WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic spectral signature

  1. Spectral signatures of chirality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of measuring chirality, via the spectral shift of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional structures. We derive an explicit mapping of the problem of oblique incidence of circularly polarized light on a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal with negligible index contrast...... to the formally equivalent problem of linearly polarized light incident on-axis on a non-chiral structure with index contrast. We derive analytical expressions for the first-order shifts of the band gaps for negligible index contrast. These are modified to give good approximations to the band gap shifts also...

  2. Methods and apparatus for multi-parameter acoustic signature inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Samuel, Todd J.; Valencia, Juan D.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Tucker, Brian J.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Skorpik, James R.; Reid, Larry D.; Munley, John T.; Pappas, Richard A.; Wright, Bob W.; Panetta, Paul D.; Thompson, Jason S.

    2007-07-24

    A multiparameter acoustic signature inspection device and method are described for non-invasive inspection of containers. Dual acoustic signatures discriminate between various fluids and materials for identification of the same.

  3. Spectral flow, index and the signature operator

    CERN Document Server

    Azzali, Sara

    2009-01-01

    We relate the spectral flow to the index for paths of selfadjoint Breuer-Fredholm operators affiliated to a semifinite von Neumann algebra, generalizing results of Robbin-Salamon and Pushnitski. Then we prove the vanishing of the von Neumann spectral flow for the tangential signature operator of a foliated manifold when the metric is varied. We conclude that the tangential signature of a foliated manifold with boundary does not depend on the metric. In the Appendix we reconsider integral formulas for the spectral flow of paths of bounded operators.

  4. Temporal shape analysis via the spectral signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardis, Elena; Konukoglu, Ender; Ou, Yangming; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Desjardins, Benoit; Pohl, Kilian M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we adapt spectral signatures for capturing morphological changes over time. Advanced techniques for capturing temporal shape changes frequently rely on first registering the sequence of shapes and then analyzing the corresponding set of high dimensional deformation maps. Instead, we propose a simple encoding motivated by the observation that small shape deformations lead to minor refinements in the spectral signature composed of the eigenvalues of the Laplace operator. The proposed encoding does not require registration, since spectral signatures are invariant to pose changes. We apply our representation to the shapes of the ventricles extracted from 22 cine MR scans of healthy controls and Tetralogy of Fallot patients. We then measure the accuracy score of our encoding by training a linear classifier, which outperforms the same classifier based on volumetric measurements.

  5. Acoustic Signature Monitoring and Management of Naval Platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Graafland, F.; Hof, J. van 't

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic signatures make naval platforms susceptible to detection by threat sensors. The variable operational conditions and lifespan of a platform cause variations in the acoustic signature. To deal with these variations, a real time signature monitoring capability is being developed, with advisory

  6. Spectral Representation Analysis of Non Contact Acousto Thermal Signature Data (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    the acoustic waves are absorbed into the material and converted to heat through the diffusion of transverse thermal currents, inter-crystalline...from Non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) experiments are considered. Spectral representation models are developed for general conductive...experiments are considered. Spectral representation models are developed for general conductive cooling physics. These models are subsequently used to

  7. A coarse-grained spectral signature generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, K. P.; Austin, J. C.; Day, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the method for object fingerprinting in the context of element specific x-ray imaging. In particular, the use of spectral descriptors that are illumination invariant and viewpoint independent for pattern identification was examined in some detail. To improve generating the relevant "signature", the spectral descriptor constructed is enhanced with a differentiator which has built-in noise filtration capability and good localisation properties, thus facilitating the extraction of element specific features at a coarse-grained level. In addition to the demonstrable efficacy in identifying significant image intensity transitions that are associated with the underlying physical process of interest, the method has the distinct advantage of being conceptually simple and computationally efficient. These latter properties allow the descriptor to be further utilised by an intelligent system capable of performing a fine-grained analysis of the extracted pattern signatures. The performance of the spectral descriptor has been studied in terms of the quality of the signature vectors that it generated, quantitatively based on the established framework of Spectral Information Measure (SIM). Early results suggested that such a multiscale approach of image sequence analysis offers a considerable potential for real-time applications.

  8. Modeling ground vehicle acoustic signatures for analysis and synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stanfield, R. [US Army CECOM, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Security and weapon systems use acoustic sensor signals to classify and identify moving ground vehicles. Developing robust signal processing algorithms for this is expensive, particularly in presence of acoustic clutter or countermeasures. This paper proposes a parametric ground vehicle acoustic signature model to aid the system designer in understanding which signature features are important, developing corresponding feature extraction algorithms and generating low-cost, high-fidelity synthetic signatures for testing. The authors have proposed computer-generated acoustic signatures of armored, tracked ground vehicles to deceive acoustic-sensored smart munitions. They have developed quantitative measures of how accurately a synthetic acoustic signature matches those produced by actual vehicles. This paper describes parameters of the model used to generate these synthetic signatures and suggests methods for extracting these parameters from signatures of valid vehicle encounters. The model incorporates wide-bandwidth and narrow- bandwidth components that are modulated in a pseudo-random fashion to mimic the time dynamics of valid vehicle signatures. Narrow- bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate frequency, amplitude and phase information contained in a single set of narrow frequency- band harmonics. Wide-bandwidth feature extraction techniques estimate parameters of a correlated-noise-floor model. Finally, the authors propose a method of modeling the time dynamics of the harmonic amplitudes as a means adding necessary time-varying features to the narrow-bandwidth signal components. The authors present results of applying this modeling technique to acoustic signatures recorded during encounters with one armored, tracked vehicle. Similar modeling techniques can be applied to security systems.

  9. The acoustic signature of decaying resonant phospholipid microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. H.; Butler, M.; Pelekasis, N.; Anderson, T.; Stride, E.; Sboros, V.

    2013-02-01

    Sub-capillary sized microbubbles offer improved techniques for diagnosis and therapy of vascular related disease using ultrasound. Their physical interaction with ultrasound remains an active research field that aims to optimize techniques. The aim of this study is to investigate whether controlled microbubble disruption upon exposure to consecutive ultrasound exposures can be achieved. Single lipid-shelled microbubble scattered echoes have been measured in response to two consecutive imaging pulses, using a calibrated micro-acoustic system. The nonlinear evolution of microbubble echoes provides an exact signature above and below primary and secondary resonance, which has been identified using theoretical results based on the Mooney-Rivlin strain softening shell model. Decaying microbubbles follow an irreversible trajectory through the resonance peak, causing the evolution of specific microbubble spectral signatures. The characteristics of the microbubble motion causes varying amounts of shell material to be lost during microbubble decay. Incident ultrasound field parameters can thus accurately manipulate the regulated shedding of shell material, which has applications for both imaging applications and localized drug delivery strategies.

  10. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  11. Spectral induced polarization signature of contaminated soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, N.; Huisman, J. A.; Shefer, I.; Furman, A.

    2012-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) signatures of porous media contaminated with non aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) were measured using an accurate impedance meter. The samples were prepared by mixing air-dried sand with 15% by weight of bentonite clay, tap water and either diesel fuel or motor oil. Next, the soil was packed in a column and left for 24 hr before electrical measurements were performed. For all the samples, water saturation was constant (Sw = 0.47) and the NAPL saturation was 0 (control), 5, or 15 percent. Counter-intuitively, the results show that addition of NAPL to the porous media resulted in an increase of the real part of the complex conductivity. Evidently, for each type of contaminant, an increase in the contaminant saturation resulted in an increase in the real part of the conductivity. The imaginary part of the complex conductivity showed a reversed behavior: higher NAPL saturation resulted in a reduction of the imaginary part of the complex conductivity. For both the real and the imaginary part of the complex conductivity, the effect of NAPL on the complex electrical conductivity was more significant for motor oil than for diesel fuel. In addition to the electrical measurements, we also performed an extraction experiment to examine the effect of the presence of NAPL on the electrical conductivity (EC) of the pore water. The results from the extraction experiment showed that addition of NAPL to the porous media resulted in an increase of the pore water EC. We argue that this increase in the real part of the complex conductivity is related to adsorption of organic polar compounds from the NAPL onto the mineral surface and the associated release of inorganic ions from the mineral surface to the pore water. These exchange processes affect both the surface and the pore water conductivity. In addition, we suggest that the decrease in polarization (associated with the imaginary part of the complex conductivity) of the NAPL contaminated porous media

  12. DEMON Acoustic Ship Signature Measurements in an Urban Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil Woo Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection, classification, and tracking of small vessels are important tasks for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification, and tracking. This paper presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise DEMON acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship spectra and were measured at distances up to 7 km. The combination of cross-correlation and methods allowed separation of the acoustic signatures of ships in busy urban environments.

  13. Spectral signatures of hydrilla from a tank and field setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfonso BLANCO; John J.QU; William E.ROPER

    2012-01-01

    The invasion of hydrilla in many waterways has caused significant problems resulting in high maintenance costs for eradicating this invasive aquatic weed.Present identification methods employed for detecting hydrilla invasions such as aerial photography and videos are difficult,costly,and time consuming.Remote sensing has been used for assessing wetlands and other aquatic vegetation,but very little information is available for detecting hydrilla invasions in coastal estuaries and other water bodies.The objective of this study is to construct a library of spectral signatures for identifying and classifying hydrilla invasions.Spectral signatures of hydrilla were collected from an experimental tank and field locations in a coastal estuary in the upper Chesapeake Bay.These measurements collected from the experimental tank,resulted in spectral signatures with an average peak surface reflectance in the near-infrared (NIR) region of 16% at a wavelength of 818 nm.However,the spectral measurements,collected in the estuary,resulted in a very different spectral signature with two surface reflectance peaks of 6% at wavelengths of 725 nm and 818 nm.The difference in spectral signatures between sites are a result of the components in the water column in the estuary because of increased turbidity (e.g.,nutrients,dissolved matter and suspended matter),and canopy being lower (submerged) in the water column.Spectral signatures of hydrilla observed in the tank and the field had similar characteristics with low reflectance in visible region of the spectrum from 400 to 700 nm,but high in the NIR region from 700 to 900 nm.

  14. Study of Porous Materials Acoustic Signatures Behaviour in Dark Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhedja, S; Hamdi, F [Laboratoires des Hyperfrequences et Semi-conducteurs, Universite de Constantine, B.P. 125, DZ-25000 (Algeria); Doghmane, A; Hadjoub, Z, E-mail: bouhedja_samia@yahoo.fr, E-mail: a_doghmane@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Semi-Conducteurs, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Badji-Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba, DZ-23000 (Algeria)

    2011-03-01

    Several kinds of lens-transducer system exist in the scanning acoustic microscope. In this work, annular lenses are chosen in order to quantify the occultation limiting angle to suppress Rayleigh mode generation. Hence, we have numerically simulated, through variable occultation of generated rays at the lens center, the porous silicon acoustic signatures at an operating frequency of 142 MHz. In non destructive control, this investigation is of a great importance in the measurement of the surface waves attenuation. The obtained results enabled us to evaluate the maximum relative occultation at Rayleigh waves.

  15. Spectral Signatures of Surface Materials in Pig Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, GuoQiang; Strøm, Jan; Blanke, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    and after high-pressure water cleaning. The spectral signatures of the surface materials and dirt attached to the surfaces showed that it is possible to make discrimination and hence to classify areas that are visually clean. When spectral bands 450, 600, 700 and 800 nm are chosen, there are at least two...... the cleaning process and to minimise the amount of water and electricity consumed. This research is aimed at utilising a spectral imaging method for cleanliness detection. Consequently, information on the reflectance of building materials and contamination in different spectral ranges is important...... in the investigation. Reflectance data were sampled under controlled lighting conditions using a spectrometer communicating with a portable computer. The measurements were performed in a laboratory with materials used in a pig house for 4-5 weeks. The spectral data were collected for the surfaces before, during...

  16. Spectral signatures for swash on reflective, intermediate and dissipative beaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, Michael G; Aagaard, Troels; Baldock, Tom E

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we synthesise a large data set gathered from a wide variety of field deployments and integrate it with previously published results to identify the spectral signatures of swash from contrasting beach types. The field data set includes the full range of micro-tidal beach types...... the three beach types. Swash energy at short-wave frequencies is dominant on reflective and intermediate beaches and swash at long-wave frequencies is dominant on dissipative beaches; consistent with previously reported spectral signatures for the surf zone on these beach types. The available swash spectra...... were classified using an automated algorithm (CLARA) into five different classes. The ordered classes represent an evolution in the spectrum shape, described by a frequency downshifting of the energy peak from the short-wave into the long-wave frequency band and an increase in the long-wave swash...

  17. Spectral statistics of the acoustic stadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.; Báez, G.; Leyvraz, F.; Seligman, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the normal-mode frequencies and wave amplitudes of the two-dimensional acoustical stadium. We also obtain the statistical properties of the acoustical spectrum and show that they agree with the results given by random matrix theory. Some normal-mode wave amplitudes showing scarring are presented.

  18. Discrimination of fungal infections on grape berries via spectral signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Daniel; Griesser, Michaela; Schütz, Erich; Khuen, Marie-Therese; Schefbeck, Christa; Ronellenfitsch, Franz Kai; Schlerf, Martin; Beyer, Marco; Schoedl-Hummel, Katharina; Anhalt, Ulrike; Forneck, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    The fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum are causing economic damages on grapevine worldwide. Especially the simultaneous occurrence of both often results in off-flavours highly threatening wine quality. For the classification of grape quality as well as for the determination of targeted enological treatments, the knowledge of the level of fungal attack is of highest interest. However, visual assessment and pathogen discrimination are cost-intensive. Consequently, a pilot laboratory study aimed at (i) detecting differences in spectral signatures between grape berry lots with different levels of infected berries (B. cinerea and/or P. expansum) and (ii) detecting links between spectral signatures and biochemical as well as quantitative molecular markers for fungal attack. To this end, defined percentages (infection levels) of table grape berries were inoculated with fungal spore suspensions. Spectral measurements were taken using a FieldSpec 3 Max spectroradiometer (ASD Inc., Boulder/Colorado, USA) in regular intervals after inoculation. In addition, fungal attack was determined enzymatically) and quantitatively (real-time PCR). In addition, gluconic acid concentrations (as a potential markers for fungal attack) were determined photometrically. Results indicate that based on spectral signatures, a discrimination of P. expansum and B. cinerea infections as well as of different B. cinerea infection levels is possible. Real-time PCR analyses, detecting DNA levels of both fungi, showed yet a low detection level. Whereas the gluconic acid concentrations turned out to be specific for the two fungi tested (B. cinerea vs. P. expansum) and thus may serve as a differentiating biochemical marker. Correlation analyses between spectral measurements and biological data (gluconic acid concentrations, fungi DNA) as well as further common field and laboratory trials are targeted.

  19. The spectral signature of cloud spatial structure in shortwave irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shi; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Pilewskie, Peter; King, Michael D.; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Walther, Andi; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Wind, Gala; Coddington, Odele M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we used cloud imagery from a NASA field experiment in conjunction with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations to show that cloud spatial structure manifests itself as a spectral signature in shortwave irradiance fields – specifically in transmittance and net horizontal photon transport in the visible and near-ultraviolet wavelength range. We found a robust correlation between the magnitude of net horizontal photon transport (H) and its spectral dependence (slope), which is scale-invariant and holds for the entire pixel population of a domain. This was surprising at first given the large degree of spatial inhomogeneity. We prove that the underlying physical mechanism for this phenomenon is molecular scattering in conjunction with cloud spatial structure. On this basis, we developed a simple parameterization through a single parameter ε, which quantifies the characteristic spectral signature of spatial inhomogeneities. In the case we studied, neglecting net horizontal photon transport leads to a local transmittance bias of ±12–19 %, even at the relatively coarse spatial resolution of 20 km. Since three-dimensional effects depend on the spatial context of a given pixel in a nontrivial way, the spectral dimension of this problem may emerge as the starting point for future bias corrections. PMID:28824698

  20. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  1. Determining the Spectral Signature of Spatial Coherent Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Pastur, L R; Fraigneau, Y; Podvin, B

    2005-01-01

    We applied to an open flow a proper orthogonal decomposition (pod) technique, on 2D snapshots of the instantaneous velocity field, to reveal the spatial coherent structures responsible of the self-sustained oscillations observed in the spectral distribution of time series. We applied the technique to 2D planes out of 3D direct numerical simulations on an open cavity flow. The process can easily be implemented on usual personal computers, and might bring deep insights on the relation between spatial events and temporal signature in (both numerical or experimental) open flows.

  2. A static acoustic signature system for the analysis of dynamic flight information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Army family of helicopters was analyzed to measure the polar octave band acoustic signature in various modes of flight. A static array of calibrated microphones was used to simultaneously acquire the signature and differential times required to mathematically position the aircraft in space. The signature was then reconstructed, mathematically normalized to a fixed radius around the aircraft.

  3. Mid-IR Spectral Search for Salt SIgnatures on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Tracy M.; Retherford, Kurt D.; Hanley, Jennifer; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Tsang, Constantine; Roth, Lorenz

    2016-10-01

    We present mid-IR spectra of Europa's leading and trailing hemispheres obtained with the NASA IRTF/TEXES instrument on March 28 and March 30, 2015. The observations span from ~10 - 11 microns with a resolving power of R ~2500. Few observations of Europa have been made at these wavelengths, and the high spectral resolution of the instrument enables the identification of distinguishing spectral features in this relatively unexplored bandpass. While the leading hemisphere of Europa consists of relatively pure water ice, the trailing hemisphere's surface contains a mix of ice and some other component, causing the surface to appear reddish at visible wavelengths. We compare the spectra from the trailing hemisphere with those from the leading, pure-ice hemisphere and with recent laboratory measurements of chlorinated salts, which have distinct spectral signatures at these wavelengths. We find that the signal obtained from Europa's leading hemisphere is 5-10 times lower than the signal obtained from the trailing hemisphere, likely due to a temperature difference between the hemispheres. We discern several spectral features that are present in the trailing hemisphere but not in the spectra of the leading hemisphere, though the explanation for these features is not yet apparent.

  4. Search for olivine spectral signatures on the surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Farina, M.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Sunshine, J.; McCord, T. B.

    2012-04-01

    The occurrence of olivines on Vesta were first postulated from traditional petrogenetic models which suggest the formation of olivine as lower crustal cumulates. An indirect confirmation is given by their presence as a minor component in some samples of diogenite meteorites, the harzburgitic diogenites and the dunitic diogenites, and as olivine mineral clasts in howardites. Another indication for this mineral was given by interpretations of ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope observations that suggested the presence of local olivine-bearing units on the surface of Vesta. The VIR instrument onboard the DAWN mission has been mapping Vesta since July 2011. VIR acquired hyperspectral images of Vesta's surface in the wavelength range from 0.25 to 5.1 µm during Approach, Survey and High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) orbits that allowed a 2/3 of the entire asteroid surface to be mapped. The VIR operative spectral interval, resolution and coverage is suitable for the detection and mapping of any olivine rich regions that may occur on the Vesta surface. The abundance of olivine in diogenites is typically lower than 10% but some samples richer in olivine are known. However, we do not expect to have extensive exposures of olivine-rich material on Vesta. Moreover, the partial overlap of olivine and pyroxene spectral signatures will make olivine difficult to detect. Different spectral parameters have been used to map olivine on extraterrestrial bodies, and here we discuss the different approaches used, and develop new ones specifically for Vesta. Our new methods are based on combinations of the spectral parameters relative to the 1 and 2 micron bands (the most prominent spectral features of Vesta surface in the visible and the infrared), such as band center locations, band depths, band areas, band area ratios. Before the direct application to the VIR data, the efficiency of each approach is evaluated by means of analysis of laboratory spectra of HED meteorites, pyroxenes

  5. Search for Olivine Spectral Signatures on the Surface of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Farina, M.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Russell, C. T.; Raymond, C. A.; Sunshine, J.; McCord, T. B.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of olivines on Vesta were first postulated from traditional petrogenetic models which suggest the formation of olivine as lower crustal cumulates. An indirect confirmation is given by their presence as a minor component in some samples of diogenite meteorites, the harzburgitic diogenites and the dunitic diogenites, and as olivine mineral clasts in howardites. Another indication for this mineral was given by interpretations of groundbased and Hubble Space Telescope observations that suggested the presence of local olivine-bearing units on the surface of Vesta. The VIR instrument onboard the DAWN mission has been mapping Vesta since July 2011. VIR acquired hyperspectral images of Vesta s surface in the wavelength range from 0.25 to 5.1 m during Approach, Survey and High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) orbits that allowed a 2/3 of the entire asteroid surface to be mapped. The VIR operative spectral interval, resolution and coverage is suitable for the detection and mapping of any olivine rich regions that may occur on the Vesta surface. The abundance of olivine in diogenites is typically lower than 10% but some samples richer in olivine are known. However, we do not expect to have extensive exposures of olivine-rich material on Vesta. Moreover, the partial overlap of olivine and pyroxene spectral signatures will make olivine difficult to detect. Different spectral parameters have been used to map olivine on extraterrestrial bodies, and here we discuss the different approaches used, and develop new ones specifically for Vesta. Our new methods are based on combinations of the spectral parameters relative to the 1 and 2 micron bands (the most prominent spectral features of Vesta surface in the visible and the infrared), such as band center locations, band depths, band areas, band area ratios. Before the direct application to the VIR data, the efficiency of each approach is evaluated by means of analysis of laboratory spectra of HED meteorites, pyroxenes, olivines

  6. Feature extraction from time domain acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Christine; Goldman, Geoffrey H.

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army is interested in developing algorithms to classify weapons systems fire based on their acoustic signatures. To support this effort, an algorithm was developed to extract features from acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire and applied to over 1300 signatures. The algorithm filtered the data using standard techniques then estimated the amplitude and time of the first five peaks and troughs and the location of the zero crossing in the waveform. The results were stored in Excel spreadsheets. The results are being used to develop and test acoustic classifier algorithms.

  7. Spectral and Polarization Signatures of Relativistic Shocks in Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic shocks are one of the most plausible sites of the emission of strongly variable, polarized multi-wavelength emission from relativistic jet sources such as blazars, via diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of relativistic particles. This paper summarizes recent results on a self-consistent coupling of diffusive shock acceleration and radiation transfer in blazar jets. We demonstrate that the observed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazars strongly constrain the nature of hydromagnetic turbulence responsible for pitch-angle scattering by requiring a strongly energy-dependent pitch-angle mean free path. The prominent soft X-ray excess ("Big Blue Bump") in the SED of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 can be modelled as the signature of bulk Compton scattering of external radiation fields by the thermal electron population, which places additional constraints on the level of hydromagnetic turbulence. It has further been demonstrated that internal shocks propagating in a jet pervaded by a helical ma...

  8. Ordinary Chondrite Spectral Signatures in the 243 Ida Asteroid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Galileo spacecraft observed asteroid 243 Ida and satellite Dactyl on August 28, 1993, with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) at wavelengths ranging from 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers[Carlson et al., 1994]. Work is being conducted to produce radiance-calibrated spectral images of 243 Ida consisting of 17-channel, 299 meters per pixel files and a 102-channel, 3.2 kilometer per pixel NIMS observations of 243 Ida for the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). These data are currently archived in PDS as uncalibrated data number counts. Radiometric calibrated 17-channel and 102-channel NIMS spectral data files of Dactyl and light curve 243 Ida observations are also being prepared. Analysis of this infrared asteroid data has confirmed that both 243 Ida and Dactyl are S-type asteroid objects and found that their olivine and pyroxene mineral abundances are consistent with that of ordinary chondrite meteorites. Tholen [1989] identified 243 Ida and Chapman et al. [1995] identified Dactyl as S-type asteroids on the basis of spectral data ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 micrometers. S-type are described [Tholen, 1989] as asteroids with a moderate albedos, a moderate to strong absorption feature shortward of 0.7 micrometers, and moderate to nonexistent absorption features longward of 0.7 micrometers. DeMeo et al. [2009] found 243 Ida to be a Sw asteroid based on Earth-based spectral observations 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers in range. Sw is a subclass of S-type asteroids that has a space weathering spectral component [DeMeo et al., 2009]. The NIMS data 243 Ida and Dactyl processed in this study exhibit signatures consistent with the Sw designation of DeMeo et al. [2009]. Measurements of olivine and pyroxene spectral bands were also conducted for the NIMS radiance data of 243 Ida and Dactyl. Band depth and band center measurements have been used to compare S-type asteroids with those of meteorites [Dunn et al., 2010; Gaffey et al., 1993]. The 243 Ida spectra were found to be consistent

  9. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced “frequency jumps,” enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.

  10. Spectral Gamma-ray Signatures of Cosmological Dark Matter Annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, L; Ullio, P; Bergstrom, Lars; Edsjo, Joakim; Ullio, Piero

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new signature for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter, a spectral feature in the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray radiation. This feature, a sudden drop of the gamma-ray intensity at an energy corresponding to the WIMP mass, comes from the asymmetric distortion of the line due to WIMP annihilation into two gamma-rays caused by the cosmological redshift. Unlike other proposed searches for a line signal, this method is not very sensitive to the exact dark matter density distribution in halos and subhalos. The only requirement is that the mass distribution of substructure on small scales follows approximately the Press-Schechter law, and that smaller halos are on the average denser than large halos, which is a generic outcome of N-body simulations of Cold Dark Matter, and which has observational support. The upcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will be eminently suited to search for these spectral features. For numerical examples, we use rates computed for supersym...

  11. Pollution detection using the spectral fluorescent signatures (SFS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Del Carmen Martín

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work has been developed in the Applied Physics Department at the University of Vigo within the line of research based on the treatment of the degraded water by pollutants through the use of microalgae, reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases through the absorption of CO2 in the process and the reuse of biomass as biofuel. Remote sensing techniques have contributed to a great extent to the development of oil pollution monitoring systems. However, the available detection methods, mainly designed for spaceborne and airborne long distance inspection, are too expensive and complex to be used in an operational way by relatively unskilled personnel. In the framework of DEOSOM project (European AMPERA project, an innovative water monitoring method was proposed, in two steps: early oil spill detection using a portable shipborne laser-induced fluorescence LIDAR (LIF/LIDAR, and analysis of suspicious water samples in laboratory using the Spectral Fluorescent Signature (SFS technique. This work is focused on the second technique. This system aims to optimize the production of microalgae for biofuel and contaminant cleaning applications and was developed and tested in photo-bioreactors in the University of Vigo within the EnerBioAlgae project (SUDOE. In this project, the SFS technique was used as a diagnostic tool employing the fluorescence analyzer INSTANT-SCREENER M53UVC. The Spectral Fluorescence Signature technique (SFS is based on compounds fluorescence properties. The fluorescence intensity of a sample is measured at different excitation and emission wavelengths to produce a 3-dimensional fluorescence matrix, which can also be presented as a 2-dimensional color image where the color shows the intensity of the fluorescence. These matrices offer qualitative and quantitative information, since they can be useful for the identification of different substances from their characteristic excitation and emission spectra of fluorescence. They also

  12. Insights on the spectral signatures of RV jitter from PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Allen Bradford; Cisewski, Jessica; Dumusque, Xavier; Fischer, Debra; Ford, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    Stellar activity features such as spots and faculae can mimic radial velocity (RV) motion by creating spurious time-varying centroid shifts in the stellar spectral lines. This "RV jitter" hinders the detection of large planetary signals (100 m s-1) around young, active stars, and it dominates the Keplerian signals of Earth-analogs (10 to 20 cm s-1) even around quiet stars. However, appropriate statistical techniques may be able to distinguish these phenomena by exploiting the spectral-line dependence and temporal coherence of RV jitter.We produce simulated disk-integrated time-series spectra of a rotating star with a spot, with a facula, or with a planet of various sizes using the SOAP 2.0 code, which uses real high-resolution and high-S/N spectra of the quiet solar photosphere and sunspots as a starting point. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used to identify and quantify the wavelength-dependent intensity variations of the spectra in each of these cases. We find that the PCA signatures of these three phenomena are distinct, suggesting that they can be distinguished in theory. We then lower the resolution and S/N of these simulated spectra and use PCA to quantify their information content. We find that high-resolution (R > 100,000) observations are better able to recover information in the spectra of spots and faculae than would be expected compared to an equivalent increase in S/N. This effect is especially pronounced for large spots and faculae (S ≥ 1%), suggesting that high-resolution spectrographs will be particularly well-suited for characterizing stellar activity.

  13. Spectral Induced Polarization Signature of Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Nimrod; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  14. On the spectral induced polarization signature of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, N.; Furman, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  15. Coefficient of variation spectral analysis: An application to underwater acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herstein, P. D.; Laplante, R. F.

    1983-05-01

    Acoustic noise in the ocean is often described in terms of its power spectral density. Just as in other media, this noise consists of both narrowband and broadband frequency components. A major problem in the analysis of power spectral density measurements is distinguishing between narrowband spectral components of interest and contaminating narrowband components. In this paper, the use of coefficient of variation (Cv) spectrum is examined as an adjunct to the conventional power spectrum to distinguish narrowband components of interest from contaminating components. The theory of the Cv is presented. Coefficients for several classical input distributions are developed. It is shown that Cv spectra can be easily implemented as an adjunct procedure during the computation of the ensemble of averaged power spectra. Power and Cv spectra derived from actual at-sea sonobuoy measurements of deep ocean ambient noise separate narrowband components from narrowband lines of interest in the ensemble of averaged power spectra, these acoustic components of interest can be distinguished in the Cv spectra.

  16. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 1: spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Bed-sediment classification using high-frequency hydro-acoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain-scale roughness. Here, a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel,rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from geo-referenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed ‘stochastic geometries’. Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power-law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological- and grain-scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales, or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate, nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed-sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  17. Spectral signatures of x((5)) processes in four-wave mixing of homogeneously broadened excitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, W.; Meier, T.; Koch, S.W.;

    2001-01-01

    The influence of fifth-order coherences on the spectrally resolved four-wave mixing response of predominantly homogeneously broadened quasi-two-dimensional excitons is studied. Fifth-order signatures are discussed as a function of spectral position and excitation polarization. An exciton-biexcito...... of one- and two-exciton resonances up to the fifth order in the optical field.......The influence of fifth-order coherences on the spectrally resolved four-wave mixing response of predominantly homogeneously broadened quasi-two-dimensional excitons is studied. Fifth-order signatures are discussed as a function of spectral position and excitation polarization. An exciton...

  18. Spectral analysis methods for vehicle interior vibro-acoustics identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Nor, Mohd. Jailani Mohd.; Ariffin, Ahmad Kamal

    2009-02-01

    Noise has various effects on comfort, performance and health of human. Sound are analysed by human brain based on the frequencies and amplitudes. In a dynamic system, transmission of sound and vibrations depend on frequency and direction of the input motion and characteristics of the output. It is imperative that automotive manufacturers invest a lot of effort and money to improve and enhance the vibro-acoustics performance of their products. The enhancement effort may be very difficult and time-consuming if one relies only on 'trial and error' method without prior knowledge about the sources itself. Complex noise inside a vehicle cabin originated from various sources and travel through many pathways. First stage of sound quality refinement is to find the source. It is vital for automotive engineers to identify the dominant noise sources such as engine noise, exhaust noise and noise due to vibration transmission inside of vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to find the vibro-acoustical sources of noise in a passenger vehicle compartment. The implementation of spectral analysis method is much faster than the 'trial and error' methods in which, parts should be separated to measure the transfer functions. Also by using spectral analysis method, signals can be recorded in real operational conditions which conduce to more consistent results. A multi-channel analyser is utilised to measure and record the vibro-acoustical signals. Computational algorithms are also employed to identify contribution of various sources towards the measured interior signal. These achievements can be utilised to detect, control and optimise interior noise performance of road transport vehicles.

  19. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 1. Spectral properties of scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bed sediment classification using high-frequency hydroacoustic instruments is challenging when sediments are spatially heterogeneous, which is often the case in rivers. The use of acoustic backscatter to classify sediments is an attractive alternative to analysis of topography because it is potentially sensitive to grain scale roughness. Here a new method is presented which uses high-frequency acoustic backscatter from multibeam sonar to classify heterogeneous riverbed sediments by type (sand, gravel, and rock) continuously in space and at small spatial resolution. In this, the first of a pair of papers that examine the scattering signatures from a heterogeneous riverbed, methods are presented to construct spatially explicit maps of spectral properties from georeferenced point clouds of geometrically and radiometrically corrected echoes. Backscatter power spectra are computed to produce scale and amplitude metrics that collectively characterize the length scales of stochastic measures of riverbed scattering, termed "stochastic geometries." Backscatter aggregated over small spatial scales have spectra that obey a power law. This apparently self-affine behavior could instead arise from morphological scale and grain scale roughnesses over multiple overlapping scales or riverbed scattering being transitional between Rayleigh and geometric regimes. Relationships exist between stochastic geometries of backscatter and areas of rough and smooth sediments. However, no one parameter can uniquely characterize a particular substrate nor definitively separate the relative contributions of roughness and acoustic impedance (hardness). Combinations of spectral quantities do, however, have the potential to delineate riverbed sediment patchiness, in a data-driven approach comparing backscatter with bed sediment observations (which is the subject of part two of this manuscript).

  20. Detection of acoustic, electro-optical and RADAR signatures of small unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, Alexander; Shoykhetbrod, Alex; Noetel, Denis; Stanko, Stephan; Laurenzis, Martin; Hengy, Sebastien; Christnacher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    We investigated signatures of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) with different sensor technologies ranging from acoustical antennas, passive and active optical imaging devices to small-size FMCW RADAR systems. These sensor technologies have different advantages and drawbacks and can be applied in a complementary sensor network to benefit from their different strengths.

  1. Effect of a cracked surface of porous silicon on the behaviour of the acoustic signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhedja Samia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We study in this work the effect of a crack, located on the porous silicon, Psi, surface on the propagation of Rayleigh waves. We simulate and analyse the acoustic signature V(z according porosity at 142 MHz, to study the microstructure of PSi around the crack.

  2. Spectral Signatures of Surface Materials in Pig Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, GuoQiang; Strøm, Jan; Blanke, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    Manual cleaning of pig production buildings based on high-pressure water cleaners is unappealing to workers, because it is tedious and health threatening. To replace manual cleaning, a few cleaning robots have been commercialised. With no cleanliness sensor available, the operation of these robots...... spectral bands for each type of the materials, in which the spectral signals can be used for discrimination of dirty and clean condition of the surfaces. (c) 2006 IAgrE. All rights reserved Published by Elsevier Ltd...

  3. Vegetation effects on impulsive events in the acoustic signature of fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedinak, Kara M; Anderson, Michael J; Apostol, Kent G; Smith, Alistair M S

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic impulse events have long been used as diagnostics for discrete phenomena in the natural world, including the detection of meteor impacts and volcanic eruptions. Wildland fires display an array of such acoustic impulse events in the form of crackling noises. Exploratory research into the properties of these impulse events revealed information regarding the specific properties of plant material. Unique acoustic frequency bands in the upper end of the sonic spectrum correlated to changes in vegetation properties. The signature of acoustic impulse events as they relate to plant species and plant water stress, were investigated in controlled laboratory combustion experiments. Correlation in the frequency range of 6.0-15.0 kHz was found for both species and water stress, indicating the possibility that a digital filter may be capable of identifying vegetation properties during wildland fire events.

  4. A Real-Time Infrared Ultra-Spectral Signature Classification Method via Spatial Pyramid Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaoguang; Ma, Yong; Li, Chang; Fan, Fan; Huang, Jun; Ma, Jiayi

    2015-07-03

    The state-of-the-art ultra-spectral sensor technology brings new hope for high precision applications due to its high spectral resolution. However, it also comes with new challenges, such as the high data dimension and noise problems. In this paper, we propose a real-time method for infrared ultra-spectral signature classification via spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which includes two aspects. First, we introduce an infrared ultra-spectral signature similarity measure method via SPM, which is the foundation of the matching-based classification method. Second, we propose the classification method with reference spectral libraries, which utilizes the SPM-based similarity for the real-time infrared ultra-spectral signature classification with robustness performance. Specifically, instead of matching with each spectrum in the spectral library, our method is based on feature matching, which includes a feature library-generating phase. We calculate the SPM-based similarity between the feature of the spectrum and that of each spectrum of the reference feature library, then take the class index of the corresponding spectrum having the maximum similarity as the final result. Experimental comparisons on two publicly-available datasets demonstrate that the proposed method effectively improves the real-time classification performance and robustness to noise.

  5. A Real-Time Infrared Ultra-Spectral Signature Classification Method via Spatial Pyramid Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoguang Mei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art ultra-spectral sensor technology brings new hope for high precision applications due to its high spectral resolution. However, it also comes with new challenges, such as the high data dimension and noise problems. In this paper, we propose a real-time method for infrared ultra-spectral signature classification via spatial pyramid matching (SPM, which includes two aspects. First, we introduce an infrared ultra-spectral signature similarity measure method via SPM, which is the foundation of the matching-based classification method. Second, we propose the classification method with reference spectral libraries, which utilizes the SPM-based similarity for the real-time infrared ultra-spectral signature classification with robustness performance. Specifically, instead of matching with each spectrum in the spectral library, our method is based on feature matching, which includes a feature library-generating phase. We calculate the SPM-based similarity between the feature of the spectrum and that of each spectrum of the reference feature library, then take the class index of the corresponding spectrum having the maximum similarity as the final result. Experimental comparisons on two publicly-available datasets demonstrate that the proposed method effectively improves the real-time classification performance and robustness to noise.

  6. Acoustic signature reduction using feedback of piezoelectric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberg, Johan; Malmgren, Anders

    2000-06-01

    The possibilities of using dynamic feedback of piezoelectric layers for controlling the acoustic properties of a surface are investigated. The investigation shows that in principle it is possible to achieve desired properties (e.g. no reflection, artificial transparency or simultaneous transmission and reception of information) using a single piezo-electric layer. The layer then operates both as a sensor and as an actuator. This approach can be described as controlling the boundary conditions of the acoustic field. The study shows that this will work well, also in practice, if the material has an electromechanic coupling factor that is large enough. Explicit controllers for these cases are given. However, for the values of electro-mechanic coupling factors of available materials, the above construction is not suitable for practical purposes, due to non-robustness. Therefore, the possibility of using multiple layers is also investigated. It turns out that a two layer construction can achieve the properties of a single layer with large electro-mechanic coupling factor. For the specific problem of achieving no reflection, an explicit construction of a realistic controller is given. Requirements of robust stability and limited voltage amplitudes imply that low reflection cannot be achieved at low and high frequencies. However for a large frequency interval, it is possible to obtain low reflection. It is shown that both the gain and phase margins are infinite with this controller. Our work makes extensive use of the Redheffer star-product for systematic modeling, analysis and synthesis of the system and the regulator.

  7. Photospheric high-frequency acoustic power excess in sunspot umbra: signature of magneto-acoustic modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zharkov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present observational evidence for the presence of MHD (magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar photosphere deduced from SOHO/MDI (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager Dopplergram velocity observations. The magneto-acoustic perturbations are observed as acoustic power enhancement in the sunspot umbra at high-frequency bands in the velocity component perpendicular to the magnetic field. We use numerical modelling of wave propagation through localised non-uniform magnetic field concentration along with the same filtering procedure as applied to the observations to identify the observed waves. Guided by the results of the numerical simulations we classify the observed oscillations as magneto-acoustic waves excited by the trapped sub-photospheric acoustic waves. We consider the potential application of the presented method as a diagnostic tool for magnetohelioseismology.

  8. Signature of Wave Chaos in Spectral Characteristics of Microcavity Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Sunada, Satoshi; Fukushima, Takehiro; Harayama, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    We report the spectral characteristics of fully chaotic and non-chaotic microcavity lasers under continuous-wave operating conditions. It is found that fully chaotic microcavity lasers operate in single mode, whereas non-chaotic microcavity lasers operate in multimode. The suppression of multimode lasing for fully chaotic microcavity lasers is explained by large spatial overlaps of the resonance wave functions that spread throughout the two-dimensional cavity due to the ergodicity of chaotic ray orbits.

  9. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Lee, E.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States); Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Lahoz, W.A. [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom)

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Mechanical and Acoustic Signature of Slow Earthquakes on Laboratory Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Marone, Chris; Tinti, Elisa; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Collettini, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    Recent seismic and geodetic observations show that fault slip occurs via a spectrum of behaviors that range from seismic (fast dynamic) to aseismic (creep). Indeed faults can slip via a variety of quasi-dynamic processes such as Slow-Slip, Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFE), and Tremor. These transient modes of slip represent slow, but self-propagating acceleration of slip along fault zones. These phenomena have been observed worldwide in a variety of active tectonic environments, however the physics of quasi-dynamic rupture and the underlying fault zone processes are still poorly understood. Rate- and State- frictional constitutive equations predict that fast dynamic slip will occur when the stiffness of the loading system (k) is less than a critical stiffness (kc) characterizing the fault gouge. In order to investigate quasi-dynamic transients, we performed laboratory experiments on simulated fault gouge (silica powders) in the double direct shear configuration with a compliant central block allowing boundary conditions where k≈kc. In addition, PZTs were used to measure acoustical properties of the gouge layers during shear. We document an evolution of the fault mechanical properties as the σn is increased. For σn state frictional type of shear. When σn ≥ 15 MPa we observe emergent slow-slip events from steady state shear with accumulated shear displacement of about 10 mm. The typical values of stress drop (Δτ) vary between 0.2 and 0.8 MPa, and have typical duration from 0.5 up to 3 seconds giving the characteristics of slow stick-slip. As σn is varied we observe different characteristics of slow slip. For σn = 15MPa a repetitive double period oscillation is observed with slow slip growing until a maximum stress drop and then self attenuating. When σn is increased to 20 and 25 MPa slow slip are characterized by larger Δτ with constant τmax and τmin, however still showing a co-seismic duration of ~2 seconds. Our results suggest that strain

  11. The Effect of Epidermal Structures on Leaf Spectral Signatures of Ice Plants (Aizoaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hans-Jürgen Heim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal structures (ES of leaves are known to affect the functional properties and spectral responses. Spectral studies focused mostly on the effect of hairs or wax layers only. We studied a wider range of different ES and their impact on spectral properties. Additionally, we identified spectral regions that allow distinguishing different ES. We used a field spectrometer to measure ex situ leaf spectral responses from 350 nm–2500 nm. A spectral library for 25 species of the succulent family Aizoaceae was assembled. Five functional types were defined based on ES: flat epidermal cell surface, convex to papillary epidermal cell surface, bladder cells, hairs and wax cover. We tested the separability of ES using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA based on the spectral data. Subsequently, variable importance (VIP was calculated to identify spectral regions relevant for discriminating our functional types (classes. Classification performance was high, with a kappa value of 0.9 indicating well-separable spectral classes. VIP calculations identified six spectral regions of increased importance for the classification. We confirmed and extended previous findings regarding the visible-near-infrared spectral region. Our experiments also confirmed that epidermal leaf traits can be classified due to clearly distinguishable spectral signatures across species and genera within the Aizoaceae.

  12. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  13. Spectral broadening of acoustic tones generated by unmanned aerial vehicles in a turbulent atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Wilson, D. K.; Finn, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic spectrum emitted by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and other aircraft can be distorted by propagation through atmospheric turbulence. Since most UAVs are propeller-based, they generate a series of acoustic tones and harmonics. In this paper, spectral broadening of these tones due...

  14. Spectral induced polarization signatures of abiotic FeS precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, geophysical methods have been shown to be sensitive to microbial induced mineralization processes. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method appears to be very promising for monitoring mineralization and microbial processes. With this work, we study the links of mineralization and SIP signals, in the absence of microbial activity. We recorded the SIP response during abiotic FeS precipitation. We show that the SIP signals are diagnostic of FeS mineralization and can be differentiated from SIP signals from bio-mineralization processes. More specifically the imaginary conductivity shows almost linear dependence on the amount of FeS precipitating out of solution, above the threshold value 0.006 gr under our experimental conditions. This research has direct implications for the use of the SIP method as a monitoring, and decision making, tool for sustainable remediation of metals in contaminated soils and groundwater.

  15. Studies on Ammonia Spectral Signatures Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, A. U.; Marschall, J.; Wong, M. H.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2006-12-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas [1,2]. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning")[2,3]. We are pursuing a research program investigating the above hypotheses. In the experiments, thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light to study their photochemistry. The spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. We have observed a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hydrocarbons. Modeling calculations of the multi-layer thin films assist in the interpretation of the experimental results and reveal the role of optical interference in masking the aforementioned ammonia spectral feature. The implications of these results for Jupiter's atmosphere will be discussed. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 and from the NASA Outer Planets Research Program under grant NNG06GF37G is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Anand Oza (Princeton University) was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  16. Integrated ray tracing simulation of spectral bio-signatures from full 3D earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dongok; Seong, Sehyun; Lee, Jae-Min; Hong, Jinsuk; Jeong, Soomin; Jeong, Yukyeong; Kim, Sug-Whan

    2009-08-01

    Accurate identification and understanding of spectral bio-signatures from possible extra terrestrial planets have received an ever increasing attention from both astronomy and space science communities in recent years. In pursuance of this subject, one of the most important scientific breakthroughs would be to obtain the detailed understanding on spectral biosignatures of the Earth, as it serves as a reference datum for accurate interpretation of collapsed (in temporal and spatial domains) information from the spectral measurement using TPF instruments. We report a new Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) model capable of computing various spectral bio-signatures as they are observed from the Earth surface. The model includes the Sun, the full 3-D Earth, and an optical instrument, all combined into single ray tracing environment in real scale. In particular, the full 3-D Earth surface is constructed from high resolution coastal line data and defined with realistic reflectance and BSDF characteristics depending on wavelength, vegetation types and their distributions. We first examined the model validity by confirming the imaging and radiometric performance of the AmonRa visible channel camera, simulating the Earth observation from the L1 halo orbit. We then computed disk averaged spectra, light curves and NDVI indexes, leading to the construction of the observed disk averaged spectra at the AmonRa instrument detector plane. The model, computational procedure and the simulation results are presented. The future plan for the detailed spectral signature simulation runs for various input conditions including seasonal vegetation changes and variable cloud covers is discussed.

  17. SSME Condition Monitoring Using Neural Networks and Plume Spectral Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Randall; Benzing, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, condition monitoring of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has become an important concern for both ground tests and in-flight operation. The complexities of the SSME suggest that active, real-time condition monitoring should be performed to avoid large-scale or catastrophic failure of the engine. In 1986, the SSME became the subject of a plume emission spectroscopy project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Since then, plume emission spectroscopy has recorded many nominal tests and the qualitative spectral features of the SSME plume are now well established. Significant discoveries made with both wide-band and narrow-band plume emission spectroscopy systems led MSFC to develop the Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system. The OPAD system is designed to provide condition monitoring of the SSME during ground-level testing. The operational health of the engine is achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and the subsequent identification of abnormal emission levels in the plume indicative of engine erosion or component failure. Eventually, OPAD, or a derivative of the technology, could find its way on to an actual space vehicle and provide in-flight engine condition monitoring. This technology step, however, will require miniaturized hardware capable of processing plume spectral data in real-time. An objective of OPAD condition monitoring is to determine how much of an element is present in the SSME plume. The basic premise is that by knowing the element and its concentration, this could be related back to the health of components within the engine. For example, an abnormal amount of silver in the plume might signify increased wear or deterioration of a particular bearing in the engine. Once an anomaly is identified, the engine could be shut down before catastrophic failure occurs. Currently, element concentrations in the plume are determined iteratively with the help of a non-linear computer

  18. Spectral signature of ultraviolet solar irradiance in Zacatecas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinedo V, J. L; Mireles G, F; Rios M, C; Quirino T, L. L; Davila R, J. I [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2006-10-15

    This study presents an analysis of the global ultraviolet spectral irradiance (290-400 nm) registered in Zacatecas, a city near the Tropic of Cancer, located at 2500 m above sea level, latitude of 22 degrees N and longitude of 102 degrees W. The spectra have been measured using a Bentham radiometer with a 0.5 nm step in wavelength. The measurements show relatively high levels of ultraviolet irradiance (UV), which may be characteristic of areas close to the Tropic of Cancer. Faced with an increase of the incidence of skin cancer among the population of Zacatecas, these measurements highlight that a damage prevention plan is required. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un analisis de la radiacion espectral global ultravioleta (290-400 nm) registrada en Zacatecas, una ciudad vecina al tropico de cancer, situada a 2500 m sobre el nivel del mar, latitud de 22 grados N y longitud de 102 grados O. Los espectros correspondientes han sido medidos mediante un espectroradiometro Bentham con un paso de 0.5 nm de longitud de onda. Las mediciones muestran niveles de radiacion ultravioleta (UV) relativamente elevados, que pueden ser caracteristicos de las zonas vecinas al tropico de cancer. Frente al aumento de incidencia de cancer en la piel en la poblacion del estado de Zacatecas, estas mediciones ponen en relieve la necesidad de formular un plan preventivo de danos.

  19. Analytical chemistry, multidimensional spectral signatures, and the future of coherent multidimensional spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John C.

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopy is a dominant measurement methodology because it resolves molecular level details over a wide concentration range. Its limitations, however, become challenged when applied to complex materials. Coherent multidimensional spectroscopy (CMDS) is the optical analogue of multidimensional NMR and like NMR, its multidimensionality promises to increase the spectral selectivity of vibrational and electronic spectroscopy. This article explores whether this promise can make CMDS a dominant spectroscopic method throughout the sciences. In order for CMDS to become a dominant methodology, it must create multidimensional spectral fingerprints that provide the selectivity required for probing complex samples. Pump-CMDS probe methods separate the pump's measurement of dynamics from a multidimensional and selective probe. Fully coherent CMDS methods are ideal multidimensional probes because they avoid relaxation effects, spectrally isolate the output signals, and provide unique and invariant spectral signatures using any combination of vibrational and electronic quantum states.

  20. The effect of speaking context on spectral- and cepstral-based acoustic features of normal voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Soren Y; Hylkema, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of speaking context on four cepstral- and spectral-based acoustic measures was investigated in 20 participants with normal voice. Speakers produced three different continuous speaking tasks that varied in duration and phonemic content. Cepstral and spectral measures that can be validly derived from continuous speech were computed across the three speaking contexts. Cepstral peak prominence (CPP), low/high spectral ratio, and the standard deviation (SD) of the low/high spectral ratio did not significantly differ across speaking contexts, and correlations for the first two measures were strong among the three speaking tasks. The SD of the CPP showed significant task differences, and relationships between the speaking contexts were generally moderate. These findings suggest that in speakers with normal voice, the differing phonemic content across several frequently used speaking stimuli minimally impacted group means for three clinically relevant cepstral- and spectral-based acoustic measures.

  1. Phase-sensitive imaging of tissue acoustic vibrations using spectrally encoded interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgayev, Ovadia; Yelin, Dvir

    2013-08-26

    Acoustic vibrations in tissue are often difficult to image, requiring high-speed scanning, high sensitivity and nanometer-scale axial resolution. Here we use spectrally encoded interferometry to measure the vibration pattern of two-dimensional surfaces, including the skin of a volunteer, at nanometric resolution, without the need for rapid lateral scanning and with no prior knowledge of the driving acoustic waveform. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for measuring tissue biomechanics using simple and compact imaging probes.

  2. Spectral signatures for the classification of microbial species using Raman spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Bailey, Vanessa L; Fansler, Sarah J; Wilkins, Michael J; Hess, Nancy J

    2012-08-01

    In general, classification-based methods based on confocal Raman microscopy are focused on targeted studies under which the spectral libraries are collected under controlled instrument parameters, which facilitate analyses via standard multivariate data analysis methods and cross-validation. We develop and compare approaches to transform spectra collected at different spectral ranges and varying levels of resolution into a single lower-dimension spectral signature library. This will result in a more robust analysis method able to accommodate spectra accumulated at different times and conditions. We demonstrate these approaches on a relevant test case; the identification of microbial species from a natural environment. The training data were based on samples prepared for three unique species collected at two time points and the test data consisted of blinded unknowns prepared and analyzed at a later date with different instrument parameters. The results indicate that using reduced dimension representations of the spectral signatures improves classification accuracy over basic alignment protocols. In particular, utilizing the microbial species partial least squares discriminant analysis classifier on the blinded samples based on alignment achieved ~78 % accuracy, while both binning and peak selection approaches yielded 100 % accuracy.

  3. Evidence for the Nature of Space Weathering Spectral Signatures on Low Albedo Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Cateline; Clark, B. E.; Barucci, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    We address an existing problem in understanding the reflected light spectral signatures of carbonaceous (low-albedo) asteroids. We know from observations of the moon and high-albedo asteroids that interplanetary surface processes (solar wind and micrometeorite bombardment) can alter the spectral properties of silicates. The problem is that we don’t understand how carbonaceous surfaces respond to surface processes. The question is, what are the spectral signatures of surface processes on low albedo asteroids? To answer this question, we need to study reflected light spectra of asteroid subsurface materials, and compare them with asteroid surface materials. In this work, we assume that primitive asteroids are the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites. We begin with a fairly well-established meteorite-asteroid link: several studies have found evidence that links the CM meteorites with the Ch/Cgh asteroids [Hiroi et ao. 1996; Fornasier et al. 1999]. Assuming this link, we reason that differences between spectra of particulate samples of the CM meteorites and spectra of the regolith of the asteroids can be due to either differences in textural properties, or differences caused by surface processes on the asteroid. Previous work has resulted in contradictory predictions. Asteroid color survey data analyzed by Lazzarin et al. (2006) predicted spectral reddening for low albedo asteroids. Laser irradiation experiments by Moroz et al. (1996; 2004; 2004b) indicated both reddening and blueing of various degrees. Our initial results indicate spectral blueing of up to 50%, with little to no concurrent albedo change. We used telescopic observations of 43 Ch and Cgh-type asteroids (0.4 to 2.5 microns) from Binzel, DeMeo, et al. (MIT) and Fornasier et al. (Obs. Paris). We compare them statistically with 106 CM meteorite spectra from RELAB. The goal of this work is to predict what the OSIRIS-REx mission will see at B-type asteroid (101955) 1999RQ36.

  4. Anomalous crater Marcia on asteroid 4 Vesta: Spectral signatures and their geological relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebner, T.; Jaumann, R.; Schroeder, S.; Krohn, K.

    2016-12-01

    DAWN Framing Camera (FC) images are used in this study to analyze the diverse spectral signatures of crater Marcia. As the FC offers high spatial resolution as well as several color filters it is well suited to resolve geological correlations on Vestas surface. Our approach comprises the analysis of images from four FC filters ( F3, F4, F5 and F6) that cover the pyroxene absorption band at 0.9 um and the comparison of Vesta data with HED meteorite spectra. We use the ratios R 750/915 (F3/F4) and R 965/830 (F5/F6) [nm] to separate HED lithologies spectrally and depict corresponding areas on HAMO mosaics ( 60 m/px). Additionally, higher resolution LAMO images ( 20 m/px) are analyzed to reveal the geologic setting. In this work, Marcia is broadly classified into three spectral regions. The first region is located in the northwestern part of the crater as well as in the central peak area and shows the most HED-like signature within the Marcia region. The other two regions, with one of them also describing Marcia ejecta, are spectrally further away from HED lithologies and likely display a mixing with more howarditic-rich material associated with carbonaceous chondrite clasts and relatively higher OH and H concentrations (e.g., [1], [2], [3]). In general, these other two regions are also associated with thick flow features within the crater, while the HED-like area does not show such prominent flows. Hence, these darker regions seem to display post-impact material inflow of the weathered howarditic surface regolith. We conclude that the Marcia impactor likely struck through the howarditic regolith and hit the eucritic crust underneath. Depicting this HED-like signature globally, it resides mostly in the Rheasilvia basin and ejecta blanket, as well as in very young crater ejecta in the equatorial region, consistent with it being a signature of fresh basaltic crust. [1] M. C. De Sanctis et al. (2012b) The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 758:L36 (5pp) [2] T. McCord et al

  5. Phase change events of volatile liquid perfluorocarbon contrast agents produce unique acoustic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Matsunaga, Terry O.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) provide a dynamic platform to approach problems in medical ultrasound (US). Upon US-mediated activation, the liquid core vaporizes and expands to produce a gas bubble ideal for US imaging and therapy. In this study, we demonstrate through high-speed video microscopy and US interrogation that PCCAs composed of highly volatile perfluorocarbons (PFCs) exhibit unique acoustic behavior that can be detected and differentiated from standard microbubble contrast agents. Experimental results show that when activated with short pulses PCCAs will over-expand and undergo unforced radial oscillation while settling to a final bubble diameter. The size-dependent oscillation phenomenon generates a unique acoustic signal that can be passively detected in both time and frequency domain using confocal piston transducers with an ‘activate high’ (8 MHz, 2 cycles), ‘listen low’ (1 MHz) scheme. Results show that the magnitude of the acoustic ‘signature’ increases as PFC boiling point decreases. By using a band-limited spectral processing technique, the droplet signals can be isolated from controls and used to build experimental relationships between concentration and vaporization pressure. The techniques shown here may be useful for physical studies as well as development of droplet-specific imaging techniques.

  6. Study of air pollutant signatures for remote sensing. [of the spectral reflectivity of leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for a possible new, indirect signature for air pollutants: the spectral reflectivity of plant leaves. Sub-visual changes (up to 160%) in the spectral reflectivity of bean and tobacco leaves were observed over the range 475nm to 750nm in response to SO2 exposures such as 2ppm/4hrs or 4ppm/16hrs, or to O3 exposures such as 90pphm/21hrs or 7.5pphm/292hrs. Such changes might be observed from a satellite using either laser or sunlight as the illumination source. Inasmuch as the plants appear to become acclimated to some of these exposure doses, environmental changes may be most important for this type of plant-response.

  7. Spectral signature barcodes based on S-shaped Split Ring Resonators (S-SRRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrojo Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is shown that S-shaped split ring resonators (S-SRRs are useful particles for the implementation of spectral signature (i.e., a class of radiofrequency barcodes based on coplanar waveguide (CPW transmission lines loaded with such resonant elements. By virtue of its S shape, these resonators are electrically small. Hence S-SRRs are of interest for the miniaturization of the barcodes, since multiple resonators, each tuned at a different frequency, are used for encoding purposes. In particular, a 10-bit barcode occupying 1 GHz spectral bandwidth centered at 2.5 GHz, with dimensions of 9 cm2, is presented in this paper.

  8. Spectral signature barcodes based on S-shaped Split Ring Resonators (S-SRRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrojo Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is shown that S-shaped split ring resonators (S-SRRs are useful particles for the implementation of spectral signature (i.e., a class of radiofrequency barcodes based on coplanar waveguide (CPW transmission lines loaded with such resonant elements. By virtue of its S shape, these resonators are electrically small. Hence S-SRRs are of interest for the miniaturization of the barcodes, since multiple resonators, each tuned at a different frequency, are used for encoding purposes. In particular, a 10-bit barcode occupying 1 GHz spectral bandwidth centered at 2.5 GHz, with dimensions of 9 cm2, is presented in this paper.

  9. [Investigation of quantitative detection of water quality using spectral fluorescence signature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun-hua; Cheng, Yong-jin; Han, Yan-ling; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2008-08-01

    A method of spectral analysis, which can simultaneously detect dissolved organic matter (DOM) and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) in natural water, was developed in the present paper with the intention of monitoring water quality fast and quantitatively. Firstly, the total luminescence spectra (TLS) of water sample from East Lake in Wuhan city were measured by the use of laser (532 nm) induced fluorescence (LIF). There were obvious peaks of relative intensity at the wavelength value of 580, 651 and 687 nm in the TLS of the sample, which correspond respectively to spectra of DOM, and the Raman scattering of water and Chl-a in the water. Then the spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) technique was adopted to analyze and distinguish spectral characteristics of DOM and Chl-a in natural water. The calibration curves and function expressions, which indicate the relation between the normalized fluorescence intensities of DOM and Chl-a in water and their concentrations, were obtained respectively under the condition of low concentration( 40 mg x L(-1)), the Raman scattering signal is totally absorbed by the molecules of humic acid being on the ground state, so the normalization technique can not be adopted. However the function expression between the concentration of the solution with humic acid and its relative fluorescence peak intensity can be acquired directly with the aid of experiment of fluorescence spectrum. It is concluded that although the expression is non-linearity as a whole, there is a excellent linear relation between the fluorescence intensity and concentration of DOM when the concentration is less than 200 mg x L(-1). The method of measurement based on spectral fluorescence signature technique and the calibration curves gained will have prospects of broad application. It can recognize fast what pollutants are and detect quantitatively their contents in water. It is realizable to monitor the quality of natural water with real time, dynamics and inlarge area.

  10. Spectral element method for elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Linlin; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jia-Min; Zhuang, Mingwei [Institute of Electromagnetics and Acoustics, and Department of Electronic Science, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Liu, Na, E-mail: liuna@xmu.edu.cn [Institute of Electromagnetics and Acoustics, and Department of Electronic Science, Xiamen, 361005 (China); Liu, Qing Huo, E-mail: qhliu@duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Numerical techniques in time domain are widespread in seismic and acoustic modeling. In some applications, however, frequency-domain techniques can be advantageous over the time-domain approach when narrow band results are desired, especially if multiple sources can be handled more conveniently in the frequency domain. Moreover, the medium attenuation effects can be more accurately and conveniently modeled in the frequency domain. In this paper, we present a spectral-element method (SEM) in frequency domain to simulate elastic and acoustic waves in anisotropic, heterogeneous, and lossy media. The SEM is based upon the finite-element framework and has exponential convergence because of the use of GLL basis functions. The anisotropic perfectly matched layer is employed to truncate the boundary for unbounded problems. Compared with the conventional finite-element method, the number of unknowns in the SEM is significantly reduced, and higher order accuracy is obtained due to its spectral accuracy. To account for the acoustic-solid interaction, the domain decomposition method (DDM) based upon the discontinuous Galerkin spectral-element method is proposed. Numerical experiments show the proposed method can be an efficient alternative for accurate calculation of elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain.

  11. Spectral element method for elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linlin; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jia-Min; Zhuang, Mingwei; Liu, Na; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    Numerical techniques in time domain are widespread in seismic and acoustic modeling. In some applications, however, frequency-domain techniques can be advantageous over the time-domain approach when narrow band results are desired, especially if multiple sources can be handled more conveniently in the frequency domain. Moreover, the medium attenuation effects can be more accurately and conveniently modeled in the frequency domain. In this paper, we present a spectral-element method (SEM) in frequency domain to simulate elastic and acoustic waves in anisotropic, heterogeneous, and lossy media. The SEM is based upon the finite-element framework and has exponential convergence because of the use of GLL basis functions. The anisotropic perfectly matched layer is employed to truncate the boundary for unbounded problems. Compared with the conventional finite-element method, the number of unknowns in the SEM is significantly reduced, and higher order accuracy is obtained due to its spectral accuracy. To account for the acoustic-solid interaction, the domain decomposition method (DDM) based upon the discontinuous Galerkin spectral-element method is proposed. Numerical experiments show the proposed method can be an efficient alternative for accurate calculation of elastic and acoustic waves in frequency domain.

  12. Satellite propulsion spectral signature detection and analysis through Hall effect thruster plume and atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Pamela; Cobb, Richard; Hartsfield, Carl; Prince, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is of utmost importance in today's congested and contested space environment. Satellites must perform orbital corrections for station keeping, devices like high efficiency electric propulsion systems such as a Hall effect thrusters (HETs) to accomplish this are on the rise. The health of this system is extremely important to ensure the satellite can maintain proper position and perform its intended mission. Electron temperature is a commonly used diagnostic to determine the efficiency of a hall thruster. Recent papers have coordinated near infrared (NIR) spectral measurements of emission lines in xenon and krypton to electron temperature measurements. Ground based observations of these spectral lines could allow the health of the thruster to be determined while the satellite is in operation. Another issue worth considering is the availability of SSA assets for ground-based observations. The current SSA architecture is limited and task saturated. If smaller telescopes, like those at universities, could successfully detect these signatures they could augment data collection for the SSA network. To facilitate this, precise atmospheric modeling must be used to pull out the signature. Within the atmosphere, the NIR has a higher transmission ratio and typical HET propellants are approximately 3x the intensity in the NIR versus the visible spectrum making it ideal for ground based observations. The proposed research will focus on developing a model to determine xenon and krypton signatures through the atmosphere and estimate the efficacy through ground-based observations. The model will take power modes, orbit geometries, and satellite altitudes into consideration and be correlated with lab and field observations.

  13. Reference spectral signature selection using density-based cluster for automatic oil spill detection in hyperspectral images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Delian; Zhang, Jianqi; Wang, Xiaorui

    2016-04-04

    Reference spectral signature selection is a fundamental work for automatic oil spill detection. To address this issue, a new approach is proposed here, which employs the density-based cluster to select a specific spectral signature from a hyperspectral image. This paper first introduces the framework of oil spill detection from hyperspectral images, indicating that detecting oil spill requires a reference spectral signature of oil spill, parameters of background, and a target detection algorithm. Based on the framework, we give the new reference spectral signature selection approach in details. Then, we demonstrate the estimation of background parameters according to the reflectance of seawater in the infrared bands. Next, the conventional adaptive cosine estimator (ACE) algorithm is employed to achieve oil spill detection. Finally, the proposed approach is tested via several practical hyperspectral images that are collected during the Horizon Deep water oil spill. The experimental results show that this new approach can automatically select the reference spectral signature of oil spills from hyperspectral images and has high detection performance.

  14. Spectral information for detection of acoustic time to arrival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Russo, Frank A.; MacDonald, Ewen

    2013-01-01

    The exponential increase of intensity for an approaching sound source provides salient information for a listener to make judgments of time to arrival (TTA). Specifically, a listener will experience a greater rate of increasing intensity for higher than for lower frequencies during a sound source......’s approach. To examine the relative importance of this spectral information, listeners were asked to make judgments about the arrival times of nine 1-octave-band sound sources (the bands were consecutive, nonoverlapping single octaves, ranging from 40–80 Hz to ~10–20 kHz). As is typical in TTA tasks...

  15. Directionality and maneuvering effects on a surface ship underwater acoustic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevorrow, Mark V; Vasiliev, Boris; Vagle, Svein

    2008-08-01

    This work examines underwater source spectra of a small (560 tons, 40 m length), single-screw oceanographic vessel, focusing on directionality and effects of maneuvers. The measurements utilized a set of four, self-contained buoys with GPS positioning, each recording two calibrated hydrophones with effective acoustic bandwidth from 150 Hz to 5 kHz. In straight, constant-speed runs at speeds up to 6.2 m s(-1), the ship source spectra showed spectral levels in reasonable agreement with reference spectra. The broadband source level was observed to increase as approximately speed to the fourth power over the range of 2.6-6.1 m s(-1), partially biased at low speeds by nonpropulsion machinery signals. Source directionality patterns were extracted from variations in source spectra while the ship transited past the buoy field. The observed spectral source levels exhibited a broadside maximum, with bow and stern aspect reduced by approximately 12-9 dB, respectively, independent of frequency. An empirical model is proposed assuming that spectral source levels exhibit simultaneous variations in aspect angle, speed, and turn rate. After correction for source directionality and speed during turning maneuvers, an excess of up to 18 dB in one-third octave source levels was observed.

  16. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics: 2. Scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Kaplinski, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length and amplitude scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by georeferenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum and the intercept and slope from a power law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration and surveys made at calibration sites at different times were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well-understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  17. Characterizing riverbed sediment using high-frequency acoustics 2: scattering signatures of Colorado River bed sediment in Marble and Grand Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Grams, Paul E.; Kaplinski, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    In this, the second of a pair of papers on the statistical signatures of riverbed sediment in high-frequency acoustic backscatter, spatially explicit maps of the stochastic geometries (length- and amplitude-scales) of backscatter are related to patches of riverbed surfaces composed of known sediment types, as determined by geo-referenced underwater video observations. Statistics of backscatter magnitudes alone are found to be poor discriminators between sediment types. However, the variance of the power spectrum, and the intercept and slope from a power-law spectral form (termed the spectral strength and exponent, respectively) successfully discriminate between sediment types. A decision-tree approach was able to classify spatially heterogeneous patches of homogeneous sands, gravels (and sand-gravel mixtures), and cobbles/boulders with 95, 88, and 91% accuracy, respectively. Application to sites outside the calibration, and surveys made at calibration sites at different times, were plausible based on observations from underwater video. Analysis of decision trees built with different training data sets suggested that the spectral exponent was consistently the most important variable in the classification. In the absence of theory concerning how spatially variable sediment surfaces scatter high-frequency sound, the primary advantage of this data-driven approach to classify bed sediment over alternatives is that spectral methods have well understood properties and make no assumptions about the distributional form of the fluctuating component of backscatter over small spatial scales.

  18. Contrasting Spectral Signatures and Sensitivities of CPA-Lasing in a $\\cal PT$-Symmetric Periodic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Li

    2016-01-01

    The CPA-laser is a coexisting state of coherent perfect absorption and lasing that was proposed in parity-time ($\\cal PT$) symmetric photonic systems. In this work we show that the spectral signature of a CPA-laser displayed by the singular value spectrum of the scattering matrix ($S$) can be orders of magnitude wider than that displayed by the eigenvalue spectrum of $S$. Since the former reflects how strongly light can be absorbed or amplified and the latter announces the spontaneous symmetry breaking of $S$, these contrasting spectral signatures indicate that near perfect absorption and extremely strong amplification can be achieved even in the $\\cal PT$-symmetric phase of $S$, which is known for and defined by its flux-conserving eigenstates. We also show that these contrasting spectral signatures are accompanied by strikingly different sensitivities to disorder and imperfection, suggesting that the eigenvalue spectrum is potentially suitable for sensing and the singular value spectrum for robust switching...

  19. Detection of Delamination in Composite Beams Using Broadband Acoustic Emission Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, A. C.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Jiang, Y. P.

    1996-01-01

    Delamination in composite structure may be caused by imperfections introduced during the manufacturing process or by impact loads by foreign objects during the operational life. There are some nondestructive evaluation methods to detect delamination in composite structures such as x-radiography, ultrasonic testing, and thermal/infrared inspection. These methods are expensive and hard to use for on line detection. Acoustic emission testing can monitor the material under test even under the presence of noise generated under load. It has been used extensively in proof-testing of fiberglass pressure vessels and beams. In the present work, experimental studies are conducted to investigate the use of broadband acoustic emission signatures to detect delaminations in composite beams. Glass/epoxy beam specimens with full width, prescribed delamination sizes of 2 inches and 4 inches are investigated. The prescribed delamination is produced by inserting Teflon film between laminae during the fabrication of composite laminate. The objectives of this research is to develop a method for predicting delamination size and location in laminated composite beams by combining smart materials concept and broadband AE analysis techniques. More specifically, a piezoceramic (PZT) patch is bonded on the surface of composite beams and used as a pulser. The piezoceramic patch simulates the AE wave source as a 3 cycles, 50KHz, burst sine wave. One broadband AE sensor is fixed near the PZT patch to measure the AE wave near the AE source. A second broadband AE sensor, which is used as a receiver, is scanned along the composite beams at 0.25 inch step to measure propagation of AE wave along the composite beams. The acquired AE waveform is digitized and processed. Signal strength, signal energy, cross-correlation of AE waveforms, and tracking of specific cycle of AE waveforms are used to detect delamination size and location.

  20. Approximation of acoustic waves by explicit Newmark's schemes and spectral element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Elena; Pavarino, Luca F.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical approximation of the acoustic wave equation is presented. The spatial discretization is based on conforming spectral elements, whereas we use finite difference Newmark's explicit integration schemes for the temporal discretization. A rigorous stability analysis is developed for the discretized problem providing an upper bound for the time step [Delta]t. We present several numerical results concerning stability and convergence properties of the proposed numerical methods.

  1. Regular algorithm for the automatic refinement of the spectral characteristics of acoustic finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, A. S.; Sokov, E. M.; V'yushkina, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    A new method is presented for the automatic refinement of finite element models of complex mechanical-acoustic systems using the results of experimental studies. The method is based on control of the spectral characteristics via selection of the optimal distribution of adjustments to the stiffness of a finite element mesh. The results of testing the method are given to show the possibility of its use to significantly increase the simulation accuracy of vibration characteristics of bodies with arbitrary spatial configuration.

  2. Spectral Volumetric Integral Equation Methods for Acoustic Medium Scattering in a Planar Homogeneous 3D Waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Lechleiter, Armin; Nguyen, Dinh Liem

    2010-01-01

    Scattering of acoustic waves from an inhomogeneous medium can be described by the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation. For scattering problems in free space, Vainikko proposed a fast spectral solution method that exploits the convolution structure of this equation's integral operator by using the fast Fourier transform. In a planar 3--dimensional waveguide, the integral operator of the Lippmann-Schwinger integral equation fails to be a convolution. In this paper, we show that the separable s...

  3. Image-Based Airborne Sensors: A Combined Approach for Spectral Signatures Classification through Deterministic Simulated Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo; Herrera, P. Javier

    2009-01-01

    The increasing technology of high-resolution image airborne sensors, including those on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, demands automatic solutions for processing, either on-line or off-line, the huge amountds of image data sensed during the flights. The classification of natural spectral signatures in images is one potential application. The actual tendency in classification is oriented towards the combination of simple classifiers. In this paper we propose a combined strategy based on the Deterministic Simulated Annealing (DSA) framework. The simple classifiers used are the well tested supervised parametric Bayesian estimator and the Fuzzy Clustering. The DSA is an optimization approach, which minimizes an energy function. The main contribution of DSA is its ability to avoid local minima during the optimization process thanks to the annealing scheme. It outperforms simple classifiers used for the combination and some combined strategies, including a scheme based on the fuzzy cognitive maps and an optimization approach based on the Hopfield neural network paradigm. PMID:22399989

  4. Image-Based Airborne Sensors: A Combined Approach for Spectral Signatures Classification through Deterministic Simulated Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo; Herrera, P Javier

    2009-01-01

    The increasing technology of high-resolution image airborne sensors, including those on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, demands automatic solutions for processing, either on-line or off-line, the huge amountds of image data sensed during the flights. The classification of natural spectral signatures in images is one potential application. The actual tendency in classification is oriented towards the combination of simple classifiers. In this paper we propose a combined strategy based on the Deterministic Simulated Annealing (DSA) framework. The simple classifiers used are the well tested supervised parametric Bayesian estimator and the Fuzzy Clustering. The DSA is an optimization approach, which minimizes an energy function. The main contribution of DSA is its ability to avoid local minima during the optimization process thanks to the annealing scheme. It outperforms simple classifiers used for the combination and some combined strategies, including a scheme based on the fuzzy cognitive maps and an optimization approach based on the Hopfield neural network paradigm.

  5. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  6. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  7. Detection and classification of salmonella serotypes using spectral signatures collected by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spectral signatures of Salmonella serotypes namely Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky were collected using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). About 5-10 µL of Salmonella suspensions with concentrations of 1...

  8. Correlations Between Large-scale Flow Structures and Acoustic Signatures in an Axisymmetric Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Berger, Zachary; Shea, Patrick; Glauser, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In a test campaign studying jet noise, simultaneous far-field acoustic measurements and near-field particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) data were sampled from a supersonic underexpanded axisymmetric jet operating at a Reynolds number of 1.3×106 . Using overlapping snapshots from three adjacent cameras, separate images of the velocity field were stitched together to form an uninterrupted window. Centered about the axis of the jet, the effective field of view spanned two jet diameters in the cross-stream direction (r) and seven diameters in the streamwise direction (z) . This area proved to be sufficiently large to capture important scales of supersonic flow relevant to noise generation. Specifically, Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) has extracted particular energy modes thought to be associated with the large-scale instability wave, shock cells, and turbulent mixing characteristic of supersonic noise. As example, time-dependent modal correlations present evidence linking the existence of shock cells to screech tones. From the data gathered, these experimental and analytical techniques are believed to be valuable tools in isolating energy-based flow structures relevant to noise generation. The authors would like to thank Spectral Energies for their continued support of research at Syracuse University.

  9. Basic tasks for improving spectral-acoustic forecasting of dynamic phenomena in coal mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, A. V.; Kontrimas, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A number of tasks for improving the spectral-acoustic method for forecasting dynamic phenomena and controlling stress condition in coalmines is considered. They are: considering the influence of a gas factor on the danger indicator, dependence of a relative pressure coefficient on the distance between the source and the receiver of the probing acoustic signal, correct selection of operating frequencies, the importance of developing the techniques for defining the critical value of the outburst danger index The influence of the rock mass stress condition ahead of the preliminary opening face on the relative pressure coefficient defined for installing the sound receiver in the wall of the opening behind the opening face is also justified in the article.

  10. Synthetic Absorption Lines for a Clumpy Medium: A Spectral Signature for Cloud Acceleration in AGN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Tim; Proga, Daniel; Dannen, Randall; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the highly ionized multiphase components of AGN disc winds may be due to thermal instability. The ions responsible for forming the observed X-ray absorption lines may only exist in relatively cool clumps that can be identified with the so-called warm absorbers. Here we calculate synthetic absorption lines for such warm absorbers from first principles by combining 2D hydrodynamic solutions of a two-phase medium with a dense grid of photoionization models to determine the detailed ionization structure of the gas. Our calculations reveal that cloud disruption, which leads to a highly complicated velocity field (i.e. a clumpy flow), will only mildly affect line shapes and strengths when the warm gas becomes highly mixed but not depleted. Prior to complete disruption, clouds that are optically thin to the driving UV resonance lines will cause absorption at an increasingly blueshifted line-of-sight velocity as they are accelerated. This behavior will imprint an identifiable signature on the line profile if warm absorbers are enshrouded in an even broader absorption line produced by a high column of intercloud gas. Interestingly, we show that it is possible to develop a spectral diagnostic for cloud acceleration by differencing the absorption components of a doublet line, a result that can be qualitatively understood using a simple partial covering model. Our calculations also permit us to comment on the spectral differences between cloud disruption and ionization changes driven by flux variability. Notably, cloud disruption offers another possibility for explaining absorption line variability.

  11. Synthetic absorption lines for a clumpy medium: a spectral signature for cloud acceleration in AGN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Tim; Proga, Daniel; Dannen, Randall; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2017-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that the highly ionized multiphase components of AGN disc winds may be due to thermal instability. The ions responsible for forming the observed X-ray absorption lines may only exist in relatively cool clumps that can be identified with the so-called warm absorbers. Here we calculate synthetic absorption lines for such warm absorbers from first principles by combining 2D hydrodynamic solutions of a two-phase medium with a dense grid of photoionization models to determine the detailed ionization structure of the gas. Our calculations reveal that cloud disruption, which leads to a highly complicated velocity field (i.e. a clumpy flow), will only mildly affect line shapes and strengths when the warm gas becomes highly mixed but not depleted. Prior to complete disruption, clouds that are optically thin to the driving UV resonance lines will cause absorption at an increasingly blueshifted line-of-sight velocity as they are accelerated. This behaviour will imprint an identifiable signature on the line profile if warm absorbers are enshrouded in an even broader absorption line produced by a high column of intercloud gas. Interestingly, we show that it is possible to develop a spectral diagnostic for cloud acceleration by differencing the absorption components of a doublet line, a result that can be qualitatively understood using a simple partial covering model. Our calculations also permit us to comment on the spectral differences between cloud disruption and ionization changes driven by flux variability. Notably, cloud disruption offers another possibility for explaining absorption line variability.

  12. Synthetic absorption lines for a clumpy medium: a spectral signature for cloud acceleration in AGN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Tim; Proga, Daniel; Dannen, Randall; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the highly ionised multiphase components of AGN disc winds may be due to thermal instability. The ions responsible for forming the observed X-ray absorption lines may only exist in relatively cool clumps that can be identified with the so-called `warm absorbers'. Here we calculate synthetic absorption lines for such warm absorbers from first principles by combining 2D hydrodynamic solutions of a two-phase medium with a dense grid of photoionization models to determine the detailed ionization structure of the gas. Our calculations reveal that cloud disruption, which leads to a highly complicated velocity field (i.e. a clumpy flow), will only mildly affect line shapes and strengths when the warm gas becomes highly mixed but not depleted. Prior to complete disruption, clouds which are optically thin to the driving UV resonance lines will cause absorption at an increasingly blueshifted line of sight velocity as they are accelerated. This behavior will imprint an identifiable signature on the line profile if warm absorbers are enshrouded in an even broader absorption line produced by a high column of intercloud gas. Interestingly, we show that it is possible to develop a spectral diagnostic for cloud acceleration by differencing the absorption components of a doublet line, a result which can be qualitatively understood using a simple partial covering model. Our calculations also permit us to comment on the spectral differences between cloud disruption and ionization changes driven by flux variability. Notably, cloud disruption offers another possibility for explaining absorption line variability.

  13. Comparison of outburst danger criteria of coal seams for acoustic spectral and instrumental forecast methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, A. V.; Bireva, Yu A.

    2016-10-01

    Outburst danger criteria for the two methods of current coal seam outburst forecast are considered: instrumental - by the initial outgassing rate and chippings outlet during test boreholes drilling, and geo-physical - by relation of high frequency and low frequency components of noise caused by cutting tool of operating equipment probing the face area taking into consideration the outburst criteria correction based on methane concentration at the face area and the coal strength. The conclusion is made on “adjustment” possibility of acoustic spectral forecast method criterion amended by control of methane concentration at the coal face and the coal strength taken from the instrumental method forecast results.

  14. Spectral signatures of photosynthesis II: coevolution with other stars and the atmosphere on extrasolar worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Kiang, N Y; Tinetti, G; Blankenship, R E; Cohen, M; Siefert, J; Crisp, D; Meadows, V S; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Segura, Antigona; Tinetti, Giovanna; Blankenship, Robert E.; Cohen, Martin; Siefert, Janet; Crisp, David; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2007-01-01

    As photosynthesis on Earth produces the primary signatures of life that can be detected astronomically at the global scale, a strong focus of the search for extrasolar life will be photosynthesis, particularly photosynthesis that has evolved with a different parent star. We take planetary atmospheric compositions simulated by Segura, et al. (2003, 2005) for Earth-like planets around observed F2V and K2V stars, modeled M1V and M5V stars, and around the active M4.5V star AD Leo; our scenarios use Earth's atmospheric composition as well as very low O2 content in case anoxygenic photosynthesis dominates. We calculate the incident spectral photon flux densities at the surface of the planet and under water. We identify bands of available photosynthetically relevant radiation and find that photosynthetic pigments on planets around F2V stars may peak in absorbance in the blue, K2V in the red-orange, and M stars in the NIR, in bands at 0.93-1.1 microns, 1.1-1.4 microns, 1.5-1.8 microns, and 1.8-2.5 microns. In additio...

  15. STUDIES OF ACOUSTIC EMISSION SIGNATURES FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE OF SS 316L WELDED SAMPLES UNDER DYNAMIC LOAD CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. RANGANAYAKULU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE signatures of various weld defects of stainless steel 316L nuclear grade weld material are investigated. The samples are fabricated by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG Welding Method have final dimension of 140 mm x 15 mm x 10 mm. AE signals from weld defects such as Pinhole, Porosity, Lack of Penetration, Lack of Side Fusion and Slag are recorded under dynamic load conditions by specially designed mechanical jig. AE features of the weld defects were attained using Linear Location Technique (LLT. The results from this study concluded that, stress release and structure deformation between the sections in welding area are load conditions major part of Acoustic Emission activity during loading.

  16. Acoustic interaction between the right and left piriform fossae in generating spectral dips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Hironori; Adachi, Seiji; Mokhtari, Parham; Kitamura, Tatsuya

    2013-10-01

    It is known that the right and left piriform fossae generate two deep dips on speech spectra and that acoustic interaction exists in generating the dips: if only one piriform fossa is modified, both the dips change in frequency and amplitude. In the present study, using a simple geometrical model and measured vocal tract shapes, the acoustic interaction was examined by the finite-difference time-domain method. As a result, one of the two dips was lower in frequency than the two independent dips that appeared when either of the piriform fossae was occluded, and the other dip was higher in frequency than the two dips. At the lower dip frequency, the piriform fossae resonated almost in opposite phase, while at the higher dip frequency, they resonated almost in phase. These facts indicate that the piriform fossae and the lower part of the pharynx can be modeled as a coupled two-oscillator system whose two normal vibration modes generate the two spectral dips. When the piriform fossae were identical, only the higher dip appeared. This is because the lower mode is not acoustically coupled to the main vocal tract enough to generate an absorption dip.

  17. Determination of single particle mass spectral signatures from light-duty vehicle emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodeman, David A; Toner, Stephen M; Prather, Kimberly A

    2005-06-15

    In this study, 28 light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDV) were operated on a chassis dynamometer at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Facility in El Monte, CA. The mass spectra of individual particles emitted from these vehicles were measured using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS). A primary goal of this study involves determining representative size-resolved single particle mass spectral signatures that can be used in future ambient particulate matter source apportionment studies. Different cycles were used to simulate urban driving conditions including the federal testing procedure (FTP), unified cycle (UC), and the correction cycle (CC). The vehicles were selected to span a range of catalytic converter (three-way, oxidation, and no catalysts) and engine technologies (vehicles models from 1953 to 2003). Exhaust particles were sampled directly from a dilution and residence chamber system using particle sizing instruments and an ATOFMS equipped with an aerodynamic lens (UF-ATOFMS) analyzing particles between 50 and 300 nm. On the basis of chemical composition, 10 unique chemical types describe the majority of the particles with distinct size and temporal characteristics. In the ultrafine size range (between 50 and 100 nm), three elemental carbon (EC) particle types dominated, all showing distinct EC signatures combined with Ca, phosphate, sulfate, and a lower abundance of organic carbon (OC). The relative fraction of EC particle types decreased as particle size increased with OC particles becoming more prevalent above 100 nm. Depending on the vehicle and cycle, several distinct OC particle types produced distinct ion patterns, including substituted aromatic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), coupled with other chemical species including ammonium, EC, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, V, and Ca. The most likely source of the Ca and phosphate in the particles is attributed to the lubricating oil. Significant variability was

  18. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  19. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  20. Acoustic signature analysis of the interaction between a dc plasma jet and a suspension liquid jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rat, V; Coudert, J F [SPCTS-CNRS UMR 6638, University of Limoges, 123 av. A Thomas 87060 Limoges cedex (France)

    2009-10-07

    Suspension plasma spraying allows forming finely structured coatings by injecting suspensions of ceramic particles within a dc plasma jet. The electric arc motion in dc plasma torch is the main acoustic source which is modified by the injection of suspension. The analyses of cross-correlations between the arc voltage and the acoustic signal show a decrease in time propagations due to local cooling of the plasma jet when injecting suspensions. Moreover, power spectra highlight acoustic amplifications below a certain frequency threshold and attenuations above. A simplified model of the frequency acoustic response of a two-phase vaporizing mixture is used to interpret experimental measurements. These acoustic effects are due to the dynamics of thermal transfers between vaporizing liquid and plasma.

  1. Vibrational Spectral Signatures of Crystalline Cellulose Using High Resolution Broadband Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Libing; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Fu, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Art J.; Wang, Hongfei; Yang, Bin

    2015-03-03

    Here we reported the first sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS) study on both the C-H and O-H region spectra of crystalline cellulose. HR-BB-SFG-VS has about 10 times better resolution than the conventional scanning SFG-VS and is known to be able to measure the intrinsic spectral lineshape and to resolve much more spectral details. With HR-BB-SFG-VS, we found that in cellulose from different sources, including Avicel and cellulose crystals isolated from algae Valonia (Iα) and tunicates (Iβ), the spectral signatures in the OH regions were unique for different allomorphs, i.e. Iα and Iβ, while the spectral signatures in the C-H regions varied in all samples examined. Even though the origin of the different behaviors of the crystalline cellulose in the O-H and C-H vibrational frequency regions is yet to be correlated to the structure of cellulose, these results provided new spectroscopic methods and opportunities to classify and understand the basic crystalline structure, as well as variations, in polymorphism of the crystalline cellulose structure.

  2. Modeling Attitude Variance in Small UAS’s for Acoustic Signature Simplification Using Experimental Design in a Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    MODELING ATTITUDE VARIANCE IN SMALL UAS’S FOR ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE SIMPLIFICATION USING EXPERIMENTAL...and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-110 MODELING ATTITUDE VARIANCE IN SMALL UAS’S FOR ACOUSTIC...USAF March 2015 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-110 MODELING ATTITUDE VARIANCE

  3. Estimation of glottal source features from the spectral envelope of the acoustic speech signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Juan Felix

    Speech communication encompasses diverse types of information, including phonetics, affective state, voice quality, and speaker identity. From a speech production standpoint, the acoustic speech signal can be mainly divided into glottal source and vocal tract components, which play distinct roles in rendering the various types of information it contains. Most deployed speech analysis systems, however, do not explicitly represent these two components as distinct entities, as their joint estimation from the acoustic speech signal becomes an ill-defined blind deconvolution problem. Nevertheless, because of the desire to understand glottal behavior and how it relates to perceived voice quality, there has been continued interest in explicitly estimating the glottal component of the speech signal. To this end, several inverse filtering (IF) algorithms have been proposed, but they are unreliable in practice because of the blind formulation of the separation problem. In an effort to develop a method that can bypass the challenging IF process, this thesis proposes a new glottal source information extraction method that relies on supervised machine learning to transform smoothed spectral representations of speech, which are already used in some of the most widely deployed and successful speech analysis applications, into a set of glottal source features. A transformation method based on Gaussian mixture regression (GMR) is presented and compared to current IF methods in terms of feature similarity, reliability, and speaker discrimination capability on a large speech corpus, and potential representations of the spectral envelope of speech are investigated for their ability represent glottal source variation in a predictable manner. The proposed system was found to produce glottal source features that reasonably matched their IF counterparts in many cases, while being less susceptible to spurious errors. The development of the proposed method entailed a study into the aspects

  4. Spectral Signatures of Photosynthesis. II. Coevolution with Other Stars And The Atmosphere on Extrasolar Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Nancy Y.; Segura, Antígona; Tinetti, Giovanna; Govindjee; Blankenship, Robert E.; Cohen, Martin; Siefert, Janet; Crisp, David; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2007-02-01

    As photosynthesis on Earth produces the primary signatures of life that can be detected astronomically at the global scale, a strong focus of the search for extrasolar life will be photosynthesis, particularly photosynthesis that has evolved with a different parent star. We take previously simulated planetary atmospheric compositions for Earth-like planets around observed F2V and K2V, modeled M1V and M5V stars, and around the active M4.5V star AD Leo; our scenarios use Earth's atmospheric composition as well as very low O2 content in case anoxygenic photosynthesis dominates. With a line-by-line radiative transfer model, we calculate the incident spectral photon flux densities at the surface of the planet and under water. We identify bands of available photosynthetically relevant radiation and find that photosynthetic pigments on planets around F2V stars may peak in absorbance in the blue, K2V in the red-orange, and M stars in the near-infrared, in bands at 0.93-1.1 μm, 1.1-1.4 μm, 1.5-1.8 μ m, and 1.8-2.5 μm. However, underwater organisms will be restricted to wavelengths shorter than 1.4 μm and more likely below 1.1 μm. M star planets without oxygenic photosynthesis will have photon fluxes above 1.6 μm curtailed by methane. Longer-wavelength, multi-photo-system series would reduce the quantum yield but could allow for oxygenic photosystems at longer wavelengths. A wavelength of 1.1 μm is a possible upper cutoff for electronic transiprotions versus only vibrational energy; however, this cutoff is not strict, since such energetics depend on molecular configuration. M star planets could be a half to a tenth as productive as Earth in the visible, but exceed Earth if useful photons extend to 1.1 μm for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Under water, organisms would still be able to survive ultraviolet flares from young M stars and acquire adequate light for growth. Key Words: Photosynthesis-Astrobiology - Photosynthetic pigments - Oxygenic photosynthesis - Anoxygenic

  5. Volume Sensor Development Test Series 2 - Lighting Conditions, Camera Settings, and Spectral and Acoustic Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-24

    sport). 2) Lysol disinfectant spray. 6 Toaster: Overdone Toast A Magic Chef model number N-10 120 V AC 60 Hz 1500W Toaster with 4 slices of white...Multiple people working Roaming Optimum 14 133 9_24_03 Spray Aerosol ( lysol ) Roaming Optimum 14 134 9_24_03 Spray Aerosol ( lysol ) Roaming Optimum 14 225...11_17_03 Spray Aerosol ( lysol ) Roaming Optimum 14 228 11_17_03 Spray Aerosol ( lysol ) Roaming Optimum 14 150 9_30_03 Spray Aerosol (old spice) Roaming

  6. Dynamics, Heat Transport, Spectral Composition and Acoustic Signatures of Mesoscale Variability in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    the present thesis research would have been in vain were it not by the invaluable orientation of my advisor, Dr. Timour Radko. His pedagogical skills...streamfunction or any other property after equilibration. The following diagnostics are based on the equilibrated PV fluxes. The parameters βnd and r are...and is likely to apply to different models. The diagnostics are focused on RMS velocity and heat flux since they are computed from a second order

  7. A Spectral Signature Shape-Based Algorithm for Landsat Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Land-cover datasets are crucial for earth system modeling and human-nature interaction research at local, regional and global scales. They can be obtained from remotely sensed data using image classification methods. However, in processes of image classification, spectral values have received considerable attention for most classification methods, while the spectral curve shape has seldom been used because it is difficult to be quantified. This study presents a classification method based on the observation that the spectral curve is composed of segments and certain extreme values. The presented classification method quantifies the spectral curve shape and takes full use of the spectral shape differences among land covers to classify remotely sensed images. Using this method, classification maps from TM (Thematic mapper data were obtained with an overall accuracy of 0.834 and 0.854 for two respective test areas. The approach presented in this paper, which differs from previous image classification methods that were mostly concerned with spectral “value” similarity characteristics, emphasizes the "shape" similarity characteristics of the spectral curve. Moreover, this study will be helpful for classification research on hyperspectral and multi-temporal images.

  8. Are you a good mimic? Neuro-acoustic signatures for speech imitation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiterer, Susanne M; Hu, Xiaochen; Sumathi, T A; Singh, Nandini C

    2013-01-01

    We investigated individual differences in speech imitation ability in late bilinguals using a neuro-acoustic approach. One hundred and thirty-eight German-English bilinguals matched on various behavioral measures were tested for "speech imitation ability" in a foreign language, Hindi, and categorized into "high" and "low ability" groups. Brain activations and speech recordings were obtained from 26 participants from the two extreme groups as they performed a functional neuroimaging experiment which required them to "imitate" sentences in three conditions: (A) German, (B) English, and (C) German with fake English accent. We used recently developed novel acoustic analysis, namely the "articulation space" as a metric to compare speech imitation abilities of the two groups. Across all three conditions, direct comparisons between the two groups, revealed brain activations (FWE corrected, p learning.

  9. Bio-inspired UAV routing, source localization, and acoustic signature classification for persistent surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Pham, Tien

    2011-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the Army Research Laboratory* is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bio-inspired techniques for search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data. A fast and accurate method has been developed to localize an event by fusing data from a sparse number of UGSs. This technique uses a bio-inspired algorithm based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. A unique acoustic event classification algorithm was also developed based on using swarm optimization. Additional studies addressed the problem of routing multiple UAVs, optimally placing sensors in the field and locating the source of gunfire at helicopters. A field test was conducted in November of 2009 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that a system controlled by bio-inspired software algorithms can autonomously detect and locate the source of an acoustic event with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In nine independent test runs of a UAV, the system autonomously located the position of an explosion nine times with an average accuracy of 3 meters. The time required to perform source localization using the UAV was on the order of a few minutes based on UAV flight times. In June 2011, additional field tests of the system will be performed and will include multiple acoustic events, optimal sensor placement based on acoustic phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA

  10. An axisymmetric time-domain spectral-element method for full-wave simulations: Application to ocean acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bottero, Alexis; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Asch, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The numerical simulation of acoustic waves in complex 3D media is a key topic in many branches of science, from exploration geophysics to non-destructive testing and medical imaging. With the drastic increase in computing capabilities this field has dramatically grown in the last twenty years. However many 3D computations, especially at high frequency and/or long range, are still far beyond current reach and force researchers to resort to approximations, for example by working in 2D (plane strain) or by using a paraxial approximation. This article presents and validates a numerical technique based on an axisymmetric formulation of a spectral finite-element method in the time domain for heterogeneous fluid-solid media. Taking advantage of axisymmetry enables the study of relevant 3D configurations at a very moderate computational cost. The axisymmetric spectral-element formulation is first introduced, and validation tests are then performed. A typical application of interest in ocean acoustics showing upslope ...

  11. Are you a good mimic? Neuro-acoustic signatures for speech imitation ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Maria Reiterer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated individual differences in speech imitation ability in late bilinguals using a neuro-acoustic approach. 138 German-English bilinguals matched on various behavioral measures were tested for speech imitation ability in a foreign language, Hindi, and categorised into high and low ability groups. Brain activations and speech recordings were obtained from 26 participants from the two extreme groups as they performed a functional neuroimaging experiment which required them to imitate sentences in three conditions: (A German, (B English and (C German with fake English accent. We used recently developed novel acoustic analysis, namely the ‘articulation space’ as a metric to compare speech imitation abilities of the two groups. Across all three conditions, direct comparisons between the two groups, revealed brain activations (FWE corrected, p< 0.05 that were more widespread with significantly higher peak activity in the left supramarginal gyrus and postcentral areas for the low ability group. The high ability group, on the other hand showed significantly larger articulation space in all three conditions. In addition, articulation space also correlated positively with imitation ability (Pearson’s r=0.7, p<0.01. Our results suggest that an expanded articulation space for high ability individuals allows access to a larger repertoire of sounds, thereby providing skilled imitators greater flexibility in pronunciation and language learning.

  12. Visible and near-infrared spectral signatures for adulteration assessment of extra virgin olive oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Ottevaere, H.; Thienpont, H.; Conte, L.; Marega, M.; Cichelli, A.; Attilio, C.; Cimato, A.

    2010-04-01

    Because of its high price, the extra virgin olive oil is frequently target for adulteration with lower quality oils. This paper presents an innovative optical technique capable of quantifying the adulteration of extra virgin olive oil caused by lowergrade olive oils. It relies on spectral fingerprinting the test liquid by means of diffuse-light absorption spectroscopy carried out by optical fiber technology in the wide 400-1700 nm spectral range. Then, a smart multivariate processing of spectroscopic data is applied for immediate prediction of adulterant concentration.

  13. Spectral Induced Polarization Signatures of Ethanol in Sand-Clay Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) method has previously been investigated as a tool for detecting physicochemical changes occurring as result of clay-organic interactions in porous media. We performed SIP measurements with a dynamic signal analyzer (NI-4551) on laboratory ...

  14. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  15. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S

    2005-10-04

    This report reviews progress made on NA22 project LL251DP to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We have met all milestones and deliverables for FY05, as shown in Table 1. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begin to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. The results obtained in FY05 further support the feasibility of successful demonstration of an NAR experiment for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs.

  16. Insights on the Spectral Signatures of Stellar Activity and Planets from PCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Allen B.; Cisewski, Jessi; Dumusque, Xavier; Fischer, Debra A.; Ford, Eric B.

    2017-09-01

    Photospheric velocities and stellar activity features such as spots and faculae produce measurable radial velocity signals that currently obscure the detection of sub-meter-per-second planetary signals. However, photospheric velocities are imprinted differently in a high-resolution spectrum than are Keplerian Doppler shifts. Photospheric activity produces subtle differences in the shapes of absorption lines due to differences in how temperature or pressure affects the atomic transitions. In contrast, Keplerian Doppler shifts affect every spectral line in the same way. With a high enough signal-to-noise (S/N) and resolution, statistical techniques can exploit differences in spectra to disentangle the photospheric velocities and detect lower-amplitude exoplanet signals. We use simulated disk-integrated time-series spectra and principal component analysis (PCA) to show that photospheric signals introduce spectral line variability that is distinct from that of Doppler shifts. We quantify the impact of instrumental resolution and S/N for this work.

  17. New Asia Dust Storm Detection Method Based on the Thermal Infrared Spectral Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As hyperspectral instruments can provide the detailed spectral information, a new spectral similarity method for detecting and differentiating dust from non-dust scenes using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS observations has been developed. The detection is based on a pre-defined Dust Spectral Similarity Index (DSSI, which was calculated from the accumulated brightness temperature differences between selected 16 AIRS observation channels, in the thermal infrared region of 800–1250 cm−1. It has been demonstrated that DSSI can effectively separate the dust from non-dust by elevating dust signals. For underlying surface covered with dust, the DSSI tends to show values close to 1.0. However, the values of DSSI for clear sky surfaces or clouds (ice and water are basically lower than those of dust, as their spectrums have significant differences with dust. To evaluate this new simple DSSI dust detection algorithm, several Asia dust events observed in northern China were analyzed, and the results agree favorably with those from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectro radiometer (MODIS and Cloud Aerosol LiDAR with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP observations.

  18. DEMON-type algorithms for determination of hydro-acoustic signatures of surface ships and of divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamnoiu, G.; Radu, O.; Rosca, V.; Pascu, C.; Damian, R.; Surdu, G.; Curca, E.; Radulescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    With the project “System for detection, localization, tracking and identification of risk factors for strategic importance in littoral areas”, developed in the National Programme II, the members of the research consortium intend to develop a functional model for a hydroacoustic passive subsystem for determination of acoustic signatures of targets such as fast boats and autonomous divers. This paper presents some of the results obtained in the area of hydroacoustic signal processing by using DEMON-type algorithms (Detection of Envelope Modulation On Noise). For evaluation of the performance of various algorithm variations we have used both audio recordings of the underwater noise generated by ships and divers in real situations and also simulated noises. We have analysed the results of processing these signals using four DEMON algorithm structures as presented in the reference literature and a fifth DEMON algorithm structure proposed by the authors of this paper. The algorithm proposed by the authors generates similar results to those obtained by applying the traditional algorithms but requires less computing resources than those and at the same time it has proven to be more resilient to random noise influence.

  19. The influence of charge stratification on the spectral signature of partially premixed combustion in a light-duty optical engine

    KAUST Repository

    Najafabadi, M. Izadi

    2017-03-25

    The origin of light emission during low-temperature combustion in a light-duty IC engine is investigated by high-speed spectroscopy in both HCCI and PPC regimes. Chemiluminescence and thermal radiation are expected to be the dominant sources of light emission during combustion. A method has been developed to distinguish chemiluminescence from thermal radiation, and different chemiluminescing species could be identified. Different combustion modes and global equivalence ratios are analyzed in this manner. The results indicate that the spectral signature (270–540 nm range) of the combustion is highly dependent on the stratification level. A significant broadband chemiluminescence signal is detected and superimposed on all spectra. This broadband chemiluminescence signal can reach up to 100 percent of the total signal in HCCI combustion, while it drops to around 80 percent for stratified combustion (PPC). We show that this broadband signal can be used as a measure for the heat release rate. The broadband chemiluminescence did also correlate with the equivalence ratio quite well in both HCCI and PPC regimes, suggesting that the total emission in the spectral region of 330–400 nm can serve as a proxy of equivalence ratio and the rate of heat release. Regarding C2* chemiluminescence, we see two different chemical mechanisms for formation of C2* in the PPC regime: first during the early stage of combustion by the breakup of bigger molecules and the second during the late stage of combustion when soot particles are forming.

  20. The influence of charge stratification on the spectral signature of partially premixed combustion in a light-duty optical engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafabadi, M. Izadi; Egelmeers, Luc; Somers, Bart; Deen, Niels; Johansson, Bengt; Dam, Nico

    2017-04-01

    The origin of light emission during low-temperature combustion in a light-duty IC engine is investigated by high-speed spectroscopy in both HCCI and PPC regimes. Chemiluminescence and thermal radiation are expected to be the dominant sources of light emission during combustion. A method has been developed to distinguish chemiluminescence from thermal radiation, and different chemiluminescing species could be identified. Different combustion modes and global equivalence ratios are analyzed in this manner. The results indicate that the spectral signature (270-540 nm range) of the combustion is highly dependent on the stratification level. A significant broadband chemiluminescence signal is detected and superimposed on all spectra. This broadband chemiluminescence signal can reach up to 100 percent of the total signal in HCCI combustion, while it drops to around 80 percent for stratified combustion (PPC). We show that this broadband signal can be used as a measure for the heat release rate. The broadband chemiluminescence did also correlate with the equivalence ratio quite well in both HCCI and PPC regimes, suggesting that the total emission in the spectral region of 330-400 nm can serve as a proxy of equivalence ratio and the rate of heat release. Regarding C2* chemiluminescence, we see two different chemical mechanisms for formation of C2* in the PPC regime: first during the early stage of combustion by the breakup of bigger molecules and the second during the late stage of combustion when soot particles are forming.

  1. Radiative Signatures of Reconnection in X-ray Binary Spectral States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    Accreting black holes (BHs) in Galactic X-ray Binary (XRB) systems represent some of the main targets of space-based high-energy observatories such as NASA s RXTE, Chandra, and NuSTAR, as well as the international observatories XMM Newton, INTEGRAL, Suzaku (Astro-E), and Astro-H. The overall radiative energy output (mostly X-rays) is ultimately powered by the conversion of the gravitational potential energy of the matter falling onto a black hole and forming an accretion disk or a hot accretion flow around it. Observationally, these systems are found to cycle between a few discrete spectral states, characterized by different overall X-ray power and spectral hardness: (1) the bright thermal high-soft state, dominated by a soft (1 keV) thermal component attributed to a thin dense accretion disk with a relatively weak corona producing a power-law tail emission to at least 1 MeV; (2) the low-hard state, showing no signs of a thin accretion disk and dominated by a single hard (with index ~ -1.7) power law truncating at about 100 keV; and (3) the bright Steep Power Law state with both a standard thin disk and a powerful coronal power-law (with index about -2.5) emission extending to at least 1 MeV. Explaining the key features of these nonthermal spectra, i.e., their power law indices and high-energy cutoffs, is one of the outstanding problems in high-energy astrophysics. The hard (10keV 1MeV) X-ray emission in these states is believed to be produced by inverse-Compton scattering in relativistically-hot gas, presumably heated by magnetic reconnection processes, and forming either an accretion disk corona or the hot accretion flow itself. Since the radiative cooling time of the energetic electrons in the intense radiation fields found in these systems is very short, the observed non-thermal hard X-ray spectra should directly reflect the instantaneous energy spectra of the electrons accelerated in reconnection events. Recent advances in kinetic simulations of reconnection

  2. Detection of illicit drugs with the technique of spectral fluorescence signatures (SFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poryvkina, Larisa; Babichenko, Sergey

    2010-10-01

    The SFS technology has already proved its analytical capabilities in a variety of industrial and environmental tasks. Recently it has been introduced for forensic applications. The key features of the SFS method - measuring a 3-dimensional spectrum of fluorescence of the sample (intensity versus excitation and emission wavelengths) with following recognition of specific spectral patterns of SFS responsible for individual drugs - provide an effective tool for the analysis of untreated seized samples, without any separation of the substance of interest from its mixture with accompanying cutting agents and diluents as a preparatory step. In such approach the chemical analysis of the sample is substituted by the analysis of SFS matrix visualized as an optical image. The SFS technology of drug detection is realized by NarTest® NTX2000 analyzer, compact device intended to measure suspicious samples in liquid, solid and powder forms. It simplifies the detection process due to fully automated procedures of SFS measuring and integrated expert system for recognition of spectral patterns. Presently the expert system of NTX2000 is able to detect marijuana, cocaine, heroin, MDMA, amphetamine and methamphetamine with the detection limit down to 5% of the drug concentration in various mixtures. The numerous tests with street samples confirmed that the use of SFS method provides reliable results with high sensitivity and selectivity for identification of drugs of abuse. More than 3000 street samples of the aforesaid drugs were analyzed with NTX2000 during validation process, and the correspondence of SFS results and conclusions of standard forensic analyses with GC/MS techniques was in 99.4% cases.

  3. Aqueous Cation-Amide Binding: Free Energies and IR Spectral Signatures by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluharova, Eva; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schmidt, Burkhard; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-07-03

    Understanding specific ion effects on proteins remains a considerable challenge. N-methylacetamide serves as a useful proxy for the protein backbone that can be well characterized both experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic signatures in the amide I band reflecting the strength of the interaction of alkali cations and alkali earth dications with the carbonyl group remain difficult to assign and controversial to interpret. Herein, we directly compute the IR shifts corresponding to the binding of either sodium or calcium to aqueous N-methylacetamide using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the two cations interact with aqueous N-methylacetamide with different affinities and in different geometries. Since sodium exhibits a weak interaction with the carbonyl group, the resulting amide I band is similar to an unperturbed carbonyl group undergoing aqueous solvation. In contrast, the stronger calcium binding results in a clear IR shift with respect to N-methylacetamide in pure water. Support from the Czech Ministry of Education (grant LH12001) is gratefully acknowledged. EP thanks the International Max-Planck Research School for support and the Alternative Sponsored Fellowship program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PJ acknowledges the Praemium Academie award from the Academy of Sciences. Calculations of the free energy profiles were made possible through generous allocation of computer time from the North-German Supercomputing Alliance (HLRN). Calculations of vibrational spectra were performed in part using the computational resources in the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grant CHE-0431312. CJM is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. PNNL is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is

  4. A holistic view of unstable dark matter. Spectral and anisotropy signatures in astrophysical backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Le

    2010-11-15

    The nature of dark matter is one of the key outstanding problems in both particle and astrophysics. If dark matter decays or annihilates into electrons and positrons, it can affect diffuse radiation backgrounds observed in astrophysics. In this thesis, we propose a new, more general analysis of constraints on dark matter models. For any decaying dark matter model, constraints on mass and lifetime can be obtained by folding the specific dark matter decay spectrum with a response function. We derive these response functions from full-sky radio surveys and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray observations as well as from the local positron fluxes measured by the PAMELA satellite experiment and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models. We also discuss the influence of astrophysical uncertainties on the response function, such as the uncertainties from propagation models and from the spatial distribution of the dark matter. Moreover, an anisotropy analysis of full-sky emission gamma-ray and radio maps is performed to identify possible signatures of annihilating dark matter. We calculate angular power spectra of the cosmological background of synchrotron emission from dark matter annihilations into electron positron pairs. We compare the power spectra with the anisotropy of astrophysical and cosmological radio backgrounds, from normal galaxies, radio-galaxies, galaxy cluster accretion shocks, the cosmic microwave background and Galactic foregrounds. In addition, we develop a numerical tool to compute gamma-ray emission from such electrons and positrons diffusing in the smooth host halo and in substructure halos with masses down to 10{sup -6}M{sub s}un. We show that, unlike the total gamma-ray angular power spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT, the angular power spectrum from the inverse Compton scattering is exponentially suppressed below an angular scale determined by the diffusion length of electrons and positrons. (orig.)

  5. The 1600 Å Emission Bump in Protoplanetary Disks: A Spectral Signature of H2O Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Roueff, Evelyne; Abgrall, Hervé

    2017-08-01

    The FUV continuum spectrum of many accreting pre-main sequence stars, Classical T Tauri Stars (CTTSs), does not continue smoothly from the well-studied Balmer continuum emission in the NUV, suggesting that additional processes contribute to the short-wavelength emission in these objects. The most notable spectral feature in the FUV continuum of some CTTSs is a broad emission approximately centered at 1600 Å, which has been referred to as the “1600 Å Bump.” The origin of this feature remains unclear. In an effort to better understand the molecular properties of planet-forming disks and the UV spectral properties of accreting protostars, we have assembled archival FUV spectra of 37 disk-hosting systems observed by the Hubble Space Telescope-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Clear 1600 Å Bump emission is observed above the smooth, underlying 1100-1800 Å continuum spectrum in 19/37 Classical T Tauri disks in the HST-COS sample, with the detection rate in transition disks (8/8) being much higher than that in primordial or non-transition sources (11/29). We describe a spectral deconvolution analysis to separate the Bump (spanning 1490-1690 Å) from the underlying FUV continuum, finding an average Bump luminosity L(Bump) ≈ 7 × 1029 erg s-1. Parameterizing the Bump with a combination of Gaussian and polynomial components, we find that the 1600 Å Bump is characterized by a peak wavelength λ o = 1598.6 ± 3.3 Å, with FWHM = 35.8 ± 19.1 Å. Contrary to previous studies, we find that this feature is inconsistent with models of H2 excited by electron -impact. We show that this Bump makes up between 5%-50% of the total FUV continuum emission in the 1490-1690 Å band and emits roughly 10%-80% of the total fluorescent H2 luminosity for stars with well-defined Bump features. Energetically, this suggests that the carrier of the 1600 Å Bump emission is powered by Lyα photons. We argue that the most likely mechanism is Lyα-driven dissociation of H2O in the inner disk, r

  6. Sleep respiratory disturbances and arousals at moderate altitude have overlapping electroencephalogram spectral signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Katrin; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Tarokh, Leila; Lo Cascio, Christian M; Tesler, Noemi; Stoewhas, Anne-Christin; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E; Huber, Reto; Achermann, Peter

    2014-08-01

    An ascent to altitude has been shown to result in more central apneas and a shift towards lighter sleep in healthy individuals. This study employs spectral analysis to investigate the impact of respiratory disturbances (central/obstructive apnea and hypopnea or periodic breathing) at moderate altitude on the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) and to compare EEG changes resulting from respiratory disturbances and arousals. Data were collected from 51 healthy male subjects who spent 1 night at moderate altitude (2590 m). Power density spectra of Stage 2 sleep were calculated in a subset (20) of these participants with sufficient artefact-free data for (a) epochs with respiratory events without an accompanying arousal, (b) epochs containing an arousal and (c) epochs of undisturbed Stage 2 sleep containing neither arousal nor respiratory events. Both arousals and respiratory disturbances resulted in reduced power in the delta, theta and spindle frequency range and increased beta power compared to undisturbed sleep. The similarity of the EEG changes resulting from altitude-induced respiratory disturbances and arousals indicates that central apneas are associated with micro-arousals, not apparent by visual inspection of the EEG. Our findings may have implications for sleep in patients and mountain tourists with central apneas and suggest that respiratory disturbances not accompanied by an arousal may, none the less, impact sleep quality and impair recuperative processes associated with sleep more than previously believed.

  7. Supernova Legacy Survey: Using Spectral Signatures To Improve Type Ia Supernovae As Distance Indicators

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, E S; Sullivan, M; Howell, D A; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Bronder, T J; Carlberg, R; Conley, A; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Pain, R; Perrett, K; Pritchet, C; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Aldering, G; Fakhouri, H K; Kronborg, T; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perlmutter, S; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Zhang, T

    2010-01-01

    GMOS optical long-slit spectroscopy at the Gemini-North telescope was used to classify targets from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) from July 2005 and May 2006 - May 2008. During this time, 95 objects were observed. Where possible the objects' redshifts (z) were measured from narrow emission or absorption features in the host galaxy spectrum, otherwise they were measured from the broader supernova features. We present spectra of 68 confirmed or probable SNe Ia from SNLS with redshifts in the range 0.17 \\leq z \\leq 1.02. In combination with earlier SNLS Gemini and VLT spectra, we used these new observations to measure pseudo-equivalent widths (EWs) of three spectral features - CaII H&K, SiII and MgII - in 144 objects and compared them to the EWs of low-redshift SNe Ia from a sample drawn from the literature. No signs of changes with z are seen for the CaII H&K and MgII features. Systematically lower EW SiII is seen at high redshift, but this can be explained by a change in demographics of the SNe Ia...

  8. Discrimination of zone-specific spectral signatures in normal human prostate using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Imran I; Martin, Francis L

    2010-12-01

    The prostate gland is the most common site of pathology in human males. Using the urethra as an anatomical reference point, it can be divided into three distinct zones known as the transition zone (TZ), peripheral zone (PZ) and central zone (CZ). The pathological conditions of benign prostatic hypertrophy and/or prostate adenocarcinoma are highly prevalent in this gland. This preliminary study set out to determine whether biochemical intra-individual differences between normal prostate zones could be identified using Raman spectroscopy with subsequent exploratory analyses. A normal (benign) prostate transverse tissue section perpendicular to the rectal surface and above the verumontanum was obtained in a paraffin-embedded block. A 10-µm-thick slice was floated onto a gold substrate, de-waxed and analysed using Raman spectroscopy (200 epithelial-cell and 140 stromal spectra/zone). Raman spectra were subsequently processed in the 1800-367 cm(-1) spectral region employing principal component analysis (PCA) to determine whether wavenumber-intensity relationships expressed as single points in hyperspace might reveal biochemical differences associated with inter-zone pathological susceptibility. Visualisation of PCA scores plots and their corresponding loadings plots highlighted 781 cm(-1) (cytosine/uracil) and 787 cm(-1) (DNA) as the key discriminating factors segregating PZ from less susceptible TZ and CZ epithelia (P prostate zones to specific pathological conditions.

  9. The Sternheimer-GW method and the spectral signatures of plasmonic polarons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustino, Feliciano

    During the past three decades the GW method has emerged among the most promising electronic structure techniques for predictive calculations of quasiparticle band structures. In order to simplify the GW work-flow while at the same time improving the calculation accuracy, we developed the Sternheimer-GW method. In Sternheimer-GW both the screened Coulomb interaction and the electron Green's function are evaluated by using exclusively occupied Kohn-Sham states, as in density-functional perturbation theory. In this talk I will review the basics of Sternheimer-GW, and I will discuss two recent applications to semiconductors and superconductors. In the case of semiconductors we calculated complete energy- and momentum-resolved spectral functions by combining Sternheimer-GW with the cumulant expansion approach. This study revealed the existence of band structure replicas which arise from electron-plasmon interactions. In the case of superconductors we calculated the Coulomb pseudo-potential from first principles, and combined this approach with the Eliashberg theory of the superconducting critical temperature. This work was supported by the Leverhulme Trust (RL-2012-001), the European Research Council (EU FP7/ERC 239578), the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/J009857/1), and the Graphene Flagship (EU FP7/604391).

  10. Mapping aboveground forest biomass combining dendrometric data and spectral signature of forest species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avocat, H.; Tourneux, F.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate measures and explicit spatial representations of forest biomass compose an important aspect to model the forest productivity and crops, and to implement sustainable forest management. Several methods have been developed to estimate and to map forest biomass, combining point-sources measurements of biophysical variables such as diameter-at-breast height (DBH), tree height, crown size, crown length, crown volume and remote sensing data (spectral vegetation index values). In this study, we propose a new method for aboveground biomass (AGB) mapping of forests and isolated trees. This method is tested on a 1100 km2 area located in the eastern France. In contrast to most of studies, our model is not calibrated using field plot measurements or point-source inventory data. The primary goal of this model is to propose an accessible and reproducible method for AGB mapping of temperate forests, by combining standard biomass values coming from bibliography and remotely sensed data. This method relies on three steps. (1) The first step consists of produce a map of wooded areas including small woods and isolated trees, and to identify the major forest stands. To do this, we use an unsupervised classification of a Landsat 7 ETM+ image. Results are compared and improved with various land cover data. (2) The second step consists of extract the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values of main forest stands. (3) Finally, these values are combined with standard AGB values provided by bibliography, to calibrate four AGB estimation models of different forest types (broadleaves, coniferous, coppices, and mixed stands). This method provides a map of aboveground biomass for forests and isolated trees with a 30 meters spatial resolution. Results demonstrate that 71 % of AGB values for hardwoods vary between 143 and 363 t.ha-1, i.e. × 1 standard deviation around the average. For coniferous stands, most of values of AGB range from 167 to 256 t.ha-1.

  11. Spectral induced polarization signatures from a crude-oil contaminated site undergoing biodegradation, Bemidji, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewafy, F.; Atekwana, E. A.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Revil, A.; Skold, M.; Gorby, Y.; Werkema, D.

    2010-12-01

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising biogeophysical technique for sensing microbially-induced changes in the petrophysical properties of porous media. Recent studies by Schmutz et al. for samples freshly contaminated with oil show a well defined relaxation peak in the 0.001-0.1 Hz frequency rangewith the magnitude of the phase and resistivity increasing with increase in the relative saturation of the oil. In this study, we extend work of Abdel Aal et al. by acquiring SIP measurements in the frequency range between 0.001 and 1000 Hz on sediment cores retrieved from a hydrocarbon contaminated site where intrinsic bioremediation is occurring. Our results show the following: (1) in general for both the saturated and unsaturated zone samples, the real and imaginary conductivity for samples from within the plume are higher than those for background samples; (2) the imaginary conductivity results show a well defined peak in the frequency range between 0.001 - 0.01 Hz for contaminated samples with the magnitude higher for samples from the smear zone (contaminated with residual-phase hydrocarbon), exceeding values obtained for samples contaminated with dissolved-phase hydrocarbons; (3) a secondary peak not observed in uncontaminated samples is also observed around 100 Hz for the contaminated samples. Our results are consistent with the Abel Aal et al. study suggesting that biodegradation increases the magnitude of the imaginary conductivity response. The peak at the lower frequency may be due to the polarization of the Stern layer as suggested by Schmutz et al. Our laboratory SIP measurements from core samples are consistent with downhole time domain induced polarization measurements that also how that the contaminated borehole is more chargeable than the background borehole.

  12. An axisymmetric time-domain spectral-element method for full-wave simulations: Application to ocean acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottero, Alexis; Cristini, Paul; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Asch, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The numerical simulation of acoustic waves in complex 3D media is a key topic in many branches of science, from exploration geophysics to non-destructive testing and medical imaging. With the drastic increase in computing capabilities this field has dramatically grown in the last twenty years. However many 3D computations, especially at high frequency and/or long range, are still far beyond current reach and force researchers to resort to approximations, for example by working in 2D (plane strain) or by using a paraxial approximation. This article presents and validates a numerical technique based on an axisymmetric formulation of a spectral finite-element method in the time domain for heterogeneous fluid-solid media. Taking advantage of axisymmetry enables the study of relevant 3D configurations at a very moderate computational cost. The axisymmetric spectral-element formulation is first introduced, and validation tests are then performed. A typical application of interest in ocean acoustics showing upslope propagation above a dipping viscoelastic ocean bottom is then presented. The method correctly models backscattered waves and explains the transmission losses discrepancies pointed out in Jensen et al. (2007). Finally, a realistic application to a double seamount problem is considered.

  13. Comprehensive Assignment of Mass Spectral Signatures from Individual Bacillus atrophaeus Spores in Matrix-Free Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, A; Pitesky, M; Steele, P; Tobias, H; Fergenson, D P; Horn, J; Russell, S C; Czerwieniec, G; Lebrilla, C; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2004-10-22

    We have conducted studies to fully characterize the mass spectral signature of individual Bacillus atrophaeus, previously known as Bacillus subtilis var niger or Bacillus globigii, spores obtained in matrix-free bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS). Mass spectra of spores grown in unlabeled, {sup 13}C-labeled and {sup 15}N-labeled growth media are used to determine the number of carbon and nitrogen atoms associated with each mass peak. To determine the parent ion structure associated with fragment ions present in the spore spectra, the mass-to-charge (m/z) fragmentation pattern of several chemical standards was obtained. Our results agree with prior assignments of dipicolinic acid, amino acids and calcium complex ions made in the spore mass spectra. Identity of several previously unidentified mass peaks, key to recognition of Bacillus spore by matrix-free BAMS, is revealed. Specifically, a set of fragment peaks in the negative polarity is shown to be consistent with the fragmentation pattern of purine nucleobase containing compounds. The identity of m/z=+74, a marker peak that helps discriminate Bacillus atrophaeus from Bacillus thuringiensis spores grown in rich medium, is surprisingly a non-description, viz. [N{sub 1}C{sub 4}H{sub 12}]{sup +}. A probable precursor molecule for the [N{sub 1}C{sub 4}H{sub 12}]{sup +} ion observed in spore spectra is trimethyl glycine ({sup +}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CH{sub 2}COOH) that produces a m/z=74 peak in presence of dipicolinic acid.

  14. An Efficient and Accurate Spectral Method for Acoustic Scattering in Elliptic Domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qirong Fang; Jie Shen; LiLian Wang

    2009-01-01

    An efficient and accurate method for solving the two-dimensional Helmhokz equation in domains exterior to elongated obstacles is developed in this paper. The method is based on the so called transformed field expansion (TFE) coupled with a spectral-Galerkin solver for elliptical domain using Mathieu functions. Numerical results are presented to show the accuracy and stability of the proposed method.

  15. Speaker height estimation from speech: Fusing spectral regression and statistical acoustic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, John H L; Williams, Keri; Bořil, Hynek

    2015-08-01

    Estimating speaker height can assist in voice forensic analysis and provide additional side knowledge to benefit automatic speaker identification or acoustic model selection for automatic speech recognition. In this study, a statistical approach to height estimation that incorporates acoustic models within a non-uniform height bin width Gaussian mixture model structure as well as a formant analysis approach that employs linear regression on selected phones are presented. The accuracy and trade-offs of these systems are explored by examining the consistency of the results, location, and causes of error as well a combined fusion of the two systems using data from the TIMIT corpus. Open set testing is also presented using the Multi-session Audio Research Project corpus and publicly available YouTube audio to examine the effect of channel mismatch between training and testing data and provide a realistic open domain testing scenario. The proposed algorithms achieve a highly competitive performance to previously published literature. Although the different data partitioning in the literature and this study may prevent performance comparisons in absolute terms, the mean average error of 4.89 cm for males and 4.55 cm for females provided by the proposed algorithm on TIMIT utterances containing selected phones suggest a considerable estimation error decrease compared to past efforts.

  16. Intrinsic chirality and prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-limonene interfaces: spectral signatures with interference chiral sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhe-Hao; Wang, Hong-Fei

    2014-09-01

    We report in this work detailed measurements of the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050 cm(-1)) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the RS racemic mixture (50/50 equal amount mixture), show that the corresponding molecular groups of the R and S enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit a spectral signature from the chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and a spectral signature from the prochiral response of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-(+)-limonene to S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and disappears for the RS racemic mixture surface. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH(2) asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-(+)-limonene and S-(-)-limonene surfaces, and also surprisingly remains the same for the RS racemic mixture surface. Therefore, the structures of the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the liquid interfaces are nevertheless not mirror images to each other, even though the corresponding groups have the same tilt angle from the interfacial normal, i.e., the R-(+)-limonene and the S-(-)-limonene at the surface are diastereomeric instead of enantiomeric. These results provide detailed information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces and demonstrate the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as a unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  17. Spectral signatures of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator to be observed by low-Earth orbit satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkov, V. V.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Interference of an incident and reflected Alfvén pulses propagating inside the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) is studied on the basis of a simple one-dimensional model. Particular emphasis has been placed on the analysis of spectral features of ultralow frequency (˜1-15 Hz) electric perturbations recently observed by Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite. This "fingerprint" multiband spectral structure was observed when satellite descended in the terminator vicinity. Among factors affecting spectral structure the satellite position and distance from the IAR boundaries are most significant. It is concluded that the observed spectrograms exhibit modulation with "period" depending on propagation delay time of reflected Alfvén pulses in such a way that this effect can mask a spectral resonance structure resulted from excitation of IAR eigenmodes. The proposed interference effect is capable to produce a spectral pattern resembling a fingerprint which is compatible with the satellite observations.

  18. Dynamic changes in spectral and spatial signatures of high frequency oscillations in rat hippocampi during epileptogenesis in acute and chronic stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Pan Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze spectral and spatial signatures of high frequency oscillations (HFOs, which include ripples and fast ripples (FRs, > 200 Hz by quantitatively assessing average and peak spectral power in a rat model of different stages of epileptogenesis.Methods: The lithium–pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy was used. The acute phase of epilepsy was assessed by recording intracranial electroencephalography (EEG activity for 1 day after status epilepticus (SE. The chronic phase of epilepsy, including spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs, was assessed by recording EEG activity for 28 days after SE. Average and peak spectral power of five frequency bands of EEG signals in CA1, CA3 and DG regions of the hippocampus were analyzed with wavelet and digital filter.Results: FRs occurred in the hippocampus in the animal model. Significant dynamic changes in the spectral power of FRS were identified in CA1 and CA3. The average spectral power of ripples increased at 20 min before SE (p < 0.05, peaked at 10 min before diazepam injection. It decreased at 10 min after diazepam (p < 0.05 and returned to baseline after 1 hour (h. The average spectral power of FRs increased at 30 min before SE (p < 0.05 and peaked at 10 min before diazepam. It decreased at 10 min after diazepam (p < 0.05 and returned to baseline at 2 h after injection. The dynamic changes were similar between average and peak spectral power of FRs. Average and peak spectral power of both ripples and FRs in the chronic phase showed a gradual downward trend compared with normal rats 14 days after SE.Significance: The spectral power of HFOs may be utilized to distinguish between normal and pathologic HFOs. Ictal average and peak spectral power of FRs were two parameters for predicting acute epileptic seizures, which could be used as a new quantitative biomarker and early warning marker of seizure. Changes in interictal HFOs power in the hippocampus at the chronic stage may be not

  19. Single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles and the source apportionment of on-line PM2.5 by single particle aerosol mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Ma, Shexia; Gao, Bo; Li, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yanjun; Cai, Jing; Li, Mei; Yao, Ling'ai; Huang, Bo; Zheng, Mei

    2017-09-01

    In order to accurately apportion the many distinct types of individual particles observed, it is necessary to characterize fingerprints of individual particles emitted directly from known sources. In this study, single particle mass spectral signatures from vehicle exhaust particles in a tunnel were performed. These data were used to evaluate particle signatures in a real-world PM2.5 apportionment study. The dominant chemical type originating from average positive and negative mass spectra for vehicle exhaust particles are EC species. Four distinct particle types describe the majority of particles emitted by vehicle exhaust particles in this tunnel. Each particle class is labeled according to the most significant chemical features in both average positive and negative mass spectral signatures, including ECOC, NaK, Metal and PAHs species. A single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was also employed during the winter of 2013 in Guangzhou to determine both the size and chemical composition of individual atmospheric particles, with vacuum aerodynamic diameter (dva) in the size range of 0.2-2μm. A total of 487,570 particles were chemically analyzed with positive and negative ion mass spectra and a large set of single particle mass spectra was collected and analyzed in order to identify the speciation. According to the typical tracer ions from different source types and classification by the ART-2a algorithm which uses source fingerprints for apportioning ambient particles, the major sources of single particles were simulated. Coal combustion, vehicle exhaust, and secondary ion were the most abundant particle sources, contributing 28.5%, 17.8%, and 18.2%, respectively. The fraction with vehicle exhaust species particles decreased slightly with particle size in the condensation mode particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  1. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Orthogonal Mass Spectral Data for the Identification of Chemical Attribution Signatures of 3-Methylfentanyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, B. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Valdez, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); DeHope, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spackman, P. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanner, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martinez, H. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Critical to many modern forensic investigations is the chemical attribution of the origin of an illegal drug. This process greatly relies on identification of compounds indicative of its clandestine or commercial production. The results of these studies can yield detailed information on method of manufacture, sophistication of the synthesis operation, starting material source, and final product. In the present work, chemical attribution signatures (CAS) associated with the synthesis of the analgesic 3- methylfentanyl, N-(3-methyl-1-phenethylpiperidin-4-yl)-N-phenylpropanamide, were investigated. Six synthesis methods were studied in an effort to identify and classify route-specific signatures. These methods were chosen to minimize the use of scheduled precursors, complicated laboratory equipment, number of overall steps, and demanding reaction conditions. Using gas and liquid chromatographies combined with mass spectrometric methods (GC-QTOF and LC-QTOF) in conjunction with inductivelycoupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), over 240 distinct compounds and elements were monitored. As seen in our previous work with CAS of fentanyl synthesis the complexity of the resultant data matrix necessitated the use of multivariate statistical analysis. Using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), 62 statistically significant, route-specific CAS were identified. Statistical classification models using a variety of machine learning techniques were then developed with the ability to predict the method of 3-methylfentanyl synthesis from three blind crude samples generated by synthetic chemists without prior experience with these methods.

  2. Herschel/HIFI observations of spectrally resolved methylidyne signatures toward the high-mass star forming core NGC6334I

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wiel, M H D; Lis, D C; Bergin, E A; Comito, C; Emprechtinger, M; Schilke, P; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Baudry, A; Goldsmith, P F; Herbst, E; Langer, W; Lord, S; Neufeld, D; Pearson, J; Philips, T; Rolffs, R; Yorke, H; Bacmann, A; Benedettini, M; Blake, G A; Boogert, A; Bottinelli, S; Cabrit, S; Caselli, P; Castets, A; Cernicharo, J; Codella, C; Coutens, A; Crimier, N; Demyk, K; Dominik, C; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Fuente, A; Gerin, M; Helmich, F; Hennebelle, P; Henning, T; Hily-Blant, P; Jacq, T; Kahane, C; Kama, M; Klotz, A; Lefloch, B; Lorenzani, A; Maret, S; Melnick, G; Nisini, B; Pacheco, S; Pagani, L; Parise, B; Salez, M; Saraceno, P; Schuster, K; Tielens, A G G M; Vastel, C; Viti, S; Wakelam, V; Walters, A; Wyrowski, F; Edwards, K; Zmuidzinas, J; Morris, P; Samoska, L A; Teyssier, D

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to extensively studied dense star forming cores, little is known about diffuse gas surrounding star forming regions. We aim to study molecular gas in the high-mass star forming region NGC6334I, including diffuse, quiescent components which are inconspicuous in widely used molecular tracers such as CO. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of CH toward NGC6334I observed as part of the CHESS Key Program. HIFI resolves the hyperfine components of its J=3/2-1/2 transition, observed in emission as well as in absorption. The CH emission appears close to the systemic velocity of NGC6334I, while a linewidth of 3 km/s is smaller than previously observed in dense gas tracers such as NH3 and SiO. The CH abundance in the hot core is 7 10^-11, two to three orders of magnitude lower than in diffuse clouds. While other studies find distinct outflows in, e.g., CO and H2O toward NGC6334I, we do not detect outflow signatures in CH. To explain the absorption signatures, at least two absorbing components are needed a...

  3. Retrieving the availability of light in the ocean utilising spectral signatures of Vibrational Raman Scattering in hyper-spectral satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dinter

    2015-01-01

    et al., 2014. RTM simulations for different chlorophyll a concentrations and illumination conditions clearly show, that low fit factors of VRS retrieval results correspond to low amounts of light in the water column and vice versa. Exemplary, one month of SCIAMACHY data were processed and a global map of the depth integrated scalar irradiance E0 was retrieved. Spectral structures of VRS were clearly identified in the radiance measurements of SCIAMACHY. The fitting approach led to consistent results and the WF-DOAS algorithm results of VRS correlated clearly with the chlorophyll concentration in case-I water. Comparisons of the diffuse attenuation coefficient, extracted by VRS fit results, with the established GlobColour Kd (490 product show consistent results.

  4. Unravelling remote sensing signatures of plants contaminated with gasoline and diesel: an approach using the red edge spectral feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, I D; Souza Filho, C R; Magalhães, L A; Quitério, G C M; Alves, M N; Oliveira, W J

    2013-03-01

    Pipeline systems used to transport petroleum products represent a potential source of soil pollution worldwide. The design of new techniques that may improve current monitoring of pipeline leakage is imperative. This paper assesses the remote detection of small leakages of liquid hydrocarbons indirectly, through the analysis of spectral features of contaminated plants. Leaf and canopy spectra of healthy plants were compared to spectra of plants contaminated with diesel and gasoline, at increasing rates of soil contamination. Contamination effects were observed both visually in the field and thorough changes in the spectral reflectance patterns of vegetation. Results indicate that the remote detection of small volumes of gasoline and diesel contaminations is feasible based on the red edge analysis of leaf and canopy spectra of plants. Brachiaria grass ranks as a favourable choice to be used as an indicator of HCs leakages along pipelines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Retrieving the availability of light in the ocean utilising spectral signatures of Vibrational Raman Scattering in hyper-spectral satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinter, T.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.; Bracher, A.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of light in the ocean is an important parameter for the determination of phytoplankton photosynthesis processes and primary production from satellite data. It is also a useful parameter for other applications, e.g. the determination of heat fluxes. In this study, a method was developed utilising the vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) effect of water molecules to determine the amount of photons available in the ocean water, which is expressed by the depth integrated scalar irradiance text-decoration:overline">E0. Radiative transfer simulations with the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) SCIATRAN show clearly the relationship of text-decoration:overline">E0 to the strength of the VRS signal measured at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Taking advantage of VRS structures in hyper-spectral satellite measurements a retrieval technique to derive text-decoration:overline"> E0 in the wavelength region from 390 to 444.5 nm was developed. This approach uses the Weighting Function Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WF-DOAS) technique, applied to TOA radiances, measured by the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). Based on the approach of Vountas et al. (2007), where the DOAS method was used to fit modelled spectra of VRS, the method was improved by using the weighting function of VRS (VRS-WF) in the DOAS fit. This was combined with a look-up table (LUT) technique, where the text-decoration:overline"> E0 value was obtained for each VRS satellite fit directly. The VRS-WF and the LUT were derived from calculations with the RTM SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al., 2014). RTM simulations for different chlorophyll a concentrations and illumination conditions clearly show, that low fit factors of VRS retrieval results correspond to low amounts of light in the water column and vice versa. Exemplary, one month of SCIAMACHY data were processed and a global map of the depth integrated scalar

  6. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  7. Surface gravity waves and their acoustic signatures, 1-30 Hz, on the mid-Pacific sea floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W E; Munk, Walter

    2013-10-01

    In 1999, Duennebier et al. deployed a hydrophone and geophone below the conjugate depth in the abyssal Pacific, midway between Hawaii and California. Real time data were transmitted for 3 yr over an abandoned ATT cable. These data have been analyzed in the frequency band 1 to 30 Hz. Between 1 and 6 Hz, the bottom data are interpreted as acoustic radiation from surface gravity waves, an extension to higher frequencies of a non-linear mechanism proposed by Longuet-Higgins in 1950 to explain microseisms. The inferred surface wave spectrum for wave lengths between 6 m and 17 cm is saturated (wind-independent) and roughly consistent with the traditional Phillips κ(-4) wave number spectrum. Shorter ocean waves have a strong wind dependence and a less steep wave number dependence. Similar features are found in the bottom record between 6 and 30 Hz. But this leads to an enigma: The derived surface spectrum inferred from the Longuet-Higgins mechanism with conventional assumptions for the dispersion relation is associated with mean square slopes that greatly exceed those derived from glitter. Regardless of the generation mechanism, the measured bottom intensities between 10 and 30 Hz are well below minimum noise standards reported in the literature.

  8. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley J.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3 σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  9. Albedos and spectral signatures determination and it connection to geological processes: Simile between Earth and other solar system bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, J.; Ochoa, L.; Saavedra, F.

    2017-07-01

    Remote sensing has always been the best investigation tool for planetary sciences. In this research have been used data of Surface albedo, electromagnetic spectra and satelital imagery in search of understanding glacier dynamics in some bodies of the solar system, and how it's related to their compositions and associated geological processes, this methodology is very common in icy moons studies. Through analytic software's some albedos map's and geomorphological analysis were made that allow interpretation of different types of ice in the glacier's and it's interaction with other materials, almost all the images were worked in the visible and infrared ranges of the spectrum; spectral data were later used to connect the reflectance whit chemical and reologic properties of the compounds studied. It have been concluded that the albedo analysis is an effective tool to differentiate materials in the bodies surfaces, but the application of spectral data is necessary to know the exact compounds of the glaciers and to have a better understanding of the icy bodies.

  10. Tracking and understanding the acoustic signature of fluido-fractures: a dual optical/micro-seismic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Zecevic, Megan; Daniel, Guillaume; Jørgen Måløy, Knut; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik

    2015-04-01

    The characterization and comprehension of irreversible rock deformation processes due to fluid flow is a challenging problem with numerous applications in many fields. This phenomenon has received an ever-increasing attention in Earth Science, Physics, with many applications in natural hazard understanding, mitigation or forecast (e.g. earthquakes, control the mechanical stability of rock and soil formations during the injection or extraction of fluids, landslides with hydrological control, volcanic eruptions), or in the industry, as CO2 sequestration. In this study, analogue models are developed (similar to the previous work of Johnsen[1] but in rectangular shape) to study the instabilities developing during motion of fluid in dense porous materials: fracturing, fingering, channelling… We study these complex fluid/solid mechanical systems using two imaging techniques: fast optical imaging and high frequency resolution of acoustic emissions. Additionally, we develop physical models rendering for the fluid mechanics (similar to the work of Niebling[2] but with injection of fluid) in the channels and the propagation of microseismic waves around the fracture. We then confront a numerical resolution of this physical system with the observed experimental system. The experimental setup consists in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell with three closed boundaries and one semi-permeable boundary which enables the flow of the fluid but not the solid particles. During the experiments, the fluid is injected into the system with a constant injection pressure from the point opposite to the semi-permeable boundary. The fluid penetrates into the solid using the pore network. At the large enough injection pressures, the fluid also makes its way via creating channels, fractures to the semi-permeable boundary. During the experiments acoustic signals are recorded using different sensors then, those signals are compared and investigated further in both time and frequency domains

  11. Local states in one-dimensional CDW (charge density wave) materials: Spectral signatures for polarons and bipolarons in MX chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, B. I.; Donohoe, R. J.; Worl, L. A.; Bulou, A. D.F.; Arrington, C. A.; Gammel, J. T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    We have undertaken a combined theoretical and experimental effort directed toward the examination of both the ground and defect states in halide-bridged mixed-valence metal linear chains materials as they are tuned within and between broken symmetry phases. Novel low-dimensional highly correlated electronic materials offer a difficult theoretical challenge as we must span from a description of electronic structure on a molecular scale to the meso scale structure that is intrinsic to these solids. Our theoretical effort at Los Alamos combines quantum chemistry, band structure calculations, and many body modeling using Peierls-Hubbard Hamiltonians in order to model ground and local states. The experimental effort combines synthesis and a variety of microscopic structural and spectroscopic probes and macroscopic measurements in an effort to fully characterize both ground and local states as these materials are tuned in the phase boundary regions between broken symmetry states. The present article summarizes some of our recent research using optical spectroscopy to obtain signatures of photoexcited and intrinsic local states and compares these experimental results with Peierls-Hubbard calculations of the optical properties of these materials. Details concerning the theoretical and experimental approaches can be found elsewhere.

  12. Spectral signatures of intramolecular charge transfer process in beta-enaminones: a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ramprasad; Mandal, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Madhuri; Maity, D K; Bhattacharyya, S P

    2009-08-06

    In this paper, we present spectroscopic signatures of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and effects of solvent on the ICT process in 3-(phenylamino)-2-cyclohexen-1-one (PACO), a member of the well-known molecular family, the beta-enaminones. The dual fluorescence in the steady state emission spectra of the molecule in polar solvents indicates the occurrence of ICT, which is further supported by time-resolved studies, using time correlated single photon counting technique with picosecond resolution. To understand the nature of the charge transfer, pH dependent studies of the probe in water were performed, where a quenching of fluorescence was observed even in the presence of very low concentrations of acids. Solvent induced fluorescence quenching was observed in ethanol and methanol. The ICT process was also investigated by quantum chemical calculations. To understand the role of solvents in the ICT process, we have theoretically studied the macroscopic and microscopic solvation of the probe in water. The absorption spectra of the molecule in the gas phase as well as in water were simulated using time dependent density functional theory with cc-pVTZ basis set and self-consistent reaction field theory that models macroscopic solvation. The possibility of microscopic solvation in water was probed theoretically and the formation of 1:3 molecular clusters by PACO with water molecules has been confirmed. Our findings could have a bearing on pH sensing applications of the probe.

  13. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  14. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  15. Wiener variable step size and gradient spectral variance smoothing for double-talk-robust acoustic echo cancellation and acoustic feedback cancellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Cacho, Jose M.; Van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc;

    2014-01-01

    -GSVS-FDAF-PEM-AFROW algorithm obtains outstanding robustness and smooth adaptation in highly adverse scenarios such as in bursting DT at high levels, and in a change of acoustic path during continuous DT. Similarly, in AFC simulations, the algorithm outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms when using a low-order near-end speech...... model and in colored non-stationary noise....

  16. Combining random forest and 2D correlation analysis to identify serum spectral signatures for neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin R; Ashton, Katherine M; Brodbelt, Andrew; Dawson, Timothy; Jenkinson, Michael D; Hunt, Neil T; Palmer, David S; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-06-07

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has long been established as an analytical technique for the measurement of vibrational modes of molecular systems. More recently, FTIR has been used for the analysis of biofluids with the aim of becoming a tool to aid diagnosis. For the clinician, this represents a convenient, fast, non-subjective option for the study of biofluids and the diagnosis of disease states. The patient also benefits from this method, as the procedure for the collection of serum is much less invasive and stressful than traditional biopsy. This is especially true of patients in whom brain cancer is suspected. A brain biopsy is very unpleasant for the patient, potentially dangerous and can occasionally be inconclusive. We therefore present a method for the diagnosis of brain cancer from serum samples using FTIR and machine learning techniques. The scope of the study involved 433 patients from whom were collected 9 spectra each in the range 600-4000 cm(-1). To begin the development of the novel method, various pre-processing steps were investigated and ranked in terms of final accuracy of the diagnosis. Random forest machine learning was utilised as a classifier to separate patients into cancer or non-cancer categories based upon the intensities of wavenumbers present in their spectra. Generalised 2D correlational analysis was then employed to further augment the machine learning, and also to establish spectral features important for the distinction between cancer and non-cancer serum samples. Using these methods, sensitivities of up to 92.8% and specificities of up to 91.5% were possible. Furthermore, ratiometrics were also investigated in order to establish any correlations present in the dataset. We show a rapid, computationally light, accurate, statistically robust methodology for the identification of spectral features present in differing disease states. With current advances in IR technology, such as the development of rapid discrete

  17. Acoustic network event classification using swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    Classifying acoustic signals detected by distributed sensor networks is a difficult problem due to the wide variations that can occur in the transmission of terrestrial, subterranean, seismic and aerial events. An acoustic event classifier was developed that uses particle swarm optimization to perform a flexible time correlation of a sensed acoustic signature to reference data. In order to mitigate the effects from interference such as multipath, the classifier fuses signatures from multiple sensors to form a composite sensed acoustic signature and then automatically matches the composite signature with reference data. The approach can classify all types of acoustic events but is particularly well suited to explosive events such as gun shots, mortar blasts and improvised explosive devices that produce an acoustic signature having a shock wave component that is aperiodic and non-linear. The classifier was applied to field data and yielded excellent results in terms of reconstructing degraded acoustic signatures from multiple sensors and in classifying disparate acoustic events.

  18. Spectral signatures of dissipative standing shocks and mass outflow in presence of Comptonization around a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Santanu; Debnath, Dipak

    2014-01-01

    Accretion flows having positive specific energy are known to produce outflows and winds which escape to a large distance. According to Two Component Advective Flow (TCAF) model, centrifugal pressure dominated region of the flow just outside the black hole horizon, with or without shocks, acts as the base of this outflow. Electrons from this region are depleted due to the wind and consequently, energy transfer rate due to inverse Comptonization of low energy photons are affected. Specifically, it becomes easier to cool this region and emerging spectrum is softened. Our main goal is to show spectral softening due to mass outflow in presence of Compton cooling. To achieve this, we modify Rankine-Hugoniot relationships at the shock front when post-shock region suffers mass loss due to winds and energy loss due to inverse Comptonization. We solve two-temperature equations governing an accretion flow around a black hole which include Coulomb exchange between protons and electrons and other major radiative processes...

  19. THE CHESS SURVEY OF THE L1157-B1 SHOCK REGION: CO SPECTRAL SIGNATURES OF JET-DRIVEN BOW SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefloch, B.; Codella, C.; Ceccarelli, C. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et dAstrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Cabrit, S. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, ENS, UPMC, UCP, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Busquet, G.; Benedettini, M. [INAF, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Cernicharo, J.; Pardo, J. R. [Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA, Ctra de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Lis, D. C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nisini, B., E-mail: lefloch@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte, Porzio Catone (Italy)

    2012-10-01

    The unprecedented sensitivity of Herschel coupled with the high resolution of the HIFI spectrometer permits studies of the intensity-velocity relationship I(v) in molecular outflows, over a higher excitation range than possible up to now. Over the course of the CHESS Key Program, we have observed toward the bright bow shock region L1157-B1, the CO rotational transitions between J = 5-4 and J = 16-15 with HIFI, and the J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 with the IRAM 30 m and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescopes. We find that all the line profiles I{sub CO}(v) are well fit by a linear combination of three exponential laws {proportional_to}exp (- |v/v{sub 0}|) with v{sub 0} = 12.5, 4.4, and 2.5 km s{sup -1}. The first component dominates the CO emission at J {>=} 13, as well as the high-excitation lines of SiO and H{sub 2}O. The second component dominates for 3 {<=} J{sub up} {<=} 10 and the third one for J{sub up} {<=} 2. We show that these exponentials are the signature of quasi-isothermal shocked gas components: the impact of the jet against the L1157-B1 bow shock (T{sub k} {approx_equal} 210 K), the walls of the outflow cavity associated with B1 (T{sub k} {approx_equal} 64 K), and the older cavity L1157-B2 (T{sub k} {approx_equal} 23 K), respectively. Analysis of the CO line flux in the large-velocity gradient approximation further shows that the emission arises from dense gas (n(H{sub 2}) {>=} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}) close to LTE up to J = 20. We find that the CO J = 2-1 intensity-velocity relation observed in various other molecular outflows is satisfactorily fit by similar exponential laws, which may hold an important clue to their entrainment process.

  20. Investigating the effect of electro-active ion concentration on spectral induced polarization signatures arising from biomineralization pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Williams, K. H.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wu, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) is a proven geophysical method for detecting biomineral formation with promising applications for monitoring biogeochemical products during microbial induced sequestration of heavy metals and radionuclides in soils. SIP has been used to monitor the evolution of bioremediation-induced end-products at the uranium-contaminated U.S. Department of Energy Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Colorado. Although a significant SIP response was detected, the quantitative interpretation is non-trivial as the polarization of metallic minerals depends both on the mineral surface properties and the electrolyte chemistry. In previous experiments SIP mechanisms were studied under complex environments and individual source mechanisms could not be evaluated. Here we examine the role of electrolyte chemistry by comparing the effect of redox active / inactive ions on metallic polarization. In these abiotic experiments magnetite was used as a proxy biomineral and dispersed within columns packed with sand. Parallel columns were saturated with solutions of different concentrations of active (Fe2+) and inactive (Ca2+) ions (0.01mM-10mM) and SIP measurements made (0.1-1000 Hz). Experimental results show small, but detectable, differences in the effect of active ion and inactive ion concentration on the SIP response. To better characterize the effect of electro-active ions on metallic minerals we used a Cole - Cole type relaxation model, to describe the SIP responses. In order to better resolve the relaxation model parameters, we followed a two-step approach whereby we started with a Bayesian based inversion to resolve for the initial parameter estimates, and subsequently used these estimates as a starting model for a deterministic solution. Our results suggest that changes in the active ion concentration, in the presence of magnetite, alone are unlikely to fully explain recent SIP monitoring data from the Rifle site.

  1. X-ray polarimetric signatures induced by spectral variability in the framework of the receding torus model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Petrucci, P.-O.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Obscuring circumnuclear dust is a well-established constituent of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Traditionally referred to as the receding dusty torus, its inner radius and angular extension should depend on the photo-ionizing luminosity of the central source. Aims: We quantify the expected time-dependent near-infrared (NIR), optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray polarization of a receding dusty torus as a function of the variable X-ray flux level and spectral shape. Methods: Using a Monte Carlo approach, we simulate the radiative transfer between the multiple components of an AGN adopting model constraints from the bright Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151. We compare our model results to the observed NIR to UV polarization of the source and predict its X-ray polarization. Results: We find that the 2-8 keV polarization fraction of a standard AGN model varies from less then a few percent along polar viewing angles up to tens of percent at equatorial inclinations. At viewing angles around the type-1/type-2 transition, there is a different X-ray polarization variability in a static or a receding torus scenario. In the former case, the expected 2-8 keV polarization of NGC 4151 is found to be 1.21% ± 0.34% with a constant polarization position angle, while in the latter scenario it varies from 0.1% to 6% depending on the photon index of the primary radiation. Additionally, an orthogonal rotation of the polarization position angle with photon energy appears for very soft primary spectra. Conclusions: Future X-ray polarimetry missions will be able to test whether the receding model is valid for Seyfert galaxies seen at a viewing angle close to the torus horizon. The overall stability of the polarization position angle for photon indexes softer than Γ = 1.5 ensures that reliable measurements of X-ray polarization are possible. We derive a long-term observational strategy for NGC 4151 assuming observations with a small to medium-sized X-ray polarimetry satellite.

  2. Speech recognition in noise as a function of the number of spectral channels : Comparison of acoustic hearing and cochlear implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesen, LM; Shannon, RV; Baskent, D; Wang, YB

    Speech recognition was measured as a function of spectral resolution (number of spectral channels) and speech-to-noise ratio in normal-hearing (NH) and cochlear-implant (CI) listeners. Vowel, consonant, word, and sentence recognition were measured in five normal -hearing listeners, ten listeners

  3. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  4. Advanced discriminating criteria for natural organic substances of cultural heritage interest: spectral decomposition and multivariate analyses of FT-Raman and FT-IR signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Céline; Bellot-Gurlet, Ludovic; Le Hô, Anne-Solenn; Paris, Céline; Regert, Martine

    2013-10-15

    Natural organic substances are involved in many aspects of the cultural heritage field. Their presence in different forms (raw, heated, mixed), with various conservation states, constitutes a real challenge regarding their recognition and discrimination. Their characterization usually involves the use of separative techniques which imply destructive sampling and specific analytical preparations. Here we propose a non destructive approach using FT-Raman and infrared spectroscopies for the identification and differentiation of natural organic substances. Because of their related functional groups, they usually present similar vibrational signatures. Nevertheless the use of appropriate signal treatment and statistical analysis was successfully carried out to overcome this limitation, then proposing new objective discriminating methodology to identify these substances. Spectral decomposition calculations were performed on the CH stretching region of a large set of reference materials such as resins, oils, animal glues, and gums. Multivariate analyses (Principal Component Analyses) were then performed on the fitting parameters, and new discriminating criteria were established. A set of previously characterized archeological resins, with different surface aspects or alteration states, was analyzed using the same methodology. These testing samples validate the efficiency of our discriminating criteria established on the reference corpus. Moreover, we proved that some alteration or ageing of organic materials is not an issue to their recognition.

  5. The use of spectral skin reflectivity and laser doppler vibrometry data to determine the optimal site and wavelength to collect human vital sign signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Kenneth A.; Kaur, Balvinder; Hodgkin, Van A.

    2012-06-01

    The carotid artery has been used extensively by researchers to demonstrate that Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) is capable of exploiting vital sign signatures from cooperative human subjects at stando. Research indicates that, the carotid, although good for cooperative and non-traumatic scenarios, is one of the first vital signs to become absent or irregular when a casualty is hemorrhaging and in progress to circulatory (hypovolemic) shock. In an effort to determine the optimal site and wavelength to measure vital signs off human skin, a human subject data collection was executed whereby 14 subjects had their spectral skin reflectivity and vital signs measured at five collection sites (carotid artery, chest, back, right wrist and left wrist). In this paper, we present our findings on using LDV and re ectivity data to determine the optimal collection site and wavelength that should be used to sense pulse signals from quiet and relatively motionless human subjects at stando. In particular, we correlate maximum levels of re ectivity across the ensemble of 14 subjects with vital sign measurements made with an LDV at two ranges, for two scenarios.

  6. Acoustic Properties of Return Strokes and M-components From Rocket-Triggered Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D.; Carvalho, F. L.; Rassoul, H.

    2015-12-01

    Using a linear, one-dimensional array of 15 microphones situated 95 meters from the lightning channel; we measure the acoustic signatures from 11 triggered-lightning events comprising 41 return strokes and 28 M-components. Measurements were taken at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in Camp Blanding, FL during the summer of 2014. Recently, we reported that beamforming signal processing enables acoustic imaging of the lightning channel at high frequencies (Dayeh et al. 2015). Following up on the work, we report on the characteristics of the acoustic measurements in terms of sound pressure amplitude, peak currents, power spectral density (PSD) properties, and the inferred energy input. In addition, we find that M-component do not create acoustic signatures in most occasions; we discuss these cases in context of the associated current amplitude, rise time, and background continuing current.

  7. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Sarah A; Zharkov, Sergei; Green, Lucie M

    2015-01-01

    The presence of flare related acoustic emission (sunquakes) in some flares represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. We present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode's EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the atmosphere above a sunquake, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the sunquake is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that, unlike many previous sunquake detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger veloc...

  8. High-Order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) Method for Wave Propagation Simulation in Complex Geophysical Media - Elastic, Acoustic and Hydro-Acoustic - an Unifying Framework to Couple Continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sébastien, T.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.; Mariotti, C.

    2014-12-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  9. Droplets Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Dahan, Raphael; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to their capillary resonances (Rayleigh, 1879) and their optical resonances (Ashkin, 1977), droplets acoustical resonances were rarely considered. Here we experimentally excite, for the first time, the acoustical resonances of a droplet that relies on sound instead of capillary waves. Droplets vibrations at 37 MHz rates and 100 quality factor are optically excited and interrogated at an optical threshold of 68 microWatt. Our vibrations span a spectral band that is 1000 times higher when compared with drops previously-studied capillary vibration.

  10. Observational Signatures of Waves and Flows in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke; Van Doorsselaere, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Propagating perturbations have been observed in extended coronal loop structures for a number of years, but the interpretation in terms of slow (propagating) magneto-acoustic waves and/or as quasi-periodic upflows remains unresolved. We used forward-modelling to construct observational signatures associated with a simple slow magneto-acoustic wave or periodic flow model. Observational signatures were computed for the 171 {\\AA} Fe ix and the 193 {\\AA} Fe xii spectral lines. Although there are many differences between the flow and wave models, we did not find any clear, robust observational characteristics that can be used in isolation ( i.e. that do not rely on a comparison between the models). For the waves model, a relatively rapid change of the average line widths as a function of (shallow) line-of-sight angles was found, whereas the ratio of the line width amplitudes to the Doppler velocity amplitudes is relatively high for the flow model. The most robust observational signature found is that the ratio of ...

  11. Signature Balancing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordkamp, H.W.; Brink, M. van den

    2006-01-01

    Signatures are an important part of the design of a ship. In an ideal situation, signatures must be as low as possible. However, due to budget constraints it is most unlikely to reach this ideal situation. The arising question is which levels of signatures are optimal given the different scenarios i

  12. X-RAY SPECTRAL RESIDUALS IN NGC 5408 X-1: DIFFUSE EMISSION FROM STAR FORMATION, OR THE SIGNATURE OF A SUPER-EDDINGTON WIND?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Andrew D [Astrophysics Office, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP12, Huntsville, Al 35812 (United States); Roberts, Timothy P. [Centre for Extragalactic Astronomy, Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Middleton, Matthew J, E-mail: andrew.d.sutton@nasa.gov [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-20

    If ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are powered by accretion onto stellar remnant black holes, then many must be accreting at super-Eddington rates. It is predicted that such high accretion rates should give rise to massive, radiatively driven winds. However, observational evidence of a wind, in the form of absorption or emission features, has remained elusive. As such, the reported detection of X-ray spectral residuals in XMM-Newton spectra of NGC 5408 X-1, which could be related to absorption in a wind is potentially very exciting. However, it has previously been assumed by several authors that these features simply originate from background diffuse plasma emission related to star formation in the ULX’s host galaxy. In this work we utilize the spatial resolving power of Chandra to test whether we can rule out this latter interpretation. We demonstrate that the majority of the luminosity in these spectral features is emitted from a highly localized region close to the ULX, and appears point-like even with Chandra. It is therefore highly likely that the spectral features are associated with the ULX itself, and little of the flux in this spectral component originates from spatially extended emission in the host galaxy. This may be consistent with the suggestion of absorption in an optically thin phase of a super-Eddington wind. Alternatively, we could be seeing emission from collisionally ionized material close to the black hole, but critically this would be difficult to reconcile with models where the source inclination largely determines the observed X-ray spectral and timing properties.

  13. Retrieval of soil erosion relevant parameters in the Western Australian wheat belt region from VNIR-SWIR and TIR spectral signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Eisele; Sabine Chabrillat; I. Lau; Kobayashi, C.; B. Wheaton; Carter, D.; Kashimura, O.; Kato, M.; Ong, C.; R. Hewson; Cudahy, T.; Hermann Kaufmann

    2011-01-01

    With the focus on new available hyperspectral imaging sensors sensitive within the thermal infrared (TIR) wavelength region, this study is testing the ability of the TIR in deriving soil erosion relevant parameters (e.g. texture, organic carbon content) from soil spectral measurements with the respect to commonly used VNIR-SWIR spectrometers. Therefore a study site was chosen located within an agricultural area in Western Australia, which is suffering from soil loss through wind erosion proce...

  14. Extraction of pure spectral signatures and corresponding chemical maps from EPR imaging data sets: identifying defects on a CaF2 surface due to a laser beam exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Fadel, Maya; Zhang, Xin; de Juan, Anna; Tauler, Roma; Vezin, Hervé; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-04-07

    A calcium fluoride (CaF2) plate was exposed to pulsed laser irradiations inducing surface morphological and ionization changes on its surface. More precisely surface damages mainly correspond to intrinsic defects. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) hyperspectral imaging is a powerful technique able to characterize the defects formed on the CaF2 surface. Indeed, EPR hyperspectral images provide spatial and spectral information about the sample studied. In fact, these images possess a great potential to obtain accurate and reliable knowledge about the chemical composition and the distribution of the component due to the presence of the spatial aspect. However, the complexity of such hyperspectral data sets imposes the use of advanced chemometric tools to extract valuable information on the considered physicochemical system. Therefore, Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) is proposed to identify and locate the different constituents in the images. The originality of this work is that it reports on the application of MCR-ALS, for the first time, on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging data sets that will furnish the distribution maps and the spectral signatures of all components present in the sample. The results show the identification of different intrinsic defects on a CaF2 sample from the sole information in the raw image measurements and, therefore, confirm the potential of this methodology and the important role of spatial information contained in the image.

  15. Spectroscopic Signatures Related to a Sunquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S. A.; Harra, L. K.; Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of flare-related acoustic emission (sunquakes (SQs)) in some flares, and only in specific locations within the flaring environment, represents a severe challenge to our current understanding of flare energy transport processes. In an attempt to contribute to understanding the origins of SQs we present a comparison of new spectral observations from Hinode’s EUV imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the chromosphere, transition region, and corona above an SQ, and compare them to the spectra observed in a part of the flaring region with no acoustic signature. Evidence for the SQ is determined using both time-distance and acoustic holography methods, and we find that unlike many previous SQ detections, the signal is rather dispersed, but that the time-distance and 6 and 7 mHz sources converge at the same spatial location. We also see some evidence for different evolution at different frequencies, with an earlier peak at 7 mHz than at 6 mHz. Using EIS and IRIS spectroscopic measurements we find that in this location, at the time of the 7 mHz peak the spectral emission is significantly more intense, shows larger velocity shifts and substantially broader profiles than in the location with no SQ, and there is a good correlation between blueshifted, hot coronal, hard X-ray (HXR), and redshifted chromospheric emission, consistent with the idea of a strong downward motion driven by rapid heating by nonthermal electrons and the formation of chromospheric shocks. Exploiting the diagnostic potential of the Mg ii triplet lines, we also find evidence for a single large temperature increase deep in the atmosphere, which is consistent with this scenario. The time of the 6 mHz and time-distance peak signal coincides with a secondary peak in the energy release process, but in this case we find no evidence of HXR emission in the quake location, instead finding very broad spectral lines, strongly shifted to the red, indicating

  16. Evaluation of limiting occulted angles in acoustic lenses for Rayleigh mode suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhedja, S; Doghmane, A; Hadjoub, Z, E-mail: Bouhedja_samia@yahoo.fr, E-mail: lsc_contact@yahoo.fr

    2010-11-15

    The generation and suppression of propagating modes in scanning acoustic microscopy play an important role in the determination of elastic parameters of materials. In this context, by placing successive absorbing stops of different diameters we suppressed the central beam of an acoustic lens to obtain dark field phenomena. Thus, using analytical and spectral methods, we investigated several rapid and medium materials characterised by Rayleigh velocities varying from 7850 m/s to 2730 m/s. Hence, we were able to put into evidence the influence of occulted angles on the behaviour of acoustic materials signatures, V(z), (periods, amplitude and attenuation) as well as the interdependence between Rayleigh velocity, attenuation and occulted angles is quantified via different chart curves.

  17. Spectral Tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Laboratories (United States)

    2003-05-01

    This research examines the feasibility of spectral tagging, which involves modifying the spectral signature of a target, e.g. by mixing an additive with the target's paint. The target is unchanged to the human eye, but the tag is revealed when viewed with a spectrometer. This project investigates a layer of security that is not obvious, and therefore easy to conceal. The result is a tagging mechanism that is difficult to counterfeit. Uniquely tagging an item is an area of need in safeguards and security and non-proliferation. The powdered forms of the minerals lapis lazuli and olivine were selected as the initial test tags due to their availability and uniqueness in the visible to near-infrared spectral region. They were mixed with paints and applied to steel. In order to verify the presence of the tags quantitatively, the data from the spectrometer was input into unmixing models and signal detection algorithms. The mixture with the best results was blue paint mixed with lapis lazuli and olivine. The tag had a 0% probability of false alarm and a 100% probability of detection. The research proved that spectral tagging is feasible, although certain tag/paint mixtures are more detectable than others.

  18. ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10332324

    'electronic signature' means data attached to, incorporated in, or logically ... See Cwele v S 2012 4 All SA 497 (SCA); Mohlabeng v Minister of Safety and Security ... ZAKZPHC 51 (2 September 2010); Delta Finance, a Division of Wesbank, ...

  19. CERTIFICATELESS SIGNATURE AND BLIND SIGNATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei; Zhang Futai

    2008-01-01

    Certificateless public key cryptography is a new paradigm introduced by AI-Riyami and Paterson. It eliminates the need of the certificates in traditional public key cryptosystems and the key escrow problem in IDentity-based Public Key Cryptography (ID-PKC). Due to the advantages of the certificateless public key cryptography,a new efficient certificateless pairing-based signature scheme is presented,which has some advantages over previous constructions in computational cost. Based on this new signature scheme,a certificateless blind signature scheme is proposed. The security of our schemes is proven based on the hardness of computational Diffie-Hellman problem.

  20. Acoustic Imaging of Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K. N.; Seshan, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Elliposidal acoustic mirror used to measure sound emitted at discrete points in burning turbulent jets. Mirror deemphasizes sources close to target source and excludes sources far from target. At acoustic frequency of 20 kHz, mirror resolves sound from region 1.25 cm wide. Currently used by NASA for research on jet flames. Produces clearly identifiable and measurable variation of acoustic spectral intensities along length of flame. Utilized in variety of monitoring or control systems involving flames or other reacting flows.

  1. Effect of high energy proton irradiation on InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Enhancement of photoluminescence efficiency (up to {approx}7 times) with minimum spectral signature shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreekumar, R.; Mandal, A. [Centre for Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Gupta, S.K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, Maharashtra (India); Chakrabarti, S., E-mail: subho@ee.iitb.ac.in [Centre for Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India)

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Authors demonstrate enhancement in photoluminescence efficiency (7 times) in single layer InAs/GaAs quantum dots using proton irradiation without any post-annealing treatment via either varying proton energy (a) or fluence (b). The increase in PL efficiency is explained by a proposed model before (c) and after irradiation (d). Highlights: {yields} Proton irradiation improved PL efficiency in InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). {yields} Proton irradiation favoured defect and strain annihilation in InAs/GaAs QDs. {yields} Reduction in defects/non-radiative recombination improved PL efficiency. {yields} Protons could be used to improve PL efficiency without spectral shift. {yields} QD based devices will be benefited by this technique to improve device performance. -- Abstract: We demonstrate 7-fold increase of photoluminescence efficiency in GaAs/(InAs/GaAs) quantum dot hetero-structure, employing high energy proton irradiation, without any post-annealing treatment. Protons of energy 3-5 MeV with fluence in the range (1.2-7.04) x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} were used for irradiation. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed crystalline quality of the GaAs cap layer improves on proton irradiation. Photoluminescence study conducted at low temperature and low laser excitation density proved the presence of non-radiative recombination centers in the system which gets eliminated on proton irradiation. Shift in photoluminescence emission towards higher wavelength upon irradiation substantiated the reduction in strain field existed between GaAs cap layer and InAs/GaAs quantum dots. The enhancement in PL efficiency is thus attributed to the annihilation of defects/non-radiative recombination centers present in GaAs cap layer as well as in InAs/GaAs quantum dots induced by proton irradiation.

  2. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  3. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...

  4. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  5. Sound signatures and production mechanisms of three species of pipefishes (Family: Syngnathidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Adam Chee Ooi; Chong, Ving Ching; Wong, Chiow San; Muniandy, Sithi Vinayakam

    2015-01-01

    Background. Syngnathid fishes produce three kinds of sounds, named click, growl and purr. These sounds are generated by different mechanisms to give a consistent signal pattern or signature which is believed to play a role in intraspecific and interspecific communication. Commonly known sounds are produced when the fish feeds (click, purr) or is under duress (growl). While there are more acoustic studies on seahorses, pipefishes have not received much attention. Here we document the differences in feeding click signals between three species of pipefishes and relate them to cranial morphology and kinesis, or the sound-producing mechanism. Methods. The feeding clicks of two species of freshwater pipefishes, Doryichthys martensii and Doryichthys deokhathoides and one species of estuarine pipefish, Syngnathoides biaculeatus, were recorded by a hydrophone in acoustic dampened tanks. The acoustic signals were analysed using time-scale distribution (or scalogram) based on wavelet transform. A detailed time-varying analysis of the spectral contents of the localized acoustic signal was obtained by jointly interpreting the oscillogram, scalogram and power spectrum. The heads of both Doryichthys species were prepared for microtomographical scans which were analysed using a 3D imaging software. Additionally, the cranial bones of all three species were examined using a clearing and double-staining method for histological studies. Results. The sound characteristics of the feeding click of the pipefish is species-specific, appearing to be dependent on three bones: the supraoccipital, 1st postcranial plate and 2nd postcranial plate. The sounds are generated when the head of the Dorichthyes pipefishes flexes backward during the feeding strike, as the supraoccipital slides backwards, striking and pushing the 1st postcranial plate against (and striking) the 2nd postcranial plate. In the Syngnathoides pipefish, in the absence of the 1st postcranial plate, the supraoccipital rubs

  6. A smart pattern recognition system for the automatic identification of aerospace acoustic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, R. H.; Fuller, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An intelligent air-noise recognition system is described that uses pattern recognition techniques to distinguish noise signatures of five different types of acoustic sources, including jet planes, propeller planes, a helicopter, train, and wind turbine. Information for classification is calculated using the power spectral density and autocorrelation taken from the output of a single microphone. Using this system, as many as 90 percent of test recordings were correctly identified, indicating that the linear discriminant functions developed can be used for aerospace source identification.

  7. Detection and Identification of Acoustic Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    AUTHOR(S) Glenn Pietila; Gabriella Cerrato; Robert E. Smith 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...independent of amplitude or pitch. An example often used in music is the ability of a musician to distinguish between the sound from two instruments...DTS-34-RR397-LR1, FRA/RDV-03/28, 2002 [6] N. P. Miller, G. S. Anderson, R. D. Horonjeff, C. W. Mange , J. C. Ross, and M. Newmark, “Aircraft Noise

  8. New high-order, semi-implicit Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin - Spectral Element Method (HDG-SEM) for simulation of complex wave propagation involving coupling between seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic waves: numerical analysis and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2015-12-01

    New seismological monitoring networks combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna, providing complementary observation of source-radiated waves. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-media - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound - wave simulation methods, in order to improve our physical understanding of energy exchanges at material interfaces.We present here a new development of a high-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, for the simulation of coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation, within a unified framework ([1],[2]) allowing for continuous and discontinuous Spectral Element Methods (SEM) to be used in the same simulation, with conforming and non-conforming meshes. The HDG-SEM approximation leads to differential - algebraic equations, which can be solved implicitly using energy-preserving time-schemes.The proposed HDG-SEM is computationally attractive, when compared with classical Discontinuous Galerkin methods, involving only the approximation of the single-valued traces of the velocity field along the element interfaces as globally coupled unknowns. The formulation is based on a variational approximation of the physical fluxes, which are shown to be the explicit solution of an exact Riemann problem at each element boundaries. This leads to a highly parallel and efficient unstructured and high-order accurate method, which can be space-and-time adaptive.A numerical study of the accuracy and convergence of the HDG-SEM is performed through a number of case studies involving elastic-acoustic (infrasound) coupling with geometries of increasing complexity. Finally, the performance of the method is illustrated through realistic case studies involving ground wave propagation associated to topography effects.In conclusion, we outline some on-going extensions of the method.References:[1] Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and

  9. Virtual Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  10. Classification of signature-only signature models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO ZhengJun; LIU MuLan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a set of criterions for classifying signature-only signature models. By the criterions, we classify signature models into 5 basic types and 69 general classes. Theoretically, 21141 kinds of signature models can be derived by appro-priately combining different general classes. The result comprises almost existing signature models. It will be helpful for exploring new signature models. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time for investigation of the problem of classifica-tion of signature-only signature models.

  11. Science of Land Target Spectral Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    parametric th dme o s • Extreme Value Theory – Fisher-Tippett theorem is the “Central Limit Theorem” for tail distributions. – Can model both CFAR detector...assumption that the signal generation kinetics for polymer coated evanescent wave sensor systems is solely based on Fickian diffusion of the analyte...was published by Phillips et al [43] showing that also surrounding flow conditions of the sensor contribute significantly to the diffusion kinetics

  12. Spectral gamma-ray signature of fluvial deposits: a case study from the Late Permian Rio do Rasto Formation, Parana Basin, Brazil; Assinatura gamaespectrometrica de depositos fluviais: estudo de caso na Formacao do Rio do Rasto, Permiano Superior da Bacia do Parana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowek, Guilherme Arruda, E-mail: arruda@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geologia; Ferreira, Francisco Jose Fonseca; Vesely, Fernando Farias, E-mail: francisco.ferreira@ufpr.br, E-mail: vesely@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia. Setor de Ciencias da Terra; Berton, Fabio, E-mail: fabioberton1@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Fluvial channel-fill deposits form highly heterogeneous hydrocarbon reservoirs. The study of outcrop analogs can help in the characterization of these heterogeneities, which are usually not detected by subsurface geophysical methods. The aim of this research is to compare outcrop log signatures with grain size trends and depositional elements of the fluvial deposits of the Late Permian Rio do Rasto Formation. A series of vertical gamma-ray logs were assembled in two outcrops in order to: 1) characterize log-facies in a succession composed of alternated flood plain, channel fill and eolian strata; 2) define within-channel spectral gamma-ray variability of a mixed-load composite point bar deposit and its relationship with grain size trends and lithofacies; 3) correlate log signatures observed in the outcrop sections with deep exploratory wells drilled several tens of kilometers from the study area. The results of this study show that gamma-ray logs have good correlation with grain size trends and that different depositional elements have distinct signatures. On the other hand, point bar deposits exhibit strong lateral changes in log signature due variations in grain size and mud content within lateral accretion strata. Although frequent, the classic bell-shaped log motif was not always detected, which means that the amount of fluvial channel-fill deposits recognized in subsurface can be underestimated. Similar log signatures were detected in the boreholes, at least in the closest ones, helping in paleoenvironmental interpretation in the subsurface. (author)

  13. Machine Fault Detection Based on Filter Bank Similarity Features Using Acoustic and Vibration Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Holguín-Londoño

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration and acoustic analysis actively support the nondestructive and noninvasive fault diagnostics of rotating machines at early stages. Nonetheless, the acoustic signal is less used because of its vulnerability to external interferences, hindering an efficient and robust analysis for condition monitoring (CM. This paper presents a novel methodology to characterize different failure signatures from rotating machines using either acoustic or vibration signals. Firstly, the signal is decomposed into several narrow-band spectral components applying different filter bank methods such as empirical mode decomposition, wavelet packet transform, and Fourier-based filtering. Secondly, a feature set is built using a proposed similarity measure termed cumulative spectral density index and used to estimate the mutual statistical dependence between each bandwidth-limited component and the raw signal. Finally, a classification scheme is carried out to distinguish the different types of faults. The methodology is tested in two laboratory experiments, including turbine blade degradation and rolling element bearing faults. The robustness of our approach is validated contaminating the signal with several levels of additive white Gaussian noise, obtaining high-performance outcomes that make the usage of vibration, acoustic, and vibroacoustic measurements in different applications comparable. As a result, the proposed fault detection based on filter bank similarity features is a promising methodology to implement in CM of rotating machinery, even using measurements with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  14. Study of wave chaos in a randomly-inhomogeneous oceanic acoustic waveguide: spectral analysis of the finite-range evolution operator

    CERN Document Server

    Makarov, D V; Uleysky, M Yu; Petrov, P S

    2012-01-01

    The proplem of sound propagation in an oceanic waveguide is considered. Scattering on random inhomogeneity of the waveguide leads to wave chaos. Chaos reveals itself in spectral properties of the finite-range evolution operator (FREO). FREO describes transformation of a wavefield in course of propagation along a finite segment of a waveguide. We study transition to chaos by tracking variations in spectral statistics with increasing length of the segment. Analysis of the FREO is accompanied with ray calculations using the one-step Poincar\\'e map which is the classical counterpart of the FREO. Underwater sound channel in the Sea of Japan is taken for an example. Several methods of spectral analysis are utilized. In particular, we approximate level spacing statistics by means of the Berry-Robnik and Brody distributions, explore the spectrum using the procedure elaborated by A. Relano with coworkers (Relano et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2002; Relano, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2008), and analyze modal expansions of the eigenfu...

  15. Soldier/robot team acoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated, autonomous, and semi-autonomous ground, air, and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  16. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  17. High-overtone Bulk-Acoustic Resonator gravimetric sensitivity: towards wideband acoustic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, D; Ballandras, S; Baron, T; Lebrasseur, E; Carry, E

    2015-01-01

    In the context of direct detection sensors with compact dimensions, we investigate the gravimetric sensitivity of High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonators, through modeling of their acoustic characteristics and experiment. The high frequency characterizing such devices is expected to induce a significant effect when the acoustic field boundary conditions are modified by a thin adlayer. Furthermore, the multimode spectral characteristics is considered for wideband acoustic spectroscopy of the adlayer, once the gravimetric sensitivity dependence of the various overtones is established. Finally, means of improving the gravimetric sensitivity by confining the acoustic field in a low acoustic-impedance layer is theoretically established.

  18. Acoustic telemetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive acoustic...

  19. RING PROXY SIGNATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Proxy signatures have been used to enable the transfer of digital signing power within some context and ring signatures can be used to provide the anonymity of a signer. By combining the functionalities of proxy signatures and ring signatures, this paper introduces a new concept, named ring proxy signature, which is a proxy signature generated by an anonymous member from a set of potential signers. The paper also constructs the first concrete ring proxy signature scheme based on the provably secure Schnorr's signatures and two ID-based ring proxy signature schemes. The security analysis is provided as well.

  20. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It has been traditional in phonetic research to characterize monophthongs using a set of static formant frequencies, i.e., formant frequencies taken from a single time-point in the vowel or averaged over the time-course of the vowel. However, over the last twenty years a growing body of research has demonstrated that, at least for a number of dialects of North American English, vowels which are traditionally described as monophthongs often have substantial spectral change. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change has been observed in speakers’ productions, and has also been found to have a substantial effect on listeners’ perception. In terms of acoustics, the traditional categorical distinction between monophthongs and diphthongs can be replaced by a gradient description of dynamic spectral patterns. This book includes chapters addressing various aspects of vowel inherent spectral change (VISC), including theoretical and experimental studies of the perceptually relevant aspects of VISC, the relationship between ar...

  1. About group digital signatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-01-01

    ...).A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature...

  2. Temporal Lorentzian spectral triples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    We present the notion of temporal Lorentzian spectral triple which is an extension of the notion of pseudo-Riemannian spectral triple with a way to ensure that the signature of the metric is Lorentzian. A temporal Lorentzian spectral triple corresponds to a specific 3 + 1 decomposition of a possibly noncommutative Lorentzian space. This structure introduces a notion of global time in noncommutative geometry. As an example, we construct a temporal Lorentzian spectral triple over a Moyal-Minkowski spacetime. We show that, when time is commutative, the algebra can be extended to unbounded elements. Using such an extension, it is possible to define a Lorentzian distance formula between pure states with a well-defined noncommutative formulation.

  3. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hume, W.R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Douglass, G.D. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  4. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  5. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  6. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  7. LY12铝合金试件拉伸声发射信号特征分析与状态识别%Acoustic Emission Signature Analysis and State Recognition for LY12 Tensile Aluminum Alloy Specimen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁立伟

    2014-01-01

    Taking LY12 duralumin with high strength as the research object , the acoustic emission testing sys-tem was employed to investigate acoustic emission signal feature of the tensile aluminum alloy specimen in elas -tic, yield, plastic deformation and fracture stages so that the relationship between specimen and acoustic emis -sion signal feature can be found; meanwhile , the independent experiment on the operating conditions of the pressure-maintaining and the repeated load was implemented and the laws of acoustic emission signal with dif -ferent working conditions were analyzed .The test results show that good corresponding relationship between LY12 aluminum alloy specimen and acoustic emission signal feature can be found .%以高强度硬铝LY12为研究对象,利用声发射试验系统研究拉伸铝合金试件在弹性、屈服、塑性变形和断裂阶段的声发射信号特征,揭示了试件状态与声发射信号特征间的关系。同时对保压和重复加载典型工况进行独立试验,分析不同工况下声发射信号的规律。试验结果表明:LY12铝合金试件状态与声发射信号特征之间存在着良好的对应关系。

  8. Acoustic biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of ...

  9. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  10. Free-jet acoustic investigation of high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles. Comprehensive data report, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, P. R.; Janardan, B. A.; Majjigi, R. K.; Shutiani, P. K.; Vogt, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Six coannular plug nozzle configurations having inverted velocity and temperature profiles, and a baseline convergent conical nozzle were tested for simulated flight acoustic evaluation in General Electric's Anechoic Free-Jet Acoustic Facility. The nozzles were tested over a range of test conditions that are typical of a Variable Cycle Engine for application to advanced high speed aircraft. The outer stream radius ratio for most of the configurations was 0.853, and the inner-stream-outer-stream area ratio was tested in the range of 0.54. Other variables investigated were the influence of bypass struts, a simple noncontoured convergent-divergent outer stream nozzle for forward quadrant shock noise control, and the effects of varying outer stream radius and inner-stream-to-outer-stream velocity ratios on the flight noise signatures of the nozzles. It was found that in simulated flight, the high-radius-ratio coannular plug nozzles maintain their jet noise and shock noise reduction features previously observed in static testing. The presence of nozzle bypass structs will not significantly effect the acoustic noise reduction features of a General Electric-type nozzle design. A unique coannular plug nozzle flight acoustic spectral prediction method was identified and found to predict the measured results quite well. Special laser velocimeter and acoustic measurements were performed which have given new insight into the jet and shock noise reduction mechanisms of coannular plug nozzles with regard to identifying further beneficial research efforts.

  11. Acoustic micro-Doppler radar for human gait imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaonian; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Waxman, Allen; Andreou, Andreas G

    2007-03-01

    A portable acoustic micro-Doppler radar system for the acquisition of human gait signatures in indoor and outdoor environments is reported. Signals from an accelerometer attached to the leg support the identification of the components in the measured micro-Doppler signature. The acoustic micro-Doppler system described in this paper is simpler and offers advantages over the widely used electromagnetic wave micro-Doppler radars.

  12. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... chapters represent review articles covering the most relevant areas of the field. They are written with the goal of providing students with comprehensive introductions. Further they offer a supply of numerous references to the relevant literature. Besides its usefulness as a textbook, this will make...

  13. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  14. Polarization signatures of airborne particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Prashant; Fuller, Kirk A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2013-07-01

    Exploratory research has been conducted with the aim of completely determining the polarization signatures of selected particulates as a function of wavelength. This may lead to a better understanding of the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and such materials, perhaps leading to the point detection of bio-aerosols present in the atmosphere. To this end, a polarimeter capable of measuring the complete Mueller matrix of highly scattering samples in transmission and reflection (with good spectral resolution from 300 to 1100 nm) has been developed. The polarization properties of Bacillus subtilis (surrogate for anthrax spore) are compared to ambient particulate matter species such as pollen, dust, and soot. Differentiating features in the polarization signatures of these samples have been identified, thus demonstrating the potential applicability of this technique for the detection of bio-aerosol in the ambient atmosphere.

  15. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  16. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...... reveals presence of a true emission from all ears tested. It is concluded that the cochlear echo can be recorded in normal-hearing newborns with an extremely low rate of type I errors.......Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar...

  17. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  18. Interpreting underwater acoustic images of the upper ocean boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulloa, Marco J [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e IngenierIas, Universidad de Guadalajara, Avenida Revolucion 1500, Sector Reforma, 44420 Guadalajara, Jal. (Mexico)

    2007-03-15

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of physical processes occurring simultaneously beneath the surface of the sea. Sonars are so sensitive that they detected a new acoustic signature at the breaking of surface gravity waves in deep water, which resembles oblique motion-like vortices.

  19. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  20. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  1. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  2. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  3. Efficient Threshold Signature Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar J Aboud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new threshold signature RSA-typed scheme. The proposed scheme has the characteristics of un-forgeable and robustness in random oracle model. Also, signature generation and verification is entirely non-interactive. In addition, the length of the entity signature participate is restricted by a steady times of the length of the RSA signature modulus. Also, the signing process of the proposed scheme is more efficient in terms of time complexity and interaction.

  4. Partial dereverberation used to characterize open circuit scuba diver signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemba, Kay L; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Reed, Todd R

    2014-08-01

    The use of passive acoustics to detect self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) divers is useful for nearshore and port security applications. While the performance of a detector can be optimized by understanding the signal's spectral characteristics, anechoic recording environments are generally not available or are cost prohibitive. A practical solution is to obtain the source spectra by equalizing the recording with the inverse of the channel's impulse response. This paper presents a dereverberation method for signal characterization that is subsequently applied to four recorded SCUBA configurations. The inverse impulse response is computed in the least-square sense, and partial dereverberation of SCUBA is performed over the 6-18 kHz band. Results indicate that early reflections and late reverberation added as much as 6.8 dB of energy. Mean unadjusted sound pressure levels computed over the 0.3-80 kHz band were 130 ± 5.9 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m. Bubble noise carries a significant amount of the total energy and masks the regulator signatures from 1.3 to 6 kHz, depending on the regulator configuration. While the dereverberation method is applied here to SCUBA signals, it is generally applicable to other sources if the impulse response of the recording environment can be obtained separately.

  5. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed.

  6. Quantum threshold group signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In most situations, the signer is generally a single person. However, when the message is written on behalf of an organization, a valid message may require the approval or consent of several persons. Threshold signature is a solution to this problem. Generally speaking, as an authority which can be trusted by all members does not exist, a threshold signature scheme without a trusted party appears more attractive. Following some ideas of the classical Shamir’s threshold signature scheme, a quantum threshold group signature one is proposed. In the proposed scheme, only t or more of n persons in the group can generate the group signature and any t-1 or fewer ones cannot do that. In the verification phase, any t or more of n signature receivers can verify the message and any t-1 or fewer receivers cannot verify the validity of the signature.

  7. About group digital signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Group signatures try to combine security (no framing, no cheating and privacy(anonymity, unlinkability.A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature. However, in the case of dispute the identity of the signature's originator can be revealed by a designated entity (group manager. The present paper describes the main concepts about group signatures, along with a brief state of the art and shows a personal cryptographic library implemented in Java that includes two group signatures.

  8. Active vibration control for underwater signature reduction of a navy ship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Vermeulen, Ruud

    2010-01-01

    Dutch navy ships are designed and built to have a low underwater signature. For low frequencies however, tonal vibrations of a gearbox can occur, which might lead to increased acoustic signatures. These vibrations are hard to reduce by passive means. To investigate the possibilities of active

  9. Active vibration control for underwater signature reduction of a navy ship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.; Berkhoff, A.; Vermeulen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Dutch navy ships are designed and built to have a low underwater signature. For low frequencies however, tonal vibrations of a gearbox can occur, which might lead to increased acoustic signatures. These vibrations are hard to reduce by passive means. To investigate the possibilities of active vibrat

  10. Acoustic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  11. Snapshots of Proton Accommodation at a Microscopic Water Surface: Understanding the Vibrational Spectral Signatures of the Charge Defect in Cryogenically Cooled H+(H2O)n=2 – 28 Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Wolke, Conrad T.; Johnson, Mark A.; Odbadrakh, Tuguldur T.; Jordan, Kenneth D.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2015-07-09

    In this Article, we review the role of gas-phase, size-selected protonated water clusters, H+(H2O)n, in the analysis of the microscopic mechanics responsible for the behavior of the excess proton in bulk water. We extend upon previous studies of the smaller, two-dimensional sheet-like structures to larger (n≥10) assemblies with three-dimensional cage morphologies which better mimic the bulk environment. Indeed, clusters in which a complete second solvation shell forms around a surface-embedded hydronium ion yield vibrational spectra where the signatures of the proton defect display strikingly similar positions and breadth to those observed in dilute acids. We investigate effects of the local structure and intermolecular interactions on the large red shifts observed in the proton vibrational signature upon cluster growth using various theoretical methods. We show that, in addition to sizeable anharmonic couplings, the position of the excess proton vibration can be traced to large increases in the electric field exerted on the embedded hydronium ion upon formation of the first and second solvation shells. MAJ acknowledges support from the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02- 06ER15800 as well as the facilities and staff of the Yale University Faculty of Arts and Sciences High Performance Computing Center, and by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CNS 08-21132 that partially funded acquisition of the facilities. SMK and SSX acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  12. Software-based acoustical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Miyara, Federico

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a detailed introduction to the use of software in combination with simple and economical hardware (a sound level meter with calibrated AC output and a digital recording system) to obtain sophisticated measurements usually requiring expensive equipment. It emphasizes the use of free, open source, and multiplatform software. Many commercial acoustical measurement systems use software algorithms as an integral component; however the methods are not disclosed. This book enables the reader to develop useful algorithms and provides insight into the use of digital audio editing tools to document features in the signal. Topics covered include acoustical measurement principles, in-depth critical study of uncertainty applied to acoustical measurements, digital signal processing from the basics, and metrologically-oriented spectral and statistical analysis of signals. The student will gain a deep understanding of the use of software for measurement purposes; the ability to implement software-based...

  13. Temporal and Spatial Comparisons of Underwater Sound Signatures of Different Reef Habitats in Moorea Island, French Polynesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Bertucci

    Full Text Available As environmental sounds are used by larval fish and crustaceans to locate and orientate towards habitat during settlement, variations in the acoustic signature produced by habitats could provide valuable information about habitat quality, helping larvae to differentiate between potential settlement sites. However, very little is known about how acoustic signatures differ between proximate habitats. This study described within- and between-site differences in the sound spectra of five contiguous habitats at Moorea Island, French Polynesia: the inner reef crest, the barrier reef, the fringing reef, a pass and a coastal mangrove forest. Habitats with coral (inner, barrier and fringing reefs were characterized by a similar sound spectrum with average intensities ranging from 70 to 78 dB re 1 μPa.Hz(-1. The mangrove forest had a lower sound intensity of 70 dB re 1 μPa.Hz(-1 while the pass was characterized by a higher sound level with an average intensity of 91 dB re 1 μPa.Hz(-1. Habitats showed significantly different intensities for most frequencies, and a decreasing intensity gradient was observed from the reef to the shore. While habitats close to the shore showed no significant diel variation in sound intensities, sound levels increased at the pass during the night and barrier reef during the day. These two habitats also appeared to be louder in the North than in the West. These findings suggest that daily variations in sound intensity and across-reef sound gradients could be a valuable source of information for settling larvae. They also provide further evidence that closely related habitats, separated by less than 1 km, can differ significantly in their spectral composition and that these signatures might be typical and conserved along the coast of Moorea.

  14. Spectral Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Jie; Wang, Li-Lian

    2011-01-01

    Along with finite differences and finite elements, spectral methods are one of the three main methodologies for solving partial differential equations on computers. This book provides a detailed presentation of basic spectral algorithms, as well as a systematical presentation of basic convergence theory and error analysis for spectral methods. Readers of this book will be exposed to a unified framework for designing and analyzing spectral algorithms for a variety of problems, including in particular high-order differential equations and problems in unbounded domains. The book contains a large

  15. Generalized Group Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The concept of generalized group signature scheme will bepresent. Based on the generalized secret sharing scheme proposed by Lin and Ha rn, a non-interactive approach is designed for realizing such generalized group signature scheme. Using the new scheme, the authorized subsets of the group in w hich the group member can cooperate to produce the valid signature for any messa ge can be randomly specified

  16. Unconditionally Secure Quantum Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Amiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Signature schemes, proposed in 1976 by Diffie and Hellman, have become ubiquitous across modern communications. They allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantees that messages cannot be forged or tampered with and that messages also can be forwarded from one recipient to another without compromising their validity. Signatures are different from, but no less important than encryption, which ensures the privacy of a message. Commonly used signature protocols—signatures based on the Rivest–Adleman–Shamir (RSA algorithm, the digital signature algorithm (DSA, and the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm (ECDSA—are only computationally secure, similar to public key encryption methods. In fact, since these rely on the difficulty of finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes, it is known that they will become completely insecure with the emergence of quantum computers. We may therefore see a shift towards signature protocols that will remain secure even in a post-quantum world. Ideally, such schemes would provide unconditional or information-theoretic security. In this paper, we aim to provide an accessible and comprehensive review of existing unconditionally securesecure signature schemes for signing classical messages, with a focus on unconditionally secure quantum signature schemes.

  17. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  18. Blind Collective Signature Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Moldovyan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the digital signature (DS scheme specified by Belarusian DS standard there are designed the collective and blind collective DS protocols. Signature formation is performed simultaneously by all of the assigned signers, therefore the proposed protocols can be used also as protocols for simultaneous signing a contract. The proposed blind collective DS protocol represents a particular implementation of the blind multisignature schemes that is a novel type of the signature schemes. The proposed protocols are the first implementations of the multisignature schemes based on Belarusian signature standard.

  19. Determining activities of radionuclides from coincidence signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Glen A.; Smith, L. Eric; Aalseth, Craig E.; Ellis, Edward; Hossbach, Todd W.; Valsan, Andrei B.

    2006-05-01

    The spectral analysis of simultaneously observed photons in separate detectors may provide an invaluable tool for radioisotope identification applications. A general recursive method to determine the activity of an isotope from the observed coincidence signature rate is discussed. The method coherently accounts for effects of true coincidence summing within a single detector and detection efficiencies. A verification of the approach with computer simulations is also discussed.

  20. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  1. Technology of Electronic Signatur

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    An electronic signature uses a hash of message and an asymetrical algorithm of encryption for its generation. During verification of message on receiver side the hash of original message must be identical with the hash of received message. Electronic message is secured autentization of author and integrity of transmission date. By electronic signature it is possible to sign everything what is in digital form.

  2. Revocable Ring Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis Y. W. Liu; Joseph K. Liu; Yi Mu; Willy Susilo; Duncan S. Wong

    2007-01-01

    Group signature allows the anonymity of a real signer in a group to be revoked by a trusted party called group manager. It also gives the group manager the absolute power of controlling the formation of the group. Ring signature, on the other hand, does not allow anyone to revoke the signer anonymity, while allowing the real signer to forma group (also known as a ring) arbitrarily without being controlled by any other party. In this paper, we propose a new variant for ring signature, called Revocable Ring Signature. The signature allows a real signer to form a ring arbitrarily while allowing a set of authorities to revoke the anonymity of the real signer. This new variant inherits the desirable properties from both group signature and ring signature in such a way that the real signer will be responsible for what it has signed as the anonymity is revocable by authorities while the real signer still has the freedom on ring formation. We provide a formal security model for revocable ring signature and propose an efficient construction which is proven secure under our security model.

  3. Digital Signature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  4. Spectral analysis of signals the missing data case

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yanwei

    2006-01-01

    Spectral estimation is important in many fields including astronomy, meteorology, seismology, communications, economics, speech analysis, medical imaging, radar, sonar, and underwater acoustics. Most existing spectral estimation algorithms are devised for uniformly sampled complete-data sequences. However, the spectral estimation for data sequences with missing samples is also important in many applications ranging from astronomical time series analysis to synthetic aperture radar imaging with angular diversity. For spectral estimation in the missing-data case, the challenge is how to extend t

  5. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Lihong V. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method...

  6. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  7. Spectral Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cecconi, Jaures

    2011-01-01

    G. Bottaro: Quelques resultats d'analyse spectrale pour des operateurs differentiels a coefficients constants sur des domaines non bornes.- L. Garding: Eigenfuction expansions.- C. Goulaouic: Valeurs propres de problemes aux limites irreguliers: applications.- G. Grubb: Essential spectra of elliptic systems on compact manifolds.- J.Cl. Guillot: Quelques resultats recents en Scattering.- N. Schechter: Theory of perturbations of partial differential operators.- C.H. Wilcox: Spectral analysis of the Laplacian with a discontinuous coefficient.

  8. An archaeal genomic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. E.; Overbeek, R.; Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    Comparisons of complete genome sequences allow the most objective and comprehensive descriptions possible of a lineage's evolution. This communication uses the completed genomes from four major euryarchaeal taxa to define a genomic signature for the Euryarchaeota and, by extension, the Archaea as a whole. The signature is defined in terms of the set of protein-encoding genes found in at least two diverse members of the euryarchaeal taxa that function uniquely within the Archaea; most signature proteins have no recognizable bacterial or eukaryal homologs. By this definition, 351 clusters of signature proteins have been identified. Functions of most proteins in this signature set are currently unknown. At least 70% of the clusters that contain proteins from all the euryarchaeal genomes also have crenarchaeal homologs. This conservative set, which appears refractory to horizontal gene transfer to the Bacteria or the Eukarya, would seem to reflect the significant innovations that were unique and fundamental to the archaeal "design fabric." Genomic protein signature analysis methods may be extended to characterize the evolution of any phylogenetically defined lineage. The complete set of protein clusters for the archaeal genomic signature is presented as supplementary material (see the PNAS web site, www.pnas.org).

  9. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions ... kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To ...

  11. Theoretical foundations of NRL spectral target detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaum, Alan

    2015-11-01

    The principal spectral detection algorithms developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) over the past 20 years for use in operational systems are described. These include anomaly detectors, signature-based methods, and techniques for anomalous change detection. Newer derivations are provided that have motivated more recent work. Mathematical methods facilitating the use of forward models for the prediction of spectral signature statistics are described and a detection algorithm is derived for ocean surveillance that is based on principles of clairvoyant fusion.

  12. Machine Fault Signature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratesh Jayaswal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present recent developments in the field of machine fault signature analysis with particular regard to vibration analysis. The different types of faults that can be identified from the vibration signature analysis are, for example, gear fault, rolling contact bearing fault, journal bearing fault, flexible coupling faults, and electrical machine fault. It is not the intention of the authors to attempt to provide a detailed coverage of all the faults while detailed consideration is given to the subject of the rolling element bearing fault signature analysis.

  13. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Holister Dis speciael Dean of Graduate Studiesj ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller B.S. Electrical...James Henry Miller 1987 The author hereby prants to MIT permission to reproduce and distribute copies of this thesis in whole or in part. Signature of...ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the

  14. Spectral polarimetric light-scattering by particulate media: 1. Theory of spectral Vector Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceolato, Romain; Riviere, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Spectral polarimetric light-scattering by particulate media has recently attracted growing interests for various applications due to the production of directional broadband light sources. Here the spectral polarimetric light-scattering signatures of particulate media are simulated using a numerical model based on the spectral Vector Radiative Transfer Equation (VRTE). A microphysical analysis is conducted to understand the dependence of the light-scattering signatures upon the microphysical parameters of particles. We reveal that depolarization from multiple scattering results in remarkable spectral and directional features, which are simulated by our model over a wide spectral range from visible to near-infrared. We propose to use these features to improve the inversion of the scattering problem in the fields of remote sensing, astrophysics, material science, or biomedical.

  15. Acoustic constituents of prosodic typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masahiko

    Different languages sound different, and considerable part of it derives from the typological difference of prosody. Although such difference is often referred to as lexical accent types (stress accent, pitch accent, and tone; e.g. English, Japanese, and Chinese respectively) and rhythm types (stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed rhythms; e.g. English, Spanish, and Japanese respectively), it is unclear whether these types are determined in terms of acoustic properties, The thesis intends to provide a potential basis for the description of prosody in terms of acoustics. It argues for the hypothesis that the source component of the source-filter model (acoustic features) approximately corresponds to prosody (linguistic features) through several experimental-phonetic studies. The study consists of four parts. (1) Preliminary experiment: Perceptual language identification tests were performed using English and Japanese speech samples whose frequency spectral information (i.e. non-source component) is heavily reduced. The results indicated that humans can discriminate languages with such signals. (2) Discussion on the linguistic information that the source component contains: This part constitutes the foundation of the argument of the thesis. Perception tests of consonants with the source signal indicated that the source component carries the information on broad categories of phonemes that contributes to the creation of rhythm. (3) Acoustic analysis: The speech samples of Chinese, English, Japanese, and Spanish, differing in prosodic types, were analyzed. These languages showed difference in acoustic characteristics of the source component. (4) Perceptual experiment: A language identification test for the above four languages was performed using the source signal with its acoustic features parameterized. It revealed that humans can discriminate prosodic types solely with the source features and that the discrimination is easier as acoustic information increases. The

  16. Abstract wave equations with acoustic boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Mugnolo, Delio

    2010-01-01

    We define an abstract setting to treat wave equations equipped with time-dependent acoustic boundary conditions on bounded domains of ${\\bf R}^n$. We prove a well-posedness result and develop a spectral theory which also allows to prove a conjecture proposed in (Gal-Goldstein-Goldstein, J. Evol. Equations 3 (2004), 623-636). Concrete problems are also discussed.

  17. Bottlenose dolphins exchange signature whistles when meeting at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Nicola J; Janik, Vincent M

    2012-07-01

    The bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, is one of very few animals that, through vocal learning, can invent novel acoustic signals and copy whistles of conspecifics. Furthermore, receivers can extract identity information from the invented part of whistles. In captivity, dolphins use such signature whistles while separated from the rest of their group. However, little is known about how they use them at sea. If signature whistles are the main vehicle to transmit identity information, then dolphins should exchange these whistles in contexts where groups or individuals join. We used passive acoustic localization during focal boat follows to observe signature whistle use in the wild. We found that stereotypic whistle exchanges occurred primarily when groups of dolphins met and joined at sea. A sequence analysis verified that most of the whistles used during joins were signature whistles. Whistle matching or copying was not observed in any of the joins. The data show that signature whistle exchanges are a significant part of a greeting sequence that allows dolphins to identify conspecifics when encountering them in the wild.

  18. Are there molecular signatures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W.P.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes molecular signatures and mutational spectrum analysis. The mutation spectrum is defined as the type and location of DNA base change. There are currently about five well documented cases. Mutations and radon-associated tumors are discussed.

  19. THE ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voiculescu Madalina Irena

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Article refers to significance and the digital signature in electronic commerce. Internet and electronic commerce open up many new opportunities for the consumer, yet, the security (or perceived lack of security of exchanging personal and financial data

  20. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  1. Robust Signatures of the Relic Neutrinos in CMB

    CERN Document Server

    Bashinsky, S V

    2004-01-01

    When the perturbations forming the acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) reentered the horizon and interacted gravitationally with all the matter, neutrinos presumably comprised 41% of the universe energy. CMB experiments have reached a capacity to probe this background of relic neutrinos. I review the neutrino imprints on CMB anisotropy and polarization at the onset of the acoustic oscillations. The discussion addresses the underlying physics, robustness or degeneracy of the imprints with changes of free cosmological parameters, and non-minimal models for the unseen radiation sector with detectable signatures in CMB.

  2. Technology of Electronic Signatur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Sadovsky

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An electronic signature uses a hash of message and an asymetrical algorithm of encryption for its generation. During verification of message on receiver side the hash of original message must be identical with the hash of received message. Electronic message is secured autentization of author and integrity of transmission date. By electronic signature it is possible to sign everything what is in digital form.

  3. Stateless Transitive Signature Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Chun-guang; CAI Man-chun; YANG Yi-xian

    2004-01-01

    A new practical method is introduced to transform the stateful transitive signature scheme to stateless one without the loss of security. According to the approach, two concrete stateless transitive signature schemes based on Factoring and RSA are presented respectively. Under the assumption of the hardness of factoring and one-more- RSA-inversion problem, both two schemes are secure under the adaptive chosen-message attacks in random oracle model.

  4. Spectral Ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Vigna, Sebastiano

    2009-01-01

    This note tries to attempt a sketch of the history of spectral ranking, a general umbrella name for techniques that apply the theory of linear maps (in particular, eigenvalues and eigenvectors) to matrices that do not represent geometric transformations, but rather some kind of relationship between entities. Albeit recently made famous by the ample press coverage of Google's PageRank algorithm, spectral ranking was devised more than fifty years ago, almost exactly in the same terms, and has been studied in psychology and social sciences. I will try to describe it in precise and modern mathematical terms, highlighting along the way the contributions given by previous scholars.

  5. Observational Signatures of Binary Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Roedig, Constanze; Miller, M Coleman

    2014-01-01

    Observations indicate that most massive galaxies contain a supermassive black hole, and theoretical studies suggest that when such galaxies have a major merger, the central black holes will form a binary and eventually coalesce. Here we discuss two spectral signatures of such binaries that may help distinguish them from ordinary AGN. These signatures are expected when the mass ratio between the holes is not extreme and the system is fed by a circumbinary disk. One such signature is a notch in the thermal continuum that has been predicted by other authors; we point out that it should be accompanied by a spectral revival at shorter wavelengths and also discuss its dependence on binary properties such as mass, mass ratio, and separation. In particular, we note that the wavelength $\\lambda_n$ at which the notch occurs depends on these three parameters in such a way as to make the number of systems displaying these notches $\\propto \\lambda_n^{16/3}$; longer wavelength searches are therefore strongly favored. A sec...

  6. Investigation on bubble dynamics characteristics and power spectral variation in acoustic field%声波作用下的气泡非线性动力学特性影响因素及功率谱变化规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨德森; 时洁; 时胜国; 张昊阳; 江薇; 靳仕源

    2013-01-01

    Based on Keller-Miksis model, the influences of multiple control parameters, such as acoustic pressure amplitude, acoustic frequency and bubble radius at rest, on the complicated dynamics characteristics of nonlinear bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave are discussed by utilizing a variety of numerical analysis methods, and the restrictive relationships among different parameters are analyzed. It is shown that chaotic state can occur only in the condition of all of the parameters in the suitable threshold, as the same time, chaotic state is the result of interaction of multiple control parameters. Furthermore, the power spectral expansion and energy conversion are existed in this nonlinear system. It is certified that the stronger acoustic pressure amplitude, the greater the sub-harmonic energy, besides, the energy attenuation of fundamental harmonic is also much greater.%为获取声波作用下的气泡非线性动力学特性影响因素及频谱变化规律,本文以描述声场作用下气泡动力学特性的Keller-Miksis模型为基础,综合利用多种数值分析方法,对激励声压幅值、激励频率以及气泡平衡半径等参数对气泡非线性动力学特性影响及参数控制下该非线性系统中多种运动状态下的频谱能量变化规律进行了研究.研究结果表明,只有当系统参数皆在一定阈值范围内时,系统才可能发生混沌,系统混沌运动状态的产生是各种因素相互制约和均衡的结果,且在该系统中蕴含着复杂的频谱展宽和能量转换过程.在实验中观察到次谐波的出现,并证明了随着激励强度的增大,产生次谐波的能量越大,同时基波能量衰减也越大.本文的研究工作可为引导外加声场的频谱结构发生改变所带来的潜在的噪声控制等应用提供一定的理论和实验基础.

  7. Perceptual Adaptation of Voice Gender Discrimination with Spectrally Shifted Vowels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianhao; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether perceptual adaptation improves voice gender discrimination of spectrally shifted vowels and, if so, which acoustic cues contribute to the improvement. Method: Voice gender discrimination was measured for 10 normal-hearing subjects, during 5 days of adaptation to spectrally shifted vowels, produced by processing the…

  8. Enhanced representation of spectral contrasts in the primary auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eCatz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of early auditory processing may be to extract some elementary features from an acoustic mixture in order to organize the auditory scene. To accomplish this task, the central auditory system may rely on the fact that sensory objects are often composed of spectral edges, i.e. regions where the stimulus energy changes abruptly over frequency. The processing of acoustic stimuli may benefit from a mechanism enhancing the internal representation of spectral edges. While the visual system is thought to rely heavily on this mechanism (enhancing spatial edges, it is still unclear whether a related process plays a significant role in audition. We investigated the cortical representation of spectral edges, using acoustic stimuli composed of multi-tone pips whose time-averaged spectral envelope contained suppressed or enhanced regions. Importantly, the stimuli were designed such that neural responses properties could be assessed as a function of stimulus frequency during stimulus presentation. Our results suggest that the representation of acoustic spectral edges is enhanced in the auditory cortex, and that this enhancement is sensitive to the characteristics of the spectral contrast profile, such as depth, sharpness and width. Spectral edges are maximally enhanced for sharp contrast and large depth. Cortical activity was also suppressed at frequencies within the suppressed region. To note, the suppression of firing was larger at frequencies nearby the lower edge of the suppressed region than at the upper edge. Overall, the present study gives critical insights into the processing of spectral contrasts in the auditory system.

  9. Military Tactical Aircraft Engine Noise Matching to Infrared Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-16

    10 Figure 5. SWIR instrument line of sight ...Component PCA – Principal Component Analysis PSD – Power Spectral Density RMS – Root Mean Square RPM – Repetitions per Minute SPL – Sound Pressure...REPORT Project WP-2404 2 To perform acoustic analysis, pressure spectra ( sound pressure levels across frequencies, with a total SPL listed at

  10. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  11. Acoustic cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  12. Acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  13. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  14. Weather and Atmospheric Effects on the Measurement and Use of Electro-Optical Signature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric Effects on the Measurement and Use of Electro-Optical Signature Data RCC 469-17 February 2017 3 Table 1. General Sub- Region Terms of the...Atmospheric Effects on the Measurement and Use of Electro-Optical Signature Data RCC 469-17 February 2017 6 eye in all quantities. Multiple human eye ...on the Measurement and Use of Electro-Optical Signature Data RCC 469-17 February 2017 7 Table 4. Relative Spectral Response of the Eye λ

  15. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  16. Cyanobacterial signature genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kirt A; Siefert, Janet L; Yerrapragada, Sailaja; Lu, Yue; McNeill, Thomas Z; Moreno, Pedro A; Weinstock, George M; Widger, William R; Fox, George E

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of 8 cyanobacterial genomes reveals that there are 181 shared genes that do not have obvious orthologs in other bacteria. These signature genes define aspects of the genotype that are uniquely cyanobacterial. Approximately 25% of these genes have been associated with some function. These signature genes may or may not be involved in photosynthesis but likely they will be in many cases. In addition, several examples of widely conserved gene order involving two or more signature genes were observed. This suggests there may be regulatory processes that have been preserved throughout the long history of the cyanobacterial phenotype. The results presented here will be especially useful because they identify which of the many genes of unassigned function are likely to be of the greatest interest.

  17. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  18. Practical quantum digital signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  19. Detection and localization using an acoustic array on a small robotic platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated autonomous and semi-autonomous ground, air and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  20. Spectral Predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  1. Measurements and Simulation Studies of Piezoceramics for Acoustic Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Salomon, K; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C

    2005-01-01

    Calibration sources are an indispensable tool for all detectors. In acoustic particle detection the goal of a calibration source is to mimic neutrino signatures as expected from hadronic cascades. A simple and promising method for the emulation of neutrino signals are piezo ceramics. We will present results of measruements and simulations on these piezo ceramics.

  2. Seismic signatures of partial saturation on acoustic borehole modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.E.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2007-01-01

    We present an exact theory of attenuation and dispersion of borehole Stoneley waves propagating along porous rocks containing spherical gas bubbles by using the Biot theory. An effective frequency-dependent fluid bulk modulus is introduced to describe the dynamic (oscillatory) behavior of the gas bu

  3. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  4. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  5. Spectral Signatures of the Pentagonal Water Cluster in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M; Mathias, G; Kuo, I W; Tobias, D J; Mundy, C J; Marx, D

    2008-07-25

    The exchange of protons between basic and acidic groups within proteins often involves transient protonation of amino acids and water molecules embedded in the protein matrix. One of the best studied proteins in this respect is Bacteriorohodopsin (BR), which works in the membrane of Halobacterium salinarium as a light-driven proton pump. The pumping process is triggered in the initial bR state by a photon absorption of an all-trans retinylidene chromophore, which is linked via a protonated Schiff base (pRSB) to the sidechain of Lys216. The subsequent photocycle comprises a series of intermediate states J, K, L, M, N and O, which are characterized by conformational and absorbance changes of the chromophore accompanying several elementary proton transfer processes. Upon completion of the photocycle one net proton has been transferred from the cyctoplasmic to the extracellular side against the proton gradient across the membrane. These proton exchange reactions can be monitored by time resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the BR wild type and site specific mutants, which allow the localization of absorbance changes within the protein. Furthermore, these measurements have revealed the fundamental importance of internal water molecules in these processes as supported by recent large-scale QM/MM molecular dynamics studies of anharmonic IR spectra.

  6. Cosmic signatures in earth's seismic tremor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulargia, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Even in absence of earthquakes, each site on earth experiences continuous elastic vibrations which are mostly traced to the nonlinear interactions of ocean waves. However, the fine structure of the spectrum at mHz frequencies shows many persistent and highly significant narrow bandwidth peaks in surprising coincidence with solar acoustic eigenmodes. The feasibility of a common cosmic origin is evaluated through an estimate of the gravitational wave cross-section of the earth, combined with its elastic response and with the stochastic amplification produced by the interference of the cosmic signal with tremor of oceanic origin. The measured spectral peaks appear compatible with a gravitational monochromatic illumination at strains h ≳ 10-20, larger than those expected for any known gravitational stellar source. Hence, a gravitational source attribution to the tremor spectral peaks would call for a population of unknown non-luminous sources with well-defined mass-distance ratios.

  7. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  8. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  9. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  10. Collider signatures of hylogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Kirpichnikov, D. V.

    2015-02-01

    We consider collider signatures of the hylogenesis—a variant of the antibaryonic dark matter model. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from results of the first LHC run. Also we suggest several new channels relevant for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at LHC.

  11. Collider signatures of Hylogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Demidov, S V; Kirpichnikov, D V

    2014-01-01

    We consider collider signatures of the hylogenesis --- a variant of antibaryonic dark matter model. We obtain bounds on the model parameters from results of the first LHC run. Also we suggest several new channels relevant for probing the antibaryonic dark matter at LHC.

  12. Signature transition and compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Mohseni, M

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that a change in the signature of the space-time metric together with compactification of internal dimensions could occure in a six-dimensional cosmological model. We also show that this is due to interaction with Maxwell fields having support in the internal part of the space-time.

  13. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a m

  14. Signatures of the Invisible

    CERN Multimedia

    Strom, D

    2003-01-01

    On the Net it is possible to take a look at art from afar via Virtual Museums. One such exhibition was recently in the New York Museum of Modern Art's branch, PS1. Entitled 'Signatures of the Invisible' it was a collaborative effort between artists and physicists (1/2 page).

  15. PROGRESS OF ACOUSTIC WAVE TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION IN UNDERGROUND PRESSURE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周楚良; 李新元; 张晓龙

    1994-01-01

    This paper carries out the experiment study on the correlation between full stress-strain process of rock samples and the acoustic parameter change of rock by using the measurement system of KS acoustic wave data processing device. On the spot, the stability of surrounding rock is studied by means of experiments on the relationship between the change process (from elastic to plastic failure zone) in surrounding rock of roadway and the change law of acoustic parameters of rock. These acoustic parameters include wave amplitude, spectral amplitude, spectrum area, spectral density, wave velocity and attenuation coefficient etc.

  16. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  17. Quantum Gravity signatures in the Unruh effect

    CERN Document Server

    Alkofer, Natalia; Saueressig, Frank; Versteegen, Fleur

    2016-01-01

    We study quantum gravity signatures emerging from phenomenologically motivated multiscale models, spectral actions, and Causal Set Theory within the detector approach to the Unruh effect. We show that while the Unruh temperature is unaffected, Lorentz-invariant corrections to the two-point function leave a characteristic fingerprint in the induced emission rate of the accelerated detector. Generically, quantum gravity models exhibiting dynamical dimensional reduction exhibit a suppression of the Unruh rate at high energy while the rate is enhanced in Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions. We quantify this behavior by introducing the "Unruh dimension" as the effective spacetime dimension seen by the Unruh effect and show that it is related, though not identical, to the spectral dimension used to characterize spacetime in quantum gravity. We comment on the physical origins of these effects and their relevance for black hole evaporation.

  18. Quantum gravity signatures in the Unruh effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkofer, Natalia; D'Odorico, Giulio; Saueressig, Frank; Versteegen, Fleur

    2016-11-01

    We study quantum gravity signatures emerging from phenomenologically motivated multiscale models, spectral actions, and causal set theory within the detector approach to the Unruh effect. We show that while the Unruh temperature is unaffected, Lorentz-invariant corrections to the two-point function leave a characteristic fingerprint in the induced emission rate of the accelerated detector. Generically, quantum gravity models exhibiting dynamical dimensional reduction exhibit a suppression of the Unruh rate at high energy while the rate is enhanced in Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions. We quantify this behavior by introducing the "Unruh dimension" as the effective spacetime dimension seen by the Unruh effect and show that it is related, though not identical, to the spectral dimension used to characterize spacetime in quantum gravity. We comment on the physical origins of these effects and their relevance for black hole evaporation.

  19. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  20. On Mechanism of Signature Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The signature is associated with the invariance of a system with intrinsic quadrupole deformation under a rotation of 180° around a principal axis, and is defined in the cranking model. The signature

  1. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI brain signatures of auditory cue utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias eScharinger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimal utilization of acoustic cues during auditory categorization is a vital skill, particularly when informative cues become occluded or degraded. Consequently, the acoustic environment requires flexible choosing and switching amongst available cues. The present study targets the brain functions underlying such changes in cue utilization. Participants performed a categorization task with immediate feedback on acoustic stimuli from two categories that varied in duration and spectral properties, while we simultaneously recorded Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD responses in fMRI and electroencephalograms (EEGs. In the first half of the experiment, categories could be best discriminated by spectral properties. Halfway through the experiment, spectral degradation rendered the stimulus duration the more informative cue. Behaviorally, degradation decreased the likelihood of utilizing spectral cues. Spectrally degrading the acoustic signal led to increased alpha power compared to nondegraded stimuli. The EEG-informed fMRI analyses revealed that alpha power correlated with BOLD changes in inferior parietal cortex and right posterior superior temporal gyrus (including planum temporale. In both areas, spectral degradation led to a weaker coupling of BOLD response to behavioral utilization of the spectral cue. These data provide converging evidence from behavioral modeling, electrophysiology, and hemodynamics that (a increased alpha power mediates the inhibition of uninformative (here spectral stimulus features, and that (b the parietal attention network supports optimal cue utilization in auditory categorization. The results highlight the complex cortical processing of auditory categorization under realistic listening challenges.

  2. Origami acoustics: using principles of folding structural acoustics for simple and large focusing of sound energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, Ryan L.; Lynd, Danielle T.

    2016-08-01

    Fixed in spatial distribution, arrays of planar, electromechanical acoustic transducers cannot adapt their wave energy focusing abilities unless each transducer is externally controlled, creating challenges for the implementation and portability of such beamforming systems. Recently, planar, origami-based structural tessellations are found to facilitate great versatility in system function and properties through kinematic folding. In this research we bridge the physics of acoustics and origami-based design to discover that the simple topological reconfigurations of a Miura-ori-based acoustic array yield many orders of magnitude worth of reversible change in wave energy focusing: a potential for acoustic field morphing easily obtained through deployable, tessellated architectures. Our experimental and theoretical studies directly translate the roles of folding the tessellated array to the adaptations in spectral and spatial wave propagation sensitivities for far field energy transmission. It is shown that kinematic folding rules and flat-foldable tessellated arrays collectively provide novel solutions to the long-standing challenges of conventional, electronically-steered acoustic beamformers. While our examples consider sound radiation from the foldable array in air, linear acoustic reciprocity dictates that the findings may inspire new innovations for acoustic receivers, e.g. adaptive sound absorbers and microphone arrays, as well as concepts that include water-borne waves.

  3. Multispectral opto-acoustic tomography (MSOT) of the brain and glioblastoma characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Neal C; Patel, Manishkumar; Morscher, Stefan; Driessen, Wouter H P; Claussen, Jing; Beziere, Nicolas; Jetzfellner, Thomas; Taruttis, Adrian; Razansky, Daniel; Bednar, Bohumil; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-01-15

    Brain research depends strongly on imaging for assessing function and disease in vivo. We examine herein multispectral opto-acoustic tomography (MSOT), a novel technology for high-resolution molecular imaging deep inside tissues. MSOT illuminates tissue with light pulses at multiple wavelengths and detects the acoustic waves generated by the thermoelastic expansion of the environment surrounding absorbing molecules. Using spectral unmixing analysis of the data collected, MSOT can then differentiate the spectral signatures of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and of photo-absorbing agents and quantify their concentration. By being able to detect absorbing molecules up to centimeters deep in the tissue it represents an ideal modality for small animal brain imaging, simultaneously providing anatomical, hemodynamic, functional, and molecular information. In this work we examine the capacity of MSOT in cross-sectional brain imaging of mice. We find unprecedented optical imaging performance in cross-sectional visualization of anatomical and physiological parameters of the mouse brain. For example, the potential of MSOT to characterize ischemic brain areas was demonstrated through the use of a carbon dioxide challenge. In addition, indocyanine green (ICG) was injected intravenously, and the kinetics of uptake and clearance in the vasculature of the brain was visualized in real-time. We further found that multiparameter, multispectral imaging of the growth of U87 tumor cells injected into the brain could be visualized through the intact mouse head, for example through visualization of deoxygenated hemoglobin in the growing tumor. We also demonstrate how MSOT offers several compelling features for brain research and allows time-dependent detection and quantification of brain parameters that are not available using other imaging methods without invasive procedures. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Two Improved Digital Signature Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, two improved digital signature schemes are presented based on the design of directed signaturescheme [3]. The peculiarity of the system is that only if the scheme is specific recipient, the signature is authenticated.Since the scheme adds the screen of some information parameters, the difficulty of deciphered keys and the security ofdigital signature system are increased.

  5. NW-MILO Acoustic Data Collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzner, Shari; Myers, Joshua R.; Maxwell, Adam R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2010-02-17

    There is an enduring requirement to improve our ability to detect potential threats and discriminate these from the legitimate commercial and recreational activity ongoing in the nearshore/littoral portion of the maritime domain. The Northwest Maritime Information and Littoral Operations (NW-MILO) Program at PNNL’s Coastal Security Institute in Sequim, Washington is establishing a methodology to detect and classify these threats - in part through developing a better understanding of acoustic signatures in a near-shore environment. The purpose of the acoustic data collection described here is to investigate the acoustic signatures of small vessels. The data is being recorded continuously, 24 hours a day, along with radar track data and imagery. The recording began in August 2008, and to date the data contains tens of thousands of signals from small vessels recorded in a variety of environmental conditions. The quantity and variety of this data collection, with the supporting imagery and radar track data, makes it particularly useful for the development of robust acoustic signature models and advanced algorithms for signal classification and information extraction. The underwater acoustic sensing system is part of a multi-modal sensing system that is operating near the mouth of Sequim Bay. Sequim Bay opens onto the Straight of Juan de Fuca, which contains part of the border between the U.S. and Canada. Table 1 lists the specific components used for the NW-MILO system. The acoustic sensor is a hydrophone permanently deployed at a mean depth of about 3 meters. In addition to a hydrophone, the other sensors in the system are a marine radar, an electro-optical (EO) camera and an infra-red (IR) camera. The radar is integrated with a vessel tracking system (VTS) that provides position, speed and heading information. The data from all the sensors is recorded and saved to a central server. The data has been validated in terms of its usability for characterizing the

  6. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... acoustic neuroma resource Click to learn more... LOGIN EVENTS DONATE Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma ... support group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ...

  8. Hybrid Baryon Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Page, P R

    2000-01-01

    We discuss whether a low-lying hybrid baryon should be defined as a three quark - gluon bound state or as three quarks moving on an excited adiabatic potential. We show that the latter definition becomes exact, not only for very heavy quarks, but also for specific dynamics. We review the literature on the signatures of hybrid baryons, with specific reference to strong hadronic decays, electromagnetic couplings, diffractive production and production in psi decay.

  9. SMAWT Signature Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    were generally inversely proportional to the size assesments of the flash and smoke . Table 26 shows the percent of change in average judgments of...Average Time of Gunner’s View Obscuration by Smoke During Firings From the Wood Line .. .. ..... ..... ...... ..... .. 18 7. Average Obscuration Times...of Gunner’s View Obscuration by Smoke - Grass Line 19 8. Normalized Comparisons of the Relative Grades Assigned to Systems Signature Components

  10. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook will pr...

  11. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  12. Acoustic transparency and opacity using Fano Interferences in Metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Khelif, A.

    2015-08-04

    We investigate both experimentally and theoretically how to generate the acoustical analogue of the Electromagnetically Induced Transparency. This phenomenon arises from Fano resonances originating from constructive and destructive interferences of a narrow discrete resonance with a broad spectral line or continuum. Measurements were realized on a double-cavity structure by using a Kundt’s Tube. Transmission properties reveal an asymmetric lineshape of the transmission that leads to acoustic transparency.

  13. Far infrared absorption by acoustic phonons in titanium dioxide nanopowders

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Daniel B.; Netting, Caleb H.; Saviot, Lucien; Pighini, Catherine; Millot, Nadine; Aymes, Daniel; Liu, Hsiang-Lin

    2006-01-01

    We report spectral features of far infrared electromagnetic radiation absorption in anatase TiO2 nanopowders which we attribute to absorption by acoustic phonon modes of nanoparticles. The frequency of peak excess absorption above the background level corresponds to the predicted frequency of the dipolar acoustic phonon from continuum elastic theory. The intensity of the absorption cannot be accounted for in a continuum elastic dielectric description of the nanoparticle material. Quantum mech...

  14. An introduction to acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruby, C. B.

    1987-08-01

    The technique of acoustic emission (AE) uses one or more sensors to 'listen' to a wide range of events that may take place inside a solid material. Depending on the source of this high frequency sound, there are broadly three application areas: structural testing and surveillance, process monitoring and control, and materials characterization. In the first case the source is probably a defect which radiates elastic waves as it grows. Provided these waves are detectable, AE can be used in conjunction with other NDT techniques to assess structural integrity. Advances in deterministic and statistical analysis methods now enable data to be interpreted in greater detail and with more confidence than before. In the second area the acoustic signature of processes is monitored, ranging from for instance the machining of metallic components to the mixing of foodstuffs, and changes correlated with variations in the process, with the potential for feedback and process control. In the third area, AE is used as an additional diagnostic technique for the study of, for instance, fracture, because it gives unique dynamic information on defect growth.

  15. Optical Mixing Controlled Stimulated Scattering instabilities: Suppression of SRS by the Controlled Introduction of Ion Acoustic and Electron Plasma Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros; Won, K; Montgomery, D S; Hammer, J; Kirkwood, R K; Schmitt, A J

    2012-01-01

    In a series of experiments on the Omega laser facility at LLE, we have demonstrated the suppression of SRS in prescribed spectral windows due to the presence of externally controlled levels of ion acoustic waves (IAW, by crossing two blue beams at the Mach -1 surface) and electron plasma waves (EPW, by crossing a blue and a green beam around a tenth critical density plasma) generated via optical mixing. We have further observed SRS backscattering of a green beam when crossed with a blue pump beam, in whose absence, that (green beam) backscattering signature was five times smaller. This is direct evidence for green beam amplification when crossed with the blue. Additional proof comes from transmitted green beam measurements. A combination of these techniques may allow the suppression of unacceptable levels of SRS near the light entrance hole of large-scale hohlraums on the NIF or LMJ.

  16. Indoor acoustic gain design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  17. Wheat signature modeling and analysis for improved training statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepka, R. F. (Principal Investigator); Malila, W. A.; Cicone, R. C.; Gleason, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of wheat and other signatures in LANDSAT multispectral scanner data were examined through empirical analysis and simulation. Irrigation patterns varied widely within Kansas; 88 percent of wheat acreage in Finney was irrigated and 24 percent in Morton, as opposed to less than 3 percent for western 2/3's of the State. The irrigation practice was definitely correlated with the observed spectral response; wheat variety differences produced observable spectral differences due to leaf coloration and different dates of maturation. Between-field differences were generally greater than within-field differences, and boundary pixels produced spectral features distinct from those within field centers. Multiclass boundary pixels contributed much of the observed bias in proportion estimates. The variability between signatures obtained by different draws of training data decreased as the sample size became larger; also, the resulting signatures became more robust and the particular decision threshold value became less important.

  18. Effects of spectral modulation filtering on vowel identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Eddins, David A

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to measure the effects of global spectral manipulations on vowel identification by progressively high-pass filtering vowel stimuli in the spectral modulation domain. Twelve American-English vowels, naturally spoken by a female talker, were subjected to varied degrees of high-pass filtering in the spectral modulation domain, with cutoff frequencies of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 cycles/octave. Identification performance for vowels presented at 70 dB sound pressure level with and without spectral modulation filtering was measured for five normal-hearing listeners. Results indicated that vowel identification performance was progressively degraded as the spectral modulation cutoff frequency increased. Degradation of vowel identification was greater for back vowels than for front or central vowels. Detailed acoustic analyses indicated that spectral modulation filtering resulted in a more crowded vowel space (F1xF2), reduced spectral contrast, and reduced spectral tilt relative to the original unfiltered vowels. Changes in the global spectral features produced by spectral modulation filtering were associated with substantial reduction in vowel identification. The results indicated that the spectral cues critical for vowel identification were represented by spectral modulation frequencies below 2 cycles/octave. These results are considered in terms of the interactions among spectral shape perception, spectral smearing, and speech perception.

  19. Acoustically induced transparency using Fano resonant periodic arrays

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2015-10-22

    A three-dimensional acoustic device, which supports Fano resonance and induced transparency in its response to an incident sound wave, is designed and fabricated. These effects are generated from the destructive interference of closely coupled one broad- and one narrow-band acoustic modes. The proposed design ensures excitation and interference of two spectrally close modes by locating a small pipe inside a wider and longer one. Indeed, numerical simulations and experiments demonstrate that this simple-to-fabricate structure can be used to generate Fano resonance as well as acoustically induced transparency with promising applications in sensing, cloaking, and imaging.

  20. Parametric Room Acoustic Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Svidt, Kjeld; Molin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses different room acoustics software and the opportunities they offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs. The first step consists in the testing and benchmarking of different tools on the basis of accuracy, speed...... and interoperability with Grasshopper 3d. The focus will be placed to the benchmarking of three different acoustic analysis tools based on raytracing. To compare the accuracy and speed of the acoustic evaluation across different tools, a homogeneous set of acoustic parameters is chosen. The room acoustics parameters...... included in the set are reverberation time (EDT, RT30), clarity (C50), loudness (G), and definition (D50). Scenarios are discussed for determining at different design stages the most suitable acoustic tool. Those scenarios are characterized, by the use of less accurate but fast evaluation tools to be used...

  1. Acoustic characteristics of clearly spoken English fricatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniwa, Kazumi; Jongman, Allard; Wade, Travis

    2009-06-01

    Speakers can adopt a speaking style that allows them to be understood more easily in difficult communication situations, but few studies have examined the acoustic properties of clearly produced consonants in detail. This study attempts to characterize the adaptations in the clear production of American English fricatives in a carefully controlled range of communication situations. Ten female and ten male talkers produced fricatives in vowel-fricative-vowel contexts in both a conversational and a clear style that was elicited by means of simulated recognition errors in feedback received from an interactive computer program. Acoustic measurements were taken for spectral, amplitudinal, and temporal properties known to influence fricative recognition. Results illustrate that (1) there were consistent overall style effects, several of which (consonant duration, spectral peak frequency, and spectral moments) were consistent with previous findings and a few (notably consonant-to-vowel intensity ratio) of which were not; (2) specific acoustic modifications in clear productions of fricatives were influenced by the nature of the recognition errors that prompted the productions and were consistent with efforts to emphasize potentially misperceived contrasts both within the English fricative inventory and based on feedback from the simulated listener; and (3) talkers differed widely in the types and magnitude of all modifications.

  2. On Constructing Certificateless Proxy Signature from Certificateless Signature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Zhong-mei; LAI Xue-jia; WENG Jian; HONG Xuan; LONG Yu; JIA Wei-wei

    2008-01-01

    In proxy signature schemes,an original signer A delegates its signing capability to a proxy signer B,in such a way that B can sign message on behalf of A.The recipient of the final message verifies at the same time that B computes the signature and that A has delegated its signing capability to B.Recently many identity-based (ID-based) proxy signature schemes have been proposed,however,the problem of key escrow is inherent in this setting.Certificateless cryptography can overcome the key escrow problem.In this paper,we present a general security model for certificateless proxy signature scheme.Then,we give a method to construct a secure certificateless proxy scheme from a secure certificateless signature scheme,and prove that the security of the construction can be reduced to the security of the original certificateless signature scheme.

  3. Molecular signatures of ribosomal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Elijah; Sethi, Anurag; Montoya, Jonathan; Woese, Carl R; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2008-09-16

    Ribosomal signatures, idiosyncrasies in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and/or proteins, are characteristic of the individual domains of life. As such, insight into the early evolution of the domains can be gained from a comparative analysis of their respective signatures in the translational apparatus. In this work, we identify signatures in both the sequence and structure of the rRNA and analyze their contributions to the universal phylogenetic tree using both sequence- and structure-based methods. Domain-specific ribosomal proteins can be considered signatures in their own right. Although it is commonly assumed that they developed after the universal ribosomal proteins, we present evidence that at least one may have been present before the divergence of the organismal lineages. We find correlations between the rRNA signatures and signatures in the ribosomal proteins showing that the rRNA signatures coevolved with both domain-specific and universal ribosomal proteins. Finally, we show that the genomic organization of the universal ribosomal components contains these signatures as well. From these studies, we propose the ribosomal signatures are remnants of an evolutionary-phase transition that occurred as the cell lineages began to coalesce and so should be reflected in corresponding signatures throughout the fabric of the cell and its genome.

  4. Simulating acoustic waves in spotted stars

    CERN Document Server

    Papini, Emanuele; Gizon, Laurent; Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic modes of oscillation are affected by stellar activity, however it is unclear how starspots contribute to these changes. Here we investigate the non-magnetic effects of starspots on global modes with angular degree $\\ell \\leq 2$ in highly active stars, and characterize the spot seismic signature on synthetic light curves. We perform 3D time-domain simulations of linear acoustic waves to study their interaction with a model starspot. We model the spot as a 3D change in the sound speed stratification with respect to a convectively stable stellar background, built from solar Model S. We perform a parametric study by considering different depths and perturbation amplitudes. Exact numerical simulations allow investigation of the wavefield-spot interaction beyond first order perturbation theory. The interaction of the axisymmetric modes with the starspot is strongly nonlinear. As mode frequency increases, the frequency shifts for radial modes exceed the value predicted by linear theory, while the shifts for...

  5. Signal classification for acoustic neutrino detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, M., E-mail: max.neff@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anton, G.; Enzenhoefer, A.; Graf, K.; Hoessl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Richardt, C. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-11

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of 1% is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  6. Signal Classification for Acoustic Neutrino Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Neff, M; Enzenhöfer, A; Graf, K; Hößl, J; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Richardt, C

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on signal classification for deep-sea acoustic neutrino detection. In the deep sea, the background of transient signals is very diverse. Approaches like matched filtering are not sufficient to distinguish between neutrino-like signals and other transient signals with similar signature, which are forming the acoustic background for neutrino detection in the deep-sea environment. A classification system based on machine learning algorithms is analysed with the goal to find a robust and effective way to perform this task. For a well-trained model, a testing error on the level of one percent is achieved for strong classifiers like Random Forest and Boosting Trees using the extracted features of the signal as input and utilising dense clusters of sensors instead of single sensors.

  7. A synthetic aperture acoustic prototype system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Robert H.; Bishop, Steven S.; Chan, Aaron M.; Gugino, Peter M.; Donzelli, Thomas P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    A novel quasi-monostatic system operating in a side-scan synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging mode is presented. This research project's objectives are to explore the military utility of outdoor continuous sound imaging of roadside foliage and target detection. The acoustic imaging method has several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution as compared to 0.8-2.4 GHz ground penetrating radar (GPR), capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to GPR technologies. The prototype system's broadband 2-17 kHz LFM chirp transceiver is mounted on a manned all-terrain vehicle. Targets are positioned within the acoustic main beam at slant ranges of two to seven meters and on surfaces such as dirt, grass, gravel and weathered asphalt and with an intervening metallic chain link fence. Acoustic image reconstructions and signature plots result in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses.

  8. Signature CERN-URSS

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschke,W

    1975-01-01

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  9. Signatures of nonthermal melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intense ultrashort laser pulses can melt crystals in less than a picosecond but, in spite of over thirty years of active research, for many materials it is not known to what extent thermal and nonthermal microscopic processes cause this ultrafast phenomenon. Here, we perform ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations of silicon on a laser-excited potential-energy surface, exclusively revealing nonthermal signatures of laser-induced melting. From our simulated atomic trajectories, we compute the decay of five structure factors and the time-dependent structure function. We demonstrate how these quantities provide criteria to distinguish predominantly nonthermal from thermal melting.

  10. The signature package on Witt spaces, II. Higher signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Albin, Pierre; Mazzeo, Rafe; Piazza, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    This is a sequel to the paper "The signature package on Witt spaces, I. Index classes" by the same authors. In the first part we investigated, via a parametrix construction, the regularity properties of the signature operator on a stratified Witt pseudomanifold, proving, in particular, that one can define a K-homology signature class. We also established the existence of an analytic index class for the signature operator twisted by a C^*_r\\Gamma Mischenko bundle and proved that the K-homology signature class is mapped to the signature index class by the assembly map. In this paper we continue our study, showing that the signature index class is invariant under rational Witt bordisms and stratified homotopies. We are also able to identify this analytic class with the topological analogue of the Mischenko symmetric signature recently defined by Banagl. Finally, we define Witt-Novikov higher signatures and show that our analytic results imply a purely topological theorem, namely that the Witt-Novikov higher sign...

  11. Identity-based threshold signature and mediated proxy signature schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yong; YANG Bo; SUN Ying

    2007-01-01

    Proxy signature schemes allow an original signer to delegate his signing rights to a proxy signer. However, many proxy signature schemes have the defect which is the inability to solve the proxy revocation problem. In this article, we firstly propose an identity-based threshold signature scheme and show that it has the properties of unforgeability and robustness. In our threshold signature scheme, we adopt such a method that the private key associated with an identity rather than the master key is shared. Then, based on the threshold signature scheme, an identity-based mediated proxy signature scheme is proposed where a security mediator (SEM) is introduced to help a proxy signer to generate valid proxy signatures, examine whether a proxy signer signs according to the warrant, and check the revocation of a proxy signer. It is shown that the proposed scheme satisfies all the security requirements of a secure proxy signature. Moreover, a proxy signer must cooperate with the SEM to generate a valid proxy signature, which makes the new scheme have an effective and fast proxy revocation.

  12. Coherent acoustic vibration of metal nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, C; Langot, P; Del Fatti, N; Vallée, F; Kirakosyan, A S; Shahbazyan, T V; Cardinal, T; Treguer, M

    2007-01-01

    Using time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, we have performed the first investigation of the vibrational modes of gold nanoshells. The fundamental isotropic mode launched by a femtosecond pump pulse manifests itself in a pronounced time-domain modulation of the differential transmission probed at the frequency of nanoshell surface plasmon resonance. The modulation amplitude is significantly stronger, and the period is longer than that in a gold nanoparticle of the same overall size, in agreement with theoretical calculations. This distinct acoustical signature of nanoshells provides a new and efficient method for identifying these versatile nanostructures and for studying their mechanical and structural properties.

  13. SPAM- SPECTRAL ANALYSIS MANAGER (UNIX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Spectral Analysis Manager (SPAM) was developed to allow easy qualitative analysis of multi-dimensional imaging spectrometer data. Imaging spectrometers provide sufficient spectral sampling to define unique spectral signatures on a per pixel basis. Thus direct material identification becomes possible for geologic studies. SPAM provides a variety of capabilities for carrying out interactive analysis of the massive and complex datasets associated with multispectral remote sensing observations. In addition to normal image processing functions, SPAM provides multiple levels of on-line help, a flexible command interpretation, graceful error recovery, and a program structure which can be implemented in a variety of environments. SPAM was designed to be visually oriented and user friendly with the liberal employment of graphics for rapid and efficient exploratory analysis of imaging spectrometry data. SPAM provides functions to enable arithmetic manipulations of the data, such as normalization, linear mixing, band ratio discrimination, and low-pass filtering. SPAM can be used to examine the spectra of an individual pixel or the average spectra over a number of pixels. SPAM also supports image segmentation, fast spectral signature matching, spectral library usage, mixture analysis, and feature extraction. High speed spectral signature matching is performed by using a binary spectral encoding algorithm to separate and identify mineral components present in the scene. The same binary encoding allows automatic spectral clustering. Spectral data may be entered from a digitizing tablet, stored in a user library, compared to the master library containing mineral standards, and then displayed as a timesequence spectral movie. The output plots, histograms, and stretched histograms produced by SPAM can be sent to a lineprinter, stored as separate RGB disk files, or sent to a Quick Color Recorder. SPAM is written in C for interactive execution and is available for two different

  14. Novel acoustic features for speech emotion recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROH Yong-Wan; KIM Dong-Ju; LEE Woo-Seok; HONG Kwang-Seok

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic features that effectively improve the recognition of emotion in human speech. The novel features in this paper are based on spectral-based entropy parameters such as fast Fourier transform (FFT) spectral entropy, delta FFT spectral entropy, Mel-frequency filter bank (MFB)spectral entropy, and Delta MFB spectral entropy. Spectral-based entropy features are simple. They reflect frequency characteristic and changing characteristic in frequency of speech. We implement an emotion rejection module using the probability distribution of recognized-scores and rejected-scores.This reduces the false recognition rate to improve overall performance. Recognized-scores and rejected-scores refer to probabilities of recognized and rejected emotion recognition results, respectively.These scores are first obtained from a pattern recognition procedure. The pattern recognition phase uses the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). We classify the four emotional states as anger, sadness,happiness and neutrality. The proposed method is evaluated using 45 sentences in each emotion for 30 subjects, 15 males and 15 females. Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the existing emotion recognition methods based on GMM using energy, Zero Crossing Rate (ZCR),linear prediction coefficient (LPC), and pitch parameters. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. One of the proposed features, combined MFB and delta MFB spectral entropy improves performance approximately 10% compared to the existing feature parameters for speech emotion recognition methods. We demonstrate a 4% performance improvement in the applied emotion rejection with low confidence score.

  15. Expressiveness considerations of XML signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Meyer, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    more and more challenging. In this paper, we investigate this issue, describing how an attacker can still interfere with Web Services communication even in the presence of XML Signatures. Additionally, we discuss the interrelation of XML Signatures and XML Encryption, focussing on their security......XML Signatures are used to protect XML-based Web Service communication against a broad range of attacks related to man-in-the-middle scenarios. However, due to the complexity of the Web Services specification landscape, the task of applying XML Signatures in a robust and reliable manner becomes...

  16. Expressiveness considerations of XML signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Meyer, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    XML Signatures are used to protect XML-based Web Service communication against a broad range of attacks related to man-in-the-middle scenarios. However, due to the complexity of the Web Services specification landscape, the task of applying XML Signatures in a robust and reliable manner becomes...... more and more challenging. In this paper, we investigate this issue, describing how an attacker can still interfere with Web Services communication even in the presence of XML Signatures. Additionally, we discuss the interrelation of XML Signatures and XML Encryption, focussing on their security...

  17. Set signatures and their applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU ChuanKun

    2009-01-01

    There are many constraints In the use of digital signatures. This paper proposes a new way of using digital signatures with some restrictions, i.e. set signatures. It works in such a way that when the signing algorithm Is given, one can use it to create a valid signature on a message if and only if the message belongs to a pre-defined set, and given the information about the signing algorithm, It is computationally Infeasible to create valid signatures on any other arbitrary messages outside of the set. This special property enables the signing algorithm to be made public, which seems to contradict with the traditional signature where a private key Is needed, which must be kept secret. What makes the problem challenging is that the signing algorithm does not reveal the secret signing key, and hence forging normal signatures for arbitrary messages is computationaUy Infeasible. In many cases, the signing algorithm does not reveal the elements in the authorized set. As an application of the new concept, set signatures for intelligent mobile agents committing "smaller than" condition Is studied, which shows the applicability of set signatures on small sets.

  18. A spectral invariant representation of spectral reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdelhameed; Tominaga, Shoji; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2011-03-01

    Spectral image acquisition as well as color image is affected by several illumination factors such as shading, gloss, and specular highlight. Spectral invariant representations for these factors were proposed for the standard dichromatic reflection model of inhomogeneous dielectric materials. However, these representations are inadequate for other characteristic materials like metal. This paper proposes a more general spectral invariant representation for obtaining reliable spectral reflectance images. Our invariant representation is derived from the standard dichromatic reflection model for dielectric materials and the extended dichromatic reflection model for metals. We proof that the invariant formulas for spectral images of natural objects preserve spectral information and are invariant to highlights, shading, surface geometry, and illumination intensity. It is proved that the conventional spectral invariant technique can be applied to metals in addition to dielectric objects. Experimental results show that the proposed spectral invariant representation is effective for image segmentation.

  19. Spectral triples and differential calculi related to the Kronecker foliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, R.; Richter, O.; Rudolph, G.

    2003-04-01

    Following the ideas of Connes and Moscovici, we describe two spectral triples related to the Kronecker foliation, whose generalized Dirac operators are related to first and second order signature operators. We also consider the corresponding differential calculi Ω D, which are drastically different in the two cases. For the second order signature operator we calculate the Chern character of the spectral triple and the Dixmier trace of certain powers of its Dirac operator. As a side-remark, we give a description of a known calculus on the two-dimensional noncommutative torus in terms of generators and relations.

  20. Special Nuclear Material Gamma-Ray Signatures for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-29

    These are slides on special nuclear material gamma-ray signatures for reachback analysts for an LSS Spectroscopy course. The closing thoughts for this presentation are the following: SNM materials have definite spectral signatures that should be readily recognizable to analysts in both bare and shielded configurations. One can estimate burnup of plutonium using certain pairs of peaks that are a few keV apart. In most cases, one cannot reliably estimate uranium enrichment in an analogous way to the estimation of plutonium burnup. The origin of the most intense peaks from some SNM items may be indirect and from ‘associated nuclides.' Indirect SNM signatures sometimes have commonalities with the natural gamma-ray background.

  1. Are leaf chemistry signatures preserved at the canopy level?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, C.C.; Gerstl, S.A.W.

    1994-05-01

    Imaging spectrometers have the potential to be very useful in remote sensing of canopy chemistry constituents such as nitrogen and lignin. In this study under the HIRIS project the question of how leaf chemical composition which is reflected in leaf spectral features in the reflectance and transmittance is affected by canopy architecture was investigated. Several plants were modeled with high fidelity and a radiosity model was used to compute the canopy spectral signature over the visible and near infrared. We found that chemical constituent specific signatures such as absorptions are preserved and in the case of low absorption are actually enhanced. For moderately dense canopies the amount of a constituent depends also on the total leaf area.

  2. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  3. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  4. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  5. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Res., 114, C07021. Evers, L. G. & Snellen , M., 2015. Passive probing of the sound fixing and ranging channel with hydro-acoustic observations from...ridge earthquakes, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 137, 2124–2136. Evers, L. G., Green, D. N., Young, N. W., & Snellen , M., 2013. Remote hydroacoustic sensing...Heaney, K. D., Assink, J. D., Smets, P. S. M., & Snellen , M., 2014. Evanescent wave coupling in a geophysical system: Airborne acoustic signals from

  6. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  7. Forward-Secure Multisignature, Threshold Signature and Blind Signature Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Forward-secure signatures are proposed to tackle the key exposure problem, in which the security of all signatures prior to key leakage is still kept even if the secret key leaks. In this paper, we construct two forward-secure multisignature schemes, one forward-secure threshold signature scheme, and one forward-secure blind signature scheme. Our constructions are based on the recently proposed forward-secure signature scheme from bilinear maps in [11]. Our constructions are very efficient and useful thanks to the elegant structure of the base scheme. Such schemes play an important role in many electronic applications such as cryptographic election systems, digital cash schemes, and e-cheques.

  8. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system is developed. Imaging the spectral characteristics of the biological intrinsic emission reveals the structure and biochemistry of the cells and extra-cellular components. By using different methods in visualizing the spectral images, discrimination between different tissue structures is achieved without the use of any stain or fluorescent label. For instance, RGB real color spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues show blue cells, green hair follicles, and purple collagen fibers. The color signature of each tissue component is directly related to its characteristic emission spectrum. The results of this study show that skin tissue nonlinear intrinsic emission is mainly due to the autofluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), flavins, keratin, melanin, phospholipids, elastin and collagen and nonlinear Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation in Type I collagen. In vivo time-lapse spectral imaging is implemented to study metabolic changes in epidermal cells in tissues. Optical scattering in tissues, a key factor in determining the maximum achievable imaging depth, is also investigated in this work.

  9. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  10. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  11. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  12. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  13. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  14. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  15. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  16. A Secure Threshold Group Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaoming; Fu Fangwei

    2003-01-01

    The threshold group signature is an important kind of signature. So far, many threshold group signature schemes have been proposed, but most of them suffer from conspiracy attack and are insecure. In this paper, a secure threshold group signature scheme is proposed. It can not only satisfy the properties of the threshold group signature, but also withstand the conspiracy attack

  17. Quantum Signature of Analog Hawking Radiation in Momentum Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiron, D; Fabbri, A; Larré, P-É; Pavloff, N; Westbrook, C I; Ziń, P

    2015-07-10

    We consider a sonic analog of a black hole realized in the one-dimensional flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that one- and two-body momentum distributions accessible by present-day experimental techniques provide clear direct evidence (i) of the occurrence of a sonic horizon, (ii) of the associated acoustic Hawking radiation, and (iii) of the quantum nature of the Hawking process. The signature of the quantum behavior persists even at temperatures larger than the chemical potential.

  18. Signatures de l'invisible

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    "Signatures of the Invisible" is an unique collaboration between contemporary artists and contemporary physicists which has the potential to help redefine the relationship between science and art. "Signatures of the Invisible" is jointly organised by the London Institute - the world's largest college of art and design and CERN*, the world's leading particle physics laboratory. 12 leading visual artists:

  19. Acoustic and non-acoustic factors in modeling listener-specific performance of sagittal-plane sound localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr eMajdak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of sound-source localization in sagittal planes (along the top-down and front-back dimension varies considerably across listeners. The directional acoustic spectral features, described by head-related transfer functions (HRTFs, also vary considerably across listeners, a consequence of the listener-specific shape of the ears. It is not clear whether the differences in localization ability result from differences in the encoding of directional information provided by the HRTFs, i.e., acoustic factors, or from differences in auditory processing of those cues (e.g., spectral-shape sensitivity, i.e., non-acoustic factors.We addressed this issue by analyzing the listener-specific localization ability in terms of localization performance. Directional responses to spatially distributed broadband stimuli from 18 listeners were used. A model of sagittal-plane localization was fit individually for each listener by considering the actual localization performance, the listener-specific HRTFs representing the acoustic factor, and an uncertainty parameter representing the non-acoustic factors. The model was configured to simulate the condition of complete calibration of the listener to the tested HRTFs. Listener-specifically calibrated model predictions yielded correlations of, on average, 0.93 with the actual localization performance. Then, the model parameters representing the acoustic and non-acoustic factors were systematically permuted across the listener group.While the permutation of HRTFs affected the localization performance, the permutation of listener-specific uncertainty had a substantially larger impact. Our findings suggest that across-listener variability in sagittal-plane localization ability is only marginally determined by the acoustic factor, i.e., the quality of directional cues found in typical human HRTFs. Rather, the non-acoustic factor, supposed to represent the listeners' efficiency in processing directional cues, appears

  20. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amami, Souhail [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)], E-mail: souhail.amami@utc.fr; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  1. IAR signatures in the ionosphere: Modeling and observations at the Chibis-M microsatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, V.; Dudkin, D.; Fedorov, E.; Korepanov, V.; Klimov, S.

    2017-02-01

    A peculiar feature of geomagnetic variations at middle/low latitudes in the ULF band, just below the fundamental tone of the Schumann resonance, is the occurrence of a multi-band spectral resonant structure, observed by high-sensitivity induction magnetometers during nighttime. The occurrence of such spectral structure was commonly attributed to the Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator (IAR) in the upper ionosphere. Rather surprisingly, while ground observations of the IAR are ubiquitous, there are practically no reports on the IAR signatures from space missions. According to the new paradigm, the multi-band spectral structure excited by a lightning discharge is in fact produced by a regular sequence of an original pulse from a stroke and echo-pulses reflected from the IAR upper boundary. Upon the interaction of initial lightning-generated pulse with the anisotropic lower ionosphere, it partially penetrates into the ionosphere, travels up the ionosphere as an Alfvén pulse, and reflects back from the upper IAR boundary. The superposition of the initial pulse and echo-pulses produces spectra with multiple spectral peaks. Our modeling of Alfvénic pulse propagation in a system with the altitude profile of Alfven velocity modeling the realistic ionosphere has shown that IAR spectral signatures are to be evident only on the ground and above the IAR. Inside the IAR, the superposition of upward and downward propagating pulses produces a more complicated spectral pattern and the IAR spectral signatures deteriorate. We have used electric field data from the low-orbit Chibis-M microsatellite to search for IAR signatures in the ionosphere. We found evidence that the multi-band structure revealed by spectral analysis in the frequency range of interest is indeed the result of a sequence of lightning-produced pulses. According to the proposed conception it seems possible to comprehend why the IAR signatures are less evident in the ionosphere than on the ground.

  2. Acoustic detection of intracranial aneurysms : A decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanBruggen, AC; Dippel, DWJ; Habbema, JDF; Mooij, JJA

    1996-01-01

    We present a further evaluation of an improved recording method for the acoustic detection of intracranial aneurysms (ADA). A sensor was applied to the patient's eyes. Two measures were derived to summarize the power spectral density functions of the sound frequencies that were obtained from each pa

  3. Acoustic fluidization for earthquakes?

    OpenAIRE

    Sornette, D.; Sornette, A.

    2000-01-01

    Melosh [1996] has suggested that acoustic fluidization could provide an alternative to theories that are invoked as explanations for why some crustal faults appear to be weak. We show that there is a subtle but profound inconsistency in the theory that unfortunately invalidates the results. We propose possible remedies but must acknowledge that the relevance of acoustic fluidization remains an open question.

  4. Acoustic diffusers III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidondo, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    This acoustic diffusion research presents a pragmatic view, based more on effects than causes and 15 very useful in the project advance control process, where the sound field's diffusion coefficient, sound field diffusivity (SFD), for its evaluation. Further research suggestions are presented to obtain an octave frequency resolution of the SFD for precise design or acoustical corrections.

  5. Parametric Room Acoustic Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Svidt, Kjeld; Molin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses different room acoustics software and the opportunities they offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs. The first step consists in the testing and benchmarking of different tools on the basis of accuracy, speed and ...

  6. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  7. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  8. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  9. Reproducible Data Processing Research for the CABRI R.I.A. experiments Acoustic Emission signal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantera, Laurent [CEA, DEN, CAD/DER/SRES/LPRE, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Issiaka Traore, Oumar [Laboratory of Machanics and Acoustics (LMA) CNRS, 13402 Marseille (France)

    2015-07-01

    The CABRI facility is an experimental nuclear reactor of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) designed to study the behaviour of fuel rods at high burnup under Reactivity Initiated Accident (R.I.A.) conditions such as the scenario of a control rod ejection. During the experimental phase, the behaviour of the fuel element generates acoustic waves which can be detected by two microphones placed upstream and downstream from the test device. Studies carried out on the last fourteen tests showed the interest in carrying out temporal and spectral analyses on these signals by showing the existence of signatures which can be correlated with physical phenomena. We want presently to return to this rich data in order to have a new point of view by applying modern signal processing methods. Such an antecedent works resumption leads to some difficulties. Although all the raw data are accessible in the form of text files, analyses and graphics representations were not clear in reproducing from the former studies since the people who were in charge of the original work have left the laboratory and it is not easy when time passes, even with our own work, to be able to remember the steps of data manipulations and the exact setup. Thus we decided to consolidate the availability of the data and its manipulation in order to provide a robust data processing workflow to the experimentalists before doing any further investigations. To tackle this issue of strong links between data, treatments and the generation of documents, we adopted a Reproducible Research paradigm. We shall first present the tools chosen in our laboratory to implement this workflow and, then we shall describe the global perception carried out to continue the study of the Acoustic Emission signals recorded by the two microphones during the last fourteen CABRI R.I.A. tests. (authors)

  10. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  11. A methodology for analyzing an acoustic scene in sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Hong; Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2007-10-01

    Presented here is a novel clustering method for Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and its application in acoustic scene analysis. In this method, HMMs are clustered based on a similarity measure for stochastic models defined as the generalized probability product kernel (GPPK), which can be efficiently evaluated according to a fast algorithm introduced by Chen and Man (2005) [1]. Acoustic signals from various sources are partitioned into small frames. Frequency features are extracted from each of the frames to form observation vectors. These frames are further grouped into segments, and an HMM is trained from each of such segments. An unknown segment is categorized with a known event if its HMM has the closest similarity with the HMM from the corresponding labeled segment. Experiments are conducted on an underwater acoustic dataset from Steven Maritime Security Laboratory, Data set contains a swimmer signature, a noise signature from the Hudson River, and a test sequence with a swimmer in the Hudson River. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully associate the test sequence with the swimmer signature at very high confidence, despite their different time behaviors.

  12. Acoustic Resonance between Ground and Thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Matsumura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low frequency acoustic waves called "acoustic gravity waves" or "infrasounds" are theoretically expected to resonate between the ground and the thermosphere. This resonance is a very important phenomenon causing the coupling of the solid Earth, neutral atmosphere, and ionospheric plasma. This acoustic resonance, however, has not been confirmed by direct observations. In this study, atmospheric perturbations on the ground and ionospheric disturbances were observed and compared with each other to confirm the existence of resonance. Atmospheric perturbations were observed with a barometer, and ionospheric disturbances were observed using the HF Doppler method. An end point of resonance is in the ionosphere, where conductivity is high and the dynamo effect occurs. Thus, geomagnetic observation is also useful, so the geomagnetic data were compared with other data. Power spectral density was calculated and averaged for each month. Peaks appeared at the theoretically expected resonance frequencies in the pressure and HF Doppler data. The frequencies of the peaks varied with the seasons. This is probably because the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere varies with the seasons, as does the reflection height of infrasounds. These results indicate that acoustic resonance occurs frequently.

  13. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory for the acoustic force density acting on inhomogeneous fluids in acoustic fields on time scales that are slow compared to the acoustic oscillation period. The acoustic force density depends on gradients in the density and compressibility of the fluid. For microfluidic systems...

  14. Signatures of AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  15. Quantum Spectral Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamhalter, Jan; Turilova, Ekaterina

    2017-02-01

    Quantum symmetries of spectral lattices are studied. Basic properties of spectral order on A W ∗-algebras are summarized. Connection between projection and spectral automorphisms is clarified by showing that, under mild conditions, any spectral automorphism is a composition of function calculus and Jordan ∗-automorphism. Complete description of quantum spectral symmetries on Type I and Type II A W ∗-factors are completely described.

  16. Secure mediated certificateless signature scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chen; MA Wen-ping; WANG Xin-mei

    2007-01-01

    Ju et al proposed a certificateless signature scheme with instantaneous revocation by introducing security mediator (SEM) mechanism. This article presents a detailed cryptoanalysis of this scheme and shows that, in their proposed scheme, once a valid signature has been produced, the signer can recover his private key information and the instantaneous revocation property will be damaged. Furthermore, an improved mediated signature scheme, which can eliminate these disadvantages, is proposed, and security proof of the improved scheme under elliptic curve factorization problem (ECFP) assumption and bilinear computational diffie-hellman problem (BCDH) assumption is also proposed.

  17. Biodiversity sampling using a global acoustic approach: contrasting sites with microendemics in New Caledonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Gasc

    Full Text Available New Caledonia is a Pacific island with a unique biodiversity showing an extreme microendemism. Many species distributions observed on this island are extremely restricted, localized to mountains or rivers making biodiversity evaluation and conservation a difficult task. A rapid biodiversity assessment method based on acoustics was recently proposed. This method could help to document the unique spatial structure observed in New Caledonia. Here, this method was applied in an attempt to reveal differences among three mountain sites (Mandjélia, Koghis and Aoupinié with similar ecological features and species richness level, but with high beta diversity according to different microendemic assemblages. In each site, several local acoustic communities were sampled with audio recorders. An automatic acoustic sampling was run on these three sites for a period of 82 successive days. Acoustic properties of animal communities were analysed without any species identification. A frequency spectral complexity index (NP was used as an estimate of the level of acoustic activity and a frequency spectral dissimilarity index (Df assessed acoustic differences between pairs of recordings. As expected, the index NP did not reveal significant differences in the acoustic activity level between the three sites. However, the acoustic variability estimated by the index Df , could first be explained by changes in the acoustic communities along the 24-hour cycle and second by acoustic dissimilarities between the three sites. The results support the hypothesis that global acoustic analyses can detect acoustic differences between sites with similar species richness and similar ecological context, but with different species assemblages. This study also demonstrates that global acoustic methods applied at broad spatial and temporal scales could help to assess local biodiversity in the challenging context of microendemism. The method could be deployed over large areas, and

  18. Acoustic detection of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmlow, John; Rahalkar, Ketaki

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when the arteries to the heart (the coronary arteries) become blocked by deposition of plaque, depriving the heart of oxygen-bearing blood. This disease is arguably the most important fatal disease in industrialized countries, causing one-third to one-half of all deaths in persons between the ages of 35 and 64 in the United States. Despite the fact that early detection of CAD allows for successful and cost-effective treatment of the disease, only 20% of CAD cases are diagnosed prior to a heart attack. The development of a definitive, noninvasive test for detection of coronary blockages is one of the holy grails of diagnostic cardiology. One promising approach to detecting coronary blockages noninvasively is based on identifying acoustic signatures generated by turbulent blood flow through partially occluded coronary arteries. In fact, no other approach to the detection of CAD promises to be as inexpensive, simple to perform, and risk free as the acoustic-based approach. Although sounds associated with partially blocked arteries are easy to identify in more superficial vessels such as the carotids, sounds from coronary arteries are very faint and surrounded by noise such as the very loud valve sounds. To detect these very weak signals requires sophisticated signal processing techniques. This review describes the work that has been done in this area since the 1980s and discusses future directions that may fulfill the promise of the acoustic approach to detecting coronary artery disease.

  19. Cosmic signatures in earth's seismic tremor?

    CERN Document Server

    Mulargia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Even in absence of earthquakes, each site on earth experiences continuous elastic vibrations which are mostly traced to the non-linear interactions of sea waves. However, the fine structure of the spectrum at mHz frequencies shows hundreds of highly significant narrow bandwidth peaks, with a persistence and a coincidence with solar acoustic eigenmodes which are incompatible with any geophysical origin. The feasibility of a common cosmic origin is evaluated through an estimate of the gravitational wave cross-section of the earth, combined with its elastic response and with the stochastic amplification produced by the interference of the cosmic signal with tremor of oceanic origin. The measured spectral peaks appear compatible with a gravitational monochromatic illumination at strains $h \\gtrsim 10^{-20} $. We analize in detail the band around 2.614 mHz, where the binary white dwarf J0651+2844 - which is the second strongest known gravitational stellar source - is expected to emit. Compatible spectral tremor pe...

  20. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying, E-mail: ying.wu@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-10-03

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating.

  1. Stochastic analysis of spectral broadening by a free turbulent shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, J. C.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the time-varying shear layer between a harmonic acoustic source and an observer on the frequency content of the observed sound is considered. Experimental data show that the spectral content of the acoustic signal is considerably broadened upon passing through such a shear layer. Theoretical analysis is presented which shows that such spectral broadening is entirely consistent with amplitude modulation of the acoustic signal by the time-varying shear layer. Thus, no actual frequency shift need be hypothesized to explain the spectral phenomenon. Experimental tests were conducted at 2, 4, and 6 kHz and at free jet flow velocities of 10, 20, and 30 m/s. Analysis of acoustic pressure time histories obtained from these tests confirms the above conclusion, at least for the low Mach numbers considered.

  2. The acoustics of uvulars in Tlingit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzer-King, Ryan E.

    This paper looks at the acoustics of uvulars in Tlingit, an Athabaskan language spoken in Alaska and Canada. Data from five native speakers was used for acoustic analysis for tokens from five phoneme groups (alveolars, plain velars, labialized velars, plain uvulars, and labialized uvulars). The tokens were analyzed by computing spectral moments of plosive bursts and fricatives, and F2 and F3 values for post-consonantal vowels, which were used to calculate locus equations, a descriptive measure of the relationship between F2 at vowel onset and midpoint. Several trends were observed, including a greater difference between F2 and F 3 after uvulars than after velars, as well as a higher center of gravity (COG) and lower skew and kurtosis for uvulars than for velars. The comparison of plain versus labialized consonants supports the finding of Suh (2008) that labialization lowers mean burst energy, or COG, and additionally found labialization to raise skew and kurtosis.

  3. Study of Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Voice Register in Mon: Acoustics and Electroglottography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Arthur S; Tiede, Mark K; Luangthongkum, Theraphan

    2015-01-01

    Mon is spoken in villages in Thailand and Myanmar. The dialect of Ban Nakhonchum, Thailand, has 2 voice registers, modal and breathy; these phonation types, along with other phonetic properties, distinguish minimal pairs. Four native speakers of this dialect recorded repetitions of 14 randomized words (7 minimal pairs) for acoustic analysis. We used a subset of these pairs in a listening test to verify the perceptual robustness of the register distinction. Acoustic analysis found significant differences in noise component, spectral slope and fundamental frequency. In a subsequent session 4 speakers were also recorded using electroglottography, which showed systematic differences in the contact quotient. The salience of these properties in maintaining the register distinction is discussed in the context of possible tonogenesis for this language. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Application of the Frequency Spectrum to Spectral Similarity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Several frequency-based spectral similarity measures, derived from commonly-used ones, are developed for hyperspectral image classification based on the frequency domain. Since the frequency spectrum (magnitude spectrum of the original signature for each pixel from hyperspectral data can clearly reflect the spectral features of different types of land covers, we replace the original spectral signature with its frequency spectrum for calculating the existing spectral similarity measure. The frequency spectrum is symmetrical around the direct current (DC component; thus, we take one-half of the frequency spectrum from the DC component to the highest frequency component as the input signature. Furthermore, considering the fact that the low frequencies include most of the frequency energy, we can optimize the classification result by choosing the ratio of the frequency spectrum (from the DC component to the highest frequency component involved in the calculation. In our paper, the frequency-based measures based on the spectral gradient angle (SAM, spectral information divergence (SID, spectral correlation mapper (SCM, Euclidean distance (ED, normalized Euclidean distance (NED and SID × sin(SAM (SsS measures are called the F-SAM, F-SID, F-SCM, F-ED, F-NED and F-SsS, respectively. In the experiment, three commonly-used hyperspectral remote sensing images are employed as test data. The frequency-based measures proposed here are compared to the corresponding existing ones in terms of classification accuracy. The classification results by parameter optimization are also analyzed. The results show that, although not all frequency-based spectral similarity measures are better than the original ones, some frequency-based measures, such as the F-SsS and F-SID, exhibit a relatively better performance and have more robust applications than the other spectral similarity measures.

  6. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  7. Underwater Applications of Acoustical Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Mehta

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic technique of acoustical holography. Requirements for recording the acoustical hologram are discussed with its ability for underwater imaging in view. Some practical systems for short-range and medium-range imaging are described. The advantages of acoustical holography over optical imaging, acoustical imaging and sonars are outlined.

  8. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...

  9. The Spectral Shift Function and Spectral Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azamov, N. A.; Carey, A. L.; Sukochev, F. A.

    2007-11-01

    At the 1974 International Congress, I. M. Singer proposed that eta invariants and hence spectral flow should be thought of as the integral of a one form. In the intervening years this idea has lead to many interesting developments in the study of both eta invariants and spectral flow. Using ideas of [24] Singer’s proposal was brought to an advanced level in [16] where a very general formula for spectral flow as the integral of a one form was produced in the framework of noncommutative geometry. This formula can be used for computing spectral flow in a general semifinite von Neumann algebra as described and reviewed in [5]. In the present paper we take the analytic approach to spectral flow much further by giving a large family of formulae for spectral flow between a pair of unbounded self-adjoint operators D and D + V with D having compact resolvent belonging to a general semifinite von Neumann algebra {mathcal{N}} and the perturbation V in {mathcal{N}} . In noncommutative geometry terms we remove summability hypotheses. This level of generality is made possible by introducing a new idea from [3]. There it was observed that M. G. Krein’s spectral shift function (in certain restricted cases with V trace class) computes spectral flow. The present paper extends Krein’s theory to the setting of semifinite spectral triples where D has compact resolvent belonging to {mathcal{N}} and V is any bounded self-adjoint operator in {mathcal{N}} . We give a definition of the spectral shift function under these hypotheses and show that it computes spectral flow. This is made possible by the understanding discovered in the present paper of the interplay between spectral shift function theory and the analytic theory of spectral flow. It is this interplay that enables us to take Singer’s idea much further to create a large class of one forms whose integrals calculate spectral flow. These advances depend critically on a new approach to the calculus of functions of non

  10. Initial Semantics for Strengthened Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Hirschowitz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We give a new general definition of arity, yielding the companion notions of signature and associated syntax. This setting is modular in the sense requested by Ghani and Uustalu: merging two extensions of syntax corresponds to building an amalgamated sum. These signatures are too general in the sense that we are not able to prove the existence of an associated syntax in this general context. So we have to select arities and signatures for which there exists the desired initial monad. For this, we follow a track opened by Matthes and Uustalu: we introduce a notion of strengthened arity and prove that the corresponding signatures have initial semantics (i.e. associated syntax. Our strengthened arities admit colimits, which allows the treatment of the λ-calculus with explicit substitution.

  11. Retail applications of signature verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Thomas G.; Russell, Gregory F.; Heilper, Andre; Smith, Barton A.; Hu, Jianying; Markman, Dmitry; Graham, Jon E.; Drews, Clemens

    2004-08-01

    The dramatic rise in identity theft, the ever pressing need to provide convenience in checkout services to attract and retain loyal customers, and the growing use of multi-function signature captures devices in the retail sector provides favorable conditions for the deployment of dynamic signature verification (DSV) in retail settings. We report on the development of a DSV system to meet the needs of the retail sector. We currently have a database of approximately 10,000 signatures collected from 600 subjects and forgers. Previous work at IBM on DSV has been merged and extended to achieve robust performance on pen position data available from commercial point of sale hardware, achieving equal error rates on skilled forgeries and authentic signatures of 1.5% to 4%.

  12. Initial Semantics for Strengthened Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Hirschowitz, André; 10.4204/EPTCS.77.5

    2012-01-01

    We give a new general definition of arity, yielding the companion notions of signature and associated syntax. This setting is modular in the sense requested by Ghani and Uustalu: merging two extensions of syntax corresponds to building an amalgamated sum. These signatures are too general in the sense that we are not able to prove the existence of an associated syntax in this general context. So we have to select arities and signatures for which there exists the desired initial monad. For this, we follow a track opened by Matthes and Uustalu: we introduce a notion of strengthened arity and prove that the corresponding signatures have initial semantics (i.e. associated syntax). Our strengthened arities admit colimits, which allows the treatment of the \\lambda-calculus with explicit substitution.

  13. Micromechanical Sensor for the Spectral Decomposition of Acoustic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    microneedle array. A variation on this charging approach used a fine copper mesh as the source of corona discharge, as shown in Figure 4.8...suspended above the remaining CYTOP surface by short pillars . This 127 provides an air gap that can be ionized by the electric field. The isotropic...Exposure Bake and SU8 Reflow After the deposition of the seed metallization layer, a thick photoresist electroplating mold is deposited and patterned

  14. Mapeamento do biovolume de plantas aquáticas submersas a partir de dados hidroacústicos e imagem multiespectral de alta resolução Mapping the bio-volume of submerged aquatic vegetation through hydro-acoustic data and high-resolution multi-spectral imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sabo Boschi

    2012-09-01

    submerged aquatic plants is a complex task due to the difficulty in volumetrically mapping and quantifying the colonized areas. In these cases, the use of hydro-acoustic data allows mapping and measuring these areas, helping formulate proposals for sustainable management of this type of aquatic vegetation. This study used the kriging technique and acoustic data to perform the spatial inference of the biovolume of submerged aquatic plants. The data was obtained from three echobathimetric surveys conducted in a Paraná River study area, characterized by the proliferation of submerged aquatic vegetation, hindering navigation. High spatial resolution multi-spectral imagery World View-2 was used to delimit the areas with submerged aquatic plants. The mapping of the bio-volume of submerged aquatic plants was conducted through the bio-volume inference using the Kriging technique and slicing of the inferred values at 15% intervals. The map generated allowed identifying the areas of highest concentration of submerged macrophytes, which predominantly presented bio-volume values between 15-30% and 30-45%. This confirms the feasibility of using the kriging technique for biovolume spatial inference through geo-referenced ecobathimetric measurements and the support of high spatial resolution imagery.

  15. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  16. A compact acoustic calibrator for ultra-high energy neutrino detection

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Bou-Cabo, M; Larosa, G; Llorens, C D; Martínez-Mora, J A

    2012-01-01

    With the aim to optimize and test the method of acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in underwater telescopes a compact acoustic transmitter array has been developed. The acoustic parametric effect is used to reproduce the acoustic signature of an ultra-high-energy neutrino interaction. Different reseach and development studies are presented in order to show the viability of the parametric sources technique to deal with the difficulties of the acoustic signal generation: a very directive transient bipolar signal with pancake directivity. The design, construction and characterization of the prototype are described, including simulation of the propagation of an experimental signal, measured in a pool, over a distance of 1 km. Following these studies, next steps will be testing the device in situ, in underwater neutrino telescope, or from a vessel in a sea campaign.

  17. Contract Signature Using Quantum Information

    CERN Document Server

    De Sousa, P B M; Ramos, Rubens Viana; Sousa, Paulo Benicio Melo de

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes how to perform contract signature in a fair way using quantum information. The protocol proposed permits two partners, users of a communication network, to exchange their signatures with non-repudiation. For this, we assume that there is a trustable arbitrator, responsible for the authentication of the signers and that performs a central task in a quantum teleportation protocol of the XOR function between two classical bits.

  18. An arbitrated quantum signature scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, G; Zeng, Guihua; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2002-01-01

    The general principle for a quantum signature scheme is proposed and investigated based on ideas from classical signature schemes and quantum cryptography. The suggested algorithm is implemented by a symmetrical quantum key cryptosystem and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) triplet states and relies on the availability of an arbitrator. We can guarantee the unconditional security of the algorithm, mostly due to the correlation of the GHZ triplet states and the use of quantum one-time pads.

  19. Color signatures in Amorsolo paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Maricor N.; Palomero, Cherry May; Cruz, Larry; Yambao, Clod Marlan Krister; Dado, Julie Mae; Salvador-Campaner, Janice May

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a two-year project aimed at capturing quantifiable color signatures of oil paintings of Fernando Amorsolo, the Philippine's first National Artists. Color signatures are found by comparing CIE xy measurements of skin color in portraits and ground, sky and foliage in landscapes. The results are compared with results of visual examination and art historical data as well as works done by Amorsolo's contemporaries and mentors.

  20. Effective use of the spectral information in speech processing of cochlear implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Tian; GONG Qin; YE Datian

    2007-01-01

    Based on the results of the acoustic research on Mandarin, two novel algorithms using the spectral information in speech processing of cochlear implants are purposed and certified effectively by the spectral information of tonal language in acoustic simulation experiments. We bring forward novel algorithms conveying the spectral information based on the choices of the frequency bands. These new algorithms can not only improve the speech recognition ability of cochlear implant users in the noisy environments but also reduce the complexity of computing and the memory occupied, and make it more suitable to be carried out in clinical practice.

  1. Flow coherent structures and frequency signature: application of the dynamic modes decomposition to open cavity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusseyran, F; Gueniat, F; Basley, J; Douay, C L; Pastur, L R; Faure, T M [LIMSI-CNRS BP 133, F-91403 Orsay Cedex (France); Schmid, P J [LadHyX, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamic dimension of an impinging flow may be significantly reduced by its boundary conditions and self-sustained oscillations they induce. The spectral signature is associated with remarkable spatial coherent structures. Dynamic modes decomposition (DMD) makes it possible to directly extract the dynamical properties of a non-linearly saturated flow. We apply DMD to highlight the spectral contribution of the longitudinal and transverse structures of an experimental open-cavity flow.

  2. Algorithms for Hyperspectral Signature Classification in Non-resolved Object Characterization Using Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, M.; Key, G.

    Accurate spectral signature classification is key to the nonimaging detection and recognition of spaceborne objects. In classical hyperspectral recognition applications, signature classification accuracy depends on accurate spectral endmember determination [1]. However, in selected target recognition (ATR) applications, it is possible to circumvent the endmember detection problem by employing a Bayesian classifier. Previous approaches to Bayesian classification of spectral signatures have been rule- based, or predicated on a priori parameterized information obtained from offline training, as in the case of neural networks [1,2]. Unfortunately, class separation and classifier refinement results in these methods tends to be suboptimal, and the number of signatures that can be accurately classified often depends linearly on the number of inputs. This can lead to potentially significant classification errors in the presence of noise or densely interleaved signatures. In this paper, we present an emerging technology for nonimaging spectral signature classfication based on a highly accurate but computationally efficient search engine called Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding (TNE) [3]. Based on prior results, TNE can optimize its classifier performance to track input nonergodicities, as well as yield measures of confidence or caution for evaluation of classification results. Unlike neural networks, TNE does not have a hidden intermediate data structure (e.g., the neural net weight matrix). Instead, TNE generates and exploits a user-accessible data structure called the agreement map (AM), which can be manipulated by Boolean logic operations to effect accurate classifier refinement algorithms. This allows the TNE programmer or user to determine parameters for classification accuracy, and to mathematically analyze the signatures for which TNE did not obtain classification matches. This dual approach to analysis (i.e., correct vs. incorrect classification) has been shown to

  3. Noise-Tolerant Hyperspectral Signature Classification in Unresolved Object Detection with Adaptive Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, M.; Key, G.

    Accurate spectral signature classification is a crucial step in the nonimaging detection and recognition of spaceborne objects. In classical hyperspectral recognition applications, especially where linear mixing models are employed, signature classification accuracy depends on accurate spectral endmember discrimination. In selected target recognition (ATR) applications, previous non-adaptive techniques for signature classification have yielded class separation and classifier refinement results that tend to be suboptimal. In practice, the number of signatures accurately classified often depends linearly on the number of inputs. This can lead to potentially severe classification errors in the presence of noise or densely interleaved signatures. In this paper, we present an enhancement of an emerging technology for nonimaging spectral signature classification based on a highly accurate, efficient search engine called Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding (TNE). Adaptive TNE can optimize its classifier performance to track input nonergodicities and yield measures of confidence or caution for evaluation of classification results. Unlike neural networks, TNE does not have a hidden intermediate data structure (e.g., a neural net weight matrix). Instead, TNE generates and exploits a user-accessible data structure called the agreement map (AM), which can be manipulated by Boolean logic operations to effect accurate classifier refinement through programmable algorithms. The open architecture and programmability of TNE's pattern-space (AM) processing allows a TNE developer to determine the qualitative and quantitative reasons for classification accuracy, as well as characterize in detail the signatures for which TNE does not obtain classification matches, and why such mis-matches occur. In this study AM-based classification has been modified to partially compensate for input statistical changes, in response to performance metrics such as probability of correct classification (Pd

  4. Attribute-Based Digital Signature System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibraimi, Luan; Asim, Muhammad; Petkovic, Milan

    2011-01-01

    An attribute-based digital signature system comprises a signature generation unit (1) for signing a message (m) by generating a signature (s) based on a user secret key (SK) associated with a set of user attributes, wherein the signature generation unit (1) is arranged for combining the user secret

  5. Attribute-Based Digital Signature System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibraimi, L.; Asim, Muhammad; Petkovic, M.

    2011-01-01

    An attribute-based digital signature system comprises a signature generation unit (1) for signing a message (m) by generating a signature (s) based on a user secret key (SK) associated with a set of user attributes, wherein the signature generation unit (1) is arranged for combining the user secret

  6. 1 CFR 18.7 - Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Signature. 18.7 Section 18.7 General Provisions... PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.7 Signature. The original and each duplicate original... stamped beneath the signature. Initialed or impressed signatures will not be accepted. Documents...

  7. 21 CFR 11.50 - Signature manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature manifestations. 11.50 Section 11.50 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.50 Signature manifestations. (a) Signed electronic...: (1) The printed name of the signer; (2) The date and time when the signature was executed; and...

  8. Semiblind Hyperspectral Unmixing in the Presence of Spectral Library Mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao; Ma, Wing-Kin; Bioucas-Dias, Jose M.; Chan, Tsung-Han

    2016-09-01

    The dictionary-aided sparse regression (SR) approach has recently emerged as a promising alternative to hyperspectral unmixing (HU) in remote sensing. By using an available spectral library as a dictionary, the SR approach identifies the underlying materials in a given hyperspectral image by selecting a small subset of spectral samples in the dictionary to represent the whole image. A drawback with the current SR developments is that an actual spectral signature in the scene is often assumed to have zero mismatch with its corresponding dictionary sample, and such an assumption is considered too ideal in practice. In this paper, we tackle the spectral signature mismatch problem by proposing a dictionary-adjusted nonconvex sparsity-encouraging regression (DANSER) framework. The main idea is to incorporate dictionary correcting variables in an SR formulation. A simple and low per-iteration complexity algorithm is tailor-designed for practical realization of DANSER. Using the same dictionary correcting idea, we also propose a robust subspace solution for dictionary pruning. Extensive simulations and real-data experiments show that the proposed method is effective in mitigating the undesirable spectral signature mismatch effects.

  9. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side ... Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient ...

  10. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resource Click to learn more... LOGIN EVENTS DONATE Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video OrangeTheory AN Warriors Laurie of ...

  12. Acoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  13. An acoustic invisible gateway

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Kan, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The recently-emerged concept of "invisible gateway" with the extraordinary capability to block the waves but allow the passage of other entities has attracted great attentions due to the general interests in illusion devices. However, the possibility to realize such a fascinating phenomenon for acoustic waves has not yet been explored, which should be of paramount significance for acoustical applications but would necessarily involve experimental difficulty. Here we design and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic invisible gateway (AIG) capable of concealing a channel under the detection of sound. Instead of "restoring" a whole block of background medium by using transformation acoustics that inevitably requires complementary or restoring media with extreme parameters, we propose an inherently distinct methodology that only aims at engineering the surface impedance at the "gate" to mimic a rigid "wall" and can be conveniently implemented by decorating meta-structures behind the channel. Such a simple yet ef...

  14. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  15. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  16. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  17. Acoustic MIMO signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yiteng; Chen, Jingdong

    2006-01-01

    A timely and important book addressing a variety of acoustic signal processing problems under multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) scenarios. It uniquely investigates these problems within a unified framework offering a novel and penetrating analysis.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree ... info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational ...

  19. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a ...

  1. Acoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tool detects noise sources by scanning sound "scene" and displaying relative location of noise-producing elements in area. System consists of ellipsoidal acoustic mirror and microphone and a display device.

  2. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma Each heading slides to reveal more information. Early Symptoms Early Symptoms Early symptoms are easily overlooked, thus making diagnosis ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects ... To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient kit ...

  4. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms ... effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ...

  6. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  7. Analysis of gas jetting and fumarole acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Kathleen; Fee, David; Yokoo, Akihiko; Matoza, Robin S.; Kim, Keehoon

    2017-06-01

    The gas-thrust region of a large volcanic eruption column is predominately a momentum-driven, fluid flow process that perturbs the atmosphere and produces sound akin to noise from jet and rocket engines, termed ;jet noise;. We aim to enhance understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We characterize the acoustic signature of 2.5-meter wide vigorously jetting fumarole at Aso Volcano, Japan using a 5-element infrasound array located on the nearby crater. The fumarole opened on 13 July 2015 on the southwest flank of the partially collapsed pyroclastic cone within Aso Volcano's Naka-dake crater and had persistent gas jetting, which produced significant audible jet noise. The array was 220 m from the fumarole and 57.6° from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle not typically feasible in volcanic environments. Array processing is performed to distinguish fumarolic jet noise from wind. Highly correlated periods are characterized by sustained, low-amplitude signal with a 7-10 Hz spectral peak. Finite difference time domain method numerical modeling suggests the influence of topography near the vent and along the propagation path significantly affects the spectral content, complicating comparisons with laboratory jet noise. The fumarolic jet has a low estimated Mach number (0.3 to 0.4) and measured temperature of 260 °C. The Strouhal number for infrasound from volcanic jet flows and geysers is not known; thus we assume a peak Strouhal number of 0.19 based on pure-air laboratory jet experiments. This assumption leads to an estimated exit velocity of the fumarole of 79 to 132 m/s. Using published gas composition data from 2003 to 2009, the fumarolic vent area estimated from thermal infrared images, and estimated jet velocity, we estimate total volatile flux at 160-270 kg/s (14,000-23,000 t/d).

  8. Analysis of gas jetting and fumarole acoustics at Aso Volcano, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, Kathleen; Fee, David; Yokoo, Akihiko; Matoza, Robin S.; Kim, Keehoon

    2017-06-01

    The gas-thrust region of a large volcanic eruption column is predominately a momentum-driven, fluid flow process that perturbs the atmosphere and produces sound akin to noise from jet and rocket engines, termed “jet noise”. We aim to enhance understanding of large-scale volcanic jets by studying an accessible, less hazardous fumarolic jet. We characterize the acoustic signature of ~ 2.5-meter wide vigorously jetting fumarole at Aso Volcano, Japan using a 5-element infrasound array located on the nearby crater. The fumarole opened on 13 July 2015 on the southwest flank of the partially collapsed pyroclastic cone within Aso Volcano's Naka-dake crater and had persistent gas jetting, which produced significant audible jet noise. The array was ~ 220 m from the fumarole and 57.6° from the vertical jet axis, a recording angle not typically feasible in volcanic environments. Array processing is performed to distinguish fumarolic jet noise from wind. Highly correlated periods are characterized by sustained, low-amplitude signal with a 7–10 Hz spectral peak. Finite difference time domain method numerical modeling suggests the influence of topography near the vent and along the propagation path significantly affects the spectral content, complicating comparisons with laboratory jet noise. The fumarolic jet has a low estimated Mach number (0.3 to 0.4) and measured temperature of ~ 260 °C. The Strouhal number for infrasound from volcanic jet flows and geysers is not known; thus we assume a peak Strouhal number of 0.19 based on pure-air laboratory jet experiments. This assumption leads to an estimated exit velocity of the fumarole of ~ 79 to 132 m/s. Using published gas composition data from 2003 to 2009, the fumarolic vent area estimated from thermal infrared images, and estimated jet velocity, we estimate total volatile flux at ~ 160–270 kg/s (14,000–23,000 t/d).

  9. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  10. SIGNATURE: A workbench for gene expression signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jeffrey T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological phenotype of a cell, such as a characteristic visual image or behavior, reflects activities derived from the expression of collections of genes. As such, an ability to measure the expression of these genes provides an opportunity to develop more precise and varied sets of phenotypes. However, to use this approach requires computational methods that are difficult to implement and apply, and thus there is a critical need for intelligent software tools that can reduce the technical burden of the analysis. Tools for gene expression analyses are unusually difficult to implement in a user-friendly way because their application requires a combination of biological data curation, statistical computational methods, and database expertise. Results We have developed SIGNATURE, a web-based resource that simplifies gene expression signature analysis by providing software, data, and protocols to perform the analysis successfully. This resource uses Bayesian methods for processing gene expression data coupled with a curated database of gene expression signatures, all carried out within a GenePattern web interface for easy use and access. Conclusions SIGNATURE is available for public use at http://genepattern.genome.duke.edu/signature/.

  11. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  12. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J;

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  13. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Communications , Computers , Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems that "capture, synthesize and distribute near-real time information to...Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced

  14. Infrared Spectral Observations While Drilling into a Frozen Lunar Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, Ted L.; Colaprete, Anthony; Thompson, Sarah; Cook, Amanda; Kleinhenz, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Past and continuing observations indicate an enrichment of volatile materials in lunar polar regions. While these volatiles may be located near the surface, access to them will likely require subsurface sampling, during which it is desirable to monitor the volatile content. In a simulation of such activities, a multilayer lunar simulant was prepared with differing water content, and placed inside a thermal vacuum chamber at Glenn Research Center (GRC). The soil profile was cooled using liquid nitrogen. In addition to the soil, a drill and infrared (IR) spectrometer (1600-3400 nm) were also located in the GRC chamber. We report the spectral observations obtained during a sequence where the drill was repeatedly inserted and extracted, to different depths, at the same location. We observe an overall increase in the spectral signature of water ice over the duration of the test. Additionally, we observe variations in the water ice spectral signature as the drill encounters different layers.

  15. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  16. Novel acoustic features for speech emotion recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ROH; Yong-Wan; KIM; Dong-Ju; LEE; Woo-Seok; HONG; Kwang-Seok

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on acoustic features that effectively improve the recognition of emotion in human speech.The novel features in this paper are based on spectral-based entropy parameters such as fast Fourier transform(FFT) spectral entropy,delta FFT spectral entropy,Mel-frequency filter bank(MFB) spectral entropy,and Delta MFB spectral entropy.Spectral-based entropy features are simple.They reflect frequency characteristic and changing characteristic in frequency of speech.We implement an emotion rejection module using the probability distribution of recognized-scores and rejected-scores.This reduces the false recognition rate to improve overall performance.Recognized-scores and rejected-scores refer to probabilities of recognized and rejected emotion recognition results,respectively.These scores are first obtained from a pattern recognition procedure.The pattern recognition phase uses the Gaussian mixture model(GMM).We classify the four emotional states as anger,sadness,happiness and neutrality.The proposed method is evaluated using 45 sentences in each emotion for 30 subjects,15 males and 15 females.Experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the existing emotion recognition methods based on GMM using energy,Zero Crossing Rate(ZCR),linear prediction coefficient(LPC),and pitch parameters.We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.One of the proposed features,combined MFB and delta MFB spectral entropy improves performance approximately 10% compared to the existing feature parameters for speech emotion recognition methods.We demonstrate a 4% performance improvement in the applied emotion rejection with low confidence score.

  17. Significance analysis of prognostic signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Beck

    Full Text Available A major goal in translational cancer research is to identify biological signatures driving cancer progression and metastasis. A common technique applied in genomics research is to cluster patients using gene expression data from a candidate prognostic gene set, and if the resulting clusters show statistically significant outcome stratification, to associate the gene set with prognosis, suggesting its biological and clinical importance. Recent work has questioned the validity of this approach by showing in several breast cancer data sets that "random" gene sets tend to cluster patients into prognostically variable subgroups. This work suggests that new rigorous statistical methods are needed to identify biologically informative prognostic gene sets. To address this problem, we developed Significance Analysis of Prognostic Signatures (SAPS which integrates standard prognostic tests with a new prognostic significance test based on stratifying patients into prognostic subtypes with random gene sets. SAPS ensures that a significant gene set is not only able to stratify patients into prognostically variable groups, but is also enriched for genes showing strong univariate associations with patient prognosis, and performs significantly better than random gene sets. We use SAPS to perform a large meta-analysis (the largest completed to date of prognostic pathways in breast and ovarian cancer and their molecular subtypes. Our analyses show that only a small subset of the gene sets found statistically significant using standard measures achieve significance by SAPS. We identify new prognostic signatures in breast and ovarian cancer and their corresponding molecular subtypes, and we show that prognostic signatures in ER negative breast cancer are more similar to prognostic signatures in ovarian cancer than to prognostic signatures in ER positive breast cancer. SAPS is a powerful new method for deriving robust prognostic biological signatures from clinically

  18. A theoretical study of acoustic glitches in low-mass main-sequence stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven CT 06520-8101 (United States); Mazumdar, Anwesh, E-mail: kuldeepv@tifr.res.in, E-mail: antia@tifr.res.in, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.edu, E-mail: anwesh@tifr.res.in [Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, V. N. Purav Marg, Mankhurd, Mumbai 400088 (India)

    2014-10-20

    There are regions in stars, such as ionization zones and the interface between radiative and convective regions, that cause a localized sharp variation in the sound speed. These are known as 'acoustic glitches'. Acoustic glitches leave their signatures on the oscillation frequencies of stars, and hence these signatures can be used as diagnostics of these regions. In particular, the signatures of these glitches can be used as diagnostics for the position of the second helium ionization zone and that of the base of the envelope convection zone. With the help of stellar models, we study the properties of these acoustic glitches in main-sequence stars. We find that the acoustic glitch due to the helium ionization zone does not correspond to the dip in the adiabatic index Γ{sub 1} caused by the ionization of He II, but to the peak in Γ{sub 1} between the He I and He II ionization zones. We find that it is easiest to study the acoustic glitch that is due to the helium ionization zone in stars with masses in the range 0.9-1.2 M {sub ☉}.

  19. Multiline Zeeman signatures as demonstrated through the Pseudo-line

    CERN Document Server

    Semel, M; Stift, M J; Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Ariste, A Lopez; Leone, F

    2008-01-01

    In order to get a significant Zeeman signature in the polarised spectra of a magnetic star, we usually 'add' the contributions of numerous spectral lines; the ultimate goal is to recover the spectropolarimetric prints of the magnetic field in these line additions. Here we want to clarify the meaning of these techniques of line addition; in particular, we try to interpret the meaning of the 'pseudo-line' formed during this process and to find out why and how its Zeeman signature is still meaningful. We create a synthetic case of lines addition and apply well tested standard solar methods routinely used in the research on magnetism in our nearest star. The results are convincing and the Zeeman signatures well detected; Solar methods are found to be quite efficient also for stellar observations. The Zeeman signatures are unequivocally detected in this multiline approach. We may anticipate the outcome magnetic fields to be reliable well beyond the weak-field approximation. Linear polarisation in the spectra of so...

  20. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  1. Ion acoustic shocks in magneto rotating Lorentzian plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, S.; Akhtar, N. [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, NILORE, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); DPAM, PIEAS, NILORE, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Hasnain, H. [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, NILORE, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-12-15

    Ion acoustic shock structures in magnetized homogeneous dissipative Lorentzian plasma under the effects of Coriolis force are investigated. The dissipation in the plasma system is introduced via dynamic viscosity of inertial ions. The electrons are following the kappa distribution function. Korteweg-de Vries Burger (KdVB) equation is derived by using reductive perturbation technique. It is shown that spectral index, magnetic field, kinematic viscosity of ions, rotational frequency, and effective frequency have significant impact on the propagation characteristic of ion acoustic shocks in such plasma system. The numerical solution of KdVB equation is also discussed and transition from oscillatory profile to monotonic shock for different plasma parameters is investigated.

  2. A polyphonic acoustic vortex and its complementary chords

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C; Padgett, M J [SUPA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.wilson@physics.gla.ac.uk

    2010-02-15

    Using an annular phased array of eight loudspeakers, we generate sound beams that simultaneously contain phase singularities at a number of different frequencies. These frequencies correspond to different musical notes and the singularities can be set to overlap along the beam axis, creating a polyphonic acoustic vortex. Perturbing the drive amplitudes of the speakers means that the singularities no longer overlap, each note being nulled at a slightly different lateral position, where the volume of the other notes is now nonzero. The remaining notes form a tri-note chord. We contrast this acoustic phenomenon to the optical case where the perturbation of a white light vortex leads to a spectral spatial distribution.

  3. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN)

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  4. An analysis of beam parameters on proton-acoustic waves through an analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac Kipergil, Esra; Erkol, Hakan; Kaya, Serhat; Gulsen, Gultekin; Unlu, Mehmet

    2017-03-02

    It has been reported that acoustic waves are generated when a high energy pulsed proton beam is deposited in a small volume within tissue. One possible application of the proton induced acoustics is to get a real-time feedback for intratreatment adjustments by monitoring such acoustic waves. High spatial resolution in ultrasound imaging may reduce proton range uncertainty. Thus, it is crucial to understand the dependence of the acoustic waves on the proton beam characteristics. In this manuscript, firstly, an analytic solution to the proton induced acoustic wave is presented to reveal the dependence of signal on beam parameters, and then combined with an analytic approximation of the Bragg curve. The influence of the beam energy, pulse duration, and beam diameter variation on the acoustic waveform are investigated. Further analysis is performed regarding the Fourier decomposition of proton-acoustic signals. Our results show that smaller spill time of proton beam upsurges the amplitude of acoustic wave for constant number of protons, and hence beneficial for dose monitoring. The increase in the energy of each individual proton in the beam leads to spatial broadening of the Bragg curve, which also yields acoustic waves of greater amplitude. The pulse duration and the beam width of the proton beam do not affect the central frequency of the acoustic wave, but they change the amplitude of the spectral components.

  5. Magnetic Signature Assessment System Using Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    Bean, J. Canning, D. Pugsley, J. Frenzel Michael Anderson, D. Edwards, "Field Measurement of Surface Ship Magnetic Signature Using Multiple AUVs... Frenzel , "Spatial Sampling of Magnetic Field Using Collaborating Autonomous Underwater Vehicles", Proceedings ofMSS Battlespace Acoustic and Seismic...J. Pentzer*, D. Odell, T. Bean, J. Canning, D. Pugsley, J. Frenzel Michael Anderson, D. Edwards, "Field Measurement of Surface Ship Magnetic

  6. Signature Optical Cues: Emerging Technologies for Monitoring Plant Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand K. Asundi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical technologies can be developed as practical tools for monitoring plant health by providing unique spectral signatures that can be related to specific plant stresses. Signatures from thermal and fluorescence imaging have been used successfully to track pathogen invasion before visual symptoms are observed. Another approach for noninvasive plant health monitoring involves elucidating the manner with which light interacts with the plant leaf and being able to identify changes in spectral characteristics in response to specific stresses. To achieve this, an important step is to understand the biochemical and anatomical features governing leaf reflectance, transmission and absorption. Many studies have opened up possibilities that subtle changes in leaf reflectance spectra can be analyzed in a plethora of ways for discriminating nutrient and water stress, but with limited success. There has also been interest in developing transgenic phytosensors to elucidate plant status in relation to environmental conditions. This approach involves unambiguous signal creation whereby genetic modification to generate reporter plants has resulted in distinct optical signals emitted in response to specific stressors. Most of these studies are limited to laboratory or controlled greenhouse environments at leaf level. The practical translation of spectral cues for application under field conditions at canopy and regional levels by remote aerial sensing remains a challenge. The movement towards technology development is well exemplified by the Controlled Ecological Life Support System under development by NASA which brings together technologies for monitoring plant status concomitantly with instrumentation for environmental monitoring and feedback control.

  7. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating establishment...

  8. Interactions in an acoustic world

    CERN Document Server

    Simaciu, Ion; Borsos, Zoltan; Bradac, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to complete an earlier paper where the acoustic world was introduced. This is accomplished by analyzing the interactions which occur between the inhomogeneities of the acoustic medium, which are induced by the acoustic vibrations traveling in the medium. When a wave packet travels in a medium, the medium becomes inhomogeneous. The spherical wave packet behaves like an acoustic spherical lens for the acoustic plane waves. According to the principle of causality, there is an interaction between the wave and plane wave packet. In specific conditions the wave packet behaves as an acoustic black hole.

  9. Doppler Signatures of the Atmospheric Circulation on Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Lewis, Nikole K; Shabram, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The meteorology of hot Jupiters has been characterized primarily with thermal measurements, but recent observations suggest the possibility of directly detecting the winds by observing the Doppler shift of spectral lines seen during transit. Motivated by these observations, we show how Doppler measurements can place powerful constraints on the meteorology. We show that the atmospheric circulation--and Doppler signature--of hot Jupiters splits into two regimes. Under weak stellar insolation, the day-night thermal forcing generates fast zonal jet streams from the interaction of atmospheric waves with the mean flow. In this regime, air along the terminator (as seen during transit) flows toward Earth in some regions and away from Earth in others, leading to a Doppler signature exhibiting superposed blue- and redshifted components. Under intense stellar insolation, however, the strong thermal forcing damps these planetary-scale waves, inhibiting their ability to generate jets. Strong frictional drag likewise damps...

  10. Infrared signature modelling of a rocket jet plume - comparison with flight measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialland, V.; Guy, A.; Gueyffier, D.; Perez, P.; Roblin, A.; Smithson, T.

    2016-01-01

    The infrared signature modelling of rocket plumes is a challenging problem involving rocket geometry, propellant composition, combustion modelling, trajectory calculations, fluid mechanics, atmosphere modelling, calculation of gas and particles radiative properties and of radiative transfer through the atmosphere. This paper presents ONERA simulation tools chained together to achieve infrared signature prediction, and the comparison of the estimated and measured signatures of an in-flight rocket plume. We consider the case of a solid rocket motor with aluminized propellant, the Black Brant sounding rocket. The calculation case reproduces the conditions of an experimental rocket launch, performed at White Sands in 1997, for which we obtained high quality infrared signature data sets from DRDC Valcartier. The jet plume is calculated using an in-house CFD software called CEDRE. The plume infrared signature is then computed on the spectral interval 1900-5000 cm-1 with a step of 5 cm-1. The models and their hypotheses are presented and discussed. Then the resulting plume properties, radiance and spectra are detailed. Finally, the estimated infrared signature is compared with the spectral imaging measurements. The discrepancies are analyzed and discussed.

  11. Speaker compensation for local perturbation of fricative acoustic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casserly, Elizabeth D

    2011-04-01

    Feedback perturbation studies of speech acoustics have revealed a great deal about how speakers monitor and control their productions of segmental (e.g., formant frequencies) and non-segmental (e.g., pitch) linguistic elements. The majority of previous work, however, overlooks the role of acoustic feedback in consonant production and makes use of acoustic manipulations that effect either entire utterances or the entire acoustic signal, rather than more temporally and phonetically restricted alterations. This study, therefore, seeks to expand the feedback perturbation literature by examining perturbation of consonant acoustics that is applied in a time-restricted and phonetically specific manner. The spectral center of the alveopalatal fricative [∫] produced in vowel-fricative-vowel nonwords was incrementally raised until it reached the potential for [s]-like frequencies, but the characteristics of high-frequency energy outside the target fricative remained unaltered. An "offline," more widely accessible signal processing method was developed to perform this manipulation. The local feedback perturbation resulted in changes to speakers' fricative production that were more variable, idiosyncratic, and restricted than the compensation seen in more global acoustic manipulations reported in the literature. Implications and interpretations of the results, as well as future directions for research based on the findings, are discussed.

  12. Acoustic metamaterials with circular sector cavities and programmable densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, W; Elsabbagh, A; Baz, A

    2012-10-01

    Considerable interest has been devoted to the development of various classes of acoustic metamaterials that can control the propagation of acoustical wave energy throughout fluid domains. However, all the currently exerted efforts are focused on studying passive metamaterials with fixed material properties. In this paper, the emphasis is placed on the development of a class of composite one-dimensional acoustic metamaterials with effective densities that are programmed to adapt to any prescribed pattern along the metamaterial. The proposed acoustic metamaterial is composed of a periodic arrangement of cell structures, in which each cell consists of a circular sector cavity bounded by actively controlled flexible panels to provide the capability for manipulating the overall effective dynamic density. The theoretical analysis of this class of multilayered composite active acoustic metamaterials (CAAMM) is presented and the theoretical predictions are determined for a cascading array of fluid cavities coupled to flexible piezoelectric active boundaries forming the metamaterial domain with programmable dynamic density. The stiffness of the piezoelectric boundaries is electrically manipulated to control the overall density of the individual cells utilizing the strong coupling with the fluid domain and using direct acoustic pressure feedback. The interaction between the neighboring cells of the composite metamaterial is modeled using a lumped-parameter approach. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance characteristics of the proposed CAAMM and its potential for generating prescribed spatial and spectral patterns of density variation.

  13. Characterizing Habitable Extrasolar Planets using Spectral Fingerprints

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenegger, L

    2009-01-01

    The detection and characterization of Earth-like planet is approaching rapidly thanks to radial velocity surveys (HARPS), transit searches (Corot, Kepler) and space observatories dedicated to their characterization are already in development phase (James Webb Space Telescope), large ground based telescopes (ELT, TNT, GMT), and dedicated space-based missions like Darwin, Terrestrial Planet Finder, New World Observer). In this paper we discuss how we can read a planets spectrum to assess its habitability and search for the signatures of a biosphere. Identifying signs of life implies understanding how the observed atmosphere physically and chemically works and thus to gather information on the planet in addition to the observing its spectral fingerprint.

  14. Far/Mid-Infrared Signatures of Solvent–Solute Interactions in a Microhydrated Model Peptide Chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirtog, M.; Rijs, A. M.; Loquais, Y.; Brenner, V.; Tardivel, B.; Gloaguen, E.; Mons, M.

    2012-01-01

    Far/mid-IR signatures of the first hydration step of a flexible biomolecule, the model peptide chain Ac-Phe-NH2, have been investigated in the gas phase using the selective IR/UV double-resonance laser technique. The broad spectral region investigated with the free-electron laser FELIX (150–800

  15. Signature Visualization of Software Binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panas, T

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present work on the visualization of software binaries. In particular, we utilize ROSE, an open source compiler infrastructure, to pre-process software binaries, and we apply a landscape metaphor to visualize the signature of each binary (malware). We define the signature of a binary as a metric-based layout of the functions contained in the binary. In our initial experiment, we visualize the signatures of a series of computer worms that all originate from the same line. These visualizations are useful for a number of reasons. First, the images reveal how the archetype has evolved over a series of versions of one worm. Second, one can see the distinct changes between version. This allows the viewer to form conclusions about the development cycle of a particular worm.

  16. Deep learning on temporal-spectral data for anomaly detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, King; Leung, Henry; Jalilian, Ehsan; Huang, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Detecting anomalies is important for continuous monitoring of sensor systems. One significant challenge is to use sensor data and autonomously detect changes that cause different conditions to occur. Using deep learning methods, we are able to monitor and detect changes as a result of some disturbance in the system. We utilize deep neural networks for sequence analysis of time series. We use a multi-step method for anomaly detection. We train the network to learn spectral and temporal features from the acoustic time series. We test our method using fiber-optic acoustic data from a pipeline.

  17. CMB spectral distortion constraints on thermal inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kihyun; Hong, Sungwook E.; Stewart, Ewan D.; Zoe, Heeseung

    2017-08-01

    Thermal inflation is a second epoch of exponential expansion at typical energy scales V1/4 ~ 106 ~ 8 GeV. If the usual primordial inflation is followed by thermal inflation, the primordial power spectrum is only modestly redshifted on large scales, but strongly suppressed on scales smaller than the horizon size at the beginning of thermal inflation, k > kb = ab Hb. We calculate the spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background generated by the dissipation of acoustic waves in this context. For kb ll 103 Mpc-1, thermal inflation results in a large suppression of the μ-distortion amplitude, predicting that it falls well below the standard value of μ simeq 2× 10-8. Thus, future spectral distortion experiments, similar to PIXIE, can place new limits on the thermal inflation scenario, constraining kb gtrsim 103 Mpc-1 if μ simeq 2× 10-8 were found.

  18. Radio signatures of lightning discharges in exoplanets and brown dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodosán, Gabriella; Helling, Christiane; Vorgul, Irena

    2014-05-01

    Lightning related signatures can be found in the whole spectral range from radio to gamma-rays. While for example UV, visible or IR molecular emission (as the lightning discharge causes changes in the local chemistry) depends on the composition of the atmosphere of the extrasolar body, radio signatures do not have this limitation, which means they may give us a universal tool for lightning observations outside the Solar System, both on exoplanets and brown dwarfs. Lightning induced radio signatures have three main types. Sferics emit in the low-frequency (LF) range with a power density peak at 10 kHz on Earth. (Aplin, K. L., 'Electrifying atmospheres', Springer 2013) Whistlers are electromagnetic waves propagating along magnetic field lines and emitting in the very low-frequency (VLF) range. (Desch, S. J. et al. 2002, Rep. Prog. Phys. 65, 955) While Schumann-resonances are VLF lightning discharge-induced electromagnetic oscillations of the earth-ionosphere cavity. (Simões, F. et al. 2012, LPICo 1683, 1052) There are certain factors that limit the observability of radio signatures. Every object with an ionosphere has a low cutoff frequency. This means radio waves with frequencies below this peak-frequency cannot propagate through the atmosphere. For Earth this value is about 5-10 MHz. However, the values for extrasolar atmospheres remain to be determined. Besides that, natural background noises like the galactic radio background or photo-electron noises give a limitation. (Zarka et al. 2012, PSS 74, 156) Putting all together, radio signatures with frequency below 10 MHz might only be observable from space. Waves below 30 kHz would not be able to reach the inner Solar System. (Zarka et al. 2012, PSS 74, 156) We show a general summary of radio signatures and their properties. A table of other lightning discharge signatures that have been observed either on Earth or other Solar System planets is also included. This table, also contains a list of different instruments

  19. A Signature Scheme with Non-Repudiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Xiangjun; GUO Xiaoli; XIAO Guozhen

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Schnorr signature scheme, a new signature scheme with non-repudiation is proposed. In this scheme, only the signer and the designated receiver can verify the signature signed by the signer, and if necessary, both the signer and the designated receiver can prove and show the validity of the signature signed by the signer. The proof of the validity of the signature is noninteractive and transferable. To verify and prove the validity of the signature, the signer and the nominated receiver needn't store extra information besides the signature. At the same time, neither the signer nor the designated receiver can deny a valid signature signed. Then, there is no repudiation in this new signature scheme. According to the security analysis of this scheme, it is found the proposed scheme is secure against existential forgery on adaptive chosen message attack.

  20. Raman Spectroscopic Signatures of Echovirus 1 Uncoating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokola, Päivi; Dadu, Elina; Kazmertsuk, Artur; Häkkänen, Heikki; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent decades, Raman spectroscopy has entered the biological and medical fields. It enables nondestructive analysis of structural details at the molecular level and has been used to study viruses and their constituents. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to study echovirus 1 (EV1), a small, nonenveloped human pathogen, in two different uncoating states induced by heat treatments. Raman signals of capsid proteins and RNA genome were observed from the intact virus, the uncoating intermediate, and disrupted virions. Transmission electron microscopy data revealed general structural changes between the studied particles. Compared to spectral characteristics of proteins in the intact virion, those of the proteins of the heat-treated particles indicated reduced α-helix content with respect to β-sheets and coil structures. Changes observed in tryptophan and tyrosine signals suggest an increasingly hydrophilic environment around these residues. RNA signals revealed a change in the environment of the genome and in its conformation. The ionized-carbonyl vibrations showed small changes between the intact virion and the uncoating intermediate, which points to cleavage of salt bridges in the protein structure during the uncoating process. In conclusion, our data reveal distinguishable Raman signatures of the intact, intermediate, and disrupted EV1 particles. These changes indicate structural, chemical, and solute-solvent alterations in the genome and in the capsid proteins and lay the essential groundwork for investigating the uncoating of EV1 and related viruses in real time. IMPORTANCE In order to combat virus infection, we need to know the details of virus uncoating. We present here the novel Raman signatures for opened and intact echovirus 1. This gives hope that the signatures may be used in the near future to evaluate the ambient conditions in endosomes leading to virus uncoating using, e.g., coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) imaging. These

  1. Redshift uncertainties and baryonic acoustic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Chaves-Montero, Jonás; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In the upcoming era of high-precision galaxy surveys, it becomes necessary to understand the impact of uncertain redshift estimators on cosmological observables. In this paper we present a detailed exploration of the galaxy clustering and baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal under the presence of redshift errors. We provide analytic expressions for how the monopole and the quadrupole of the redshift-space power spectrum (together with their covariances) are affected. Additionally, we discuss the modifications in the shape, signal to noise, and cosmological constraining power of the BAO signature. We show how and why the BAO contrast is $\\mathit{enhanced}$ with small redshift uncertainties, and explore in detail how the cosmological information is modulated by the interplay of redshift-space distortions, redshift errors, and the number density of the sample. We validate our results by comparing them with measurements from a ensemble of $N$-body simulations with $8100h^{-3}\\text{Gpc}^3$ aggregated volume....

  2. Spectral Kurtosis Statistics of Transient Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Nita, Gelu M

    2016-01-01

    We obtain analytical approximations for the expectation and variance of the Spectral Kurtosis estimator in the case of Gaussian and coherent transient time domain signals mixed with a quasi-stationary Gaussian background, which are suitable for practical estimations of their signal-to-noise ratio and duty-cycle relative to the instrumental integration time. We validate these analytical approximations by means of numerical simulations and demonstrate that such estimates are affected by statistical uncertainties that, for a suitable choice of the integration time, may not exceed a few percent. Based on these analytical results, we suggest a multiscale Spectral Kurtosis spectrometer design optimized for real-time detection of transient signals, automatic discrimination based on their statistical signature, and measurement of their properties.

  3. Luminosity and spectral evolution of QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y Y; Yi, I S

    1999-01-01

    We apply the observed spectral states of the Galactic black hole candidates (GBHCs) to the quasi-stellar object (QSO) luminosity evolution based on the correlation between luminosity and the spectrum, which is strongly supported by the similarities of emission mechanisms in GBHCs and QSOs. We derive the QSO luminosity evolution trends in the UV/optical and the X-ray energy bands and demonstrate that their trends are significantly affected by the spectral evolution. Each energy band shows distinct evolution properties. We test one of the widely discussed cosmological evolution scenarios of QSOs, in which QSOs evolve as a single long-lived population, and show that the resulting luminosity functions seen in different energy bands exhibit distinguishable and potentially observable evolution signatures in the X-ray energy bands.

  4. Detecting a unique EBL signature with TeV gamma rays

    OpenAIRE

    Imran, Asif; Krennrich, Frank

    2007-01-01

    We discuss prospects for detecting a spectral break in gamma-ray spectra of blazars due to the extragalactic background light (EBL) density falling off between the near and mid-IR. A measurable spectral change in the TeV spectra at 1 TeV could arise from a rapid or slow drop in the EBL density above ~1 micron. This effect is mediated by the ratio of the near to mid-IR density of EBL. A detection of such a spectral feature could become a clear signature of EBL absorption. A non-detection would...

  5. Spatial-spectral preprocessing for endmember extraction on GPU's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Luis I.; Plaza, Javier; Plaza, Antonio; Li, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Spectral unmixing is focused in the identification of spectrally pure signatures, called endmembers, and their corresponding abundances in each pixel of a hyperspectral image. Mainly focused on the spectral information contained in the hyperspectral images, endmember extraction techniques have recently included spatial information to achieve more accurate results. Several algorithms have been developed for automatic or semi-automatic identification of endmembers using spatial and spectral information, including the spectral-spatial endmember extraction (SSEE) where, within a preprocessing step in the technique, both sources of information are extracted from the hyperspectral image and equally used for this purpose. Previous works have implemented the SSEE technique in four main steps: 1) local eigenvectors calculation in each sub-region in which the original hyperspectral image is divided; 2) computation of the maxima and minima projection of all eigenvectors over the entire hyperspectral image in order to obtain a candidates pixels set; 3) expansion and averaging of the signatures of the candidate set; 4) ranking based on the spectral angle distance (SAD). The result of this method is a list of candidate signatures from which the endmembers can be extracted using various spectral-based techniques, such as orthogonal subspace projection (OSP), vertex component analysis (VCA) or N-FINDR. Considering the large volume of data and the complexity of the calculations, there is a need for efficient implementations. Latest- generation hardware accelerators such as commodity graphics processing units (GPUs) offer a good chance for improving the computational performance in this context. In this paper, we develop two different implementations of the SSEE algorithm using GPUs. Both are based on the eigenvectors computation within each sub-region of the first step, one using the singular value decomposition (SVD) and another one using principal component analysis (PCA). Based

  6. An Improved Proxy Multi-Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Li-ze; ZHANG Sheng; YANG Yi-xian

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Kim-like's proxy multi-signature scheme[1],an improved proxy multi-signature scheme is proposed.The new scheme overcomes the two problems in the Kim-like's proxy multi-signature scheme:(1)Security issue(every original signer can forge a valid proxy multi-signature for any message);(2)Efficiency issue(both the size of the proxy multi-signature and the efficiency of signature checking are dependent on the number of the original signers).

  7. Verifiably Encrypted Signatures Without Random Oracles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang-xue; CHEN Ke-fei; LIU Sheng-li; LI Shi-qun

    2006-01-01

    Verifiably encrypted signatures are employed when a signer wants to sign a message for a verifier but does not want the verifier to possess his signature on the message until some certain requirements of his are satisfied. This paper presented new verifiably encrypted signatures from bilinear pairings. The proposed signatures share the properties of simplicity and efficiency with existing verifiably encrypted signature schemes. To support the proposed scheme, it also exhibited security proofs that do not use random oracle assumption. For existential unforgeability, there exist tight security reductions from the proposed verifiably encrypted signature scheme to a strong but reasonable computational assumption.

  8. High-frequency seafloor acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, D. R; Richardson, M. D

    2007-01-01

    This title provides access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics...

  9. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  10. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  11. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  12. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  13. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  14. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  15. Acoustics of courtyard theatres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiqing

    2008-01-01

    The traditional Chinese theatre was often built with a courtyard. In such open-top space, the absence of a roof would mean little reverberation and non-diffused sound field.Acoustically the situation is quite different from that of any enclosed space. The refore, theclassic room acoustics, such as Sabine reverberation formula, would no longer be applicable due to the lack of sound reflections from the ceiling. As the parameter of reverberation time T30 shows the decay rate only, it would not properly characterize the prominent change in the fine structure of the echogram, particularly in case of a large reduction of reflections during the decay process. The sense of reverbrance in a courtyard space would differ noticeably from that of the equivalent 3D-T30 in an enclosed space. Based upon the characteristic analysis of the sound field in an open-top space, this paper presents a preliminary study on the acoustics of the courtyard theatres.

  16. Epigenetic Signatures of Cigarette Smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Joehanes (Roby); Just, A.C. (Allan C.); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); L.C. Pilling (Luke); L.M. Reynolds (Lindsay); Mandaviya, P.R. (Pooja R.); W. Guan (Weihua); Xu, T. (Tao); C.E. Elks (Cathy); Aslibekyan, S. (Stella); H. Moreno-Macías (Hortensia); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); J. Brody (Jennifer); Dhingra, R. (Radhika); P. Yousefi (Paul); J.S. Pankow (James); Kunze, S. (Sonja); Shah, S.H. (Sonia H.); A.F. McRae (Allan F.); K. Lohman (Kurt); Sha, J. (Jin); D. Absher (Devin); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); Zhao, W. (Wei); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); J. Bressler (Jan); M.L. Grove (Megan); T. Huan (Tianxiao); C. Liu (Chunyu); Mendelson, M.M. (Michael M.); C. Yao (Chen); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); A. Peters (Annette); R. Wang-Sattler (Rui); P.M. Visscher (Peter); N.R. Wray (Naomi); J.M. Starr (John); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); Rodriguez, C.J. (Carlos J.); N.J. Wareham (Nick); Irvin, M.R. (Marguerite R.); Zhi, D. (Degui); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); P. Vineis (Paolo); Ambatipudi, S. (Srikant); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); Schwartz, J. (Joel); Colicino, E. (Elena); Hou, L. (Lifang); Vokonas, P.S. (Pantel S.); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Singleton (Andrew); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); S.T. Turner (Stephen); E.B. Ware (Erin B.); Smith, A.K. (Alicia K.); T. Klengel (Torsten); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth B.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K.D. Taylor (Kent); S.A. Gharib (Sina); Swenson, B.R. (Brenton R.); Liang, L. (Liming); D.L. Demeo (Dawn L.); G.T. O'Connor (George); Z. Herceg (Zdenko); Ressler, K.J. (Kerry J.); K.N. Conneely (Karen N.); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); Kardia, S.L.R. (Sharon L. R.); D. Melzer (David); A.A. Baccarelli (Andrea A.); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); I. Romieu (Isabelle); D.K. Arnett (Donna); Ong, K.K. (Ken K.); Y. Liu (Yongmei); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); M. Fornage (Myriam); D. Levy (Daniel); S.J. London (Stephanie J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground-DNA methylation leaves a long-term signature of smoking exposure and is one potential mechanism by which tobacco exposure predisposes to adverse health outcomes, such as cancers, osteoporosis, lung, and cardiovascular disorders. Methods and Results-To comprehensively determine

  17. Motif signatures of transcribed enhancers

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-09-14

    In mammalian cells, transcribed enhancers (TrEn) play important roles in the initiation of gene expression and maintenance of gene expression levels in spatiotemporal manner. One of the most challenging questions in biology today is how the genomic characteristics of enhancers relate to enhancer activities. This is particularly critical, as several recent studies have linked enhancer sequence motifs to specific functional roles. To date, only a limited number of enhancer sequence characteristics have been investigated, leaving space for exploring the enhancers genomic code in a more systematic way. To address this problem, we developed a novel computational method, TELS, aimed at identifying predictive cell type/tissue specific motif signatures. We used TELS to compile a comprehensive catalog of motif signatures for all known TrEn identified by the FANTOM5 consortium across 112 human primary cells and tissues. Our results confirm that distinct cell type/tissue specific motif signatures characterize TrEn. These signatures allow discriminating successfully a) TrEn from random controls, proxy of non-enhancer activity, and b) cell type/tissue specific TrEn from enhancers expressed and transcribed in different cell types/tissues. TELS codes and datasets are publicly available at http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/TELS.

  18. Graph Signatures for Visual Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Pak C.; Foote, Harlan P.; Chin, George; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.

    2006-11-17

    We present a visual analytics technique to explore graphs using the concept of a data signature. A data signature, in our context, is a multidimensional vector that captures the local topology information surrounding each graph node. Signature vectors extracted from a graph are projected onto a low-dimensional scatterplot through the use of scaling. The resultant scatterplot, which reflects the similarities of the vectors, allows analysts to examine the graph structures and their corresponding real-life interpretations through repeated use of brushing and linking between the two visualizations. The interpretation of the graph structures is based on the outcomes of multiple participatory analysis sessions with intelligence analysts conducted by the authors at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The paper first uses three public domain datasets with either well-known or obvious features to explain the rationale of our design and illustrate its results. More advanced examples are then used in a customized usability study to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach. The study results reveal not only the limitations and weaknesses of the traditional approach based solely on graph visualization but also the advantages and strengths of our signature-guided approach presented in the paper.

  19. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  20. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms...... of descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal “acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO work item. This paper...

  1. Room Acoustical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mechel, Fridolin

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the theory of room acoustical fields and revises the Mirror Source Methods for practical computational use, emphasizing the wave character of acoustical fields.  The presented higher methods include the concepts of “Mirror Point Sources” and “Corner sources which allow for an excellent approximation of complex room geometries and even equipped rooms. In contrast to classical description, this book extends the theory of sound fields describing them by their complex sound pressure and the particle velocity. This approach enables accurate descriptions of interference and absorption phenomena.

  2. Acoustic black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, M

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in a moving fluid provides a conceptually clean and powerful analogy for understanding black hole physics. As a teaching tool, the analogy is useful for introducing students to both General Relativity and fluid mechanics. As a research tool, the analogy helps clarify what aspects of the physics are kinematics and what aspects are dynamics. In particular, Hawking radiation is a purely kinematical effect, whereas black hole entropy is intrinsically dynamical. Finally, I discuss the fact that with present technology acoustic Hawking radiation is almost experimentally testable.

  3. Dynamic Range Adaptation to Spectral Stimulus Statistics in Human Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Nadine; Obleser, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Classically, neural adaptation refers to a reduction in response magnitude by sustained stimulation. In human electroencephalography (EEG), neural adaptation has been measured, for example, as frequency-specific response decrease by previous stimulation. Only recently and mainly based on animal studies, it has been suggested that statistical properties in the stimulation lead to adjustments of neural sensitivity and affect neural response adaptation. However, it is thus far unresolved which statistical parameters in the acoustic stimulation spectrum affect frequency-specific neural adaptation, and on which time scales the effects take place. The present human EEG study investigated the potential influence of the overall spectral range as well as the spectral spacing of the acoustic stimulation spectrum on frequency-specific neural adaptation. Tones randomly varying in frequency were presented passively and computational modeling of frequency-specific neural adaptation was used. Frequency-specific adaptation was observed for all presentation conditions. Critically, however, the spread of adaptation (i.e., degree of coadaptation) in tonotopically organized regions of auditory cortex changed with the spectral range of the acoustic stimulation. In contrast, spectral spacing did not affect the spread of frequency-specific adaptation. Therefore, changes in neural sensitivity in auditory cortex are directly coupled to the overall spectral range of the acoustic stimulation, which suggests that neural adjustments to spectral stimulus statistics occur over a time scale of multiple seconds. PMID:24381293

  4. Compressive Spectral Renormalization Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel numerical scheme for finding the sparse self-localized states of a nonlinear system of equations with missing spectral data is introduced. As in the Petviashivili's and the spectral renormalization method, the governing equation is transformed into Fourier domain, but the iterations are performed for far fewer number of spectral components (M) than classical versions of the these methods with higher number of spectral components (N). After the converge criteria is achieved for M components, N component signal is reconstructed from M components by using the l1 minimization technique of the compressive sampling. This method can be named as compressive spectral renormalization (CSRM) method. The main advantage of the CSRM is that, it is capable of finding the sparse self-localized states of the evolution equation(s) with many spectral data missing.

  5. Experimental verification of the Kramers-Kronig relationship for acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C C; Lahham, M; Martin, B G

    1990-01-01

    A spectral technique for effectively and accurately measuring acoustic attenuation over a wide frequency range is reported. The spectral technique for phase measurement developed by W. Sachse and Y.H. Pao (1978) was used to determine the acoustic dispersion. For acoustic waves, a very simple and useful Kramers-Kronig relationship was previously derived by M. O'Donnell, E.T. Jaynes, and J.G. Miller (1981). The attenuation was calculated, using this relationship, from the measured dispersion and then compared with the attenuation that was measured independently. Dispersion was deduced from the measured attenuation and compared with the measured dispersion. The results of two highly attenuative specimens are presented. The agreement between the calculated attenuation and measured attenuation is excellent. The deduced dispersion also agrees well with the measured one. This agreement verifies the simple Kramers-Kronig relationship used. It further shows the accuracy of the spectral techniques for attenuation and dispersion measurements over a wide frequency range.

  6. Signatures of collective and matter effects on supernova neutrinos at large detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, Sandhya; Dighe, Amol; Mirizzi, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the expected galactic supernova neutrino signal at large next-generation underground detectors. At different epochs after the explosion, the primary fluxes can be quite different. For these primary neutrino fluxes, spectral splits induced by collective neutrino flavor transformations can arise for either mass hierarchy in both neutrino and antineutrino channels. We classify flux models according to the nature and number of these splits, and calculate the observable electron-neutrino and electron-antineutrino spectra at Earth, taking into account subsequent matter effects. We find that some of the spectral splits could occur sufficiently close to the peak energies to produce significant distortions in the observable SN neutrino signal. The most striking signature of this effect would be presence of peculiar energy dependent modulations associated with Earth matter crossing, present only in portions of the SN neutrino energy spectra demarcated by spectral splits. These signatures at proposed large ...

  7. The other spectral flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Gato-Rivera, Beatriz; Rosado, Jose Ignacio

    1995-01-01

    Recently we showed that the spectral flow acting on the N=2 twisted topological theories gives rise to a topological algebra automorphism. Here we point out that the untwisting of that automorphism leads to a spectral flow on the untwisted N=2 superconformal algebra which is different from the usual one. This "other" spectral flow does not interpolate between the chiral ring and the antichiral ring. In particular, it maps the chiral ring into the chiral ring and the antichiral ring into the antichiral ring. We discuss the similarities and differences between both spectral flows. We also analyze their action on null states.

  8. Spectral Correlation of Multicarrier Modulated Signals and Its Application for Signal Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijian; Le Ruyet (Eurasipmember), Didier; Terré, Michel

    2009-12-01

    Spectral correlation theory for cyclostationary time-series signals has been studied for decades. Explicit formulas of spectral correlation function for various types of analog-modulated and digital-modulated signals are already derived. In this paper, we investigate and exploit the cyclostationarity characteristics for two kinds of multicarrier modulated (MCM) signals: conventional OFDM and filter bank based multicarrier (FBMC) signals. The spectral correlation characterization of MCM signal can be described by a special linear periodic time-variant (LPTV) system. Using this LPTV description, we have derived the explicit theoretical formulas of nonconjugate and conjugate cyclic autocorrelation function (CAF) and spectral correlation function (SCF) for OFDM and FBMC signals. According to theoretical spectral analysis, Cyclostationary Signatures (CS) are artificially embedded into MCM signal and a low-complexity signature detector is, therefore, presented for detecting MCM signal. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of this CS detector compared to traditionary energy detector.

  9. Spectral Correlation of Multicarrier Modulated Signals and Its Application for Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Haijian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectral correlation theory for cyclostationary time-series signals has been studied for decades. Explicit formulas of spectral correlation function for various types of analog-modulated and digital-modulated signals are already derived. In this paper, we investigate and exploit the cyclostationarity characteristics for two kinds of multicarrier modulated (MCM signals: conventional OFDM and filter bank based multicarrier (FBMC signals. The spectral correlation characterization of MCM signal can be described by a special linear periodic time-variant (LPTV system. Using this LPTV description, we have derived the explicit theoretical formulas of nonconjugate and conjugate cyclic autocorrelation function (CAF and spectral correlation function (SCF for OFDM and FBMC signals. According to theoretical spectral analysis, Cyclostationary Signatures (CS are artificially embedded into MCM signal and a low-complexity signature detector is, therefore, presented for detecting MCM signal. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of this CS detector compared to traditionary energy detector.

  10. Elliptic Curve Blind Digital Signature Schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOULin; YANGYixian; WENQiaoyan

    2003-01-01

    Blind signature schemes are important cryptographic protocols in guaranteeing the privacy or anonymity of the users.Three new blind signature schemes and their corresponding generalizations are pro-posed. Moreover, their securities are simply analyzed.

  11. Characteristics Analysis of Joint Acoustic Echo and Noise Suppression in Periodic Drillstring Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of wireless data telemetry used by oil industry uses compressional acoustic waves to transmit downhole information from the bottom hole to the surface. Unfortunately, acoustic echoes and drilling vibration noises in periodic drillstring are a major issue in transmission performance. A combined acoustic echo and noise suppression method based on wave motion characteristic in drillstring is adopted to enhance an upward-going transmitted acoustic signal. The presented scheme consists of a primary acoustic echo canceller using an array of two accelerometers for dealing with the downward-going noises and a secondary acoustic insulation structure for restraining the upward-going vibration noises. Furthermore, the secondary acoustic insulation structure exhibits a banded and dispersive spectral structure because of periodic groove configuration. By using a finite-differential algorithm for the one-dimensional propagation of longitudinal waves, acoustic receiving characteristics of transmitted signals are simulated with additive Gaussian noise in a periodic pipe structure of limited length to investigate the effects on transmission performance optimization. The results reveal that the proposed scheme can achieve a much lower error bit ratio over a specified acoustic isolation frequency range with a 30–40 dB reduction in the average noise level compared to traditional single-receiver scheme.

  12. Broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission through an acoustic prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ailing; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xi, Yanhui

    2017-08-01

    Narrow bandwidth and complex structure are the main shortcomings of the existing asymmetric acoustic transmission devices. In this letter, a simple broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device is proposed by using an acoustic prism filled with xenon gas. The sound pressure field distributions, the transmission spectra, and the prism angle effect are numerically investigated by using finite element method. The proposed device can always realize asymmetric acoustic transmission for the wave frequency larger than 480 Hz because the wave paths are not influenced by the wave frequencies. The asymmetric acoustic transmission is attributed to normal refraction and total reflection occur at different interfaces. Besides, relatively high transmission efficiency is realized due to the similar impedance between the acoustic prism and background. And the transmitted wave direction can be controlled freely by changing the prism angle. Our design provides a simple method to obtain broadband asymmetric acoustic transmission device and has potentials in many applications, such as noise control and medical ultrasound.

  13. Distributed acoustic sensing for pipeline monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, David; McEwen-King, Magnus [OptaSense, QinetiQ Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Optical fibre is deployed widely across the oil and gas industry. As well as being deployed regularly to provide high bandwidth telecommunications and infrastructure for SCADA it is increasingly being used to sense pressure, temperature and strain along buried pipelines, on subsea pipelines and downhole. In this paper we present results from the latest sensing capability using standard optical fibre to detect acoustic signals along the entire length of a pipeline. In Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fibre is used for both sensing and telemetry. In this paper we present results from the OptaSense{sup TM} system which has been used to detect third party intervention (TPI) along buried pipelines. In a typical deployment the system is connected to an existing standard single-mode fibre, up to 50km in length, and was used to independently listen to the acoustic / seismic activity at every 10 meter interval. We will show that through the use of advanced array processing of the independent, simultaneously sampled channels it is possible to detect and locate activity within the vicinity of the pipeline and through sophisticated acoustic signal processing to obtain the acoustic signature to classify the type of activity. By combining spare fibre capacity in existing buried fibre optic cables; processing and display techniques commonly found in sonar; and state-of-the-art in fibre-optic distributed acoustic sensing, we will describe the new monitoring capabilities that are available to the pipeline operator. Without the expense of retrofitting sensors to the pipeline, this technology can provide a high performance, rapidly deployable and cost effective method of providing gapless and persistent monitoring of a pipeline. We will show how this approach can be used to detect, classify and locate activity such as; third party interference (including activity indicative of illegal hot tapping); real time tracking of pigs; and leak detection. We will also show how an

  14. Observational signatures of anisotropic inflationary models

    CERN Document Server

    Ohashi, Junko; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    We study observational signatures of two classes of anisotropic inflationary models in which an inflaton field couples to (i) a vector kinetic term F_{mu nu}F^{mu nu} and (ii) a two-form kinetic term H_{mu nu lambda}H^{mu nu lambda}. We compute the corrections from the anisotropic sources to the power spectrum of gravitational waves as well as the two-point cross correlation between scalar and tensor perturbations. The signs of the anisotropic parameter g_* are different depending on the vector and the two-form models, but the statistical anisotropies generally lead to a suppressed tensor-to-scalar ratio r and a smaller scalar spectral index n_s in both models. In the light of the recent Planck bounds of n_s and r, we place observational constraints on several different inflaton potentials such as those in chaotic and natural inflation in the presence of anisotropic interactions. In the two-form model we also find that there is no cross correlation between scalar and tensor perturbations, while in the vector ...

  15. Modelling Perception of Structure and Affect in Music: Spectral Centroid and Wishart's Red Bird

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Roger T.; Freya Bailes

    2011-01-01

    Pearce (2011) provides a positive and interesting response to our article on time series analysis of the influences of acoustic properties on real-time perception of structure and affect in a section of Trevor Wishart’s Red Bird (Dean & Bailes, 2010). We address the following topics raised in the response and our paper. First, we analyse in depth the possible influence of spectral centroid, a timbral feature of the acoustic stream distinct from the high level general parameter we used initial...

  16. Partially Blind Signatures Based on Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Niu, Hui-Fang

    2012-12-01

    In a partially blind signature scheme, the signer explicitly includes pre-agreed common information in the blind signature, which can improve the availability and performance. We present a new partially blind signature scheme based on fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyze the security of this scheme, and show it is not possible to forge valid partially blind signatures. Moreover, the comparisons between this scheme and those based on public-key cryptography are also discussed.

  17. Quantum group blind signature scheme without entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Huang, Liusheng; Yang, Wei; He, Libao

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we propose a quantum group blind signature scheme designed for distributed e-voting system. Our scheme combines the properties of group signature and blind signature to provide anonymity of voters in an e-voting system. The unconditional security of our scheme is ensured by quantum mechanics. Without employing entanglement, the proposed scheme is easier to be realized comparing with other quantum signature schemes.

  18. Blind Signature Scheme Based on Chebyshev Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheswara Rao Valluri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A blind signature scheme is a cryptographic protocol to obtain a valid signature for a message from a signer such that signer’s view of the protocol can’t be linked to the resulting message signature pair. This paper presents blind signature scheme using Chebyshev polynomials. The security of the given scheme depends upon the intractability of the integer factorization problem and discrete logarithms ofChebyshev polynomials.

  19. Blind Signature Scheme Based on Chebyshev Polynomials

    OpenAIRE

    Maheswara Rao Valluri

    2011-01-01

    A blind signature scheme is a cryptographic protocol to obtain a valid signature for a message from a signer such that signer’s view of the protocol can’t be linked to the resulting message signature pair. This paper presents blind signature scheme using Chebyshev polynomials. The security of the given scheme depends upon the intractability of the integer factorization problem and discrete logarithms ofChebyshev polynomials.

  20. Post-quantum signatures for today

    OpenAIRE

    Dahmen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Digital signatures are essential for the security of computer networks such as the Internet. For example, digital signatures are widely used to ensure the authenticity and integrity of updates for operating systems and other software applications. The security of the few practically used signature schemes is threatened by quantum computers. When large quantum computers are built, all currently used signature schemes will become insecure. It is therefore of extreme importance to develop altern...