynchronous stations. Rayleigh wave group traveltimes are inverted to construct velocity-period maps with unprecedented resolution for a region covering Mexico and the southern United States. The resulting period maps are then used to regionalize dispersion curves in order to obtain local 1-D shear velocity models (VS) of the crust and uppermost mantle in every cell of a grid of 0.4°. The 1-D structures are obtained by iteratively adding layers until reaching a given misfit, and a global tomography model is considered as an input for depths below 150 km. Finally, a high-resolution 3-D VS model is obtained from these inversions. The major structures observed in the 3-D model are in agreement with the tectonic-geodynamic features and with previous regional and local studies. It also offers new insights to understand the present and past tectonic evolution of the region.

  10. Constraints on the thermal and compositional nature of the Earth's mantle inferred from joint inversion of compressional and shear seismic waves and mineral physics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesoniero, Andrea

    Research: Solid Earth on October 2015. The second manuscript “S − to − P heterogeneity ratio in the lower mantle and thermo-chemical implications” has been submitted to Earth and Planetary Science Letters and it is currently under review process. This thesis represents the culmination of my Ph.D. project...... the results of a combined interdisciplinary study that includes seismology and mineral physics. The purpose is to augment our knowledge on the thermal and chemical nature of the inner Earth. A large global seismic database has been gathered and analyzed during the project and a new global joint compressional...... and submitted to international peer reviewed journals. The first manuscript “Hydration of marginal basins and compositional variations within the continental lithospheric mantle inferred from a new global model of shear and compressional velocity.” has been accepted for publication on Journal of Geophysical...

  11. Three dimensional shear wave velocity structure of crust and upper mantle in South China Sea and its adjacent regions by surface waveform inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We assembled approximately 328 seismic records. The data set wasfrom 4 digitally recording long-period and broadband stations of CDSN. We carried out the inversion based on the partitioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large-scale optimization problem into a number of independent small-scale problems. We adopted surface waveform inversion with an equal block (2°′2°) discretization in order to acquire the images of shear velocity structure at different depths (from surface to 430 km) in the crust and upper-mantle. The resolution of all these anomalies has been established with 2check-board2 resolution tests. These results show significant difference in velocity, lithosphere and asthenosphere structure between South China Sea and its adjacent regions.

  12. Shear-Wave Splitting in a Critical Crust: the Next Step Biréfringence des ondes transversales dans les croûtes critiques : la prochaine étape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crampin S.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Arguably, shear-wave splitting displaying azimuthal anisotropy has not lived up to its initial promise of opening a new window for understanding cracks and stress in the crust. This paper reviews two recent related developments which appear to renew these initial hopes and provide new opportunities for monitoring, modelling, and even predicting, the (pre-fracturing deformation of fluid-saturated microcracked rock. A recently developed model of anisotropic poro-elasticity (APE for the stress-induced evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock matches a wide range of otherwise inexplicable or dissociated phenomena and appears to be a good first-order approximation to the evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock. Since the parameters that control small-scale (pre-fracturing deformation also control shear-wave splitting, it appears that the evolution of fluid-saturated microcracked rock can be directly monitored by shear-wave splitting, and the response to future changes predicted by APE. The success of APE-modelling and observations of shear-wave splitting imply that almost all rock is close to a state of fracture criticality associated with the percolation threshold, when shear-strength is lost and through-going fractures can propagate. This confirms other evidence for the self-organized criticality of in situ rock. The significance of this identification is that the small-scale physics that controls the whole phenomena can now be identified as the stress-induced manipulation of fluids around intergranular microcracks. This has the possibly unique advantage amongst critical systems that details of the pre-fracturing deformation and the approach to the criticality threshold (in this case the proximity to fracturing can be monitored at each locality by appropriate observations of shear-wave splitting. This paper reviews the these developments and discusses their implications and applications, particularly the implications of self

  13. A Large Scale Automatic Earthquake Location Catalog in the San Jacinto Fault Zone Area Using An Improved Shear-Wave Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M. C. A.; Ross, Z.; Vernon, F.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    UC San Diego's ANZA network began archiving event-triggered data in 1982. As a result of improved recording technology, continuous waveform data archives are available starting in 1998. This continuous dataset, from 1998-present, represents a wealth of potential insight into spatio-temporal seismicity patterns, earthquake physics and mechanics of the San Jacinto Fault Zone. However, the volume of data renders manual analysis costly. In order to investigate the characteristics of the data in space and time, an automatic earthquake location catalog is needed. To this end, we apply standard earthquake signal processing techniques to the continuous data to detect first-arriving P-waves in combination with a recently developed S-wave detection algorithm. The resulting dataset of arrival time observations are processed using a grid association algorithm to produce initial absolute locations which are refined using a location inversion method that accounts for 3-D velocity heterogeneities. Precise relative locations are then derived from the refined absolute locations using the HypoDD double-difference algorithm. Moment magnitudes for the events are estimated from multi-taper spectral analysis. A >650% increase in the S:P pick ratio is achieved using the updated S-wave detection algorithm, when compared to the currently available catalog for the ANZA network. The increased number of S-wave observations leads to improved earthquake location accuracy and reliability (ie. less false event detections). Various aspects of spatio-temporal seismicity patterns and size distributions are investigated. Updated results will be presented at the meeting.

  14. 基于TDC的L_(CR)波切向应力检测方法的研究%METHOD WITH TDC FOR EVALUATING SHEAR STRESS BY LCR WAVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴仙金; 丁杰雄; 李凌轩

    2010-01-01

    基于固体中声速与应力的关系以及临界折射纵波(critically refracted longitudinal wave, L_(CR))的产生机理,提出一种利用LCR波从表面检测物体内部切向应力的实施方法,并对测量系统的硬件结构和工作原理进行详细阐述.针对应力改变导致的LCR波传播时间的微量变化,系统采用基于逻辑门绝对传输时间原理工作的"时间-数字转换器"(time to digital converter,TDC)来满足高精度的时间间隔测量要求.在测量过程中采用"单端发射-双端接收"的布局模式进一步降低测量误差,以提高应力检测的精度.

  15. High Prevalence of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Monoinfection and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Hepatitis-B Co-infection as Assessed by Shear Wave Elastography: Study at a Teaching Hospital in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitau, Samuel Nguku; Vinayak, Sudhir; Silaba, Micah; Adam, Rodney; Shah, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of liver fibrosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) monoinfection versus those with HIV hepatitis-B virus (HBV) co-infection as assessed with shear wave elastography (SWE) in a tertiary sub-Saharan Africa hospital. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 consecutive patients, 70 with HIV monoinfection and 35 with HIV-HBV co-infection, had liver elastography obtained using SWE to assess for the presence of liver fibrosis the cutoff of which was 5.6 kPa. Assessment of aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) score (a noninvasive serum biomarker of liver fibrosis) in these patients was also done. Results: The prevalence of liver fibrosis was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection, 25.7%, compared to those with HIV monoinfection, 7.1%. APRI score was greater in patients with HIV-HBV co-infection than those with HIV monoinfection. HIV co-infection with HBV accelerates progression to liver fibrosis. Association of a low cluster of differentiation 4 (CD-4) count with advanced fibrosis supports earlier starting of antiretroviral therapy to prevent rapid progression of liver disease in HIV-positive patients. Conclusion: In view of the high prevalence of