WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic waves propagation

  1. Acoustical Wave Propagation in Sonic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulian Girip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to discuss the technique of controlling the mechanical properties of sonic composites. The idea is to architecture the scatterers and material from which they are made, their number and geometry in order to obtain special features in their response to external waves. We refer to perfectly reflecting of acoustical waves over a desired range of frequencies or to prohibit their propagation in certain directions, or confining the waves within specified volumes. The internal structure of the material has to be chosen in such a way that to avoid the scattering of acoustical waves inside the material. This is possible if certain band-gaps of frequencies can be generated for which the waves are forbidden to propagate in certain directions. These bandgaps can be extended to cover all possible directions of propagation by resulting a full band-gap. If the band-gaps are not wide enough, their frequency ranges do not overlap. These band-gaps can overlap due to reflections on the surface of thick scatterers, as well as due to wave propagation inside them. growth.

  2. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  3. Propagation characteristics of acoustic emission wave in reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoxiong Feng

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of components and damage mechanism of reinforced concrete, the wave propagation characteristics in reinforced concrete are always complicated and difficult to determine. The objective of this article is to study the failure process of reinforced concrete structure under the damage caused by pencil-broken. A new method on the basis of the acoustic emission technique and the Hilbert-Huang transform theory is proposed in this work. By using acoustic emission technique, the acoustic emission wave signal is generating while the real-time damage information and the strain field of the reinforced concrete structure is receiving simultaneously. Based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT theory, the peak frequency characteristics of the acoustic emission signals were extracted to identify the damage modes of the reinforced concrete structure. The results demonstrate that this method can quantitatively investigate the acoustic emission wave propagation characteristic in reinforced concrete structures and might also be promising in other civil constructions. Keywords: Acoustic emission, Reinforced concrete structure, Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT, Propagation characteristics

  4. Nonlinear propagation of weakly relativistic ion-acoustic waves in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-06

    Oct 6, 2016 ... Abstract. This work presents theoretical and numerical discussion on the dynamics of ion-acoustic solitary wave for weakly relativistic regime in unmagnetized plasma comprising non-extensive electrons, Boltzmann positrons and relativistic ions. In order to analyse the nonlinear propagation phenomena, ...

  5. Theoretical Model of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozaczka Eugeniusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the propagation of low frequency waves in a shallow sea. As a source of acoustic waves, underwater disturbances generated by ships were adopted. A specific feature of the propagation of acoustic waves in shallow water is the proximity of boundaries of the limiting media characterised by different impedance properties, which affects the acoustic field coming from a source situated in the water layer “deformed” by different phenomena. The acoustic field distribution in the real shallow sea is affected not only by multiple reflections, but also by stochastic changes in the free surface shape, and statistical changes in the seabed shape and impedance. The paper discusses fundamental problems of modal sound propagation in the water layer over different types of bottom sediments. The basic task in this case was to determine the acoustic pressure level as a function of distance and depth. The results of the conducted investigation can be useful in indirect determination of the type of bottom.

  6. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.velasco@ccadet.unam.mx; Rendón, Pablo L., E-mail: pablo.rendon@ccadet.unam.mx [Grupo de Acústica y Vibraciones, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Apartado Postal 70-186, C.P. 04510, México D.F., México (Mexico)

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  7. Simulation of the acoustic wave propagation using a meshless method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajko J.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents numerical simulations of the acoustic wave propagation phenomenon modelled via Linearized Euler equations. A meshless method based on collocation of the strong form of the equation system is adopted. Moreover, the Weighted least squares method is used for local approximation of derivatives as well as stabilization technique in a form of spatial ltering. The accuracy and robustness of the method is examined on several benchmark problems.

  8. Propagation of three-dimensional electron-acoustic solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, M.; El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; El-Sherif, L. S.

    2011-06-01

    Theoretical investigation is carried out for understanding the properties of three-dimensional electron-acoustic waves propagating in magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold magnetized electron fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the cold magnetized electron fluid, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation, Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, in the small- but finite- amplitude regime. The ZK equation is solved analytically and it is found that it supports both solitary and blow-up solutions. It is found that rarefactive electron-acoustic solitary waves strongly depend on the density and temperature ratios of the hot-to-cold electron species as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Furthermore, there is a critical value for the nonthermal electron parameter, which decides whether the electron-acoustic solitary wave's amplitude is decreased or increased by changing various plasma parameters. Importantly, the change of the propagation angles leads to miss the balance between the nonlinearity and dispersion; hence, the localized pulses convert to explosive/blow-up pulses. The relevance of this study to the nonlinear electron-acoustic structures in the dayside auroral zone in the light of Viking satellite observations is discussed.

  9. Propagation of three-dimensional electron-acoustic solitary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, M.; El-Sherif, L. S.; El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical investigation is carried out for understanding the properties of three-dimensional electron-acoustic waves propagating in magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold magnetized electron fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the cold magnetized electron fluid, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation, Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, in the small- but finite- amplitude regime. The ZK equation is solved analytically and it is found that it supports both solitary and blow-up solutions. It is found that rarefactive electron-acoustic solitary waves strongly depend on the density and temperature ratios of the hot-to-cold electron species as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Furthermore, there is a critical value for the nonthermal electron parameter, which decides whether the electron-acoustic solitary wave's amplitude is decreased or increased by changing various plasma parameters. Importantly, the change of the propagation angles leads to miss the balance between the nonlinearity and dispersion; hence, the localized pulses convert to explosive/blow-up pulses. The relevance of this study to the nonlinear electron-acoustic structures in the dayside auroral zone in the light of Viking satellite observations is discussed.

  10. Nonlinear internal wave effects on acoustic propagation and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Kara Grace

    Experimental observations and theoretical studies show that nonlinear internal waves occur widely in shallow water and cause acoustic propagation effects including ducting and mode coupling. Horizontal ducting results when acoustic modes travel between internal wave fronts that form waveguide boundaries. For small grazing angles between a mode trajectory and a front, an interference pattern may arise that is a horizontal Lloyd mirror pattern. An analytic description for this feature is provided, along with comparisons between results from the formulated model predicting a horizontal Lloyd mirror pattern and an adiabatic mode parabolic equation. Different waveguide models are considered, including boxcar and jump sound speed profiles where change in sound speed is assumed 12 m/s. Modifications to the model are made to include multiple and moving fronts. The focus of this analysis is on different front locations relative to the source, as well as on the number of fronts and their curvatures and speeds. Curvature influences mode incidence angles and thereby changes the interference patterns. For sources oriented so that the front appears concave, the areas with interference patterns shrink as curvature increases, while convexly oriented fronts cause patterns to expand. Curvature also influence how energy is distributed in the internal wave duct. For certain curvatures and duct widths energy forms a whispering gallery or becomes fully ducted. Angular constraints which indicate when to expect these phenomena are presented. Results are compared to propagation calculations and were found to agree in most examples. In some cases trailing internal waves are present in the duct and disturb horizontal propagation. This type of propagation is characterized as a scattering process as a result of broken internal wave fronts between the lead waves. Traditionally this is handled in regimes where adiabatic normal modes are valid using sound speed perturbations to describe energy

  11. Propagation-invariant waves in acoustic, optical, and radio-wave fields

    OpenAIRE

    Salo, Janne

    2003-01-01

    The physical phenomena considered in this thesis are associated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves that propagate in free space or in homogeneous media without diffraction. The concept of rotationally periodic wave propagation is introduced in the first journal article included in the thesis and it is subsequently used to analyse waves that avoid diffractive deterioration by repeatedly returning to their initial shape, possibly rotated around the optical axis. Such waves constitute an es...

  12. Aeroacoustics: Acoustic wave propagation; Aircraft noise prediction; Aeroacoustic instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1976-01-01

    The papers in this volume deal with recent research into acoustic-wave propagation through the atmosphere and progress in aeroacoustic instrumentation, facilities, and test techniques. Topics include the propagation of aircraft noise over long distances in the lower atmosphere, measured effects of turbulence on the rise time of a weak shock, sound scattering from atmospheric turbulence, saturation effects associated with sound propagation in a turbulent medium, and a computer model of the lightning-thunder process. Other papers discuss the development of a computer system for aircraft noise prediction; aircraft flyover noise measurements; and theories and methods for the prediction of ground effects on aircraft noise propagation, for the prediction of airframe aerodynamic noise, for turbine noise prediction, and for combustion noise prediction. Attention is also given to the use of Hartmann generators as sources of high-intensity sound in a large absorption flow-duct facility, an outdoor jet noise facility, factors in the design and performance of free-jet acoustic wind tunnels, and the use of a laser shadowgraph for jet noise diagnosis.

  13. Sources and propagation of atmospherical acoustic shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Sources of aerial shock waves are numerous and produce acoustical signals that propagate in the atmosphere over long ranges, with a wide frequency spectrum ranging from infrasonic to audible, and with a complex human response. They can be of natural origin, like meteors, lightning or volcanoes, or human-made as for explosions, so-called "buzz-saw noise" (BSN) from aircraft engines or sonic booms. Their description, modeling and data analysis within the viewpoint of nonlinear acoustics will be the topic of the present lecture, with focus on two main points: the challenges of the source description, and the main features of nonlinear atmospheric propagation. Inter-disciplinary aspects, with links to atmospheric and geo-sciences will be outlined. Detailed description of the source is very dependent on its nature. Mobile supersonic sources can be rotating (fan blades of aircraft engines) or in translation (meteors, sonic boom). Mach numbers range from transonic to hypersonic. Detailed knowledge of geometry is critical for the processes of boom minimization and audible frequency spectrum of BSN. Sources of geophysical nature are poorly known, and various mechanisms for explaining infrasound recorded from meteors or thunderstorms have been proposed. Comparison between recorded data and modeling may be one way to discriminate between them. Moreover, the nearfield of these sources is frequently beyond the limits of acoustical approximation, or too complex for simple modeling. A proper numerical description hence requires specific matching procedures between nearfield behavior and farfield propagation. Nonlinear propagation in the atmosphere is dominated by temperature and wind stratification. Ray theory is an efficient way to analyze observations, but is invalid in various situations. Nonlinear effects are enhanced locally at caustics, or in case of grazing propagation over a rigid surface. Absorption, which controls mostly the high frequency part of the spectrum contained

  14. Acoustic wave propagation in fluids with coupled chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulies, T.S.; Schwarz, W.H.

    1984-08-01

    This investigation presents a hydroacoustic theory which accounts for sound absorption and dispersion in a multicomponent mixture of reacting fluids (assuming a set of first-order acoustic equations without diffusion) such that several coupled reactions can occur simultaneously. General results are obtained in the form of a biquadratic characteristic equation (called the Kirchhoff-Langevin equation) for the complex propagation variable chi = - (α + iω/c) in which α is the attenuation coefficient, c is the phase speed of the progressive wave and ω is the angular frequency. Computer simulations of sound absorption spectra have been made for three different chemical systems, each comprised of two-step chemical reactions using physico-chemical data available in the literature. The chemical systems studied include: (1) water-dioxane, (2) aqueous solutions of glycine and (3) cobalt polyphosphate mixtures. Explicit comparisons are made between the exact biquadratic characteristic solution and the approximate equation (sometimes referred to as a Debye equation) previously applied to interpret the experimental data for the chemical reaction contribution to the absorption versus frequency. The relative chemical reaction and classical viscothermal contributions to the sound absorption are also presented. Several discrepancies that can arise when estimating thermodynamic data (chemical reaction heats or volume changes) for multistep chemical reaction systems when making dilute solution or constant density assumptions are discussed

  15. Acoustic wave propagation in bubbly flow with gas, vapor or their mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuning; Guo, Zhongyu; Gao, Yuhang; Du, Xiaoze

    2018-01-01

    Presence of bubbles in liquids could significantly alter the acoustic waves in terms of wave speed and attenuation. In the present paper, acoustic wave propagation in bubbly flows with gas, vapor and gas/vapor mixtures is theoretically investigated in a wide range of parameters (including frequency, bubble radius, void fraction, and vapor mass fraction). Our finding reveals two types of wave propagation behavior depending on the vapor mass fraction. Furthermore, the minimum wave speed (required for the closure of cavitation modelling in the sonochemical reactor design) is analyzed and the influences of paramount parameters on it are quantitatively discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modelling Acoustic Wave Propagation in Axisymmetric Varying-Radius Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Willatzen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A computationally fast and accurate model (a set of coupled ordinary differential equations) for fluid sound-wave propagation in infinite axisymmetric waveguides of varying radius is proposed. The model accounts for fluid heat conduction and fluid irrotational viscosity. The model problem is solved...... by expanding solutions in terms of cross-sectional eigenfunctions following Stevenson’s method. A transfer matrix can be easily constructed from simple model responses of a given waveguide and later used in computing the response to any complex wave input. Energy losses due to heat conduction and viscous...

  17. The influence of acoustoelectronic interactions on a traverse acoustic waves propagation in plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlyij, P.V.; Kozachenko, V.V.; Korobkyina, O.O.; Kucherov, Yi.Ya.; Yil'yin, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    The accoustoelectronic interactions influence on a traverse acoustical waves, propagation speed in plates of C 6ν crystals is investigated. It is shown, that in the low frequencies and at small thickness of plates it is much more than for bulk waves

  18. Study of acoustic wave propagation through the cross section of green wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikrallah, Adil; Kabouchi, Bousselham; Hakam, Abdelillah; Brancheriau, Loïc; Bailleres, Henri; Famiri, Abderrahim; Ziani, Mohsine

    2010-02-01

    An experimental approach was used to model stress wave propagation in green wood (Douglas fir). Based on the assumption that wood is an orthotropic material, the stress wave velocity through the cross section was calculated using plane strain motion equations. The experiments were carried out in two steps under axial restraint, while the wave propagation time was measured on discs and bars sliced from the discs. Mechanical and physical properties were determined in free vibration. The results showed a significant difference in propagation velocity between waves propagating throughout the whole disc volume and guided waves in bars. The acoustic anisotropy of green wood is discussed and the stress wave form simulation is presented. Good agreement between the simulation and experimental results was obtained.

  19. Recent studies of acoustic wave propagation in shallow water waveguides with variable water column properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiey, M.; Lynch, J. F.

    2012-11-01

    In the past half-century numerous scientific research programs have been conducted which have advanced our understanding of shallow water acoustics far beyond the original and pioneering work by Ewing, Worzel, and Pekeris (1948). In particular, during the last three decades several major initiatives have focused on both observation and modeling of acoustic waves in shallow water region with extremely variable environmental properties. We now realize that the shallow water acoustic wave propagation problem is a complicated study of wave propagation in a 4D partially random media with anisotropic, time and space dependent physical properties. The nonlinear internal wave field, the shelf break front, and coastal eddies are good examples of oceanographic processes that cause this type of variability. A review of our progress, which focuses on the effects of the water column, is presented, as well as an assessment of what future questions will be of interest and importance.

  20. Acoustic wave propagation in Ni3 R (R= Mo, Nb, Ta) compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 76; Issue 4. Acoustic wave propagation in Ni3 ( = Mo, Nb, Ta) compounds. Pramod Kumar Yadawa ... Author Affiliations. Pramod Kumar Yadawa1. Department of Applied Physics, AMITY School of Engineering and Technology, Bijwasan, New Delhi 110 061, India ...

  1. Nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 80; Issue 6. Nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with arbitrarily charged dust and trapped electrons. O Rahman A A Mamun. Volume 80 Issue 6 June 2013 pp ...

  2. One-way propagation of acoustic waves through a periodic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Xu, Wei; Yan, Xu; Qian, Menglu; Cheng, Qian

    2018-02-01

    One-way acoustic transmission is achieved through a brass plate with a periodic grating on the surface. Using the Schlieren imaging technique, the positive and negative propagation processes of acoustic waves through the periodic structure were experimentally observed. Simulations were performed using the finite-element method. Both the experimental and simulation results revealed a very large transmission ratio between positive and negative incidence, thus demonstrating the feasibility of using this structure as an acoustic rectifier. The results indicate that the structure has a broadband working frequency. The structure has potential applications in ultrasonic medical devices and sonochemical reactors.

  3. Propagation of acoustic shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries and into shadow zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjouy, C., E-mail: cyril.desjouy@gmail.com; Ollivier, S.; Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P. [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides et d’Acoustique, UMR CNRS 5509, École Centrale de Lyon, Université de Lyon, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Marsden, O. [European Center For Medium Range Weather Forecasts, United Kingdom Shinfield (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-28

    The study of acoustic shock propagation in complex environments is of great interest for urban acoustics, but also for source localization, an underlying problematic in military applications. To give a better understanding of the phenomenon taking place during the propagation of acoustic shocks, laboratory-scale experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the propagation of weak shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries, and into shadow zones created by corners. In particular, this work focuses on the study of the local interactions taking place between incident, reflected, and diffracted waves according to the geometry in both regular or irregular – also called Von Neumann – regimes of reflection. In this latter case, an irregular reflection can lead to the formation of a Mach stem that can modify the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure. Short duration acoustic shock waves were produced by a 20 kilovolts electric spark source and a schlieren optical method was used to visualize the incident shockfront and the reflection/diffraction patterns. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations based on the high-order finite difference solution of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  4. Kinetic description of the oblique propagating spin-electron acoustic waves in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2018-03-01

    An oblique propagation of the spin-electron acoustic waves in degenerate magnetized plasmas is considered in terms of quantum kinetics with the separate spin evolution, where the spin-up electrons and the spin-down electrons are considered as two different species with different equilibrium distributions. It is considered in the electrostatic limit. The corresponding dispersion equation is derived. Analysis of the dispersion equation is performed in the long-wavelength limit to find an approximate dispersion equation describing the spin-electron acoustic wave. The approximate dispersion equation is solved numerically. Real and imaginary parts of the spin-electron acoustic wave frequency are calculated for different values of the parameters describing the system. It is found that the increase in the angle between the direction of wave propagation and the external magnetic field reduces the real and imaginary parts of spin-electron acoustic wave frequency. The increase in the spin polarization decreases the real and imaginary parts of frequency either. The imaginary part of frequency has a nonmonotonic dependence on the wave vector which shows a single maximum. The imaginary part of frequency is small in comparison with the real part for all parameters in the area of applicability of the obtained dispersion equation.

  5. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Snow Based on a Biot-Type Porous Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidler, R.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that acoustic methods are inexpensive, robust and simple, the application of seismic waves to snow has been sparse. This might be due to the strong attenuation inherent to snow that prevents large scale seismic applications or due to the somewhat counterintuitive acoustic behavior of snow as a porous material. Such materials support a second kind of compressional wave that can be measured in fresh snow and which has a decreasing wave velocity with increasing density of snow. To investigate wave propagation in snow we construct a Biot-type porous model of snow as a function of porosity based on the assumptions that the solid frame is build of ice, the pore space is filled with a mix of air, or air and water, and empirical relationships for the tortuosity, the permeability, the bulk, and the shear modulus.We use this reduced model to investigate compressional and shear wave velocities of snow as a function of porosity and to asses the consequences of liquid water in the snowpack on acoustic wave propagation by solving Biot's differential equations with plain wave solutions. We find that the fast compressional wave velocity increases significantly with increasing density, but also that the fast compressional wave velocity might be even lower than the slow compressional wave velocity for very light snow. By using compressional and shear strength criteria and solving Biot's differential equations with a pseudo-spectral approach we evaluate snow failure due to acoustic waves in a heterogeneous snowpack, which we think is an important mechanism in triggering avalanches by explosives as well as by skiers. Finally, we developed a low cost seismic acquisition device to assess the theoretically obtained wave velocities in the field and to explore the possibility of an inexpensive tool to remotely gather snow water equivalent.

  6. Acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foldyna, Josef; Sitek, Libor; Habán, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, - (2006), s. 1457-1460 ISSN 0041-624X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300860501; GA ČR GA105/03/0183 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : pressure pulsation * pulsating jet Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.322, year: 2006

  7. Acoustic Bloch Wave Propagation in a Periodic Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-24

    matrix (Ramo, Whinnery, and Van Duzer , 1965). Given the amplitudes of the two travelling waves in a single cell, then, we can find the amplitudes of...harmonics (Ramo, Whinnery, and Van Duzer , 1965). ; is interesting to note that because the range of the sum index n in Eq. 2.53 includ negative integers...34backwar. wave structures" (Ramo, Whinnery, and Van Duzer , 1965). 2.4.3 The Convolution Representation The apparent simplicity of the Bloch wave function

  8. Propagation of flexural waves in inhomogeneous plates exhibiting hysteretic nonlinearity: Nonlinear acoustic black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Vitalyi E; Ni, Chenyin; Lomonosov, Alexey; Shen, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Theory accounting for the influence of hysteretic nonlinearity of micro-inhomogeneous material on flexural wave in the plates of continuously varying thickness is developed. For the wedges with thickness increasing as a power law of distance from its edge strong modifications of the wave dynamics with propagation distance are predicted. It is found that nonlinear absorption progressively disappearing with diminishing wave amplitude leads to complete attenuation of acoustic waves in most of the wedges exhibiting black hole phenomenon. It is also demonstrated that black holes exist beyond the geometrical acoustic approximation. Applications include nondestructive evaluation of micro-inhomogeneous materials and vibrations damping. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of fast acoustic wave propagation using OFDR with double interrogation and frequency tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive OFDR system capable of detecting and tracking fast acoustic wave propagation is described. The system was tested by dropping a screw (50gr) and a paperclip (impact of the screw led to a transient shift in the frequency of the interrogating light which corrupted the observed response. By tracking the beat frequencies of predefined reflectors and extracting their amplitudes significant improvement in the system's output was obtained.

  10. Simulation study of acoustic wave propagation in ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mohite-Patil, T.B.; Saran, A.K.; Sawant, S.R.; Chile, R.H.; Mohite-Patil, T.T.

    Many reports are available on the sound attenuation and speed in the deep ocean, as a function of different ingredients of sea. The absorption and speed of sound waves are related to the change in sound speed, depth, salinity, temperature, PH...

  11. The Propagation of Tsunami Generated Acoustic-Gravity Waves in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Llewellyn Smith, S.; Rottman, J.; Broutman, D.; Minster, J. B. H.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunami-generated acoustic-gravity waves propagate in the atmosphere up to the ionosphere, where they have been observed to have an impact on the total electron content (TEC). We simulate the propagation of 2D&3D linearized acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere by Fourier transforming in the horizontal and solving the vertical structure with a tsunami-perturbed lower boundary and an upper radiation boundary conditions. Starting from the algorithm of Broutman (2013) and the atmospheric profile of the 2004 Sumatra Tsunami, we add compressibility to the atmosphere and extend the calculation to three dimensions. Compressibility is an important feature of the real atmosphere, and we investigate its effect on wave propagation. We obtain the vertical wavenumber as a function of buoyancy frequency, density scale height, sound speed, and background wind velocity. Results show that wind shear and compressibility have a significant impact on wave transmission and reflection. We also investigate the 3D problem to allow variations in the bottom boundary condition and in the background wind profiles. Results are quite similar to the 2D case.

  12. Analysis of ray trajectories of flexural waves propagating over generalized acoustic black hole indentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao; Cheng, Li

    2018-03-01

    An Acoustic Black Hole (ABH) indentation embedded in thin-walled structures has been proved remarkably useful for broadband flexural wave focalization, in which the phase velocity of the flexural waves and the refractive index of the media undergo gradual changes from the outside towards the center of the indentation. A generalized two-dimensional ABH indentation can be defined by three geometric parameters: a power index, an extra thickness and a radius of a plateau at the indentation center. The dependence of the energy focalization on these parameters as well as the energy focalization process is of paramount importance for the understanding and design of effective ABH indentations. This work aims at investigating the energy focalization characteristics of flexural waves in such generalized ABH indentations. The calculation of the flexural ray trajectories is conducted to reveal and analyze the wave propagation features through numerical integration of the eikonal equation from the Geometric Acoustics Approximation (GAA). The theoretical results are verified by both experiment using wave visualization technique based on laser acoustic scanning method and finite element (FE) simulations. Finally, the influence of the geometric parameters on the flexural wave focalization characteristics in ABH indentations is discussed in detail.

  13. Acoustic propagation operators for pressure waves on an arbitrarily curved surface in a homogeneous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yimin; Verschuur, Eric; van Borselen, Roald

    2018-03-01

    The Rayleigh integral solution of the acoustic Helmholtz equation in a homogeneous medium can only be applied when the integral surface is a planar surface, while in reality almost all surfaces where pressure waves are measured exhibit some curvature. In this paper we derive a theoretically rigorous way of building propagation operators for pressure waves on an arbitrarily curved surface. Our theory is still based upon the Rayleigh integral, but it resorts to matrix inversion to overcome the limitations faced by the Rayleigh integral. Three examples are used to demonstrate the correctness of our theory - propagation of pressure waves acquired on an arbitrarily curved surface to a planar surface, on an arbitrarily curved surface to another arbitrarily curved surface, and on a spherical cap to a planar surface, and results agree well with the analytical solutions. The generalization of our method for particle velocities and the calculation cost of our method are also discussed.

  14. Effect of soil texture on the propagation and attenuation of acoustic wave at unsaturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Lung; Tsai, Chang-Tai

    2007-05-01

    SummaryA central issue in the successful application of acoustic wave method to detect subsurface hydrological properties is a better understanding of the influence of soil texture on the propagation and attenuation of acoustic wave as moisture content is varied, which was numerically investigated in the present study. Our earlier studies have demonstrated the existence of three different modes of acoustic wave in an elastic porous medium containing two immiscible, viscous, compressible fluids. Based on the dispersion equation obtained in the Lo-Sposito-Majer (LSM) model, the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient of the P1 and P2 waves which respectively propagate the fastest and second fastest were determined as a function of water saturation for 11 soil texture classes. The slowest wave (P3) was not characterized in this study since it does not travel far, due to very high attenuation. To provide a more general result, the calculated phase velocity and attenuation coefficient for different soil textures were normalized by those computed for sand. The normalization leads the resulting dimensionless parameters to be frequency independent throughout the whole range (up to 500 Hz) with Darcy's law remaining valid for the description of each fluid flow under wave excitation. The normalized phase velocity of the P1 wave was shown to have a substantially constant value at higher water saturations, but in the lower saturation range it first increases to reach a certain maximum value for different soil types and then decreases. The physical parameter controlling this phenomenon is the ratio of two effective non-wetting fluid storativity factors. Numerical results reveal that the normalized attenuation coefficient of the P1 wave is sensitive to soil texture and water saturation. Sand and loamy sand have the highest and second highest attenuation coefficients for the P1 wave, respectively. The magnitude of the normalized phase velocity of the P2 wave is found to be

  15. Simulation of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Aluminium Coatings for Material Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Grünwald

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium coatings and their characterization are of great interest in many fields of application, ranging from aircraft industries to microelectronics. Here, we present the simulation of acoustic wave propagation in aluminium coatings via the elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT in comparison to experimental results. The simulations of intensity (I–defocus (z curves, obtained by scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM, were first carried out on an aluminium bulk sample, and secondly on a 1 µm aluminium coating deposited on a silicon substrate. The I(z curves were used to determine the Rayleigh wave velocity of the aluminium bulk sample and the aluminium coating. The results of the simulations with respect to the Rayleigh velocity were corroborated by non-destructive SAM measurements and laser ultrasonic measurements (LUS.

  16. Modeling of acoustic wave propagation and scattering for telemetry of complex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LU, B.

    2011-01-01

    This study takes place in the framework of tools development for the telemetry simulation. Telemetry is a possible technology applied to monitoring the sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) and consists in positioning in the reactor core a transducer to generate an ultrasonic beam. This beam propagates through an inhomogeneous random medium since temperature fluctuations occur in the liquid sodium and consequently the sound velocity fluctuates as well, which modifies the bream propagation. Then the beam interacts with a reactor structure immersed in sodium. By measuring the time of flight of the backscattered echo received by the same transducer, one can determine the precise location of the structure. The telemetry simulation therefore requires modeling of both the acoustic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous random medium and the interaction of this wave with structures of various shapes; this is the objective of this work. A stochastic model based on a Monte Carlo algorithm is developed in order to take into account the random fluctuations of the acoustic field. The acoustic field through an inhomogeneous random medium is finally modeled from the field calculated in a mean homogeneous medium by modifying the travel times of rays in the homogeneous medium, using a correction provided by the stochastic model. This stochastic propagation model has been validated by comparison with a deterministic model and is much simpler to integrate in the CIVA software platform for non destructive evaluation simulation and less time consuming than the deterministic model. In order to model the interaction between the acoustic wave and the immersed structures, classical diffraction models have been evaluated for rigid structures, including the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and the Kirchhoff approximation (KA). These two approaches appear to be complementary. Combining them so as to retain only their advantages, we have developed a hybrid model (the so-called refined KA

  17. Spectro-spatial analysis of wave packet propagation in nonlinear acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W. J.; Li, X. P.; Wang, Y. S.; Chen, W. Q.; Huang, G. L.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze wave packet propagation in weakly nonlinear acoustic metamaterials and reveal the interior nonlinear wave mechanism through spectro-spatial analysis. The spectro-spatial analysis is based on full-scale transient analysis of the finite system, by which dispersion curves are generated from the transmitted waves and also verified by the perturbation method (the L-P method). We found that the spectro-spatial analysis can provide detailed information about the solitary wave in short-wavelength region which cannot be captured by the L-P method. It is also found that the optical wave modes in the nonlinear metamaterial are sensitive to the parameters of the nonlinear constitutive relation. Specifically, a significant frequency shift phenomenon is found in the middle-wavelength region of the optical wave branch, which makes this frequency region behave like a band gap for transient waves. This special frequency shift is then used to design a direction-biased waveguide device, and its efficiency is shown by numerical simulations.

  18. Impacts of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickmeier, Justin

    Acoustical oceanography is one way to study the ocean, its internal layers, boundaries and all processes occurring within using underwater acoustics. Acoustical sensing techniques allows for the measurement of ocean processes from within that logistically or financially preclude traditional in-situ measurements. Acoustic signals propagate as pressure wavefronts from a source to a receiver through an ocean medium with variable physical parameters. The water column physical parameters that change acoustic wave propagation in the ocean include temperature, salinity, current, surface roughness, seafloor bathymetry, and vertical stratification over variable time scales. The impacts of short-time scale water column variability on acoustic wave propagation include coherent and incoherent surface reflections, wavefront arrival time delay, focusing or defocusing of the intensity of acoustic beams and refraction of acoustic rays. This study focuses on high-frequency broadband acoustic waves, and examines the influence of short-time scale water column variability on broadband high-frequency acoustics, wavefronts, from 7 to 28 kHz, in shallow water. Short-time scale variability is on the order of seconds to hours and the short-spatial scale variability is on the order of few centimeters. Experimental results were collected during an acoustic experiment along 100 m isobaths and data analysis was conducted using available acoustic wave propagation models. Three main topics are studied to show that acoustic waves are viable as a remote sensing tool to measure oceanographic parameters in shallow water. First, coherent surface reflections forming striation patterns, from multipath receptions, through rough surface interaction of broadband acoustic signals with the dynamic sea surface are analyzed. Matched filtered results of received acoustic waves are compared with a ray tracing numerical model using a sea surface boundary generated from measured water wave spectra at the time of

  19. Paracousti-UQ: A Stochastic 3-D Acoustic Wave Propagation Algorithm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, Leiph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic full waveform algorithms, such as Paracousti, provide deterministic solutions in complex, 3-D variable environments. In reality, environmental and source characteristics are often only known in a statistical sense. Thus, to fully characterize the expected sound levels within an environment, this uncertainty in environmental and source factors should be incorporated into the acoustic simulations. Performing Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is one method of assessing this uncertainty, but it can quickly become computationally intractable for realistic problems. An alternative method, using the technique of stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE), allows computation of the statistical properties of output signals at a fraction of the computational cost of MC. Paracousti-UQ solves the SPDE system of 3-D acoustic wave propagation equations and provides estimates of the uncertainty of the output simulated wave field (e.g., amplitudes, waveforms) based on estimated probability distributions of the input medium and source parameters. This report describes the derivation of the stochastic partial differential equations, their implementation, and comparison of Paracousti-UQ results with MC simulations using simple models.

  20. A spectral hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin method for elastic-acoustic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2018-04-01

    , when element polynomials of order k are used, and to exhibit the classical spectral convergence of SEM. Additional inexpensive local post-processing in both the elastic and the acoustic case allow to achieve higher convergence orders. The HDG scheme provides a natural framework for coupling classical, continuous Galerkin SEM with HDG-SEM in the same simulation, and it is shown numerically in this paper. As such, the proposed HDG-SEM can combine the efficiency of the continuous SEM with the flexibility of the HDG approaches. Finally, more complex numerical results, inspired from real geophysical applications, are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the method for wave propagation in heterogeneous elastic-acoustic media with complex geometries.

  1. Propagation of cylindrical and spherical electron-acoustic solitary wave packets in unmagnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, R.; Omran, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    Investigation of nonlinear wave modulation of electron-acoustic solitary wave packets in planar as well as nonplanar geometry is carried out for an unmagnetized two temperature plasma composed of cold and hot (featuring q-nonextensive distribution) electrons with stationary ions. It is shown that in such plasma, propagation of EA wave packets is governed by a modified NLSE which accounts for the geometrical effect and the nonextensivity of the hot electron species. It is found that the nature of the modulational instabilities would be significantly modified due to the geometrical effects, density ratio α of the hot-to-cold electrons species as well as their temperature ratio θ. Also, there exists a modulation instability period for the cylindrical and spherical envelope excitations, which does not exist in the one-dimensional case. Furthermore, spherical EA solitary wave packets are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. The relevance of the current study to EA wave modulation in auroral zone plasma is highlighted.

  2. Fast volumetric integral-equation solver for acoustic wave propagation through inhomogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleszynski, E; Bleszynski, M; Jaroszewicz, T

    2008-07-01

    Elements are described of a volumetric integral-equation-based algorithm applicable to accurate large-scale simulations of scattering and propagation of sound waves through inhomogeneous media. The considered algorithm makes possible simulations involving realistic geometries characterized by highly subwavelength details, large density contrasts, and described in terms of several million unknowns. The algorithm achieves its competitive performance, characterized by O(N log N) solution complexity and O(N) memory requirements, where N is the number of unknowns, through a fast and nonlossy fast Fourier transform based matrix compression technique, the adaptive integral method, previously developed for solving large-scale electromagnetic problems. Because of its ability of handling large problems with complex geometries, the developed solver may constitute an efficient and high fidelity numerical simulation tool for calculating acoustic field distributions in anatomically realistic models, e.g., in investigating acoustic energy transfer to the inner ear via nonairborne pathways in the human head. Examples of calculations of acoustic field distribution in a human head, which require solving linear systems of equations involving several million unknowns, are presented.

  3. SH surface acoustic wave propagation in a cylindrically layered piezomagnetic/piezoelectric structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianke; Xian, Kai; Wang, Ji

    2009-01-01

    SH surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation in a cylindrically layered magneto-electro-elastic structure is investigated analytically, where a piezomagnetic (or piezoelectric) material layer is bonded to a piezoelectric (or piezomagnetic) substrate. By means of transformation, the governing equations of the coupled waves are reduced to Bessel equation and Laplace equation. The boundary conditions imply that the displacements, shear stresses, electric potential, and electric displacements are continuous across the interface between the layer and the substrate together with the traction free at the surface of the layer. The magneto-electrically open and shorted conditions at cylindrical surface are taken to solve the problem. The phase velocity is numerically calculated for different thickness of the layer and wavenumber for piezomagnetic ceramics CoFe(2)O(4) and piezoelectric ceramics BaTiO(3). The effects of magnetic permeability on propagation properties of SH-SAW are discussed in detail. The distributions of displacement, magnetic potential and magneto-electromechanical coupling factor are also figured and discussed.

  4. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  5. Acoustic Wave Propagation Modeling by a Two-dimensional Finite-difference Summation-by-parts Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Petersson, N. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rodgers, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    Acoustic waveform modeling is a computationally intensive task and full three-dimensional simulations are often impractical for some geophysical applications such as long-range wave propagation and high-frequency sound simulation. In this study, we develop a two-dimensional high-order accurate finite-difference code for acoustic wave modeling. We solve the linearized Euler equations by discretizing them with the sixth order accurate finite difference stencils away from the boundary and the third order summation-by-parts (SBP) closure near the boundary. Non-planar topographic boundary is resolved by formulating the governing equation in curvilinear coordinates following the interface. We verify the implementation of the algorithm by numerical examples and demonstrate the capability of the proposed method for practical acoustic wave propagation problems in the atmosphere.

  6. Oblique propagation of ion acoustic soliton-cnoidal waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian-Yong; Cheng, Xue-Ping; Tang, Xiao-Yan, E-mail: xytang@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yang, Jian-Rong [Department of Physics and Electronics, Shangrao Normal University, Jiangxi, Shangrao 334001 (China); Ren, Bo [Institute of Nonlinear Science, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The oblique propagation of ion-acoustic soliton-cnoidal waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with superthermal electrons is studied. Linear dispersion relations of the fast and slow ion-acoustic modes are discussed under the weak and strong magnetic field situations. By means of the reductive perturbation approach, Korteweg-de Vries equations governing ion-acoustic waves of fast and slow modes are derived, respectively. Explicit interacting soliton-cnoidal wave solutions are obtained by the generalized truncated Painlevé expansion. It is found that every peak of a cnoidal wave elastically interacts with a usual soliton except for some phase shifts. The influence of the electron superthermality, positron concentration, and magnetic field obliqueness on the soliton-cnoidal wave are investigated in detail.

  7. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  8. Wave propagation and power flow in an acoustic metamaterial plate with lateral local resonance attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Sheng, Meiping; Ding, Xiaodong; Yan, Xiaowei

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents analysis on wave propagation and power flow in an acoustic metamaterial plate with lateral local resonance. The metamaterial is designed to have lateral local resonance systems attached to a homogeneous plate. Relevant theoretical analysis, numerical modelling and application prospect are presented. Results show that the metamaterial has two complete band gaps for flexural wave absorption and vibration attenuation. Damping can smooth and lower the metamaterial’s frequency responses in high frequency ranges at the expense of the band gap effect, and as an important factor to calculate the power flow is thoroughly investigated. Moreover, the effective mass density becomes negative and unbounded at specific frequencies. Simultaneously, power flow within band gaps are dramatically blocked from the power flow contour and power flow maps. Results from finite element modelling and power flow analysis reveal the working mechanism of the flexural wave attenuation and power flow blocked within the band gaps, where part of the flexural vibration is absorbed by the vertical resonator and the rest is transformed through four-link-mechanisms to the lateral resonators that oscillate and generate inertial forces indirectly to counterbalance the shear forces induced by the vibrational plate. The power flow is stored in the vertical and lateral local resonance, as well as in the connected plate.

  9. Generation and Upper Atmospheric Propagation of Acoustic Gravity Waves according to Numerical Modeling and Radio Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Nesterov, Ivan; Padokhin, Artem; Kurbatov, Grigory

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere can be generated by a variety of the phenomena in the near-Earth environment and atmosphere as well as by some perturbations of the Earth's ground or ocean surface. For instance, the role of the AGW sources can be played by the earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seisches, tsunami waves. We present the examples of AGWs excited by the tsunami waves traveling in the ocean, by seisches, and by ionospheric heating by the high-power radio wave. In the last case, the gravity waves are caused by the pulsed modulation of the heating wave. The AGW propagation in the upper atmosphere induces the variations and irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere, whose structure can be efficiently reconstructed by the method of the ionospheric radio tomography (RT) based on the data from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS). The input data for RT diagnostics are composed of the 150/400 MHz radio signals from the low-orbiting (LO) satellites and 1.2-1.5 GHz radio signals from the high-orbiting (HO) satellites with their orbits at ~1000 and ~20000 km above the ground, respectively. These data enable ionospheric imaging on different spatiotemporal scales with different spatiotemporal resolution and coverage, which is suitable, inter alia, for tracking the waves and wave-like features in the ionosphere. In particular, we demonstrate the maps of the ionospheric responses to the tornado at Moore (Oklahoma, USA) of May 20, 2013, which are reconstructed from the HO data. We present the examples of LORT images containing the waves and wavelike disturbances associated with various sources (e.g., auroral precipitation and high-power heating of the ionosphere). We also discuss the results of modeling the AGW generation by the surface and volumetric sources. The millihertz AGW from these sources initiate the ionospheric perturbation with a typical scale of a few hundred km at the

  10. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-02

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant.

  11. Experimental investigation of starting characteristics and wave propagation from a shallow open cavity and its acoustic emission at supersonic speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, S.; Desikan, S. L. N.; Niranjan, Sahoo

    2018-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on a shallow open cavity (L/D = 5) at a supersonic Mach number (M = 1.8) to understand its transient starting characteristics, wave propagation (inside and outside the cavity) during one vortex shedding cycle, and acoustic emission. Starting characteristics and wave propagation were visualized through time resolved schlieren images, while acoustic emissions were captured through unsteady pressure measurements. Results showed a complex shock system during the starting process which includes characteristics of the bifurcated shock system, shock train, flow separation, and shock wave boundary layer interaction. In one vortex shedding cycle, vortex convection from cavity leading edge to cavity trailing edge was observed. Flow features outside the cavity demonstrated the formation and downstream movement of a λ-shock due to the interaction of shock from the cavity leading edge and shock due to vortex and generation of waves on account of shear layer impingement at the cavity trailing edge. On the other hand, interesting wave structures and its propagation were monitored inside the cavity. In one vortex shedding cycle, two waves such as a reflected compression wave from a cavity leading edge in the previous vortex shedding cycle and a compression wave due to the reflection of Mach wave at the cavity trailing edge corner in the current vortex shedding cycle were visualized. The acoustic emission from the cavity indicated that the 2nd to 4th modes/tones are dominant, whereas the 1st mode contains broadband spectrum. In the present studies, the cavity feedback mechanism was demonstrated through a derived parameter coherence coefficient.

  12. Imaging the Chicxulub central crater zone from large scale seismic acoustic wave propagation and gravity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Martin, R.

    2017-12-01

    Large complex craters are characterized by central uplifts that represent large-scale differential movement of deep basement from the transient cavity. Here we investigate the central sector of the large multiring Chicxulub crater, which has been surveyed by an array of marine, aerial and land-borne geophysical methods. Despite high contrasts in physical properties,contrasting results for the central uplift have been obtained, with seismic reflection surveys showing lack of resolution in the central zone. We develop an integrated seismic and gravity model for the main structural elements, imaging the central basement uplift and melt and breccia units. The 3-D velocity model built from interpolation of seismic data is validated using perfectly matched layer seismic acoustic wave propagation modeling, optimized at grazing incidence using shift in the frequency domain. Modeling shows significant lack of illumination in the central sector, masking presence of the central uplift. Seismic energy remains trapped in an upper low velocity zone corresponding to the sedimentary infill, melt/breccias and surrounding faulted blocks. After conversion of seismic velocities into a volume of density values, we use massive parallel forward gravity modeling to constrain the size and shape of the central uplift that lies at 4.5 km depth, providing a high-resolution image of crater structure.The Bouguer anomaly and gravity response of modeled units show asymmetries, corresponding to the crater structure and distribution of post-impact carbonates, breccias, melt and target sediments

  13. Propagation of ion-acoustic waves in a warm dusty plasma with electron inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, S. N.; Talukdar, A.

    2011-08-01

    The KdV equation is derived for weakly nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized warm dusty plasma with electron inertia. It has been shown that the inclusion of electron inertia and pressure variation of the species not only significantly modifies the basic features (width and amplitude) of dust ion-acoustic solitions, but also introduces a new parametric regime for the existence of positive and negative solitons.

  14. Triangulation Tracking of a Radially Propagating MHD Wave in the AIA 1600 Acoustic Power Maps in Active Region 12193

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsue, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    For decades it has been established that the amount of energy released by solar flares excites the acoustic oscillations propagating on the surface of the Sun (Wolff 1972). It is believed that these flares can excite velocity oscillations in active regions, especially those regions where a higher class solar flare has taken place (Kumar 2006). However, questions arise as to how the behaviors of acoustic oscillations within such a chaotic environment can birth other waves of the MHD type. Can we observe such events?

  15. Propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Saturated Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coussy O.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce travail comporte deux parties. La première partie concerne la théorie de la propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés. Une revue des différentes méthodes existantes est faite et un développement critique de la théorie de Biot est exposé en détail. On examine en particulier les différents résultats auxquels cette théorie conduit et on regarde, dans quelles conditions et sur quels problèmes géophysiques, les phénomènes physiques mis en évidence peuvent jouer de manière notable. Dans la deuxième partie, on présente une vérification expérimentale due à Plona (1980 de la théorie de Biot. Après une introduction qualitative de l'expérience mise en place, on expose les résultats obtenus pour un grand nombre de matériaux de porosités différentes. La notion de tortuosité d'un milieu poreux est introduite théoriquement et discutée expérimentalement. This article is in two parts. The first part has to do with the theory of acoustic wave propagation in saturated porous media. Different existing methods are reviewed, and Biot's theory is critically developed in detail. In particular, the different results to which this theory leads are examined, and the conditions and geophysical problems on which the physical phenomena involved may have an appreciable effect are considered. The second part is devoted to the experimental check made by Plona (1980 of Biot's theory. After a qualitative introduction of the experimental procedure, the results obtained for many materials of different porosities are described. The concept of the tortuosity of a porous medium is introduced theoretically and discussed experimentally.

  16. Features of acoustic wave propagation in the Me/ZnO/Me/diamond waveguide structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, Sergey I; Zolotova, Olga P; Sorokin, Boris P; Turchin, Pavel P; Talismanov, Vladimir S

    2018-01-01

    The effect of mass loading on the phase velocities of the surface acoustic wave dispersion modes in the Me/ZnO/Me/diamond piezoelectric layered structure as a function of frequency, metallic, and piezoelectric layer thickness has been investigated. Aluminum, molybdenum, and platinum were considered as the metallic layer materials. It has been demonstrated that the change in the phase velocities substantially depends on the acoustic impedance of the metal layer and its thickness. Results obtained can be useful in the development of controlled acoustoelectronic devices and sensors operating on the Rayleigh and Love waves.

  17. Propagation of surface acoustic waves in n-type GaAs films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chhi-Chong; Tsai, Jensan

    1983-05-01

    The effect of nonparabolicity on the amplification of surface acoustic waves in n-type GaAs films is investigated quantum mechanically in the GHz frequency region. Numerical results show that the amplification coefficient for the nonparabolic band structure is enhanced due to the nonlinear nature of the energy band in semiconductors. Moreover, the amplification coefficients in semiconductors depend on the temperature, the electronic screening effect, the frequency of sound waves, the applied electric field, and the thickness of the semiconductor film.

  18. Simulation of wave propagation inside a human eye: acoustic eye model (AEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Požar, T.; Halilovič, M.; Horvat, D.; Petkovšek, R.

    2018-02-01

    The design and development of the acoustic eye model (AEM) is reported. The model consists of a computer-based simulation that describes the propagation of mechanical disturbance inside a simplified model of a human eye. The capabilities of the model are illustrated with examples, using different laser-induced initial loading conditions in different geometrical configurations typically occurring in ophthalmic medical procedures. The potential of the AEM is to predict the mechanical response of the treated eye tissue in advance, thus complementing other preliminary procedures preceding medical treatments.

  19. Nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma. Now, using eqs (13)–(15) one can easily eliminate (∂n(2) d /∂ξ), (∂u(2) d /∂ξ), and. (∂φ(2)/∂ξ), and obtain. ∂φ(1). ∂τ. + A. √ φ(1). ∂φ(1). ∂ξ. + B. ∂3φ(1). ∂ξ3. = 0,. (16) where. A = 3γ. 4 vp. (μe + αμi). ,. (17). B = vp. 2(μe + αμi) . (18). Equation (16) is a mKdV equation for ...

  20. Topology optimization of wave-propagation problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures.......Topology optimization is demonstrated as a useful tool for systematic design of wave-propagation problems. We illustrate the applicability of the method for optical, acoustic and elastic devices and structures....

  1. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François, E-mail: francois.coulouvrat@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7190, Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert, F-75005, Paris (France)

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  2. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  3. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-01-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  4. Oblique propagation of dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty pair-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, A. P., E-mail: apmisra@visva-bharati.ac.in, E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com; Barman, Arnab [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan-731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2014-07-15

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of electrostatic waves in a magnetized pair-ion plasma with immobile charged dusts. It is shown that obliquely propagating (OP) low-frequency (in comparison with the negative-ion cyclotron frequency) long-wavelength “slow” and “fast” modes can propagate, respectively, as dust ion-acoustic (DIA) and dust ion-cyclotron (DIC)-like waves. The properties of these modes are studied with the effects of obliqueness of propagation (θ), the static magnetic field, the ratios of the negative to positive ion masses (m), and temperatures (T) as well as the dust to negative-ion number density ratio (δ). Using the standard reductive perturbation technique, we derive a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation which governs the evolution of small-amplitude OP DIA waves. It is found that the KdV equation admits only rarefactive solitons in plasmas with m well below its critical value m{sub c} (≫ 1) which typically depends on T and δ. It is shown that the nonlinear coefficient of the KdV equation vanishes at m = m{sub c}, i.e., for plasmas with much heavier negative ions, and the evolution of the DIA waves is then described by a modified KdV (mKdV) equation. The latter is shown to have only compressive soliton solution. The properties of both the KdV and mKdV solitons are studied with the system parameters as above, and possible applications of our results to laboratory and space plasmas are briefly discussed.

  5. Numerical study of wave propagation around an underground cavity: acoustic case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Schöberl, Joachim; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the need to detect an underground cavity within the procedure of an On-Site-Inspection (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), which might be caused by a nuclear explosion/weapon testing, we aim to provide a basic numerical study of the wave propagation around and inside such an underground cavity. The aim of the CTBTO is to ban all nuclear explosions of any size anywhere, by anyone. Therefore, it is essential to build a powerful strategy to efficiently investigate and detect critical signatures such as gas filled cavities, rubble zones and fracture networks below the surface. One method to investigate the geophysical properties of an underground cavity allowed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-test Ban Treaty is referred to as 'resonance seismometry' - a resonance method that uses passive or active seismic techniques, relying on seismic cavity vibrations. This method is in fact not yet entirely determined by the Treaty and there are also only few experimental examples that have been suitably documented to build a proper scientific groundwork. This motivates to investigate this problem on a purely numerical level and to simulate these events based on recent advances in the mathematical understanding of the underlying physical phenomena. Here, we focus our numerical study on the propagation of P-waves in two dimensions. An extension to three dimensions as well as an inclusion of the full elastic wave field is planned in the following. For the numerical simulations of wave propagation we use a high order finite element discretization which has the significant advantage that it can be extended easily from simple toy designs to complex and irregularly shaped geometries without excessive effort. Our computations are done with the parallel Finite Element Library NGSOLVE ontop of the automatic 2D/3D tetrahedral mesh generator NETGEN (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ngsolve/). Using the basic mathematical understanding of the

  6. Concurrent Visualization of Acoustic Radiation Force Displacement and Shear Wave Propagation with 7T MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available Manual palpation is a common and very informative diagnostic tool based on estimation of changes in the stiffness of tissues that result from pathology. In the case of a small lesion or a lesion that is located deep within the body, it is difficult for changes in mechanical properties of tissue to be detected or evaluated via palpation. Furthermore, palpation is non-quantitative and cannot be used to localize the lesion. Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS can also be used to evaluate the properties of biological tissues non-invasively. In this study, an MRgFUS system combines high field (7T MR and 3 MHz focused ultrasound to provide high resolution MR imaging and a small ultrasonic interrogation region (~0.5 x 0.5 x 2 mm, as compared with current clinical systems. MR-Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI provides a reliable and efficient method for beam localization by detecting micron-scale displacements induced by ultrasound mechanical forces. The first aim of this study is to develop a sequence that can concurrently quantify acoustic radiation force displacements and image the resulting transient shear wave. Our motivation in combining these two measurements is to develop a technique that can rapidly provide both ARFI and shear wave velocity estimation data, making it suitable for use in interventional radiology. Secondly, we validate this sequence in vivo by estimating the displacement before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU ablation, and we validate the shear wave velocity in vitro using tissue-mimicking gelatin and tofu phantoms. Such rapid acquisitions are especially useful in interventional radiology applications where minimizing scan time is highly desirable.

  7. Nonlinear wave propagation of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitary waves in negative ion plasmas with superthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; El-Shamy, E. F.; Khedr, D. M.; Khedr

    2013-10-01

    Investigation of arbitrary amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves which accompany collisionless positive-negative ion plasmas with high-energy electrons (represented by kappa distribution) is presented. Arbitrary amplitude solitary waves are investigated by deriving an energy-integral equation involving a Sagdeev-like pseudopotential. The existence regions of solitary pulses are, defined precisely, modified by the superthermality of energetic electrons. Furthermore, numerical calculations reveal that both compressive and rarefactive pulses may exist for negative ion mass groups in Titan's atmosphere. The superthermality of energetic electrons are found to modify the existence domains of large amplitude ion-acoustic waves in Titan's atmosphere. The dependence of solitary excitation characteristics on the superthermal parameter, the negative ion concentration, the positive-to-negative ions mass ratio, and the Mach number have been investigated. The present study might be helpful to understand the excitation of fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary pulses that may appear in the interplanetary medium and/or in the astrophysical plasmas in general.

  8. Propagation of nonplanar dust-acoustic envelope solitary waves in a two-ion-temperature dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Jukui

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of the cylindrical and spherical dust-acoustic envelope solitary wave (DAESW) in an unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of negatively charged dust fluid and ions of two different temperatures is investigated. By using the reductive perturbation method, the cylindrical and spherical geometry-modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation (GMNLSE) is obtained. The change of the DAESW amplitude due to the cylindrical and spherical geometry effects is deduced analytically. It is shown that there exist two time ranges. On the other hand, the wave amplitude changes with time τ as (τ 0 /τ) m/2 when the geometry effect is stronger and as (τ 0 /τ) m when the geometry effect is weaker, where τ 0 is the initial time, and m=1 (2) refers to the cylindrical (spherical) case. The theoretical results are verified by the numerical calculation for the GMNLSE. The modulational instability of dust-acoustic waves governed by the GMNLSE is also presented. It is shown that the propagation of the DAESW in cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, and planar one-dimensional geometry are very different. The presence of a second component of ions would modify the nature of the modulation instabilities

  9. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model......The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...

  10. Identification of acoustic wave propagation in a duct line and its application to detection of impact source location based on signal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yong Woo; Kim, Min Soo; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2010-01-01

    For the detection of the impact location in a pipeline system, the correlation method has been the conventional method. For the application of the correlation method, the diameter of a duct should be small so that the acoustic wave inside the duct can propagate with nondispersive characteristics, in the form of, for example, a plane wave. This correlation method calculates the cross-correlation between acoustic waves measured at two acceleration sensors attached to a buried duct. It also gives information about the arrival time delay of an acoustic wave between two sensors. These arrival time delays are used for the estimation of the impact location. However, when the diameter of the duct is large, the acoustic waves inside the duct propagate with dispersive characteristics owing to the reflection of the acoustic wave off of the wall of the duct. This dispersive characteristic is related to the acoustic modes inside a duct. Therefore, the correlation method does not work correctly for the detection of the impact location. This paper proposes new methods of accurately measuring the arrival time delay between two sensors attached to duct line system. This method is based on the time-frequency analyses of the short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). These methods can discriminate direct waves (non-dispersive waves) and reflective waves (dispersive waves) from the measured wave signals through the time-frequency analysis. The direct wave or the reflective wave is used to estimate the arrival time delay. This delay is used for the identification of the impact location. This systematic method can predict the impact location due to the impact forces of construction equipment with more accuracy than the correlation method

  11. A mixed finite element method for acoustic wave propagation in moving fluids based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treyssède, Fabien; Gabard, Gwénaël; Ben Tahar, Mabrouk

    2003-02-01

    A nonstandard wave equation, established by Galbrun in 1931, is used to study sound propagation in nonuniform flows. Galbrun's equation describes exactly the same physical phenomenon as the linearized Euler's equations (LEE) but is derived from an Eulerian-Lagrangian description and written only in term of the Lagrangian perturbation of the displacement. This equation has interesting properties and may be a good alternative to the LEE: only acoustic displacement is involved (even in nonhomentropic cases), it provides exact expressions of acoustic intensity and energy, and boundary conditions are easily expressed because acoustic displacement whose normal component is continuous appears explicitly. In this paper, Galbrun's equation is solved using a finite element method in the axisymmetric case. With standard finite elements, the direct displacement-based variational formulation gives some corrupted results. Instead, a mixed finite element satisfying the inf-sup condition is proposed to avoid this problem. A first set of results is compared with semianalytical solutions for a straight duct containing a sheared flow (obtained from Pridmore-Brown's equation). A second set of results concerns a more complex duct geometry with a potential flow and is compared to results obtained from a multiple-scale method (which is an adaptation for the incompressible case of Rienstra's recent work).

  12. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  13. Ion Acoustic Waves in the Presence of Electron Plasma Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave.......Long-wavelength ion acoustic waves in the presence of propagating short-wavelength electron plasma waves are examined. The influence of the high frequency oscillations is to decrease the phase velocity and the damping distance of the ion wave....

  14. Characterization of low-frequency acoustic wave propagation through a periodic corrugated waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changyong; Huang, Lixi

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a periodic corrugated waveguide structure is proposed, and its unit-cell is analyzed by the wave finite element method. In low-frequency range, the unit-cell is treated as an equivalent fluid through a homogenization process, and the equivalent acoustic parameters are obtained, which are validated by finite structure simulations and experiments. The proposed structure is shown to add tortuosity to the waveguide, hence higher equivalent fluid density is achieved, while the system elastic modulus remains unchanged. As a result, the equivalent speed of sound is smaller than normal air. The application of such change of speed of sound is demonstrated in the classic quarter-wavelength resonator based on the corrugated waveguide, which gives a lower resonance frequency with the same side branch length. When the waveguide is filled with porous materials, the added tortuosity enhances the broadband, low-frequency sound absorption by increasing the equivalent mass without bringing in excess damping, the latter being partly responsible for the poor performance of usual porous materials in the low-frequency region. Therefore, the proposed structure provides another dimension for the design and optimization of porous sound absorption materials.

  15. Propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés. Effets d'interface Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Saturated Porous Media. Interface Effects (Part Two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-11-01

    égligeable. En outre, nous montrons que la géométrie du milieu de propagation joue un rôle relativement secondaire. This article is the logical continuation of a previous article (O. Coussy and T. Bourbié, 1984 concerning the propagation, within the framework of Biot's theory, of acoustic waves in infinite saturated porous media. Starting from the same assumptions as O. Coussy and T. Bourbié concerning the propagation media, this article analyzes the influence of the presence of plane geometric discontinuities (free semi-infinite media or the contacts between two semi-infinite media or discontinuities with cylindrical symmetry (wells. After reviewing the stress-strain relations for a porous medium and the basic equations for dynamic poroelasticity, the article discusses the boundary conditions to be imposed on the interfaces. It then examines the general laws of reflection and refraction in poroelasticity (generalized Snell-Descartes laws. The application of these laws to several interesting specific cases mainly reveals the following phenomena: (1 a slow compressive wave is always generated at the interface between two saturated porous media; (2 the reflected and transmitted waves are generally inhomogeneous. In the next phase the propagation of acoustic waves is examined on the free surface of a semi-infinite saturated porous medium (Rayleigh waves and at the plane interface between a liquid and a saturated porous medium (Stoneley waves. Compared to the properties known for them in conventional elastodynamics, these waves in poroelasticity are slightly dispersive, and appreciably attenuated because of the two-phase nature of the propagation medium. Lastly, the influence of a submerged source emitting near a permeable interface is examined. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental role of permeability and flow conditions at interfaces on the attenuation of S waves and surface waves. By way of comparison, the influence of these parameters on the first arrivals (P waves is

  16. Propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés. Effets d'interface Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Saturated Porous Media. Interface Effects (Part Three

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-11-01

    égligeable. En outre, nous montrons que la géométrie du milieu de propagation joue un rôle relativement secondaire. This article is the logical continuation of a previous article (O. Coussy and T. Bourbié, 1984 concerning the propagation, within the framework of Biot's theory, of acoustic waves in infinite saturated porous media. Starting from the same assumptions as O. Coussy and T. Bourbié concerning the propagation media, this article analyzes the influence of the presence of plane geometric discontinuities (free semi-infinite media or the contacts between two semi-infinite media or discontinuities with cylindrical symmetry (wells. After reviewing the stress-strain relations for a porous medium and the basic equations for dynamic poroelasticity, the article discusses the boundary conditions to be imposed on the interfaces. It then examines the general laws of reflection and refraction in poroelasticity (generalized Snell-Descartes laws. The application of these laws to several interesting specific cases mainly reveals the following phenomena: (1 a slow compressive wave is always generated at the interface between two saturated porous media; (2 the reflected and transmitted waves are generally inhomogeneous. In the next phase the propagation of acoustic waves is examined on the free surface of a semi-infinite saturated porous medium (Rayleigh waves and at the plane interface between a liquid and a saturated porous medium (Stoneley waves. Compared to the properties known for them in conventional elastodynamics, these waves in poroelasticity are slightly dispersive, and appreciably attenuated because of the two-phase nature of the propagation medium. Lastly, the influence of a submerged source emitting near a permeable interface is examined. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental role of permeability and flow conditions at interfaces on the attenuation of S waves and surface waves. By way of comparison, the influence of these parameters on the first arrivals (P waves is

  17. Propagation des ondes acoustiques dans les milieux poreux saturés. Effets d'interface Propagation of Acoustic Waves in Saturated Porous Media. Interface Effects (Part One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasolofosaon P.

    2006-11-01

    égligeable. En outre, nous montrons que la géométrie du milieu de propagation joue un rôle relativement secondaire. This article is the logical continuation of a previous article (O. Coussy and T. Bourbié, 1984 concerning the propagation, within the framework of Biot's theory, of acoustic waves in infinite saturated porous media. Starting from the same assumptions as O. Coussy and T. Bourbié concerning the propagation media, this article analyzes the influence of the presence of plane geometric discontinuities (free semi-infinite media or the contacts between two semi-infinite media or discontinuities with cylindrical symmetry (wells. After reviewing the stress-strain relations for a porous medium and the basic equations for dynamic poroelasticity, the article discusses the boundary conditions to be imposed on the interfaces. It then examines the general laws of reflection and refraction in poroelasticity (generalized Snell-Descartes laws. The application of these laws to several interesting specific cases mainly reveals the following phenomena: (1 a slow compressive wave is always generated at the interface between two saturated porous media; (2 the reflected and transmitted waves are generally inhomogeneous. In the next phase the propagation of acoustic waves is examined on the free surface of a semi-infinite saturated porous medium (Rayleigh waves and at the plane interface between a liquid and a saturated porous medium (Stoneley waves. Compared to the properties known for them in conventional elastodynamics, these waves in poroelasticity are slightly dispersive, and appreciably attenuated because of the two-phase nature of the propagation medium. Lastly, the influence of a submerged source emitting near a permeable interface is examined. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental role of permeability and flow conditions at interfaces on the attenuation of S waves and surface waves. By way of comparison, the influence of these parameters on the first arrivals (P waves is

  18. Stability of the high-order finite elements for acoustic or elastic wave propagation with high-order time stepping

    KAUST Repository

    De Basabe, Jonás D.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the stability of some high-order finite element methods, namely the spectral element method and the interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method (IP-DGM), for acoustic or elastic wave propagation that have become increasingly popular in the recent past. We consider the Lax-Wendroff method (LWM) for time stepping and show that it allows for a larger time step than the classical leap-frog finite difference method, with higher-order accuracy. In particular the fourth-order LWM allows for a time step 73 per cent larger than that of the leap-frog method; the computational cost is approximately double per time step, but the larger time step partially compensates for this additional cost. Necessary, but not sufficient, stability conditions are given for the mentioned methods for orders up to 10 in space and time. The stability conditions for IP-DGM are approximately 20 and 60 per cent more restrictive than those for SEM in the acoustic and elastic cases, respectively. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 RAS.

  19. Three-Dimensional Acoustic Propagation Through Shallow Water Internal, Surface Gravity and Bottom Sediment Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    and large ( sand waves) transverse bedforms [21]. Note that in the literature the term ” sand dunes ” can refer to both sand waves and megaripples...Bottom ripples have wave- lengths of centimeters, whereas the length scales of megaripples and sand waves are tens and even hundreds of meters. The last...number. Full field numerical modeling of low frequency sound propaga- tion through large sand waves located on a sloped bottom was performed using the

  20. Theoretical analysis of surface acoustic wave propagating properties of Y-cut nano lithium niobate film on silicon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface acoustic wave (SAW propagating characteristics of Y-cut nano LiNbO3 (LN film on SiO2/LN substrate have been theoretically calculated. The simulated results showed a shear horizontal (SH SAW with enhanced electromechanical coupling factor K2 owing to a dimensional effect of the nanoscale LN film. However, a Rayleigh SAW and two other resonances related to thickness vibrations caused spurious responses for wideband SAW devices. These spurious waves could be fully suppressed by properly controlling structural parameters including the electrode layer height, thickness, and the Euler angle (θ of the LN thin film. Finally, a pure SH SAW was obtained with a wide θ range, from 0° to 5° and 165° to 180°. The largest K2 achieved for the pure SH SAW was about 35.1%. The calculated results demonstrate the promising application of nano LN film to the realization of ultra-wideband SAW devices.

  1. Theoretical analysis of surface acoustic wave propagating properties of Y-cut nano lithium niobate film on silicon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing, E-mail: jingchen0408@hotmail.com; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Han, Tao; Zhou, Liu; Tang, Gongbin; Liu, Boquan; Ji, Xiaojun [Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-08-15

    The surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating characteristics of Y-cut nano LiNbO{sub 3} (LN) film on SiO{sub 2}/LN substrate have been theoretically calculated. The simulated results showed a shear horizontal (SH) SAW with enhanced electromechanical coupling factor K{sup 2} owing to a dimensional effect of the nanoscale LN film. However, a Rayleigh SAW and two other resonances related to thickness vibrations caused spurious responses for wideband SAW devices. These spurious waves could be fully suppressed by properly controlling structural parameters including the electrode layer height, thickness, and the Euler angle (θ) of the LN thin film. Finally, a pure SH SAW was obtained with a wide θ range, from 0° to 5° and 165° to 180°. The largest K{sup 2} achieved for the pure SH SAW was about 35.1%. The calculated results demonstrate the promising application of nano LN film to the realization of ultra-wideband SAW devices.

  2. The effects of variable dust size and charge on dust acoustic waves propagating in a hybrid Cairns–Tsallis complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Siragy, N. M.; Behery, E. E.; Elbendary, A. A.; Taha, R. M.

    2018-05-01

    The propagation characteristics of dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma consisting of variable size dust grains, hybrid Cairns-Tsallis-distributed electrons, and nonthermal ions are studied. The charging of the dust grains is described by the orbital-motion-limited theory and the size of the dust grains obeys the power law dust size distribution. To describe the nonlinear propagation of the DAWs, a Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived using a reductive perturbation method. It is found that the nonthermal and nonextensive parameters influence the main properties of DAWs. Moreover, our results reveal that the rarefactive waves can propagate mainly in the proposed plasma model while compressive waves can be detected for a very small range of the distribution parameters of plasma species, and the DAWs are faster and wider for smaller size dust grains. Applications of the present results to dusty plasma observations are briefly discussed.

  3. Propagation of ion-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma with non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    isothermality of electrons, Mach numbers etc. have considerable impact on the amplitude as well as the width of the solitary waves. Dependence of soliton profiles ... great deal of interest in numerous collective processes in a plasma contaminated by the charged dust grains encountered very often in space and laboratory ...

  4. Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves in a degenerate dense ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    both non-relativistic and ultrarelativistic limits. Therefore, in this paper, we consider a degenerate dense plasma containing non-relativistic degenerate cold ion fluid and both non-relativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons for studying the basic features of solitary waves in such a degenerate dense plasma.

  5. Propagation of waves

    CERN Document Server

    David, P

    2013-01-01

    Propagation of Waves focuses on the wave propagation around the earth, which is influenced by its curvature, surface irregularities, and by passage through atmospheric layers that may be refracting, absorbing, or ionized. This book begins by outlining the behavior of waves in the various media and at their interfaces, which simplifies the basic phenomena, such as absorption, refraction, reflection, and interference. Applications to the case of the terrestrial sphere are also discussed as a natural generalization. Following the deliberation on the diffraction of the "ground? wave around the ear

  6. Propagation of three-dimensional ion-acoustic solitary waves in magnetized negative ion plasmas with nonthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Elghmaz, E. A.

    2010-04-01

    Properties of small amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in a warm magneto plasma with positive-negative ions and nonthermal electrons are investigated. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the positive-negative ions, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation; Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, in the small amplitude regime. The ZK equation is analyzed to examine the existence regions of the solitary pulses. It is found that compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic solitary waves strongly depend on the mass and density ratios of the positive and negative ions as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Also, it is found that there are two critical values for the density ratio of the negative-to-positive ions (υ), the ratio between unperturbed electron-to-positive ion density (μ), and the nonthermal electron parameter (β), which decide the existence of positive and negative ion-acoustic solitary waves. The present study is applied to examine the small amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary excitations for the (H+, O2-) and (H+, H-) plasmas, where they are found in the D- and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere. This investigation should be helpful in understanding the salient features of the nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in space and in laboratory plasmas where two distinct groups of ions and non-Boltzmann distributed electrons are present.

  7. Acoustic propagation mode in a cylindrical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Idehara, Toshitaka; Inada, Hideyo

    1975-01-01

    The sound velocity in a cylindrical plasma produced by a high frequency discharge is measured by an interferometer system. The result shows that the acoustic wave guide effect does exist in a neutral gas and in a plasma. It is found that the wave propagates in the mode m=2 in a rigid boundary above the cut-off frequency fsub(c) and in the mode m=0 below fsub(c). Because the mode m=0 is identical to a plane wave, the sound velocity in free space can be evaluated exactly. In the mode m=2, the sound velocity approaches the free space value, when the frequency increases sufficiently. (auth.)

  8. Study of the influence of semiconductor material parameters on acoustic wave propagation modes in GaSb/AlSb bi-layered structures by Legendre polynomial method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othmani, Cherif; Takali, Farid; Njeh, Anouar; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of Rayleigh-Lamb waves in bi-layered structures is studied. For this purpose, an extension of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method is proposed to formulate the acoustic wave equation in the bi-layered structures induced by thin film Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) and with Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb) substrate in moderate thickness. Acoustic modes propagating along a bi-layer plate are shown to be quite different than classical Lamb modes, contrary to most of the multilayered structures. The validation of the LP method is illustrated by a comparison between the associated numerical results and those obtained using the ordinary differential equation (ODE) method. The convergency of the LP method is discussed through a numerical example. Moreover, the influences of thin film GaSb parameters on the characteristics Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagation has been studied in detail. Finally, the advantages of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method to analyze the multilayered structures are described. All the developments performed in this work were implemented in Matlab software.

  9. Study of the influence of semiconductor material parameters on acoustic wave propagation modes in GaSb/AlSb bi-layered structures by Legendre polynomial method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othmani, Cherif, E-mail: othmanicheriffss@gmail.com; Takali, Farid; Njeh, Anouar; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of Rayleigh–Lamb waves in bi-layered structures is studied. For this purpose, an extension of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method is proposed to formulate the acoustic wave equation in the bi-layered structures induced by thin film Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) and with Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb) substrate in moderate thickness. Acoustic modes propagating along a bi-layer plate are shown to be quite different than classical Lamb modes, contrary to most of the multilayered structures. The validation of the LP method is illustrated by a comparison between the associated numerical results and those obtained using the ordinary differential equation (ODE) method. The convergency of the LP method is discussed through a numerical example. Moreover, the influences of thin film GaSb parameters on the characteristics Rayleigh–Lamb waves propagation has been studied in detail. Finally, the advantages of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method to analyze the multilayered structures are described. All the developments performed in this work were implemented in Matlab software.

  10. Ocean Acoustic Propagation and Coherence Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Propagation variability is an inescapable complicating factor for both active and passive sonar systems, and for underwater acoustic communications...framework, to be exploited in the use of underwater sound in shallow water. Our knowledge of acoustic field patterns in shallow water, building block...Ocean Acoustics and Signals Laboratory . Five acoustic studies are planned: 1. Canyon and slope acoustics : Identify purely geometrically controlled

  11. Flood Wave Propagation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 5. Flood Wave Propagation-The Saint Venant Equations. P P Mujumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 5 May 2001 pp 66-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/05/0066-0073 ...

  12. Flood Wave Propagation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I available for forecasting the propagation of the flood wave. Introduction. Among all natural disasters, floods are the most frequently occurring phenomena that affect a large section of population all over the world, every year. Throughout the last century, flood- ing has been one of the most devastating disasters both in terms.

  13. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  14. On resonant coupling of acoustic waves and gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Christophe

    2017-11-01

    Acoustic propagation in the atmosphere is often modeled using modes that are confined within waveguides causing the sound to propagate through multiple paths to the receiver. On the other hand, direct observations in the lower stratosphere show that the gravity wave field is intermittent, and is often dominated by rather well defined large-amplitude wave packets. In the present work, we use normal modes to describe both the gravity wave field and the acoustic field. The gravity wave spectrum is obtained by launching few monochromatic waves whose properties are chosen stochastically to mimic the intermittency. Owing to the disparity of the gravity and acoustic length scales, the interactions between the gravity wave field and each of the acoustic modes can be described using a multiple-scale analysis. The appropriate amplitude evolution equation for the acoustic field involves certain random terms that can be directly related to the gravity wave sources. We will show that the cumulative effect of gravity wave breakings makes the sensitivity of ground-based acoustic signals large, in that small changes in the gravity wave parameterization can create or destroy specific acoustic features.

  15. Simulation of acoustic guided wave propagation in cortical bone using a semi-analytical finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Daniel; Haiat, Guillaume; Fernandes, Julio; Belanger, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Axial transmission techniques have been extensively studied for cortical bone quality assessment. However, the modeling of ultrasonic guided waves propagation in such a complex medium remains challenging. The aim of this paper is to develop a semi-analytical finite element method to simulate the propagation of guided waves in an irregular, multi-layer, and heterogeneous bone cross-section modeled with anisotropic and viscoelastic material properties. The accuracy of the simulations was verified against conventional time-domain three-dimensional finite element. The method was applied in the context of axial transmission in bone to investigate the feasibility of first arrival signal (FAS) to monitor degradation of intracortical properties at low frequency. Different physiopathological conditions for the intracortical region, varying from healthy to osteoporotic, were monitored through FAS velocity using a 10-cycle tone burst excitation centered at 32.5 kHz. The results show that the variation in FAS velocity is mainly associated with four of the eight modes supported by the waveguide, varying with velocity values between 550 and 700 m/s along the different scenarios. Furthermore, the FAS velocity is shown to be associated with the group velocity of the mode with the highest relative amplitude contribution at each studied scenario. However, because of the evolution of the mode with the highest contribution, the FAS velocity is shown to be limited to discriminate intracortical bone properties at low frequency.

  16. Wave propagation scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birman, M Sh

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this collection were written primarily by members of the St. Petersburg seminar in mathematical physics. The seminar, now run by O. A. Ladyzhenskaya, was initiated in 1947 by V. I. Smirnov, to whose memory this volume is dedicated. The papers in the collection are devoted mainly to wave propagation processes, scattering theory, integrability of nonlinear equations, and related problems of spectral theory of differential and integral operators. The book is of interest to mathematicians working in mathematical physics and differential equations, as well as to physicists studying va

  17. Wave propagation in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, Jan

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids is of interest in many branches of the physical scienses and engineering. This book aims to present an account of the theory of wave propagation in elastic solids. The material is arranged to present an exposition of the basic concepts of mechanical wave propagation within a one-dimensional setting and a discussion of formal aspects of elastodynamic theory in three dimensions, followed by chapters expounding on typical wave propagation phenomena, such as radiation, reflection, refraction, propagation in waveguides, and diffraction. The treat

  18. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...about Arctic acoustics during the Cold War is now obsolete. The goal of the Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE) is to determine the...Canada Basin (McLaughlin et al., 2011). These changing conditions make the Canada Basin an ideal location to test the hypothesis put forward by P

  19. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Signal Propagating Through the South China Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    ANALYSIS OF ACOUSTIC SIGNAL PROPAGATING THROUGH THE SOUTH CHINA SEA BASIN by Meihuei Chen March 2016 Thesis Advisor...ACOUSTIC SIGNAL PROPAGATING THROUGH THE SOUTH CHINA SEA BASIN 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Meihuei Chen 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...China Sea (SCS) basin to study the effects of nonlinear internal waves on 400- Hz acoustic signal propagation. The acoustic arrival structure for this

  20. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  1. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Julian L

    1990-01-01

    This is the second work of a set of two volumes on the phenomena of wave propagation in nonreacting and reacting media. The first, entitled Wave Propagation in Solids and Fluids (published by Springer-Verlag in 1988), deals with wave phenomena in nonreacting media (solids and fluids). This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media-specifically, in electro­ magnetic materials. Since these volumes were designed to be relatively self­ contained, we have taken the liberty of adapting some of the pertinent material, especially in the theory of hyperbolic partial differential equations (concerned with electromagnetic wave propagation), variational methods, and Hamilton-Jacobi theory, to the phenomena of electromagnetic waves. The purpose of this volume is similar to that of the first, except that here we are dealing with electromagnetic waves. We attempt to present a clear and systematic account of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials that will be readily accessi...

  2. Acoustic wave rectification in viscoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yukihiro; Shimomura, Yukito; Nishiguchi, Norihiko

    2018-03-01

    We have numerically investigated the propagation of acoustic waves in a periodic array of triangular holes embedded in a matrix composed of viscoelastic materials, such as polymers, using an extended finite-difference time-domain method. Although the viscoelasticity of the substrate in acoustic wave rectifiers smears out the fine structures observed at the transmission rate, the rectifying effect of acoustic waves survives. Moreover, the transmittance for longitudinal wave incidence broadly shows a vivid rectification effect in a wide frequency range when the difference between the velocities of longitudinal and transverse waves is large. In addition, the extreme sensitivity of shear rate with respect to time (or frequency) gives rise to the marked modulation of the frequency dependence of the transmission rate.

  3. Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Propagation of both low and high frequency waves in a plasma consisting of electrons, ions, positrons and charged dust particles have been theoretically studied. The characteristics of dust acoustic wave propagating through the plasma has been analysed and the dispersion relation deduced is a generalization of ...

  4. Shallow water sound propagation with surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindle, Chris T; Deane, Grant B

    2005-05-01

    The theory of wavefront modeling in underwater acoustics is extended to allow rapid range dependence of the boundaries such as occurs in shallow water with surface waves. The theory allows for multiple reflections at surface and bottom as well as focusing and defocusing due to reflection from surface waves. The phase and amplitude of the field are calculated directly and used to model pulse propagation in the time domain. Pulse waveforms are obtained directly for all wavefront arrivals including both insonified and shadow regions near caustics. Calculated waveforms agree well with a reference solution and data obtained in a near-shore shallow water experiment with surface waves over a sloping bottom.

  5. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  6. Propagation and oblique collision of electron-acoustic solitons in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature-electron (2Te) plasmas (plasmas populated with two different electron species) ... plasmas [22–24]. The propagation of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in quantum 2Te plasma has been recently studied in refs [25,26]. However, to the best ..... Thus, their coefficients must vanish to eliminate the secularities.

  7. Time-domain Simulations of the Acoustic Streaming Produced by a Propagating Wave Radiated by a Circular Piston

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco

    2013-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations of the sound field produced by a circular piston in a rigid baffled are presented. The aim was to calculate the acoustic streaming and the flow of mass generated by the sound field. For this purpose, the classical finite-difference time-domain method was implemented...

  8. Wave propagation in electromagnetic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is concerned with wave propagation in reacting media, specifically in electromagnetic materials. An account is presented of the mathematical methods of wave phenomena in electromagnetic materials. The author presents the theory of time-varying electromagnetic fields, which involves a discussion of Faraday's laws, Maxwell's equations and their application to electromagnetic wave propagation under a variety of conditions. The author gives a discussion of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics. Chapters are included on quantum mechanics and the theory of relativity. The mathematical foundation of electromagnetic waves vis a vis partial differential equations is discussed

  9. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  10. Modeling of acoustic wave propagation and scattering for telemetry of complex structures; Modelisation de la propagation et de l'interaction d'une onde acoustique pour la telemetrie de structures complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LU, B.

    2011-11-07

    This study takes place in the framework of tools development for the telemetry simulation. Telemetry is a possible technology applied to monitoring the sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) and consists in positioning in the reactor core a transducer to generate an ultrasonic beam. This beam propagates through an inhomogeneous random medium since temperature fluctuations occur in the liquid sodium and consequently the sound velocity fluctuates as well, which modifies the bream propagation. Then the beam interacts with a reactor structure immersed in sodium. By measuring the time of flight of the backscattered echo received by the same transducer, one can determine the precise location of the structure. The telemetry simulation therefore requires modeling of both the acoustic wave propagation in an inhomogeneous random medium and the interaction of this wave with structures of various shapes; this is the objective of this work. A stochastic model based on a Monte Carlo algorithm is developed in order to take into account the random fluctuations of the acoustic field. The acoustic field through an inhomogeneous random medium is finally modeled from the field calculated in a mean homogeneous medium by modifying the travel times of rays in the homogeneous medium, using a correction provided by the stochastic model. This stochastic propagation model has been validated by comparison with a deterministic model and is much simpler to integrate in the CIVA software platform for non destructive evaluation simulation and less time consuming than the deterministic model. In order to model the interaction between the acoustic wave and the immersed structures, classical diffraction models have been evaluated for rigid structures, including the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) and the Kirchhoff approximation (KA). These two approaches appear to be complementary. Combining them so as to retain only their advantages, we have developed a hybrid model (the so-called refined KA

  11. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch,; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold, G [Ithaca, NY

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  12. A Novel Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF)-Based Methodology to Study the Internal Wave Effects on Acoustic Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    mail: gaelle.casagrande@dga.defense.gouv.fr). Y. Stephan is with the Service Hydrographique et Oceanographique de la Marine (SHOM), Brest 29200...640-653, 2002. ^«^^^ Gaelic Casagrande received the M.Se. degree in ^m Ik ph\\sies from the University Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, fl ^k France...Marine (SHOM) within the Military Oceanography Depart- ment, Brest , France. His current interests include acoustic environmental assessment and

  13. Wave propagation in mechanical metamaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.

    2017-01-01

    In mechanical metamaterials, large deformations can occur in systems which are topological from the point of view of linear waves. The interplay between such nonlinearities and topology affects wave propagation. Beyond perfectly periodic systems, defects provide a way to modify and control

  14. Quasinormal modes and classical wave propagation in analogue black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2004-01-01

    Many properties of black holes can be studied using acoustic analogues in the laboratory through the propagation of sound waves. We investigate in detail sound wave propagation in a rotating acoustic (2+1)-dimensional black hole, which corresponds to the 'draining bathtub' fluid flow. We compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system and discuss late-time power-law tails. Because of the presence of an ergoregion, waves in a rotating acoustic black hole can be superradiantly amplified. We also compute superradiant reflection coefficients and instability time scales for the acoustic black hole bomb, the equivalent of the Press-Teukolsky black hole bomb. Finally we discuss quasinormal modes and late-time tails in a nonrotating canonical acoustic black hole, corresponding to an incompressible, spherically symmetric (3+1)-dimensional fluid flow

  15. Resonant surface acoustic wave chemical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Robert W.; Brocato, Terisse; Stotts, Larry G.

    2017-08-08

    Apparatus for chemical detection includes a pair of interdigitated transducers (IDTs) formed on a piezoelectric substrate. The apparatus includes a layer of adsorptive material deposited on a surface of the piezoelectric substrate between the IDTs, where each IDT is conformed, and is dimensioned in relation to an operating frequency and an acoustic velocity of the piezoelectric substrate, so as to function as a single-phase uni-directional transducer (SPUDT) at the operating frequency. Additionally, the apparatus includes the pair of IDTs is spaced apart along a propagation axis and mutually aligned relative to said propagation axis so as to define an acoustic cavity that is resonant to surface acoustic waves (SAWs) at the operating frequency, where a distance between each IDT of the pair of IDTs ranges from 100 wavelength of the operating frequency to 400 wavelength of the operating frequency.

  16. Propagating wave correlations in complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creagh, Stephen C; Gradoni, Gabriele; Hartmann, Timo; Tanner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel approach for computing wave correlation functions inside finite spatial domains driven by complex and statistical sources. By exploiting semiclassical approximations, we provide explicit algorithms to calculate the local mean of these correlation functions in terms of the underlying classical dynamics. By defining appropriate ensemble averages, we show that fluctuations about the mean can be characterised in terms of classical correlations. We give in particular an explicit expression relating fluctuations of diagonal contributions to those of the full wave correlation function. The methods have a wide range of applications both in quantum mechanics and for classical wave problems such as in vibro-acoustics and electromagnetism. We apply the methods here to simple quantum systems, so-called quantum maps, which model the behaviour of generic problems on Poincaré sections. Although low-dimensional, these models exhibit a chaotic classical limit and share common characteristics with wave propagation in complex structures. (paper)

  17. An analysis of surface acoustic wave propagation in a plate of functionally graded materials with a layered model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liming; Ji, Wang; Zheng, Zhong; Jianke, Du

    2008-02-01

    In a homogeneous plate, Rayleigh waves will have a symmetric and anti-symmetric mode regarding to the mid-plane with different phase velocities. If plate properties vary along the thickness, or the plate is of functionally graded material (FGM), the symmetry of modes and frequency behavior will be modified, thus producing different features for engineering applications such as amplifying or reducing the velocity and deformation. This kind of effect can also be easily realized by utilizing a layered structure with desired material properties that can produce these effects in terms of velocity and displacements, since Rayleigh waves in a solid with general material property grading schemes are difficult to analyze with known methods. Solutions from layered structures with exponential and polynomial property grading schemes are obtained from the layered model and comparisons with known analytical results are made to validate the method and examine possible applications of such structures in engineering.

  18. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers.

  19. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments.

  20. Wave fields in real media wave propagation in anisotropic, anelastic, porous and electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, José M

    2014-01-01

    Authored by the internationally renowned José M. Carcione, Wave Fields in Real Media: Wave Propagation in Anisotropic, Anelastic, Porous and Electromagnetic Media examines the differences between an ideal and a real description of wave propagation, starting with the introduction of relevant stress-strain relations. The combination of this relation and the equations of momentum conservation lead to the equation of motion. The differential formulation is written in terms of memory variables, and Biot's theory is used to describe wave propagation in porous media. For each rheology, a plane-wave analysis is performed in order to understand the physics of wave propagation. This book contains a review of the main direct numerical methods for solving the equation of motion in the time and space domains. The emphasis is on geophysical applications for seismic exploration, but researchers in the fields of earthquake seismology, rock acoustics, and material science - including many branches of acoustics of fluids and ...

  1. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... that at resonance a stationary state arise consisting of multiple oscillating shock waves. Off resonance driving leads to a nearly linear oscillating ground state but superimposed by bursts of a fast oscillating shock wave. Based on a travelling wave ansatz for the fluid velocity potential with an added 2'nd order...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  2. Dimensional analysis of acoustically propagated signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott D.; Thomson, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, long term measurements of atmospherically propagated sound signals have consisted of time series of multiminute averages. Only recently have continuous measurements with temporal resolution corresponding to turbulent time scales been available. With modern digital data acquisition systems we now have the capability to simultaneously record both acoustical and meteorological parameters with sufficient temporal resolution to allow us to examine in detail relationships between fluctuating sound and the meteorological variables, particularly wind and temperature, which locally determine the acoustic refractive index. The atmospheric acoustic propagation medium can be treated as a nonlinear dynamical system, a kind of signal processor whose innards depend on thermodynamic and turbulent processes in the atmosphere. The atmosphere is an inherently nonlinear dynamical system. In fact one simple model of atmospheric convection, the Lorenz system, may well be the most widely studied of all dynamical systems. In this paper we report some results of our having applied methods used to characterize nonlinear dynamical systems to study the characteristics of acoustical signals propagated through the atmosphere. For example, we investigate whether or not it is possible to parameterize signal fluctuations in terms of fractal dimensions. For time series one such parameter is the limit capacity dimension. Nicolis and Nicolis were among the first to use the kind of methods we have to study the properties of low dimension global attractors.

  3. Wave propagation and group velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Brillouin, Léon

    1960-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Group Velocity contains papers on group velocity which were published during the First World War and are missing in many libraries. It introduces three different definitions of velocities: the group velocity of Lord Rayleigh, the signal velocity of Sommerfeld, and the velocity of energy transfer, which yields the rate of energy flow through a continuous wave and is strongly related to the characteristic impedance. These three velocities are identical for nonabsorbing media, but they differ considerably in an absorption band. Some examples are discussed in the last chapter

  4. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  5. Cylindrical and spherical dust-acoustic wave modulations in dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The nonlinear wave modulation of planar and non-planar (cylindrical and spherical) dust-acoustic waves (DAW) propagating in dusty plasmas, in the presence of non-extensive distributions for ions and electrons is investigated. By employing multiple scales technique, a cylindrically and spherically modified nonlinear ...

  6. Cylindrical and spherical dust-acoustic wave modulations in dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The nonlinear wave modulation of planar and non-planar (cylindrical and spherical) dust-acoustic waves (DAW) propagating in dusty plasmas, in the presence of non-extensive distribu- tions for ions and electrons is investigated. By employing multiple scales technique, a cylindrically and spherically modified ...

  7. Monograph on propagation of sound waves in curved ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostafinski, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    After reviewing and evaluating the existing material on sound propagation in curved ducts without flow, it seems strange that, except for Lord Rayleigh in 1878, no book on acoustics has treated the case of wave motion in bends. This monograph reviews the available analytical and experimental material, nearly 30 papers published on this subject so far, and concisely summarizes what has been learned about the motion of sound in hard-wall and acoustically lined cylindrical bends.

  8. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  9. Acoustic modes propagating along the free surface of granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshin, V; Gusev, V; Tournat, V

    2007-05-01

    In unconsolidated granular materials under gravity there exist acoustical waves propagating along the surface with anomalously low sound velocity. The presented theory describes these guided surface acoustic modes (GSAM) confined between the surface of the granular materials and in-depth layers with increasing rigidity. The analysis is based on the obtained original analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation that has never been used both in classical and quantum mechanics. This solution is valid for a particular rigidity profile, whereas the general case of grains with or without adhesion has been analyzed numerically. In contrast to the Rayleigh wave polarized in the sagittal (vertical) plane, which is the unique localized mode in a homogeneous solid, an infinite number of modes with sagittal polarization as well as an infinite number of shear horizontal modes have been found. The difference in physical mechanisms of localization is discussed, and the transformation of the GSAMs into the Rayleigh wave at the increasing adhesion is demonstrated: The first sagittal mode transforms into the Rayleigh one, while the others delocalize. The theory explains the experimentally observed magnitude of velocity for the acoustic waves in sand elliptically polarized in the sagittal plane.

  10. Propagation law of impact elastic wave based on specific materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmin CHEN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the propagation law of the impact elastic wave on the platform, the experimental platform is built by using the specific isotropic materials and anisotropic materials. The glass cloth epoxy laminated plate is used for anisotropic material, and an organic glass plate is used for isotropic material. The PVDF sensors adhered on the specific materials are utilized to collect data, and the elastic wave propagation law of different thick plates and laminated plates under impact conditions is analyzed. The Experimental results show that in anisotropic material, transverse wave propagation speed along the fiber arrangement direction is the fastest, while longitudinal wave propagation speed is the slowest. The longitudinal wave propagation speed in anisotropic laminates is much slower than that in the laminated thick plates. In the test channel arranged along a particular angle away from the central region of the material, transverse wave propagation speed is larger. Based on the experimental results, this paper proposes a material combination mode which is advantageous to elastic wave propagation and diffusion in shock-isolating materials. It is proposed to design a composite material with high acoustic velocity by adding regularly arranged fibrous materials. The overall design of the barrier material is a layered structure and a certain number of 90°zigzag structure.

  11. Propagation of sound waves in ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described.......Plane wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls, radiation from ducts, classical four-pole theory for composite duct systems, and three-dimentional waves in wave guides of various cross-sectional shape are described....

  12. Modeling of the propagation and reception of elastic waves emitted by a crack under stress. Application to the simulation of non-destructive testing by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Khalifa, Warida

    2013-01-01

    AE Non-destructive testing is used in many fields such as nuclear energy, oil and gas, civil engineering or mechanical engineering to check the integrity of structures under stress. Depending on the ratio of structure thickness to wavelength, the energy released by a crack under stress can propagate either as guided waves (in thin structures) or as Rayleigh wave (in thick structures). The analysis of signals resulting from this ultrasonic 'passive' method is particularly difficult due to the complexity of typically measured signals. The objective of this thesis is to develop models to enable the simulation of AE testing experiments in the case of thick or thin structure. The developed models rely on the coupling between an AE source model, wave propagation models and an AE Sensor model. In the case of thick structures two 2D models (for plane and cylindrical surfaces) and a 3D model (for plane surface) have been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the Rayleigh wave emitted by a crack under stress. In the case of thin structures, a 2D model has been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the guided modes emitted by a crack under stress. Several parametric studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the different model input data on the AE signals and thus help to interpret AE testing results. (author) [fr

  13. Radio wave propagation and parabolic equation modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Apaydin, Gokhan

    2018-01-01

    A thorough understanding of electromagnetic wave propagation is fundamental to the development of sophisticated communication and detection technologies. The powerful numerical methods described in this book represent a major step forward in our ability to accurately model electromagnetic wave propagation in order to establish and maintain reliable communication links, to detect targets in radar systems, and to maintain robust mobile phone and broadcasting networks. The first new book on guided wave propagation modeling and simulation to appear in nearly two decades, Radio Wave Propagation and Parabolic Equation Modeling addresses the fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation generally, with a specific focus on radio wave propagation through various media. The authors explore an array of new applications, and detail various v rtual electromagnetic tools for solving several frequent electromagnetic propagation problems. All of the methods described are presented within the context of real-world scenari...

  14. Acoustic Propagation Modeling for Marine Hydro-Kinetic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. N.; Johnson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The combination of riverine, tidal, and wave energy have the potential to supply over one third of the United States' annual electricity demand. However, in order to deploy and test prototypes, and commercial installations, marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices must meet strict regulatory guidelines that determine the maximum amount of noise that can be generated and sets particular thresholds for determining disturbance and injury caused by noise. An accurate model for predicting the propagation of a MHK source in a real-life hydro-acoustic environment has been established. This model will help promote the growth and viability of marine, water, and hydrokinetic energy by confidently assuring federal regulations are meet and harmful impacts to marine fish and wildlife are minimal. Paracousti, a finite difference solution to the acoustic equations, was originally developed for sound propagation in atmospheric environments and has been successfully validated for a number of different geophysical activities. The three-dimensional numerical implementation is advantageous over other acoustic propagation techniques for a MHK application where the domains of interest have complex 3D interactions from the seabed, banks, and other shallow water effects. A number of different cases for hydro-acoustic environments have been validated by both analytical and numerical results from canonical and benchmark problems. This includes a variety of hydrodynamic and physical environments that may be present in a potential MHK application including shallow and deep water, sloping, and canyon type bottoms, with varying sound speed and density profiles. With the model successfully validated for hydro-acoustic environments more complex and realistic MHK sources from turbines and/or arrays can be modeled.

  15. Characterization of microchannel anechoic corners formed by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Alam, Ashar; Ahmed, Husnain; Park, Jinsoo; Jung, Jin Ho; Park, Kwangseok; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2018-02-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) generated in a piezoelectric substrate couple with a liquid according to Snell's law such that a compressional acoustic wave propagates obliquely at a Rayleigh angle ( θ t) inside the microchannel to form a region devoid of a direct acoustic field, which is termed a microchannel anechoic corner (MAC). In the present study, we used microchannels with various heights and widths to characterize the width of the MAC region formed by a single travelling SAW. The attenuation of high-frequency SAWs produced a strong acoustic streaming flow that moved the particles in and out of the MAC region, whereas reflections of the acoustic waves within the microchannel resulted in standing acoustic waves that trapped particles at acoustic pressure nodes located within or outside of the MAC region. A range of actuation frequencies and particle diameters were used to investigate the effects of the acoustic streaming flow and the direct acoustic radiation forces by the travelling as well as standing waves on the particle motion with respect to the MAC region. The width of the MAC ( w c), measured experimentally by tracing the particles, increased with the height of the microchannel ( h m) according to a simple trigonometric equation w c = h m × tan ( θ t ).

  16. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    application is modulation of optical waves in waveguides. This presentation elaborates on how a SAW is generated by interdigital transducers using a 2D model of a piezoelectric, inhomogeneous material implemented in the high-level programming language Comsol Multiphysics. The SAW is send through a model...

  17. Nonlinear acoustic wave equations with fractional loss operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, Fabrice; Holm, Sverre

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives are well suited to describe wave propagation in complex media. When introduced in classical wave equations, they allow a modeling of attenuation and dispersion that better describes sound propagation in biological tissues. Traditional constitutive equations from solid mechanics and heat conduction are modified using fractional derivatives. They are used to derive a nonlinear wave equation which describes attenuation and dispersion laws that match observations. This wave equation is a generalization of the Westervelt equation, and also leads to a fractional version of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov and Burgers' equations. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  18. On the propagation of elastic waves in acoustically anisotropic austenitic materials and at their boundaries during non-destructive inspection with ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munikoti, V.K.

    2001-03-01

    In this work the propagation behaviour of ultrasound in austenitic weld metal has been analyzed by the time-harmonic plane wave approach. Bounded beam and pulse propagation as occurring in ultrasonic testing can be sufficiently dealt with by this approach. More sophisticated approaches principally do not offer any improvements in the results of plane wave modeling except for diffraction and aperture effects and, therefore, the subject matter of this work has been limited to plane wave propagation in the bulk of the medium and at different types of interfaces. Inspite of the fact, that the individual columnar grains of the weld metal have cubic symmetry, the austenitic weld metal as a whole exhibits cylinder-symmetrical texture, as substantiated by metallurgical examination, and therefore has been treated as an anisotropic poly-crystalline medium with transverse isotropic symmetry. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die Ultraschallausbreitung in akustisch anisotropen, homogenen Werkstoffen mit stengelkristalliner Textur wie austenitischen Plattierungen und Schweissverbindungen, austenitischem Guss oder geschweissten Komponenten aus austenitischem Guss modelliert. Wie die in dieser Arbeit referierten metallurgischen Untersuchungen gezeigt haben, koennen austenitisches Schweissgut und stengelkristallin erstarrter austenitischer Guss makroskopisch als polykristallines Medium mit zylindersymmetrischer Textur behandelt werden, also als Medium mit transversal isotroper Symmetrie, obwohl mikroskopisch die einzelnen Stengelkristallite kubische Symmetrie aufweisen. Die Schallausbreitung wird mit Hilfe des Ansatzes ebener Wellen modelliert. Obwohl bei der Ultraschallpruefung gepulste und begrenzte Schallbuendel verwendet werden, liefert dieser Ansatz die bei der Ultraschallpruefung beobachteten Wellenarten mit Geschwindigkeiten und Polarisationen, Schallbuendelablenkung und Reflexion und Brechnung nach Richtung und Amplitude, so dass ueber das Modell der ebenen

  19. Nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia

    2009-01-01

    The problem of nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves involving the dynamics of mobile cold positrons is addressed. A theoretical work is presented to show their existence and possible realization in a simple four-component plasma model. The results should be useful for the understanding of the localized structures that may occur in space and laboratory plasmas as new sources of cold positrons are now well developed.

  20. Spontaneous excitations of low amplitude hole filaments, acoustic vortices, and rogue wave events in weakly disordered dust acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Chang, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Jun-Yi; I, Lin

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we briefly review our recent experimental studies on the observations and waveform dynamics of spontaneous excitations of low and high amplitude singular objects: low amplitude hole filaments coinciding with the wiggling trajectories of topological defects surrounded by acoustic vortices with helical waveforms, and uncertain rogue wave events, in self-excited weakly disordered dust acoustic waves. The changes of waveform topology, caused by kinking, rupturing and reconnection of sequential wave crests surfaces, and the reversed process, are responsible for the chaotic creation, propagation, and annihilation of acoustic vortex pairs with opposite helicities winding around low amplitude hole filaments. The observed rogue wave events are preceded by a higher probability of surrounding defects. Particle focusing by the transverse electric forces from ruptured and tilted wave crests nearby defects are identified as the major cause for rogue wave generation.

  1. Depropagation and propagation simulation of the acoustic waves by using finite differences operators; Simulacao da propagacao e depropagacao de ondas acusticas usando operadores de diferencas finitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Marco A.B.; Santos, Roberto H.M. dos; Silva, Marcelo S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa em Geofisica e Geologia

    2004-07-01

    The numerical simulation of shot gathers over a (2D) velocity field, which corresponds to a model of Atlantic continental shelf, at the continental break area, using a typical model of the Brazilian Atlantic coast, suggested by PETROBRAS. The finite difference technique (FD) is used to solve the second derivatives in time and space of the acoustic wave equation, using fourth order operators to solve the spatial derivatives and second order operators to solve the time derivative. It is applied an explicitly scheme to calculate the pressure field values at a future instant. The use of rectangular mesh helps to generate data less noisy, since we can control better the numerical dispersion. The source functions (wavelets), as the first and the second derivatives of the gaussian function, are proper to generate synthetic seismograms with the FD method, because they allow an easy discretization. On the forward modeling, which is the simulation of wave fields, allows to control the stability limit of the method, wherever be the given velocity field, just employing compatible small values of the sample rate. The algorithm developed here, which uses only the FD technique, is able to perform the forward modeling, saving the image times, which can be used latter to perform the retropropagation of the wave field and thus migrate the source-gathers the reverse time extrapolation is able to test the used velocity model, and detect determine errors up to 5% on the used velocity model. (author)

  2. Wave fields in real media wave propagation in anisotropic, anelastic, porous and electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, José M

    2007-01-01

    This book examines the differences between an ideal and a real description of wave propagation, where ideal means an elastic (lossless), isotropic and single-phase medium, and real means an anelastic, anisotropic and multi-phase medium. The analysis starts by introducing the relevant stress-strain relation. This relation and the equations of momentum conservation are combined to give the equation of motion. The differential formulation is written in terms of memory variables, and Biot's theory is used to describe wave propagation in porous media. For each rheology, a plane-wave analysis is performed in order to understand the physics of wave propagation. The book contains a review of the main direct numerical methods for solving the equation of motion in the time and space domains. The emphasis is on geophysical applications for seismic exploration, but researchers in the fields of earthquake seismology, rock acoustics, and material science - including many branches of acoustics of fluids and solids - may als...

  3. Observations of Obliquely Propagating Electron Bernstein Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R. J.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Stenzel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation.......Plane electron Bernstein waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field are investigated. The waves are excited by a plane grid antenna in a large volume magnetoplasma. The observations compare favorably with the predictions of the linear dispersion relation....

  4. Toward a Nonlinear Acoustic Analogy: Turbulence as a Source of Sound and Nonlinear Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is proposed that directly includes nonlinear propagation effects. We examine the Lighthill acoustic analogy and replace the Green's function of the wave equation with numerical solutions of the generalized Burgers' equation. This is justified mathematically by using similar arguments that are the basis of the solution of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This approach is superior to alternatives because propagation is accounted for directly from the source to the far-field observer instead of from an arbitrary intermediate point. Validation of a numerical solver for the generalized Burgers' equation is performed by comparing solutions with the Blackstock bridging function and measurement data. Most importantly, the mathematical relationship between the Navier-Stokes equations, the acoustic analogy that describes the source, and canonical nonlinear propagation equations is shown. Example predictions are presented for nonlinear propagation of jet mixing noise at the sideline angle.

  5. Nucleus-acoustic shock waves in white dwarfs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Jannat

    2018-03-09

    Mar 9, 2018 ... Abstract. The nucleus-acoustic shock waves (NASWs) propagating in a white dwarf plasma system, which contain non-relativistically or ultrarelativistically degenerate electrons, non-relativistically degenerate, viscous fluid of light nuclei, and immobile nuclei of heavy elements, have been theoretically ...

  6. Terrestrial propagation of long electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Galejs, Janis; Fock, V A

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial Propagation of Long Electromagnetic Waves deals with the propagation of long electromagnetic waves confined principally to the shell between the earth and the ionosphere, known as the terrestrial waveguide. The discussion is limited to steady-state solutions in a waveguide that is uniform in the direction of propagation. Wave propagation is characterized almost exclusively by mode theory. The mathematics are developed only for sources at the ground surface or within the waveguide, including artificial sources as well as lightning discharges. This volume is comprised of nine chapte

  7. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea 5b. GRANT NUMBER NOOO 14-12-1 -0226 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...based on data from the 2009-20 I I NPAL Philippine Sea experiments funded by ONR Grant NOOO 14-08-1-0840 , Fourteen of these publi cations appeared in...North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Deep Water Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea ONR Grant NOOO 14-12-1-0226 Period of Performance: 01

  8. Detection of in-plane displacements of acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the in-plane particle displacement components of ultrasonic surface acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric (EFFI) sensors are reported. Wave propagation in materials and the fiber sensor elements are briefly discussed. Calibrated experimental results obtained for simulated acoustic emission events on homogeneous metal test specimens are reported and compared to previous results obtained using piezoelectric transducers.

  9. Damping-Growth Transition for Ion-Acoustic Waves in a Density Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    A damping-growth transition for ion-acoustic waves propagating in a nonuniform plasma (e-folding length for the density ln) is observed at a wavelength λ∼2πln. This result supports calculations performed in connection with the problem of heating of the solar corona by ion-acoustic waves generated...... in the solar photosphere....

  10. On Collisionless Damping of Ion Acoustic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla; Petersen, P.I.

    1973-01-01

    Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero.......Exact theoretical treatments show that the damping of ion acoustic waves in collisionless plasmas does not vanish when the derivative of the undisturbed distribution function at the phase velocity equals zero....

  11. Controlling wave propagation through nonlinear engineered granular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Andrea

    We study the fundamental dynamic behavior of a special class of ordered granular systems in order to design new, structured materials with unique physical properties. The dynamic properties of granular systems are dictated by the nonlinear, Hertzian, potential in compression and zero tensile strength resulting from the discrete material structure. Engineering the underlying particle arrangement of granular systems allows for unique dynamic properties, not observed in natural, disordered granular media. While extensive studies on 1D granular crystals have suggested their usefulness for a variety of engineering applications, considerably less attention has been given to higher-dimensional systems. The extension of these studies in higher dimensions could enable the discovery of richer physical phenomena not possible in 1D, such as spatial redirection and anisotropic energy trapping. We present experiments, numerical simulation (based on a discrete particle model), and in some cases theoretical predictions for several engineered granular systems, studying the effects of particle arrangement on the highly nonlinear transient wave propagation to develop means for controlling the wave propagation pathways. The first component of this thesis studies the stress wave propagation resulting from a localized impulsive loading for three different 2D particle lattice structures: square, centered square, and hexagonal granular crystals. By varying the lattice structure, we observe a wide range of properties for the propagating stress waves: quasi-1D solitary wave propagation, fully 2D wave propagation with tunable wave front shapes, and 2D pulsed wave propagation. Additionally the effects of weak disorder, inevitably present in real granular systems, are investigated. The second half of this thesis studies the solitary wave propagation through 2D and 3D ordered networks of granular chains, reducing the effective density compared to granular crystals by selectively placing wave

  12. Propagation of extensional waves in a piezoelectric semiconductor rod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.L. Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the propagation of extensional waves in a thin piezoelectric semiconductor rod of ZnO whose c-axis is along the axis of the rod. The macroscopic theory of piezoelectric semiconductors was used which consists of the coupled equations of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge. The problem is nonlinear because the drift current is the product of the unknown electric field and the unknown carrier density. A perturbation procedure was used which resulted in two one-way coupled linear problems of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge, respectively. The acoustic wave and the accompanying electric field were obtained from the equations of piezoelectricity. The motion of carriers was then determined from the conservation of charge using a trigonometric series. It was found that while the acoustic wave was approximated by a sinusoidal wave, the motion of carriers deviates from a sinusoidal wave qualitatively because of the contributions of higher harmonics arising from the originally nonlinear terms. The wave crests become higher and sharper while the troughs are shallower and wider. This deviation is more pronounced for acoustic waves with larger amplitudes.

  13. Some considerations of wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, P. L. F. M.

    The meaning of group velocity and its relation to conserved quantities are demonstrated. The origin of wave dispersion in terms of nonlocal and relaxation phenomena are clarified. The character of a wave described by an equation with a general type of nonlinearity and general dispersion terms is explained. The steepening of a wave flank and the occurrence of stationary waves are discussed.

  14. Underwater Acoustic Propagation in the Philippine Sea: Intensity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew W.

    In the spring of 2009, broadband transmissions from a ship-suspended source with a 284 Hz center frequency were received on a moored and navigated vertical array of hydrophones over a range of 107 km in the Philippine Sea. During a 60-hour period over 19 000 transmissions were carried out. The observed wavefront arrival structure reveals four distinct purely refracted acoustic paths: one with a single upper turning point near 80 m depth, two with a pair of upper turning points at a depth of roughly 300 m, and one with three upper turning points at 420 m. Individual path intensity, defined as the absolute square of the center frequency Fourier component for that arrival, was estimated over the 60-hour duration and used to compute scintillation index and log-intensity variance. Monte Carlo parabolic equation simulations using internal-wave induced sound speed perturbations obeying the Garrett-Munk internal-wave en- ergy spectrum were in agreement with measured data for the three deeper-turning paths but differed by as much as a factor of four for the near surface-interacting path. Estimates of the power spectral density and temporal autocorrelation function of intensity were attempted, but were complicated by gaps in the measured time-series. Deep fades in intensity were observed in the near surface-interacting path. Hypothesized causes for the deep fades were examined through further acoustic propagation modeling and analysis of various available oceanographic measurements.

  15. Making and Propagating Elastic Waves: Overview of the new wave propagation code WPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCandless, K P; Petersson, N A; Nilsson, S; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Blair, S C

    2006-05-09

    We are developing a new parallel 3D wave propagation code at LLNL called WPP (Wave Propagation Program). WPP is being designed to incorporate the latest developments in embedded boundary and mesh refinement technology for finite difference methods, as well as having an efficient portable implementation to run on the latest supercomputers at LLNL. We are currently exploring seismic wave applications, including a recent effort to compute ground motions for the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake. This paper will briefly describe the wave propagation problem, features of our numerical method to model it, implementation of the wave propagation code, and results from the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake simulation.

  16. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  17. Propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Weiyan

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with the SLF/ELF wave propagation, an important branch of electromagnetic theory. The SLF/ELF wave propagation theory is well applied in earthquake electromagnetic radiation, submarine communication, thunderstorm detection, and geophysical prospecting and diagnostics. The propagation of SLF/ELF electromagnetic waves is introduced in various media like the earth-ionospheric waveguide, ionospheric plasma, sea water, earth, and the boundary between two different media or the stratified media. Applications in the earthquake electromagnetic radiation and the submarine communications are also addressed. This book is intended for scientists and engineers in the fields of radio propagation and EM theory and applications. Prof. Pan is a professor at China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation in Qingdao (China). Dr. Li is a professor at Zhejiang University in Hangzhou (China).

  18. Spatial Processing of Urban Acoustic Wave Fields from High-Performance Computations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ketcham, Stephen A; Wilson, D. K; Cudney, Harley H; Parker, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    .... The objective of this work is to develop spatial processing techniques for acoustic wave propagation data from three-dimensional high-performance computations to quantify scattering due to urban...

  19. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  20. Sound Propagation in a Duct with Wall Corrugations Having Square-Wave Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A. Hawwa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic wave propagation in ducts with rigid walls having square-wave wall corrugations is considered in the context of a perturbation formulation. Using the ratio of wall corrugation amplitude to the mean duct half width, a small parameter is defined and a two levels of approximations are obtained. The first-order solution produces an analytical description of the pressure field inside the duct. The second-order solution yields an analytical estimate of the phase speed of waves transmitting through the duct. The effect of wall corrugation density on acoustic impedance and wave speeds is highlighted. The analysis reveals that waves propagating in a duct with square-wave wall corrugation are slower than waves propagating in a duct with sinusoidal wave corrugation having the same corrugation wavelength.

  1. Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Coupled seismic and electromagnetic wave propagation is studied theoretically and experimentally. This coupling arises because of the electrochemical double layer, which exists along the solid-grain/fluid-electrolyte boundaries of porous media. Within the double layer, charge is redistributed,

  2. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannyk Bourquin

    Full Text Available Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel.

  3. Acoustic wave science realized by metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwoo; Nguyen, Duc Minh; Rho, Junsuk

    2017-01-01

    Artificially structured materials with unit cells at sub-wavelength scale, known as metamaterials, have been widely used to precisely control and manipulate waves thanks to their unconventional properties which cannot be found in nature. In fact, the field of acoustic metamaterials has been much developed over the past 15 years and still keeps developing. Here, we present a topical review of metamaterials in acoustic wave science. Particular attention is given to fundamental principles of acoustic metamaterials for realizing the extraordinary acoustic properties such as negative, near-zero and approaching-infinity parameters. Realization of acoustic cloaking phenomenon which is invisible from incident sound waves is also introduced by various approaches. Finally, acoustic lenses are discussed not only for sub-diffraction imaging but also for applications based on gradient index (GRIN) lens.

  4. Propagating waves in human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka eTakahashi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in non-human primates have shown that beta oscillations (15-30Hz of local field potentials (LFPs in the arm/hand areas of primary motor cortex (MI propagate as traveling waves across the cortex. These waves exhibited two stereotypical features across animals and tasks: 1 The waves propagated in two dominant modal directions roughly 180 degrees apart, and 2 their propagation speed ranged from 10 ~ 35 cm/s. It is, however, unknown if such cortical waves occur in the human motor cortex. This study shows that the two properties of propagating beta waves are present in MI of a tetraplegic human patient while he was instructed to perform an instruction delay center out task using a cursor controlled by the chin. Moreover, we show that beta waves are sustained and have similar properties whether the subject was engaged in the task or at rest. The directions of the successive sustained waves both in the human subject and a nonhuman primate (NHP subject tended to switch from one dominant mode to the other, and at least in the NHP subject the estimated distance travelled between successive waves traveling into and out of the central sulcus is consistent with the hypothesis of wave reflection between the border of motor and somatosensory cortices. Further, we show that the occurrence of the beta waves is not uniquely tied to periods of increased power in the beta frequency band. These results demonstrate that traveling beta waves in MI are a general phenomenon occurring in human as well as non-human primates. Consistent with the non-human primate data, the dominant directions of the beta LFP waves in human aligned to the proximal to distal gradient of joint representations in MI somatotopy. This consistent finding of wave propagation may imply the existence of a hardwired organization of motor cortex that mediates this spatio-temporal pattern.

  5. Propagation of sound waves in tubes of noncircular cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Plane-acoustic-wave propagation in small tubes with a cross section in the shape of a flattened oval is described. Theoretical descriptions of a plane wave propagating in a tube with circular cross section and between a pair of infinite parallel plates, including viscous and thermal damping, are expressed in similar form. For a wide range of useful duct sizes, the propagation constant (whose real and imaginary parts are the amplitude attenuation rate and the wave number, respectively) is very nearly the same function of frequency for both cases if the radius of the circular tube is the same as the distance between the parallel plates. This suggests that either a circular-cross-section model or a flat-plate model can be used to calculate wave propagation in flat-oval tubing, or any other shape tubing, if its size is expressed in terms of an equivalent radius, given by g = 2 x (cross-sectional area)/(length of perimeter). Measurements of the frequency response of two sections of flat-oval tubing agree with calculations based on this idea. Flat-plate formulas are derived, the use of transmission-line matrices for calculations of plane waves in compound systems of ducts is described, and examples of computer programs written to carry out the calculations are shown.

  6. Topology Optimization for Wave Propagation Problems with Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk

    discussion of the finite element method and a hybrid ofa wave based method and the finite element method, used to discretize the modelproblems under consideration. A short discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of applying the hybrid method compared to the finite element method, used in conjunction......This Thesis treats the development and experimental validation of density-based topology optimization methods for wave propagation problems. Problems in the frequency regime where design dimensions are between approximately one fourth and ten wavelengths are considered. All examples treat problems...... from acoustics, however problems for TE or TM polarized electromagnetic waves and shear waves in solids in two dimensions may be treated using the proposed methods with minor modifications. A brief introduction to wave problems and to density-based topology optimizationis included, as is a brief...

  7. Propagation characteristics of ion-acoustic double layer in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harvinder Kaur

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... Abstract. In the present investigation, ion-acoustic double layers in an inhomogeneous plasma consisting of. Maxwellian and non-thermal distributions of electrons are studied. We have derived a modified Korteweg–de Vries. (mKdV) equation for ion-acoustic double layers propagating in a collisionless ...

  8. Time domain characteristics of wave motion in dispersive and anisotropic continuum acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-12-01

    The authors study the wave propagation in continuum acoustic metamaterials whose all or not all of the principal elements of the mass tensor or the scalar compressibility can be negative due to wave dispersion. Their time-domain wave characteristics are particularly investigated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, in which algorithms for the Drude and Lorentz dispersion pertinent to acoustic metamaterials are provided necessarily. Wave propagation nature of anisotropic acoustic metamaterials with all admissible material parameters are analyzed in a general manner. It is found that anomalous negative refraction phenomena can appear in several dispersion regimes, and their unique time-domain signatures have been discovered by the FDTD modeling. It is further proposed that two different metamaterial layers with specially assigned dispersions could comprise a conjugate pair that permits wave propagation only at specific points in the wave vector space. The time-domain pulse simulation verifies that acoustic directive radiation capable of modulating radiation angle with the wave frequency can be realized with this conjugate pair. The study provides the detailed analysis of wave propagation in anisotropic and dispersive acoustic mediums, which makes a further step toward dispersion engineering and transient wave control through acoustic metamaterials.

  9. Variation principle for nonlinear wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Lee, Y.C.; Nishikawa, Kyoji; Hojo, H.; Yoshida, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Variation principle is derived which determines stationary nonlinear propagation of electrostatic waves in the self-consistent density profile. Example is given for lower-hybrid waves and the relation to the variation principle for the Lagrangian density of electromagnetic fluids is discussed

  10. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tural engineering or to hydrocarbon/geothermal processes. References. Bear J, Sorek S, Ben-Dor G and Mazor G 1992 Displacement waves in saturated thermoelastic porous media, I. Basic equations; Fluid Dyn. Res. 9 155–164. Biot M A 1956a The theory of propagation of elastic waves in a fluid-saturated porous solid, ...

  11. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  12. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuntz, M. (Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO (USA) Heidelberg Universitaet (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  13. Radiation and propagation of electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tyras, George; Declaris, Nicholas

    1969-01-01

    Radiation and Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves serves as a text in electrical engineering or electrophysics. The book discusses the electromagnetic theory; plane electromagnetic waves in homogenous isotropic and anisotropic media; and plane electromagnetic waves in inhomogenous stratified media. The text also describes the spectral representation of elementary electromagnetic sources; the field of a dipole in a stratified medium; and radiation in anisotropic plasma. The properties and the procedures of Green's function method of solution, axial currents, as well as cylindrical boundaries a

  14. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Paul; Pizzolato, Marco; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Masserey, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness and beam skewing of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes A 0 and S 0 were investigated. Experimental measurements using contact wedge transducer excitation and laser measurement were conducted. Good agreement was found between the theoretically calculated angular dependency of the phase slowness and measurements for different propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation. Significant wave skew and beam widening was observed experimentally due to the anisotropy, especially for the S 0 mode. Explicit finite element simulations were conducted to visualize and quantify the guided wave beam skew. Good agreement was found for the A 0 mode, but a systematic discrepancy was observed for the S 0 mode. These effects need to be considered for the non-destructive testing of wafers using guided waves.

  15. Solitary wave propagation in solar flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdelyi, Robert; Fedun, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the excitation, time-dependent dynamic evolution, and interaction of nonlinear propagating (i.e., solitary) waves on vertical cylindrical magnetic flux tubes in compressible solar atmospheric plasma. The axisymmetric flux tube has a field strength of 1000 G at its footpoint, which is typical for photospheric regions. Nonlinear waves that develop into solitary waves are excited by a footpoint driver. The propagation of the nonlinear signal is investigated by solving numerically a set of fully nonlinear 2.0D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in cylindrical coordinates. For the initial conditions, axisymmetric solutions of the linear dispersion relation for wave modes in a magnetic flux tube are applied. In the present case, we focus on the sausage mode only. The dispersion relation is solved numerically for a range of plasma parameters. The equilibrium state is perturbed by a Gaussian at the flux tube footpoint. Two solitary solutions are found by solving the full nonlinear MHD equations. First, the nonlinear wave propagation with external sound speed is investigated. Next, the solitary wave propagating close to the tube speed, also found in the numerical solution, is studied. In contrast to previous analytical and numerical works, here no approximations were made to find the solitary solutions. A natural application of the present study may be spicule formation in the low chromosphere. Future possible improvements in modeling and the relevance of the photospheric chromospheric transition region coupling by spicules is suggested

  16. Extraction of lateral eigenmode properties in thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator from interferometric measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkonen, Kimmo; Pensala, Tuomas; Meltaus, Johanna; Kaivola, Matti

    2010-01-01

    A heterodyne laser interferometer is used to study acoustic wave fields excited in a 1.8 GHz AlN thin film bulk acoustic waveresonator. The electrical response of the resonator exhibits a strong thickness resonance onto which spurious modes, caused by lateral standing plate waves, are superposed. Optical interferometermeasurements are used to extract dispersion curves of the laterally propagating waves responsible for the spurious responses. A discrete eigenmode spectrum due to the finite lat...

  17. Rich eight-branch spectrum of the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in partially spin-polarized electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.; Iqbal, Z.

    2016-03-01

    We consider the separate spin evolution of electrons and positrons in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. We consider the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in these systems. Working in a regime of high-density n0˜1027cm-3 and high-magnetic-field B0=1010 G, we report the presence of the spin-electron acoustic waves and their dispersion dependencies. In electron-positron plasmas, similarly to the electron-ion plasmas, we find one spin-electron acoustic wave (SEAW) at the propagation parallel or perpendicular to the external field and two spin-electron acoustic waves at the oblique propagation. At the parallel or perpendicular propagation of the longitudinal waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas, we find four branches: the Langmuir wave, the positron-acoustic wave, and a pair of waves having spin nature, they are the SEAW and the wave discovered in this paper, called the spin-electron-positron acoustic wave (SEPAW). At the oblique propagation we find eight longitudinal waves: the Langmuir wave, the Trivelpiece--Gould wave, a pair of positron-acoustic waves, a pair of SEAWs, and a pair of SEPAWs. Thus, for the first time, we report the existence of the second positron-acoustic wave existing at the oblique propagation and the existence of SEPAWs.

  18. Propagation of high frequency electrostatic surface waves along the planar interface between plasma and dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rinku; Dey, M.

    2018-04-01

    An analytical model is developed that explains the propagation of a high frequency electrostatic surface wave along the interface of a plasma system where semi-infinite electron-ion plasma is interfaced with semi-infinite dusty plasma. The model emphasizes that the source of such high frequency waves is inherent in the presence of ion acoustic and dust ion acoustic/dust acoustic volume waves in electron-ion plasma and dusty plasma region. Wave dispersion relation is obtained for two distinct cases and the role of plasma parameters on wave dispersion is analyzed in short and long wavelength limits. The normalized surface wave frequency is seen to grow linearly for lower wave number but becomes constant for higher wave numbers in both the cases. It is observed that the normalized frequency depends on ion plasma frequencies when dust oscillation frequency is neglected.

  19. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  20. Ultrasonic attenuation of surface acoustic waves in superconducting zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.E.; Marshall, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    The attenuation of 90-MHz elastic surface waves propagating in both 3,000 and 10,000 A films of zinc has been measured as a function of temperature from 3 to 0.38 K. The surface acoustic waves were generated and detected by using a surface-acoustic-wave device interdigital transducers plated onto a Y-Z cut lithium-niobate substrate. Utilizing the experimental results, in the BCS theory, energy gaps of 2Δ (0) equal to 4.17 +- 0.20 and 3.81 +- 0.20 in units of k/sub B/T/sub c/ were calculated for the 3,000 and 10,000 A films, respectively. The transition temperatures for the 3,000 and 10,000 A films were 1.5 +- 0.01 and 1.31 +- 0.01 K, respectively

  1. Submillimeter wave propagation in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Johnson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Propagation of submillimeter waves (smm) in tokamak plasma was investigated both theoretically and experimentally to ensure successful measurements of electron density and plasma current distributions in tokamak devices. Theoretical analyses were carried out to study the polarization of the smm waves in TFTR and ISX-B tokamaks. A multichord smm wave interferometer/polarimeter system was employed to simultaneously measure the line electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The experimental study on TFTR is under way. Computer codes were developed and have been used to study the wave propagation and to reconstruct the distributions of plasma current and density from the measured data. The results are compared with other measurements. 5 references, 2 figures

  2. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Analysis of Shadow Zone Arrivals and Acoustic Propagation in Numerical Ocean Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dushaw, Brian

    2009-01-01

    ... depth of the receiver lies well below the depths of the predicted cusps. Several models for the temperature and salinity in the North Pacific Ocean were obtained and processed to enable simulations of acoustic propagation for comparison to the observations...

  3. Wave Propagation in Smart Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we deal with the behavior of solutions to hyperbolicequations such as the wave equation:\\begin{equation}\\label{waveeq1}\\frac{\\partial^2}{\\partial t^2}u-\\Delta u=f,\\end{equation}or the equations of linear elasticity for an isotropic medium:\\begin{equation}\\label{elasteq1}\\frac......{\\partial^2}{\\partial t^2}u -(\\lambda+\\mu){\\text{\\rm grad div}} u -\\mu\\Deltau=0,\\end{equation}where $u=u(t,x)$ denotes a 3-vector field on $\\Bbb R\\times\\Bbb R^3$,and $\\lambda$ and $\\mu$ are the Lame-constants....

  4. Wave Propagation in Smart Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we deal with the behavior of solutions to hyperbolic equations such as the wave equation: \\begin{equation}\\label{waveeq1} \\frac{\\partial^2}{\\partial t^2}u-\\Delta u=f, \\end{equation} or the equations of linear elasticity for an isotropic medium: \\begin{equation}\\label{elasteq1} \\frac......{\\partial^2}{\\partial t^2}u -(\\lambda+\\mu){\\text{\\rm grad div}} u -\\mu\\Delta u=0, \\end{equation} where $u=u(t,x)$ denotes a 3-vector field on $\\Bbb R\\times\\Bbb R^3$, and $\\lambda$ and $\\mu$ are the Lame-constants....

  5. Thermal Acoustic Waves from Wall with Temporal Temperature Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, G.; Tsukamoto, M.; Sakurai, A.

    2011-05-01

    Although phenomenon of thermo-acoustic wave has been known for many years in some familiar experiences such as "singing flame" from Bunsen burner, recent trends of utilizing it for the industrial applications urge the understandings of basic details of the phenomenon itself. Here we consider, in this connection, the problem of acoustic wave generation from a particular heat source of solid wall whose temperature changes with time and the phenomenon of temperature change by standing wave oscillating in closed tube. For these we set a hollow tube whose temperature at its one end wall changes with time, and compute flow field inside using the molecular kinetic model, which is found to be more convenient for the boundary value fitting than the ordinary acoustic theory system to this problem. In practice, we use the Boltzmann equation with the BGK approximation, and compute two cases above in monotonic and sinusoidal temperature changes with time. Results of both cases show propagating density wave from the wall almost in acoustic velocity to the first case and the temperature decreases in average to the second case.

  6. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  7. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Random Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1984-01-01

    The propagation of a narrow frequency band beam of electromagnetic waves in a medium with randomly varying index of refraction is considered. A novel formulation of the governing equation is proposed. An equation for the average Green function (or transition probability) can then be derived...

  8. An optimal design problem in wave propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellido, J.C.; Donoso, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We consider an optimal design problem in wave propagation proposed in Sigmund and Jensen (Roy. Soc. Lond. Philos. Trans. Ser. A 361:1001-1019, 2003) in the one-dimensional situation: Given two materials at our disposal with different elastic Young modulus and different density, the problem consists...

  9. Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ionospheric Plasma Heating During Powerful Wave Propagation. S Ram. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v12i1.15563 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's ...

  10. Parallel electric field in the auroral ionosphere: excitation of acoustic waves by Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Israelevich

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a new mechanism for the formation of a parallel electric field observed in the auroral ionosphere. For this purpose, the excitation of acoustic waves by propagating Alfvén waves was studied numerically. We find that the magnetic pressure perturbation due to finite amplitude Alfvén waves causes the perturbation of the plasma pressure that propagates in the form of acoustic waves, and gives rise to a parallel electric field. This mechanism explains the observations of the strong parallel electric field in the small-scale electromagnetic perturbations of the auroral ionosphere. For the cases when the parallel electric current in the small-scale auroral perturbations is so strong that the velocity of current carriers exceeds the threshold of the ion sound instability, the excited ion acoustic waves may account for the parallel electric fields as strong as tens of mV/m.

  11. Topology Optimization for Transient Wave Propagation Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, René

    as for vectorial elastic wave propagation problems using finite element analysis [P2], [P4]. The concept is implemented in a parallel computing code that includes efficient techniques for performing gradient based topology optimization. Using the developed computational framework the thesis considers four...... are derived by use of the adjoint variable method. Many wave propagation problems are open-region problems, i.e. the outer boundaries of the modeling domain must be re ection-less. The thesis contains new and independent developments within perfectly matched layer techniques for scalar as well......The study of elastic and optical waves together with intensive material research has revolutionized everyday as well as cutting edge technology in very tangible ways within the last century. Therefore it is important to continue the investigative work towards improving existing as well as innovate...

  12. Microscale anechoic architecture: acoustic diffusers for ultra low power microparticle separation via traveling surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Jan; Langelier, Sean; Rezk, Amgad R; Lindner, Gerhard; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2015-01-07

    We present a versatile and very low-power traveling SAW microfluidic sorting device able to displace and separate particles of different diameter in aqueous suspension; the travelling wave propagates through the fluid bulk and diffuses via a Schröder diffuser, adapted from its typical use in concert hall acoustics to be the smallest such diffuser to be suitable for microfluidics. The effective operating power range is two to three orders of magnitude less than current SAW devices, uniquely eliminating the need for amplifiers, and by using traveling waves to impart forces directly upon suspended microparticles, they can be separated by size.

  13. Gravitational wave propagation in isotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, P.A.; O'Shea, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    We study the propagation of gravitational waves carrying arbitrary information through isotropic cosmologies. The waves are modeled as small perturbations of the background Robertson-Walker geometry. The perfect fluid matter distribution of the isotropic background is, in general, modified by small anisotropic stresses. For pure gravity waves, in which the perturbed Weyl tensor is radiative (i.e. type N in the Petrov classification), we construct explicit examples for which the presence of the anisotropic stress is shown to be essential and the histories of the wave fronts in the background Robertson-Walker geometry are shear-free null hypersurfaces. The examples derived in this case are analogous to the Bateman waves of electromagnetic theory

  14. Propagation of an ionizing surface electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boev, A.G.; Prokopov, A.V.

    1976-11-01

    The propagation of an rf surface wave in a plasma which is ionized by the wave itself is analyzed. The exact solution of the nonlinear Maxwell equations is discussed for the case in which the density of plasma electrons is an exponential function of the square of the electric field. The range over which the surface wave exists and the frequency dependence of the phase velocity are found. A detailed analysis is given for the case of a plasma whose initial density exceeds the critical density at the wave frequency. An increase in the wave amplitude is shown to expand the frequency range over which the plasma is transparent; The energy flux in the plasma tends toward a certain finite value which is governed by the effective ionization field.

  15. Acoustic metasurface for refracted wave manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Xiang; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Fu-Gen; Dong, Hua-Feng; Mu, Zhong-Fei; Li, Jing-bo

    2018-02-01

    Here we present a design of a transmitted acoustic metasurface based on a single row of Helmholtz resonators with varying geometric parameters. The proposed metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law of refraction, but also exhibits various interesting properties and potential applications such as insulation of two quasi-intersecting transmitted sound waves, ultrasonic Bessel beam generator, frequency broadening effect of anomalous refraction and focusing.

  16. Lamb waves propagation in layered piezoelectric/piezomagnetic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzin, Hamdi; Ben Amor, Morched; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2017-04-01

    A dynamic solution is presented for the propagation of harmonic waves in magneto-electro-elastic plates composed of piezoelectric BaTiO 3 (B) and magnetostrictive CoFe 2 O 4 (F) material. The state-vector approach is employed to derive the propagator matrix which connects the field variables at the upper interface to those at the lower interface of each layer. The ordinary differential approach is employed to determine the wave propagating characteristics in the plate by imposing the traction-free boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the layered plate. The dispersion curves of the piezoelectric-piezomagnetic plate are shown for different thickness ratios. The numerical results show clearly the influence of different stacking sequences as well as thickness ratio on dispersion curves and on magneto-electromechanical coupling factor. These findings could be relevant to the analysis and design of high-performance surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices constructed from piezoelectric and piezomagnetic materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  18. Wave chaos in acoustics and elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Gregor; Soendergaard, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Interpreting wave phenomena in terms of an underlying ray dynamics adds a new dimension to the analysis of linear wave equations. Forming explicit connections between spectra and wavefunctions on the one hand and the properties of a related ray dynamics on the other hand is a comparatively new research area, especially in elasticity and acoustics. The theory has indeed been developed primarily in a quantum context; it is increasingly becoming clear, however, that important applications lie in the field of mechanical vibrations and acoustics. We provide an overview over basic concepts in this emerging field of wave chaos. This ranges from ray approximations of the Green function to periodic orbit trace formulae and random matrix theory and summarizes the state of the art in applying these ideas in acoustics-both experimentally and from a theoretical/numerical point of view. (topical review)

  19. Correspondence between sound propagation in discrete and continuous random media with application to forest acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E; Wilson, D Keith; Muhlestein, Michael B; Attenborough, Keith

    2018-02-01

    Although sound propagation in a forest is important in several applications, there are currently no rigorous yet computationally tractable prediction methods. Due to the complexity of sound scattering in a forest, it is natural to formulate the problem stochastically. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the equations for the statistical moments of the sound field propagating in a forest have the same form as those for sound propagation in a turbulent atmosphere if the scattering properties of the two media are expressed in terms of the differential scattering and total cross sections. Using the existing theories for sound propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, this analogy enables the derivation of several results for predicting forest acoustics. In particular, the second-moment parabolic equation is formulated for the spatial correlation function of the sound field propagating above an impedance ground in a forest with micrometeorology. Effective numerical techniques for solving this equation have been developed in atmospheric acoustics. In another example, formulas are obtained that describe the effect of a forest on the interference between the direct and ground-reflected waves. The formulated correspondence between wave propagation in discrete and continuous random media can also be used in other fields of physics.

  20. The effect of lower-hybrid waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamabata, Hiromitsu; Namikawa, Tomikazu; Mori, Kazuhiro

    1988-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of hydromagnetic waves in a magnetic plasma are investigated using the two-plasma fluid equations including the effect of lower-hybrid waves propagating perpendicularly to the magnetic field. The effect of lower-hybrid waves on the propagation of hydromagnetic waves is analysed in terms of phase speed, growth rate, refractive index, polarization and the amplitude relation between the density perturbation and the magnetic-field perturbation for the cases when hydromagnetic waves propagate in the plane whose normal is perpendicular to both the magnetic field and the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves and in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves. It is shown that hydromagnetic waves propagating at small angles to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves can be excited by the effect of lower-hybrid waves and the energy of excited waves propagates nearly parallel to the propagation direction of lower-hybrid waves. (author)

  1. Propagation characteristics of ion-acoustic double layer in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harvinder Kaur

    2017-07-24

    Jul 24, 2017 ... (mKdV) equation with cubic nonlinearity has been used widely to describe the propagation characteristics of electrostatic double layers in different plasma sys- tems [21–33]. It may further be noted that two-electron species are very common in laboratory [34–38] as well as space plasmas [1]. Ion-acoustic ...

  2. Attenuation compensation in least-squares reverse time migration using the visco-acoustic wave equation

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2013-08-20

    Attenuation leads to distortion of amplitude and phase of seismic waves propagating inside the earth. Conventional acoustic and least-squares reverse time migration do not account for this distortion which leads to defocusing of migration images in highly attenuative geological environments. To account for this distortion, we propose to use the visco-acoustic wave equation for least-squares reverse time migration. Numerical tests on synthetic data show that least-squares reverse time migration with the visco-acoustic wave equation corrects for this distortion and produces images with better balanced amplitudes compared to the conventional approach. © 2013 SEG.

  3. Surface Acoustic Wave Nebulisation Mass Spectrometry for the Fast and Highly Sensitive Characterisation of Synthetic Dyes in Textile Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astefanei, A.; van Bommel, M.; Corthals, G.L.

    2017-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave nebulisation (SAWN) mass spectrometry (MS) is a method to generate gaseous ions compatible with direct MS of minute samples at femtomole sensitivity. To perform SAWN, acoustic waves are propagated through a LiNbO3 sampling chip, and are conducted to the liquid sample, which

  4. Investigation of the Plate Theories Accuracy for the Elastic Wave Propagation Analysis of FGM Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrkash, Milad; Azhari, Mojtaba; Mirdamadi, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The importance of the elastic wave propagation problem in plates arises from application of the elastic waves in non-destructive evaluation of structures. However, precise understanding and analyzing of acoustic guided waves especially in non-homogeneous plates such as functionally graded material ones is so complicated that the exact elastodynamics methods are rarely used in practical applications. Hence, the simple approximate plate theories have attracted much inter...

  5. Dust acoustic shock wave generation due to dust charge variation in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Burger equation. Results of the numerical investigation of the propagation of large-amplitude dust acoustic stationary shock wave are presented here using the complete set of non-linear dust fluid equations coupled with the dust charging equation and Poisson equation. The DA waves are of compressional type showing ...

  6. Dust acoustic shock wave generation due to dust charge variation in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Non-adiabatic charge variation; shock wave. Abstract. In a dusty plasma, the non-adiabaticity of the charge variation on a dust grain surface results in an anomalous dissipation. Analytical investigation shows that this results in a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic (DA) wave propagation which is described by ...

  7. Wave propagation in axially moving periodic strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Vladislav S.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with analytically studying transverse waves propagation in an axially moving string with periodically modulated cross section. The structure effectively models various relevant technological systems, e.g. belts, thread lines, band saws, etc., and, in particular, roller chain drives...... for diesel engines by capturing both their spatial periodicity and axial motion. The Method of Varying Amplitudes is employed in the analysis. It is shown that the compound wave traveling in the axially moving periodic string comprises many components with different frequencies and wavenumbers....... This is in contrast to non-moving periodic structures, for which all components of the corresponding compound wave feature the same frequency. Due to this "multi-frequency" character of the wave motion, the conventional notion of frequency band-gaps appears to be not applicable for the moving periodic strings. Thus...

  8. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S.

    2014-01-01

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence

  9. Nonlinear transient wave propagation in homgeneous plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, K.

    1983-01-01

    The transient phenomena associated with the propagation of nonlinear high frequency waves in homogeneous and isotropic or anisotropic plasma are considered. The basic equation for the different wave types included in this analysis are derived by using a two-fluid description of the plasma. Before discussing the importance of different nonlinearities the main results from a linear treatment are given. Generation of harmonic and local changes in the plasma frequency caused by ponderomotive forces are the nonlinear phenomena which are included in the nonlinear treatment. Generation of harmonics is only important for extraordinary waves and this case is discussed in detail. The density perturbations are described either as forced non-dispersive or as forced dispersive low frequency electrostatic waves. The differences between these two descriptions are first considered analytically then by a numerical analysis of the problem with the influence of the density variations on the propagation of the high frequency wave included. A one-dimensional description is used in all cases. (Auth.)

  10. Pressure wave propagation in sodium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was done on the pressure wave propagation within the pipes and mixture vessel of a termohydraulic loop for thermal shock with sodium. It was used the characteristic method to solve the one-dimensional continuity and momentum equations. The numerical model includes the pipes and the effects of valves and other accidents on pressure losses. The study was based on designer informations and engineering tables. It was evaluated the pressure wave sizes, parametrically as a function of the draining valve closure times. (author) [pt

  11. Seismic Wave Propagation in Layered Viscoelastic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R. D.

    2008-12-01

    Advances in the general theory of wave propagation in layered viscoelastic media reveal new insights regarding seismic waves in the Earth. For example, the theory predicts: 1) P and S waves are predominantly inhomogeneous in a layered anelastic Earth with seismic travel times, particle-motion orbits, energy speeds, Q, and amplitude characteristics that vary with angle of incidence and hence, travel path through the layers, 2) two types of shear waves exist, one with linear and the other with elliptical particle motions each with different absorption coefficients, and 3) surface waves with amplitude and particle motion characteristics not predicted by elasticity, such as Rayleigh-Type waves with tilted elliptical particle motion orbits and Love-Type waves with superimposed sinusoidal amplitude dependencies that decay exponentially with depth. The general theory provides closed-form analytic solutions for body waves, reflection-refraction problems, response of multiple layers, and surface wave problems valid for any material with a viscoelastic response, including the infinite number of models, derivable from various configurations of springs and dashpots, such as elastic, Voight, Maxwell, and Standard Linear. The theory provides solutions independent of the amount of intrinsic absorption and explicit analytic expressions for physical characteristics of body waves in low-loss media such as the deep Earth. The results explain laboratory and seismic observations, such as travel-time and wide-angle reflection amplitude anomalies, not explained by elasticity or one dimensional Q models. They have important implications for some forward modeling and inverse problems. Theoretical advances and corresponding numerical results as recently compiled (Borcherdt, 2008, Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media, Cambridge University Press) will be reviewed.

  12. Wave propagation retrieval method for chiral metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the wave propagation method for the retrieving of effective properties of media with circularly polarized eigenwaves, in particularly for chiral metamaterials. The method is applied for thick slabs and provides bulk effective parameters. Its strong sides are the absence...... of artificial branches of the refractive index and simplicity in implementation. We prove the validity of the method on three case studies of homogeneous magnetized plasma, bi-cross and U-shaped metamaterials....

  13. Effect of non-uniform mean flow field on acoustic propagation problems in computational aeroacoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, Haiqing; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in the presence of a non-uniform mean flow is studied numerically by using two different acoustic propagating models, which solve linearized Euler equations (LEE) and acoustic perturbation equations (APE). As noise induced by turbulent flows often propagates from near field t...

  14. Wave propagation in the magnetosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic procedure is developed for identifying the spatial regimes of various modes of wave propagation in the Jupiter magnetosphere that may be encountered by flyby missions. The Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) diagram of plasma physics is utilized to identify the frequency regimes in which different modes of propagation occur in the magnetoplasma. The Gledhill model and the Ioannidis and Brice model of the magnetoplasma are summarized, and configuration-space CMA diagrams are constructed for each model for frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The distinctive propagation features, the radio noise regimes, and the wave-particle interactions are discussed. It is concluded that the concentration of plasma in the equatorial plane makes this region of vital importance for radio observations with flyby missions. Local radio noise around the electron cyclotron frequency will probably differ appreciably from its terrestrial counterpart due to the lack of field-line guidance. Hydromagnetic wave properties at frequencies near the ion cyclotron frequency and below will probably be similar to the terrestrial case.

  15. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  16. Simulations of Seismic Wave Propagation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdağ, Ebru; Ruan, Youyi; Metthez, Nathan; Khan, Amir; Leng, Kuangdai; van Driel, Martin; Wieczorek, Mark; Rivoldini, Attilio; Larmat, Carène S.; Giardini, Domenico; Tromp, Jeroen; Lognonné, Philippe; Banerdt, Bruce W.

    2017-10-01

    We present global and regional synthetic seismograms computed for 1D and 3D Mars models based on the spectral-element method. For global simulations, we implemented a radially-symmetric Mars model with a 110 km thick crust (Sohl and Spohn in J. Geophys. Res., Planets 102(E1):1613-1635, 1997). For this 1D model, we successfully benchmarked the 3D seismic wave propagation solver SPECFEM3D_GLOBE (Komatitsch and Tromp in Geophys. J. Int. 149(2):390-412, 2002a; 150(1):303-318, 2002b) against the 2D axisymmetric wave propagation solver AxiSEM (Nissen-Meyer et al. in Solid Earth 5(1):425-445, 2014) at periods down to 10 s. We also present higher-resolution body-wave simulations with AxiSEM down to 1 s in a model with a more complex 1D crust, revealing wave propagation effects that would have been difficult to interpret based on ray theory. For 3D global simulations based on SPECFEM3D_GLOBE, we superimposed 3D crustal thickness variations capturing the distinct crustal dichotomy between Mars' northern and southern hemispheres, as well as topography, ellipticity, gravity, and rotation. The global simulations clearly indicate that the 3D crust speeds up body waves compared to the reference 1D model, whereas it significantly changes surface waveforms and their dispersive character depending on its thickness. We also perform regional simulations with the solver SES3D (Fichtner et al. Geophys. J. Int. 179:1703-1725, 2009) based on 3D crustal models derived from surface composition, thereby addressing the effects of various distinct crustal features down to 2 s. The regional simulations confirm the strong effects of crustal variations on waveforms. We conclude that the numerical tools are ready for examining more scenarios, including various other seismic models and sources.

  17. Seismic Wave Propagation on the Tablet Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tablet computers widely used in recent years. The performance of the tablet computer is improving year by year. Some of them have performance comparable to the personal computer of a few years ago with respect to the calculation speed and the memory size. The convenience and the intuitive operation are the advantage of the tablet computer compared to the desktop PC. I developed the iPad application of the numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation. The numerical simulation is based on the 2D finite difference method with the staggered-grid scheme. The number of the grid points is 512 x 384 = 196,608. The grid space is 200m in both horizontal and vertical directions. That is the calculation area is 102km x 77km. The time step is 0.01s. In order to reduce the user waiting time, the image of the wave field is drawn simultaneously with the calculation rather than playing the movie after the whole calculation. P and S wave energies are plotted on the screen every 20 steps (0.2s). There is the trade-off between the smooth simulation and the resolution of the wave field image. In the current setting, it takes about 30s to calculate the 10s wave propagation (50 times image updates). The seismogram at the receiver is displayed below of the wave field updated in real time. The default medium structure consists of 3 layers. The layer boundary is defined by 10 movable points with linear interpolation. Users can intuitively change to the arbitrary boundary shape by moving the point. Also users can easily change the source and the receiver positions. The favorite structure can be saved and loaded. For the advance simulation, users can introduce the random velocity fluctuation whose spectrum can be changed to the arbitrary shape. By using this application, everyone can simulate the seismic wave propagation without the special knowledge of the elastic wave equation. So far, the Japanese version of the application is released on the App Store. Now I am preparing the

  18. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhard Michael Reindl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  19. Interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in a stochastic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, N.; Peterson, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    In the Stanford radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) an electromagnetic signal is made to scatter from a moving acoustic pulse train. Under a Bragg-scatter condition maximum electromagnetic scattering occurs. The scattered radio signal contains temperature and wind information as a function of the acoustic-pulse position. In this investigation RASS performance is assessed in an atmosphere characterized by the presence of turbulence and mean atmospheric parameters. The only assumption made is that the electromagnetic wave is not affected by stochastic perturbations in the atmosphere. It is concluded that the received radio signal depends strongly on the intensity of turbulence for altitudes of the acoustic pulse greater than the coherence length of propagation. The effect of mean vertical wind and mean temperature on the strength of the received signal is also demonstrated to be insignificant. Mean horizontal winds, however, shift the focus of the reflected electromagnetic energy from its origin, resulting in a decrease in received signal level when a monostatic radio-frequency (RF) system is used. For a bistatic radar configuration with space diversified receiving antennas, the shifting of the acoustic pulse makes possible the remote measurement of the horizontal wind component.

  20. Acoustic Wave Filter Technology-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Clemens C W

    2017-09-01

    Today, acoustic filters are the filter technology to meet the requirements with respect to performance dictated by the cellular phone standards and their form factor. Around two billion cellular phones are sold every year, and smart phones are of a very high percentage of approximately two-thirds. Smart phones require a very high number of filter functions ranging from the low double-digit range up to almost triple digit numbers in the near future. In the frequency range up to 1 GHz, surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters are almost exclusively employed, while in the higher frequency range, bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and SAW filters are competing for their shares. Prerequisites for the success of acoustic filters were the availability of high-quality substrates, advanced and highly reproducible fabrication technologies, optimum filter techniques, precise simulation software, and advanced design tools that allow the fast and efficient design according to customer specifications. This paper will try to focus on innovations leading to high volume applications of intermediate frequency (IF) and radio frequency (RF) acoustic filters, e.g., TV IF filters, IF filters for cellular phones, and SAW/BAW RF filters for the RF front-end of cellular phones.

  1. Modeling Propagation of Shock Waves in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W. M.; Molitoris, J. D.

    2006-07-01

    We present modeling results for the propagation of strong shock waves in metals. In particular, we use an arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE3D) code to model the propagation of strong pressure waves (P ˜ 300 to 400 kbars) generated with high explosives in contact with aluminum cylinders. The aluminum cylinders are assumed to be both flat-topped and have large-amplitude curved surfaces. We use 3D Lagrange mechanics. For the aluminum we use a rate-independent Steinberg-Guinan model, where the yield strength and shear modulus depend on pressure, density and temperature. The calculation of the melt temperature is based on the Lindermann law. At melt the yield strength and shear modulus is set to zero. The pressure is represented as a seven-term polynomial as a function of density. For the HMX-based high explosive, we use a JWL, with a program burn model that give the correct detonation velocity and C-J pressure (P ˜ 390 kbars). For the case of the large-amplitude curved surface, we discuss the evolving shock structure in terms of the early shock propagation experiments by Sakharov.

  2. Infrasound propagation in tropospheric ducts and acoustic shadow zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine D

    2017-10-01

    Numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations governing acoustic propagation are performed to investigate infrasound propagation in the troposphere and into acoustic shadow zones. An existing nonlinear finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) solver that constrains input sound speed models to be axisymmetric is expanded to allow for advection and rigid, stair-step topography. The FDTD solver permits realistic computations along a given azimuth. It is applied to several environmental models to examine the effects of nonlinearity, topography, advection, and two-dimensional (2D) variations in wind and sound speeds on the penetration of infrasound into shadow zones. Synthesized waveforms are compared to a recording of a rocket motor fuel elimination event at the Utah Test and Training Range. Results show good agreement in the amplitude, duration, and spectra of synthesized and recorded waveforms for propagation through 2D atmospheric models whether or not topography, advection, or nonlinearity is explicitly included. However, infrasound propagation through a one-dimensional, range-averaged, atmospheric model yields waveforms with lower amplitudes and frequencies, suggesting that small-scale atmospheric variability causes significant scatter within the troposphere, leading to enhanced infrasound penetration into shadow zones. Thus, unresolved fine-scale atmospheric dynamics are not required to explain infrasound propagation into shadow zones.

  3. Special Course on Acoustic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    diffusion term contributes only about Y.5% to the classical absorption in air; the principal components involved are oxygen, nitrogen and argon ...dcl Delcgato Nazionale a1.rAGAR!)Quartier Reane Elitabesli 3, Piazzalle AdenauerR-ic d𔃼:vec, 1140 Bruxelles Roma/EUR CANADA LUXEMBOURG Defence

  4. Interaction of whispering-gallery electromagnetic waves with acoustic waves in tapered quartz rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sychugov, V A; Magdich, L N; Torchigin, V P

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of whispering-gallery waves in a dynamic cavity formed by a tapered quartz rod and the plane interface between two regions of the rod with different refractive indices moving along the axis of the rod is analysed. It is shown that the limiting frequency shift of light in such a cavity is determined by its Q factor and the attainable refractive index discontinuity. The possibility of using acoustic waves for obtaining a dynamic cavity is considered. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Surface Acoustic Waves in ferroelectrics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarasenko A., Nataliya; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Tarasenko, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 298, - (2004), s. 325-333 ISSN 0015-0193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS1010203 Keywords : Rayleigh waves * ferroelectric films * phase transition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.517, year: 2004

  6. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  7. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polzikova, N. I., E-mail: polz@cplire.ru; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P. [Kotel’nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Mokhovaya 11, building 7, Moscow, 125009 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  8. Non-ideal dust acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konefka, F; Contreras, J P; Puerta, J; Castro, E; MartIn, P

    2008-01-01

    The dispersion relation for dust acoustic waves (DA waves) functionally depends on the state equation for the charged dust grains. The ideal gas equation is usually used for studying the effect of temperature on this dispersion relation. However, since the space occupied by the grains can be important in high-density plasmas, the non-ideal effects can be important in this case. This paper analyses the dispersion relation for DA waves, when more precise state equations are used as those described for Pade approximants. The correction to the usual wave equation has been determined and the break point in density, where the ideal gas-state equation has been found. The non-ideal effects are more important for short wavelength ones, and the limits where those effects become important are also studied. Since there are several experimental results for these kinds of waves, the importance of the non-ideal effects in these cases is analysed in detail.

  9. Enhancing propagation characteristics of truncated localized waves in silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-07-01

    The spectral characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica are analyzed. Numerical experiments show that the immunity of the truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica to decay and distortion is enhanced as the non-linearity of the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector gets stronger, in contrast to free-space propagating waves, which suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2011 IEEE.

  10. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E.; Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons at (2.5-3)×vte, where vte ≡ (2Te/me)1/2 is the electron thermal speed. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off-axis (r/a⩾0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established techniques for computing wave propagation and absorption use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions. In typical plasma conditions with electron densities of several 1019 m-3 and toroidal magnetic fields strengths of 4 Telsa, the perpendicular wavelength is of the order of 1 mm and the parallel wavelength is of the order of 1 cm. Even in a relatively small device such as Alcator C-Mod with a minor radius of 22 cm, the number of wavelengths that must be resolved requires large amounts of computational resources for the full wave treatment. These requirements are met with a massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave code that has been adapted specifically for the simulation of LH waves [J. C. Wright, et al., Commun. Comput. Phys., 4, 545 (2008), J. C. Wright, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16 July (2009)]. This model accurately represents the effects of focusing and diffraction that occur in LH propagation. It is also coupled with a Fokker-Planck solver, CQL3D, to provide self-consistent distribution functions for the plasma dielectric as well as a synthetic hard X-ray (HXR) diagnostic for direct comparisons with experimental measurements of LH waves. The wave solutions from the TORIC-LH zero FLR model will be compared to the results from ray tracing from the GENRAY/CQL3D code via the synthetic HXR diagnostic and power deposition.

  11. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J. C.; Bonoli, P. T.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E.; Harvey, R. W.

    2009-01-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons at (2.5-3)xv te , where v te ≡ (2T e /m e ) 1/2 is the electron thermal speed. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off-axis (r/a≥0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established techniques for computing wave propagation and absorption use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions.In typical plasma conditions with electron densities of several 10 19 m -3 and toroidal magnetic fields strengths of 4 Telsa, the perpendicular wavelength is of the order of 1 mm and the parallel wavelength is of the order of 1 cm. Even in a relatively small device such as Alcator C-Mod with a minor radius of 22 cm, the number of wavelengths that must be resolved requires large amounts of computational resources for the full wave treatment. These requirements are met with a massively parallel version of the TORIC full wave code that has been adapted specifically for the simulation of LH waves [J. C. Wright, et al., Commun. Comput. Phys., 4, 545 (2008), J. C. Wright, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16 July (2009)]. This model accurately represents the effects of focusing and diffraction that occur in LH propagation. It is also coupled with a Fokker-Planck solver, CQL3D, to provide self-consistent distribution functions for the plasma dielectric as well as a synthetic hard X-ray (HXR) diagnostic for direct comparisons with experimental measurements of LH waves.The wave solutions from the TORIC-LH zero FLR model will be compared to the results from ray tracing from the GENRAY/CQL3D code via the synthetic HXR diagnostic and power deposition.

  12. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes equations approach to acoustic propagation in flow ducts with sharp edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Axel; Boij, Susann; Efraimsson, Gunilla

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic wave propagation in flow ducts is commonly modeled with time-domain non-linear Navier-Stokes equation methodologies. To reduce computational effort, investigations of a linearized approach in frequency domain are carried out. Calculations of sound wave propagation in a straight duct are presented with an orifice plate and a mean flow present. Results of transmission and reflections at the orifice are presented on a two-port scattering matrix form and are compared to measurements with good agreement. The wave propagation is modeled with a frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes equation methodology. This methodology is found to be efficient for cases where the acoustic field does not alter the mean flow field, i.e., when whistling does not occur.

  13. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  14. Asymmetric transmission of acoustic waves in a layer thickness distribution gradient structure using metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-San Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research presents an innovative asymmetric transmission design using alternate layers of water and metamaterial with complex mass density. The directional transmission behavior of acoustic waves is observed numerically inside the composite structure with gradient layer thickness distribution and the rectifying performance of the present design is evaluated. The layer thickness distributions with arithmetic and geometric gradients are considered and the effect of gradient thickness on asymmetric wave propagation is systematically investigated using finite element simulation. The numerical results indicate that the maximum pressure density and transmission through the proposed structure are significantly influenced by the wave propagation direction over a wide range of audible frequencies. Tailoring the thickness of the layered structure enables the manipulation of asymmetric wave propagation within the desired frequency range. In conclusion, the proposed design offers a new possibility for developing directional-dependent acoustic devices.

  15. A Variational Formulation for the Finite Element Analysis of Sound Wave Propagation in a Spherical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiedzik, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Development of design tools to furnish optimal acoustic environments for lightweight aircraft demands the ability to simulate the acoustic system on a workstation. In order to form an effective mathematical model of the phenomena at hand, we have begun by studying the propagation of acoustic waves inside closed spherical shells. Using a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction model based upon variational principles, we have written a finite element analysis program and are in the process of examining several test cases. Future investigations are planned to increase model accuracy by incorporating non-linear and viscous effects.

  16. Simulation of acoustic-gravity waves from atmospheric pressure variations and their influence on the high atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdyaeva, Yuliya; Kshevetskii, Sergey; Gavrilov, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    The processes of heating/cooling gas during phase transitions of water are one of the most important energy sources of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere. Meteorological wave sources are very diverse and have complex, evolving spatial structure. The available experimental data are usually not enough for a detailed description of these wave sources. Therefore, modeling of acoustic-gravity waves from meteorological sources is challenging. The waves propagated from meteorological sources affect the atmospheric pressure. The atmospheric pressure variations with frequencies of acoustic-gravity wave spectrum are well recorded with microbarographs. It is interesting to use these experimental data, atmospheric pressure variations, for simulation of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere. The hydrodynamic problem of propagation of acoustic-gravity waves from atmospheric pressure variations given on the Earth's surface is set and studied. It is shown that the solution of this boundary problem is completely determined by the pressure field. The numerical method for solving the problem is suggested. The program is tested by comparison of numerical simulations with known analytical solutions. The simulation of acoustic-gravity waves propagated from atmospheric pressure variation experimentally observed with microbarographs is performed. The effects of waves generated by atmospheric pressure variations in the atmosphere are investigated.

  17. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in MCF7 cell modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) in MCF7 cell modules (comprised of MCF7 cells and collagen) and based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with an OCT swept source wavelength sweep imaging system. Acoustic radiation force was applied to the MCF7 cell constructs. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the acoustic radiation force, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these modules. The OCT phase maps are acquired with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. We also calculated the tissue mechanical properties based on the propagating shear waves in the MCF7 + collagen phantoms using the Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) of an ultrasound transducer, and measured the shear wave speed with the OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future studies of mechanical property measurements of breast cancer structures, with applications in the study of breast cancer pathologies.

  18. Non-Linear Excitation of Ion Acoustic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Hirsfield, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The excitation of ion acoustic waves by nonlinear coupling of two transverse magnetic waves generated in a microwave cavity was investigated. Measurements of the wave amplitude showed good agreement with calculations based on the Vlasov equation.......The excitation of ion acoustic waves by nonlinear coupling of two transverse magnetic waves generated in a microwave cavity was investigated. Measurements of the wave amplitude showed good agreement with calculations based on the Vlasov equation....

  19. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  20. Eulerian Simulation of Acoustic Waves Over Long Range in Realistic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, Subhashini; Steinhoff, John

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for computation of long-range acoustics. The approach is a hybrid of near and far-field methods, and is unique in its Eulerian treatment of the far-field propagation. The near-field generated by any existing method to project an acoustic solution onto a spherical surface that surrounds a source. The acoustic field on this source surface is then extended to an arbitrarily large distance in an inhomogeneous far-field. This would normally require an Eulerian solution of the wave equation. However, conventional Eulerian methods have prohibitive grid requirements. This problem is overcome by using a new method, ``Wave Confinement'' (WC) that propagates wave-identifying phase fronts as nonlinear solitary waves that live on grid indefinitely. This involves modification of wave equation by the addition of a nonlinear term without changing the basic conservation properties of the equation. These solitary waves can then be used to ``carry'' the essential integrals of the acoustic wave. For example, arrival time, centroid position and other properties that are invariant as the wave passes a grid point. Because of this property the grid can be made as coarse as necessary, consistent with overall accuracy to resolve atmospheric/ground variations. This work is being funded by the U.S. Army under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (contract number: # W911W6-12-C-0036). The authors would like to thank Dr. Frank Caradonna and Dr. Ben W. Sim for this support.

  1. Wave propagation in a magnetically structured atmosphere. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic fields may introduce structure (inhomogeneity) into an otherwise uniform medium and thus change the nature of wave propagation in that medium. As an example of such structuring, wave propagation in an isolated magnetic slab is considered. It is supposed that disturbances outside the slab are laterally non-propagating. The effect of gravity is ignored. The field can support the propagation of both body and surface waves. The existence and nature of these waves depends upon the relative magnitudes of the sound speed c 0 and Alfven speed upsilonsub(A) inside the slab, and the sound speed csub(e) in the field-free environment. (orig./WL)

  2. Love wave propagation in functionally graded piezoelectric material layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianke; Jin, Xiaoying; Wang, Ji; Xian, Kai

    2007-03-01

    An exact approach is used to investigate Love waves in functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) layer bonded to a semi-infinite homogeneous solid. The piezoelectric material is polarized in z-axis direction and the material properties change gradually with the thickness of the layer. We here assume that all material properties of the piezoelectric layer have the same exponential function distribution along the x-axis direction. The analytical solutions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrically open or short circuit conditions. The effects of the gradient variation of material constants on the phase velocity, the group velocity, and the coupled electromechanical factor are discussed in detail. The displacement, electric potential, and stress distributions along thickness of the graded layer are calculated and plotted. Numerical examples indicate that appropriate gradient distributing of the material properties make Love waves to propagate along the surface of the piezoelectric layer, or a bigger electromechanical coupling factor can be obtained, which is in favor of acquiring a better performance in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices.

  3. Surface acoustic wave actuated cell sorting (SAWACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, T; Braunmüller, S; Schmid, L; Wixforth, A; Weitz, D A

    2010-03-21

    We describe a novel microfluidic cell sorter which operates in continuous flow at high sorting rates. The device is based on a surface acoustic wave cell-sorting scheme and combines many advantages of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence activated droplet sorting (FADS) in microfluidic channels. It is fully integrated on a PDMS device, and allows fast electronic control of cell diversion. We direct cells by acoustic streaming excited by a surface acoustic wave which deflects the fluid independently of the contrast in material properties of deflected objects and the continuous phase; thus the device underlying principle works without additional enhancement of the sorting by prior labelling of the cells with responsive markers such as magnetic or polarizable beads. Single cells are sorted directly from bulk media at rates as fast as several kHz without prior encapsulation into liquid droplet compartments as in traditional FACS. We have successfully directed HaCaT cells (human keratinocytes), fibroblasts from mice and MV3 melanoma cells. The low shear forces of this sorting method ensure that cells survive after sorting.

  4. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with two-temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. By using reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma (containing a negatively charged dust fluid, Boltzmann distributed electrons and two-temperature nonthermal ions) is investigated. The effects of two-temperature nonthermal ions on the basic properties of ...

  5. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron–positron–ion–dust plasmas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-09-19

    Sep 19, 2014 ... Abstract. Propagation of small but finite nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma, which consists of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively charged dust particles with different sizes and masses. A Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (KP) equation is obtained by ...

  6. Electromagnetic wave propagation in relativistic magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, I.

    1985-01-01

    An improved mathematical technique and a new code for deriving the conductivity tensor for collisionless plasmas have been developed. The method is applicable to a very general case, including both hot (relativistic) and cold magnetized plasmas, with only isotropic equilibrium distributions being considered here. The usual derivation starts from the relativistic Vlasov equation and leads to an integration over an infinite sum of Bessel functions which has to be done numerically. In the new solution the integration is carried out over a product of two Bessel functions only. This reduces the computing time very significantly. An added advantage over existing codes is our capability to perform the computations for waves propagating obliquely to the magnetic field. Both improvements greatly facilitate investigations of properties of the plasma under conditions hitherto unexplored

  7. Wave propagation in heterogeneous excitable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, I.; Engel, H.

    1998-04-01

    Heterogeneities deeply affect pulse dynamics in excitable media. In one dimension, spatially periodic variation of the excitation threshold leads to a characteristic dependence of the propagation speed on the modulation period d with a maximum at a certain optimal value dopt. The maximum speed may be larger than the pulse velocity in an effective homogeneous medium. In two dimensions, the geometry and size of heterogeneities determine the wave dynamics. For example, an excitability distribution made of oblique stripes with different angles of inclination can result in a speedup or a slowdown of the pulse. The calculations are carried out with a modified Oregonator model for light-sensitive Belouzov-Zhabotinskii media where a heterogeneous distribution of excitability can be achieved by inhomogeneous illumination. Nevertheless, the results do not depend on the details of the local kinetics, but apply to the general case of excitable media.

  8. Acoustic Environment of Haro Strait: Preliminary Propagation Modeling and Data Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Christopher D; Wolfson, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Field measurements and acoustic propagation modeling for the frequency range 1 10 kHz are combined to analyze the acoustic environment of Haro Strait of Puget Sound, home to the southern resident killer whales...

  9. Evanescent Acoustic Wave Scattering by Targets and Diffraction by Ripples Graduate Traineeship Award in Ocean Acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osterhoudt, Curtis F; Marston, Philip L

    2007-01-01

    .... The purpose of his research was to improve the understanding of the way that acoustic evanescent waves interact with targets buried in sediments in situations encountered in underwater acoustics...

  10. Synthetic modelling of acoustical propagation applied to seismic oceanography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormann, Jean; Cobo, Pedro; Biescas, Berta; Sallarés, Valentí; Papenberg, Cord; Recuero, Manuel; Carbonell, Ramón

    2010-03-01

    Recent work shows that multichannel seismic (MCS) systems provide detailed information on the oceans' finestructure. The aim of this paper is to analyze if high order numerical algorithms are suitable to accurately model the extremely weak wavefield scattered by the oceans' finestructures. For this purpose, we generate synthetic shot records along a coincident seismic and oceanographic profile acquired across a Mediterranean salt lens in the Gulf of Cadiz. We apply a 2D finite-difference time-domain propagation model, together with second-order Complex Frequency Shifted Perfectly Matched Layers at the numerical boundaries, using as reference a realistic sound speed map with the lateral resolution of the seismic data. We show that our numerical propagator creates an acoustical image of the ocean finestructures including the salt lens that reproduces with outstanding detail the real acquired one.

  11. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  12. Mathematical problems in wave propagation theory

    CERN Document Server

    1970-01-01

    The papers comprising this collection are directly or indirectly related to an important branch of mathematical physics - the mathematical theory of wave propagation and diffraction. The paper by V. M. Babich is concerned with the application of the parabolic-equation method (of Academician V. A. Fok and M. A, Leontovich) to the problem of the asymptotic behavior of eigenfunc­ tions concentrated in a neighborhood of a closed geodesie in a Riemannian space. The techniques used in this paper have been föund useful in solving certain problems in the theory of open resonators. The topic of G. P. Astrakhantsev's paper is similar to that of the paper by V. M. Babich. Here also the parabolic-equation method is used to find the asymptotic solution of the elasticity equations which describes Love waves concentrated in a neighborhood of some surface ray. The paper of T. F. Pankratova is concerned with finding the asymptotic behavior of th~ eigenfunc­ tions of the Laplace operator from the exact solution for the surf...

  13. Transmission experiment by the simulated LMFBR model and propagation analysis of acoustic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Yasuda, Tsutomu; Araki, Hitoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Acoustic transducers to detect a boiling of sodium may be installed in the upper structure and at the upper position of reactor vessel wall under constricted conditions. A set of the experiments of transmission of acoustic vibration to various points of the vessel was performed utilizing the half scale-hydraulic flow test facility simulating reactor vessel over the frequency range 20 kHz -- 100 kHz. Acoustic signals from an installed sound source in the core were measured at each point by both hydrophones in the vessel and vibration pickups on the vessel wall. In these experiments transmission of signals to each point of detectors were clearly observed to background noise level. These data have been summarized in terms of the transmission loss and furthermore are compared with background noise level of flow to estimate the feasibility of detection of sodium boiling sound. The ratio of signal to noise was obtained to be about 13 dB by hydrophone in the upper structure, 8 dB by accelerometer and 16 dB by AE-sensor at the upper position on the vessel in experiments used the simulation model. Sound waves emanated due to sodium boiling also propagate along the wall of the vessel may be predicted theoretically. The result of analysis suggests a capability of detection at the upper position of the reactor vessel wall. Leaky Lamb waves of the first symmetric (L 1 ) and of the antisymmetric (F 1 ) mode and shear horizontal wave (SH) have been derived in light of the attenuation due to coupling to liquid sodium as the traveling modes over the frequency range 10 kHz -- 100 kHz up to 50 mm in thickness of the vessel wall. Leaky Lamb wave (L 1 ) and (SH) mode have been proposed theoretically on the some assumption to be most available to detect the boiling sound of sodium propagating along the vessel wall. (author)

  14. Instrumentation Suite for Acoustic Propagation Measurements in Complex Shallow Water Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Obtain at-sea measurements to test theoretical and modeling predictions of acoustic propagation in dynamic, inhomogeneous, and nonisotropic shallow water...

  15. Controlling the transmission of ultrahigh frequency bulk acoustic waves in silicon by 45° mirrors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengxiang; Gao, Jiaming; Carlier, Julien; Campistron, Pierre; NDieguene, Assane; Guo, Shishang; Matar, Olivier Bou; Dorothee, Debavelaere-Callens; Nongaillard, Bertrand

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a feasible microsystem in which the direction of localized ultrahigh frequency (∼1GHz) bulk acoustic wave can be controlled in a silicon wafer. Deep etching technology on the silicon wafer makes it possible to achieve high aspect ratio etching patterns which can be used to control bulk acoustic wave to transmit in the directions parallel to the surface of the silicon wafer. Passive 45° mirror planes obtained by wet chemical etching were employed to reflect the bulk acoustic wave. Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film transducers were deposited by radio frequency sputtering with a thickness of about 1μm on the other side of the wafer, which act as emitter/receptor after aligned with the mirrors. Two opponent vertical mirrors were inserted between the 45° mirrors to guide the transmission of the acoustic waves. The propagation of the bulk acoustic wave was studied with simulations and the characterization of S(21) scattering parameters, indicating that the mirrors were efficient to guide bulk acoustic waves in the silicon wafer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cylindrical and spherical soliton collision of electron-acoustic waves in non-Maxwellian plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.; Moslem, W. M.; Elghmaz, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    Generation of quasielastic electron-acoustic (EA) waves head-on collision are investigated in non-planar (cylindrical/spherical) plasma composed of cold electrons fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. The cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations describing two bidirectional EA waves are derived and solved analytically. Numerical investigation have shown that only positive electron-acoustic (EA) structures can propagate and collide. The analytical phase shift |Δ A | due to the non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons is different from the Maxwellian case. Both the hot-to-cold electron number density ratio α and nonthermal parameter β have opposite effect on the phase shift behavior. The phase shift of the spherical EA waves is smaller than the cylindrical case, which indicates that the former is more stable for collision. The relevance of the present study to EA waves propagating in the Earth's auroral zone is highlighted.

  17. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pencheva, M; Benova, E; Zhelyazkov, I

    2007-01-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance

  18. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v vphvph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  19. Coupling of acoustic waves to clouds in the jovian troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulme, Patrick; Mosser, Benoît

    2005-11-01

    Seismology is the best tool for investigating the interior structure of stars and giant planets. This paper deals with a photometric study of jovian global oscillations. The propagation of acoustic waves in the jovian troposphere is revisited in order to estimate their effects on the planetary albedo. According to the standard model of the jovian cloud structure there are three major ice cloud layers (e.g., [Atreya et al., 1999. A comparison of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn: Deep atmospheric composition, cloud structure, vertical mixing, and origin. Planet Space Sci. 47, 1243-1262]). We consider only the highest layers, composed of ammonia ice, in the region where acoustic waves are trapped in Jupiter's atmosphere. For a vertical wave propagating in a plane parallel atmosphere with an ammonia ice cloud layer, we calculate first the relative variations of the reflected solar flux due to the smooth oscillations at about the ppm level. We then determine the phase transitions induced by the seismic waves in the clouds. These phase changes, linked to ice particle growth, are limited by kinetics. A Mie model [Mishchenko et al., 2002. Scattering, Absorption, and Emission of Light by Small Particles. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, pp. 158-190] coupled with a simple radiation transfer model allows us to estimate that the albedo fluctuations of the cloud perturbed by a seismic wave reach relative variations of 70 ppm for a 3-mHz wave. This albedo fluctuation is amplified by a factor of ˜70 relative to the previously published estimates that exclude the effect of the wave on cloud properties. Our computed amplifications imply that jovian oscillations can be detected with very precise photometry, as proposed by the microsatellite JOVIS project, which is dedicated to photometric seismology [Mosser et al., 2004. JOVIS: A microsatellite dedicated to the seismic analysis of Jupiter. In: Combes, F., Barret, D., Contini, T., Meynadier, F., Pagani, L. (Eds.), SF2A-2004

  20. Study of ultrasonic propagation through vortices for acoustic monitoring of high-temperature and turbulent fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massacret, Nicolas; Moysan, Joseph; Ploix, Marie-Aude; Chaouch, Naim; Jeannot, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic monitoring in high temperature fluids with turbulences requires the knowledge of wave propagation in such media and the development of simulation tools. Applications could be the monitoring of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The objectives are mainly acoustic telemetry and thermometry, which involve the propagation of ultrasounds in turbulent and heated sodium flows. We developed a ray-tracing model to simulate the wave propagation and to determine wave deviations and delays due to an inhomogeneous medium. In previous work we demonstrated the sensitivity of ultrasounds to temperature gradients in liquid sodium. To complete that study, we need to investigate the sensitivity of ultrasounds to vortices created in a moving fluid. We designed a specific experimental setup called IKHAR (Instabilities of Kelvin-Helmholtz for Acoustic Research) in order to assess the validity of the ray-tracing model and the potential of ultrasounds for monitoring such fluid. In this experiment, Von Karman instabilities were created in a flow of water. Fluid temperature was homogeneous in our experimental setup. Through a careful choice of the parameters, periodic vortices were generated. The experiment was also simulated using Comsol registered to allow discussion about repeatability. The throughtransmission method was used to measure wave delays due to the vortices. Arrays of transducers were used to measure time of flight variations of several nanoseconds with a high spatial resolution. Results were similar to simulation results. They demonstrate that beam delays due to vortices can be measured and confirm the potential of ultrasounds in monitoring very inhomogeneous fluid media such as liquid sodium used as coolant fluid in nuclear fast reactors.

  1. Topology Optimization in wave-propagation and flow problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Gersborg-Hansen, A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss recent extensions of the topology optimization method to wave-propagation and flow problems. More specifically, we optimize material distribution in scalar wave propagation problems modelled by Helmholtz equation. Moreover, we investigate the influence of the inertia term on the optimal...

  2. Models for seismic wave propagation in periodically layered porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudarova, A.; Van Dalen, K.N.; Drijkoningen, G.G.

    2014-01-01

    Several models are discussed for seismic wave propagation in periodically layered poroelastic media where layers represent mesoscopic-scale heterogeneities that are larger than the pore and grain sizes but smaller than the wavelength. The layers behave according to Biot’s theory. Wave propagation

  3. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.; Luding, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed in dense granular media with a narrow polydisperse size-distribution and a linear contact-force law. A small perturbation is created on one side of a static packing and its propagation, for both P- and S-waves, is examined. A size variation

  4. Wave Packet Propagation and Electric Conductivity of Nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maeda, Munehiko; Saito, Keiji; Miyashita, Seiji; Raedt, Hans De

    2004-01-01

    We compute the electric conductivity of nanowires in the presence of magnetic domain walls by the method of wave packet propagation. We demonstrate that the propagation through the wire depends on the initial state used in the wave packet simulation. We propose a procedure, based on the Landauer

  5. Analysis of flexural wave propagation in poroelastic composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wave propagation in an infinitely long poroelastic composite hollow cylinder in is examined by employing Biot's theory of wave propagation in poroelastic media. A poroelastic composite hollow cylinder consists of two concentric poroelastic cylindrical layers both of which are made of different poroelastic materials with each ...

  6. Guiding and confinement of interface acoustic waves in solid-fluid pillar-based phononic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Mohd Razip Wee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pillar-based phononic crystals exhibit some unique wave phenomena due to the interaction between surface acoustic modes of the substrate and local resonances supported by pillars. In this paper, we extend the investigations by taking into account the presence of a liquid medium. We particularly demonstrate that local resonances dramatically decrease the phase velocity of Scholte-Stoneley wave, which leads to a slow wave at the solid/fluid interface. Moreover, we show that increasing the height of pillars introduces a new set of branches of interface modes and drastically affects the acoustic energy localization. Indeed, while some modes display a highly confined pressure between pillars, others exponentially decay in the fluid or only propagate in the solid without disturbing the fluid pressure. These theoretical results, performed by finite element method, highlight a new acoustic wave confinement suitable in various applications such as acoustophoresis, lab on chip and microfluidics.

  7. Universal morphologies of fluid interfaces deformed by the radiation pressure of acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, N; Chraïbi, H; Wunenburger, R; Delville, J-P; Brasselet, E

    2012-12-14

    We unveil the generation of universal morphologies of fluid interfaces by radiation pressure regardless of the nature of the wave, whether acoustic or optical. Experimental observations reveal interface deformations endowed with steplike features that are shown to result from the interplay between the wave propagation and the shape of the interface. The results are supported by numerical simulations and a quantitative interpretation based on the waveguiding properties of the field is provided.

  8. Acoustic Wave in a Dusty Plasma with Frequent Grain Charging Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee J.; Cho, Sang-Hoon

    2003-01-01

    The sink terms in the electron and ion continuity equations and the frictional terms in the momentum equations of a dusty plasma are obtained by taking moments of a kinetic equation which takes into account the grain charging collisions by electrons and ions. We show that an acoustic wave can propagate as a normal mode in the parameter regime where the frequencies of charging collisions are much greater than the wave frequency

  9. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  10. Wave propagation in plasma-filled wave-guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leprince, Philippe

    1966-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of wave propagation along a plasma column without external magnetic field. The author first present and comment various theoretical results, and dispersion curves plotted for the main modes (particularly, the bipolar mode). He tries to define fundamental magnitudes which characterise a plasma-filled wave-guide. He reports the comparison of some experimental results with the previous theoretical results. Based on the study of the bipolar mode, the author develops a method of measurement of plasma column density. In the last part, the author reports the study of the resonance of a plasma-containing cavity. Several resonances are highlighted and new dispersion curves are plotted by using a varying length cavity. He also addresses the coupling of plasma modes with guide modes, and thus indicates the shape of Brillouin diagrams for a plasma-filled wave-guide. Moreover, some phenomena highlighted during plasma column density measurements by using the cavity method could then be explained [fr

  11. Wave propagation in damage assessment of ground anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, B.; Rucka, M.

    2015-07-01

    The inspection possibilities of ground anchors are limited to destructive test such as pull-out test. Guided wave propagation gives an opportunity to develop an inspection system dedicated to determine the condition of inspected element without violation of their integrity. In this paper the experimental study on wave propagation in laboratory models of ground anchors are presented. Experiments were conducted for different bonding lengths and different frequencies of excitation. Waves were generated by a piezoelectric actuator and the laser vibrometry technique was used to register velocity signals. For all tested anchors it was possible to identify the boundary between steel and concrete based on the registered reflections in wave propagation signals.

  12. Nucleus-acoustic shock waves in white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannat, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The nucleus-acoustic shock waves (NASWs) propagating in a white dwarf plasma system, which contain non-relativistically or ultrarelativistically degenerate electrons, non-relativistically degenerate, viscous fluid of light nuclei, and immobile nuclei of heavy elements, have been theoretically investigated. We have used the reductive perturbation method, which is valid for small but finite-amplitude NASWs to derive the Burgers equation. The NASWs are, in fact, associated with the nucleus-acoustic (NA) waves in which the inertia is provided by the light nuclei, and restoring force is provided by the degenerate pressure of electrons. On the other hand, the stationary heavy nuclei participate only in maintaining the background charge neutrality condition at equilibrium. It is found that the viscous force acting in the fluid of light nuclei is a source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of NASWs. It is also observed that the basic features (polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the NASWs are significantly modified by the presence of heavy nuclei, and that NASWs are formed with either positive or negative potential depending on the values of the charge density of the heavy nuclei. The basic properties are also found to be significantly modified by the effects of ultrarelativistically degenerate electrons. The implications of our results in white dwarfs are briefly discussed.

  13. Anomalous width variation of rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves in the context of auroral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Ghosh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of dynamic, large amplitude solitary waves in the auroral regions of space is well known. Since their velocities are of the order of the ion acoustic speed, they may well be considered as being generated from the nonlinear evolution of ion acoustic waves. However, they do not show the expected width-amplitude correlation for K-dV solitons. Recent POLAR observations have actually revealed that the low altitude rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves are associated with an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. This indicates that a weakly nonlinear theory is not appropriate to describe the solitary structures in the auroral regions. In the present work, a fully nonlinear analysis based on Sagdeev pseudopotential technique has been adopted for both parallel and oblique propagation of rarefactive solitary waves in a two electron temperature multi-ion plasma. The large amplitude solutions have consistently shown an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. The width-amplitude variation profile of obliquely propagating rarefactive solitary waves in a magnetized plasma have been compared with the recent POLAR observations. The width-amplitude variation pattern is found to fit well with the analytical results. It indicates that a fully nonlinear theory of ion acoustic solitary waves may well explain the observed anomalous width variations of large amplitude structures in the auroral region.

  14. Sound radiation from an infinite elastic cylinder with dual-wave propagation-intensity distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation of sound from an elastic cylindrical shell filled with fluid and supporting multiwave propagation is studied analytically. Combinations of supersonic and subsonic shell waves are considered. The radiated field is mapped by using acoustic intensity vectors evaluated at various locations. Both time averaged and instantaneous intensity are investigated. The acoustic intensity is seen to vary markedly with axial distance down the cylinder. The effect is shown to be associated with cross terms in the intensity relations, and its magnitude and location to depend upon the relative phase and amplitudes of individual waves. Subsonic shell waves are demonstrated to interact strongly with supersonic shell waves to cause a large modification in the radiated intensity distributions near the shell surface.

  15. Field experiments to determine wave propagation principles and mechanical properties of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Stephan; Gebhard, Felix; Dual, Jürg; Schweizer, Jürg

    2017-04-01

    To understand the release of snow avalanches by explosions one needs to know how acoustic waves travel above and within the snowpack. Hitherto, wave propagation was investigated in the laboratory with small samples or in the field in the shock wave region. We developed a measurement system and layout to derive wave attenuation in snow, wave speeds and elastic moduli on small-scale (1-2 m) field experiments to close the gap between the lab scale (0.1 m) and the scale of artificial release (10-100 m). We used solid explosives and hammer blows to create the load and accelerometers to measure the resulting wave within the snowpack. The strong attenuation we observed indicates that we measured the second longitudinal wave which propagates through the pore space. The wave speeds, however, corresponded to the speeds of the first longitudinal wave within the ice skeleton. The elastic moduli were high on the order of several tens of MPa for lower densities (150 kg m-3) and agreed well with earlier lab studies, in particular for the higher densities 250-400 kg m-3). However, the scatter was rather large as expected for in-situ experiments in the layered snow cover. In addition, we measured accelerations during propagation saw test experiments. The propagation of cracks during this type of snow instability test has mainly been studied by analysing the bending of the slab (due to the saw cut) using particle tracking velocimetry. We used the accelerometers to measure crack propagation speeds. The wave speeds were slightly higher for most experiments than reported previously. Furthermore, in some experiments, we encountered to different wave types with one propagating at a higher speed. This finding may be interpreted as the actual crack propagation and the settling of the weak layer (collapse wave). Our results show that field measurements of propagation properties are feasible and that crack propagation as observed during propagation saw tests may involve different processes

  16. PIC simulation of compressive and rarefactive dust ion-acoustic solitary waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhong-Zheng; Zhang, Heng; Hong, Xue-Ren; Gao, Dong-Ning; Zhang, Jie; Duan, Wen-Shan, E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU & IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yang, Lei, E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU & IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The nonlinear propagations of dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a collisionless four-component unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing nonextensive electrons, inertial negative ions, Maxwellian positive ions, and negatively charged static dust grains have been investigated by the particle-in-cell method. By comparing the simulation results with those obtained from the traditional reductive perturbation method, it is observed that the rarefactive KdV solitons propagate stably at a low amplitude, and when the amplitude is increased, the prime wave form evolves and then gradually breaks into several small amplitude solitary waves near the tail of soliton structure. The compressive KdV solitons propagate unstably and oscillation arises near the tail of soliton structure. The finite amplitude rarefactive and compressive Gardner solitons seem to propagate stably.

  17. Brillouin scattering study of surface acoustic waves in crystalline GaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuk, J.; Kiefte, H.; Clouter, M. J.

    1992-10-01

    Surface acoustic modes in GaP crystals have been observed and identified using the technique of high-contrast Brillouin spectroscopy. Surface acoustic wave velocities were determined for (100) GaP in different directions of wave propagation. The values of the velocities are: 3250 m/s in the [010] direction and 3467 m/s in the [011] direction on the (100) GaP surface. These results are discussed and compared with theoretical calculations and with similar measurements in GaAs and Si.

  18. Traveling neutral disturbances. [acoustic-gravity wave coupling to minor species in atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, S. H.; Eun, H.

    1976-01-01

    The coupling of acoustic-gravity waves in the main atmosphere to acoustic waves characteristic of individual minor species in the atmosphere is postulated. Such coupling would exist as a result of resonances in the response of the minor species, and its likelihood depends on the mass of the atmospheric particle relative to the major species mass, the diffusion of the minor species, and the direction of propagation of the main disturbance. These minor-species disturbances may explain some AE-C measurements in the thermosphere and could possibly play a role in the distribution of minor species and their chemistry in the mesosphere.

  19. Acoustic Full Waveform Inversion using the Pure Acoustic Wave Equation in VTI Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Yonghwan; Seol, Soon Jee; Byun, Joongmoo

    2015-04-01

    During the past several decades, full waveform inversion (FWI) has received considerable attention for the high resolution imaging of complex media in seismic exploration applications. After its introduction in the 1980s, several researchers endeavored to develop a more practical and robust FWI algorithm based on recent advancements in computer performance. However, the computational cost of FWI is extremely high in modern acquisitions with high-fold, dense sources and receivers and wide azimuthal coverage. Moreover, the intrinsic non-linearity, ill-posedness, and possibility of being trapped in local minima must be addressed to consider multiparameter FWI in an anisotropic media. In this study, a pure-acoustic wave modeling algorithm using a modified cell-based method was developed as a modeling engine for FWI, and the developed pure acoustic algorithm was used to simulate P-wave propagation in VTI media without generating any S-wave artifacts. For efficient anisotropic inversion, a FWI algorithm that uses the plane-wave approach and a multifrequency simultaneous inversion method were also developed. The computational cost of FWI can be effectively reduced by using the proposed FWI algorithm. To overcome the intrinsic problems of the multiparameter FWI, a hybrid inversion strategy consisting of monoparameter and multiparameter FWI was suggested based on the sensitivity analysis according to the ray parameter range. In the developed hybrid FWI, the vertical velocity, which has a major influence on the data, is first estimated using the monoparameter FWI scheme. In the second stage, joint updates of the vertical and horizontal wave speeds without a lower absolute value of the ray parameter are performed using the multiparameter FWI scheme. By applying the suggested FWI strategy, both the vertical and horizontal velocities were reconstructed properly for the complex model and fault model, and the root mean square (RMS) error curves converged steadily to lower values

  20. Calculation of surface acoustic waves in a multilayered piezoelectric structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuwei; Wen Zhiyu; Hu Jing

    2013-01-01

    The propagation properties of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in a ZnO—SiO 2 —Si multilayered piezoelectric structure are calculated by using the recursive asymptotic method. The phase velocities and the electromechanical coupling coefficients for the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave in the different ZnO—SiO 2 —Si structures are calculated and analyzed. The Love mode wave is found to be predominantly generated since the c-axis of the ZnO film is generally perpendicular to the substrate. In order to prove the calculated results, a Love mode SAW device based on the ZnO—SiO 2 —Si multilayered structure is fabricated by micromachining, and its frequency responses are detected. The experimental results are found to be mainly consistent with the calculated ones, except for the slightly larger velocities induced by the residual stresses produced in the fabrication process of the films. The deviation of the experimental results from the calculated ones is reduced by thermal annealing. (semiconductor physics)

  1. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Tantawy, S. A., E-mail: samireltantawy@yahoo.com; El-Awady, E. I., E-mail: eielawady@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Tribeche, M., E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Plasma Physics Group, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  2. A wave propagation matrix method in semiclassical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Takigawa, N.

    1977-05-01

    A wave propagation matrix method is used to derive the semiclassical formulae of the multiturning point problem. A phase shift matrix and a barrier transformation matrix are introduced to describe the processes of a particle travelling through a potential well and crossing a potential barrier respectively. The wave propagation matrix is given by the products of phase shift matrices and barrier transformation matrices. The method to study scattering by surface transparent potentials and the Bloch wave in solids is then applied

  3. Surface acoustic wave micromotor with arbitrary axis rotational capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjeung, Ricky T.; Hughes, Mark S.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2011-11-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) actuated rotary motor is reported here, consisting of a millimeter-sized spherical metal rotor placed on the surface of a lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric substrate upon which the SAW is made to propagate. At the design frequency of 3.2 MHz and with a fixed preload of 41.1 μN, the maximum rotational speed and torque achieved were approximately 1900 rpm and 5.37 μN-mm, respectively, producing a maximum output power of 1.19 μW. The surface vibrations were visualized using laser Doppler vibrometry and indicate that the rotational motion arises due to retrograde elliptical motions of the piezoelectric surface elements. Rotation about orthogonal axes in the plane of the substrate has been obtained by using orthogonally placed interdigital electrodes on the substrate to generate SAW impinging on the rotor, offering a means to generate rotation about an arbitrary axis in the plane of the substrate.

  4. Anisotropic surface acoustic waves in tungsten/lithium niobate phononic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Hong; Yu, Yuan-Hai

    2018-02-01

    Phononic crystals (PnC) were known for acoustic band gaps for different acoustic waves. PnCs were already applied in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices as reflective gratings based on the band gaps. In this paper, another important property of PnCs, the anisotropic propagation, was studied. PnCs made of circular tungsten films on a lithium niobate substrate were analyzed by finite element method. Dispersion curves and equal frequency contours of surface acoustic waves in PnCs of various dimensions were calculated to study the anisotropy. The non-circular equal frequency contours and negative refraction of group velocity were observed. Then PnC was applied as an acoustic lens based on the anisotropic propagation. Trajectory of SAW passing PnC lens was calculated and transmission of SAW was optimized by selecting proper layers of lens and applying tapered PnC. The result showed that PnC lens can suppress diffraction of surface waves effectively and improve the performance of SAW devices.

  5. Study on Propagation Characteristics of Ultrasonic Guided Wave for EMAT Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songsong LI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave technology using Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer has the advantages of withstand high sensitivity, low attenuation, quickly and efficiently detection etc. To effectively detect the defects, it is necessary to study the propagation characteristics of guided wave. In this paper, the dispersion and multimode characteristics of guided waves are studied by the disperse simulation software, and the variation rule of propagation is analyzed by the geometric parameters of plate and pipe. The results show that the dispersion characteristics of guided wave are depended on the material, the thickness and inner diameter, and it is better at lower frequencies and smaller thickness. This is helpful to the selection of excitation mode, operating frequency and transducer structure parameter.

  6. Efficient implementation of an explicit partitioned shear and longitudinal wave propagation algorithm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolman, Radek; Cho, S.S.; Park, K.C.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 7 (2016), s. 543-579 ISSN 0029-5981 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0288; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/2315 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : stress wave propagation * finite element method * explicit time integrator * dispersion * minimal spurious oscillations * partitioned analysis Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 2.162, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1097-0207

  7. Impact of internal waves on sound propagation off Bhimilipatnam, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sridevi, B.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, M.M.M.; Maneesha, K.; SujithKumar, S.; Prasanna, P.L.

    -259 Impact of internal waves on sound propagation off Bhimilipatnam, East coast of India B.Sridevi, T.V. Ramana Murty, Y. Sadhuram, M.M.M. Rao, K. Maneesha, S. Sujith Kumar and P.L. Prasanna National Institute of Oceanography, Regional center, 176... the variability of ocean environment rather than it’s mean. Oceanic changes relevant to underwater acoustics are classified into mean and fluctuating components (De Santo 1979) with the following general model of the sound velocity equation...

  8. Time-Evolving Acoustic Propagation Modeling in a Complex Ocean Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colin, M.E.G.G.; Duda, T.F.; Raa, L.A. te; Zon, T. van; Haley Jr., P.J.; Lermusiaux, P.F.J.; Leslie, W.G.; Mirabito, C.; Lam, F.P.A.; Newhall, A.E.; Lin, Y.T.; Lynch, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    During naval operations, sonar performance estimates often need to be computed in-situ with limited environmental information. This calls for the use of fast acoustic propagation models. Many naval operations are carried out in challenging and dynamic environments. This makes acoustic propagation

  9. Computational simulation in architectural and environmental acoustics methods and applications of wave-based computation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Shinichi; Otsuru, Toru

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews a variety of methods for wave-based acoustic simulation and recent applications to architectural and environmental acoustic problems. Following an introduction providing an overview of computational simulation of sound environment, the book is in two parts: four chapters on methods and four chapters on applications. The first part explains the fundamentals and advanced techniques for three popular methods, namely, the finite-difference time-domain method, the finite element method, and the boundary element method, as well as alternative time-domain methods. The second part demonstrates various applications to room acoustics simulation, noise propagation simulation, acoustic property simulation for building components, and auralization. This book is a valuable reference that covers the state of the art in computational simulation for architectural and environmental acoustics.  

  10. AE source localization on the material with unknown elastic wave propagation velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Weom Heum; Kim, Dal Jung; Jhang, Kyung Young

    1996-01-01

    The ability to locate defects in materials is one of the major attractions of the acoustic emission technique. The standard method of planar source location is to place three or more transducers on the surface of a specimen and to triangulate the source position by using the differences in arrival times of the acoustic emission wave at the sensors. But the standard method have limited applications if the propagation velocity in the medium is riot known. In this paper, we propose a method for AE source localization on the material with unknown elastic wave propagation velocity. In this method, it is not needed to know the propagation velocity previously, that is, we can apply this method to arbitrary materials of which properties is not known exactly. We discuss the robustness of detecting AE source location algorithm according to the errors, and signal processing for measurement of the differences in arrival times of acoustic emission wave at the sensors. For performance evaluation of this algorithm, experiments performed using a lead break as the AE source on the surface of an aluminum plate.

  11. Cruise Report: Long-Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Long-range Owan ACoustic Propagation EXpewbitent LOAPEX L ý ý . OPXSRO So0 SVLAMVLA 40 KAA 20 M0 1 10 170 IN ISO 140 30 1010 Figure 1.2. LOAPEX assets...4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 5000 > -5000 4.6 4.61 4.62 4.63 4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 20 0 -I -20 4.6 4.61 4.62 4.63 4.64 4.65 4.66 4.67 4.68 .• 50001 1 1 1

  12. Propagation of dust electro-acoustic modes in dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinash, K.

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of the dust electro-acoustic (DEA) mode in dusty plasma with different electron and ion temperatures T e and T i and different ion species is studied. The critical ratio of the dust space charge to the ion space charge ε for the excitation of DEA mode is found to decrease with increasing T e /T i and increase with m i /m e (m i and m e are the ion and electron masses). Thus experiments with hydrogen plasma where electrons are sufficiently hotter than ions and where the reduction in the dust charge with ε is more than 50% are essential for the observation of self-shielding and the DEA mode

  13. On the propagation of truncated localized waves in dispersive silica

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Propagation characteristics of truncated Localized Waves propagating in dispersive silica and free space are numerically analyzed. It is shown that those characteristics are affected by the changes in the relation between the transverse spatial spectral components and the wave vector. Numerical experiments demonstrate that as the non-linearity of this relation gets stronger, the pulses propagating in silica become more immune to decay and distortion whereas the pulses propagating in free-space suffer from early decay and distortion. © 2010 Optical Society of America.

  14. Time evolution of nonplanar dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayout, Saliha; Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Sciences- Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, U.S.T.H.B, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Sahu, Biswajit [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University, Barasat, Kolkata-700126 (India)

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical study on the nonlinear propagation of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) dust ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASW) is carried out in a dusty plasma, whose constituents are inertial ions, superthermal electrons, and charge fluctuating stationary dust particles. Using the reductive perturbation theory, a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived. It is shown that the propagation characteristics of the cylindrical and spherical DIA solitary waves significantly differ from those of their one-dimensional counterpart.

  15. Extraction of lateral eigenmode properties in thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator from interferometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Kimmo; Pensala, Tuomas; Meltaus, Johanna; Kaivola, Matti

    2010-04-01

    A heterodyne laser interferometer is used to study acoustic wave fields excited in a 1.8 GHz AlN thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator. The electrical response of the resonator exhibits a strong thickness resonance onto which spurious modes, caused by lateral standing plate waves, are superposed. Optical interferometer measurements are used to extract dispersion curves of the laterally propagating waves responsible for the spurious responses. A discrete eigenmode spectrum due to the finite lateral dimensions of the resonator is observed. An equivalent circuit model for a multimode resonator is fitted to the mechanical resonator response extracted along a single curve in the dispersion diagram, and is used to determine properties, such as Q-values, of the individual lateral eigenmodes. Measured wave field images, extracted dispersion curves, and the eigenmode spectrum with the model fitting results are presented.

  16. Model for small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Juan R.; Desai, Sachi V.

    2011-11-01

    Accurate modeling of small firearms muzzle blast wave propagation in the far field is critical to predict sound pressure levels, impulse durations and rise times, as functions of propagation distance. Such a task being relevant to a number of military applications including the determination of human response to blast noise, gunfire detection and localization, and gun suppressor design. Herein, a time domain model to predict small arms fire muzzle blast wave propagation is introduced. The model implements a Friedlander wave with finite rise time which diverges spherically from the gun muzzle. Additionally, the effects in blast wave form of thermoviscous and molecular relaxational processes, which are associated with atmospheric absorption of sound were also incorporated in the model. Atmospheric absorption of blast waves is implemented using a time domain recursive formula obtained from numerical integration of corresponding differential equations using a Crank-Nicholson finite difference scheme. Theoretical predictions from our model were compared to previously recorded real world data of muzzle blast wave signatures obtained by shooting a set different sniper weapons of varying calibers. Recordings containing gunfire acoustical signatures were taken at distances between 100 and 600 meters from the gun muzzle. Results shows that predicted blast wave slope and exponential decay agrees well with measured data. Analysis also reveals the persistency of an oscillatory phenomenon after blast overpressure in the recorded wave forms.

  17. Nonlinear wave modulation of cylindrical and spherical quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, R.; El-Labany, S. K.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulation of quantum ion-acoustic (QIA) envelope solitary waves in a dense quantum plasma comprised of electrons and ions is investigated. For this purpose, a one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model and the Poisson equation are considered. By using the standard reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation with the geometrical and the quantum effects is derived. The effect of quantum corrections and the effect due to the cylindrical and spherical geometries on the propagation of the QIA envelope solitary waves are examined. It is shown that there exists a modulation instability period depending on the quantum parameter, which does not exist for the one-dimensional classical case.

  18. Propagation of Elastic Waves in Prestressed Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inder Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D solutions of the dynamical equations in the presence of external forces are derived for a homogeneous, prestressed medium. 2D plane waves solutions are obtained from general solutions and show that there exist two types of plane waves, namely, quasi-P waves and quasi-SV waves. Expressions for slowness surfaces and apparent velocities for these waves are derived analytically as well as numerically and represented graphically.

  19. Wave propagation in tyres and the resultant noise radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi-Jeon, Kim

    Tyre noise has become an increasingly important road traffic noise source. This is because other sources on the vehicle, such as the air intake system, the exhaust system and the engine, have tended to become relatively quieter. This situation forces the tyre noise component to be reduced in order to achieve a reduction in the overall traffic noise level. In the research reported here, vibration, sound radiation and sound transmission of a passenger car radial tyre were investigated. The first half of this thesis discusses the vibration characteristics using two methods; (1)FEM to analysis modal behaviour in detail, (2)Analytical models to interpret the FEM results. These methods have both advantages and disadvantages in investigating tyre vibration. Combining the two methods is necessary in order to a fully understand the vibration behaviour of a tyre. Dispersion relationships and the related frequency of tyre modes is analysed by FEM and the flexural wave propagation in the tyre shell and the sound radiation of the tyre wall by flexural modes is analyzed using plate and shell theory. The second part of this thesis discusses the radiation and transmission of tyre noise. To predict the radiation of sound with only a knowledge of the surface vibration velocity, the experimental Green's functions were estimated by using the acoustic reciprocity principle. This technique was also applied to separate airborne structure borne noise for identification of the transmission path of tyre noise into a vehicle cabin and quantification of the relative contribution of various regions of the vibrating tyre surface to vehicle interior noise. The application of acoustic reciprocity for the tyre noise problem was verified and compared with BEM analysis.

  20. Acoustic wave simulation using an overset grid for the global monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, N.; Le Bras, R.

    2017-12-01

    The International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) has been monitoring hydro-acoustic and infrasound waves over the globe. Because of the complex natures of the oceans and the atmosphere, computer simulation can play an important role in understanding the observed signals. In this regard, methods which depend on partial differential equations and require minimum modelling, are preferable. So far, to our best knowledge, acoustic wave propagation simulations based on partial differential equations on such a large scale have not been performed (pp 147 - 161 of ref [1], [2]). The main difficulties in building such simulation codes are: (1) considering the inhomogeneity of medium including background flows, (2) high aspect ratio of computational domain, (3) stability during long time integration. To overcome these difficulties, we employ a two-dimensional finite different (FDM) scheme on spherical coordinates with the Yin-Yang overset grid[3] solving the governing equation of acoustic waves introduces by Ostashev et. al.[4]. The comparison with real recording examples in hydro-acoustic will be presented at the conference. [1] Paul C. Etter: Underwater Acoustic Modeling and Simulation, Fourth Edition, CRC Press, 2013. [2] LIAN WANG et. al.: REVIEW OF UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC PROPAGATION MODELS, NPL Report AC 12, 2014. [3] A. Kageyama and T. Sato: "Yin-Yang grid": An overset grid in spherical geometry, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q09005, 2004. [4] Vladimir E. Ostashev et. al: Equations for finite-difference, time-domain simulation of sound propagation in moving inhomogeneous media and numerical implementation, Acoustical Society of America. DOI: 10.1121/1.1841531, 2005.

  1. Strongly driven ion acoustic waves in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldis, H.A.; Labaune, C.; Renard, N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper present an experimental study of ion acoustic waves with wavenumbers corresponding to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Time resolved Thomson scattering in frequency and wavenumber space, has permitted to observe the dispersion relation of the waves as a function of the laser intensity. Apart from observing ion acoustic waves associated with a strong second component is observed at laser intensities above 10 13 Wcm -2

  2. Control of Wave Propagation and Effect of Kerr Nonlinearity on Group Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazrat, Ali; Iftikhar, Ahmed; Ziauddin

    2013-01-01

    We use four-level atomic system and control the wave propagation via forbidden decay rate. The Raman gain process becomes dominant on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) medium by increasing the forbidden decay rate via increasing the number of atoms [G.S. Agarwal and T.N. Dey, Phys. Rev. A 74 (2006) 043805 and K. Harada, T. Kanbashi, and M. Mitsunaga, Phys. Rev. A 73 (2006) 013803]. The behavior of wave propagation is dramatically changed from normal (subluminal) to anomalous (superluminal) dispersion by increasing the forbidden decay rate. The system can also give a control over the group velocity of the light propagating through the medium via Kerr field. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  3. Vertical elliptic operator for efficient wave propagation in TTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2015-08-19

    Elliptic wave extrapolation operators require significantly less computational cost than the ones for transversely isotropic (TI) media. However, it does not provide accurate wavefield representation or imaging for the prevalent TI media. We propose a new vertical elliptically anisotropic (VEA) wave equation by decomposing the acoustic TI pseudo-differential wave equation. The decomposition results in a vertical elliptic differential equation and a scalar operator. The new VEA-like wave equation shares the same dispersion relation as that of the original acoustic TI wave equation. Therefore, the kinematic contents are correctly matched to the original equation. Moreover, the proposed decomposition yields better amplitude properties than the isotropic decomposition without increasing the computational load. Therefore, it exhibits better cost versus accuracy tradeoff compared to the isotropic or the tilted elliptic decompositions. We demonstrate with numerical examples that the proposed methodology is numerically stable for complex models and is free from shear-wave artifacts.

  4. Local principles of wave propagation in inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold, Harry; She, Jianming; Zorumski, William E.

    1993-01-01

    Four local principles are proven for waves propagating in a layered medium with a variable wave speed. These principles are (1) that inhomogeneities increase the amplitude of waves generated by a source of fixed strength, (2) that inhomogeneities reduce spatial oscillation, or increase the wavelength, (3) that inhomogeneities decrease transmission, or increase reflection, and (4) that transmission increases monotonically with frequency. Definitions of inhomogeneity, local wave function, and local reflection and transmission coefficients are made as a basis for stating these principles.

  5. Acoustic streaming induced by two orthogonal ultrasound standing waves in a microfluidic channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2018-07-01

    A mathematical model is derived for acoustic streaming in a microfluidic channel confined between a solid wall and a rigid reflector. Acoustic streaming is produced by two orthogonal ultrasound standing waves of the same frequency that are created by two pairs of counter-propagating leaky surface waves induced in the solid wall. The magnitudes and phases of the standing waves are assumed to be different. Full analytical solutions are found for the equations of acoustic streaming. The obtained solutions are used in numerical simulations to reveal the structure of the acoustic streaming. It is shown that the interaction of two standing waves leads to the appearance of a cross term in the equations of acoustic streaming. If the phase lag between the standing waves is nonzero, the cross term brings about circular vortices with rotation axes perpendicular to the solid wall of the channel. The vortices make fluid particles rotate and move alternately up and down between the solid wall and the reflector. The obtained results are of immediate interest for acoustomicrofluidic applications such as the ultrasonic micromixing of fluids and the manipulation of microparticles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Whistler Wave Propagation Through the Ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Invernón, F. J.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Luque, A.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the attenuation of whistler waves generated by hypotetical Venusian lightning occurring at the altitude of the cloud layer under different ionospheric conditions. We use the Stanford full-wave method for stratified media of Lehtinen and Inan (2008) to model wave propagation through the ionosphere of Venus. This method calculates the electromagnetic field created by an arbitrary source in a plane-stratified medium (i.e., uniform in the horizontal direction). We see that the existence of holes in electronic densities and the magnetic field configuration caused by solar wind play an important role in the propagation of electromagnetic waves through the Venusian ionosphere.

  7. Surface wave propagation in a fluid-saturated incompressible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    saturated incompressible porous media. Many studies have discussed the surface wave propagation in elastic media and a com- prehensive review is available in the standard texts, e.g., Ewing et al (1957) and Achenbach. (1976). The surface ...

  8. Topics in Computational Modeling of Shock and Wave Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gazonas, George A; Main, Joseph A; Laverty, Rich; Su, Dan; Santare, Michael H; Raghupathy, R; Molinari, J. F; Zhou, F

    2006-01-01

    This report contains reprints of four papers that focus on various aspects of shock and wave propagation in cellular, viscoelastic, microcracked, and fragmented media that appear in the Proceedings...

  9. Theoretical Studies of Stress Wave Propagation in Laterally Confined Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohani, Behzad

    1999-01-01

    .... A considerable body of scientific literature on one-dimensional stress wave propagation for such models has been published in recent years by various researchers, both in the United States and abroad...

  10. Source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish; Antani, Lakulish; Kim, Sujeong; Manocha, Dinesh

    2014-04-01

    We present an approach to model dynamic, data-driven source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation in virtual environments and computer games. Our directional source representation is expressed as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic (SH) sources. In the preprocessing stage, we precompute and encode the propagated sound fields due to each SH source. At runtime, we perform the SH decomposition of the varying source directivity interactively and compute the total sound field at the listener position as a weighted sum of precomputed SH sound fields. We propose a novel plane-wave decomposition approach based on higher-order derivatives of the sound field that enables dynamic HRTF-based listener directivity at runtime. We provide a generic framework to incorporate our source and listener directivity in any offline or online frequency-domain wave-based sound propagation algorithm. We have integrated our sound propagation system in Valve's Source game engine and use it to demonstrate realistic acoustic effects such as sound amplification, diffraction low-passing, scattering, localization, externalization, and spatial sound, generated by wave-based propagation of directional sources and listener in complex scenarios. We also present results from our preliminary user study.

  11. Comment on "Three-dimensional finite element modeling of guided ultrasound wave propagation in intact and healing long bones," [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121(6), 3907-3921 (2007)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Di; Gong, Xiufen; Wu, Junru

    2008-06-01

    Protopappas et al. performed finite element (FE) studies on the propagation of guided ultrasound waves in intact and healing long bones, and found that the dispersion of guided modes was significantly influenced by the irregularity and anisotropy of the bone. A time-frequency (t-f) method was applied to the obtained signals and several wave modes were identified. However, this technique was unable to quantify their observations and provide monitoring capabilities. One possible reason of this shortcoming may come from the inherent disadvantage of the t-f method. The objective of this comment is to demonstrate that it is necessary to combine other techniques with FE simulations for the extraction of significant quantitative ultrasonic features. Individual guided modes in an isotropic pipe have been theoretically examined using the normal mode expansion (NME) method, and many modes that are missed by the t-f analysis have been identified. It is concluded that in order to extract quantitative ultrasonic features, FE simulations should be supplemented by other techniques such as the NME.

  12. Acoustic streaming in a microfluidic channel with a reflector: Case of a standing wave generated by two counterpropagating leaky surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    A theory is developed for the modeling of acoustic streaming in a microfluidic channel confined between an elastic solid wall and a rigid reflector. A situation is studied where the acoustic streaming is produced by two leaky surface waves that propagate towards each other in the solid wall and thus form a combined standing wave in the fluid. Full analytical solutions are found for both the linear acoustic field and the field of the acoustic streaming. A dispersion equation is derived that allows one to calculate the wave speed in the system under study. The obtained solutions are used to consider particular numerical examples and to reveal the structure of the acoustic streaming. It is shown that two systems of vortices are established along the boundaries of the microfluidic channel.

  13. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  14. On wave propagation in a random micropolar generalized thermoelastic medium

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Manindra; Bhattacharyya Rabindra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This paper endeavours to study aspects of wave propagation in a random generalized-thermal micropolar elastic medium. The smooth perturbation technique conformable to stochastic differential equations has been employed. Six different types of waves propagate in the random medium. The dispersion equations have been derived. The effects due to random variations of micropolar elastic and generalized thermal parameters have been computed. Randomness causes change of phase speed and attenuation of...

  15. Spectral element method for wave propagation on irregular domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A spectral element approximation of acoustic propagation problems combined with a new mapping method on irregular domains is proposed. Following this method, the Gauss–Lobatto–Chebyshev nodes in the standard space are applied to the spectral element method (SEM). The nodes in the physical space are ...

  16. Spectral element method for wave propagation on irregular domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Hui Geng

    2018-03-14

    Mar 14, 2018 ... A spectral element approximation of acoustic propagation problems combined with a new mapping method on irregular ... Spectral element method; curved quadrilateral element; isoparametric element; Chebyshev polynomial ... overcome this problem, such as meshless local strong form method [9], the ...

  17. Free wave propagation in continuous pipes carrying a flowing fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espindola, J.J. de; Silva, J.B. da

    1982-01-01

    The propagation constants of a periodically supported pipe are computed. Use is made of a general free wave-propagation theory, based on transfer matrices. Comparison is made with previously published results, computed through a simpler, limited scope theory. (Author) [pt

  18. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  19. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Rohit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like soil. The study of these properties is aimed at modeling wave propagation for oil, mineral or gas exploration (seismic prospecting or non-destructive testing of the internal structure of solids. The focus is on the total energy content of a pulse propagating through an idealized one-dimensional discrete particle system like a mass disordered granular chain, which allows understanding the energy attenuation due to disorder since it isolates the longitudinal P-wave from shear or rotational modes. It is observed from the signal that stronger disorder leads to faster attenuation of the signal. An ordered granular chain exhibits ballistic propagation of energy whereas, a disordered granular chain exhibits more diffusive like propagation, which eventually becomes localized at long time periods. For obtaining mean-field macroscopic/continuum properties, ensemble averaging has been used, however, such an ensemble averaged spectral energy response does not resolve multiple scattering, leading to loss of information, indicating the need for a different framework for micro-macro averaging.

  20. Energy Content & Spectral Energy Representation of Wave Propagation in a Granular Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rohit; Luding, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    -signals, interpreting information from a Total Energy signal turned out to be much easier in comparison to displacement, velocity or acceleration signals of the wave, hence, indicating a better analysis method for wave propagation through granular materials. Increasing disorder decreases the Energy of higher frequency signals transmitted, but at the same time the energy of spatially localized high frequencies increases. Brian P. Lawney and Stefan Luding. Mass-disorder effects on the frequency filtering in one-dimensional discrete particle systems. AIP Conference Proceedings, 1542(1), 2013. Ibrahim Guven. Hydraulical and acoustical properties of porous sintered glass bead systems: experiments, theory and simulations (Doctoral dissertation). Rainer Tonn. Comparison of seven methods for the computation of Q. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors, 55(3):259 - 268, 1989. Rohit Kumar Shrivastava and Stefan Luding.: Effect of Disorder on Bulk Sound Wave Speed : A Multiscale Spectral Analysis, Nonlin. Processes Geophys. Discuss., doi:10.5194/npg-2016-83, in review, 2017.

  1. Efficient techniques for wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Ravish

    Sound propagation techniques model the effect of the environment on sound waves and predict their behavior from point of emission at the source to the final point of arrival at the listener. Sound is a pressure wave produced by mechanical vibration of a surface that propagates through a medium such as air or water, and the problem of sound propagation can be formulated mathematically as a second-order partial differential equation called the wave equation. Accurate techniques based on solving the wave equation, also called the wave-based techniques, are too expensive computationally and memory-wise. Therefore, these techniques face many challenges in terms of their applicability in interactive applications including sound propagation in large environments, time-varying source and listener directivity, and high simulation cost for mid-frequencies. In this dissertation, we propose a set of efficient wave-based sound propagation techniques that solve these three challenges and enable the use of wave-based sound propagation in interactive applications. Firstly, we propose a novel equivalent source technique for interactive wave-based sound propagation in large scenes spanning hundreds of meters. It is based on the equivalent source theory used for solving radiation and scattering problems in acoustics and electromagnetics. Instead of using a volumetric or surface-based approach, this technique takes an object-centric approach to sound propagation. The proposed equivalent source technique generates realistic acoustic effects and takes orders of magnitude less runtime memory compared to prior wave-based techniques. Secondly, we present an efficient framework for handling time-varying source and listener directivity for interactive wave-based sound propagation. The source directivity is represented as a linear combination of elementary spherical harmonic sources. This spherical harmonic-based representation of source directivity can support analytical, data

  2. On wave propagation in a random micropolar generalized thermoelastic medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Manindra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper endeavours to study aspects of wave propagation in a random generalized-thermal micropolar elastic medium. The smooth perturbation technique conformable to stochastic differential equations has been employed. Six different types of waves propagate in the random medium. The dispersion equations have been derived. The effects due to random variations of micropolar elastic and generalized thermal parameters have been computed. Randomness causes change of phase speed and attenuation of waves. Attenuation coefficients for high frequency waves have been computed. Second moment properties have been briefly discussed with application to wave propagation in the random micropolar elastic medium. Integrals involving correlation functions have been transformed to radial forms. A special type of generalized thermo-mechanical auto-correlation functions has been used to approximately compute effects of random variations of parameters. Uncoupled problem has been briefly outlined.

  3. Propagation of gravitational waves in the nonperturbative spinor vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Eurasian National University, Institute for Basic Research, Astana (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science of the NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan); Folomeev, Vladimir [Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science of the NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan)

    2014-09-15

    The propagation of gravitational waves on the background of a nonperturbative vacuum of a spinor field is considered. It is shown that there are several distinctive features in comparison with the propagation of plane gravitational waves through empty space: there exists a fixed phase difference between the h{sub yy,zz} and h{sub yz} components of the wave; the phase and group velocities of gravitational waves are not equal to the velocity of light; the group velocity is always less than the velocity of light; under some conditions the gravitational waves are either damped or absent; for given frequency, there exist two waves with different wave vectors. We also discuss the possibility of an experimental verification of the obtained effects as a tool to investigate nonperturbative quantum field theories. (orig.)

  4. Electron-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with hot electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Sabry, Refaat

    2012-10-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of electron-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold magnetized electron fluid, hot electrons featuring Tsallis distribution, and stationary ions are examined. The nonlinear evolution equation (i.e., Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation), governing the propagation of EAS waves in such plasma is derived and investigated analytically and numerically, for parameter regimes relevant to the dayside auroral zone. It is revealed that the amplitude, strength and nature of the nonlinear EAS waves are extremely sensitive to the degree of the hot electron nonextensivity. Furthermore, the obtained results are in good agreement with the observations made by the Viking satellite.

  5. Dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    between nonlinear and dispersion effects can result in the formation of symmetrical solitary waves. Also shock ... et al have studied the effect of nonadiabatic dust charge variation on the nonlinear dust acoustic wave with ..... Figure 5 presents the border between oscillatory- and monotonic-type shock waves as functions of ...

  6. Cylindrical and spherical dust-acoustic wave modulations in dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cylindrical and dust-acoustic wave modulations in dusty plasmas. PQ is required for wave amplitude (modulational) stability. On the other hand, a positive sign of PQ allows for a random perturbation to grow and may thus lead to wave collapse or blow-up. To investigate the stability profile, we have determined in various ...

  7. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF ACOUSTIC WAVE PARAMETERS NEAR SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-01-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  8. Simulation of Sound Waves Using the Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid Flow: Benchmark Cases for Outdoor Sound Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Erik M; Lohman, Walter J A; Zhou, Han

    2016-01-01

    Propagation of sound waves in air can be considered as a special case of fluid dynamics. Consequently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow can be used for simulating sound propagation. In this article application of the LBM to sound propagation is illustrated for various cases: free-field propagation, propagation over porous and non-porous ground, propagation over a noise barrier, and propagation in an atmosphere with wind. LBM results are compared with solutions of the equations of acoustics. It is found that the LBM works well for sound waves, but dissipation of sound waves with the LBM is generally much larger than real dissipation of sound waves in air. To circumvent this problem it is proposed here to use the LBM for assessing the excess sound level, i.e. the difference between the sound level and the free-field sound level. The effect of dissipation on the excess sound level is much smaller than the effect on the sound level, so the LBM can be used to estimate the excess sound level for a non-dissipative atmosphere, which is a useful quantity in atmospheric acoustics. To reduce dissipation in an LBM simulation two approaches are considered: i) reduction of the kinematic viscosity and ii) reduction of the lattice spacing.

  9. Viscoelastic characterization of dispersive media by inversion of a general wave propagation model in optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvietcovich, Fernando; Rolland, Jannick P.; Grygotis, Emma; Wayson, Sarah; Helguera, Maria; Dalecki, Diane; Parker, Kevin J.

    2018-02-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of tissue such as elasticity and viscosity is fundamental for better understanding and assessment of pathological and physiological processes. Dynamic optical coherence elastography uses shear/surface wave propagation to estimate frequency-dependent wave speed and Young's modulus. However, for dispersive tissues, the displacement pulse is highly damped and distorted during propagation, diminishing the effectiveness of peak tracking approaches. The majority of methods used to determine mechanical properties assume a rheological model of tissue for the calculation of viscoelastic parameters. Further, plane wave propagation is sometimes assumed which contributes to estimation errors. To overcome these limitations, we invert a general wave propagation model which incorporates (1) the initial force shape of the excitation pulse in the space-time field, (2) wave speed dispersion, (3) wave attenuation caused by the material properties of the sample, (4) wave spreading caused by the outward cylindrical propagation of the wavefronts, and (5) the rheological-independent estimation of the dispersive medium. Experiments were conducted in elastic and viscous tissue-mimicking phantoms by producing a Gaussian push using acoustic radiation force excitation, and measuring the wave propagation using a swept-source frequency domain optical coherence tomography system. Results confirm the effectiveness of the inversion method in estimating viscoelasticity in both the viscous and elastic phantoms when compared to mechanical measurements. Finally, the viscoelastic characterization of collagen hydrogels was conducted. Preliminary results indicate a relationship between collagen concentration and viscoelastic parameters which is important for tissue engineering applications.

  10. Statistical Characterization of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Mine Environments

    KAUST Repository

    Yucel, Abdulkadir C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational framework for statistically characterizing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation through mine tunnels and galleries is presented. The framework combines a multi-element probabilistic collocation method with a full-wave fast Fourier transform and fast multipole method accelerated surface integral equation-based EM simulator to statistically characterize fields from wireless transmitters in complex mine environments. 1536-1225 © 2013 IEEE.

  11. Mathematical modelling of generation and forward propagation of dispersive waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lie She Liam, L.S.L.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the mathematical theory of forward propagation and generation of dispersive waves. We derive the AB2-equation which describes forward traveling waves in two horizontal dimension. It is the generalization of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvilli (KP) equation. The derivation is based

  12. Nonlinear wave propagation through a ferromagnet with damping in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    magnetic waves in a ferromagnet can be reduced to an integro-differential equation. Keywords. Solitons; integro-differential equations; reductive perturbation method. PACS Nos 41.20 Jb; 05.45 Yv; 03.50 De; 78.20 Ls. 1. Introduction. The phenomenon of propagation of electromagnetic waves in ferromagnets are not only.

  13. Stress Wave Propagation in Larch Plantation Trees-Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenglu Liu; Fang Jiang; Xiping Wang; Houjiang Zhang; Wenhua Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we attempted to simulate stress wave propagation in virtual tree trunks and construct two dimensional (2D) wave-front maps in the longitudinal-radial section of the trunk. A tree trunk was modeled as an orthotropic cylinder in which wood properties along the fiber and in each of the two perpendicular directions were different. We used the COMSOL...

  14. Nonlinear wave propagation through a ferromagnet with damping in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wavelength in (2+1) dimensions. The purpose of the present work is to study the property of electromagnetic waves of long wavelength propagating through an isotropic ferromagnet in the classical continuum limit in (2+1) dimensions taking into account the dissipative effect. By using the long wave approximation of the ...

  15. Wave propagation in ducts using the finite element method. [for aircraft noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majjigi, R. K.; Sigman, R. K.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper outlines a comparative study designed to assess and compare the accuracy of the finite element method (FEM) for linear and quadratic elements as applied to problems in duct acoustics. The acoustic disturbances are assumed to be irrotational and isentropic so that the problem can be formulated in terms of the acoustic velocity potential. It is shown that for the case of plane wave propagation in a hard-walled annular cylinder, the accuracy of the FEM solution can be increased at higher frequencies by using quadratic triangular elements instead of linear triangular elements. Evidence is presented to enhance the confidence in applying the developed FEM by comparing results with those obtained by other independently developed numerical approaches such as an integral equation technique and a finite difference method.

  16. Electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons and an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: lakhina@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India); University of the Western Cape, Belville (South Africa); Devanandhan, S., E-mail: devanandhan@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India); Bharuthram, R., E-mail: rbharuthram@uwc.ac.za [University of the Western Cape, Belville (South Africa)

    2016-08-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves having nonthermal hot electrons, cold and beam electrons, and ions in a magnetized plasma. We have employed reductive perturbation theory to derive the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation describing the nonlinear evolution of these waves. The two-dimensional plane wave solution of KdV-ZK equation is analyzed to study the effects of nonthermal and beam electrons on the characteristics of the solitons. Theoretical results predict negative potential solitary structures. We emphasize that the inclusion of finite temperature effects reduces the soliton amplitudes and the width of the solitons increases by an increase in the obliquity of the wave propagation. The numerical analysis is presented for the parameters corresponding to the observations of “burst a” event by Viking satellite on the auroral field lines.

  17. Surface Wave Focusing and Acoustic Communications in the Surf Zone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Preisig, James

    2004-01-01

    The forward scattering of acoustic signals off of shoaling surface gravity waves in the surf zone results in a time-varying channel impulse response that is characterized by intense, rapidly fluctuating arrivals...

  18. CAMEX-3 JPL SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE (SAW) HYGROMETER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This CAMEX-3 Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Hygrometer dataset consists of dewpoint timeline measurements acquired during each DC-8...

  19. A theory of coherent propagation of light wave in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zi-zhao, G.; Guo-zhen, Y.

    1980-05-01

    In this paper, we suggest a theory to describe the pheonmena of coherent propagation of light wave in semiconductors. Basing on two band system and considering the interband and intraband transitions induced by light wave and the interaction between electrons, we obtain the nonlinear equations for the description of interaction between carriers and coherent light wave. We have made use of the equations to analyse the phenomena which arise from the interaction between semiconductors and coherent light, for example, the multiphoton transitions, the saturation of light absorption of exciton, the shift of exciton line in intense light field, and the coherent propagation phenomena such as self-induced transparency, etc. (author)

  20. Computer modeling of inelastic wave propagation in porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheney, J.A.; Schatz, J.F.; Snell, C.

    1979-01-01

    Computer modeling of wave propagation in porous rock has several important applications. Among them are prediction of fragmentation and permeability changes to be caused by chemical explosions used for in situ resource recovery, and the understanding of nuclear explosion effects such as seismic wave generation, containment, and site hardness. Of interest in all these applications are the distance from the source to which inelastic effects persist and the amount of porosity change within the inelastic region. In order to study phenomena related to these applications, the Cam Clay family of models developed at Cambridge University was used to develop a similar model that is applicable to wave propagation in porous rock. That model was incorporated into a finite-difference wave propagation computer code SOC. 10 figures, 1 table

  1. Thin film bulk acoustic wave devices : performance optimization and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Pensala, Tuomas

    2011-01-01

    Thin film bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators and filters operating in the GHz range are used in mobile phones for the most demanding filtering applications and complement the surface acoustic wave (SAW) based filters. Their main advantages are small size and high performance at frequencies above 2 GHz. This work concentrates on the characterization, performance optimization, and modeling techniques of thin film BAW devices. Laser interferometric vibration measurements together with plat...

  2. Modulation of cavity-polaritons by surface acoustic waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lima, M. M.; Poel, Mike van der; Hey, R.

    2006-01-01

    We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations.......We modulate cavity-polaritons using surface acoustic waves. The corresponding formation of a mini-Brillouin zone and band folding of the polariton dispersion is demonstrated for the first time. Results are in good agreement with model calculations....

  3. Radiative damping of standing acoustic waves in solar coronal loops

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, S.J.; Erdelyi, R.

    2008-01-01

    Context. A detailed understanding of the physical processes that determine the damping timescales of magneto-acoustic waves is essential to interpret diagnostic results from the application of solar magneto-seismology.\\ud Aims. The influence of the transition region and the importance of radiative emission, arising from equilibrium and non-equilibrium ionisation balances, for the damping timescale of the fundamental mode standing acoustic wave is investigated.\\ud Methods. An extensive numeric...

  4. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  5. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  6. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, S., E-mail: shahzadm100@gmail.com; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q. [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, Munazza Z. [Department of Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan)

    2016-06-15

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found which depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.

  7. Propagation of waves in shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrikant, A L

    1998-01-01

    The state of the art in a theory of oscillatory and wave phenomena in hydrodynamical flows is presented in this book. A unified approach is used for waves of different physical origins. A characteristic feature of this approach is that hydrodynamical phenomena are considered in terms of physics; that is, the complement of the conventionally employed formal mathematical approach. Some physical concepts such as wave energy and momentum in a moving fluid are analysed, taking into account induced mean flow. The physical mechanisms responsible for hydrodynamic instability of shear flows are conside

  8. An algorithm for determination of geodetic path for application in long-range acoustic propagation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Sivakholundu, K.M.; Navelkar, G.S.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, C.S.

    A computer program has been developed for the construction of geodetic path between two points on the spheroidal surface for application in long range acoustic propagation in the ocean. Geodetic equations have integrated numerically upto...

  9. Spectral transfer functions of body waves propagating through a stratified medium. Part 1: Basic theory by means of matrix propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macia, R.; Correig, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic wave propagation is described by a second order differential equation for medium displacement. By Fourier transforming with respect to time and space, wave equation transforms into a system of first order linear differential equations for the Fourier transform of displacement and stress. This system of differential equations is solved by means of Matrix Propagator and applied to the propagation of body waves in stratified media. The matrix propagators corresponding to P-SV and SH waves in homogeneous medium are found as an intermediate step to obtain the spectral response of body waves propagating through a stratified medium with homogeneous layers. (author) 14 refs

  10. Nonlinear multi-frequency electromagnetic wave propagation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovik, Dmitry V.

    2017-11-01

    A generalisation of the concept of monochromatic electromagnetic waves guided by layered waveguide structures filled with non-linear medium is introduced. This generalisation leads to guided waves of a novel type: a non-linear multi-frequency guided wave. The existence of such waves, in particular guide structures, is proven using the perturbation method. Numerical experiments are presented for non-linear 1- and 2-frequency guided waves in plane and cylindrical (with a circular cross-section) waveguides. Numerically, a novel non-linear effect is found for particular cases of non-linear multi-frequency guided waves. The suggested generalisation gives not only a unified approach to treat various electromagnetic wave propagation problems but also paves the way to study non-linear interactions of guided waves.

  11. Ultra-directional source of longitudinal acoustic waves based on a two-dimensional solid/solid phononic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morvan, B.; Tinel, A.; Sainidou, R.; Rembert, P. [Laboratoire Ondes et Milieux Complexes, UMR CNRS 6294, Université du Havre, 75 rue Bellot, 76058 Le Havre (France); Vasseur, J. O.; Hladky-Hennion, A.-C. [Institut d' Electronique, de Micro-électronique et de Nanotechnologie, UMR CNRS 8520, Cité Scientifique, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Swinteck, N.; Deymier, P. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2014-12-07

    Phononic crystals (PC) can be used to control the dispersion properties of acoustic waves, which are essential to direct their propagation. We use a PC-based two-dimensional solid/solid composite to demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the spatial filtering of a monochromatic non-directional wave source and its emission in a surrounding water medium as an ultra-directional beam with narrow angular distribution. The phenomenon relies on square-shaped equifrequency contours (EFC) enabling self-collimation of acoustic waves within the phononic crystal. Additionally, the angular width of collimated beams is controlled via the EFC size-shrinking when increasing frequency.

  12. Surface Acoustic WaveAmmonia Sensors Based on ST-cut Quartz under Periodic Al Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yau Su

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface acoustic wave (SAW devices are key components for sensing applications. SAW propagation under a periodic grating was investigated in this work. The theoretical method used here is the space harmonic method. We also applied the results of SAW propagation studied in this work to design a two-port resonator with an Al grating on ST-cut quartz. The measured frequency responses of the resonator were similar to the simulation ones. Then, the chemical interface of polyaniline/WO3 composites was coated on the SAW sensor for ammonia detection. The SAW sensor responded to ammonia gas and could be regenerated using dry nitrogen.

  13. Nonlinear acoustic waves in micro-inhomogeneous solids

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarov, Veniamin

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear Acoustic Waves in Micro-inhomogeneous Solids covers the broad and dynamic branch of nonlinear acoustics, presenting a wide variety of different phenomena from both experimental and theoretical perspectives. The introductory chapters, written in the style of graduate-level textbook, present a review of the main achievements of classic nonlinear acoustics of homogeneous media. This enables readers to gain insight into nonlinear wave processes in homogeneous and micro-inhomogeneous solids and compare it within the framework of the book. The subsequent eight chapters covering: Physical m

  14. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinton, Gianmarco [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina - North Carolina State University, 348 Taylor Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA gfp@unc.edu (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  15. Particle separation by phase modulated surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Gergely; Andrade, Marco A B; Reboud, Julien; Marques-Hueso, Jose; Desmulliez, Marc P Y; Cooper, Jonathan M; Riehle, Mathis O; Bernassau, Anne L

    2017-09-01

    High efficiency isolation of cells or particles from a heterogeneous mixture is a critical processing step in lab-on-a-chip devices. Acoustic techniques offer contactless and label-free manipulation, preserve viability of biological cells, and provide versatility as the applied electrical signal can be adapted to various scenarios. Conventional acoustic separation methods use time-of-flight and achieve separation up to distances of quarter wavelength with limited separation power due to slow gradients in the force. The method proposed here allows separation by half of the wavelength and can be extended by repeating the modulation pattern and can ensure maximum force acting on the particles. In this work, we propose an optimised phase modulation scheme for particle separation in a surface acoustic wave microfluidic device. An expression for the acoustic radiation force arising from the interaction between acoustic waves in the fluid was derived. We demonstrated, for the first time, that the expression of the acoustic radiation force differs in surface acoustic wave and bulk devices, due to the presence of a geometric scaling factor. Two phase modulation schemes are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical findings were experimentally validated for different mixtures of polystyrene particles confirming that the method offers high selectivity. A Monte-Carlo simulation enabled us to assess performance in real situations, including the effects of particle size variation and non-uniform acoustic field on sorting efficiency and purity, validating the ability to separate particles with high purity and high resolution.

  16. Detection of Electromechanical Wave Propagation Using Synchronized Phasor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Prakash; Dambhare, Sanjay; Pramanik, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Considering electrical network as a continuum has become popular for electromechanical wave analysis. This paper reviews the concept of electromechanical wave propagation. Analysis of large number of generator ring system will be an easy way to illustrate wave propagation. The property of traveling waves is that the maximum and minimum values do not occur at the same time instants and hence the difference between these time delays can be easily calculated. The homogeneous, isotropic 10 generator ring system is modeled using electromagnetic transient simulation programs. The purpose of this study is to investigate the time delays and wave velocities using Power System Computer Aided Design (PSCAD)/Electromagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The disturbances considered here are generator disconnections and line trips.

  17. Propagation of shear waves in viscoelastic medium at irregular boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Amares; Gupta, Shishir; Sharma, Vikash; Kumari, Pato

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to study the shear wave propagation in a viscoelastic layer over a semi-infinite viscoelastic half space due to irregularity in the viscoelastic layer. It is of great interest to study the propaga-tion of shear waves in the assumed medium having a non planar boundary due to its similarity to most of the real situations. The perturbation method is applied to find the displacement field. The effect of complex wave number on dissipation factor is analysed. Finally, as an application, the result obtained has been used to get the reflected field in viscoelastic layer when the shear wave is incident on an irregular boundary in the shape of parabolic irregularity as well as triangular notch. It is observed that the amplitude of this reflected wave decreases with increasing length of the notch, and increases with increasing depth of the irregularity.

  18. Spatial damping of propagating sausage waves in coronal cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming-Zhe; Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xia, Li-Dong; Yu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    Context. Sausage modes are important in coronal seismology. Spatially damped propagating sausage waves were recently observed in the solar atmosphere. Aims: We examine how wave leakage influences the spatial damping of sausage waves propagating along coronal structures modeled by a cylindrical density enhancement embedded in a uniform magnetic field. Methods: Working in the framework of cold magnetohydrodynamics, we solve the dispersion relation (DR) governing sausage waves for complex-valued, longitudinal wavenumber k at given real angular frequencies ω. For validation purposes, we also provide analytical approximations to the DR in the low-frequency limit and in the vicinity of ωc, the critical angular frequency separating trapped from leaky waves. Results: In contrast to the standing case, propagating sausage waves are allowed for ω much lower than ωc. However, while able to direct their energy upward, these low-frequency waves are subject to substantial spatial attenuation. The spatial damping length shows little dependence on the density contrast between the cylinder and its surroundings, and depends only weakly on frequency. This spatial damping length is of the order of the cylinder radius for ω ≲ 1.5vAi/a, where a and vAi are the cylinder radius and the Alfvén speed in the cylinder, respectively. Conclusions: If a coronal cylinder is perturbed by symmetric boundary drivers (e.g., granular motions) with a broadband spectrum, wave leakage efficiently filters out the low-frequency components.

  19. Nonlinear wave propagation studies, dispersion modeling, and signal parameters correction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk

    ..: ..., 2004, 00. [European Workshop on FP6-AERONEWS /1./. Naples (IT), 13.09.2004-16.09.2004] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 502927 - AERO-NEWS Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : nodestructive testing * nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  20. Topology optimization applied to room acoustic problems and surface acoustic wave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    of the project is concerned with simulation and optimization of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices [4]. SAWs are for instance used in filters and resonators in mobile phones and to modulate light waves [5], and it is here essential to obtain waves with a high intensity, to direct the waves or to optimize...... of engineering fields such as mechanism design, fluid problems and photonic and phononic band-gap materials and structures [1,2]. In this project topology optimization is first applied to control acoustic properties in a room [3]. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room...

  1. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-01-01

    The charge variation induced nonlinear dust-acoustic wave damping in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions is considered. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries (dK-dV) equation the coefficients of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive parameter q. The damping term, solely due to the dust charge variation, is affected by the ion nonextensivity. For the sake of completeness, the possible effects of nonextensivity and collisionless damping on weakly nonlinear wave packets described by the dK-dV equation are succinctly outlined by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation with a complex nonlinear coefficient

  2. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Plasma Physics Group (PPG), University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2014-12-15

    The charge variation induced nonlinear dust-acoustic wave damping in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions is considered. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries (dK-dV) equation the coefficients of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive parameter q. The damping term, solely due to the dust charge variation, is affected by the ion nonextensivity. For the sake of completeness, the possible effects of nonextensivity and collisionless damping on weakly nonlinear wave packets described by the dK-dV equation are succinctly outlined by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation with a complex nonlinear coefficient.

  3. Subwoofer and nanotube butterfly acoustic flame extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Mayo, Nathanael K.; Baughman, Ray H.; Mills, Brent T.; Habtour, Ed

    2017-01-01

    Nonchemical flame control using acoustic waves from a subwoofer and a lightweight carbon nanotube thermoacoustic projector was demonstrated. The intent was to manipulate flame intensity, direction and propagation. The mechanisms of flame suppression using low frequency acoustic waves were discussed.

  4. Acoustic Pressure Waves in Vibrating 3-D Laminated Beam-Plate Enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Osheku

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of structural vibration on the propagation of acoustic pressure waves through a cantilevered 3-D laminated beam-plate enclosure is investigated analytically. For this problem, a set of well-posed partial differential equations governing the vibroacoustic wave interaction phenomenon are formulated and matched for the various vibrating boundary surfaces. By employing integral transforms, a closed form analytical expression is computed suitable for vibroacoustic modeling, design analysis, and general aerospace defensive applications. The closed-form expression takes the form of a kernel of polynomials for acoustic pressure waves showing the influence of linear interface pressure variation across the axes of vibrating boundary surfaces. Simulated results demonstrate how the mode shapes and the associated natural frequencies can be easily computed. It is shown in this paper that acoustic pressure waves propagation are dynamically stable through laminated enclosures with progressive decrement in interfacial pressure distribution under the influence of high excitation frequencies irrespective of whether the induced flow is subsonic, sonic , supersonic, or hypersonic. Hence, in practice, dynamic stability of hypersonic aircrafts or jet airplanes can be further enhanced by replacing their noise transmission systems with laminated enclosures.

  5. Lightning characterization through acoustic and electromagnetic measurements recorded during the HyMeX SOP1 and simulation of the acoustic nonlinear propagation in realistic thunderstorm meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallin, L.; Coulouvrat, F.; Farges, T.; Marchiano, R.; Defer, E.; Rison, W.; Schulz, W.; Nuret, M.

    2013-12-01

    The goal is to study the transformation of the thunder (amplitude, spectrum) during its travel from the lightning channel towards a detector (microphone, microbarometer), considering propagation distances of less than 50 km and complex local meteorological properties. Inside the European HyMeX project, the SOP1 campaign (2012) took place from September 2012 to November 2012 in South of France. An acoustic station (center: 4.39° E, 44.08° N) composed of a microphone array placed inside a microbarometer array was installed by CEA near city of Uzès. It was located in the center of an LMA network coming with two slow antennas. This network was deployed in France for the first time by the New Mexico Tech and LERMA laboratory. The detections from the European lightning location system EUCLID complete this dataset. During the SOP1 period several storms passed over the station. The post-processings of the records point out days with interesting thunderstorms. Especially during the 26th of October 2012 in the evening (around 8 pm) a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Not too many lightning strokes are detected by EUCLID, the corresponding flashes are then well characterized by the LMA network. Slow antennas present good electric field measurements. The acoustic records have excellent quality. We present for some selected flashes a comparative study of the different measurements (LMA, slow antenna, EUCLID, microphones, microbarometers): focusing on amplitude and spectrum of the thunder waveforms, and on propagation effects due to the meteorological conditions. To quantify the impact of these meteorological conditions on the propagating thunder (from the lightning sources to the acoustic array), a code named Flhoward is used [Dagrau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 130, 20-32, 2011][Coulouvrat, Wave Motion, 49, 50--63, 2012]. It is designed to simulate the nonlinear propagation of acoustic shock waves through a realistic atmosphere model (including temperature

  6. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling Grant B. Deane Marine Physical Laboratory , Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla, CA...long-term science objective is to develop a physical model of high-frequency scattering of underwater acoustic signals from the sea surface under a... acoustic communications problem. The scattering of sound from the sea surface is important for the operation of underwater sonar and underwater

  7. Wave Propagation in Pipe-like Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsbøl, Jonas

    pipe with changing radius, which is known as the shell of revolution, it is found that classical rod and beam theory, to some extent, can be used to approximate the fundamental modes of the torsional, axial, and breathing wave. However, by means of the shell model some remarkable effects are predicted...... when even these very fundamental waves are travelling along a shell of revolution. The effects cover modal changes and excitation of localised resonances. For modes of higher order similar excitations of localised resonances are also predicted....

  8. Introduction to Wave Propagation in Nonlinear Fluids and Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-02-01

    Waves occur widely in nature and have innumerable commercial uses. Waves are responsible for the sound of speech, meteors igniting the atmosphere, radio and television broadcasting, medical diagnosis using ultrasound. This book provides a thorough, modern introduction to the study of linear and nonlinear waves. Beginning with fundamental concepts of motion, the book goes on to discuss linear and nonlinear mechanical waves, thermodynamics, and constitutive models for a variety of gases, liquids, and solids. Among the important areas of research and application are impact analysis, shock wave research, explosive detonation, nonlinear acoustics, and hypersonic aerodynamics. Students at an advanced undergraduate/graduate level will find this text a clear and comprehensive introduction to the study of nonlinear wave phenomena, and it will also be valuable as a professional reference in engineering and applied physics.

  9. Gas explosion characterization, wave propagation (small scale experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, G.C.

    1985-08-01

    A number of experiments have been performed with blast waves arising from the ignition of homogeneous and well defined mixtures of methane, oxygen and nitrogen, contained within spherical balloons with controlled initial dimensions. The pressure characteristics has been studied for blast waves with and without influence from reflected waves. The influence of obstacles in the flow field has also been treated. Both configuration with one box and two closely spaced boxes have been considered, and a wave-wave interaction phenomenon was observed in the case of closely spaced obstacles. Moreover reflection coefficients have been established and some pressure variations over the surfaces have been observed. An acoustic appriximation has been used to model the blast wave originating from an expanding sphere. It has been demonstrated, that the generated pressure pulse is very sensitive to the expansion rate. Calculated and measured data have been compared, and a reasonable agreement has been found. (author)

  10. Unidirectional wave propagation in media with complex principal axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, S. A. R.

    2018-02-01

    In an anisotropic medium, the refractive index depends on the direction of propagation. Zero index in a fixed direction implies a stretching of the wave to uniformity along that axis, reducing the effective number of dimensions by 1. Here we investigate two-dimensional gyrotropic media where the refractive index is 0 in a complex valued direction, finding that the wave becomes an analytic function of a single complex variable z . For simply connected media this analyticity implies unidirectional propagation of electromagnetic waves, similar to the edge states that occur in photonic "topological insulators." For a medium containing holes the propagation is no longer unidirectional. We illustrate the sensitivity of the field to the topology of the space using an exactly solvable example. To conclude we provide a generalization of transformation optics where a complex coordinate transformation can be used to relate ordinary anisotropic media to the recently highlighted gyrotropic ones supporting one-way edge states.

  11. Detecting electromagnetic cloaks using backward-propagating waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-08-01

    A novel approach for detecting transformation-optics invisibility cloaks is proposed. The detection method takes advantage of the unusual backward-propagation characteristics of recently reported beams and pulses to induce electromagnetic scattering from the cloak. Even though waves with backward-propagating energy flux cannot penetrate the cloaking shell and interact with the cloaked objects (i.e., they do not make the cloaked object visible), they provide a mechanism for detecting the presence of cloaks. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Transient Aspects of Wave Propagation Connected with Spatial Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzat G. Bakhoum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents transient aspects of light wave propagation connected with spatial coherence. It is shown that reflection and refraction phenomena involve spatial patterns which are created within a certain transient time interval. After this transient time interval, these patterns act like a memory, determining the wave vector for subsequent sets of reflected/refracted waves. The validity of this model is based on intuitive aspects regarding phase conservation of energy for waves reflected/refracted by multiple centers in a certain material medium.

  13. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah, Iran and Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  14. Quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in weak relativistic plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ion-acoustic waves. Recently, Stenflo et al [24] observed two new low-frequency elec- trostatic modes in ultra-cold unmagnetized quantum dusty plasmas. Ali and Shukla ... waves in a nonuniform ultra-cold Fermi dusty gas composed of inertialess electrons, and ions as well ... the Van Allen radiation belts [34] etc. Streaming ...

  15. Wave propagation in elastic layers with damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorokin, Sergey; Darula, Radoslav

    2016-01-01

    The conventional concepts of a loss factor and complex-valued elastic moduli are used to study wave attenuation in a visco-elastic layer. The hierarchy of reduced-order models is employed to assess attenuation levels in various situations. For the forcing problem, the attenuation levels are found...

  16. Surface acoustic wave electric field effect on acoustic streaming: Numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darinskii, A. N.; Weihnacht, M.; Schmidt, H.

    2018-01-01

    The paper numerically studies the contribution of the electric field accompanying the surface acoustic wave to the actuation of the acoustic streaming in microchannels. The finite element method is used. The results obtained as applied to the surface waves on 128° and 64°-rotated Y cuts of LiNbO3 demonstrate that the force created by the electric field is capable of accelerating appreciably the acoustic streaming. In particular, examples are given for the situations where the electric field increases the streaming velocity by a factor of about 2-3 and significantly changes the flow pattern as compared to predictions of computations ignoring the electric field.

  17. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-01-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 ± 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 ± 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 ± 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10 -5 rad s -1 .

  18. In Situ Observations of Seismic Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Kenneth Stewart

    Instrumented geotechnical field sites are designed to capture the infrequent but critically important in situ case histories of ground response, deformation, and liquefaction during significant earthquakes that generate high intensity ground shaking and large strains. The University of California at Santa Barbara has been monitoring densely instrumented geotechnical array field sites for almost three decades, with continuous recording now for more than a decade. When seismic waves travel into soil with sufficiently large ground motions, the soil behaves nonlinearly meaning the shear modulus of the material decreases from the linear value observed during weak ground motions. The degraded shear modulus can continue to affect a site for a period of time by changing the soil response during smaller ground motions after the large event. Decreased shear modulus is inferred when a decrease of shear wave velocity between two sensors in a vertical downhole array is observed. This velocity is calculated by measuring the difference in shear wave arrival times between the sensors using normalized cross correlation. The trend of decreasing shear wave velocity with increasing peak ground acceleration is observed at multiple geotechnical array field sites. The length of time the decreased velocity remains following stronger shaking is analyzed using more than 450 events over more than a decade at the Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA). Using both monthly and yearly velocity averages between sensors, there is evidence that suggests the shear wave velocity remains low over a period of months following larger significant shaking events at the site. In addition, at WLA there is evidence that the decrease in shear wave velocity can be detected at ground motion levels as low as 20 cm/s2. Additionally at the Garner Valley Downhole Array, a permanent cross-hole experiment is used to measure velocity changes in the soil with changing water table height. An underground hammer source swings

  19. Radio Wave Propagation Scene Partitioning for High-Speed Rails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio wave propagation scene partitioning is necessary for wireless channel modeling. As far as we know, there are no standards of scene partitioning for high-speed rail (HSR scenarios, and therefore we propose the radio wave propagation scene partitioning scheme for HSR scenarios in this paper. Based on our measurements along the Wuhan-Guangzhou HSR, Zhengzhou-Xian passenger-dedicated line, Shijiazhuang-Taiyuan passenger-dedicated line, and Beijing-Tianjin intercity line in China, whose operation speeds are above 300 km/h, and based on the investigations on Beijing South Railway Station, Zhengzhou Railway Station, Wuhan Railway Station, Changsha Railway Station, Xian North Railway Station, Shijiazhuang North Railway Station, Taiyuan Railway Station, and Tianjin Railway Station, we obtain an overview of HSR propagation channels and record many valuable measurement data for HSR scenarios. On the basis of these measurements and investigations, we partitioned the HSR scene into twelve scenarios. Further work on theoretical analysis based on radio wave propagation mechanisms, such as reflection and diffraction, may lead us to develop the standard of radio wave propagation scene partitioning for HSR. Our work can also be used as a basis for the wireless channel modeling and the selection of some key techniques for HSR systems.

  20. Finite-difference theory for sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform flow using the wave envelope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Finite difference equations are derived for sound propagation in a two dimensional, straight, soft wall duct with a uniform flow by using the wave envelope concept. This concept reduces the required number of finite difference grid points by one to two orders of magnitude depending on the length of the duct and the frequency of the sound. The governing acoustic difference equations in complex notation are derived. An exit condition is developed that allows a duct of finite length to simulate the wave propagation in an infinitely long duct. Sample calculations presented for a plane wave incident upon the acoustic liner show the numerical theory to be in good agreement with closed form analytical theory. Complete pressure and velocity printouts are given to some sample problems and can be used to debug and check future computer programs.

  1. Ultrasonic guided wave propagation in pipes with elbows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breon, Luke J.

    Guided wave inspection of pipelines is an important and growing area of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE). This technique can be used for remote inspection or monitoring of buried pipelines, or pipelines with insulation. Guided waves are sensitive to flaws such as corrosion pits and cracks. They can be used to locate flaws existing on either the outer or the inner surface of a pipe. Guided wave energy focusing can be performed to concentrate guided wave energy at particular combinations of circumferential and axial locations in straight pipes. When it can be used, this practice enhances the circumferential resolution of defects. Elbows in a piping system are sufficiently disruptive to guided wave energy that the focusing methods used in practical inspections of straight pipe have not been extended to the region beyond an elbow. Counter-intuitively, elbows with a 45 degree bend are more harmful to guided waves than those with a 90 degree bend. A simple and elegant explanation for this phenomenon is provided in this dissertation. Theoretical advancements to guided wave physics propagating around an elbow have tended to be few and slow. This is at least partly due to the complexity of the mathematics involved in the conventional description of guided wave mechanics. Parametric focusing for pipes with bends has not been previously possible as it is for straight sections of pipes. While some techniques such as time-reversal mirrors and blind finite-element-method modeling have existed for focusing beyond elbows, these techniques have been limited and largely of academic value. Also, the understanding of wave behavior in a pipe elbow has in the past been generally unclear. Consequently, signal interpretation has also been very limited for guided waves initiating in, or returning from, the far side of an elbow. A new approach to understanding guided wave propagation is developed in this work. This understanding consists of the idea that the pathway a guided wave will take

  2. Test of single degree of freedom acoustic treatment impedance models for multimodal acoustic propagation in duct with flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccouche, Ryan; Moreau, Soléne; Ben Tahar, Mabrouk

    2017-06-01

    Passive acoustic treatments, also called liners, are the main solution to noise problems. The Single Degree Of Freedom (SDOF) acoustic treatment, composed of a thin material (perforated plate) affixed to air cavities with a rigid bottom, constitutes a solution. Predicting sound level reduction by an SDOF treatment requires reliable acoustic impedance models. An experimental/numerical method has been developed for a duct with an acoustic treatment to test acoustic impedance models of SDOF treatment with a multimodal propagation in the presence of a mean flow. This method is based on the comparison of experimental results from an aeroacoustic bench composed of a circular duct with a treated area, and numerical results from an FEM-PML axisymmetric model based on Galbrun's equation. The numerical results are confronted with experimental results to test impedance models up to M 0 =±0.25.

  3. Oblique propagation of solitary waves in weakly relativistic magnetized plasma with kappa distributed electrons in the presence of negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmanpoor, H.; Sharifian, M.; Gholipour, S.; Borhani Zarandi, M.; Shokri, B.

    2018-03-01

    The oblique propagation of nonlinear ion acoustic solitary waves (solitons) in magnetized collisionless and weakly relativistic plasma with positive and negative ions and super thermal electrons has been examined by using reduced perturbation method to obtain the Korteweg-de Vries equation that admits an obliquely propagating soliton solution. We have investigated the effects of plasma parameters like negative ion density, electrons temperature, angle between wave vector and magnetic field, ions velocity, and k (spectral index in kappa distribution) on the amplitude and width of solitary waves. It has been found out that four modes exist in our plasma model, but the analysis of the results showed that only two types of ion acoustic modes (fast and slow) exist in the plasma and in special cases only one mode could be propagated. The parameters of plasma for these two modes (or one mode) determine which one is rarefactive and which one is compressive. The main parameter is negative ions density (β) indicating which mode is compressive or rarefactive. The effects of the other plasma parameters on amplitude and width of the ion acoustic solitary waves have been studied. The main conclusion is that the effects of the plasma parameters on amplitude and width of the solitary wave strongly depend on the value of the negative ion density.

  4. Propagation of Ultrasonic Guided Waves in Composite Multi-Wire Ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaldas Raisutis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wire ropes are widely used as load-carrying constructional elements in bridges, cranes, elevators, etc. Structural integrity of such ropes can be inspected by using non-destructive ultrasonic techniques. The objective of this work was to investigate propagation of ultrasonic guided waves (UGW along composite multi-wire ropes in the cases of various types of acoustic contacts between neighboring wires and the plastic core. The modes of UGW propagating along the multi-wire ropes were identified using modelling, the dispersion curves were calculated using analytical and semi-analytical finite element (SAFE techniques. In order to investigate the effects of UGW propagation, the two types of the acoustic contact between neighboring wires were simulated using the 3D finite element method (FE as well. The key question of investigation was estimation of the actual boundary conditions between neighboring wires (solid or slip and the real depth of penetration of UGW into the overall cross-section of the rope. Therefore, in order to verify the results of FE modelling, the guided wave penetration into strands of multi-wire rope was investigated experimentally. The performed modelling and experimental investigation enabled us to select optimal parameters of UGW to be used for non-destructive testing.

  5. Demonstration of slow sound propagation and acoustic transparency with a series of detuned resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results demonstrating the phenomenon of acoustic transparency with a significant slowdown of sound propagation realized with a series of paired detuned acoustic resonators (DAR) side-attached to a waveguide. The phenomenon mimics the electromagnetically induced transparency...... than 20 dB on both sides of the transparency window, and we quantify directly (using a pulse propagation) the acoustic slowdown effect, resulting in the sound group velocity of 9.8 m/s (i.e. in the group refractive index of 35). We find very similar values of the group refractive index by using...

  6. Low Frequency Acoustic Intensity Propagation Modeling in Shallow Water Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    the formulation of Clay and Medwin [20] was coded into Matlab [21]. This formulation allows for the interaction of the water column with a second...Figure 7. Comparison of COMSOL and Normal Modes: Acoustic Magnitude Code predicted magnitude of acoustic pressure over the 0–600 m range from source ... source location. Figure 8. Comparison of COMSOL and Normal Modes: Imaginary Component Code predicted imaginary component of the total acoustic

  7. Modulated 3D electron-acoustic rogue waves in magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; Sabry, R.

    2017-05-01

    Modulational instability analysis of Electron-acoustic (EA) rogue waves is carried out in a three-dimensional magnetized plasma holding two electron populations (nonthermal hot electrons following Cairns distribution and cold electron fluid) and stationary ions. A (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation that governs the evolution of the EA rogue waves in the current plasma system is derived through derivative expansion method. The existence domains for the first and second order rogue waves are investigated. Effects of the plasma parameters on the propagation of the first and second order rogue waves are examined analytically and numerically. Furthermore, the role of the different plasma parameters as well as the critical threshold of the obliqueness θ on the first and second order rogue waves for parameters regimes corresponding to dayside auroral zone plasma are emphasized.

  8. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Fan, Ren-Hao; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu; Jiangnan University Collaboration

    In this talk, we present our studies on broadband properties of acoustic waves through metal gratings. We have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing and new acoustic devices. References: [1] Dong-Xiang Qi, Yu-Qiang Deng, Di-Hu Xu, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Ze-Guo Chen, Ming-Hui Lu, X. R. Huang and Mu Wang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 011906 (2015); [2] Dong-Xiang Qi, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Xian-Rong Huang, Ming-Hui Lu, Xu Ni, Qing Hu, and Mu Wang, Applied Physics Letters 101, 061912 (2012).

  9. Directional bending wave propagation in periodically perforated plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Manktelow, Kevin; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We report on the investigation of wave propagation in a periodically perforated plate. A unit cell with double-C perforations is selected as a test article suitable to investigate two-dimensional dispersion characteristics, group velocities, and internal resonances. A numerical model, formulated...... using Mindlin plate elements, is developed to predict relevant wave characteristics such as dispersion, and group velocity variation as a function of frequency and direction of propagation. Experimental tests are conducted through a scanning laser vibrometer, which provides full wave field information....... The analysis of time domain wave field images allows the assessment of plate dispersion, and the comparison with numerical predictions. The obtained results show the predictive ability of the considered numerical approach and illustrate how the considered plate configuration could be used as the basis...

  10. TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELLING OF ACCIDENTAL FLOOD WAVES PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorand Catalin STOENESCU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this article describes a modern modeling methodology of the propagation of accidental flood waves in case a dam break; this methodology is applied in Romania for the first time for the pilot project „Breaking scenarios of Poiana Uzului dam”. The calculation programs used help us obtain a bidimensional calculation (2D of the propagation of flood waves, taking into consideration the diminishing of the flood wave on a normal direction to the main direction; this diminishing of the flood wave is important in the case of sinuous courses of water or with urban settlements very close to the minor river bed. In the case of Poiana Uzului dam, 2 scenarios were simulated with the help of Ph.D. Eng. Dan Stematiu, plausible scenarios but with very little chances of actually producing. The results were presented as animations with flooded surfaces at certain time steps successively.

  11. Wave propagation phenomena in metamaterials for retrieving of effective parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Ha, S.

    2011-01-01

    reveal so-called wave effective parameters, assigned for particular ligh propagation direction in numerical or real experiments. Therefore, finding the EP is a tricky problem, which still requires a lot of contribution to get deeper insight in it. We report on our advances in restoration MMs EP taking...... into account propagation of eigen-waves in multilayered structures (thicknesses 10-100 unit cells). Thus, the question of pa-rameters convergence is naturally resolved in our approach. The method has been tested on complex three-dimensional structures like a split-cube-in-carcass and with circular polarized...... waves on chiral MMs [1, 2]. Elaborating our approach the new method has been established, where the unit-cell volume and face field averaging procedures define wave and input (Bloch) impedances correspond-ingly. The first part of the method involves the extraction of the dominating (fundamental) Bloch...

  12. Monitoring polymer properties using shear horizontal surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Dana Y; Millard, Paul J; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio

    2009-10-01

    Real-time, nondestructive methods for monitoring polymer film properties are increasingly important in the development and fabrication of modern polymer-containing products. Online testing of industrial polymer films during preparation and conditioning is required to minimize material and energy consumption, improve the product quality, increase the production rate, and reduce the number of product rejects. It is well-known that shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation is sensitive to mass changes as well as to the mechanical properties of attached materials. In this work, the SH-SAW was used to monitor polymer property changes primarily dictated by variations in the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic properties of a negative photoresist film were monitored throughout the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced polymer cross-linking process using SH-SAW delay line devices. Changes in the polymer film mass and viscoelasticity caused by UV exposure produced variations in the phase velocity and attenuation of the SH-SAW propagating in the structure. Based on measured polymer-coated delay line scattering transmission responses (S(21)) and the measured polymer layer thickness and density, the viscoelastic constants c(44) and eta(44) were extracted. The polymer thickness was found to decrease 0.6% during UV curing, while variations in the polymer density were determined to be insignificant. Changes of 6% in c(44) and 22% in eta(44) during the cross-linking process were observed, showing the sensitivity of the SH-SAW phase velocity and attenuation to changes in the polymer film viscoelasticity. These results indicate the potential for SH-SAW devices as online monitoring sensors for polymer film processing.

  13. Love wave propagation in piezoelectric layered structure with dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jianke; Xian, Kai; Wang, Ji; Yong, Yook-Kong

    2009-02-01

    We investigate analytically the effect of the viscous dissipation of piezoelectric material on the dispersive and attenuated characteristics of Love wave propagation in a layered structure, which involves a thin piezoelectric layer bonded perfectly to an unbounded elastic substrate. The effects of the viscous coefficient on the phase velocity of Love waves and attenuation are presented and discussed in detail. The analytical method and the results can be useful for the design of the resonators and sensors.

  14. Millimetre Wave Propagation Over the Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-29

    gases in the atmospherei (in particular oxygen and water vapour) causes part of the energy transmitted in millimetre waves to be absorbed. In order to...respectively to water vapour and oxygen reach 0.5 dB/km and 0.03 dB/km. Mlecular attenuation may vary substantially according to the meteorological conditions...significatifs de houle et d’un capteur embarcable utdl- sant cer algorithmex, Th~se de doctorat de 3tme cycle, Universiti Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris VI

  15. Modeling ocean wave propagation under sea ice covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Shen, Hayley H.; Cheng, Sukun

    2015-02-01

    Operational ocean wave models need to work globally, yet current ocean wave models can only treat ice-covered regions crudely. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of ice effects on wave propagation and different research methodology used in studying these effects. Based on its proximity to land or sea, sea ice can be classified as: landfast ice zone, shear zone, and the marginal ice zone. All ice covers attenuate wave energy. Only long swells can penetrate deep into an ice cover. Being closest to open water, wave propagation in the marginal ice zone is the most complex to model. The physical appearance of sea ice in the marginal ice zone varies. Grease ice, pancake ice, brash ice, floe aggregates, and continuous ice sheet may be found in this zone at different times and locations. These types of ice are formed under different thermal-mechanical forcing. There are three classic models that describe wave propagation through an idealized ice cover: mass loading, thin elastic plate, and viscous layer models. From physical arguments we may conjecture that mass loading model is suitable for disjoint aggregates of ice floes much smaller than the wavelength, thin elastic plate model is suitable for a continuous ice sheet, and the viscous layer model is suitable for grease ice. For different sea ice types we may need different wave ice interaction models. A recently proposed viscoelastic model is able to synthesize all three classic models into one. Under suitable limiting conditions it converges to the three previous models. The complete theoretical framework for evaluating wave propagation through various ice covers need to be implemented in the operational ocean wave models. In this review, we introduce the sea ice types, previous wave ice interaction models, wave attenuation mechanisms, the methods to calculate wave reflection and transmission between different ice covers, and the effect of ice floe breaking on shaping the sea ice morphology

  16. Numerical study of the collar wave characteristics and the effects of grooves in acoustic logging while drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufeng; Guan, Wei; Hu, Hengshan; Xu, Minqiang

    2017-05-01

    Large-amplitude collar wave covering formation signals is still a tough problem in acoustic logging-while-drilling (LWD) measurements. In this study, we investigate the propagation and energy radiation characteristics of the monopole collar wave and the effects of grooves on reducing the interference to formation waves by finite-difference calculations. We found that the collar wave radiates significant energy into the formation by comparing the waveforms between a collar within an infinite fluid, and the acoustic LWD in different formations with either an intact or a truncated collar. The collar wave recorded on the outer surface of the collar consists of the outward-radiated energy direct from the collar (direct collar wave) and that reflected back from the borehole wall (reflected collar wave). All these indicate that the significant effects of the borehole-formation structure on collar wave were underestimated in previous studies. From the simulations of acoustic LWD with a grooved collar, we found that grooves broaden the frequency region of low collar-wave excitation and attenuate most of the energy of the interference waves by multireflections. However, grooves extend the duration of the collar wave and convert part of the collar-wave energy originally kept in the collar into long-duration Stoneley wave. Interior grooves are preferable to exterior ones because both the low-frequency and the high-frequency parts of the collar wave can be reduced and the converted inner Stoneley wave is relatively difficult to be recorded on the outer surface of the collar. Deeper grooves weaken the collar wave more greatly, but they result in larger converted Stoneley wave especially for the exterior ones. The interference waves, not only the direct collar wave but also the reflected collar wave and the converted Stoneley waves, should be overall considered for tool design.

  17. Love waves propagation in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric layer on a piezomagnetic half-space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzin, Hamdi; Ben Amor, Morched; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical approach is taken into consideration to investigate Love wave propagation in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric layer on a piezomagnetic half-space. The magneto-electrically open and short conditions are applied to solve the problem. The phase and group velocity of the Love wave is numerically calculated for the magneto-electrically open and short cases, respectively. The variations of magneto-electromechanical coupling factor, mechanical displacements, electric and magnetic potentials along the thickness direction of the layers are obtained and discussed. The numerical results clearly show the influence of different stacking sequences on dispersion curves and on magneto-electromechanical coupling factor. This work may be relevant to analysis and design of various acoustic surface wave devices constructed from piezoelectric and piezomagnetic materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A combined ADER-DG and PML approach for simulating wave propagation in unbounded domains

    KAUST Repository

    Amler, Thomas

    2012-09-19

    In this work, we present a numerical approach for simulating wave propagation in unbounded domains which combines discontinuous Galerkin methods with arbitrary high order time integration (ADER-DG) and a stabilized modification of perfectly matched layers (PML). Here, the ADER-DG method is applied to Bérenger’s formulation of PML. The instabilities caused by the original PML formulation are treated by a fractional step method that allows to monitor whether waves are damped in PML region. In grid cells where waves are amplified by the PML, the contribution of damping terms is neglected and auxiliary variables are reset. Results of 2D simulations in acoustic media with constant and discontinuous material parameters are presented to illustrate the performance of the method.

  19. Propagation of ultrasonic pulses in the testing of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by means of acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klot, R. von.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments are being conducted with a thick steel plate (d = 82,5 mm) and a large vessel (d = 22 mm) to investigate whether surface waves are excited when the sound source (ultrasonic transmitter) is several wavelengths below the surface where the receivers are located. It has been discovered that the amplitude value of the received signal, which is fixed using a discriminator threshold, propagates at the surface of both components at the velocity of the surface wave, which is 3.0 m/ms. In the case of a narrow-band transmitter and receiver with centre frequencies of 140 kHz, the bulk waves are so long that the flexural wave a 0 is excited by interference. In the case of thick plates the flexural wave turns into surface waves which propagate on both surfaces. When a broad-band receiver and transmitter with centre frequencies of 675 kHz are used, there is no excitation of plate waves since the bulk wave pulses are too short. In the latter configuration the received signal is composed of a number of bulk wave pulses, which, according to the above measurements of the sound velocity, give an envelope curve with the characteristic features of plate waves. In the case of the plate, the ultrasonic transmitter is correctly located for an amplitude range of 26 dB for both frequencies. The locating accuracy is approximately equal to the distance of the source from the surface. On the basis of this result, it is expected that the use of acoustic emission to test nuclear reactor pressure vessels will permit correct location of faults at all depths in the wall of the vessel, by means of the velocity of the surface wave. (orig.) [de

  20. Seismic Wave Propagation in Icy Ocean Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähler, Simon C.; Panning, Mark P.; Vance, Steven D.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; van Driel, Martin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Kedar, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    Seismology was developed on Earth and shaped our model of the Earth's interior over the twentieth century. With the exception of the Philae lander, all in situ extraterrestrial seismological effort to date was limited to other terrestrial planets. All have in common a rigid crust above a solid mantle. The coming years may see the installation of seismometers on Europa, Titan, and Enceladus, so it is necessary to adapt seismological concepts to the setting of worlds with global oceans covered in ice. Here we use waveform analyses to identify and classify wave types, developing a lexicon for icy ocean world seismology intended to be useful to both seismologists and planetary scientists. We use results from spectral-element simulations of broadband seismic wavefields to adapt seismological concepts to icy ocean worlds. We present a concise naming scheme for seismic waves and an overview of the features of the seismic wavefield on Europa, Titan, Ganymede, and Enceladus. In close connection with geophysical interior models, we analyze simulated seismic measurements of Europa and Titan that might be used to constrain geochemical parameters governing the habitability of a sub-ice ocean.

  1. Oblique Propagation and Dissipation of Alfven Waves in Coronal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We investigate the effect of viscosity and magnetic diffusivity on the oblique propagation and dissipation of Alfvén waves with respect to the normal outward direction, making use of MHD equations, density, temperature and magnetic field structure in coronal holes and underlying magnetic funnels. We find ...

  2. Propagation of waves in a gravitating and rotating anisotropic heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    (1956) equations neglecting the heat flux vector. Gravitational instability on propagation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in astrophysical plasma is investigated by Alemayehu and Tessema (2013a) by considering the effect of gravitational instability and viscosity with anisotropic pressure tensor and heat conducting.

  3. Chiral metamaterials characterisation using the wave propagation retrieval method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation we extend the wave propagation method for the retrieval of the effective properties to the case of chiral metamaterials with circularly polarised eigenwaves. The method is unambiguous, simple and provides bulk effective parameters. Advantages and constraints are discussed...

  4. Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged dust particles has been investigated by various authors in recent times as the presence of charged dust grains give rise to a new kind of modes called dust modes and it has wide applications in magneto- sphere and space plasma [1–3]. In fact, Rao et al [4] ...

  5. Wave propagation in coated cylinders with reference to fretting fatigue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The frequency of vibration or contact loading is an important parameter. The general frequency regime ... dicting initiation and propagation of micro cracks during fretting demands a proper study of stress wave .... The following expressions give the stresses and displacements in terms of potential func- tions. 2μur = ∂. ∂r. +.

  6. Statistical characterization of wave propagation in mine environments

    KAUST Repository

    Bakir, Onur

    2012-07-01

    A computational framework for statistically characterizing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation through mine tunnels and galleries is presented. The framework combines a multi-element probabilistic collocation (ME-PC) method with a novel domain-decomposition (DD) integral equation-based EM simulator to obtain statistics of electric fields due to wireless transmitters in realistic mine environments. © 2012 IEEE.

  7. Wave propagation in a general anisotropic poroelastic medium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 116; Issue 4. Wave propagation in a general anisotropic poroelastic medium: Biot's theories and homogenisation theory. M D Sharma. Volume 116 Issue 4 August ... Keywords. Anisotropic poroelastic (APE) solid; Biot's theory; homogenisation theory; phase velocity.

  8. Analysis of flexural wave propagation in poroelastic composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    wave propagation in poroelastic media. A poroelastic composite hollow cylinder consists of two concentric poroelastic cylindrical layers both of which are made of different poroelastic materials with each poroelastic material as homogeneous and isotropic. The inner and outer boundaries of composite hollow poroelastic ...

  9. Seismic wave propagation in fractured media: A discontinuous Galerkin approach

    KAUST Repository

    De Basabe, Jonás D.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate and implement a discontinuous Galekin method for elastic wave propagation that allows for discontinuities in the displacement field to simulate fractures or faults using the linear- slip model. We show numerical results using a 2D model with one linear- slip discontinuity and different frequencies. The results show a good agreement with analytic solutions. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. Influence of support viscoelastic properties on the structural wave propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Hong

    2007-01-01

    The dissipation of the structural vibration energy at viscoelastic supports is an efficient method of reducing modal resonances and consequent noise and fatigue related problems. The support stiffness has significant impact on the modal characteristics. The dissipation capabilities of the viscoelastic support depend on its stiffness. Methods to optimally tune this support stiffness are proposed in this study. The characteristic mechanical impedance for structural vibration is obtained from wave propagation analysis and non-reflecting boundary conditions. The wave propagation is analyzed near the supports installed at edges, middle of a structure, and for the tuned vibration absorber. The dependence of the optimal stiffness on the location and mass of the supports is identified. A simple analytical solution for optimal support stiffness for maximum dissipation of propagating vibration energy at supports is presented

  11. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron-acoustic solitary waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, C. S.; Vasko, I. Y.; Mozer, F. S.; Agapitov, O. V.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2018-02-01

    The broadband electrostatic turbulence observed in the inner magnetosphere is produced by large-amplitude electrostatic solitary waves of generally two types. The solitary waves with symmetric bipolar parallel (magnetic field-aligned) electric field are electron phase space holes. The solitary waves with highly asymmetric bipolar parallel electric field have been recently shown to correspond to the electron-acoustic plasma mode (existing due to two-temperature electron population). Through theoretical and numerical analysis of hydrodynamic and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations, we demonstrate that the asymmetric solitary waves appear due to the steepening of initially quasi-monochromatic electron-acoustic perturbation arrested at some moment by collisionless dissipation (Landau damping). The typical steepening time is found to be from a few to tens of milliseconds. The steepening of the electron-acoustic waves has not been reproduced in self-consistent kinetic simulations yet, and factors controlling the formation of steepened electron-acoustic waves, rather than electron phase space holes, remain unclear.

  13. Effective constants for wave propagation through partially saturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.; Thigpen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The multipole scattering coefficients for elastic wave scattering from a spherical inhomogeneity in a fluid-saturated porous medium have been calculated. These coefficients may be used to obtain estimates of the effective macroscopic constants for long-wavelength propagation of elastic waves through partially saturated media. If the volume average of the single scattering from spherical bubbles of gas and liquid is required to vanish, the resulting equations determine the effective bulk modulus, density, and viscosity of the multiphase fluid filling the pores. The formula for the effective viscosity during compressional wave excitation is apparently new

  14. Spin wave propagation in a uniformly biased curved magnonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, A. V.; Davies, C. S.; Kruglyak, V. V.; Romanenko, D. V.; Grishin, S. V.; Beginin, E. N.; Sharaevskii, Y. P.; Nikitov, S. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using Brillouin light scattering microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, we study the propagation and transformation of magnetostatic spin waves across uniformly biased curved magnonic waveguides. Our results demonstrate that the spin wave transmission through the bend can be enhanced or weakened by modifying the distribution of the inhomogeneous internal magnetic field spanning the structure. Our results open up the possibility of optimally molding the flow of spin waves across networks of magnonic waveguides, thereby representing a step forward in the design and construction of the more complex magnonic circuitry.

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Greve

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh-environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.

  16. Wave propagation at the human muscle-compact bone interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsia Shao-Yi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the improvement of the signal processing and image technology, the clinical ultrasound system becomes an important tool to assist doctors in detecting diseases. Hence, it is necessary to know the biological effects of ultrasound in human tissue. In ultrasonic waves, the discrepancy between classic elasticity and experimental elasticity becomes a particularly important problem, especially when there are higher frequencies and smaller wavelengths, i.e., in the case of wave propagation in human muscle and compact bone. Consequently, the influence of the microstructure is important and this fact leads to the generation of new types of waves unknown in classic elasticity. General continuum theories, such as couple stress theory and micropolar theory, have degrees of freedom in addition to those of classic elasticity. Such theories are thought to be applicable to composites with granular or porous structure, effective chiral composite, and human compact bone. In this work, a theoretical analysis concerning the reflected and transmitted fields of an incident plane wave P propagating at the human muscle-compact bone interface has been investigated. The results show that the wave fields are affected by microstructures of the human bone. Knowledge of this occurrence may offer some contribution to the understanding of the ultrasound propagation in the biological effects of human tissue.

  17. Nonlinear excitation of geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.; Guzdar, P. N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, two mode-coupling analyses for the nonlinear excitation of the geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in tokamak plasmas by drift waves are presented. The first approach is a coherent parametric process, which leads to a three-wave resonant interaction. This investigation allows for the drift waves and the GAMs to have comparable scales. The second approach uses the wave-kinetic equations for the drift waves, which then couples to the GAMs. This requires that the GAM scale length be large compared to the wave packet associated with the drift waves. The resonance conditions for these two cases lead to specific predictions of the radial wave number of the excited GAMs

  18. B-spline based finite element method in one-dimensional discontinuous elastic wave propagation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolman, Radek; Okrouhlík, Miloslav; Berezovski, A.; Gabriel, Dušan; Kopačka, Ján; Plešek, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, June (2017), s. 382-395 ISSN 0307-904X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/2315; GA MŠk(CZ) EF15_003/0000493 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) DAAD-16-12; AV ČR(CZ) ETA-15-03 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce; Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : discontinuous elastic wave propagation * B-spline finite element method * isogeometric analysis * implicit and explicit time integration * dispersion * spurious oscillations Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics OBOR OECD: Acoustics Impact factor: 2.350, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0307904X17300835

  19. Propagation and application of waves in the ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    This review deals with the propagation of waves, especially radio waves in the ionosphere. In the macroscopic electromagnetic theory, the mathematical structure of wave propagation problems depends entirely on the properties of the dielectric operator in a magnetically nonpermeable medium. These properties can be deduced from general discussions of symmetry and considerations of physical principles. When the medium is specifically the ionosphere, various physical phenomena may occur. Because of a large number of parameters, it is desirable to define a parameter space. A point in the parameter space corresponds to a specific plasma. The parameter space is subdivided into regions whose boundaries correspond to conditions of resonance and cutoff. As the point crosses these boundaries, the refractive index surface transforms continuously.

  20. Excitation of coherent propagating spin waves by pure spin currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Vladislav E; Urazhdin, Sergei; Liu, Ronghua; Divinskiy, Boris; Telegin, Andrey; Demokritov, Sergej O

    2016-01-28

    Utilization of pure spin currents not accompanied by the flow of electrical charge provides unprecedented opportunities for the emerging technologies based on the electron's spin degree of freedom, such as spintronics and magnonics. It was recently shown that pure spin currents can be used to excite coherent magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostructures. However, because of the intrinsic nonlinear self-localization effects, magnetic auto-oscillations in the demonstrated devices were spatially confined, preventing their applications as sources of propagating spin waves in magnonic circuits using these waves as signal carriers. Here, we experimentally demonstrate efficient excitation and directional propagation of coherent spin waves generated by pure spin current. We show that this can be achieved by using the nonlocal spin injection mechanism, which enables flexible design of magnetic nanosystems and allows one to efficiently control their dynamic characteristics.

  1. Spiral Calcium Wave Propagation and Annihilation in Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleiter, James; Girard, Steven; Peralta, Ernest; Clapham, David

    1991-04-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger. Information is encoded in the magnitude, frequency, and spatial organization of changes in the concentration of cytosolic free Ca2+. Regenerative spiral waves of release of free Ca2+ were observed by confocal microscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. This pattern of Ca2+ activity is characteristic of an intracellular milieu that behaves as a regenerative excitable medium. The minimal critical radius for propagation of focal Ca2+ waves (10.4 micrometers) and the effective diffusion constant for the excitation signal (2.3 x 10-6 square centimeters per second) were estimated from measurements of velocity and curvature of circular wavefronts expanding from foci. By modeling Ca2+ release with cellular automata, the absolute refractory period for Ca2+ stores (4.7 seconds) was determined. Other phenomena expected of an excitable medium, such as wave propagation of undiminished amplitude and annihilation of colliding wavefronts, were observed.

  2. Stress Wave Propagation due to a Moving Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the performance of two numerical methods of solving the problem of a time dependent moving force on the surface of an elastic continuum will be evaluated. One method is the finite element method (FEM) formulated in convected coordinates coupled with an absorbing boundary condition...... of the impedance type. The other method to be considered is the boundary element method (BEM), where a new formulation using Green's functions transformed to a moving coordinate system is introduced. The methods are tested by the classic wave propagation problem of a Ricker Pulse propagating from the surface...... of an elastic halfspace. The time integral net impulse of the considered loading must be null for the considered FEM to work. Further, the FEM is unable to absorb Rayleigh waves, since the considered impedance condition has been tuned P- and S-waves. By contrast the BEM is able to handle also these cases...

  3. Exploiting Acoustic Similarity of Propagating Paths for Audio Signal Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Bin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Blind signal separation can easily find its position in audio applications where mutually independent sources need to be separated from their microphone mixtures while both room acoustics and sources are unknown. However, the conventional separation algorithms can hardly be implemented in real time due to the high computational complexity. The computational load is mainly caused by either direct or indirect estimation of thousands of acoustic parameters. Aiming at the complexity reduction, in this paper, the acoustic paths are investigated through an acoustic similarity index (ASI. Then a new mixing model is proposed. With closely spaced microphones (5–10 cm apart, the model relieves the computational load of the separation algorithm by reducing the number and length of the filters to be adjusted. To cope with real situations, a blind audio signal separation algorithm (BLASS is developed on the proposed model. BLASS only uses the second-order statistics (SOS and performs efficiently in frequency domain.

  4. Acoustic-Gravity Waves Interacting with a Rectangular Trench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Kadri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical solution of the two-dimensional linear problem of an acoustic-gravity wave interacting with a rectangular trench, in a compressible ocean, is presented. Expressions for the flow field on both sides of the trench are derived. The dynamic bottom pressure produced by the acoustic-gravity waves on both sides of the trench is measurable, though on the transmission side it decreases with the trench depth. A successful recording of the bottom pressures could assist in the early detection of tsunami.

  5. An Unconditionally Stable Method for Solving the Acoustic Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Kai Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An unconditionally stable method for solving the time-domain acoustic wave equation using Associated Hermit orthogonal functions is proposed. The second-order time derivatives in acoustic wave equation are expanded by these orthogonal basis functions. By applying Galerkin temporal testing procedure, the time variable can be eliminated from the calculations. The restriction of Courant-Friedrichs-Levy (CFL condition in selecting time step for analyzing thin layer can be avoided. Numerical results show the accuracy and the efficiency of the proposed method.

  6. Near-perfect conversion of a propagating plane wave into a surface wave using metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcvetkova, S. N.; Kwon, D.-H.; Díaz-Rubio, A.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper theoretical and numerical studies of perfect/nearly perfect conversion of a plane wave into a surface wave are presented. The problem of determining the electromagnetic properties of an inhomogeneous lossless boundary which would fully transform an incident plane wave into a surface wave propagating along the boundary is considered. An approximate field solution which produces a slowly growing surface wave and satisfies the energy conservation law is discussed and numerically demonstrated. The results of the study are of great importance for the future development of such devices as perfect leaky-wave antennas and can potentially lead to many novel applications.

  7. Waves and Structures in Nonlinear Nondispersive Media General Theory and Applications to Nonlinear Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Gurbatov, S N; Saichev, A I

    2012-01-01

    "Waves and Structures in Nonlinear Nondispersive Media: General Theory and Applications to Nonlinear Acoustics” is devoted completely to nonlinear structures. The general theory is given here in parallel with mathematical models. Many concrete examples illustrate the general analysis of Part I. Part II is devoted to applications to nonlinear acoustics, including specific nonlinear models and exact solutions, physical mechanisms of nonlinearity, sawtooth-shaped wave propagation, self-action phenomena, nonlinear resonances and engineering application (medicine, nondestructive testing, geophysics, etc.). This book is designed for graduate and postgraduate students studying the theory of nonlinear waves of various physical nature. It may also be useful as a handbook for engineers and researchers who encounter the necessity of taking nonlinear wave effects into account of their work. Dr. Gurbatov S.N. is the head of Department, and Vice Rector for Research of Nizhny Novgorod State University. Dr. Rudenko O.V. is...

  8. Analysis of sound propagation in ducts using the wave envelope concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for sound propagation in a rectangular two-dimensional duct without steady flow for plane wave input. Before the difference equations are formulated, the governing Helmholtz equation is first transformed to a form whose solution does not oscillate along the length of the duct. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude, and the number of grid points becomes independent of the sound frequency. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. Example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a one-dimensional straight hard-wall duct and in a two-dimensional straight soft-wall duct without steady flow. The numerical solutions show evidence of the existence along the duct wall of a developing acoustic pressure diffusion boundary layer which is similar in nature to the conventional viscous flow boundary layer. In order to better illustrate this concept, the wave equation and boundary conditions are written such that the frequency no longer appears explicitly in them. The frequency effects in duct propagation can be visualized solely as an expansion and stretching of the suppressor duct.

  9. Anisotropic propagation imaging of elastic waves in oriented columnar thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffy, E.; Dodane, G.; Euphrasie, S.; Mosset, A.; Vairac, P.; Martin, N.; Baida, H.; Rampnoux, J. M.; Dilhaire, S.

    2017-12-01

    We report on the observation of strongly anisotropic surface acoustic wave propagation on nanostructured thin films. Two kinds of tungsten samples were prepared by sputtering on a silicon substrate: a conventional thin film with columns normal to the substrate surface, and an oriented columnar architecture using the glancing angle deposition (GLAD) process. Pseudo-Rayleigh waves (PRWs) were imaged as a function of time in x and y directions for both films thanks to a femtosecond heterodyne pump-probe setup. A strong anisotropic propagation as well as a high velocity reduction of the PRWs were exhibited for the GLAD sample. For the wavevector k/2π  =  3  ×  105 m-1 the measured group velocities v x and v y equal 2220 m s-1 for the sample prepared with conventional sputtering, whereas a strong anisotropy appears (v x   =  1600 m s-1 and v y   =  870 m s-1) for the sample prepared with the GLAD process. Using the finite element method, the anisotropy is related to the structural anisotropy of the thin film’s architecture. The drop of PRWs group velocities is mainly assigned to the porous microstructure, especially favored by atomic shadowing effects which appear during the growth of the inclined columns. Such GLAD thin films constitute a new tool for the control of the propagation of surface elastic waves and for the design of new devices with useful properties.

  10. Strong wave/mean-flow coupling in baroclinic acoustic streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, Greg; Michel, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    Recently, Chini et al. demonstrated the potential for large-amplitude acoustic streaming in compressible channel flows subjected to strong background cross-channel density variations. In contrast with classic Rayleigh streaming, standing acoustic waves of O (ɛ) amplitude acquire vorticity owing to baroclinic torques acting throughout the domain rather than via viscous torques acting in Stokes boundary layers. More significantly, these baroclinically-driven streaming flows have a magnitude that also is O (ɛ) , i.e. comparable to that of the sound waves. In the present study, the consequent potential for fully two-way coupling between the waves and streaming flows is investigated using a novel WKBJ analysis. The analysis confirms that the wave-driven streaming flows are sufficiently strong to modify the background density gradient, thereby modifying the leading-order acoustic wave structure. Simulations of the wave/mean-flow system enabled by the WKBJ analysis are performed to illustrate the nature of the two-way coupling, which contrasts sharply with classic Rayleigh streaming, for which the waves can first be determined and the streaming flows subsequently computed.

  11. Topics in the Analysis of Shear-Wave Propagation in Oblique-Plate Impact Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheidler, Mike

    2007-01-01

    This report addresses several topics in the theoretical analysis of shock waves, acceleration waves, and centered simple waves, with emphasis on the propagation of shear waves generated in oblique-plate impact tests...

  12. On the Relation Between Complex Modes and Wave Propagation Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmida, K. M.; Arruda, J. R. F.

    2002-08-01

    This paper discusses the well-known, but often misunderstood, concept of complex modes of dynamic structures. It shows how complex modes can be interpreted in terms of wave propagation phenomena caused by either localized damping or propagation to the surrounding media. Numerical simulation results are presented for different kinds of structures exhibiting modal and wave propagation characteristics: straight beams, an L-shaped beam, and a three-dimensional frame structure. The input/output transfer relations of these structures are obtained using a spectral formulation known as the spectral element method (SEM). With this method, it is straightforward to use infinite elements, usually known as throw-off elements, to represent the propagation to infinity, which is a possible cause of modal complexity. With the SEM model, the exact dynamic behavior of structures can be investigated. The mode complexity of these structures is investigated. It is shown that mode complexity characterizes a behavior that is half-way between purely modal and purely propagative. A coefficient for quantifying mode complexity is introduced. The mode complexity coefficient consists of the correlation coefficient between the real and imaginary parts of the eigenvector, or of the operational deflection shape (ODS). It is shown that, far from discontinuities, this coefficient is zero in the case of pure wave propagation in which case the plot of the ODS in the complex plane is a perfect circle. In the other extreme situation, a finite structure without damping (or with proportional damping), where the mode shape (or the ODS) is a straight line on the complex plane, has a unitary complexity coefficient. For simple beam structures, it is shown that the mode complexity factor can also be calculated by curve-fitting the mode to an ellipse and computing the ratio of its radii.

  13. Propagation of the three-dimensional dust acoustic solitons in magnetized quantum plasmas with dust polarity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, M.; Ali, S.; Sabry, R.

    2009-01-01

    The quantum hydrodynamical model is employed to investigate the nonlinear properties of the quantum dust acoustic waves in a magnetized dusty plasma composed of inertialess electrons, ions, and mobile positive/negative charged dust particles. For this purpose, a quantum Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived and the basic features of the electrostatic excitations are investigated by applying the direct method. It is found that positive and negative bell-shaped solitary pulses become explosive pulses depending mainly upon the angles of propagation and dust polarity. Furthermore, the effects due to nondimensional quantum parameter and the external magnetic field are examined on the width of the quantum dust acoustic solitary pulses. The relevance of the present results to semiconductor quantum wells is mentioned.

  14. SPATIAL DAMPING OF PROPAGATING KINK WAVES IN PROMINENCE THREADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Transverse oscillations and propagating waves are frequently observed in threads of solar prominences/filaments and have been interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. We investigate the spatial damping of propagating kink MHD waves in transversely nonuniform and partially ionized prominence threads. Resonant absorption and ion-neutral collisions (Cowling's diffusion) are the damping mechanisms taken into account. The dispersion relation of resonant kink waves in a partially ionized magnetic flux tube is numerically solved by considering prominence conditions. Analytical expressions of the wavelength and damping length as functions of the kink mode frequency are obtained in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For typically reported periods of thread oscillations, resonant absorption is an efficient mechanism for the kink mode spatial damping, while ion-neutral collisions have a minor role. Cowling's diffusion dominates both the propagation and damping for periods much shorter than those observed. Resonant absorption may explain the observed spatial damping of kink waves in prominence threads. The transverse inhomogeneity length scale of the threads can be estimated by comparing the observed wavelengths and damping lengths with the theoretically predicted values. However, the ignorance of the form of the density profile in the transversely nonuniform layer introduces inaccuracies in the determination of the inhomogeneity length scale.

  15. Reflection and Transmission of Acoustic Waves at Semiconductor - Liquid Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Sharma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of reflection and transmission characteristics of acoustic waves at the interface of a semiconductor halfspace underlying an inviscid liquid has been carried out. The reflection and transmission coefficients of reflected and transmitted waves have been obtained for quasi-longitudinal (qP wave incident at the interface from fluid to semiconductor. The numerical computations of reflection and transmission coefficients have been carried out with the help of Gauss elimination method by using MATLAB programming for silicon (Si, germanium (Ge and silicon nitride (Si3N4 semiconductors. In order to interpret and compare, the computer simulated results are plotted graphically. The study may be useful in semiconductors, seismology and surface acoustic wave (SAW devices in addition to engines of the space shuttles.

  16. On waves in gases. Part I: Acoustics of jets, turbulence, and ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.

    1986-01-01

    This review on some aspects of waves in gases concentrates first (Part I) on modern research in the acoustics of fluids at rest or in steady or turbulent motion, in free space, in the presence of obstacles, or in ducts. The study of sound, for which the sole restoring force is pressure, will be extended in a later paper (Part II) to include the other three restoring forces, namely, gravity, electromagnetic, and Coriolis forces, leading to current research on internal, magnetic, and inertial waves and their couplings. The Introduction at the beginning of Part I, and the discussion at the end of Part II, concern all four types of waves in gases, and their relevance in physics and engineering. In Part I, the following areas of acoustics are addressed: the generation of noise by turbulence, inhomogeneities or bubbles, in natural and engineering flows, e.g., wind or jets; the scattering of sound by interfaces and diffraction by turbulence, and their effects on spectral and directional redistribution of energy; propagation in ducts, without or with mean flow, e.g., the horns of musical instruments and loudspeakers, and inlets and exhausts of engines; the effects of dissipation and nonlinearity on waves, e.g., in laboratory and engineering shock tubes, and in geophysical and astrophysical conditions. Underlying these topics is the interaction of acoustics with manking, ranging from the processes of human hearing and speech to the reproduction of desirable sounds (music) and reduction of undesirable sounds (noise).

  17. Observations of Upward Propagating Waves in the Transition Region and Corona above Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhenyong; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui

    2018-03-01

    We present observations of persistent oscillations of some bright features in the upper-chromosphere/transition region above sunspots taken by IRIS SJ 1400 Å and upward propagating quasi-periodic disturbances along coronal loops rooted in the same region taken by the AIA 171 Å passband. The oscillations of the features are cyclic oscillatory motions without any obvious damping. The amplitudes of the spatial displacements of the oscillations are about 1″. The apparent velocities of the oscillations are comparable to the sound speed in the chromosphere, but the upward motions are slightly larger than that of the downward. The intensity variations can take 24%–53% of the background, suggesting nonlinearity of the oscillations. The FFT power spectra of the oscillations show a dominant peak at a period of about 3 minutes, which is consistent with the omnipresent 3 minute oscillations in sunspots. The amplitudes of the intensity variations of the upward propagating coronal disturbances are 10%–15% of the background. The coronal disturbances have a period of about 3 minutes, and propagate upward along the coronal loops with apparent velocities in a range of 30 ∼ 80 km s‑1. We propose a scenario in which the observed transition region oscillations are powered continuously by upward propagating shocks, and the upward propagating coronal disturbances can be the recurrent plasma flows driven by shocks or responses of degenerated shocks that become slow magnetic-acoustic waves after heating the plasma in the coronal loops at their transition-region bases.

  18. Observation of sound focusing and defocusing due to propagating nonlinear internal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, J; Badiey, M; Karjadi, E A; Katsnelson, B; Tskhoidze, A; Lynch, J F; Moum, J N

    2008-09-01

    Fluctuations of the low frequency sound field in the presence of an internal solitary wave packet during the Shallow Water '06 experiment are analyzed. Acoustic, environmental, and on-board ship radar image data were collected simultaneously before, during, and after a strong internal solitary wave packet passed through the acoustic track. Preliminary analysis of the acoustic wave temporal intensity fluctuations agrees with previously observed phenomena and the existing theory of the horizontal refraction mechanism, which causes focusing and defocusing when the acoustic track is nearly parallel to the front of the internal waves [J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 122(2), pp. 747-760 (2007)].

  19. CHROMOSPHERIC HEATING BY ACOUSTIC WAVES COMPARED TO RADIATIVE COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, M.; Heinzel, P.; Švanda, M.; Jurčák, J. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (v.v.i.), Fričova 298, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Del Moro, D.; Berrilli, F. [Department of Physics, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-20

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near the large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on 2008 October 15, in the Fe i 617.3 nm and Ca ii 853.2 nm lines of the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. In analyzing the Ca ii observations (with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.″4 and 52 s) the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared to that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from the power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca ii line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven one-dimensional hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of the maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72%. In a quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only about 15%. In active areas with a photospheric magnetic-field strength between 300 and 1300 G and an inclination of 20°–60°, the contribution increases from 23% (chromospheric network) to 54% (a plage). However, these values have to be considered as lower limits and it might be possible that the acoustic energy flux is the main contributor to the heating of bright chromospheric network and plages.

  20. Boussinesq Modeling of Wave Propagation and Runup over Fringing Coral Reefs, Model Evaluation Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Demirbilek, Zeki; Nwogu, Okey G

    2007-01-01

    ..., for waves propagating over fringing reefs. The model evaluation had two goals: (a) investigate differences between laboratory and field characteristics of wave transformation processes over reefs, and (b...

  1. Wave propagation and instabilities in monolithic and periodically structured elastomeric materials undergoing large deformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoldi, Katia; Boyce, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Wave propagation in elastomeric materials undergoing large deformations is relevant in numerous application areas, including nondestructive testing of materials and ultrasound techniques, where finite deformations and corresponding stress states can influence wave propagation and hence

  2. Acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. VII - Non-grey, non-LTE H(-) models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, F.; Ulmschneider, P.; Kalkofen, W.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation and shock formation of radiatively damped acoustic waves in the solar chromosphere are studied under the assumption that H(-) is the only absorber; the opacity is non-grey. Deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) are permitted. The results of numerical simulations show the depth dependence of the heating by the acoustic waves to be insensitive to the mean state of the atmosphere. After the waves have developed into shocks, their energy flux decays exponentially with a constant damping length of about 1.4 times the pressure scale height, independent of initial flux and wave period. Departures from LTE have a strong influence on the mean temperature structure in dynamical chromosphere models; this is even more pronounced in models with reduced particle density - simulating conditions in magnetic flux tubes - which show significantly increased temperatures in response to mechanical heating. When the energy dissipation of the waves is sufficiently large to dissociate most of the H(-) ions, a strong temperature rise is found that is reminiscent of the temperature structure in the transition zone between chromosphere and corona; the energy flux remaining in the waves then drives mass motions.

  3. The energy transport by the propagation of sound waves in wave guides with a moving medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Grand, P.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the propagation of sound waves radiated by a source in a fluid moving with subsonic velocity between two parallel walls or inside a cylindrical tube is considered in [2], The most interesting thing of this problem is that waves may occur with constant amplitude coming from infinity.

  4. Observations and Modeling of Upper Ocean Hydrography in the Western Arctic With Implications for Acoustic Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    propagation of acoustic energy is said to travel along paths that curve according to the varying sound -speed properties of seawater. As sound ...loss due to the conversion of sound energy into heat through absorption , or the scattering of sound energy out of the ray path (Kuperman 2001). In...and so the ice-ocean interface plays a significant role in the attenuation of sound . The acoustical properties of sea ice, and sea ice’s effects on

  5. Influence of cancellous bone microstructure on two ultrasonic wave propagations in bovine femur: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsunori; Somiya, Hiroki; Kubo, Tomohiro; Matsukawa, Mami; Otani, Takahiko; Tsujimoto, Toshiyuki

    2010-11-01

    The influence of cancellous bone microstructure on the ultrasonic wave propagation of fast and slow waves was experimentally investigated. Four spherical cancellous bone specimens extracted from two bovine femora were prepared for the estimation of acoustical and structural anisotropies of cancellous bone. In vitro measurements were performed using a PVDF transducer (excited by a single sinusoidal wave at 1 MHz) by rotating the spherical specimens. In addition, the mean intercept length (MIL) and bone volume fraction (BV/TV) were estimated by X-ray micro-computed tomography. Separation of the fast and slow waves was clearly observed in two specimens. The fast wave speed was strongly dependent on the wave propagation direction, with the maximum speed along the main trabecular direction. The fast wave speed increased with the MIL. The slow wave speed, however, was almost constant. The fast wave speeds were statistically higher, and their amplitudes were statistically lower in the case of wave separation than in that of wave overlap.

  6. A coupled modal-finite element method for the wave propagation modeling in irregular open waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelat, Adrien; Felix, Simon; Pagneux, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    In modeling the wave propagation within a street canyon, particular attention must be paid to the description of both the multiple reflections of the wave on the building facades and the radiation in the free space above the street. The street canyon being considered as an open waveguide with a discontinuously varying cross-section, a coupled modal-finite element formulation is proposed to solve the three-dimensional wave equation within. The originally open configuration-the street canyon open in the sky above-is artificially turned into a close waveguiding structure by using perfectly matched layers that truncate the infinite sky without introducing numerical reflection. Then the eigenmodes of the resulting waveguide are determined by a finite element method computation in the cross-section. The eigensolutions can finally be used in a multimodal formulation of the wave propagation along the canyon, given its geometry and the end conditions at its extremities: initial field condition at the entrance and radiation condition at the output. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  7. Book Review: Wave propagation in materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Neil

    2018-02-01

    This book's remit is to provide a very extensive and detailed coverage of many one and two dimensional wave propagating behaviours primarily in structures such as rods, beams and plates of complexity covering laminated, sandwich plates, smart configurations and complex material compositions. This is potentially where the detailed presentation, including the derivation of the governing equations of motion from first principles, i.e. Hamilton's method, for example, distracts slightly from the subsequent wave solutions, the numerical simulations showing time responses, the wave speeds and importantly the dispersion characteristics. The author introduces a number of known analytical methodologies and means to obtain wave solutions, including the spectral finite element approach and also provides numerical examples showing the approach being applied to joints and framed structures.

  8. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    loss measurements from 5-20 kHz and interface roughness data were collected using an ROV platform as part of the GLISTEN experiment. WORK COMPLETED...and measured water sound speed and the ping number. Each ping had an associated latitude and longitude since the ROV was tracked using an ultrashort...baseline (USB) acoustic tracking system. This allowed the ROV data to be directly compared to the multibeam survey (MBS). The tracking system also

  9. Signal Processing of Underwater Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-11-01

    goes through a surface dipole distribution.. Show that when the work is expressed as a Stieltjes integral, this difficulty is avoided. 4.6 A stochastic...and Sons, Inc., New York, 1953 Duflos, J.: Etude des Effects de 1’Echantillonnage en Detection des Signaux Foibles, l’Onde Electrique , Paris, No. 443...M., and R. J. Thompson-’ Directivity Study of the Noise Field in the Ocean, Employing a Correlative Dipole , J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 36, pp. 1788-1794

  10. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) based multichannel cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Li, Sixing; Guo, Xiang; Chan, Chung Yu; Chiang, I-Kao; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J Philip; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-11-07

    We introduce a novel microfluidic device for cell sorting in continuous flow using tunable standing surface acoustic waves. This method allows individual cells to be precisely directed into five different outlet channels in a single step. It is versatile, simple, label-free, non-invasive, and highly controllable.

  11. Quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in weak relativistic plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A linear dispersion relation is also obtained taking into account the relativistic effect. The properties of quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves, obtained from the deformed KdV equation, are studied taking into account the quantum mechanical effects in the weak relativistic limit. It is found that relativistic effects significantly ...

  12. Detection of Suspicious Mass on Structures by Acoustical Waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Stoklasová, Pavla; Norris, C.S.P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 3 (2012), s. 14-21 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/0588 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : pulse holointerferometry * pulse electronic speckle patterns interferometry * laser vibrometry * lamb waves Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.378, year: 2012

  13. Dromion solutions for an electron acoustic wave and its application ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. Nov. & Dec. 2000 physics pp. 693–698. Dromion solutions for an electron acoustic wave and its application to space observations. S S GHOSH£, A ... out a systematic reductive perturbation analysis in two dimensions of the model two fluid .... For a more quantitative understanding of the shape and finer features.

  14. Quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in weak relativistic plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Small amplitude quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves are studied in an unmagnetized two- species relativistic quantum plasma system, comprised of electrons and ions. The one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) is used to obtain a deformed Korteweg–de Vries (dKdV) equation by reductive ...

  15. Propagation of bottom-trapped waves over variable topography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    on a topographic slope, as they propagate towards a deeper region of constant depth, is examined using a quasi-geostrophic model. It is seen that there can be no free transmitted wave to the region of constant depth. The bottom-trapped energy is thus... currents farther away. 1. INTRODUCTION Rhines (1970) showed that a stratified rotating fluid over sloping bottom topography can support free waves that are bottom-intensified. The in- crease in the kinetic energy of the currents with depth...

  16. Wave propagation in a quasi-chemical equilibrium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.-M.; Baum, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Wave propagation in a quasi-chemical equilibrium plasma is studied. The plasma is infinite and without external fields. The chemical reactions are assumed to result from the ionization and recombination processes. When the gas is near equilibrium, the dominant role describing the evolution of a reacting plasma is played by the global conservation equations. These equations are first derived and then used to study the small amplitude wave motion for a near-equilibrium situation. Nontrivial damping effects have been obtained by including the conduction current terms.

  17. On the lamb wave propagation in anisotropic laminated composite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soo Keun; Jeong, Hyun Jo; Kim, Moon Saeng

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the propagation of Lamb (or plate) waves in anisotropic laminated composite plates. The dispersion relations are explicitly derived using the classical plate theory (CLT), the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and the exact solution (ES), Attention is paid to the lowest antisymmetric (flexural) and lowest symmetric(extensional) modes in the low frequency, long wavelength limit. Different values of shear correction factor were tested in FSDT and comparisons between flexural wave dispersion curves were made with exact results to asses the range of validity of approximate plate theories in the frequency domain.

  18. Ultrasonic Guided Wave Propagation through Welded Lap Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Jankauskas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research presented here is the investigation of ultrasonic guided wave (UGW propagation through the lap joint welded plates used in the construction of a storage tank floors. The investigations have been performed using numerical simulation by finite element method (FEM and tested by measurement of the transmission losses of the guided waves transmitted through the welded lap joints. Propagation of the symmetric S0 mode in the welded stainless steel plates in the cases of different lap joint overlap width, operation frequency, and additional plate bonding caused by corrosion were investigated. It was shown that the transmission losses of the S0 mode can vary in the range of 2 dB to 8 dB depending on the ratio between lap joint width and wavelength. It was also demonstrated that additional bonding in the overlap zone caused by corrosion can essentially reduce transmission losses.

  19. Temperature Compensation of Surface Acoustic Waves on Berlinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, David Michael Marshall

    The surface acoustic wave properties of Berlinite (a-AlPO4) have been investigated theoretically and experimentally, for a variety of crystallographic orientations, to evaluate its possible use as a substrate material for temperature compensated surface acoustic wave devices. A computer program has been developed to calculate the surface wave properties of a material from its elastic, piezoelectric, dielectric and lattice constants and their temperature derivatives. The program calculates the temperature coefficient of delay, the velocity of the surface wave, the direction of power flow and a measure of the electro-mechanical coupling. These calculations have been performed for a large number of orientations using a modified form of the data given by Chang and Barsch for Berlinite and predict several new temperature compensated directions. Experimental measurements have been made of the frequency-temperature response of a surface acoustic wave oscillator on an 80° X axis boule cut which show it to be temperature compensated in qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions. This orientation shows a cubic frequency-temperature dependence instead of the expected parabolic response. Measurements of the electro-mechanical coupling coefficient k gave a value lower than predicted. Similar measurements on a Y cut plate gave a value which is approximately twice that of ST cut quartz, but again lower than predicted. The surface wave velocity on both these cuts was measured to be slightly higher than predicted by the computer program. Experimental measurements of the lattice parameters a and c are also presented for a range of temperatures from 25°C to just above the alpha-beta transition at 584°C. These results are compared with the values obtained by Chang and Barsch. The results of this work indicate that Berlinite should become a useful substrate material for the construction of temperature compensated surface acoustic wave devices.

  20. Wave propagation in layered anisotropic media with application to composites

    CERN Document Server

    Nayfeh, AH

    1995-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of the dynamic behavior of layered materials in general, and laminated fibrous composites in particular, are presented in this book. The need to understand the microstructural behavior of such classes of materials has brought a new challenge to existing analytical tools. This book explores the fundamental question of how mechanical waves propagate and interact with layered anisotropic media. The chapters are organized in a logical sequence depending upon the complexity of the physical model and its mathematical treatment.

  1. 24 GHz cmWave Radio Propagation Through Vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Ignacio; Abreu, Renato Barbosa; Portela Lopes de Almeida, Erika

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a measurement-based analysis of cm-wave radio propagation through vegetation at 24 GHz. A set of dedicated directional measurements were performed with horn antennas located close to street level inside a densely-vegetated area illuminated from above. The full azimuth...... along the paper are useful for simulation and radio network planning of future wireless systems operating at 24 GHz in presence of vegetation....

  2. Singular value decomposition methods for wave propagation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Parrot, M.; Lefeuvre, F.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2003), s. 10-1-10-13 ISSN 0048-6604 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/01/1064 Grant - others:Barrande(CZ) 98039/98055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911; CEZ:MSM 113200004 Keywords : wave propagation * singular value decomposition Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.832, year: 2003

  3. Flat lens effect on seismic waves propagation in the subsoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brûlé, Stéphane; Javelaud, Emmanuel H; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2017-12-22

    We show that seismic energy simulated by an artificial source that mainly propagates Rayleigh surface waves, is focused in structured soil made of a grid of holes distributed in the ground. We carry out large-scale field tests with a structured soil made of a grid consisting of cylindrical and vertical holes in the ground and a low frequency artificial source (seismic metamaterials to counteract partially or totally the most devastating components of seismic signals.

  4. Wave propagation in fluids models and numerical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    This second edition with four additional chapters presents the physical principles and solution techniques for transient propagation in fluid mechanics and hydraulics. The application domains vary including contaminant transport with or without sorption, the motion of immiscible hydrocarbons in aquifers, pipe transients, open channel and shallow water flow, and compressible gas dynamics. The mathematical formulation is covered from the angle of conservation laws, with an emphasis on multidimensional problems and discontinuous flows, such as steep fronts and shock waves. Finite

  5. Surface wave propagation in a fluid-saturated incompressible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surface wave propagation in a fluid-saturated incompressible porous medium157 where ˙xi˙xi˙xi and ¨xi¨xi¨xi(i = F,S) denote the velocities and accelerations of solid and fluid phases respectively and p is the effective pore pressure of the incompressible pore fluid. ρS and ρF are the densities of the solid and fluid phases ...

  6. Highly Nonlinear Wave Propagation in Elastic Woodpile Periodic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    Highly Nonlinear Wave Propagation in Elastic Woodpile Periodic Structures E. Kim,1 F. Li,1 C. Chong,2 G. Theocharis ,3 J. Yang,1 and P.G. Kevrekidis2...Kevrekidis, IMA J. Appl. Math. 76, 389 (2011). [4] G. Theocharis , N. Boechler, and C. Daraio, in Phononic Crystals and Metamaterials, Ch. 6, Springer...9] N. Boechler, G. Theocharis , and C. Daraio, Nature Ma- terials 10, 665 (2011). [10] F. Li, P. Anzel, J. Yang, P.G. Kevrekidis, and C. Daraio, Nat

  7. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  8. Dust acoustic shock wave at high dust density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Sarkar, Susmita; Khan, Manoranjan; Avinash, K.; Gupta, M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Dust acoustic (DA) shock wave at high dust density, i.e., the dust electroacoustic (DEA) or dust Coulomb (DC) shock wave has been investigated incorporating the nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The nonlinear DEA (DC) shock wave is seen to be governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation, in which the Burger term is proportional to the nonadiabaticity generated dissipation. It is seen that the shock strength decreases but after reaching minimum, it increases as the dust space charge density |q d n d | increases and the shock strength of DA wave is greater than that of DEA (DC) wave. Moreover the DEA (DC) shock width increases appreciably with increase mass m i of the ion component of the dusty plasma but for DA shock wave the effect is weak

  9. Reliability assessment of different plate theories for elastic wave propagation analysis in functionally graded plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrkash, Milad; Azhari, Mojtaba; Mirdamadi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    The importance of elastic wave propagation problem in plates arises from the application of ultrasonic elastic waves in non-destructive evaluation of plate-like structures. However, precise study and analysis of acoustic guided waves especially in non-homogeneous waveguides such as functionally graded plates are so complicated that exact elastodynamic methods are rarely employed in practical applications. Thus, the simple approximate plate theories have attracted much interest for the calculation of wave fields in FGM plates. Therefore, in the current research, the classical plate theory (CPT), first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT) and third-order shear deformation theory (TSDT) are used to obtain the transient responses of flexural waves in FGM plates subjected to transverse impulsive loadings. Moreover, comparing the results with those based on a well recognized hybrid numerical method (HNM), we examine the accuracy of the plate theories for several plates of various thicknesses under excitations of different frequencies. The material properties of the plate are assumed to vary across the plate thickness according to a simple power-law distribution in terms of volume fractions of constituents. In all analyses, spatial Fourier transform together with modal analysis are applied to compute displacement responses of the plates. A comparison of the results demonstrates the reliability ranges of the approximate plate theories for elastic wave propagation analysis in FGM plates. Furthermore, based on various examples, it is shown that whenever the plate theories are used within the appropriate ranges of plate thickness and frequency content, solution process in wave number-time domain based on modal analysis approach is not only sufficient but also efficient for finding the transient waveforms in FGM plates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Propagation of electromagnetic radiation in a random field of gravitational waves and space radio interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginsky, V.B.; Kardashev, N.S.; Polnarev, A.G.; Novikov, I.D.

    1989-12-01

    Propagation of an electromagnetic wave in the field of gravitational waves is considered. Attention is given to the principal difference between the electromagnetic wave propagation in the field of random gravitational waves and the electromagnetic wave propagation in a medium with a randomly-inhomogeneous refraction index. It is shown that in the case of the gravitation wave field the phase shift of an electromagnetic wave does not increase with distance. The capability of space radio interferometry to detect relic gravitational waves as well as gravitational wave bursts of non cosmological origin are analyzed. (author). 64 refs, 2 figs

  11. Dislocation kinetics and the acoustic-wave approximation for liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    A dislocation-dependent model for liquids describes the lattice deformation and the fluidity deformation as additive deformations. The lattice deformation represents distortions of an atom's potential energy structure and is a recoverable deformation response. The fluidity deformation represents discontinuous repositioning of atoms by dislocation kinetics in the lattice structure and is a nonrecoverable deformation response. From this model, one concludes that in liquids the acoustic-wave approximation is a description of a recoverable oscillation deformation that has dissipation because of dislocation kinetics. Other more-complex waves may exist, but such waves would rapidly disappear because of the small thermodynamic potential for dislocation kinetics in liquids

  12. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  13. Soliton generation via continuous stokes acoustic self-scattering of hypersonic waves in a paramagnetic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugay, A. N.; Sazonov, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for continuous frequency down-conversion of acoustic waves propagating in a paramagnetic crystal at a low temperature in an applied magnetic field. A transverse hypersonic pulse generating a carrier-free longitudinal strain pulse via nonlinear effects is scattered by the generated pulse. This leads to a Stokes shift in the transverse hypersonic wave proportional to its intensity, and both pulses continue to propagate in the form of a mode-locked soliton. As the transverse-pulse frequency is Stokes shifted, its spectrum becomes narrower. This process can be effectively implemented only if the linear group velocity of the transverse hypersonic pulse equals the phase velocity of the longitudinal strain wave. These velocities are renormalized by spin-phonon coupling and can be made equal by adjusting the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. The transverse structure of the soliton depends on the sign of the group velocity dispersion of the transverse component. When the dispersion is positive, planar solitons can develop whose transverse component has a topological defect of dark vortex type and longitudinal component has a hole. In the opposite case, the formation of two-component acoustic 'bullets' or vortices localized in all directions is possible

  14. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  15. Van Allen Probe observations of EMIC wave propagation in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikin, A.; Zhang, J.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    This study examines the propagation of inner magnetosphere (L vector, , analysis on all observed EMIC wave events to determine the direction of propagation, with bi-directionally propagating EMIC waves indicating the presence of the EMIC wave source region. EMIC waves were considered bi-directional (i.e., in the source region) if at least two wave packets exhibited opposing flux components, and (W/km2), consistently for 60 seconds. Events not observed to have opposing flux components are considered unidirectional. EMIC wave events observed at relatively high magnetic latitudes, generally, are found to propagate away from the magnetic equator (i.e., unidirectional). Bi-directionally propagating EMIC waves are preferably observed at lower magnetic latitudes. The occurrence rate, spatial distribution, and the energy propagation angle of both unidirectionally and bi-directionally propagating EMIC waves are examined with respect to L, MLT, and MLAT.

  16. Staggered-grid finite-difference acoustic modeling with the Time-Domain Atmospheric Acoustic Propagation Suite (TDAAPS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, David Franklin; Collier, Sandra L. (U.S. Army Research Laboratory); Marlin, David H. (U.S. Army Research Laboratory); Ostashev, Vladimir E. (NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory); Symons, Neill Phillip; Wilson, D. Keith (U.S. Army Cold Regions Research Engineering Lab.)

    2005-05-01

    This document is intended to serve as a users guide for the time-domain atmospheric acoustic propagation suite (TDAAPS) program developed as part of the Department of Defense High-Performance Modernization Office (HPCMP) Common High-Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI). TDAAPS performs staggered-grid finite-difference modeling of the acoustic velocity-pressure system with the incorporation of spatially inhomogeneous winds. Wherever practical the control structure of the codes are written in C++ using an object oriented design. Sections of code where a large number of calculations are required are written in C or F77 in order to enable better compiler optimization of these sections. The TDAAPS program conforms to a UNIX style calling interface. Most of the actions of the codes are controlled by adding flags to the invoking command line. This document presents a large number of examples and provides new users with the necessary background to perform acoustic modeling with TDAAPS.

  17. Directional Acoustic Wave Manipulation by a Porpoise via Multiphase Forehead Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Xianyan; Cao, Wenwu; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2017-12-01

    Porpoises are small-toothed whales, and they can produce directional acoustic waves to detect and track prey with high resolution and a wide field of view. Their sound-source sizes are rather small in comparison with the wavelength so that beam control should be difficult according to textbook sonar theories. Here, we demonstrate that the multiphase material structure in a porpoise's forehead is the key to manipulating the directional acoustic field. Computed tomography (CT) derives the multiphase (bone-air-tissue) complex, tissue experiments obtain the density and sound-velocity multiphase gradient distributions, and acoustic fields and beam formation are numerically simulated. The results suggest the control of wave propagations and sound-beam formations is realized by cooperation of the whole forehead's tissues and structures. The melon size significantly impacts the side lobes of the beam and slightly influences the main beams, while the orientation of the vestibular sac mainly adjusts the main beams. By compressing the forehead complex, the sound beam can be expanded for near view. The porpoise's biosonar allows effective wave manipulations for its omnidirectional sound source, which can help the future development of miniaturized biomimetic projectors in underwater sonar, medical ultrasonography, and other ultrasonic imaging applications.

  18. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  19. Numerical simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in elastically anisotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Victoria Cristina Cheade; Jospin, Reinaldo Jacques; Bittencourt, Marcelo de Siqueira Queiroz

    2013-01-01

    The ultrasonic non-destructive testing of components may encounter considerable difficulties to interpret some inspections results mainly in anisotropic crystalline structures. A numerical method for the simulation of elastic wave propagation in homogeneous elastically anisotropic media, based on the general finite element approach, is used to help this interpretation. The successful modeling of elastic field associated with NDE is based on the generation of a realistic pulsed ultrasonic wave, which is launched from a piezoelectric transducer into the material under inspection. The values of elastic constants are great interest information that provide the application of equations analytical models, until small and medium complexity problems through programs of numerical analysis as finite elements and/or boundary elements. The aim of this work is the comparison between the results of numerical solution of an ultrasonic wave, which is obtained from transient excitation pulse that can be specified by either force or displacement variation across the aperture of the transducer, and the results obtained from a experiment that was realized in an aluminum block in the IEN Ultrasonic Laboratory. The wave propagation can be simulated using all the characteristics of the material used in the experiment valuation associated to boundary conditions and from these results, the comparison can be made. (author)

  20. Wave propagation, scattering and emission in complex media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya-Qiu

    I. Polarimetric scattering and SAR imagery. EM wave propagation and scattering in polarimetric SAR interferometry / S. R. Cloude. Terrain topographic inversion from single-pass polarimetric SAR image data by using polarimetric stokes parameters and morphological algorithm / Y. Q. Jin, L. Luo. Road detection in forested area using polarimetric SAR / G. W. Dong ... [et al.]. Research on some problems about SAR radiometric resolution / G. Dong ... [et al.]. A fast image matching algorithm for remote sensing applications / Z. Q. Hou ... [et al.]. A new algorithm of noised remote sensing image fusion based on steerable filters / X. Kang ... [et al.]. Adaptive noise reduction of InSAR data based on anisotropic diffusion models and their applications to phase unwrapping / C. Wang, X. Gao, H. Zhang -- II. Scattering from randomly rough surfaces. Modeling tools for backscattering from rough surfaces / A. K. Fung, K. S. Chen. Pseudo-nondiffracting beams from rough surface scattering / E. R. Méndez, T. A. Leskova, A. A. Maradudin. Surface roughness clutter effects in GPR modeling and detection / C. Rappaport. Scattering from rough surfaces with small slopes / M. Saillard, G. Soriano. Polarization and spectral characteristics of radar signals reflected by sea-surface / V. A. Butko, V. A. Khlusov, L. I. Sharygina. Simulation of microwave scattering from wind-driven ocean surfaces / M. Y. Xia ... [et al.]. HF surface wave radar tests at the Eastern China Sea / X. B. Wu ... [et al.] -- III. Electromagnetics of complex materials. Wave propagation in plane-parallel metamaterial and constitutive relations / A. Ishimaru ... [et al.]. Two dimensional periodic approach for the study of left-handed metamaterials / T. M. Grzegorczyk ... [et al.]. Numerical analysis of the effective constitutive parameters of a random medium containing small chiral spheres / Y. Nanbu, T. Matsuoka, M. Tateiba. Wave propagation in inhomogeneous media: from the Helmholtz to the Ginzburg -Landau equation / M

  1. Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we present our recent work on making structured metals transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves via excitation of surface waves. First, we theoretically show that one-dimensional metallic gratings can become transparent and completely antireflective for extremely broadband electromagnetic waves by relying on surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. Second, we experimentally demonstrate that metallic gratings with narrow slits are highly transparent for broadband terahertz waves at oblique incidence and high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. Further, we significantly develop oblique metal gratings transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves (including optical waves and terahertz ones) under normal incidence. In the third, we find the principles of broadband transparency for structured metals can be extended from one-dimensional metallic gratings to two-dimensional cases. Moreover, similar phenomena are found in sonic artificially metallic structures, which present the transparency for broadband acoustic waves. These investigations provide guidelines to develop many novel materials and devices, such as transparent conducting panels, antireflective solar cells, and other broadband metamaterials and stealth technologies. - Highlights: • Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves. • Non-resonant excitation of surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. • Sonic artificially metallic structures transparent for broadband acoustic waves

  2. One-Dimensional Full Wave Simulation of Equatorial Magnetosonic Wave Propagation in an Inhomogeneous Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Lunjin; Yang, Lixia; Xia, Zhiyang; Malaspina, David M.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of the plasmapause on equatorially radially propagating fast magnetosonic (MS) waves in the Earth's dipole magnetic field is studied by using finite difference time domain method. We run 1-D simulation for three different density profiles: (1) no plasmapause, (2) with a plasmapause, and (3) with a plasmapause accompanied with fine-scale density irregularity. We find that (1) without plasmapause the radially inward propagating MS wave can reach ionosphere and continuously propagate to lower altitude if no damping mechanism is considered. The wave properties follow the cold plasma dispersion relation locally along its trajectory. (2) For simulation with a plasmapause with a scale length of 0.006 RE compared to wavelength, only a small fraction of the MS wave power is reflected by the plasmapause. WKB approximation is generally valid for such plasmapause. (3) The multiple fine-scale density irregularities near the outer edge of plasmapause can effectively block the MS wave propagation, resulting in a terminating boundary for MS waves near the plasmapause.

  3. Wave propagation in metamaterials and effective parameters retrieving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Ha, S.; Sukhorukov, A.

    2011-01-01

    of the determined effective parameters and applicability to thin slabs only. The other methods based, for example, on the eigenfunctions calculations [Menzel], or analytical calculations [Simovski] require advanced skills either in numerical methods and programming or in analytical derivations and maybe considered...... as handsome for implementation. We set a goal to develop a method which is unambiguous but at the same time simple and straightforward. We assume that this can be done by observing the wave propagation inside a metamaterial slab thick enough to avoid transient effects. First, we formulated a retrieval method...... complex wave effective parameters. Extending the method further we developed the approach to determine both wave and material effective parameters through the Bloch-mode analysis [3]. The idea is to perform the Bloch mode expansion [4] of the field inside the metamaterial slab when it is illuminated...

  4. Theory of electromagnetic wave propagation in ferromagnetic Rashba conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Junya; Takeuchi, Akihito; Kohno, Hiroshi; Tatara, Gen

    2018-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of various electromagnetic wave propagation phenomena in a ferromagnetic bulk Rashba conductor from the perspective of quantum mechanical transport. In this system, both the space inversion and time reversal symmetries are broken, as characterized by the Rashba field α and magnetization M, respectively. First, we present a general phenomenological analysis of electromagnetic wave propagation in media with broken space inversion and time reversal symmetries based on the dielectric tensor. The dependence of the dielectric tensor on the wave vector q and M is retained to first order. Then, we calculate the microscopic electromagnetic response of the current and spin of conduction electrons subjected to α and M, based on linear response theory and the Green's function method; the results are used to study the system optical properties. First, it is found that a large α enhances the anisotropic properties of the system and enlarges the frequency range in which the electromagnetic waves have hyperbolic dispersion surfaces and exhibit unusual propagations known as negative refraction and backward waves. Second, we consider the electromagnetic cross-correlation effects (direct and inverse Edelstein effects) on the wave propagation. These effects stem from the lack of space inversion symmetry and yield q-linear off-diagonal components in the dielectric tensor. This induces a Rashba-induced birefringence, in which the polarization vector rotates around the vector (α ×q ) . In the presence of M, which breaks time reversal symmetry, there arises an anomalous Hall effect and the dielectric tensor acquires off-diagonal components linear in M. For α ∥M , these components yield the Faraday effect for the Faraday configuration q ∥M and the Cotton-Mouton effect for the Voigt configuration ( q ⊥M ). When α and M are noncollinear, M- and q-induced optical phenomena are possible, which include nonreciprocal directional dichroism in the

  5. Ionospheric Responses to Nonlinear Acoustic Waves Generated by Natural Hazard Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Ionospheric total electron content (TEC) fluctuations following large-magnitude earthquakes and resulting tsunamis, e.g. Tohoku in 2011, have been noted in many recent investigations [e.g., Galvan et al., Radio Science, 47(4), 2012]. Earthquakes impact the atmosphere through vertical displacements of the Earth's crust or ocean surfaces producing, as one effect, low-frequency acoustic waves. These waves can achieve significant amplitudes during propagation through the rarefied upper atmosphere, and are capable of driving sizable ionospheric electron density (TEC) fluctuations and electrical currents. Earthquake-generated acoustic waves are readily identifiable in GPS observations as 0.1-2 TECU, 3-5 mHz, oscillations, which are delayed from the quake occurrence by roughly the sound travel time between the ground and ionosphere. In some extreme cases, the onset of acoustic oscillations is concurrent with a persistent, sharp decrease in TEC (~5 TECU) above the epicenter [e.g., Kakinami et al., GRL, 39(13), 2012]. Ionospheric responses to large amplitude acoustic waves are investigated using a coupled atmosphere-ionosphere model [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. Of particular interest are effects of acoustic wave amplitude and nonlinearity on ionospheric responses, including production of detectable TEC oscillations and longer-lived responses like TEC depletions. The atmospheric dynamics model solves a Navier-Stokes' system of equations and incorporates generation of acoustic waves through acceleration source terms at ground-level. The ionospheric model solves a fluid system of equations for each of the major ionospheric species, and includes an electrostatic description of dynamo currents. The coupled model enables direct computation of observable quantities, such as vertical TEC and magnetic field fluctuations. Here we construct simulation case studies for realistic earthquake events and compare results against published TEC and magnetic field data. This

  6. Induced wave propagation from a vibrating containment envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.; Thigpen, L.; Rambo, J.T.

    1985-09-01

    Low frequency wave forms are observed in the particle velocity measurements around the cavity and containment envelope formed by an underground nuclear test. The vibration solution for a spherical shell is used to formulate a model for the low frequency wave that propagates outward from this region. In this model the containment envelope is the zone of material that is crushed by the compressive shock wave of the nuclear explosion. The containment envelope is approximated by a spherical shell of material. The material in the spherical shell is densified and is given a relatively high kinetic energy density because of the high compressive stress and particle velocity of the shock wave. After the shock wave has propagated through the spherical shell, the spherical shell vibrates in order to dissipate the kinetic energy acquired from the shock wave. Based on the model, the frequency of vibration depends on the dimensions and material properties of the spherical shell. The model can also be applied in an inverse mode to obtain global estimates of averaged materials properties. This requires using experimental data and semi-empirical relationships involving the material properties. A particular case of estimating a value for shear strength is described. Finally, the oscillation time period of the lowest frequency from five nuclear tests is correlated with the energy of the explosion. The correlation provides another diagnostic to estimate the energy of a nuclear explosion. Also, the longest oscillation time period measurement provides additional experimental data that can be used to assess and validate various computer models. 11 refs., 2 figs

  7. ENERGY CONTENT AND PROPAGATION IN TRANSVERSE SOLAR ATMOSPHERIC WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Soler, R. [Solar Physics Group, Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Verth, G., E-mail: tom.vandoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.be [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Hicks Building, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10

    Recently, a significant amount of transverse wave energy has been estimated propagating along solar atmospheric magnetic fields. However, these estimates have been made with the classic bulk Alfven wave model which assumes a homogeneous plasma. In this paper, the kinetic, magnetic, and total energy densities and the flux of energy are computed for transverse MHD waves in one-dimensional cylindrical flux tube models with a piecewise constant or continuous radial density profile. There are fundamental deviations from the properties for classic bulk Alfven waves. (1) There is no local equipartition between kinetic and magnetic energy. (2) The flux of energy and the velocity of energy transfer have, in addition to a component parallel to the magnetic field, components in the planes normal to the magnetic field. (3) The energy densities and the flux of energy vary spatially, contrary to the case of classic bulk Alfven waves. This last property has the important consequence that the energy flux computed with the well known expression for bulk Alfven waves could overestimate the real flux by a factor in the range 10-50, depending on the flux tube equilibrium properties.

  8. Propagation of photosensitive chemical waves on the circular routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Akiko; Nakata, Satoshi; Ichino, Takatoshi

    2005-06-09

    The propagation of chemical waves in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction was investigated using an excitable field in the shape of a circular ring or figure "8" that was drawn by computer software and then projected on a film soaked with BZ solution using a liquid-crystal projector. For a chemical wave in a circular reaction field, the shape of the chemical wave was investigated depending on the ratio of the inner and outer radii. When two chemical waves were generated on a field shaped like a figure "8" (one chemical wave in each circle) as the initial condition, the location of the collision of the waves either was constant or alternated depending on the degree of overlap of the two circular rings. These experimental results were analyzed on the basis of a geometrical discussion and theoretically reproduced on the basis of a reaction-diffusion system using a modified Oregonator model. These results suggest that the photosensitive BZ reaction may be useful for creating spatio-temporal patterns depending on the geometric arrangement of excitable fields.

  9. Elastic wavelets and their application to problems of solitary wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cattani, Carlo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper can be referred to that direction in the wavelet theory, which was called by Kaiser "the physical wavelets". He developed the analysis of first two kinds of physical wavelets - electromagnetic (optic and acoustic wavelets. Newland developed the technique of application of harmonic wavelets especially for studying the harmonic vibrations. Recently Cattani and Rushchitsky proposed the 4th kind of physical wavelets - elastic wavelets. This proposal was based on three main elements: 1. Kaiser's idea of constructing the physical wavelets on the base of specially chosen (admissible solutions of wave equations. 2. Developed by one of authors theory of solitary waves (with profiles in the form of Chebyshov-Hermite functions propagated in elastic dispersive media. 3. The theory and practice of using the wavelet "Mexican Hat" system, the mother and farther wavelets (and their Fourier transforms of which are analytically represented as the Chebyshov-Hermite functions of different indexes. An application of elastic wavelets to studying the evolution of solitary waves of different shape during their propagation through composite materials is shown on many examples.

  10. Wave energy converter effects on wave propagation: A sensitivity study in Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Magalen, J.; Ruehl, K.; Chartrand, C.

    2014-12-01

    The development of renewable offshore energy in the United States is growing rapidly and wave energy is one of the largest resources currently being evaluated. The deployment of wave energy converter (WEC) arrays required to harness this resource could feasibly number in the hundreds of individual devices. The WEC arrays have the potential to alter nearshore wave propagation and circulation patterns and ecosystem processes. As the industry progresses from pilot- to commercial-scale it is important to understand and quantify the effects of WECs on the natural nearshore processes that support a local, healthy ecosystem. To help accelerate the realization of commercial-scale wave power, predictive modeling tools have been developed and utilized to evaluate the likelihood of environmental impact. At present, direct measurements of the effects of different types of WEC arrays on nearshore wave propagation are not available; therefore wave model simulations provide the groundwork for investigations of the sensitivity of model results to prescribed WEC characteristics over a range of anticipated wave conditions. The present study incorporates a modified version of an industry standard wave modeling tool, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore), to simulate wave propagation through a hypothetical WEC array deployment site on the California coast. The modified SWAN, referred to as SNL-SWAN, incorporates device-specific WEC power take-off characteristics to more accurately evaluate a WEC device's effects on wave propagation. The primary objectives were to investigate the effects of a range of WEC devices and device and array characteristics (e.g., device spacing, number of WECs in an array) on nearshore wave propagation using SNL-SWAN model simulations. Results showed that significant wave height was most sensitive to variations in WEC device type and size and the number of WEC devices in an array. Locations in the lee centerline of the arrays in each modeled scenario showed the

  11. Tuneable film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Gevorgian, Spartak Sh; Vorobiev, Andrei K

    2013-01-01

    To handle many standards and ever increasing bandwidth requirements, large number of filters and switches are used in transceivers of modern wireless communications systems. It makes the cost, performance, form factor, and power consumption of these systems, including cellular phones, critical issues. At present, the fixed frequency filter banks based on Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators (FBAR) are regarded as one of the most promising technologies to address performance -form factor-cost issues. Even though the FBARs improve the overall performances the complexity of these systems remains high.  Attempts are being made to exclude some of the filters by bringing the digital signal processing (including channel selection) as close to the antennas as possible. However handling the increased interference levels is unrealistic for low-cost battery operated radios. Replacing fixed frequency filter banks by one tuneable filter is the most desired and widely considered scenario. As an example, development of the softwa...

  12. Plane waves at or near grazing incidence in the parabolic approximation. [acoustic equations of motion for sound fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a plane wave at or near grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. It is shown how this approximation accounts for effects neglected in the usual plane wave reflection analysis which, at grazing incidence, erroneously predicts complete cancellation of the incident field by the reflected field. Examples are presented which illustrate that the solution obtained by the parabolic approximation contains several of the physical phenomena known to occur in wave propagation near an absorbing boundary.

  13. Investigation into the Effect of Acoustic Radiation Force and Acoustic Streaming on Particle Patterning in Acoustic Standing Wave Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilei Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic standing waves have been widely used in trapping, patterning, and manipulating particles, whereas one barrier remains: the lack of understanding of force conditions on particles which mainly include acoustic radiation force (ARF and acoustic streaming (AS. In this paper, force conditions on micrometer size polystyrene microspheres in acoustic standing wave fields were investigated. The COMSOL® Mutiphysics particle tracing module was used to numerically simulate force conditions on various particles as a function of time. The velocity of particle movement was experimentally measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV. Through experimental and numerical simulation, the functions of ARF and AS in trapping and patterning were analyzed. It is shown that ARF is dominant in trapping and patterning large particles while the impact of AS increases rapidly with decreasing particle size. The combination of using both ARF and AS for medium size particles can obtain different patterns with only using ARF. Findings of the present study will aid the design of acoustic-driven microfluidic devices to increase the diversity of particle patterning.

  14. Dust confinement and dust acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.

    2005-10-01

    Systematic laboratory experiments on dust acoustic waves require the confinement of dust particles. Here we report on new experiments in a magnetized plasma region in front of an additional positively biased disk electrode in a background plasma which is generated in argon at 27MHz between a disk and grid electrode. The plasma diffuses through the grid along the magnetic field. The three-dimensional dust distribution is measured with a horizontal sheet of laser light and a CCD camera, which are mounted on a vertical translation stage. Depending on magnetic field and discharge current, cigar or donut-shaped dust clouds are generated, which tend to rotate about the magnetic field direction. Measurements with emissive probes show that the axial confinement of dust particles with diameters between 0.7-2 μm is achieved by a balance of ion-drag force and electric field force. Dust levitation and radial confinement is due to a strong radial electric field. Dust acoustic waves are destabilized by the ion flow or can be stimulated by a periodic bias on the disk electrode. The observed wave dispersion is compared with fluid and kinetic models of the dust acoustic wave.

  15. Mid-frequency sound propagation through internal waves at short range with synoptic oceanographic observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouseff, Daniel; Tang, Dajun; Williams, Kevin L; Wang, Zhongkang; Moum, James N

    2008-09-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an analysis of mid-frequency acoustic transmission data collected at range 550 m during the Shallow Water 2006 Experiment. The acoustic data were collected on a vertical array immediately before, during, and after the passage of a nonlinear internal wave on 18 August, 2006. Using oceanographic data collected at a nearby location, a plane-wave model for the nonlinear internal wave's position as a function of time is developed. Experimental results show a new acoustic path is generated as the internal wave passes above the acoustic source.

  16. SILICON COMPATIBLE ACOUSTIC WAVE RESONATORS: DESIGN, FABRICATION AND PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliza Aini Md Ralib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Continuous advancement in wireless technology and silicon microfabrication has fueled exciting growth in wireless products. The bulky size of discrete vibrating mechanical devices such as quartz crystals and surface acoustic wave resonators impedes the ultimate miniaturization of single-chip transceivers. Fabrication of acoustic wave resonators on silicon allows complete integration of a resonator with its accompanying circuitry.  Integration leads to enhanced performance, better functionality with reduced cost at large volume production. This paper compiles the state-of-the-art technology of silicon compatible acoustic resonators, which can be integrated with interface circuitry. Typical acoustic wave resonators are surface acoustic wave (SAW and bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonators.  Performance of the resonator is measured in terms of quality factor, resonance frequency and insertion loss. Selection of appropriate piezoelectric material is significant to ensure sufficient electromechanical coupling coefficient is produced to reduce the insertion loss. The insulating passive SiO2 layer acts as a low loss material and aims to increase the quality factor and temperature stability of the design. The integration technique also is influenced by the fabrication process and packaging.  Packageless structure using AlN as the additional isolation layer is proposed to protect the SAW device from the environment for high reliability. Advancement in miniaturization technology of silicon compatible acoustic wave resonators to realize a single chip transceiver system is still needed. ABSTRAK: Kemajuan yang berterusan dalam teknologi tanpa wayar dan silikon telah menguatkan pertumbuhan yang menarik dalam produk tanpa wayar. Saiz yang besar bagi peralatan mekanikal bergetar seperti kristal kuarza menghalang pengecilan untuk merealisasikan peranti cip. Silikon serasi  gelombang akustik resonator mempunyai potensi yang besar untuk menggantikan unsur

  17. The spatial location of laser-driven, forward-propagating waves in a National-Ignition-Facility-relevant plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobble, J. A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Kurnit, N. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Lopez, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    Ion acoustic and electron plasma waves, associated with backward-propagating stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering, have been diagnosed in a long-scale-length, nearly homogenous plasma with transverse flow. Thomson scattered light from a probe beam is employed to show that these waves are well localized in space and for a time much shorter than the laser pulse duration. These plasma conditions are relevant to hohlraum design for the National Ignition Facility inertial confinement fusion laser system. [R. Sawicki et al., Fusion Technol. 34, 1097 (1998)]. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  18. Modeling the Propagation of Shock Waves in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W. Michael

    2005-07-01

    We present modeling results for the propagation of strong shock waves in metals. In particular, we use an arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE3D) code to model the propagation of strong pressure waves (P ˜300 to 400 kbars) generated with high explosives in contact with aluminum cylinders. The aluminum cylinders are assumed to be both flat-topped and have large-amplitude curved surfaces. We use 3D Lagrange mechanics. For the aluminum we use a rate-independent Steinberg-Guinan model, where the yield strength and bulk modulus depends on pressure, density and temperature. The calculation of the melt temperature is based on the Lindermann law. At melt the yield strength and bulk modulus is set to zero. The pressure is represented as a seven-term polynomial as a function of density. For the HMX-based high explosive, we use a JWL, with a program burn model that gives the correct detonation velocity and C-J pressure (P ˜ 390 kbars). For the case of the large-amplitude curved surface, we discuss the evolving shock structure in terms of the early shock propagation experiments by Sakharov. We also discuss the dependence of our results upon our material model for aluminum.

  19. Near-surface viscosity measurements with a love acoustic wave device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, A.F.; Cooper, B.J.; Lappas, S.; Sor, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In the last decade, considerable research effort has been directed towards interfacing piezoelectric transducers with biological detection systems to produce efficient and highly selective biosensors. Several types of piezoelectric or, more specifically, acoustic wave transducers have been investigated. Our group has developed Love wave (guided surface skimming wave) devices which are made by attaching a thin overlayer with the appropriate acoustic properties to the surface of a conventional surface horizontal mode device. An optimised layer concentrates most of the propagating wave energy in the guiding layer and can improve the device sensitivity in detecting gas-phase mass loading on the surface some 20- to 40-fold. Love wave devices used in liquid phase sensing will also respond to viscous, as well as mass, loading on the device surface. We have studied the propagation of viscous waves into liquid sitting on a Love wave device both theoretically and experimentally. Modelling of the effect of a viscous liquid layer on a Love wave propagating in a layered medium predicts the velocity profile in the solid substrate and in the adjoining liquid. This is a function of the thickness of the guiding layer, the elastic properties of the guiding layer and the piezoelectric substrate, and of the viscosity and density of the liquid layer. We report here on measurements of the viscosity of aqueous glycerine solutions made with a quartz Love wave device with a 5.5 μm SiO 2 guiding layer. The linear relationship between the decrease in the device frequency and the square root of the viscosity density product is accurately observed at Newtonian viscosities. At higher viscosities, there is an increase in damping, the insertion loss of the device saturates, Δf is no longer proportional to (ηp) l/2 and reaches a maximum. We also show results for the determination of the gelation time in protein and inorganic aqueous gels and for the rate of change of viscosity with

  20. Computational study on full-wave inversion based on the acoustic wave-equation; Onkyoha hado hoteishiki full wave inversion no model keisan ni yoru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.; Sassa, K. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Uesaka, S. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    The effect of initial models on full-wave inversion (FWI) analysis based on acoustic wave-equation was studied for elastic wave tomography of underground structures. At present, travel time inversion using initial motion travel time is generally used, and inverse analysis is conducted using the concept `ray,` assuming very high wave frequency. Although this method can derive stable solutions relatively unaffected by initial model, it uses only the data of initial motion travel time. FWI calculates theoretical waveform at each receiver using all of observed waveforms as data by wave equation modeling where 2-D underground structure is calculated by difference calculus under the assumption that wave propagation is described by wave equation of P wave. Although it is a weak point that FWI is easily affected by noises in an initial model and data, it is featured by high resolution of solutions. This method offers very excellent convergence as a proper initial model is used, resulting in sufficient performance, however, it is strongly affected by initial model. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.