WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic nuclear magnetic resonance

  1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  2. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  3. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic neuroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Murata, Hideaki; Ito, Haruhide; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kadoya, Masumi; Suzuki, Masayuki.

    1989-03-01

    Thirteen patients with acoustic neuroma were studied on a 1.5T superconductive magnetic resonance (MR) imager. Acoustic neuromas appeared as lower signal intensity than the surrounding brain stem on T1 weighted image (W.I.), and as higher signal intensity on T2 W.I.. Axial and coronal sections of T1 W.I. were very useful in observing the tumor in the auditory canal and in investigating the anatomical relations of the tumor and the surrounding structures. MR imaging is very excellent examination to make early diagnosis of the acoustic neuroma and preoperative anatomical evaluation.

  5. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  6. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging.

  7. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  8. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  10. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Ledbetter, Micah; Theis, Thomas; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectr...

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  12. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Ledbetter, Micah; Blanchard, John; Ring, Hattie; Ganssle, Paul; Appelt, Stephan; Bluemich, Bernhard; Pines, Alex; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near-zero-field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J-coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high field case, where heteronuclear J-couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with non-trivial spectra.

  13. Near-zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, M P; Theis, T; Blanchard, J W; Ring, H; Ganssle, P; Appelt, S; Blümich, B; Pines, A; Budker, D

    2011-09-02

    We investigate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in near zero field, where the Zeeman interaction can be treated as a perturbation to the electron mediated scalar interaction (J coupling). This is in stark contrast to the high-field case, where heteronuclear J couplings are normally treated as a small perturbation. We show that the presence of very small magnetic fields results in splitting of the zero-field NMR lines, imparting considerable additional information to the pure zero-field spectra. Experimental results are in good agreement with first-order perturbation theory and with full numerical simulation when perturbation theory breaks down. We present simple rules for understanding the splitting patterns in near-zero-field NMR, which can be applied to molecules with nontrivial spectra.

  14. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Tomimatsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance involving quantum Hall states (QHSs was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  15. Experiments in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong; Lu, Wei; Choi, J.-H.; Chia, H. J.; Mirsaidov, U. M.; Guchhait, S.; Cambou, A. D.; Cardenas, R.; Park, K.; Markert, J. T.

    2006-03-01

    We report our group's effort in the construction of an 8-T, ^3 He cryostat based nuclear magnetic resonance force microscope (NMRFM). The probe has two independent 3-D of piezoelectric x-y-z positioners for precise positioning of a fiber optic interferometer and a sample/gradient-producing magnet with respect to a micro-cantilever. The piezoelectric positioners have a very uniform controllable step size with virtually no backlash. A novel RF tuning circuit board design is implemented which allows us to simply swap out one RF component board with another for experiments involving different nuclear species. We successfully fabricated and are characterizing 50μm x50μm x0.2μm double torsional oscillators. We have also been characterizing ultrasoft cantilevers whose spring constant is on the order of 10-4 N/m. We also report NMRFM data for ammonium dihydrogen phosphate(ADP) at room temperature using our 1.2-T system. Observed features include the correct shift of the NMR peak with carrier frequency, increases in signal amplitude with both RF field strength and frequency modulation amplitude, and signal oscillation (spin nutation) as a function of tipping RF pulse length. Experiments in progress on NH4MgF3 (at 1.2 T) and MgB2 (at 8.1 T) will also be briefly reviewed. Robert A. Welch Foundation grant No.F-1191 and the National Science Foundation grant No. DMR-0210383.

  16. Quantum information processing and nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Cummins, H K

    2001-01-01

    as spectrometer pulse sequence programs. Quantum computers are information processing devices which operate by and exploit the laws of quantum mechanics, potentially allowing them to solve problems which are intractable using classical computers. This dissertation considers the practical issues involved in one of the more successful implementations to date, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Techniques for dealing with systematic errors are presented, and a quantum protocol is implemented. Chapter 1 is a brief introduction to quantum computation. The physical basis of its efficiency and issues involved in its implementation are discussed. NMR quantum information processing is reviewed in more detail in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 considers some of the errors that may be introduced in the process of implementing an algorithm, and high-level ways of reducing the impact of these errors by using composite rotations. Novel general expressions for stabilising composite rotations are presented in Chapter 4 and a new class o...

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  18. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keevil, Stephen F [Department of Medical Physics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Guy' s Hospital, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London, Guy' s Campus, London, SE1 9RT (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  19. Resonantly detecting axion-mediated forces with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2014-10-17

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 10(9) and 10(12) GeV or axion masses between 10(-6) and 10(-3) eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  20. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Ph.D., Jorge O.

    2002-06-10

    The objective of the project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This will be accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging were linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of cores and theoretical modeling.

  1. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES OF URANOCENES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Wayne D.; Streitwieser, Jr., Andrew

    1979-12-01

    In the past several years a substantial amount of work has been devoted toward evaluation of the contact and pseudocontact contributions to the observed isotropic shifts in H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of uranium(IV) organometallic compounds. One reason for interest in this area arises from using the presence of contact shifts as a prcbe for covalent character in the uranium carbon bonds in these compounds. Several extensive {sup 1}H NNR studies on Cp{sub 3} U-X compounds and less extensive studies on uranocenes have been reported. Interpretation of these results suggests that contact shifts-contribute significantly to the observed isotropic shifts. Their presence has been taken as indicative of covalent character of metal carbon bonds in these systems, but agreement is not complete. In this paper we shall review critically the work reported on uranocenes in the light of recent results and report recent work on attempted separation of the observed isotropic shifts in alkyluranocenes into contact and pseudocontact components.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, P.N.L.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measure

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C9H11ITe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance data of C10H13ITe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhova, B. M.

    This document is part of Part 6 `Organic Metalloid Compounds' of Subvolume D 'Chemical Shifts and Coupling Constants for Carbon-13' of Landolt-Börnstein III/35 'Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data', Group III 'Condensed Matter'.

  5. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of acoustic streaming: absorption coefficient and acoustic field shape estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madelin, Guillaume; Grucker, Daniel; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudiere, Eric

    2006-07-01

    In this study, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to visualize acoustic streaming in liquids. A single-shot spin echo sequence (HASTE) with a saturation band perpendicular to the acoustic beam permits the acquisition of an instantaneous image of the flow due to the application of ultrasound. An average acoustic streaming velocity can be estimated from the MR images, from which the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and the bulk viscosity of different glycerol-water mixtures can be deduced. In the same way, this MRI method could be used to assess the acoustic field and time-average power of ultrasonic transducers in water (or other liquids with known physical properties), after calibration of a geometrical parameter that is dependent on the experimental setup.

  7. Implementation of Quantum Logic Gates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jiang-Feng; WU Ji-Hui; SHI Ming-Jun; HAN Liang; ZHOU Xian-Yi; YE Bang-Jiao; WENG Hui-Ming; HAN Rong-Dian

    2000-01-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques with a solution of cytosine molecules, we show an implementation of certain quantum logic gates (including NOT gate, square-root of NOT gate and controlled-NOT gate), which have central importance in quantum computing. In addition, experimental results show that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can efficiently measure the result of quantum computing without attendant wave-function collapse.

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-01

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  9. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  10. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S

    2005-10-04

    This report reviews progress made on NA22 project LL251DP to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We have met all milestones and deliverables for FY05, as shown in Table 1. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begin to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. The results obtained in FY05 further support the feasibility of successful demonstration of an NAR experiment for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs.

  11. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  12. Pulse Design in Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palani, Ravi Shankar

    2017-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation is centred on the theory of experimental methods in solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which deals with interaction of electromagnetic radiation with nuclei in a magnetic field and possessing a fundamental quantum mechanical property...

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems.

  14. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Thomas; Ganssle, Paul; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnet...

  15. Realization of a Quantum Scheduling Algorithm Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Fu; DENG Zhi-Wei; PAN Yan-Na; LU Zhi-Heng

    2004-01-01

    The quantum scheduling algorithm proposed by Grover is generalized to extend its scope of applications. The generalized algorithm proposed here is realized on a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer. The experimental results show that the generalized algorithm can work efficiently in the case that Grover's scheduling algorithm is completely invalid, and represent the quantum advantages when qubits replace classical bits.

  16. C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance in organic geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, B.; Wilson, D. M.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Study of C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of polycyclic fused systems. The fingerprint qualities of the natural abundance in C-13 NMR spectra permitting unequivocal identification of these compounds is discussed. The principle of structural additivity of C-13 NMR information is exemplified on alpha and beta androstanes, alpha and beta cholestanes, ergostanes, sitostanes, and isodecanes.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  18. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Ternary Phase Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Jennifer K.; Terrance, Jacob C.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in which the ternary phase diagram of water, 1-propanol and n-heptane is measured using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The experiment builds upon basic concepts of NMR spectral analysis, typically taught in the undergraduate…

  19. NMR of TMV. Nuclear magnetic resonance of tobacco mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de J.L.

    1978-01-01

    This Thesis describes the application of conventional 13 C and 1 H high resolution Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic resonance (HR FT NMR) to Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) and its protein oligo- and polymers and some other largebiological systems. The rod-like (TMV) consists of 2

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water motion in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Thesis treats one of the new techniques in plant science i.e. nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRi) applied to water motion in plants. It is a challenge, however, to measure this motion in intact plants quantitatively, because plants impose specific problems when studied using NMRi. At high

  1. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  2. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  3. Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.; Zilm, K.; Pines, A.

    1983-01-01

    In polycrystalline samples, NMR "powder spectra" are broad and much structural information is lost as a result of the orientational disorder. In this Letter Fourier-transform NMR in zero magnetic field is described. With no preferred direction in space, all crystallites contribute equivalently and resolved dipolar splittings can be interpreted directly in terms of internuclear distances. This opens the possiblity of molecular structure determination without the need for single crystals or ori...

  4. Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.; Zilm, K.; Pines, A.

    1983-05-30

    In polycrystalline samples, NMR ''powder spectra'' are broad and much structural information is lost as a result of the orientational disorder. In this Letter Fourier transform NMR in zero magnetic field is described. With no preferred direction in space, all crystallites contribute equivalently and resolved dipolar splittings can be interpreted directly in terms of internuclear distances. This opens the possibility of molecular structure determination without the need for single crystals or oriented samples.

  5. Advances in Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Theis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In the course of the last century, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has become a powerful and ubiquitous analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. Traditionally, the great analytical power of NMR comes at the cost of mobility and large expenses for cryogenic cooling. This thesis presents how zero-field NMR detected with an atomic magnetometer is emerging as a new, potentially portable and cost-effective modality of NMR with the ability of providing ...

  6. Demonstration of Quantum Entanglement Control Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jing-Yi; ZHANG Jing-Fu; DENG Zhi-Wei; LU Zhi-Heng

    2004-01-01

    @@ With the two forms of the quantum entanglement control, the quantum entanglement swapping and preservation are demonstrated in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer. The pseudopure state is prepared to represent the quantum entangled states through macroscopic signals. Entanglement swapping is directly realized by a swap operation. By controlling the interactions between the system and its environment,we can preserve an initial entangled state for a longer time. The experimental results are in agreement with the experiment.

  7. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein Pourmodheji; Ebrahim Ghafar-Zadeh; Sebastian Magierowski

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelera...

  8. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance studies of the stripes materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, H.-J., E-mail: h.grafe@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Solid State Research, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic and Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) is a powerful tool to probe electronic inhomogeneities in correlated electron systems. Its local character allows for probing different environments due to spin density modulations or inhomogeneous doping distributions emerging from the correlations in these systems. In fact, NMR/NQR is not only sensitive to magnetic properties through interaction of the nuclear spin, but also allows to probe the symmetry of the charge distribution and its homogeneity, as well as structural modulations, through sensitivity to the electric field gradient (EFG). We review the results of NMR and NQR in the cuprates from intrinsic spatial variations of the hole concentration in the normal state to stripe order at low temperatures, thereby keeping in mind the influence of doping induced disorder and inhomogeneities. Finally, we briefly discuss NQR evidence for local electronic inhomogeneities in the recently discovered iron pnictides, suggesting that electronic inhomogeneities are a common feature of correlated electron systems.

  9. Capacitor-based detection of nuclear magnetization: nuclear quadrupole resonance of surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorovič, Alan; Apih, Tomaž; Kvasić, Ivan; Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko; Strle, Drago; Muševič, Igor

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate excitation and detection of nuclear magnetization in a nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) experiment with a parallel plate capacitor, where the sample is located between the two capacitor plates and not in a coil as usually. While the sensitivity of this capacitor-based detection is found lower compared to an optimal coil-based detection of the same amount of sample, it becomes comparable in the case of very thin samples and even advantageous in the proximity of conducting bodies. This capacitor-based setup may find its application in acquisition of NQR signals from the surface layers on conducting bodies or in a portable tightly integrated nuclear magnetic resonance sensor.

  10. Unconventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques using nanostructured diamond surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Victor; Jarmola, Andrey; Budker, Dmitry; Santori, Charles; Huang, Zhihong; Beausoleil, Raymond

    2014-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies rely on obtaining high nuclear magnetization, motivating low operating temperatures and high magnetic fields. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques traditionally require another superconducting magnet and THz optics. We seek to use chip-scale devices to polarize nuclei in liquids at room temperature. The technique relies on optical pumping of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers and subsequent transfer of polarization to nuclei via hyperfine interaction, spin diffusion, and heteronuclear polarization transfer. We expect efficient polarization transfer will be realized by maximizing the diamond surface area. We have fabricated densely-packed (50 % packing fraction), high-aspect-ratio (10+) nanopillars over mm2 regions of the diamond surface. Pillars designed to have a few-hundred-nanometer diameter act as optical antennas, reducing saturation intensity. We also report progress in using nanopillar arrays as sensitive optical detectors of nano-scale NMR by measuring NV center Zeeman shifts produced by nearby external nuclei. The enhanced surface area increases the effective density of NV centers which couple to external nuclei. Combining these techniques may enable, e.g., identification of trace analytes and molecular imaging.

  11. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  12. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Theis, Thomas; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared to conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated via parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP), enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H J-couplings in compounds with 13C in natural abundance in a single transient. The resulting spectra display distinct features that have straightforward interpretation and can be...

  13. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  14. Implementation of Quantum Private Queries Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chuan; HAO Liang; ZHAO Lian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a modified protocol for the realization of a quantum private query process on a classical database.Using one-qubit query and CNOT operation,the query process can be realized in a two-mode database.In the query process,the data privacy is preserved as the sender would not reveal any information about the database besides her query information,and the database provider cannot retain any information about the query.We implement the quantum private query protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system.The density matrix of the memory registers are constructed.

  15. Random matrix theory in biological nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacelle, S

    1984-01-01

    The statistical theory of energy levels or random matrix theory is presented in the context of the analysis of chemical shifts of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of large biological systems. Distribution functions for the spacing between nearest-neighbor energy levels are discussed for uncorrelated, correlated, and random superposition of correlated energy levels. Application of this approach to the NMR spectra of a vitamin, an antibiotic, and a protein demonstrates the state of correlation of an ensemble of energy levels that characterizes each system. The detection of coherent and dissipative structures in proteins becomes feasible with this statistical spectroscopic technique. PMID:6478032

  16. Applications of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Sensors to Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Proietti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  17. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance sensors to cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Noemi; Capitani, Donatella; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2014-04-21

    In recent years nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have been increasingly applied to investigate, characterize and monitor objects of cultural heritage interest. NMR is not confined to a few specific applications, but rather its use can be successfully extended to a wide number of different cultural heritage issues. A breakthrough has surely been the recent development of portable NMR sensors which can be applied in situ for non-destructive and non-invasive investigations. In this paper three studies illustrating the potential of NMR sensors in this field of research are reported.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based quantification of organic diphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenevich, Stepan; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-01-15

    Phosphorylated compounds are ubiquitous in life. Given their central role, many such substrates and analogs have been prepared for subsequent evaluation. Prior to biological experiments, it is typically necessary to determine the concentration of the target molecule in solution. Here we describe a method where concentrations of stock solutions of organic diphosphates and bisphosphonates are quantified using (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy with standard instrumentation using a capillary tube with a secondary standard. The method is specific and is applicable down to a concentration of 200 μM. The capillary tube provides the reference peak for quantification and deuterated solvent for locking.

  19. Dynamic nuclear polarization and nuclear magnetic resonance in the simplest pseudospin quantum Hall ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. W.; Yang, K. F.; Mishima, T. D.; Santos, M. B.; Hirayama, Y.

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in the simplest pseudospin quantum Hall ferromagnet (QHF) of an InSb two-dimensional electron gas with a large g factor using tilted magnetic fields. The DNP-induced amplitude change in a resistance spike of the QHF at large current enables observation of the resistively detected nuclear magnetic resonance of the high nuclear spin isotope I115n with nine quadrupole splittings. Our results demonstrate the importance of domain structures in the DNP process. The nuclear spin relaxation time T1 in this QHF was relatively short (˜120s) and almost temperature independent.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Li-ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ohno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging has high sensitivity to proton (1H and lithium (7Li. It is a useful measurement for electrolyte in Li-ion battery. 1H NMR images of lithium ion battery which is composed of LiMn2O4 / LiClO4 + propylene carbonate (PC / Li-metal have been studied. 1H NMR images of electrolyte near cathode material (LiMn2O4 showed anomalous intensity distribution, which was quite inhomogeneous. From NMR images as a function of repetition time (TR, it was concluded that the anomalous intensity distribution was not due to change of relaxation time but an indirect (spatial para-magnetization effect from cathode material. The paramagnetization induced by high magnetic field distorts linearity of magnetic gradient field, leading to apparent intensity variance. This functional image is an easy diagnostic measurement for magnetization of cathode material, which allows the possibility to check uniformity of cathode material and change of magnetization under electrochemical process.

  1. Single crystal nuclear magnetic resonance in spinning powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Andrew J.; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon

    2011-10-01

    We present a method for selectively exciting nuclear magnetic resonances (NMRs) from well-defined subsets of crystallites from a powdered sample under magic angle spinning. Magic angle spinning induces a time dependence in the anisotropic interactions, which results in a time variation of the resonance frequencies which is different for different crystallite orientations. The proposed method exploits this by applying selective pulses, which we refer to as XS (for crystallite-selective) pulses, that follow the resonance frequencies of nuclear species within particular crystallites, resulting in the induced flip angle being orientation dependent. By selecting the radiofrequency field to deliver a 180 ○ pulse for the target orientation and employing a train of such pulses combined with cogwheel phase cycling, we obtain a high degree of orientational selectivity with the resulting spectrum containing only contributions from orientations close to the target. Typically, this leads to the selection of between 0.1% and 10% of the crystallites, and in extreme cases to the excitation of a single orientation resulting in single crystal spectra of spinning powders. Two formulations of this method are described and demonstrated with experimental examples on [1 - 13C]-alanine and the paramagnetic compound Sm2Sn2O7.

  2. 11B nuclear magnetic resonance in boron-doped diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwa Murakami, Tadashi Shimizu, Masataka Tansho and Yoshihiko Takano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent results obtained by 11B solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR on boron-doped diamond, grown by the high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT or chemical vapor deposition techniques. Simple single-pulse experiments as well as advanced two-dimensional NMR experiments were applied to the boron sites in diamond. It is shown that magic-angle spinning at magnetic fields above 10 T is suitable for observation of high-resolution 11B spectra of boron-doped diamond. For boron-doped HPHT diamonds, the existence of the excess boron that does not contribute to electrical conductivity was confirmed and its 11B NMR signal was characterized. The point-defect structures (B+H complexes and -B-B-/-B-C-B- clusters, postulated previously for the excess boron, were discarded and graphite-like structures were assigned instead.

  3. Developing hyperpolarized krypton-83 for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.

    This dissertation discusses the production of highly nonequilibrium nuclear spin polarization, referred to as hyperpolarization or hp, in the nuclear spin I = 9/2 noble gas isotope krypton-83 using spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP). This nonequilibrium polarization yields nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that are enhanced three or more orders of magnitude above those of thermally polarized krypton and enables experiments that would otherwise be impossible. Krypton-83 possesses a nuclear electric quadrupole moment that dominates the longitudinal (T1) relaxation due to coupling of the quadrupole moment to fluctuating electric field gradients generated by distortions to the spherical symmetry of the electronic environment. Relaxation slows polarization buildup and limits the maximum signal intensity but makes krypton-83 a sensitive probe of its environment. The gas-phase krypton-83 longitudinal relaxation rate increases linearly with total gas density due to binary collisions. Density independent relaxation, caused by the formation of krypton-krypton van der Waals molecules and surface adsorption, also contributes to the observed rate. Buffer gases suppress van der Waals molecule mediated relaxation by breaking apart the weakly bound krypton dimers. Surface relaxation is gas composition independent and therefore more difficult to suppress. However, this relaxation mechanism makes hp krypton-83 sensitive to important surface properties including surface-to-volume ratio, surface chemistry, and surface temperature. The presence of surfaces with high krypton adsorption affinities (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces) accelerates the relaxation times and can produce T1 contrast in hp krypton-83 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tobacco smoke deposited on surfaces generates strong T1 contrast allowing the observation of smoke deposition with spatial resolution. Conversely, water adsorption on surfaces significantly lengths the T1 times due competitive surface adsorption

  4. DC SQUID Spectrometers for Nuclear Quadrupole and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TonThat, Dinh M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUJD) is a very sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order of 1 μΦ0Hz-1/2 at liquid helium temperature (Φ0=h/2e). This inherent flux sensitivity of the SQUID is used in a spectrometer for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR.)and nuclear quadruple resonance (NQR). The processing magnetic field from the nuclear spins is coupled to the SQUID by mean of a flux transformer. The SQUID NMR spectrometer is used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time T1 of solid 129Xe at 4.2 K down to 0.1 mT.

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  6. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance metabolite profiling in plant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terskikh, Victor; Kermode, Allison R

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been successfully applied to profile a variety of primary and secondary metabolites in whole intact plant seeds in vivo. The nondestructive nature of NMR spectroscopy allows direct metabolic studies to be performed on the same seed throughout a given physio-logical process or key lifecycle transition, such as dormancy breakage, germination, and early postgerminative growth. Multinuclear NMR is capable of evaluating seed quality by assessing nondestructively nutrient reserves and seed protectants at seed maturity and to further monitor reserve mobilization following germination, which is critical for seedling emergence. In this chapter, we illustrate the use of several in vivo NMR techniques for metabolite profiling in seeds. Importantly, some of these methods have potential for the screening of single seeds or seed populations to identify seedlots with compromised viability either due to developmental problems or as a result of deterioration during prolonged storage.

  7. Explosives Detection Using Magnetic and Nuclear Resonance Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Fraissard, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) a highly promising new technique for bulk explosives detection: relatively inexpensive, more compact than NMR, but with considerable selectivity. Since the NQR frequency is insensitive to long-range variations in composition, mixing explosives with other materials, such as the plasticizers in plastic explosives, makes no difference. The NQR signal strength varies linearly with the amount of explosive, and is independent of its distribution within the volume monitored. NQR spots explosive types in configurations missed by the X-ray imaging method. But if NQR is so good, why it is not used everywhere? Its main limitation is the low signal-to-noise ratio, particularly with the radio-frequency interference that exists in a field environment, NQR polarization being much weaker than that from an external magnetic field. The distinctive signatures are there, but are difficult to extract from the noise. In addition, the high selectivity is partly a disadvantage, as it is hard to bui...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwey, B.; Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.

    1985-12-01

    170 patients with suspected lesions of the cervical part of the medulla were examined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography. 27 cases revealed no pathological changes in the regions of the cervical medulla, the cervical canal and of the cervical spine. 143 cases produced pathological findings whose diagnoses determined therapeutical approach. Verified pathological changes comprised anomalies of the cranio-cervical junction like basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation, various types of cavity formation in the cervical medulla (syringomyelia, hydromyelia), demyelinization processes, intramedullary and extramedullary tumours, intervertebral disk degeneration processes, dislocation of intervertebral disks and spondylophytes with spinal stenoses. Sagittal sections in different functional positions allowed to demonstrate the biomechanical effects of extramedullary masses on the cervical medulla. However, proven tumours could not be differentiated successfully using histological methods. Nevertheless, NMR tomography will replace invasive methods like conventional cervical myelography and CT myelography in diagnostic clarification of diseases of the cervical medulla.

  9. Diffusion Pore Imaging by Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Windschuh, Johannes; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements are widely used to derive parameters indirectly related to the microstructure of biological tissues and porous media. However, a direct imaging of cell or pore shapes and sizes would be of high interest. For a long time, determining pore shapes by NMR diffusion acquisitions seemed impossible, because the necessary phase information could not be preserved. Here we demonstrate experimentally using the measurement technique which we have recently proposed theoretically that the shape of arbitrary closed pores can be imaged by diffusion acquisitions, which yield the phase information. For this purpose, we use hyperpolarized xenon gas in well-defined geometries. The signal can be collected from the whole sample which mainly eliminates the problem of vanishing signal at increasing resolution of conventional NMR imaging. This could be used to non-invasively gain structural information inaccessible so far such as pore or cell shapes, cell density or axon integri...

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single subnanoliter ova

    CERN Document Server

    Grisi, Marco; Guidetti, Roberto; Harris, Nicola; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is, in principle, a promising candidate to study the intracellular chemistry of single microscopic living entities. However, due to sensitivity limitations, NMR experiments were reported only on very few and relatively large single cells down to a minimum volume of 10 nl. Here we show NMR spectroscopy of single ova at volume scales (0.1 and 0.5 nl) where life development begins for a broad variety of animals, humans included. We demonstrate that the sensitivity achieved by miniaturized inductive NMR probes (few pmol of 1H nuclei in some hours at 7 T) is sufficient to observe chemical heterogeneities among subnanoliter ova of tardigrades. Such sensitivities should allow to non-invasively monitor variations of concentrated intracellular compounds, such as glutathione, in single mammalian zygotes.

  12. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  13. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  14. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection Using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard R. Tittmann; P.M. Lenahan; David Spears; Rhys Williams

    2008-11-25

    The objective of this project is to develop anovel technique for remote, non-destructive, non-radiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs. We propse the development of a detection system based on magnetic resonance principles (NAR), which would work where radiation detection is not possible. The approach would be non-intrusive, penetrating, applicable to many materials of interest for Nonproliferation, and be able to identify the nuclear samples under investigation.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with dc SQUID amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaney, M.B. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 {times} 10{sup 17} in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO{sub 3} crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with DC SQUID amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, M. B.

    1990-11-01

    The development and fabrication of dc SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) with Nb/Al2O3/Nb Josephson junctions is described. A theory of the dc SQUID as a radio-frequency amplifier is presented, with an optimization strategy that accounts for the loading and noise contributions of the postamplifier and maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of the total system. The high sensitivity of the dc SQUID is extended to high field NMR. A dc SQUID is used as a tuned radio-frequency amplifier to detect pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance at 32 MHz from a metal film in a 3.5 Tesla static field. A total system noise temperature of 11 K has been achieved, at a bath temperature of 4.2 K. The minimum number of nuclear Bohr magnetons observable from a free precession signal after a single pulse is about 2 x 10(exp 17) in a bandwidth of 25 kHz. In a separate experiment, a dc SQUID is used as a rf amplifier in a NQR experiment to observe a new resonance response mechanism. The net electric polarization of a NaClO3 crystal due to the precessing electric quadrupole moments of the Cl nuclei is detected at 30 MHz. The sensitivity of NMR and NQR spectrometers using dc SQUID amplifiers is compared to the sensitivity of spectrometers using conventional rf amplifiers. A SQUID-based spectrometer has a voltage sensitivity which is comparable to the best achieved by a FET-based spectrometer, at these temperatures and operating frequencies.

  17. Line broadening interference for high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra under inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Chen, Youhe; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy serves as an important tool for analyzing chemicals and biological metabolites. However, its performance is subject to the magnetic-field homogeneity. Under inhomogeneous fields, peaks are broadened to overlap each other, introducing difficulties for assignments. Here, we propose a method termed as line broadening interference (LBI) to provide high-resolution information under inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing certain gradients in the indirect dimension to interfere the magnetic-field inhomogeneity. The conventional spectral-line broadening is thus interfered to be non-diagonal, avoiding the overlapping among adjacent resonances. Furthermore, an inhomogeneity correction algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to recover the high-resolution information from LBI spectra. Theoretical deductions are performed to offer systematic and detailed analyses on the proposed method. Moreover, experiments are conducted to prove the feasibility of the proposed method for yielding high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of macroscopic morphology and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrall, Geoffrey Alden [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are traditionally used to study molecular level structure and dynamics with a noted exception in medically applied NMR imaging (MRI). In this work, new experimental methods and theory are presented relevant to the study of macroscopic morphology and dynamics using NMR field gradient techniques and solid state two-dimensional exchange NMR. The goal in this work is not to take some particular system and study it in great detail, rather it is to show the utility of a number of new and novel techniques using ideal systems primarily as a proof of principle. By taking advantage of the analogy between NMR imaging and diffraction, one may simplify the experiments necessary for characterizing the statistical properties of the sample morphology. For a sample composed of many small features, e.g. a porous medium, the NMR diffraction techniques take advantage of both the narrow spatial range and spatial isotropy of the sample`s density autocorrelation function to obtain high resolution structural information in considerably less time than that required by conventional NMR imaging approaches. The time savings of the technique indicates that NMR diffraction is capable of finer spatial resolution than conventional NMR imaging techniques. Radio frequency NMR imaging with a coaxial resonator represents the first use of cylindrically symmetric field gradients in imaging. The apparatus as built has achieved resolution at the micron level for water samples, and has the potential to be very useful in the imaging of circularly symmetric systems. The study of displacement probability densities in flow through a random porous medium has revealed the presence of features related to the interconnectedness of the void volumes. The pulsed gradient techniques used have proven successful at measuring flow properties for time and length scales considerably shorter than those studied by more conventional techniques.

  19. Advances in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug discovery is a complex and unpredictable endeavor with a high failure rate. Current trends in the pharmaceutical industry have exasperated these challenges and are contributing to the dramatic decline in productivity observed over the last decade. The industrialization of science by forcing the drug discovery process to adhere to assembly-line protocols is imposing unnecessary restrictions, such as short project time-lines. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance are responding to these self-imposed limitations and are providing opportunities to increase the success rate of drug discovery. Objective/Method A review of recent advancements in NMR technology that have the potential of significantly impacting and benefiting the drug discovery process will be presented. These include fast NMR data collection protocols and high-throughput protein structure determination, rapid protein-ligand co-structure determination, lead discovery using fragment-based NMR affinity screens, NMR metabolomics to monitor in vivo efficacy and toxicity for lead compounds, and the identification of new therapeutic targets through the functional annotation of proteins by FAST-NMR. Conclusion NMR is a critical component of the drug discovery process, where the versatility of the technique enables it to continually expand and evolve its role. NMR is expected to maintain this growth over the next decade with advancements in automation, speed of structure calculation, in-cell imaging techniques, and the expansion of NMR amenable targets. PMID:20333269

  20. Membrane proteins structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Sergey; Lorigan, Gary A

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins represent a challenging class of biological systems to study. They are extremely difficult to crystallize and in most cases they retain their structure and functions only in membrane environments. Therefore, commonly used diffraction methods fail to give detailed molecular structure and other approaches have to be utilized to obtain biologically relevant information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, however, can provide powerful structural and dynamical constraints on these complicated systems. Solution- and solid-state NMR are powerful methods for investigating membrane proteins studies. In this work, we briefly review both solution and solid-state NMR techniques for membrane protein studies and illustrate the applications of these methods to elucidate proteins structure, conformation, topology, dynamics, and function. Recent advances in electronics, biological sample preparation, and spectral processing provided opportunities for complex biological systems, such as membrane proteins inside lipid vesicles, to be studied faster and with outstanding quality. New analysis methods therefore have emerged, that benefit from the combination of sample preparation and corresponding specific high-end NMR techniques, which give access to more structural and dynamic information.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  2. Updated methodology for nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional petroleum resources, particularly in shales, are expected to play an increasingly important role in the world’s energy portfolio in the coming years. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), particularly at low-field, provides important information in the evaluation of shale resources. Most of the low-field NMR analyses performed on shale samples rely heavily on standard T1 and T2 measurements. We present a new approach using solid echoes in the measurement of T1 and T1–T2 correlations that addresses some of the challenges encountered when making NMR measurements on shale samples compared to conventional reservoir rocks. Combining these techniques with standard T1 and T2 measurements provides a more complete assessment of the hydrogen-bearing constituents (e.g., bitumen, kerogen, clay-bound water) in shale samples. These methods are applied to immature and pyrolyzed oil shale samples to examine the solid and highly viscous organic phases present during the petroleum generation process. The solid echo measurements produce additional signal in the oil shale samples compared to the standard methodologies, indicating the presence of components undergoing homonuclear dipolar coupling. The results presented here include the first low-field NMR measurements performed on kerogen as well as detailed NMR analysis of highly viscous thermally generated bitumen present in pyrolyzed oil shale.

  3. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance of quadrupolar systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuanhu

    1997-09-17

    This dissertation describes two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance theory and experiments which have been developed to study quadruples in the solid state. The technique of multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, MQMAS is first compared with another technique, dynamic-angle spinning (DAS). The similarity between the two techniques allows us to extend much of the DAS work to the MQMAS case. Application of MQMAS to a series of aluminum containing materials is then presented. The superior resolution enhancement through MQMAS is exploited to detect the five- and six-coordinated aluminum in many aluminosilicate glasses. Combining the MQMAS method with other experiments, such as HETCOR, greatly expands the possibility of the use of MQMAS to study a large range of problems and is demonstrated in Chapter 5. Finally, the technique switching-angle spinning (SAS) is applied to quadrupolar nuclei to fully characterize a quadrupolar spin system in which all of the 8 NMR parameters are accurately determined. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate that with the combination of two-dimensional NMR concepts and new advanced spinning technologies, a series of multiple-dimensional NMR techniques can be designed to allow a detailed study of quadrupolar nuclei in the solid state.

  4. Frequency and Spatial Selectivity in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jan O.

    1988-12-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The techniques presented in this thesis are concerned with the high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of liquids. A selective pulse, shaped according to the first half of a Gaussian curve, is developed; it gives a very narrow absorption-mode excitation profile. This characteristics is used in developing selective coherence transfer experiments in which an individual transition is irradiated by the selective pulse followed by irradiation with an intense non-selective pulse. By stepping the irradiation frequency of the selective pulse along in small increments, this experiment produces results similar to conventional two-dimensional homonuclear correlation spectroscopy. Such a method allows selected spectral regions of a conventional two-dimensional spectrum to be examined under higher resolution while avoiding the restrictions imposed by the sampling theorem. The technique is also extended to a third frequency dimension by irradiating two transitions simultaneously before applying a non-selective pulse which yields correlations between three coupled nuclei. The remainder of this thesis introduces a spatial localisation method based on a "straddle coil": two parallel coaxial surface coils, one on each side of the sample and supplied with radiofrequency pulses of opposite phase. This configuration can be used for spatial localisation experiments by applying a sequence of equal and opposite prepulses before acquiring the signal. The prepulses saturate the nuclear spins in all sample regions except the sensitive volume close to the median plane where the radiofrequency fields from the two coils cancel. Pulse sequences are proposed that are insensitive to radiofrequency offset over an appreciable range. The location of the sensitive volume can be tracked across the sample in the axial dimension by changing the ratio of the radiofrequency currents in the two coils.

  5. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  6. Multi-exponential inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Weimin(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Kenyon, W. E. , Petrophysical principles of applications of NMR logging, The Log Analyst, 1997, March-April: 21-43.[2]Timur, A., Producible porosity and permeability of sandstone investigated through nuclear magnetic resonance principles,Journal of Petroleum Technology, 1969, 21: 775-786.[3]Chakrabarty, T. , Longo, J. , A new method for mineral quantification to aid in hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation,Journal of Canadian Petroleum Technology, 1997, 36(11 ): 15-21.[4]Kleinberg, R. L. , Vinegar, H. J. , NMR properties of reservoir fluids, The Log Analyst, 1996, November-December: 20-32.[5]Wahba, G. , Practical approximate solutions to linear operator equations when the data are noisy, SIAM. J. Numer. Anal. ,1977, 14(4): 651-667.[6]Butler, J. P. , Reeds, J. A. , Dawson, S. V. , Estimating solutions of first kind integral equations with nonnegative constraints and optimal smoothing, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. , 1981, 18(3): 381-397.[7]Munn, K. , Smith, D. M., A NMR technique for the analysis of pore structure: Numerical inversion of relaxation measurements, Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 1987,19(1): 117-126.[8]Provencher, S. W., A constrained regularization method for inverting data represented by linear algebraic or integral equations, Computer Physics Communications, 1982, 27: 213-227.[9]Bergman, D. J., Dunn, K. J., Magnetic susceptibility contrasted fixed field gradient effects on the spin-echo amplitude in a periodic porous media with diffusion, Phys. Soc., 1995, 40: 695-702.[10]Wang Weimin, The basic experiment studies of NMR logging, Well Logging Technology, 1997, 21 (6): 385-392.

  7. Internal defect inspection in magnetic tile by using acoustic resonance technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Luofeng; Yin, Ming; Huang, Qinyuan; Zhao, Yue; Deng, Zhenbo; Xiang, Zhaowei; Yin, Guofu

    2016-11-01

    This paper focuses on the validity of a nondestructive methodology for magnetic tile internal defect inspection based on acoustic resonance. The principle of this methodology is to analyze the acoustic signal collected from the collision of magnetic tile with a metal block. To accomplish the detection process, the separating part of the detection system is designed and discussed in detail in this paper. A simplified mathematical model is constructed to analyze the characteristics of the impact of magnetic tile with a metal block. The results demonstrate that calculating the power spectrum density (PSD) can diagnose the internal defect of magnetic tile. Two different data-driven multivariate algorithms are adopted to obtain the feature set, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis (h-NLPCA). Three different classifiers are then performed to deal with magnetic tile classification problem based on features extracted by PCA or h-NLPCA. The classifiers adopted in this paper are fuzzy neural networks (FNN), variable predictive model based class discrimination (VPMCD) method and support vector machine (SVM). Experimental results show that all six methods are successful in identifying the magnetic tile internal defect. In this paper, the effect of environmental noise is also considered, and the classification results show that all the methods have high immunity to background noise, especially PCA-SVM and h-NLPCA-SVM. Considering the accuracy rate, computation cost problem and the ease of implementation, PCA-SVM turns out to be the best method for this purpose.

  8. Development of a miniature permanent magnetic circuit for nuclear magnetic resonance chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rongsheng; Yi, Hong; Wu, Weiping; Ni, Zhonghua

    2013-07-01

    The existing researches of miniature magnetic circuits focus on the single-sided permanent magnetic circuits and the Halbach permanent magnetic circuits. In the single-sided permanent magnetic circuits, the magnetic flux density is always very low in the work region. In the Halbach permanent magnetic circuits, there are always great difficulties in the manufacturing and assembly process. The static magnetic flux density required for nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) chip is analyzed based on the signal noise ratio(SNR) calculation model, and then a miniature C-shaped permanent magnetic circuit is designed as the required magnetic flux density. Based on Kirchhoff's law and magnetic flux refraction principle, the concept of a single shimming ring is proposed to improve the performance of the designed magnetic circuit. Using the finite element method, a comparative calculation is conducted. The calculation results demonstrate that the magnetic circuit improved with a single shimming has higher magnetic flux density and better magnetic field homogeneity than the one improved with no shimming ring or double shimming rings. The proposed magnetic circuit is manufactured and its experimental test platform is also built. The magnetic flux density measured in the work region is 0.7 T, which is well coincided with the theoretical design. The spatial variation of the magnetic field is within the range of the instrument error. At last, the temperature dependence of the magnetic flux density produced by the proposed magnetic circuit is investigated through both theoretical analysis and experimental study, and a linear functional model is obtained. The proposed research is crucial for solving the problem in the application of NMR-chip under different environmental temperatures.

  9. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  10. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Pourmodheji

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS. In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  11. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-06-09

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery.

  12. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N., E-mail: neelampg@iastate.edu; Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  13. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (Φ/Ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  14. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the

  15. Non-resonant interacting ion acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccari, Attilio [Technical Institute ' G Cardano' , Monterotondo, Rome (Italy)

    1999-01-29

    We perform an analytical and numerical investigation of the interaction among non-resonant ion acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma. Waves are supposed to be non-resonant, i.e. with different group velocities that are not close to each other. We use an asymptotic perturbation method, based on Fourier expansion and spatio-temporal rescaling. We show that the amplitude slow modulation of Fourier modes cannot be described by the usual nonlinear Schroedinger equation but by a new model system of nonlinear evolution equations. This system is C-integrable, i.e. it can be linearized through an appropriate transformation of the dependent and independent variables. We demonstrate that a subclass of solutions gives rise to envelope solitons. Each envelope soliton propagates with its own group velocity. During a collision solitons maintain their shape, the only change being a phase shift. Numerical results are used to check the validity of the asymptotic perturbation method. (author)

  16. Measurement of untruncated nuclear spin interactions via zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, J. W.; Sjolander, T. F.; King, J. P.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Levine, E. H.; Bajaj, V. S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from the effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultralow-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-13C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This permits the investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin J coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultralow-field NMR and has potential applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  17. Measuring the Muon g-2 Magnetic Storage Field Via Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthias; Muon g-2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Muon g - 2 experiment at Fermilab aims to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment, aμ, to a precision of 140 ppb, using a technique that determines the muon spin precession frequency in the highly uniform magnetic field of a storage ring. Both precession frequency and field determination contribute equally to the final systematic uncertainty. The magnetic field is determined from the measurement of free induction decay (FID) signals provided by a matrix of custom proton nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) probes. FID simulations show that we can achieve the required precision for extraction of field values compared to systematic contributions. The recently powered muon storage ring is providing data to evaluate the pNMR measurement results. We will describe the performance to date of this system.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance of laser-polarized noble gases in molecules, materials and organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodson, Boyd McLean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are fundamentally challenged by the insensitivity that stems from the ordinarily low spin polarization achievable in even the strongest NMR magnets. However, by transferring angular momentum from laser light to electronic and nuclear spins, optical pumping methods can increase the nuclear spin polarization of noble gases by several orders of magnitude, thereby greatly enhancing their NMR sensitivity. This dissertation is primarily concerned with the principles and practice of optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The enormous sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping noble gases can be exploited to permit a variety of novel NMR experiments across many disciplines. Many such experiments are reviewed, including the void-space imaging of organisms and materials, NMR and MRI of living tissues, probing structure and dynamics of molecules in solution and on surfaces, and zero-field NMR and MRI.

  19. Highly sensitive detection of protein biomarkers via nuclear magnetic resonance biosensor with magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeun, Minhong; Park, Sungwook; Lee, Hakho; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    Magnetic-based biosensors are attractive for on-site detection of biomarkers due to the low magnetic susceptibility of biological samples. Here, we report a highly sensitive magnetic-based biosensing system that is composed of a miniaturized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) device and magnetically engineered nanoferrite particles (NFPs). The sensing performance, also identified as the transverse relaxation (R2) rate, of the NMR device is directly related to the magnetic properties of the NFPs. Therefore, we developed magnetically engineered NFPs (MnMg-NFP) and used them as NMR agents to exhibit a significantly improved R2 rate. The magnetization of the MnMg-NFPs was increased by controlling the Mn and Mg cation concentration and distribution during the synthesis process. This modification of the Mn and Mg cation directly contributed to improving the R2 rate. The miniaturized NMR system, combined with the magnetically engineered MnMg-NFPs, successfully detected a small amount of infectious influenza A H1N1 nucleoprotein with high sensitivity and stability.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  1. A magnetic resonance imaging study on the articulatory and acoustic speech parameters of Malay vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zourmand, Alireza; Mirhassani, Seyed Mostafa; Ting, Hua-Nong; Bux, Shaik Ismail; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Bilgen, Mehmet; Jalaludin, Mohd Amin

    2014-07-25

    The phonetic properties of six Malay vowels are investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize the vocal tract in order to obtain dynamic articulatory parameters during speech production. To resolve image blurring due to the tongue movement during the scanning process, a method based on active contour extraction is used to track tongue contours. The proposed method efficiently tracks tongue contours despite the partial blurring of MRI images. Consequently, the articulatory parameters that are effectively measured as tongue movement is observed, and the specific shape of the tongue and its position for all six uttered Malay vowels are determined.Speech rehabilitation procedure demands some kind of visual perceivable prototype of speech articulation. To investigate the validity of the measured articulatory parameters based on acoustic theory of speech production, an acoustic analysis based on the uttered vowels by subjects has been performed. As the acoustic speech and articulatory parameters of uttered speech were examined, a correlation between formant frequencies and articulatory parameters was observed. The experiments reported a positive correlation between the constriction location of the tongue body and the first formant frequency, as well as a negative correlation between the constriction location of the tongue tip and the second formant frequency. The results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective tool for the dynamic study of speech production.

  2. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  3. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rasly

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  4. Dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance field sensing with part-per-trillion resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Brunner, David O.; Schmid, Thomas; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-12-01

    High-field magnets of up to tens of teslas in strength advance applications in physics, chemistry and the life sciences. However, progress in generating such high fields has not been matched by corresponding advances in magnetic field measurement. Based mostly on nuclear magnetic resonance, dynamic high-field magnetometry is currently limited to resolutions in the nanotesla range. Here we report a concerted approach involving tailored materials, magnetostatics and detection electronics to enhance the resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance sensing by three orders of magnitude. The relative sensitivity thus achieved amounts to 1 part per trillion (10-12). To exemplify this capability we demonstrate the direct detection and relaxometry of nuclear polarization and real-time recording of dynamic susceptibility effects related to human heart function. Enhanced high-field magnetometry will generally permit a fresh look at magnetic phenomena that scale with field strength. It also promises to facilitate the development and operation of high-field magnets.

  5. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav;

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic effects on the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and 131Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe2 system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular...

  6. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  7. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (HRMAS NMR) for Studies of Reactive Fabrics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911SR-11-C-0047 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...ECBC-TR-1326 HIGH RESOLUTION MAGIC ANGLE SPINNING NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE (HRMAS NMR) FOR STUDIES OF REACTIVE FABRICS David J. McGarvey...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT An analytical chemistry method is described for measuring the reactivity and permeation of

  8. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the

  9. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron-based Superconductors as Probed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO1–xFxFeAs and LiFeAs.

  10. Nuclear spin conversion of water inside fullerene cages detected by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamone, Salvatore, E-mail: s.mamone@soton.ac.uk; Concistrè, Maria; Carignani, Elisa; Meier, Benno; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Johannessen, Ole G.; Denning, Mark; Carravetta, Marina; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H., E-mail: mhl@soton.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lei, Xuegong; Li, Yongjun [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Goh, Kelvin; Horsewill, Anthony J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-21

    The water-endofullerene H{sub 2}O@C{sub 60} provides a unique chemical system in which freely rotating water molecules are confined inside homogeneous and symmetrical carbon cages. The spin conversion between the ortho and para species of the endohedral H{sub 2}O was studied in the solid phase by low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance. The experimental data are consistent with a second-order kinetics, indicating a bimolecular spin conversion process. Numerical simulations suggest the simultaneous presence of a spin diffusion process allowing neighbouring ortho and para molecules to exchange their angular momenta. Cross-polarization experiments found no evidence that the spin conversion of the endohedral H{sub 2}O molecules is catalysed by {sup 13}C nuclei present in the cages.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayler, Michael C. D.; Sjolander, Tobias F.; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1 μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100 μT to 1 mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  12. Development and applications of NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in low fields and zero field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielecki, A.

    1987-05-01

    This dissertation is about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the absence of applied magnetic fields. NMR is usually done in large magnetic fields, often as large as can be practically attained. The motivation for going the opposite way, toward zero field, is that for certain types of materials, particularly powdered or polycrystalline solids, the NMR spectra in zero field are easier to interpret than those obtained in high field. 92 refs., 60 figs., 1 tab.

  13. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Firenze and INSTM, Firenze (Italy); Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Corti, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.corti@unipv.it; Borsa, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  14. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Kristina [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Slater, Lee [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  15. Rotatable Small Permanent Magnet Array for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Instrumentation: A Concept Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Vogel

    Full Text Available We studied the feasibility of generating the variable magnetic fields required for ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry with dynamically adjustable permanent magnets. Our motivation was to substitute traditional electromagnets by distributed permanent magnets, increasing system portability.The finite element method (COMSOL® was employed for the numerical study of a small permanent magnet array to calculate achievable magnetic field strength, homogeneity, switching time and magnetic forces. A manually operated prototype was simulated and constructed to validate the numerical approach and to verify the generated magnetic field.A concentric small permanent magnet array can be used to generate strong sample pre-polarisation and variable measurement fields for ultra-low field relaxometry via simple prescribed magnet rotations. Using the array, it is possible to achieve a pre-polarisation field strength above 100 mT and variable measurement fields ranging from 20-50 μT with 200 ppm absolute field homogeneity within a field-of-view of 5 x 5 x 5 cubic centimetres.A dynamic small permanent magnet array can generate multiple highly homogeneous magnetic fields required in ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI instruments. This design can significantly reduce the volume and energy requirements of traditional systems based on electromagnets, improving portability considerably.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchinsky, I; Sushkov, A O; Urbach, E; de Leon, N P; Choi, S; De Greve, K; Evans, R; Gertner, R; Bersin, E; Müller, C; McGuinness, L; Jelezko, F; Walsworth, R L; Park, H; Lukin, M D

    2016-02-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition.

  17. Thermal Transition of Ribonuclease A Observed Using Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫永彬; 罗雪春; 周海梦; 张日清

    2001-01-01

    The thermal transition of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) was investigated using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Significant resonance overlap in the large native protein limits accurate assignments in the 1H NMR spectrum. This study proposes extending the investigation of large proteins by dynamic analysis. Comparison of the traditional method and the correlation coefficient method suggests successful application of spectrum image analysis in dynamic protein studies by NMR.

  18. Sealed magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance probe and process for spectroscopy of hazardous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Herman M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Townsend, Mark R.; Ewing, James R.

    2016-06-14

    A magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe is described that includes double containment enclosures configured to seal and contain hazardous samples for analysis. The probe is of a modular design that ensures containment of hazardous samples during sample analysis while preserving spin speeds for superior NMR performance and convenience of operation.

  19. Study of coals by high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨保联; 冯继文; 周建威; 李丽云; 叶朝辉

    1999-01-01

    By using high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance method, six coal samples coming from four countries were investigated. Twelve structural parameters of these samples were measured and compared with those of Chinese coals. Spectral editing experiment was carried out and 15N NMR spectrum was obtained.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Nail Polish Remover Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Markus M.; Caccamis, Joshua T.; Heitz, Mark P.; Schlecht, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    Substantial modifications are presented for a previously described experiment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to quantitatively determine analytes in commercial nail polish remover. The revised experiment is intended for a second- or third-year laboratory course in analytical chemistry and can be conducted for larger laboratory…

  1. The Complexation of the Na(super +) by 18-Crown-6 Studied via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Steven J.; Stevenson, Cheryl D.

    2004-01-01

    A student friendly experiment that teaches several important concepts of modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), like multinuclear capabilities, the NMR time scale, and time-averaged signals, is described along with some important concepts of thermo chemical equilibria. The mentioned experiment involves safe and inexpensive compounds, such as…

  2. Towards nuclear magnetic resonance micro-spectroscopy and micro-imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, P.J.M. van; Janssen, J.W.G.; Kentgens, A.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The first successful experiments demonstrating Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) were a spin-off from the development of electromagnetic technology and its introduction into civilian life in the late forties. It was soon discovered that NMR spectra held chemically relevant information making it usefu

  3. In vivo imaging of the rat anatomy with nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, G; Crooks, L E; Davis, P; De Groot, J; Herfkens, R; Margulis, A R; Gooding, C; Kaufman, L; Hoenninger, J; Arakawa, M; McRee, R; Watts, J

    1980-09-01

    Live rats were imaged by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These images demonstrated fine detail and high object contrast. Motion artifacts are not apparent in 4-minute images, and major blood vessels are demonstrated as regions of low signal intensity because of blood flow. Selective contrast enhancement is possible by varying NMR imager accumulation parameters.

  4. A New Density Operator Formalism for Describing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林东海; 吴钦义

    1994-01-01

    A density operator formalism has been proposed to describe the evolution of two-spin-1/2 systems in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments:The formalism is particularly convenient and has distinct physical meaning for describing the evolution of spin systems under the Hamiltonian containing non-commutable terms. Some examples are presented to demonstrate the new formalism.

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Elastic Wave Velocity of Chalk Saturated with Brines Containing Divalent Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven a good technique for measuring pore size distribution in reservoir rocks. The use of low field NMR together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, can contribute to illustrate the effect of adsorbing ions on chalk elasticity. NMR is useful...

  6. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance and sound velocity measurements of chalk saturated with magnesium rich brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katika, Konstantina; Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    The use of low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to determine petrophysical properties of reservoirs has proved to be a good technique. Together with sonic and electrical resistivity measurements, NMR can contribute to illustrate the changes on chalk elasticity due to different pore water...

  8. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear da D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzil penicilina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Monica R.M.P.; Gemal, Andre L.; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Menezes, Sonia M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1995-12-31

    The development of new drugs from penicillins has induced the study of this substances by nuclear magnetic resonance. Several samples of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin were analysed using {sup 13} C NMR techniques in aqueous solution and solid state. Spectral data of this compounds were shown and the results were presented and analysed 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. High Performance Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Moler. Direct imaging of the coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface. Nature Physics, 7(10) 767771...2011) [35] S. M. M. Yee, D. A. Crandles and L. V. Gon- charova. Ferromagnetism on the unpolished sur- faces of single crystal metal oxide substrates. J. App. Phys., 110(3) (2011) ...International Workshop on Spin Mechanics, Tokai,Japan, 24–26 February 2013, “Nanoscale scanning probe ferromagnetic resonance imaging using localized

  11. Development of nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance spectroscopy under 10 GPa class pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, R; Uchida, Y; Hirayama, K; Yamazaki, T; Fukazawa, H; Kohori, Y [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Takeshita, N, E-mail: hideto@nmr.s.chiba-u.ac.j [JST, TRIP, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    The high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) are conventionally performed up to 3 GPa using piston cylinder cell. However, the NMR/NQR measurements beyond this pressure range are scarcely performed owing to the technical difficulty. Recently, we developed new high pressure NMR/NQR technique using cubic anvil apparatus in which highly hydrostatic pressure was obtained. Using the new method, the {sup 63}Cu-NQR signal of Cu{sub 2}O was observed up to 7.2GPa with high sensitivity. The use of MgO gasket in mini-cubic anvil apparatus was examined for enlarging pressure range.

  12. A method for mechanical generation of radio frequency fields in nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wagenaar, J J T; Donkersloot, R J; Marsman, F; de Wit, M; Bossoni, L; Oosterkamp, T H

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative method for magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with ultra-low dissipation, by using the higher modes of the mechanical detector as radio frequency (rf) source. This method allows MRFM on samples without the need to be close to an rf source. Furthermore, since rf sources require currents that give dissipation, our method enables nuclear magnetic resonance experiments at ultra-low temperatures. Removing the need for an on-chip rf source is an important step towards a MRFM which can be widely used in condensed matter physics.

  13. Evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of acoustic neuroma. Comparative study with plain X-ray and CTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Kimihisa; Sakai, Makoto; Shinkawa, Atsushi; Miyake, Hirosato; Matsukawa, Junichi

    1987-11-01

    In order to find an approach to earlier and more acurate diagnosis of acoustic neuroma, a comparative evaluation of MRI, plain X-ray (Stenvers' projection), high resolution CT with or without Metrizamide enhancement and air-CT has been made in five clinical cases of acoustic neuroma. A paramagnetic contrast agent, Gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), was used to enhance images resolution in two cases of acoustic neuroma. In MRI, the high singnal mass in the posterior fossa was smaller than 10 x 10 mm in 2 cases, 17 x 20 mm in 2 cases and 35 x 40 mm in one case. MRI revealed enlargement of the neurovascular bundle around the VII and VIII cranial nerves compatible with a diagnosis of acoustic neuroma in all 5 cases, and masses within the cerebellopontine angle were also disclosed. In 2 cases the image of equivocal acoustic neuromas was well enhanced, and these lesions were visualized after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. In one of the cases the acoustic neuroma was satisfactorily differentiated from the surrounding cystic lesion with the aid of a contrast medium. Magnetic resonance which uses no ionizing radiation seems to be innocuous and offers several advantages over other imaging methods and CT, which may produce an adverse reaction when a contrast medium is used in CT-cisternography. Further advancement of MR technology will offer greater assistance in differential diagnosis of lesions such as acoustic tumors or other cerebellopontine angle tumors.

  14. Cut and paste RNA for nuclear magnetic resonance, paramagnetic resonance enhancement, and electron paramagnetic resonance structural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duss, Olivier; Diarra Dit Konté, Nana; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2015-01-01

    RNA is a crucial regulator involved in most molecular processes of life. Understanding its function at the molecular level requires high-resolution structural information. However, the dynamic nature of RNA complicates structure determination because crystallization is often not possible or can result in crystal-packing artifacts resulting in nonnative structures. To study RNA and its complexes in solution, we described an approach in which large multi-domain RNA or protein-RNA complex structures can be determined at high resolution from isolated domains determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and then constructing the entire macromolecular structure using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) long-range distance constraints. Every step in this structure determination approach requires different types of isotope or spin-labeled RNAs. Here, we present a simple modular RNA cut and paste approach including protocols to generate (1) small isotopically labeled RNAs (<10 nucleotides) for NMR structural studies, which cannot be obtained by standard protocols, (2) large segmentally isotope and/or spin-labeled RNAs for diamagnetic NMR and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR, and (3) large spin-labeled RNAs for pulse EPR spectroscopy.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance J coupling constant polarizabilities of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Hanna; Nielsen, Monia R.; Pagola, Gabriel I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the so far most extended investigation of the calculation of the coupling constant polarizability of a molecule. The components of the coupling constant polarizability are derivatives of the NMR indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant with respect to an external elec...

  16. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  17. High-pass bird-cage coil for nuclear-magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Joel C.; Fukushima, Eiichi

    1988-06-01

    Cylindrical bird-cage coils generate uniform magnetic fields transverse to the cylinder axis for use in the large sample nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. We describe the design and construction of an eight-rung high-pass bird-cage coil to operate at 80 MHz in a cylindrical bore of a superconducting magnet. The coil is 12.7 cm in diameter by 30.5 cm long and has a 7-cm-diam region in the center where the field intensity is within 10% of the average.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of pure and Ni/Co doped LiFeAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Baek, Seung-Ho; Hammerath, Franziska; Graefe, Uwe; Utz, Yannic; Harnagea, L.; Nacke, Claudia; Aswartham, Saicharan; Wurmehl, Sabine; Buechner, Bernd [Leibniz-Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present Nuclear Magnetic and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NMR/NQR) measurements on pure, Ni and Co doped LiFeAs single crystals. The parent compound LiFeAs exhibits unconventional superconductivity with a transition temperature of about 17 K. Unlike other Fe based superconductors, where superconductivity is induced or stabilized by Co or Ni doping, replacement of Fe by these elements leads to a suppression of the superconducting transition temperature in LiFeAs. In case of Ni doping, a bulk magnetic order is induced below about 160 K. In contrast, for Co doping, the superconducting transition temperature is only reduced, but no magnetic order is observed. We discuss the nature and the origin of this magnetic order and its relation to unconventional superconductivity in pure LiFeAs.

  19. Zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of viscous liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y.; Blanchard, J. W.; Pustelny, S.; Saielli, G.; Bagno, A.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report zero-field NMR measurements of a viscous organic liquid, ethylene glycol. Zero-field spectra were taken showing resolved scalar spin-spin coupling (J-coupling) for ethylene glycol at different temperatures and water contents. Molecular dynamics strongly affects the resonance linewidth, which closely follows viscosity. Quantum chemical calculations have been used to obtain the relative stability and coupling constants of all ethylene glycol conformers. The results show the potential of zero-field NMR as a probe of molecular structure and dynamics in a wide range of environments, including viscous fluids.

  20. Zero and Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Via Optical Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, John Woodland

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is among the most powerful analytical tools available to the chemical and biological sciences for chemical detection, characterization, and structure elucidation. NMR experiments are usually performed in large magnetic fields in order to maximize sensitivity and increase chemical shift resolution. However, the high magnetic fields required for conventional NMR necessitate large, immobile, and expensive superconducting magnets, limiting the use of the technique. New hyperpolarization and non-inductive detection methods have recently allowed for NMR measurements in the inverse regime of extremely low magnetic fields. Whereas a substantial body of research has been conducted in the high-field regime, taking advantage of the efficient coherent control afforded by a spectroscopy dominated by coupling to the spectrometer, the zero- and ultra-low-field (ZULF) regime has remained mostly unexplored. In this dissertation, we investigate the applicability of ZULF-NMR as a novel spectroscopic technique complimentary to high-field NMR. In particular, we consider various aspects of the ZULF-NMR experiment and the dynamics of nuclear spins under various local spin coupling Hamiltonians. We first survey zero-field NMR experiments on systems dominated by the electron-mediated indirect spin-spin coupling (J-coupling). The resulting J-spectra permit precision measurement of chemically relevant information due to the exquisite sensitivity of J-couplings to subtle changes in molecular geometry and electronic structure. We also consider the effects of weak magnetic fields and residual dipolar couplings in anisotropic media, which encode information about nuclear magnetic moments and geometry, and further resolve topological ambiguities by lifting degeneracies. By extending the understanding of the interactions that contribute to ZULF-NMR spectra, this work represents a significant advancement towards a complete description of zero- and ultra

  1. Simulation of general three-body interactions in a nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Three-body interaction plays an important role in many-body physics,and quantum computer is efficient in simulating many-body interactions. We have experimentally demonstrated the general three-body interactions in a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble quantum computer. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance computer we implemented general forms of three-body interactions including σ 1x σ z2 σ x3 and σ 1x σ z2 σ y3 . The results show good agreement between theory and experiment. We have also given a concise and practical formula for a general n-body interaction in terms of one-and two-body interactions.

  2. Analysis of antimycin A by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic-resonance spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Steven T.K.; Wilkins, Charles L.; Abidi, Sharon L.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of closely related streptomyces fermentation products, antimycin A, Is separated, and the components are identified by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with directly linked 400-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance detection. Analyses of mixtures of three amino acids, alanine, glycine, and valine, are used to determine optimal measurement conditions. Sensitivity increases of as much as a factor of 3 are achieved, at the expense of some loss in chromatographic resolution, by use of an 80-μL NMR cell, Instead of a smaller 14-μL cell. Analysis of the antimycin A mixture, using the optimal analytical high performance liquid chromatography/nuclear magnetic resonance conditions, reveals it to consist of at least 10 closely related components.

  3. Negotiated identities of chemical instrumentation: the case of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 1956-1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jody A

    2003-05-01

    What is an NMR spectrometer? Beginning with this seemingly simple question, I will explore the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy between the years 1956 and 1969 from two vantage points: the organic chemists who used the new instrument, and Varian Associates-the makers of the first NMR spectrometers-. Through an examination of the articles and advertisements published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, I will draw two conclusions. First, organic chemists and Varian Associates (along with other actors) are co-responsible for the development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (i.e., NMR spectroscopy was not created by a single actor). Second, by changing the way NMR spectrometers are used, organic chemists attempted to change to the identity of the instrument. Similarly, when Varian Associates advertised their NMR spectrometers in a different way, they, too, attempted to change the identity of the instrument.

  4. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du.

    High-field NMR experiments were used to determine the full structures of six new natural products extracted from plants. These are: four saponins (PT-2, P1, P2 and P3) from the plant Alphitonia zizyphoides found in Samoa; one sesquiterpene (DF-4) from Douglas fir and one diterpene derivative (E-2) from a Chinese medicinal herb. By concerted use of various 1D and 2D NMR techniques, the structures of the above compounds were established and complete resonance assignments were achieved. The 2D INADEQUATE technique coupled with a computerized spectral analysis was extensively used. When carried out on concentrations as low as 60 mg of sample, this technique provided absolute confirmation of the assignments for 35 of the possible 53 C-C bonds for PT-2. On 30 mg of sample of E-21, it revealed 22 of 28 possible C-C bonds.

  5. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials. The first technique is a tunnel-diode resonator (TDR) which detects bulk changes in the dynamic susceptibility, chi = dM/dH. The capability of TDR to operate at low temperatures (less than 100 mK) and high fields (up to 65 T in pulsed fields) was critical for investigations of the antiferromagnetically correlated magnetic molecules Cr12Cu2 and Cr12 Ln4 (Ln = Y, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb), and the superconductor SrFe2(As1--xPx) 2 (x = 0.35). Investigations of Cr12Cu 2 and Cr12Ln4 demonstrates the first implementation of TDR to experimentally investigate the lowlying energy spectra of magnetic molecules in pulsed magnetic fields. Zeeman splitting of the quantum spin states results in transitions between field-dependent ground state energy levels observed as peaks in dM/dH at 600 mK, and demonstrate good agreement with theoretical calculations using a isotropic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. Increasing temperature to 2.5 K, TDR reveals a rich spectrum of frequency-dependent level crossings from thermally populated excited states which cannot be observed by conventional static magnetometry techniques. The last study presented uses TDR in pulsed fields to determine the temperature-dependent upper-critical field Hc2 to investigate the effects of columnar defects arising from heavy ion irradiation of SrFe2(As 1--xPx)2. Results suggest irradiation uniformly suppresses Tc and Hc2, and does not introduce additional features on H c2(T) and the shapes of the anisotropic Hc2 curves indicates a nodal superconducting gap. The second technique is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which yields site specific magnetic and electronic information arising from hyperfine interactions for select magnetic nuclei. NMR spectra and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation measurements are reported

  6. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of prion peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Jonathan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    High-resolution structural studies using x-ray diffraction and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are not feasible for proteins of low volubility and high tendency to aggregate. Solid state NMR (SSNMR) is in principle capable of providing structural information in such systems, however to do this efficiently and accurately, further SSNMR tools must be developed This dissertation describes the development of three new methods and their application to a biological system of interest, the priori protein (PrP).

  7. Simulation of the four-body interaction in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WenZhang; ZHANG JingFu; LONG GuiLu

    2009-01-01

    The four-body interaction plays an important role in many-body systems,and it can exhibit interesting phase transition behaviors.In this letter,we report the experimental demonstration of a four-body interaction in a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor.The strongly modulating pulse is used to implement spin selective excitation.The results show a good agreement between theory and experiment.

  8. Simulating decoherence behavior of a system in entangled state using nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Shan, L; Deng, Z; Zhang, Jingfu; Lu, Zhiheng; Shan, Lu; Deng, Zhiwei

    2002-01-01

    By choosing H nucleus in Carbon-13 labelled trichloroethylene as one qubit environment, and two C nuclei as a two-qubit system, we have simulated quantum decoherence when the system lies in an entangled state using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Decoupling technique is used to trace over the environment degrees of freedom. Experimental results show agreements with the theoretical predictions. Our experiment scheme can be generalized to the case that environment is composed of multiple qubits.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance on selected lithium based compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisch, Christian

    2013-11-26

    This thesis presents the NMR measurements on the single crystals LiMnPO{sub 4} and Li{sub 0.9}FeAs. Therefore, the thesis is divided into two separated sections. The first part reports on the competitive next generation cathode material LiMnPO{sub 4} with a stable reversible capacity up to 145 mAh/g and a rather flat discharge voltage curve at 4.1 V. For the basic understanding of the material the magnetic properties have been investigated by a Li and P NMR study in the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase. LiMnPO{sub 4} shows a strong anisotropy of the dipolar hyperfine coupling due to the strong local magnetic moments at the Mn site. The corresponding dipole tensor of the Li- and P-nuclei is fully determined by orientation and temperature dependent NMR experiments and compared to the calculated values from crystal structure data. Deviations of the experimentally determined values from the theoretical ones are discussed in terms of Mn disorder which could have an impact on the mobility of the Li ions. The disorder is corroborated by diffuse X-ray diffraction experiments which indicate a shift of the heavy elements in the lattice, namely the Mn atoms. Furthermore, the spin arrangement in the relative strong field of 7.0494 T in the antiferromagnetic state is understood by the NMR measurements. In order to obtain parameters of the Li ion diffusion in LiMnPO{sub 4} measurements of the spin lattice relaxation rate were performed. Due to the strong dipolar coupling between the Li-nuclei and the magnetic moments at the Mn site it is difficult to extract parameters which can characterize the diffusive behavior of the Li ions. The second section reports on the AC/DC susceptibility and NMR/NQR studies on Li deficit samples labeled as Li{sub 0.9}FeAs. LiFeAs belongs to the family of the superconducting Pnictides which are discovered in 2008 by H. Hosono et al. In recent studies the stoichiometric compound reveals triplet superconductivity below T{sub c}-18 K which

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Computing Using Liquid Crystal Solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Yannoni, C S; Vandersypen, L M K; Miller, D C; Kubinec, M G; Chuang, I L; Yannoni, Costantino S.; Sherwood, Mark H.; Vandersypen, Lieven M.K.; Miller, Dolores C.; Kubinec, Mark G.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    1999-01-01

    Liquid crystals offer several advantages as solvents for molecules used for NMR quantum computing (NMRQC). The dipolar coupling between nuclear spins manifest in the NMR spectra of molecules oriented by a liquid crystal permits a significant increase in clock frequency, while short spin-lattice relaxation times permit fast recycling of algorithms, and save time in calibration and signal-enhancement experiments. Furthermore, the use of liquid crystal solvents offers scalability in the form of an expanded library of spin-bearing molecules suitable for NMRQC. These ideas are demonstrated with the successful execution of a 2-qubit Grover search using a molecule ($^{13}$C$^{1}$HCl$_3$) oriented in a liquid crystal and a clock speed eight times greater than in an isotropic solvent. Perhaps more importantly, five times as many logic operations can be executed within the coherence time using the liquid crystal solvent.

  11. Chemical structures in pyrodextrin determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanjie; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2016-10-20

    Glycosidic linkages in a pyrodextrin were identified by NMR spectroscopy for the first time. Pyrodextrin was prepared by slurrying waxy maize starch at pH 3, filtering and drying at 40°C to 10-15% moisture content, then heating at 170°C for 4h. (1)H and (13)C NMR resonances of the pyrodextrin were assigned with the assistance of 2D techniques including COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, and HMBC, all measured on a 500MHz instrument. During dextrinization, native waxy maize starch was hydrolyzed and extensively branched with new glycosidic linkages. The resulting pyrodextrin became 100% soluble in water and produced lower viscosity solutions at 30% solids. There were only 1.2% reducing ends (α-form) detected in the pyrodextrin, but 1,6-anhydro-β-d-glucopyranosyl units accounted for 5.2% of repeating units and they were thought to be at the potential reducing end. New glycosyl linkages including α-1,6, β-1,6, α-1,2, and β-1,2 were identified. The total non-α-1,4 linkages in the pyrodextrin were about 17.8% compared to 5.8% in a maltodextrin prepared by α-amylase digestion. Transglycosidation and depolymerization occurred during dextrinization, and the resulting pyrodextrin was highly branched.

  12. Remote detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with an anisotropic magnetoresistive sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verpillat, F; Ledbetter, M P; Xu, S; Michalak, D J; Hilty, C; Bouchard, L-S; Antonijevic, S; Budker, D; Pines, A

    2008-02-19

    We report the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using an anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensor. A "remote-detection" arrangement was used in which protons in flowing water were prepolarized in the field of a superconducting NMR magnet, adiabatically inverted, and subsequently detected with an AMR sensor situated downstream from the magnet and the adiabatic inverter. AMR sensing is well suited for NMR detection in microfluidic "lab-on-a-chip" applications because the sensors are small, typically on the order of 10 mum. An estimate of the sensitivity for an optimized system indicates that approximately 6 x 10(13) protons in a volume of 1,000 mum(3), prepolarized in a 10-kG magnetic field, can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 in a 1-Hz bandwidth. This level of sensitivity is competitive with that demonstrated by microcoils in superconducting magnets and with the projected sensitivity of microfabricated atomic magnetometers.

  13. Enhanced affinity of ketotifen toward tamarind seed polysaccharide in comparison with hydroxyethylcellulose and hyaluronic acid: a nuclear magnetic resonance investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Nazzi, Samuele; Balzano, Federica; Di Colo, Giacomo; Zambito, Ylenia; Zaino, Chiara; Sansò, Marco; Salvadori, Eleonora; Benvenuti, Marco

    2008-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrated that, in aqueous solution, ketotifen fumarate bound more strongly to tamarind seed polysaccharide (TSP) than to hydroxyethylcellulose or hyaluronic acid. Results were confirmed by dynamic dialysis technique.

  14. Electromagnetic properties of inner double walled carbon nanotubes investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Bouhrara, M.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C 60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  15. Using microcontact printing to fabricate microcoils on capillaries for high resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance on nanoliter volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.A.; Jackman, R.J.; Whitesides, G.M. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Olson, D.L.; Sweedler, J.V. [Beckman Institute and Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This letter describes a method for producing conducting microcoils for high resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) spectroscopy on nanoliter volumes. This technique uses microcontact printing and electroplating to form coils on microcapillaries. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra collected using these microcoils, have linewidths less than 1 Hz for model compounds and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio=3) for ethylbenzene of 2.6 nmol in 13 min. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Experimental quantum simulation of Avian Compass in a nuclear magnetic resonance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Jason; Feng, GuanRu; Zheng, Chao; Long, GuiLu

    2016-12-01

    Avian magnetoreception is the capacity for avians to sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Discovered more than forty years ago, it has attracted intensive studies over the years. One promising model for describing this capacity in avians is the widely used reference-and-probe model where radical pairs within the eyes of bird combines to form singlet and triplet quantum states. The yield depends on the angle between the Earth's magnetic field and the molecules' axis, hence the relative value of yield of the singlet state or triplet state enables avians to sense the direction. Here we report the experimental demonstration of avian magnetoreception in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor. It is shown clearly from the experiment that the yield of the singlet state attains maximum when it is normal to the Earth's magnetic field, and the experimental results agree with theory very well.

  17. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Drake, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum.

  18. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  19. Billion-fold enhancement in sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for magnesium ions in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottberg, Alexander; Stachura, Monika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-12-15

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. (31)Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 10(7) magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  20. Bioengineered Magnetoferritin Nanoprobes for Single-Dose Nuclear-Magnetic Resonance Tumor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanzhao; Liang, Minmin; Li, Xiao; Fan, Kelong; Xiao, Jie; Li, Yanli; Shi, Hongcheng; Wang, Fei; Choi, Hak Soo; Cheng, Dengfeng; Yan, Xiyun

    2016-04-26

    Despite all the advances in multimodal imaging, it remains a significant challenge to acquire both magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging in a single dose because of the enormous difference in sensitivity. Indeed, nuclear imaging is almost 10(6)-fold more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); thus, repeated injections are generally required to obtain sufficient MR signals after nuclear imaging. Here, we show that strategically engineered magnetoferritin nanoprobes can image tumors with high sensitivity and specificity using SPECT and MRI in living mice after a single intravenous injection. The magnetoferritin nanoprobes composed of (125)I radionuclide-conjugated human H-ferritin iron nanocages ((125)I-M-HFn) internalize robustly into cancer cells via a novel tumor-specific HFn-TfR1 pathway. In particular, the endocytic recycling characteristic of TfR1 transporters solves the nuclear signal blocking issue caused by the high dose nanoprobes injected for MRI, thus enabling simultaneous functional and morphological tumor imaging without reliance on multi-injections.

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  2. Device for measurement of power and shape of radio frequency pulses in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, M.; Řezníček, R.; Křišťan, P.; Štěpánková, H.

    2012-05-01

    A design of an instrument to measure the power and shape of radio frequency (RF) pulses operating in a broad frequency range is described. The device is capable of measuring the pulse power up to 500 W of both CW and extremely short (˜1 μs) RF pulses of arbitrary period. The pulse envelope can be observed on a logarithmic scale on a corresponding instrument output using an inexpensive storage oscilloscope. The instrument consists of a coaxial measurement head, the RF processing circuits and an AD conversion and display unit. The whole device is based on widely available integrated circuits; thus, good reproducibility and adaptability of the design is ensured. Since the construction is intended to be used in particular (but not solely) in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we found it useful to provide a demonstration of two typical usage scenarios. Other application fields may comprise magnetic resonance imaging, radar and laser technology, power amplifier testing, etc.

  3. [Recent progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum for drug research and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jun; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2015-01-01

    In the process of modern drug research, the new methods and technologies which can detect drug molecules' chemical composition, structure and interaction with biomolecules are always the key scientific problems people care about. Spectra (including IR, UV and NMR) are the most common analytical methods, of which NMR can obtain detailed parameter about the nucleus of organic molecules through researching the laws of nuclear transition in the impact of surrounding chemical environment. The parameter contains rich information about the chemical composition, structure and interaction with other molecules of organic molecules. In many complex environments, such as liquid, solid or gas state, even biological in situ environment, NMR can provide molecules' chemical composition, atomic-resolution three-dimensional structure, information of interaction with each other and dynamic process, especially the information about drug interacting with biomacromolecules. In recent years, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum in drug research and development are more and more widespread. This paper reviewed its recent progress in structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in drug research and development. In the first part, we gave a brief introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance technology and its applications in drug research. In the second part, we explained the basic principles briefly and summarized progress in methods and techniques for drug research. In the third part, we discussed applications of nuclear magnetic resonance ir structure and dynamic of targeted biological macromolecules, drug design and screening and drug metabolism in detail. The conclusions were stated in the last part.

  4. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance for the in vivo study of water content in trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, Jacob, E-mail: jlyoder@lanl.gov [Inorganic, Isotope and Actinide Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Malone, Michael W.; Espy, Michelle A. [Applied Modern Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sevanto, Sanna [Earth Systems Observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging have long been used to study water content in plants. Approaches have been primarily based on systems using large magnetic fields (∼1 T) to obtain NMR signals with good signal-to-noise. This is because the NMR signal scales approximately with the magnetic field strength squared. However, there are also limits to this approach in terms of realistic physiological configuration or those imposed by the size and cost of the magnet. Here we have taken a different approach – keeping the magnetic field low to produce a very light and inexpensive system, suitable for bulk water measurements on trees less than 5 cm in diameter, which could easily be duplicated to measure on many trees or from multiple parts of the same tree. Using this system we have shown sensitivity to water content in trees and their cuttings and observed a diurnal signal variation in tree water content in a greenhouse. We also demonstrate that, with calibration and modeling of the thermal polarization, the system is reliable under significant temperature variation.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report; Laboratoire commun de resonance magnetique nucleaire, rapport quadriennal 1994-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  6. Magnetic Lenz lenses increase the limit-of-detection in nuclear magnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Spengler, Nils; Meissner, Markus V; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    A high NMR detection sensitivity is indispensable when dealing with mass and volume-limited samples, or whenever a high spatial resolution is required. The use of miniaturised RF coils is a proven way to increase sensitivity, but may be impractical and is not applicable to every experimental situation. We present the use of magnetic lenses, denoted as Lenz lenses due to their working principle, to focus the magnetic flux of a macroscopic RF coil into a smaller volume and thereby locally enhance the sensitivity of the NMR experiment - at the expense of the total sensitive volume. Besides focusing, such lenses facilitate re-guiding or re-shaping of magnetic fields much like optical lenses do with light beams. For the first time we experimentally demonstrate the use of Lenz lenses in magnetic resonance and provide a compact mathematical description of the working principle. Through simulations we show that optimal arrangements can be found.

  7. [Value of the nuclear magnetic cholangio resonance in the study of the patient with jaundice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramática, L; Struni, M; Carranza, D; Verasay, G; Taborda, B; Caballero, F; Gramática, L

    1999-01-01

    This report analyse the results about forty three (43) patients, thirty six (36) of which showed an extrahepatic obstructive biliary Syndrome was made evident by ultrasonography, five (5) with a cholecistolithiasis and doubtful history of jaundice were evaluated to carry out a video-surgery procedure and two (2) patients whom hepatic-yeyunostomy had been practiced, a control of anastomosis in postoperative period was required. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Operative Cholangiography findings were correlated and afterward with the anatomopathological studies when they arrived. In all cases the Nuclear Magnetic Cholangio Resonance (NMCR) let us prove the diagnosis of extrahepatic biliary obstruction determining with precision furthermore the topographical site of the lesion. Respecting the aetiology of obstruction, NMCR was accurate in 34 out of 36 cases (94.4%). In conclusion Cholangio-Resonance is an excellent diagnostic method to evaluate biliary ductal system including anatomic changes. However, there are some limitations yet in order to determine the aetiology of lesions about extrahepatic biliary via extremes. We emphasize its features such as non-invasive, little operating dependent, and without morbimortality that become it as a method of choice to study the biliary via from a diagnostic viewpoint.

  8. Monitoring lactic acid production during milk fermentation by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteille, R; Gaudet, M; Lecanu, B; This, H

    2013-04-01

    When fermenting milk, lactic bacteria convert part of α- and β-lactoses into d- and l- lactic acids, causing a pH decrease responsible for casein coagulation. Lactic acid monitoring during fermentation is essential for the control of dairy gel textural and organoleptic properties, and is a way to evaluate strain efficiency. Currently, titrations are used to follow the quantity of acids formed during jellification of milk but they are not specific to lactic acid. An analytical method without the use of any reagent was investigated to quantify lactic acid during milk fermentation: in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two methods using in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared: (1) d- and l-lactic acids content determination, using the resonance of their methyl protons, showing an increase from 2.06 ± 0.02 to 8.16 ± 0.74 g/L during 240 min of fermentation; and (2) the determination of the α- and β-lactoses content, decreasing from 42.68 ± 0.02 to 30.76 ± 1.75 g/L for the same fermentation duration. The ratio between the molar concentrations of produced lactic acids and consumed lactoses enabled cross-validation, as the value (2.02 ± 0.18) is consistent with lactic acid bacteria metabolism.

  9. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  10. Modeling the nuclear magnetic resonance behavior of lung: from electrical engineering to critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutillo, A G; Ailion, D C

    1999-01-01

    The present article reviews the basic principles of a new approach to the characterization of pulmonary disease. This approach is based on the unique nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of the lung and combines experimental measurements (using specially developed NMR techniques) with theoretical simulations. The NMR signal from inflated lungs decays very rapidly compared with the signal from completely collapsed (airless) lungs. This phenomenon is due to the presence of internal magnetic field inhomogeneity produced by the alveolar air-tissue interface (because air and water have different magnetic susceptibilities). The air-tissue interface effects can be detected and quantified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques using temporally symmetric and asymmetric spin-echo sequences. Theoretical models developed to explain the internal (tissue-induced) magnetic field inhomogeneity in aerated lungs predict the NMR lung behavior as a function of various technical and physiological factors (e.g., the level of lung inflation) and simulate the effects of various lung disorders (in particular, pulmonary edema) on this behavior. Good agreement has been observed between the predictions obtained from the mathematical models and the results of experimental NMR measurements in normal and diseased lungs. Our theoretical and experimental data have important pathophysiological and clinical implications, especially with respect to the characterization of acute lung disease (e.g., pulmonary edema) and the management of critically ill patients.

  11. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies on the variant-3 neurotoxin from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing: Sequential assignment of resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettesheim, D.G.; Klevit, R.E.; Drobny, G.; Watt, D.D.; Krishna, N.R. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (USA))

    1989-02-21

    The authors report the sequential assignment of resonances to specific residues in the proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the variant-3 neurotoxin from the scorpion Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing (range southwestern U.S.A.). A combination of two-dimensional NMR experiments such as 2D-COSY, 2D-NOESY, and single- and double-RELAY coherence transfer spectroscopy has been employed on samples of the protein dissolved in D{sub 2}O and in H{sub 2}O for assignment purposes. These studies provide a basis for the determination of the solution-phase conformation of this protein and for undertaking detailed structure-function studies of these neurotoxins that modulate the flow of sodium current by binding to the sodium channels of excitable membranes.

  12. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh, E-mail: rramesh@iisermohali.ac.in [Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali, Sector 81, Manauli, P.O. Box-140306, Mohali, Punjab (India)

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  13. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-01

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R2) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R2 experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  14. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R(2)) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R(2) experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  15. Residual Dipolar Couplings in Zero-to-Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Blanchard, John W; King, Jonathan P; Ledbetter, Micah P; Levine, Emma H; Bajaj, Vikram S; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Zero-to-ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF-NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the interaction averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial orientational ordering, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero-to-ultra-low-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-$^{13}$C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This represents the first investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin $J$-coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole c...

  16. Recent Advances in Computational Methods for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Data Processing

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2013-01-11

    Although three-dimensional protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a computationally costly and tedious process that would benefit from advanced computational techniques, it has not garnered much research attention from specialists in bioinformatics and computational biology. In this paper, we review recent advances in computational methods for NMR protein structure determination. We summarize the advantages of and bottlenecks in the existing methods and outline some open problems in the field. We also discuss current trends in NMR technology development and suggest directions for research on future computational methods for NMR.

  17. Implementation of a multiple round quantum dense coding using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Jingfu; XIE; Jingyi; WANG; Chuan; DENG; Zhiwei; LU

    2005-01-01

    A multiple round quantum dense coding scheme based on the quantum phase estimation algorithm is proposed and implemented in a three qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computer. Using an m + 1 qubit system, Bob can transmit one of 2m+1 messages to Alice, through manipulating only one qubit and exchanging it between Alice and Bob for m rounds. The information capacity is enhanced to m + 1 bits as compared to m bits in a classical scheme. The scheme has been demonstrated in NMR system, and the experimental results show a good agreement between theory and experiment.

  18. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, David K [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Geneseo, NY (United States)

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  19. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations.

  20. Experimental study of quantum simulation for quantum chemistry with a nuclear magnetic resonance simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Boruo; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-10-13

    Quantum computers have been proved to be able to mimic quantum systems efficiently in polynomial time. Quantum chemistry problems, such as static molecular energy calculations and dynamical chemical reaction simulations, become very intractable on classical computers with scaling up of the system. Therefore, quantum simulation is a feasible and effective approach to tackle quantum chemistry problems. Proof-of-principle experiments have been implemented on the calculation of the hydrogen molecular energies and one-dimensional chemical isomerization reaction dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance systems. We conclude that quantum simulation will surpass classical computers for quantum chemistry in the near future.

  1. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  2. Geometric optimal control of the contrast imaging problem in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnard, B; Glaser, S J; Lapert, M; Sugny, D; Zhang, Y

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to introduce the tools to analyze the contrast imaging problem in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Optimal trajectories can be selected among extremal solutions of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle applied to this Mayer type optimal problem. Such trajectories are associated to the question of extremizing the transfer time. Hence the optimal problem is reduced to the analysis of the Hamiltonian dynamics related to singular extremals and their optimality status. This is illustrated by using the examples of cerebrospinal fluid / water and grey / white matter of cerebrum.

  3. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Polzikova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator (HBAR formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  4. Multi-dimensional Inversion Modeling of Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR Data for Groundwater Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warsa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is an important economic source of water supply for drinking water and irrigation water for agriculture. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR sounding is a relatively new geophysical method that can be used to determine the presence of culturally and economically important substances, such as subsurface water or hydrocarbon distribution. SNMR sounding allows the determination of water content and pore size distribution directly from the surface. The SNMR method is performed by stimulating an alternating current pulse through an antenna at the surface in order to confirm the existence of water in the subsurface. This paper reports the development of a 3-D forward modeling code for SNMR amplitudes and decay times, after which an improved 2-D and 3-D inversion algorithm is investigated, consisting of schemes for regularizing model parameterization. After briefly reviewing inversion schemes generally used in geophysics, the special properties of SNMR or magnetic resonance sounding (MRS inversion are evaluated. We present an extension of MRS to magnetic resonance tomography (MRT, i.e. an extension for 2-D and 3-D investigation, and the appropriate inversions.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an

  7. High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of the Active Site of Chymotrypsin. I. The Hydrogen Bonded Protons of the “Charge Relay” System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robillard, G.; Shulman, R.G.

    1974-01-01

    High resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to observe protons at the active site of chymotrypsin Aδ and at the same region of chymotrypsinogen A. A single resonance with the intensity of one proton is located in the low field region of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. Th

  8. High-resolution liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of nanoliter sample volumes using microcoil detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kentgens, A.P.M.; Bart, J.; Bentum, van P.J.M.; Brinkmann, A.; Eck, van E.R.H.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Janssen, J.W.G.; Knijn, P.J.; Vasa, S.; Verkuijlen, M.H.W.

    2008-01-01

    The predominant means to detect nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) is to monitor the voltage induced in a radiofrequency coil by the precessing magnetization. To address the sensitivity of NMR for mass-limited samples it is worthwhile to miniaturize this detector coil. Although making smaller coils see

  9. Chirality-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance effects induced by indirect spin-spin coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, P.; Buckingham, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    It is predicted that, for two spin-1/2 nuclei coupled by indirect spin-spin coupling in a chiral molecule, chirality-sensitive induced electric polarization can be observed at the frequencies equal to the sum and difference between the spin resonance frequencies. Also, an electric field oscillating at the difference frequency can induce spin coherences which allow the direct discrimination between enantiomers by nuclear magnetic resonance. The dominant contribution to the magnitude of these expected chiral effects is proportional to the permanent electric dipole moment and to the antisymmetric part of the indirect spin-spin coupling tensor of the chiral molecule. Promising compounds for experimental tests of the predictions are derivatives of 1,3-difluorocyclopropene.

  10. 77Se nuclear magnetic resonance of topological insulator Bi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Nataliya M.; Rybicki, Damian; Guehne, Robin; Williams, Grant V. M.; Chong, Shen V.; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Garate, Ion; Haase, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Topological insulators constitute a new class of materials with an energy gap in the bulk and peculiar metallic states on the surface. We report on new features resulting from the bulk electronic structure, based on a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of 77Se on Bi2Se3 and Cu0.15Bi2Se3 single crystals. First, we find two resonance lines and show that they originate from the two inequivalent Se lattice sites. Second, we observe unusual field-independent linewidths and attribute them to an unexpectedly strong internuclear coupling mediated by bulk electrons. In order to support this interpretation, we present a model calculation of the indirect internuclear coupling and show that the Bloembergen-Rowland coupling is much stronger than the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida coupling. Our results call for a revision of earlier NMR studies and add information concerning the bulk electronic properties.

  11. General and hybrid correlation nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of phosphorus in Phytophthora palmivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Gemma M; Fernandez, David I; Niere, Julie O; Adams, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Generalized two-dimensional (Gen2D) correlation analysis and hybrid correlation analysis have been applied to a series of dynamic (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra to monitor the in vivo metabolic changes of the plant pathogen Phytophthora palmivora in the presence and absence of phosphonate over an 18-h period. Results indicate that phosphonate exposure causes cleavage in organism polyphosphate chains as well as an increase in total sugar phosphates. In the presence of phosphonate, the NMR resonances attributed to terminal polyphosphate phosphorus reduced at a lower rate than those of middle polyphosphate phosphorus, indicating a change in average chain length and suggesting cleavage in the middle of the chain as well as at the ends. The correlation analysis techniques serve to identify and confirm spectral regions undergoing major change in the time-series data and facilitate the analysis of these dynamic changes.

  12. Interaction of Divalent Metal Ions with the Adenosine Triphosphate Measured Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of adenosine triphosphate with divalent metal ions is important in biochemical functions. The effects of pH and metal ions Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Co2+ on the chemical shift of the phosphate group of ATP have been studied using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The chemical shift of the β-phosphate of ATP is the most sensitive to pH. Ca2+ and Mg2+ bind with the α- and β-phosphate groups of ATP. Zn2+ binds to the adenosine ring hydrogen as well as to phosphate. The paramagnetic ions Mn2+ and Co2+ do not cause chemical shifts of the phosphate or proton peak. Mn2+ and Co2+ broaden the resonance peak only.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kanegae, Y

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems and discuss the discrepancy between two recent (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 experiments on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8. When the magnetic layers is are in the antiferromagnetic state, (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layers is shown to decrease with decreasing due to the excitation gap associated with the magnetic ordering. The proximity effect of superconductivity on (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layer is negligibly small. Our result indicates that the temperature dependence of (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8 likely originates from the antiferromagnetism in the RuO sub 2 layers, but not from the superconductivity in the CuO sub 2 layers. (author)

  14. high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in studies of Picrotoxanolides of Coriaria. Coryamyrtin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre Galvis Luis Enrique

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Spectral evidence by Protonic Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (400
    MAHz and 90 MHz of the analeptic sesquiterpene lactone coriamyrtin, isolated from the colombian plant Coriaria microphyUn, Poir., is discussed, and analogies are made with the spectra of authentic samples of picrotin and picrotoxinin.Se discute la evidencia espectroscópica de Resonancia Magnética
    Nuclear Protónica (400MHz y 90 MHz para coriamirtina, una lactona sesquiterpénica de carácter analéptico, aislada de la planta colombiana Coriasia microphyUn, Poir., mediante analogías con espectros de muestras autenticadas de picrotina y picrotoxinina.

  15. Antisymmetric Couplings Enable Direct Observation of Chirality in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    King, Jonathan P; Blanchard, John W

    2016-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that a term in the nuclear spin Hamiltonian, the antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling, is fundamentally connected to molecular chirality. We propose and simulate a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment to observe this interaction and differentiate between enantiomers without adding any additional chiral agent to the sample. The antisymmetric \\textit{J}-coupling may be observed in the presence of molecular orientation by an external electric field. The opposite parity of the antisymmetric coupling tensor and the molecular electric dipole moment yields a sign change of the observed coupling between enantiomers. We show how this sign change influences the phase of the NMR spectrum and may be used to discriminate between enantiomers.

  16. Charge order and low frequency spin dynamics in lanthanum cuprates revealed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, H.J.; Vyalikh, A.; Vavilova, J.; Buchner, B. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Solid State Research, Dresden (Germany); Curro, N.J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Young, B.L. [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Gu, G.D.; Hucker, M. [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Vavilova, J. [Kazan Zavoiskiy Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    We report detailed {sup 17}O, {sup 139}La, and {sup 63,65}Cu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) measurements in a stripe ordered La{sub 1.875}Ba{sub 0.125}CuO{sub 4} single crystal and in oriented powder samples of La{sub 1.8-x}Eu{sub 0.2}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}. We observe a partial wipe out of the {sup 17}O NMR intensity and a simultaneous drop of the {sup 17}O electric field gradient (EFG) at low temperatures where the spin stripe order sets in. In contrast, the {sup 63,65}Cu intensity is completely wiped out at the same temperature. The drop of the {sup 17}O quadrupole frequency is compatible with a charge stripe order. The {sup 17}O spin lattice relaxation rate shows a peak similar to that of the {sup 139}La, which is of magnetic origin. This peak is doping dependent and is maximal at x {approx} 1/8. (authors)

  17. [sup 27]Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectra in CeAl[sub 3] at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunziker, J. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)); Gavilano, J.L. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)); Buechi, S. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)); Ott, H.R. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    1994-02-01

    We have measured the nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, spectra of CeAl[sub 3] at 3.964 MHz, 2.095 MHz and 0.937 MHz in the temperature range between 0.04 K and 20 K. The complicated NMR absorption line of CeAl[sub 3] powder is shown to have more than one component, corresponding to at least two inequivalent Al sites. Below 0.9 K the relative intensity of a broad asymmetric structure increases, and the width of the NMR spectrum shows a rapid increase. At fields of the order of two kilogauss the asymmetry is strongly supressed. The temperature dependence of the asymmetry and width of the spectrum below 0.9 K, can neither be explained in terms of a temperature dependent Knight shift nor in terms of conventional magnetic ordering. (orig.)

  18. Sub-nanoliter nuclear magnetic resonance coils fabricated with multilayer soft lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Matthew H. C.; Homenuke, Mark A.; Michal, Carl A.; Hansen, Carl L.

    2009-09-01

    We describe the fabrication and characterization of sub-nanoliter volume nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transceiver coils that are easily amenable to integration within PDMS-based microfluidics. NMR coils were constructed by the injection of liquid metal into solenoidal cavities created around a microchannel using consecutive replica molding and bonding of PDMS layers. This construction technique permits the integration of NMR coils with solenoidal, toroidal or other three-dimensional geometries within highly integrated microfluidic systems and are one step toward NMR-based chemical screening and analysis on chip. The current proof-of-principle implementation displays limited sensitivity and resolution due to the conductivity and magnetic susceptibilities of the construction materials. However, NMR measurements and finite-element simulations made with the current device geometry indicate that optimization of these materials will allow for the collection of spectra from sub-millimolar concentration samples in less than 1 nL of solution.

  19. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  1. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B P; Saini, G S S

    2016-02-15

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Structure, spectra and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid studied by density functional theory, Raman spectroscopic and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Mohanty, B. P.; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-02-01

    Structure, vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and antioxidant action of ascorbic acid towards hydroxyl radicals have been studied computationally and in vitro by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopic techniques. Time dependant density functional theory calculations have been employed to specify various electronic transitions in ultraviolet-visible spectra. Observed chemical shifts and vibrational bands in nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational spectra, respectively have been assigned with the help of calculations. Changes in the structure of ascorbic acid in aqueous phase have been examined computationally and experimentally by recording Raman spectra in aqueous medium. Theoretical calculations of the interaction between ascorbic acid molecule and hydroxyl radical predicted the formation of dehydroascorbic acid as first product, which has been confirmed by comparing its simulated spectra with the corresponding spectra of ascorbic acid in presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance as a method of fluid mobility detection in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakov, Sergey; Loskutov, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is widely used for studying the structure of porous media and processes taking place in such media. This method permits to determine porosity and pore-size distributions, which have direct practical application in various areas. The problem of porous media permeability determination is connected directly with extraction of hydrocarbons from pays and water from aquiferous layers. But it is impossible to measure directly amount of fluid past through the fixes cross section for determination of bed permeability. So various indirect approaches are used to find correlation of permeability value with porosity and pore size distribution which can be determined directly using NMR relaxometry. In contrast to porosity, permeability is dynamic characteristic of porous media so it may be measured correctly only in conditions of moving fluid. Natural porous medium has branched pore structure, so a chaotic component of fluid velocity will occur even for constant mean filtration fluid velocity. In the presence of magnetic field gradient this chaotic fluid velocity will produce additional spin dephasing and decrease of relaxation time [1]. Direct detecting of fluid movement in porous core samples through the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence has been demonstrated and theoretical model and analysis was given. Experiments were made on a set of sandstone samples (Berea, Bentheimer, Castle Gate, Leopard) and with synthetic high-perm samples made of abrasive material. The experiments show that the NMR spin echo measurements permit to fix mean fluid velocity mm/sec. The experiments and the theoretical model show that for low fluid velocities the mean relaxation rate is proportional to fluid velocity . The results may serve as the basis for determination of mobility of liquids in porous media and permeability. 1. P.T.Callaghan. Principles of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Microscopy. 1991, Oxford University Press.

  4. Contributed review: nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Fordham, Edmund J

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general.

  5. Contributed Review: Nuclear magnetic resonance core analysis at 0.3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Jonathan, E-mail: JMitchell16@slb.com; Fordham, Edmund J. [Schlumberger Gould Research, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0EL (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a powerful toolbox for petrophysical characterization of reservoir core plugs and fluids in the laboratory. Previously, there has been considerable focus on low field magnet technology for well log calibration. Now there is renewed interest in the study of reservoir samples using stronger magnets to complement these standard NMR measurements. Here, the capabilities of an imaging magnet with a field strength of 0.3 T (corresponding to 12.9 MHz for proton) are reviewed in the context of reservoir core analysis. Quantitative estimates of porosity (saturation) and pore size distributions are obtained under favorable conditions (e.g., in carbonates), with the added advantage of multidimensional imaging, detection of lower gyromagnetic ratio nuclei, and short probe recovery times that make the system suitable for shale studies. Intermediate field instruments provide quantitative porosity maps of rock plugs that cannot be obtained using high field medical scanners due to the field-dependent susceptibility contrast in the porous medium. Example data are presented that highlight the potential applications of an intermediate field imaging instrument as a complement to low field instruments in core analysis and for materials science studies in general.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  8. Parameter analysis for a nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on 133Cs–129Xe/131Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da-Wei; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Zhou, Min; Xu, Xin-Ye

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically investigate several parameters for the nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope based on 133Cs–129Xe/131Xe. For a cell containing a mixture of 133Cs at saturated pressure, we investigate the optimal quenching gas (N2) pressure and the corresponding pump laser intensity to achieve 30% 133Cs polarization at the center of the cell when the static magnetic field B 0 is 5 {{μ }}{{T}} with different 129Xe/131Xe pressure. The effective field produced by spin-exchange polarized 129Xe or 131Xe sensed by 133Cs can also be discussed in different 129Xe/131Xe pressure conditions. Furthermore, the relationship between the detected signal and the probe laser frequency is researched. We obtain the optimum probe laser detuning from the D2 (6{}2{{S}}1/2\\to 6{}2{{P}}3/2) resonance with different 129Xe/131Xe pressure owing to the pressure broadening. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2014AA123401), the National Key Basic Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2016YFA0302103 and 2012CB821302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant 11134003), and Shanghai Excellent Academic Leaders Program of China (Grant No. 12XD1402400).

  9. High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of ovarian cyst fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, E A; Moolenaar, S H; Massuger, L F; Boonstra, H; Engelke, U F; de Jong, J G; Wevers, R A

    2000-08-01

    Most ovarian tumors are cystic structures containing variable amounts of fluid. Several studies of ovarian cyst fluid focus on one specific metabolite using conventional assay systems. We examined the potential of (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in evaluation of the overall metabolic composition of cyst fluid from different ovarian tumors. Ovarian cyst fluid samples obtained from 40 patients with a primary ovarian tumor (12 malignant and 28 benign) were examined. After deproteinization and pD standardization, we performed (1)H-NMR spectroscopy on a 600 MHz instrument. With (1)H-NMR spectroscopy we found detectable concentrations of 36 metabolites with high intersample variation. A number of unassigned resonances as well as unexpected metabolites were found. We introduce an overall inventory of the low-molecular-weight metabolites in ovarian cyst fluid with corresponding resonances. Significant differences in concentration (p overview of low-molecular-weight proton-containing metabolities present in ovarian cyst fluid samples. The metabolic composition of cyst fluid differs significantly between benign and malignant ovarian tumors. Furthermore, differences between benign subgroups possibly related to histopathological behaviour can be detected. The presence of N-acetyl aspartic acid and 5-oxoproline exclusively in serous cystadenoma samples is remarkable. Future studies will concentrate on these findings and explore the possibilities of extrapolating information from the in vitro studies to in vivo practice, in which metabolic differences between malignant and benign subtypes can be of great importance in a pre-operative phase.

  10. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D; Wang, Kang L; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-07-14

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive (8)Li(+) ions that can provide "one-dimensional imaging" in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the (8)Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron-nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials.

  11. Principles and some applications of ''zero field nuclear magnetic resonance''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor, A.; Virlet, J.

    1987-10-01

    The method known as ''zero field NMR'' is reviewed. The technique allows the observation of nuclear dipolar and quadrupolar interactions in powder samples, which may otherwise be possible in high field on monocristals only. The anisotropy due to the magnetic field is removed although sensitivity is preserved. This method is compared to other Nuclear Resonance spectroscopies: its originality lies in the measurement of the coherent evolution of the system in zero field after a perturbation induced by suddenly switching the magnetic field. The Fourier transform of the ''zero field free induction decay'' then gives the ''zero field spectrum''. The ideal experiment is described with its adaptations due to experimental constraints, as realized in our laboratory at Saclay and in the laboratory of A. Pines at Berkeley. We present with our first measurements a review of most of the results published to date on spin 1/2 as well as spin 1/2 (quadrupolar) nuclei. Possible future developments of the method are also discussed.

  12. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabela A; Souza, Alexandre M; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-14

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  13. Theoretical approaches to control spin dynamics in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eugene Stephane Mananga

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews theoretical approaches for controlling spin dynamics in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. We present fundamental theories in the history of NMR, namely, the average Hamiltonian and Floquet theories. We also discuss emerging theories such as the Fer and Floquet-Magnus expansions. These theories allow one to solve the time-dependent Schrodinger equation, which is still the central problem in spin dynamics of solid-state NMR. Examples from the literature that highlight several applications of these theories are presented, and particular attention is paid to numerical integrators and propagator operators. The problem of time propagation calculated with Chebychev expansion and the future development of numerical directions with the Cayley transformation are considered. The bibliography includes 190 references.

  14. Impurity detection in alkali-metal vapor cells via nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.

    2016-11-01

    We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of alkali metals sealed in glass vapor cells to perform in situ identification of chemical contaminants. The alkali Knight shift varies with the concentration of the impurity, which in turn varies with temperature as the alloy composition changes along the liquidus curve. Intentional addition of a known impurity validates this approach and reveals that sodium is often an intrinsic contaminant in cells filled with distilled, high-purity rubidium or cesium. Measurements of the Knight shift of the binary Rb-Na alloy confirm prior measurements of the shift's linear dependence on Na concentration, but similar measurements for the Cs-Na system demonstrate an unexpected nonlinear dependence of the Knight shift on the molar ratio. This non-destructive approach allows monitoring and quantification of ongoing chemical processes within the kind of vapor cells which form the basis for precise sensors and atomic frequency standards.

  15. Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Water Dynamics in Different Ginger Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chongyang; Zhou, Qi; Gao, Shan; Bao, Qingjia; Chen, Fang; Liu, Chaoyang

    2016-01-20

    Different ginger cultivars may contain different nutritional and medicinal values. In this study, a time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance method was employed to study water dynamics in different ginger cultivars. Significant differences in transverse relaxation time T2 values assigned to the distribution of water in different parts of the plant were observed between Henan ginger and four other ginger cultivars. Ion concentration and metabolic analysis showed similar differences in Mn ion concentrations and organic solutes among the different ginger cultivars, respectively. On the basis of Pearson's correlation analysis, many organic solutes and 6-gingerol, the main active substance of ginger, exhibited significant correlations with water distribution as determined by NMR T2 relaxation, suggesting that the organic solute differences may impact water distribution. Our work demonstrates that low-field NMR relaxometry provides useful information about water dynamics in different ginger cultivars as affected by the presence of different organic solutes.

  16. 13C Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and µ-Raman Spectroscopic Characterization of Sicilian Amber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Germana; Capitani, Donatella; Mazzoleni, Paolo; Proietti, Noemi; Raneri, Simona; Longobardo, Ugo; Di Tullio, Valeria

    2016-08-01

    (13)C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and µ-Raman spectroscopy were applied to characterize Sicilian amber samples. The main goal of this work was to supply a complete study of simetite, highlighting discriminating criteria useful to distinguish Sicilian amber from fossil resins from other regions and laying the foundations for building a spectroscopic database of Sicilian amber. With this aim, a private collection of unrefined simetite samples and fossil resins from the Baltic region and Dominican Republic was analyzed. Overall, the obtained spectra permitted simetite to be distinguished from the other resins. In addition, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectroscopic data, allowing the clustering of simetite samples with respect to the Baltic and Dominican samples and to group the simetite samples in two sets, depending on their maturity. Finally, the analysis of loadings allowed for a better understanding of the spectral features that mainly influenced the discriminating characteristics of the investigated ambers.

  17. A sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance study of structural and organisational changes in the cell

    CERN Document Server

    Tunnah, S K

    2000-01-01

    Increasing importance is being placed on understanding the role of membrane lipids in many different areas of biochemistry. It is of interest to determine what interactions may occur between membrane lipids and drug species. Furthermore, an increasing body of evidence suggests that membrane lipids are involved in the pathology of numerous diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and HIV. Clearly, the more information available on the mechanisms involved in diseases, the greater the potential for identifying a cure or even a prevention. sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the alterations in membrane lipid organisation and structure in intact, viable cultured cells. Changes in the sup 1 H NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation measurements of the human K562 and the rat FRTL-5 cell lines were observed on the addition of the fatty acid species: triolein, evening primrose oil, arachidonic acid and ITF 1779. Results indicate that the membrane lipids are reorganised to a...

  18. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, F; Broccio, M; Corsaro, C; Faraone, A; Wanderlingh, U; Liu, L; Mou, C-Y; Chen, S H

    2006-04-28

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature T(L)=223+/-2 K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280 K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time tau(T), as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  19. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cross polarization from quadrupolar nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Paul, Susan M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The development of solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has, to a large extent, focused on using spin-1/2 nuclei as probes to investigate molecular structure and dynamics. For such nuclei, the technique of cross polarization is well-established as a method for sensitivity enhancement. However, over two-thirds of the nuclei in the periodic table have a spin-quantum number greater than one-half and are known as quadrupolar nuclei. Such nuclei are fundamental constituents of many inorganic materials including minerals, zeolites, glasses, and gels. It is, therefore, of interest to explore the extent to which polarization can be transferred from quadrupolar nuclei. In this dissertation, solid-state NMR experiments involving cross polarization from quadrupolar nuclei to spin-1/2 nuclei under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions are investigated in detail.

  20. Observation of intermolecular double-quantum coherence signal dips in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Gui-Ping; Cai Cong-Bo; Cai Shu-Hui; Chen Zhong

    2011-01-01

    The correlated spectroscopy revamped by asymmetric Z-gradient echo detection (CRAZED) sequence is modified to investigate intermolecular double-quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance signal dips in highly polarized spin systems.It is found that the occurrence of intermolecular double-quantum coherence signal dips is related to sample geometry,field inhomogeneity and dipolar correlation distance.If the field inhomogeneity is refocused,the signal dip occurs at a fixed position whenever the dipolar correlation distance approaches the sample dimension.However,the position is shifted when the field inhomogeneity exists.Experiments and simulations are performed to validate our theoretic analysis.These signal features may offer a unique way to investigate porous structures and may find applications in biomedicine and material science.

  1. Investigation on Mechanisms of Polymer Enhanced Oil Recovery by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Microscopic Theoretical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-Cheng; SONG Kao-Ping; LIU Li; YANG Er-Long

    2008-01-01

    Polymer flooding is an efficient technique to enhance oil recovery over water flooding.There are lots of discussions regarding the mechanisms for polymer flooding enhancing oil recovery. The main focus is whether polymer flooding can increase sweep effciency alone,or can increase both of sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency.We present a study on this problem.Oil displacement experiments on 4 natural cores show that polymer flooding can increase oil recovery efficiency by more than 12% over water.Moreover,photos are taken by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method both after water flooding and after polymer flooding,which show remaining oil saturation distribution at the middle cross section and the central longitudinal section.Analyses of these photos demonstrate that polymer flooding can increase both sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency.

  2. High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: From Chemical Structure to Food Authenticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannina, L.; Segre, A.

    2002-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique able to give us a relevant contribution in food analysis. In this review, some practical aspects of this technique (sample preparation, acquisition time, relaxation delay, etc) as well as some methods of spectral assignment of the spectra (2D and 1D selective technique) are reported. Some examples of NMR quantitative analyses are reported. In particular, the results relative to the NMR study of olive oils are discussed, among these: the comparison between conventional analyses and the NMR analysis in the olive oil characterization; the NMR determination of minor components such as squalene, cyclo-arthenol and chlorophyll in olive oil; the panel test and its relationship with NMR data: the geographical characterization of olive oils. (Author) 26 refs.

  3. Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Richardson, C.J.; Gleason, R.A.; Pellechia, P.J.; Honomichl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of velocity distributions in an ultrasonically vibrated granular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J M; Tarvaz, T; Mantle, M D; Sederman, A J; Gladden, L F; Sheikh, N A; Wildman, R D

    2014-05-13

    We report the results of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments on granular beds of mustard grains fluidized by vertical vibration at ultrasonic frequencies. The variation of both granular temperature and packing fraction with height was measured within the three-dimensional cell for a range of vibration frequencies, amplitudes and numbers of grains. Small increases in vibration frequency were found--contrary to the predictions of classical 'hard-sphere' expressions for the energy flux through a vibrating boundary--to result in dramatic reductions in granular temperature. Numerical simulations of the grain-wall interactions, using experimentally determined Hertzian contact stiffness coefficients, showed that energy flux drops significantly as the vibration period approaches the grain-wall contact time. The experiments thus demonstrate the need for new models for 'soft-sphere' boundary conditions at ultrasonic frequencies.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of Arnold-Chiari type I malformation with hydromyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLaPaz, R.L.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; New, P.F.; Kistler, J.P.; McGinnis, B.D.; Pykett, I.L.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-02-01

    Saturation recovery nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) images and metrizamide computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained in an adult patient with a clinical history suggestive of syringomyelia. Both NMR and CT studies showed low lying cerebellar tonsils. The CT study demonstrated central cavitation of the spinal cord from the midthoracic to midcervical levels but could not exclude an intramedullary soft tissue mass at the cervico-medullary junction. The NMR images in transverse, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated extension of an enlarged central spinal cord cerebrospinal fluid space to the cervico-medullary junction. This was felt to be strong evidence for exclusion of an intramedullary soft tissue mass and in favor of a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari Type I malformation with hydromyelia. The noninvasive nature of spinal cord and cervico-medullary junction evaluation with NMR is emphasized.

  6. The fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition in confined water: nuclear magnetic resonance results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, F.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Faraone, A.; Wanderlingh, U.; Liu, L.; Mou, C.-Y.; Chen, S. H.

    2006-04-01

    By means of a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, we give evidence of the existence of a fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover transition (FST) in confined water at a temperature TL=223±2K. We have studied the dynamics of water contained in 1D cylindrical nanoporous matrices (MCM-41-S) in the temperature range 190-280K, where experiments on bulk water were so far hampered by crystallization. The FST is clearly inferred from the T dependence of the inverse of the self-diffusion coefficient of water (1/D) as a crossover point from a non-Arrhenius to an Arrhenius behavior. The combination of the measured self-diffusion coefficient D and the average translational relaxation time ⟨τT⟩, as measured by neutron scattering, shows the predicted breakdown of Stokes-Einstein relation in deeply supercooled water.

  7. Structure, Dynamics, and Assembly of Filamentous Bacteriophages by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opella, Stanley J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina; Park, Sang Ho

    2008-05-01

    Filamentous bacteriophages serve as model systems for the development and implementation of spectroscopic methods suitable for biological supramolecular assemblies. Not only are their coat proteins small and readily prepared in the laboratory, but they also have two primary roles as membrane proteins and as the principal structural element of the virus particles. As a bacterial system, they are readily labeled with stable isotopes, and this has opened possibilities for the many nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies described in this review. In particular, solid-state NMR of aligned samples has been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of both the membrane-bound forms of coat proteins in phospholipid bilayers and structural forms in virus particles, which has led to an analysis of the assembly mechanism for virus particles as they are extruded through the cell membrane.

  8. Application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Hybrid Methods to Structure Determination of Complex Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prischi, Filippo; Pastore, Annalisa

    2016-01-01

    The current main challenge of Structural Biology is to undertake the structure determination of increasingly complex systems in the attempt to better understand their biological function. As systems become more challenging, however, there is an increasing demand for the parallel use of more than one independent technique to allow pushing the frontiers of structure determination and, at the same time, obtaining independent structural validation. The combination of different Structural Biology methods has been named hybrid approaches. The aim of this review is to critically discuss the most recent examples and new developments that have allowed structure determination or experimentally-based modelling of various molecular complexes selecting them among those that combine the use of nuclear magnetic resonance and small angle scattering techniques. We provide a selective but focused account of some of the most exciting recent approaches and discuss their possible further developments.

  9. Characterization of yogurts made with milk solids nonfat by rheological behavior and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Yan Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding milk solids nonfat (MSNF on the physical properties and microstructure of yogurts was investigated. The physical properties of fat free yogurt, fat free with MSNF yogurt, whole fat yogurt, and whole fat with MSNF yogurt were analyzed using shear viscosity, viscoelasticity, and texture analysis. The two yogurts with MSNF had higher consistency coefficient (K, storage modulus (G′, yield stress, and hardness. To gain insight into the multiphase system, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and brightfield microscope images were acquired. The addition of MSNF significantly modified NMR relaxation time; T1 values were reduced significantly. Brightfield microscope images showed that the size of the protein network of the two yogurts with MSNF added was greater than that of the two yogurts without MSNF added. The microstructural information supported the physical information. The results showed that the increase in MSNF contributed positively to strengthening the physical/mechanical properties of yogurt.

  10. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  11. Information Flow and Protein Dynamics: the Interplay Between Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina ePastor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  13. A reactor for high-throughput high-pressure nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, N. J.; Knapp, S. M. M.; Landis, C. R.

    2015-10-01

    The design of a reactor for operando nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) monitoring of high-pressure gas-liquid reactions is described. The Wisconsin High Pressure NMR Reactor (WiHP-NMRR) design comprises four modules: a sapphire NMR tube with titanium tube holder rated for pressures as high as 1000 psig (68 atm) and temperatures ranging from -90 to 90 °C, a gas circulation system that maintains equilibrium concentrations of dissolved gases during gas-consuming or gas-releasing reactions, a liquid injection apparatus that is capable of adding measured amounts of solutions to the reactor under high pressure conditions, and a rapid wash system that enables the reactor to be cleaned without removal from the NMR instrument. The WiHP-NMRR is compatible with commercial 10 mm NMR probes. Reactions performed in the WiHP-NMRR yield high quality, information-rich, and multinuclear NMR data over the entire reaction time course with rapid experimental turnaround.

  14. Developments in quantum information processing by nuclear magnetic resonance: Use of quadrupolar and dipolar couplings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kumar; K V Ramanathan; T S Mahesh; Neeraj Sinha; K V R Murali

    2002-08-01

    Use of dipolar and quadrupolar couplings for quantum information processing (QIP) by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described. In these cases, instead of the individual spins being qubits, the 2 energy levels of the spin-system can be treated as an -qubit system. It is demonstrated that QIP in such systems can be carried out using transition-selective pulses, in CH3CN, 13CH3CN, 7Li ( = 3/2) and 133Cs ( = 7/2), oriented in liquid crystals yielding 2 and 3 qubit systems. Creation of pseudopure states, implementation of logic gates and arithmetic operations (half-adder and subtractor) have been carried out in these systems using transition-selective pulses.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of epoxy- based polymer-dispersed liquid crystal droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J W

    1998-01-01

    In this work, polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLC) samples were prepared and studied by nuclear magnetic resonance. Proton NMR spectra and spin-lattice relaxations of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl(5CB) and p-methoxybenzylidene-p-n-butylaniline (MBBA) liquid crystals confined in microdroplets were measured. The experimental results were compared with those of the liquid crystals in the pores of silica-gels and with those of the mixing components. The experimental results indicated that the nematic ordering in the microdroplets differed markedly from that observed in bulk nematic crystals. In addition, we examined spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms. The proton spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms in bulk nematic liquid crystals are well established. However, when nematic liquid crystals are confined in microdroplets, the relaxation mechanisms are expected to be affected. We examined possible relaxation mechanisms to explain the observed increase in the spin-lattice relaxation rate of liquid crystals confined in m...

  16. Nonideal rotations in nuclear magnetic resonance: Estimation of coherence transfer leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerschow, Alexej [Materials Sciences Division, 11-D62, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemistry Department, D62 Hildebrand, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2000-07-15

    When spherical tensors are rotated by certain angles, coherence transfer selection rules may apply. For example, a {pi} rotation cleanly inverts the coherence order. A {pi}/2 rotation of a T{sub 0}{sup 1} tensor creates only T{sub {+-}}{sub 1}{sup 1} tensors. In this work estimations are given for the coherence transfer leakage under the action of rotations with small errors in the rotation angle or axis. Although the theory is stated with particular applications to NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) in mind it is equally applicable wherever nonideal rotations of spherical tensors are considered (e.g., quantum computing and relaxation theory). In NMR it is useful for the estimation of coherence transfer leakage, especially in pulse sequences with many n{pi} pulses. The results are also applicable to spinors and half-integer representations of the rotation group. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Material degradation of liquid organic semiconductors analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Fukushima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid organic light-emitting diodes (liquid OLEDs are unique devices consisting only of liquid organic semiconductors in the active layer, and the device performances have been investigated recently. However, the device degradation, especially, the origin has been unknown. In this study, we show that material degradation occurs in liquid OLEDs, whose active layer is composed of carbazole with an ethylene glycol chain. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR experiments clearly exhibit that the dimerization reaction of carbazole moiety occurs in the liquid OLEDs during driving the devices. In contrast, cleavages of the ethylene glycol chain are not detected within experimental error. The dimerization reaction is considered to be related to the device degradation.

  18. {sup 23}Na nuclear magnetic resonance study of the structure and dynamic of natrolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paczwa, Mateusz; Olszewski, Marcin; Sergeev, Nikolaj [Szczecin Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Physics; Sapiga, Aleksej A.; Sapiga, Aleksej V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky Univ., Simferopol, Crimea (Ukraine)

    2015-07-01

    The temperature dependences of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of {sup 23}Na nuclei in natrolite (Na{sub 2}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 10} . 2H{sub 2}O) have been studied. The temperature dependences of the spin-lattice relaxation times T{sub 1} in natrolite have also been studied. It has been shown that the spin-lattice relaxation of the {sup 23}Na is governed by the electric quadrupole interaction with the crystal electric field gradients modulated by translational motion of H{sub 2}O molecules in the natrolite pores. The dipolar interactions with paramagnetic impurities become significant as a relaxation mechanism of the {sup 23}Na nuclei only at low temperature (<270 K).

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance in contemporary art: the case of "Moon Surface" by Turcato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Noemi; Di Tullio, Valeria; Capitani, Donatella; Tomassini, Roberta; Guiso, Marcella

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies were applied to characterize the constitutive materials and the state of degradation of a contemporary painting. The investigation was mandatory to plan a suitable restoration. Noninvasive, portable NMR allowed the detection of degraded regions of the painting based on the measurement of longitudinal relaxation time. A few samples were investigated by high resolution solid state NMR and NMR in solution, which allowed us to identify the polyurethane constituting the artefact, to investigate the microstructure in detail, and to assess that the degradation process mostly affected the ethylene units used to cap the polypropylene oxide polymeric chain. As a matter of fact, a shortening of longitudinal relaxation time was accompanied by a degradation of ethylene units. The degradation of the inorganic loading was investigated by 27Al MAS, which evidenced the absence of penta-coordinated aluminum in degraded samples.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of erythrocyte membranes in chronic myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morariu, V V; Petrov, L

    1986-07-01

    The temperature dependence of the apparent water diffusional exchange through erythrocyte membranes in cases of policitemia vera, chronic granulocytic leukemia and primary myelofibrosis was measured by using a nuclear magnetic resonance method in the presence of Mn2+. The thermal transition shifted to lower temperatures in all cases, regardless of the stage of the disease, suggesting a structural alteration of the membrane. The shift of transition indirectly suggests a lower penetration of the erythrocytes by Mn2+. The water exchange time at 37 degrees C also increased, mainly in the blast crisis; it seems to have a prognostic value of some clinical interest. No simple correlation of the water exchange and the following clinical investigations was observed: the white count, the percentage of promyelocites and myeloblasts, the sedimentation rate of blood, the osmotic fragility of erythrocytes, the total concentration of proteins, albumin and immunoglobulins, respectively, in plasma.

  1. Solid state 31phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance of iron-, manganese-, and copper-containing synthetic hydroxyapatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Taylor, R. E.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for Lunar or Martian outposts. Solid state 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was utilized to examine the paramagnetic effects of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ to determine if they were incorporated into the SHA structure. Separate Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ containing SHA materials along with a transition metal free SHA (pure-SHA) were synthesized using a precipitation method. The proximity (concentrations were incorporated in the SHA structure. Iron-, Mn-, and Cu-containing SHA are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu in the ALS cropping system.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemometrics to identify pine nuts that cause taste disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Helmut; Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Tschiersch, Christopher; Vancutsem, Jeroen; Thielert, Gerhard; Mohring, Arne; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2011-07-13

    Nontargeted 400 MHz (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used in the context of food surveillance to reveal Pinus species whose nuts cause taste disturbance following their consumption, the so-called pine nut syndrome (PNS). Using principal component analysis, three groups of pine nuts were distinguished. PNS-causing products were found in only one of the groups, which however also included some normal products. Sensory analysis was still required to confirm PNS, but NMR allowed the sorting of 53% of 57 samples, which belong to the two groups not containing PNS species. Furthermore, soft independent modeling of class analogy was able to classify the samples between the three groups. NMR spectroscopy was judged as suitable for the screening of pine nuts for PNS. This process may be advantageous as a means of importation control that will allow the identification of samples suitable for direct clearance and those that require further sensory analysis.

  3. Cardiovascular imaging in the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiotoxicity: cardiovascular magnetic resonance and nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alessia; Pizzino, Fausto; Gargiulo, Paola; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale; Cadeddu, Christian; Mele, Donato; Monte, Ines; Novo, Giuseppina; Zito, Concetta; Di Bella, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity (CTX) is a determining factor for the quality of life and mortality of patients administered potentially cardiotoxic drugs and in long-term cancer survivors. Therefore, prevention and early detection of CTX are highly desirable, as is the exploration of alternative therapeutic strategies and/or the proposal of potentially cardioprotective treatments. In recent years, cardiovascular imaging has acquired a pivotal role in this setting. Although echocardiography remains the diagnostic method most used to monitor cancer patients, the need for more reliable, reproducible and accurate detection of early chemotherapy-induced CTX has encouraged the introduction of second-line advanced imaging modalities, such as cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques, into the clinical setting. This review of the Working Group on Drug Cardiotoxicity and Cardioprotection of the Italian Society of Cardiology aims to afford an overview of the most important findings from the literature about the role of CMR and nuclear techniques in the management of chemotherapy-treated patients, describe conventional and new parameters for detecting CTX from both diagnostic and prognostic perspectives and provide integrated insight into the role of CMR and nuclear techniques compared with other imaging tools and versus the positions of the most important international societies.

  4. Discriminating poststroke depression from stroke by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jianqi Xiao,1,* Jie Zhang,2,* Dan Sun,3,* Lin Wang,4,* Lijun Yu,5 Hongjing Wu,5 Dan Wang,5 Xuerong Qiu5 1Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Qiqihar City, Qiqihar, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital of Jiamusi City, Jiamusi, 3Department of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Daqing Oil Field, Daqing, 4Department of Nursing, 5Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Qiqihar City, Qiqihar, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Poststroke depression (PSD, the most common psychiatric disease that stroke survivors face, is estimated to affect ~30% of poststroke patients. However, there are still no objective methods to diagnose PSD. In this study, to explore the differential metabolites in the urine of PSD subjects and to identify a potential biomarker panel for PSD diagnosis, the nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic method was applied. Ten differential metabolites responsible for discriminating PSD subjects from healthy control (HC and stroke subjects were found, and five of these metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers (lactate, α-hydroxybutyrate, phenylalanine, formate, and arabinitol. The panel consisting of these five metabolites provided excellent performance in discriminating PSD subjects from HC and stroke subjects, achieving an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.946 in the training set (43 HC, 45 stroke, and 62 PSD subjects. Moreover, this panel could classify the blinded samples from the test set (31 HC, 33 stroke, and 32 PSD subjects with an area under the curve of 0.946. These results laid a foundation for the future development of urine-based objective methods for PSD diagnosis and investigation of PSD pathogenesis. Keywords: poststroke depression, PSD, stroke, nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, metabonomic

  5. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance in osteoporosis evaluation; Aplicacoes de ressonancia magnetica nuclear na avaliacao de osteoporose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannoni, Ricardo A., E-mail: giannoni@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Montrazi, Elton T.; Bonagamba, Tito J., E-mail: elton.montrazi@gmail.com, E-mail: tito@ifsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cesar, Reinaldo, E-mail: reinaldofisica@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2013-07-01

    In this work, initially ceramic samples of known porosity were used. These ceramic samples were saturated with water. The nuclear magnetic resonance signal due to relaxation processes that the hydrogen nucleus water contained in the pores of this ceramic material was measured. Then these samples were subjected to a process of drying and measures successively. As the water contained in pores greater evaporates the intensity of signal decreases and shows the sign because of the smaller pores. The analysis of this drying process gives a qualitative assessment of the pore size of the material. In a second step, bones of animals of unknown porosity underwent the same methodology for evaluating osteoporosis. Also a sample of human vertebra in a unique manner, with the same purpose was measured. Combined with other techniques is a quantitative evaluation of the possible porosity.

  6. Angstrom-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Single Molecules via Wave-Function Fingerprints of Nuclear Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Long; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2016-08-01

    Single-molecule sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and angstrom resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the highest challenges in magnetic microscopy. Recent development in dynamical-decoupling- (DD) enhanced diamond quantum sensing has enabled single-nucleus NMR and nanoscale NMR. Similar to conventional NMR and MRI, current DD-based quantum sensing utilizes the "frequency fingerprints" of target nuclear spins. The frequency fingerprints by their nature cannot resolve different nuclear spins that have the same noise frequency or differentiate different types of correlations in nuclear-spin clusters, which limit the resolution of single-molecule MRI. Here we show that this limitation can be overcome by using "wave-function fingerprints" of target nuclear spins, which is much more sensitive than the frequency fingerprints to the weak hyperfine interaction between the targets and a sensor under resonant DD control. We demonstrate a scheme of angstrom-resolution MRI that is capable of counting and individually localizing single nuclear spins of the same frequency and characterizing the correlations in nuclear-spin clusters. A nitrogen-vacancy-center spin sensor near a diamond surface, provided that the coherence time is improved by surface engineering in the near future, may be employed to determine with angstrom resolution the positions and conformation of single molecules that are isotope labeled. The scheme in this work offers an approach to breaking the resolution limit set by the "frequency gradients" in conventional MRI and to reaching the angstrom-scale resolution.

  7. On-line monitoring of chemical reactions by using bench-top nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, E; Perlo, J; Duchateau, A L L; Verzijl, G K M; Litvinov, V M; Blümich, B; Casanova, F

    2014-10-06

    Real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements carried out with a bench-top system installed next to the reactor inside the fume hood of the chemistry laboratory are presented. To test the system for on-line monitoring, a transfer hydrogenation reaction was studied by continuously pumping the reaction mixture from the reactor to the magnet and back in a closed loop. In addition to improving the time resolution provided by standard sampling methods, the use of such a flow setup eliminates the need for sample preparation. Owing to the progress in terms of field homogeneity and sensitivity now available with compact NMR spectrometers, small molecules dissolved at concentrations on the order of 1 mmol L(-1) can be characterized in single-scan measurements with 1 Hz resolution. Owing to the reduced field strength of compact low-field systems compared to that of conventional high-field magnets, the overlap in the spectrum of different NMR signals is a typical situation. The data processing required to obtain concentrations in the presence of signal overlap are discussed in detail, methods such as plain integration and line-fitting approaches are compared, and the accuracy of each method is determined. The kinetic rates measured for different catalytic concentrations show good agreement with those obtained with gas chromatography as a reference analytical method. Finally, as the measurements are performed under continuous flow conditions, the experimental setup and the flow parameters are optimized to maximize time resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garitezi, T. M.; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    We report high field 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe2As2 single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T0≃128 K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency νQ≃2.57(1) MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe2As2 compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe-As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T0 in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T0 suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe2As2 [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  9. A solid state nuclear magnetic resonance study of industrial inorganic pigments

    CERN Document Server

    Dajda, N

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has been used to look at a number of colourful ceramic pigment systems, most of which are sold commercially in large quantities. Doped zircon (ZrSiO sub 4) pigments were examined using sup 1 sup 9 F, sup 2 sup 3 Na, sup 2 sup 9 Si, sup 5 sup 1 V and sup 9 sup 1 Zr NMR. In these systems, paramagnetic species are incorporated into the sample in small quantities creating the colourful pigment. The impurity dopants in the systems studied either dope directly into lattice sites in the zircon, or form an extra chemical phase. NMR was able to distinguish between these two doping mechanisms in a number of doped zircon pigments. Most spectra showed effects which were due to the magnetic influence of paramagnetic colouring species, and the strength of the interaction depended on the magnetic moment of the ion containing the unpaired electron. In the case of vanadium doped zircon, the moment was small enough that it allowed extra contact shifted peaks to be resolved in the spectra which indica...

  10. Quantification of aquifer properties with surface nuclear magnetic resonance in the Platte River valley, central Nebraska, using a novel inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Trevor P.; Hobza, Christopher M.; Steele, Gregory V.; Abraham, Jared D.; Cannia, James C.; Woodward, Duane D.

    2012-01-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance, a noninvasive geophysical method, measures a signal directly related to the amount of water in the subsurface. This allows for low-cost quantitative estimates of hydraulic parameters. In practice, however, additional factors influence the signal, complicating interpretation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Central Platte Natural Resources District, evaluated whether hydraulic parameters derived from surface nuclear magnetic resonance data could provide valuable input into groundwater models used for evaluating water-management practices. Two calibration sites in Dawson County, Nebraska, were chosen based on previous detailed hydrogeologic and geophysical investigations. At both sites, surface nuclear magnetic resonance data were collected, and derived parameters were compared with results from four constant-discharge aquifer tests previously conducted at those same sites. Additionally, borehole electromagnetic-induction flowmeter data were analyzed as a less-expensive surrogate for traditional aquifer tests. Building on recent work, a novel surface nuclear magnetic resonance modeling and inversion method was developed that incorporates electrical conductivity and effects due to magnetic-field inhomogeneities, both of which can have a substantial impact on the data. After comparing surface nuclear magnetic resonance inversions at the two calibration sites, the nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived parameters were compared with previously performed aquifer tests in the Central Platte Natural Resources District. This comparison served as a blind test for the developed method. The nuclear magnetic-resonance-derived aquifer parameters were in agreement with results of aquifer tests where the environmental noise allowed data collection and the aquifer test zones overlapped with the surface nuclear magnetic resonance testing. In some cases, the previously performed aquifer tests were not designed fully to characterize

  11. Phytate Hydrolysis in Rat Gastrointestinal Tracts, as Observed by 31P Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Alan; Richards, Colin P.; Trimble, Mary L.

    1983-01-01

    Phytate hydrolysis was followed through rat gastrointestinal tracts by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No phytate hydrolysis products were detected in the diet, stomach, or small intestine. It was concluded that cecal bacteria were responsible for phytate hydrolysis, which continued in the colon and fecal pellet.

  12. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  13. Rationale for the combination of nuclear medicine with magnetic resonance for pre-clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Douglas J; Kapusta, Maciej; Li, Junqiang; Patt, Bradley E

    2006-08-01

    Multi-modality combinations of SPECT/CT and PET/CT have proven to be highly successful in the clinic and small animal SPECT/CT and PET/CT are becoming the norm in the research and drug development setting. However, the use of ionizing radiation from a high-resolution CT scanner is undesirable in any setting and particularly in small animal imaging (SAI), in laboratory experiments where it can result in radiation doses of sufficient magnitude that the experimental results can be influenced by the organism's response to radiation. The alternative use of magnetic resonance (MR) would offer a high-resolution, non-ionizing method for anatomical imaging of laboratory animals. MR brings considerably more than its 3D anatomical capability, especially regarding the imaging of laboratory animals. Dynamic MR imaging techniques can facilitate studies of perfusion, oxygenation, and diffusion amongst others. Further, MR spectroscopy can provide images that can be related to the concentration of endogenous molecules in vivo. MR imaging of injected contrast agents extends MR into the domain of molecular imaging. In combination with nuclear medicine (NM) SPECT and PET modalities in small animal imaging, MR would facilitate studies of dynamic processes such as biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. However, the detectors for nearly all PET and SPECT systems are still based on vacuum tube technology, namely: photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) in which the signal is generated by transporting electrons over a substantial distance within an evacuated glass tube, making them inoperable in even small magnetic fields. Thus the combination of SPECT or PET with MR has not been practical until the recent availability of semiconductor detectors such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD's) for PET and CdZnTe (CZT) detectors for SPECT coupled with the availability of high-density low noise ASIC electronics to read out the semiconductor detectors. The strong advantage of these

  14. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  15. Fabrication and Magnetic Properties of Co-Doped TiO2 Powders Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Shi-Hui; WANG Xin-Wei; KOU Xiao-Ming; ZHOU Xue-Yun; XI Li; ZUO Ya-Lu; YANG Xiao-Lin; ZHAO Yu-Xuan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Co0.04 Ti0.96 O2 powders are fabricated by sol-gel method. The structure and magnetic properties are investigated under different annealing conditions systematically with emphasis on the influence of oxygen pressure. Pure anatase structure was acquired for all the samples annealed at 450 ℃ for one hour. The samples annealed in air exhibit evident room-temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) with a small magnetic moment of 0.029μB per Co atom and coercivity Hc of 26 Oe, while the samples annealed in vacuum have strong RTFM with a larger magnetic moment of 1.18 μB per Co atom and Hc of 430 Oe. The zero-field spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 59 Co is obtained to prove the existence of Co clusters in the latter samples, implying that the Co clusters are responsible for the strong RTFM in the samples annealed in vacuum. No Co cluster could be observed using both XPS and NMR techniques in the samples annealed in air, implying that the RTFM found in these samples is intrinsic.

  16. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in inhomogeneous magnetic fields: A fast two-dimensional J-resolved experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuqing; Lin, Yung-Ya; Cai, Shuhui; Yang, Yu; Sun, Huijun; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-03-14

    High spectral resolution in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a prerequisite for achieving accurate information relevant to molecular structures and composition assignments. The continuous development of superconducting magnets guarantees strong and homogeneous static magnetic fields for satisfactory spectral resolution. However, there exist circumstances, such as measurements on biological tissues and heterogeneous chemical samples, where the field homogeneity is degraded and spectral line broadening seems inevitable. Here we propose an NMR method, named intermolecular zero-quantum coherence J-resolved spectroscopy (iZQC-JRES), to face the challenge of field inhomogeneity and obtain desired high-resolution two-dimensional J-resolved spectra with fast acquisition. Theoretical analyses for this method are given according to the intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence treatment. Experiments on (a) a simple chemical solution and (b) an aqueous solution of mixed metabolites under externally deshimmed fields, and on (c) a table grape sample with intrinsic field inhomogeneity from magnetic susceptibility variations demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of the iZQC-JRES method. The application of this method to inhomogeneous chemical and biological samples, maybe in vivo samples, appears promising.

  17. Advances in high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance methods in inhomogeneous magnetic fields using intermolecular multiple quantum coherences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Strong and extremely homogeneous static magnetic field is usually required for high-resolution nu-clear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, in the cases of in vivo and so on, the magnetic field inho-mogeneity owing to magnetic susceptibility variation in samples is unavoidable and hard to eliminate by conventional methods such as shimming. Recently, intermolecular multiple quantum coherences (iMQCs) have been employed to eliminate inhomogeneous broadening and obtain high-resolution NMR spectra, especially for in vivo samples. Compared to other high-resolution NMR methods, iMQC method exhibits its unique feature and advantage. It simultaneously holds information of chemical shifts, multiplet structures, coupling constants, and relative peak areas. All the information is often used to analyze and characterize molecular structures in conventional one-dimensional NMR spec-troscopy. In this work, recent technical developments including our results in this field are summarized; the high-resolution mechanism is analyzed and comparison with other methods based on interactions between spins is made; comments on the current situation and outlook on the research directions are also made.

  18. Single spin magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  19. Characterization of elastic interactions in GaAs/Si composites by optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ryan M.; Tokarski, John T.; McCarthy, Lauren A.; Stanton, Christopher J.; Bowers, Clifford R.

    2016-08-01

    Elastic interactions in GaAs/Si bilayer composite structures were studied by optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance (OPNMR). The composites were fabricated by epoxy bonding of a single crystal of GaAs to a single crystal of Si at 373 K followed by selective chemical etching of the GaAs at room temperature to obtain a series of samples with GaAs thickness varying from 37 μm to 635 μm, while the Si support thickness remained fixed at 650 μm. Upon cooling to below 10 K, a biaxial tensile stress developed in the GaAs film due to differential thermal contraction. The strain perpendicular to the plane of the bilayer and localized near the surface of the GaAs was deduced from the quadrupolar splitting of the Gallium-71 OPNMR resonance. Strain relaxation by bowing of the composite was observed to an extent that depended on the relative thickness of the GaAs and Si layers. The variation of the strain with GaAs layer thickness was found to be in good agreement with a general analytical model for the elastic relationships in composite media.

  20. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-03-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  1. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, R S; Babauta, J T; Majors, P D; Mehta, H S; Ewing, R J; Ewing, T W; Mueller, K T; Beyenal, H

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for noninvasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live biofilms respiring on electrodes. Here, we describe a biofilm microreactor system, including a reusable and a disposable reactor, that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radio frequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms on electrodes. EC-NMR was used to investigate growth medium flow velocities and depth-resolved acetate concentration inside the biofilm. As a novel contribution we used Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate the standard deviations of the acetate concentration measurements. Overall, we found that the disposable EC-NMR microreactor provided a 9.7 times better signal-to-noise ratio over the reusable reactor. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of a Bi2Te3 topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podorozhkin, D. Yu.; Charnaya, E. V.; Antonenko, A.; Mukhamad'yarov, R.; Marchenkov, V. V.; Naumov, S. V.; Huang, J. C. A.; Weber, H. W.; Bugaev, A. S.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of a grown high-quality Bi2Te3 semiconductor single crystal have been presented. Signals from the 125Te isotope were detected by the spin echo method in the range from 10 K to room temperature. It was found that the NMR spectrum consists of two lines. The line with a positive shift of the resonance frequency corresponded to the bulk of the sample. The line with a negative shift was interpreted as a signal from the surface of the single crystal. The temperature and orientational dependences of the positions of the NMR line of nuclei in the bulk of the crystal were studied. It was shown that the shifts are mainly determined by the Knight shift due to the interaction with mobile charge carriers. The thermoactivation character of the concentration of mobile charges in the crystal under study, which corresponds to the intrinsic conductance, was proved, and the energy parameters of the thermoactivation processes were calculated.

  3. Low-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of systems frustrated by competing exchange interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Beas

    This doctoral thesis emphasizes on the study of frustrated systems which form a very interesting class of compounds in physics. The technique used for the investigation of the magnetic properties of the frustrated materials is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR is a very novel tool for the microscopic study of the spin systems. NMR enables us to investigate the local magnetic properties of any system exclusively. The NMR experiments on the different systems yield us knowledge of the static as well as the dynamic behavior of the electronic spins. Frustrated systems bear great possibilities of revelation of new physics through the new ground states they exhibit. The vandates AA'VO(PO4)2 [AA' ≡ Zn2 and BaCd] are great prototypes of the J1-J2 model which consists of magnetic ions sitting on the corners of a square lattice. Frustration is caused by the competing nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) exchange interactions. The NMR investigation concludes a columnar antiferromagnetic (AFM) state for both the compounds from the sharp peak of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) and a sudden broadening of the 31P-NMR spectrum. The important conclusion from our study is the establishment of the first H-P-T phase diagram of BaCdVO(PO4)2. Application of high pressure reduces the saturation field (HS) in BaCdVO(PO4)2 and decreases the ratio J2/J1, pushing the system more towards a questionable boundary (a disordered ground state) between the columnar AFM and a ferromagnetic ground state. A pressure up to 2.4 GPa will completely suppress HS. The Fe ions in the `122' iron-arsenide superconductors also sit on a square lattice thus closely resembling the J1-J2 model. The 75As-NMR and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments are conducted in the compound CaFe2As2 prepared by two different heat treatment methods (`as-grown' and `annealed'). Interestingly the two samples show two different ground states. While the ground state of the `as

  4. Advances and applications of dynamic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltisberger, J.H.

    1993-06-01

    This dissertation describes nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and theory which have been developed to study quadrupolar nuclei (those nuclei with spin greater than one-half) in the solid state. Primarily, the technique of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) is extensively reviewed and expanded upon in this thesis. Specifically, the improvement in both the resolution (two-dimensional pure-absorptive phase methods and DAS angle choice) and sensitivity (pulse-sequence development), along with effective spinning speed enhancement (again through choice of DAS conditions or alternative multiple pulse schemes) of dynamic-angle spinning experiment was realized with both theory and experimental examples. The application of DAS to new types of nuclei (specifically the {sup 87}Rb and {sup 85}Rb nuclear spins) and materials (specifically amorphous solids) has also greatly expanded the possibilities of the use of DAS to study a larger range of materials. This dissertation is meant to demonstrate both recent advances and applications of the DAS technique, and by no means represents a comprehensive study of any particular chemical problem.

  5. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al2O3), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  6. Anvil cell gasket design for high pressure nuclear magnetic resonance experiments beyond 30 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen [Faculty of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Leipzig, Linnéstrasse 5, Leipzig 04103 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are reported at up to 30.5 GPa of pressure using radiofrequency (RF) micro-coils with anvil cell designs. These are the highest pressures ever reported with NMR, and are made possible through an improved gasket design based on nano-crystalline powders embedded in epoxy resin. Cubic boron-nitride (c-BN), corundum (α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), or diamond based composites have been tested, also in NMR experiments. These composite gaskets lose about 1/2 of their initial height up to 30.5 GPa, allowing for larger sample quantities and preventing damages to the RF micro-coils compared to precipitation hardened CuBe gaskets. It is shown that NMR shift and resolution are less affected by the composite gaskets as compared to the more magnetic CuBe. The sensitivity can be as high as at normal pressure. The new, inexpensive, and simple to engineer gaskets are thus superior for NMR experiments at high pressures.

  7. Study on signal intensity of low field nuclear magnetic resonance via an indirect coupling measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Feng-Ying; Wang Ning; Jin Yi-Rong; Deng Hui; Tian Ye; Lang Pei-Lin; Li Jie

    2013-01-01

    We carry out an ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment based on high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs).The measurement field is in a micro-tesla range (~10 μT-100 μT) and the experiment is conducted in a home-made magnetically-shielded-room (MSR).The measurements are performed by the indirect coupling method in which the signal of nuclei precession is indirectly coupled to the SQUID through a tuned copper coil transformer.In such an arrangement,the interferences of applied measurement and polarization field to the SQUID sensor are avoided and the performance of the SQUID is not destroyed.In order to compare the detection sensitivity obtained by using the SQUID with that achieved using a conventional low-noise-amplifier,we perform the measurements using a connercial room temperature amplifier.The results show that in a wide frequency range (~1 kHz-10 kHz) the measurements with the SQUID sensor exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio,Further,we discuss the dependence of NMR peak magnitude on measurement frequency.We attribute the reduction of the peak magnitude at high frequency to the increased field inhomogeneity as the measurement field increases.This is verified by compensating the field gradient using three sets of gradient coils.

  8. /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance study of renal allograft rejection in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, J.I.; Haug, C.E.; Shanley, P.F.; Weil, R. III; Chan, L.

    1988-01-01

    Phosphorus (/sup 31/P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to serially evaluate heterotopic renal allograft rejection in the rat. Renal allografts transplanted to the groin of recipient animals were studied using a 1.89 Tesla horizontal bore magnet. The relative intracellular concentrations of phosphorus metabolites such as adenosine triphosphate and inorganic phosphate as well as intracellular pH were determined by /sup 31/P NMR on days 4, 7, 10, and 14 following transplantation across a major histocompatibility mismatch. Recipient rats chosen to be rejectors received no immunosuppression while animals chosen to be nonrejectors received cyclosporine during the first 7 days following transplantation. By day 7, all rejector rats could be distinguished from nonrejector rats by their higher relative concentration of inorganic phosphate and their lower relative concentration of adenosine triphosphate. These NMR findings correlated with histologic findings of renal infarction probably related to vascular rejection in the allografts. /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy may have application as a noninvasive tool in the differential diagnosis of posttransplantation renal insufficiency.

  9. Partial-Homogeneity-Based Two-Dimensional High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy under Inhomogeneous Magnetic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wenqi; Wei, Zhiliang; Ding, Nan; Yang, Yu; Ye, Qimiao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-18

    High-resolution multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy serves as an irreplaceable and versatile tool in various chemical investigations. In this study, a method based on the concept of partial homogeneity is developed to offer two-dimensional (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra under inhomogeneous fields. Oscillating gradients are exerted to encode the high-resolution information, and a field-inhomogeneity correction algorithm based on pattern recognition is designed to recover high-resolution spectra. Under fields where inhomogeneity primarily distributes along a single orientation, the proposed method will improve performances of 2D NMR spectroscopy without increasing the experimental duration or significant loss in sensitivity, and thus may open important perspectives for studies of inhomogeneous chemical systems.

  10. Iron overload in a teenager with xerocytosis: the importance of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, Reijâne Alves de; Kassab, Carolina; Seguro, Fernanda Salles [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Costa, Fernando Ferreira [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Silveira, Paulo Augusto Achucarro [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Wood, John [University of Southern California, California (United States); Hamerschlak, Nelson [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To report a case of iron overload secondary to xerocytosis, a rare disease in a teenager, diagnosed, by T2* magnetic resonance imaging. We report the case of a symptomatic patient with xerocytosis, a ferritin level of 350ng/mL and a significant cardiac iron overload. She was diagnosed by T2* magnetic resonance imaging and received chelation therapy Ektacytometric analysis confirmed the diagnosis of hereditary xerocytosis. Subsequent T2* magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated complete resolution of the iron overload in various organs, as a new echocardiography revealed a complete resolution of previous cardiac alterations. The patient remains in chelation therapy. Xerocytosis is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by dehydrated stomatocytosis. The patient may present with intense fatigue and iron overload. We suggest the regular use of T2* magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis and control of the response to iron chelation in xerocytosis, and we believe it can be used also in other hemolytic anemia requiring transfusions.

  11. Energy Moment Method Applied to Nuclear Quadrupole Splitting of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, V

    1962-01-01

    Expressions giving the sum of the energy values, raised to the second and third power, for a nucleus interacting with a static magnetic field and a static electric field gradient are derived. Several applications of this method for obtaining the values of the components of the electric field...

  12. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of charge transfer complex formation between Silver Nitrate and Benzylcyanide in Solvent Ethylene Glycol

    CERN Document Server

    Modarress, H

    2003-01-01

    The formation constant for charge transfer complexes between electron acceptor (AgNo sub 3) and electron donor benzylcyanide (C sub 6 H sub 5 -CH sub 2 -C ident to N) in solvent ethyleneglycol [(CH sub 2 OH) sub 2] has been evaluated by using the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of aromatic group of benzylcyanide measured against external references, tetramethylsilane, hexamethyldisilane and cyclohexane at 20 sup d ig sup C. The external referencing procedure eliminated the interference of internal reference in the course of complexation. The necessary bulk magnetic susceptibility corrections on the measured chemical shifts have been made. The solution nationalised and their effects on the formation constant have been considered and a new equation has been suggested to obtain the main ionic activity coefficient of AgNO sub 3 from nuclear magnetic resonance results. The mean ionic activity coefficient has been taken into account in the formation constant calculations. The results indicated that the a...

  14. Fast high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy through indirect zero-quantum coherence detection in inhomogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Han-Ping; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan-Qin; Wei, Zhi-Liang; Cai, Shu-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Zhong

    2014-06-01

    In many cases, high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra are virtually impossible to obtain by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance methods because of inhomogeneity of magnetic field and inherent heterogeneity of sample. Although conventional intramolecular zero-quantum coherence (ZQC) can be used to obtain high-resolution spectrum in inhomogeneous field, the acquisition takes rather long time. In this paper, a spatially encoded intramolecular ZQC technique is proposed to fast acquire high-resolution NMR spectrum in inhomogeneous field. For the first time, the gradient-driven decoding technique is employed to selectively acquire intramolecular ZQC signals. Theoretical analyses and experimental observations demonstrate that high-resolution NMR spectral information can be retrieved within several scans even when the field inhomogeneity is severe enough to erase most spectral information. This work provides a new way to enhance the acquisition efficiency of high-resolution intramolecular ZQC spectroscopy in inhomogeneous fields.

  15. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jachmann, Rebecca C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  16. New Methodology For Use in Rotating Field Nuclear MagneticResonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jachmann, Rebecca C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-18

    High-resolution NMR spectra of samples with anisotropicbroadening are simplified to their isotropic spectra by fast rotation ofthe sample at the magic angle 54.7 circ. This dissertation concerns thedevelopment of novel Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies basedwhich would rotate the magnetic field instead of the sample, rotatingfield NMR. It provides an over of the NMR concepts, procedures, andexperiments needed to understand the methodologies that will be used forrotating field NMR. A simple two-dimensional shimming method based onharmonic corrector rings which can provide arbitrary multiple ordershimming corrections were developed for rotating field systems, but couldbe used in shimming other systems as well. Those results demonstrate, forexample, that quadrupolar order shimming improves the linewidth by up toan order of magnitude. An additional order of magnitude reduction is inprinciple achievable by utilizing this shimming method for z-gradientcorrection and higher order xy gradients. A specialized pulse sequencefor the rotating field NMR experiment is under development. The pulsesequence allows for spinning away from the magic angle and spinningslower than the anisotropic broadening. This pulse sequence is acombination of the projected magic angle spinning (p-MAS) and magic angleturning (MAT) pulse sequences. This will be useful to rotating field NMRbecause there are limits on how fast a field can be spun and spin at themagic angle is difficult. One of the goals of this project is forrotating field NMR to be used on biological systems. The p-MAS pulsesequence was successfully tested on bovine tissue samples which suggeststhat it will be a viable methodology to use in a rotating field set up. Aside experiment on steering magnetic particle by MRI gradients was alsocarried out. Some movement was seen in these experiment, but for totalcontrol over steering further experiments would need to bedone.

  17. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  18. Probing beer aging chemistry by nuclear magnetic resonance and multivariate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, J.A. [CICECO-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Barros, A.S. [QOPNA-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Carvalho, B.; Brandao, T. [UNICER, Bebidas de Portugal, Leca do Balio, 4466-955, S. Mamede de Infesta (Portugal); Gil, Ana M., E-mail: agil@ua.pt [CICECO-Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-09-30

    Graphical abstract: The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days) is described. Both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and an aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration revealed the importance of well known markers (e.g. 5-HMF) as well as of other compounds: amino acids, higher alcohols, organic acids, dextrins and some still unassigned spin systems. 2D correlation analysis enabled relevant compound variations to be confirmed and inter-compound correlations to be assessed, thus offering improved insight into the chemical aspects of beer aging. Highlights: {center_dot} Use of NMR metabonomics for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in beer exposed to forced aging. {center_dot} Compositional variations evaluated by principal component analysis and partial least squares-discriminant analysis. {center_dot} Results reveal importance of known markers and other compounds: amino and organic acids, higher alcohols, dextrins. {center_dot} 2D correlation analysis reveals inter-compound relationships, offering insight into beer aging chemistry. - Abstract: This paper describes the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in tandem with multivariate analysis (MVA), for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to forced aging (at 45 deg. C for up to 18 days). To evaluate the resulting compositional variations, both principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR spectra of beer recorded as a function of aging and a clear aging trend was observed. Inspection of PLS-DA loadings and peak integration enabled the changing compounds to be identified, revealing the importance of well known

  19. Tunnel-diode resonator and nuclear magnetic resonance studies of low-dimensional magnetic and superconducting systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeninas, Steven Lee [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis emphasizes two frequency-domain techniques which uniquely employ radio frequency (RF) excitations to investigate the static and dynamic properties of novel magnetic and superconducting materials.

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  1. Nanocrystalline tin oxide: Possible origin of its weak ferromagnetism deduced from nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Lian, Yadong; Gu, Min; Yu, Ji; Tang, Tong B.; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Weiyi

    2016-09-01

    Nanocrystalline tin oxide was fabricated, with molar ratio O/Sn determined as 1.40, 1.55, 1.79, 1.92 and 1.96 from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. They displayed weak ferromagnetism, the sample with O/Sn = 1.55 showing the maximum saturation magnetization reaching almost 8 ×10-3 emu /g at room temperature. 119Sn nuclear magnetic resonance allowed the deduction, based on four resolved resonance peaks, that their Sn ions had four possible coordination numbers, namely 3, 4, 5 and 6. The relative fraction of 4-coordinated cations was the one found to bear positive linear correlation with saturation magnetization of the sample. It is surmised that magnetism in tin oxide results mainly from 4-coordination Sn ions, of valance about +3, as estimated from the binding energies of their 3d photoelectron emission levels.

  2. Thermodynamics of wheat germ agglutinin-sialyloligosaccharide interactions by proton nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronis, K A; Carver, J P

    1985-02-12

    The thermodynamic parameters that characterize the binding of wheat germ agglutinin isolectin I (WGA I) to the alpha 2-3 isomer of (N-acetylneuraminyl)lactose have been determined by 360-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The chemical exchange of the ligand between the free and bound sites resulted in a broadening and upfield shifting of the N-acetyl methyl resonance [Kronis, K.A., & Carver, J.P. (1985) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)] which has allowed the determination of the equilibrium constant, KD, and the dissociation rate constant, kD. In this paper, the analysis of the temperature dependence of the KD values between 25.4 and 51.6 degrees C yielded equilibrium parameters indicative of a large entropy barrier to binding: delta H degree = -13.3 +/- 1.0 kcal mol-1 and delta S degree = -31.9 +/- 2.4 cal mol-1 K-1. The Arrhenius plot of the effect of temperature on the dissociation rate (kD) and the plot of 1n (kD/T) vs. 1/T indicated that the transition complex represented an unfavorable energy state compared to the dissociated molecules with an activation energy (EA) of +18.0 kcal mol-1 and enthalpy and entropy of dissociation (delta HD not equal to and delta SD not equal to) values of +17.4 +/- 0.3 kcal mol-1 and +13.4 +/- 1.2 cal mol-1 K-1, respectively. The driving force for this binding reaction is the large negative delta H degree with a small enthalpic barrier to association (delta HA = +4.1 kcal mol-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Recent Advances in Characterization of Lignin Polymer by Solution-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run-Cang Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for efficient utilization of biomass induces a detailed analysis of the fundamental chemical structures of biomass, especially the complex structures of lignin polymers, which have long been recognized for their negative impact on biorefinery. Traditionally, it has been attempted to reveal the complicated and heterogeneous structure of lignin by a series of chemical analyses, such as thioacidolysis (TA, nitrobenzene oxidation (NBO, and derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC. Recent advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR technology undoubtedly have made solution-state NMR become the most widely used technique in structural characterization of lignin due to its versatility in illustrating structural features and structural transformations of lignin polymers. As one of the most promising diagnostic tools, NMR provides unambiguous evidence for specific structures as well as quantitative structural information. The recent advances in two-dimensional solution-state NMR techniques for structural analysis of lignin in isolated and whole cell wall states (in situ, as well as their applications are reviewed.

  4. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2017-02-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the data set, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modelling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modelling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal-to-noise ratio in the data by 10 per cent. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multilayered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  5. Rapid detection of peanut oil adulteration using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenran; Wang, Xin; Chen, Lihua

    2017-02-01

    (1)H low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) and chemometrics were employed to screen the quality changes of peanut oil (PEO) adulterated with soybean oil (SO), rapeseed oil (RO), or palm oil (PAO) in ratios ranging from 0% to 100%. Significant differences in the LF-NMR parameters, single component relaxation time (T2W), and peak area proportion (S21 and S22), were detected between pure and adulterated peanut oil samples. As the ratio of adulteration increased, the T2W, S21, and S22 changed linearly; however, the multicomponent relaxation times (T21 and T22) changed slightly. The established principal component analysis or discriminant analysis models can correctly differentiate authentic PEO from fake and adulterated samples with at least 10% of SO, RO, or PAO. The binary blends of oils can be clearly classified by discriminant analysis when the adulteration ratio is above 30%, illustrating possible applications in screening the oil species in peanut oil blends.

  6. Relaxation study of cement based grouting material using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xianzhong; Lin Baiquan; Zhai Cheng; Ni Guanhua; Li Ziwen

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at actual condition of poor effect of hole sealing for the reason of poor cement paste fluidity in the process of coal mine gas drainage,by adding a water reducing agent,cement paste for hole sealing was produced.The changes of initial distribution,weighted average values and total relaxation signal intensity of transverse relaxation time (T2) of water in pure cement paste and water reducing agent added cement paste were studied with low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).The results show that there are four peaks in T2 distribution curves of cement paste:the first peak is related to the bound water in flocculation,the second and the third peaks are related to the water in flocculation,water reducing agent makes it extending towards the long relaxation time,increasing its liquidity,and the fourth peak is related to the free water.By using weighted average values of T2 and total relaxation signal intensity,hydration process of cement pastes could be roughly divided into four stages:the initial period,reaction period,accelerated period and steady period.By analyzing the periods,it makes sure that the grouting process should be completed in the reaction period in the site,and the drainage process should be started in the steady period.The results have great guiding significance to the hole sealing and methane drainage.

  7. Relaxation study of cement based grouting material using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li; Xianzhong; Lin; Baiquan; Zhai; Cheng; Ni; Guanhua; Li; Ziwen

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at actual condition of poor effect of hole sealing for the reason of poor cement paste fluidity in the process of coal mine gas drainage,by adding a water reducing agent,cement paste for hole sealing was produced.The changes of initial distribution,weighted average values and total relaxation signal intensity of transverse relaxation time(T 2) of water in pure cement paste and water reducing agent added cement paste were studied with low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR).The results show that there are four peaks in T2 distribution curves of cement paste:the first peak is related to the bound water in flocculation,the second and the third peaks are related to the water in flocculation,water reducing agent makes it extending towards the long relaxation time,increasing its liquidity,and the fourth peak is related to the free water.By using weighted average values of T2 and total relaxation signal intensity,hydration process of cement pastes could be roughly divided into four stages:the initial period,reaction period,accelerated period and steady period.By analyzing the periods,it makes sure that the grouting process should be completed in the reaction period in the site,and the drainage process should be started in the steady period.The results have great guiding significance to the hole sealing and methane drainage.

  8. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, D.; Meier, R.; Rachocki, A.; Korpała, A.; Singh, R. K.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-06-01

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220-258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF4, 243-318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF6, 258-323 K). The dispersion of 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate R1(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by 19F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF6 in the corresponding frequency range. From the 1H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF4, and BMIM-PF6 are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the 1H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R1 on square root of frequency. From the 19F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF6. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  9. Serum Metabolomic Profiling of Sulphur Mustard-Exposed Individuals Using (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Zahra; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunus; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Mirkhani, Fatemeh; Parvin, Shahram; Salehi, Maryam; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Vahabi, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur mustard is an alkylating agent that reacts with different cellular components, causing acute and delayed complications that may remain for decades after exposure. This study aimed to identify differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed individuals suffering from chronic complications compared with unexposed individuals as the control group. Serum samples were obtained from 15 mustard-exposed individuals and 15 apparently healthy unexposed individuals. Metabolomic profiling was performed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and analyses were carried out using Chenomex and MATLAB softwares. Metabolites were identified using Human Metabolome Database, and the main metabolic pathways were identified using MetaboAnalyst software. Chemometric analysis of serum samples identified 11 differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed and unexposed groups. The main pathways that were influenced by sulphur mustard exposure were related to vitamin B6 (down-regulation), bile acid (up-regulation) and tryptophan (down-regulation) metabolism. Metabolism of vitamin B6, bile acids and tryptophan are the most severely impaired pathways in individuals suffering from chronic mustard-induced complications. These findings may find implications in the monitoring of exposed patients and identification of new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolo, N.R.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of ({sup 13}C-4) to ({sup 13}C-5)-glutamate, ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-alanine or ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-lactate produced when ({sup 13}C-2)-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the {sup 13}C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in {sup 13}C NMR human studies from the current literature.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolo, N.R.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of [{sup 13}C-4] to [{sup 13}C-5]-glutamate, [{sup 13}C-3] to [{sup 13}C-2]-alanine or [{sup 13}C-3] to [{sup 13}C-2]-lactate produced when [{sup 13}C-2]-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the {sup 13}C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in {sup 13}C NMR human studies from the current literature.

  12. Gas vesicles across kingdoms: a comparative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviso, Eugenio; Belenky, Marina; Griffin, Robert G; Herzfeld, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The buoyancy organelles of aquatic microorganisms have to meet stringent specifications: allowing gases to equilibrate freely across the proteinaceous shell, preventing the condensation of water vapor inside the hollow cavity and resisting collapse under hydrostatic pressures that vary with column depth. These properties are provided by the 7- to 8-kDa gas vesicle protein A (GvpA), repeats of which form all but small, specialized portions of the shell. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance is uniquely capable of providing high-resolution information on the fold and assembly of GvpA. Here we compare results for the gas vesicles of the haloarchaea Halobacterium salinarum with those obtained previously for the cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae. The data suggest that the two organisms follow similar strategies for avoiding water condensation. On the other hand, in its relatively shallow habitat, H. salinarum is able to avoid collapse with a less costly GvpA fold than is adopted by A. flos-aquae.

  13. Detecting unfrozen sediments below thermokarst lakes with surface nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, Andrew D.; Grosse, Guido; Walbrecker, Jan O.; Müller-Petke, Mike; Keating, Kristina; Liu, Lin; Jones, Benjamin M.; Knight, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    A talik is a layer or body of unfrozen ground that occurs in permafrost due to an anomaly in thermal, hydrological, or hydrochemical conditions. Information about talik geometry is important for understanding regional surface water and groundwater interactions as well as sublacustrine methane production in thermokarst lakes. Due to the direct measurement of unfrozen water content, surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a promising geophysical method for noninvasively estimating talik dimensions. We made surface NMR measurements on thermokarst lakes and terrestrial permafrost near Fairbanks, Alaska, and confirmed our results using limited direct measurements. At an 8 m deep lake, we observed thaw bulb at least 22 m below the surface; at a 1.4 m deep lake, we detected a talik extending between 5 and 6 m below the surface. Our study demonstrates the value that surface NMR may have in the cryosphere for studies of thermokarst lake hydrology and their related role in the carbon cycle.

  14. Molecular dynamics and composition of crude oil by low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zijian; Xiao, Lizhi; Wang, Zhizhan; Liao, Guangzhi; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Can

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are widely used to identify pure substances and probe protein dynamics. Oil is a complex mixture composed of hydrocarbons, which have a wide range of molecular size distribution. Previous work show that empirical correlations of relaxation times and diffusion coefficients were found for simple alkane mixtures, and also the shape of the relaxation and diffusion distribution functions are related to the composition of the fluids. The 2D NMR is a promising qualitative evaluation method for oil composition. But uncertainty in the interpretation of crude oil indicated further study was required. In this research, the effect of each composition on relaxation distribution functions is analyzed in detail. We also suggest a new method for prediction of the rotational correlation time distribution of crude oil molecules using low field NMR (LF-NMR) relaxation time distributions. A set of down-hole NMR fluid analysis system is independently designed and developed for fluid measurement. We illustrate this with relaxation-relaxation correlation experiments and rotational correlation time distributions on a series of hydrocarbon mixtures that employ our laboratory-designed downhole NMR fluid analyzer. The LF-NMR is a useful tool for detecting oil composition and monitoring oil property changes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Empirical compensation function for eddy current effects in pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X X; Macdonald, P M

    1995-05-01

    An empirical compensation function for the correction of eddy current effects in the Stejskal-Tanner pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments has been established. Eddy currents may arise as a result of the application of sharp and strong gradient pulses and may cause severe distortion of the NMR signals. In this method, the length of one gradient pulse is altered to compensate for the eddy current effects. The compensation is considered to be ideal when the position and the phase of the spin-echo maximum obtained from an aqueous solution of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is the same in the presence and absence of a gradient pulse in the PGSE pulse sequence. We first characterized the functional dependence of the length of the required compensation on the three principal variables in the PGSE experiment: the gradient strength, the duration of the gradient pulse, and the interval between the two gradient pulses. Subsequently, we derived a model which successfully describes the general relationship between these variables and the size of the induced eddy current. The parameters extracted from fitting the model to the experimental compensation data may be used to predict the correct compensation for any combination of the three principal variables.

  16. Discrimination of hexabromocyclododecane from new polymeric brominated flame retardant in polystyrene foam by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannerat, Damien; Pupier, Marion; Schweizer, Sébastien; Mitrev, Yavor Nikolaev; Favreau, Philippe; Kohler, Marcel

    2016-02-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) is a brominated flame retardant (BFR) and major additive to polystyrene foam thermal insulation that has recently been listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. During a 2013/2014 field analytical survey, we measured HBCDD content ranging from 0.2 to 2.4% by weight in 98 polystyrene samples. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses indicated that expandable (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams significantly differed in the α/γ HBCDD isomer ratio, with a majority of α and γ isomers in XPS and EPS, respectively. Interestingly, this technique indicated that some recent materials did not contain HBCDD, but demonstrated bromine content when analysed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Further investigation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was able to discriminate between the BFRs present. In addition to confirming the absence or presence of HBCDD in polystyrene samples, high-field NMR spectroscopy provided evidence of the use of brominated butadiene styrene (BBS) as copolymer in the production of polystyrene. Use of this alternative flame retardant is expected to cause fewer health and environmental concerns. Our results highlight a trend towards the use of copolymerized BFRs as an alternative to HBCDD in polystyrene foam boards. In addition to providing a rapid NMR method to identify polymeric BFR, our analytical approach is a simple method to discriminate between flame-retardants in polystyrene foam insulating materials.

  17. Insights into partially folded or unfolded States of metalloproteins from nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turano, Paola

    2004-12-13

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides detailed insights into the conformational features of unfolded and partially folded proteins. In the case of metalloproteins, special attention should be devoted to the characterization of the properties of the metal binding sites, and specific approaches need to be developed depending on the nature of the metal ion and its coordination environment. At the same time, metal-based NMR parameters may help in getting a better picture of the average structural properties of the metalloprotein. A critical evaluation of the limits of applicability of paramagnetic effects for solution structure determination in partially folded or unfolded proteins is presented. The coupling between NMR characterization of structure and dynamic of the polypeptide chain and of the metal environment provides insights into the stabilizing role of metal ions in metalloproteins. The overall approach is illustrated for some case examples of increasing flexibility obtained far from native conditions for cytochrome c and superoxide dismutase, two metalloproteins that have been extensively studied in our lab and whose misfolded forms may be relevant for important biological processes.

  18. Radiation damping and reciprocity in nuclear magnetic resonance: the replacement of the filling factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropp, James; Van Criekinge, Mark

    2010-09-01

    The basic equation describing radiation damping in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is rewritten by means of the reciprocity principle, to remove the dependence of the damping constant upon filling factor - a parameter which is neither uniquely defined for easily measured. The new equation uses instead the transceive efficiency, i.e. the peak amplitude of the radiofrequency B field in laboratory coordinates, divided by the square root of the resistance of the detection coil, for which a simple and direct means of measurement exists. We use the efficiency to define the intrinsic damping constant, i.e. that which obtains when both probe and preamplifier are perfectly matched to the system impedance. For imperfect matching of the preamp, it is shown that the damping constant varies with electrical distance to the probe, and equations are given and simulations performed, to predict the distance dependence, which (for lossless lines) is periodic modulo a half wavelength. Experimental measurements of the radiation-damped free induction NMR signal of protons in neat water are performed at a static B field strength of 14.1T; and an intrinsic damping constant measured using the variable line method. For a sample of 5mm diameter, in an inverse detection probe we measure an intrinsic damping constant of 204 s(-1), corresponding to a damping linewidth of 65 Hz for small tip angles. The predicted intrinsic linewidth, based upon three separate measurements of the efficiency, is 52.3 Hz, or 80% of the measured value.

  19. Soil wettability as determined from using low-field nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Florence P; Kantzas, Apostolos; Langford, Cooper H

    2003-06-15

    The molarity of ethanol droplet and water drop penetration time methods are commonly used to determine soil wettability because these tests are quick and easy to perform. However, these tests do not provide reproducible results on the same sample. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is shown as an alternative tool to determine soil wettability. Addition of small amounts of water in dry wettable porous media produces predominant amplitude peaks at transverse relaxation times (T2) of 100 ms or less while addition of water in dry water-repellent porous media with the same pore structure produce predominant amplitude peaks at T2 values near 1000 ms. The geometric mean of T2 (T(2gm)) from water-repellent samples immediately after the addition of water is greater than 1000 ms, which is close to that of bulk water, while T(2gm) from wettable samples immediately after the addition of water is significantly less than 1000 ms. Measurements over time show that water-repellent samples eventually reach the same equilibrium end point as its corresponding wettable sample when continually exposed to water. This paper will show that NMR can be used to formulate a screening criterion for quickly determining wettability. The advantage of using NMR is that the results are reproducible provided the sample is prepared and analyzed in a systematic manner.

  20. Decomposition of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants into active and passive orbital contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Tuttle, Tell; Cremer, Dieter

    2004-06-01

    The theory of the J-OC-PSP (decomposition of J into orbital contributions using orbital currents and partial spin polarization) method is derived to distinguish between the role of active, passive, and frozen orbitals on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin coupling mechanism. Application of J-OC-PSP to the NMR spin-spin coupling constants of ethylene, which are calculated using coupled perturbed density functional theory in connection with the B3LYP hybrid functional and a [7s,6p,2d/4s,2p] basis set, reveal that the well-known pi mechanism for Fermi contact (FC) spin coupling is based on passive pi orbital contributions. The pi orbitals contribute to the spin polarization of the sigma orbitals at the coupling nuclei by mediating spin information between sigma orbitals (spin-transport mechanism) or by increasing the spin information of a sigma orbital by an echo effect. The calculated FC(pi) value of the SSCC (1)J(CC) of ethylene is 4.5 Hz and by this clearly smaller than previously assumed.

  1. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of tellurite toxicity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M; Ung, Shiela; Turner, Raymond J

    2004-12-01

    Here we compare the physiological state of Escherichia coli exposed to tellurite or selenite by using the noninvasive technique of phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We studied glucose-fed Escherichia coli HB101 cells containing either a normal pUC8 plasmid with no tellurite resistance determinants present or the pTWT100 plasmid which contains the resistance determinants tehAB. No differences could be observed in intracellular ATP levels, the presence or absence of a transmembrane pH gradient, or the levels of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates when resistant cells were studied by 31P NMR in the presence or absence of tellurite. In the sensitive strain, we observed that the transmembrane pH gradient was dissipated and intracellular ATP levels were rapidly depleted upon exposure to tellurite. Only the level of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates remained the same as observed with resistant cells. Upon exposure to selenite, no differences could be observed by 31P NMR between resistant and sensitive strains, suggesting that the routes for selenite and tellurite reduction within the cells differ significantly, since only tellurite is able to collapse the transmembrane pH gradient and lower ATP levels in sensitive cells. The presence of the resistance determinant tehAB, by an as yet unidentified detoxification event, protects the cells from uncoupling by tellurite.

  2. Fricke dosimetry analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance: a comparative study with traditional methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Barbara D.L.; Araujo, Barbara C.R.; Sebastiao, Rita C.O., E-mail: ritacos@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Quimica; Virtuoso, Luciano S. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Alfenas, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Meira-Belo, Luiz C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Dosimetric systems are chosen according to its particular characteristics, monitoring interval and dose detection threshold. This present work proposed comparative study between Fricke dosimeter traditional with the system using polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymer instead the animal gelatin, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spin echo experiments. The interaction between ferrous and ferric ions with hydrogen contained in the base polymer will be investigated through the proton relaxation time distribution, T2, and the PEO as well as having a low commercial value, has a cleaner matrix, which will provide a more informative spectra. The ultraviolet spectra were also analyzed to compare the results. The process of obtaining the microscopic property T2 from the macroscopic spin echo NMR experiments is a problem classified as an ill-conditioned inverse problem. Usually, robust techniques are required to solve this kind of problem and the Hopfield neural network was chosen in this work. The T2 showed a correlation with the applied dose. As the dose is increased, the polymer protons interact more strongly with ferric ion and consequently its relaxation time decreases. The T2 distribution curve modeling assumes a multi-exponential decay in the problem, which represents a more precise theory compared with a T2 average value determination. The neural network approach was numerically stable and robust with respect to deviations in the initial conditions or experimental noises in the echo spin data and a numeric analysis was also performed. The obtained results stated this methodology as a promising tool in dosimetric systems studies. (author)

  3. Metabolomics with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in a Drosophila melanogaster Model of Surviving Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalov, Veli; Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed N.; Clément, Marie-Jeanne; Reyes Uribe, Laura; Le Moyec, Laurence; Kaynar, Ata Murat

    2016-01-01

    Patients surviving sepsis demonstrate sustained inflammation, which has been associated with long-term complications. One of the main mechanisms behind sustained inflammation is a metabolic switch in parenchymal and immune cells, thus understanding metabolic alterations after sepsis may provide important insights to the pathophysiology of sepsis recovery. In this study, we explored metabolomics in a novel Drosophila melanogaster model of surviving sepsis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), to determine metabolite profiles. We used a model of percutaneous infection in Drosophila melanogaster to mimic sepsis. We had three experimental groups: sepsis survivors (infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with oral linezolid), sham (pricked with an aseptic needle), and unmanipulated (positive control). We performed metabolic measurements seven days after sepsis. We then implemented metabolites detected in NMR spectra into the MetExplore web server in order to identify the metabolic pathway alterations in sepsis surviving Drosophila. Our NMR metabolomic approach in a Drosophila model of recovery from sepsis clearly distinguished between all three groups and showed two different metabolomic signatures of inflammation. Sham flies had decreased levels of maltose, alanine, and glutamine, while their level of choline was increased. Sepsis survivors had a metabolic signature characterized by decreased glucose, maltose, tyrosine, beta-alanine, acetate, glutamine, and succinate. PMID:28009836

  4. Absolute quantification for benzoic acid in processed foods using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-09-15

    The absolute quantification method of benzoic acid (BA) in processed foods using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed and validated. BA levels were determined using proton signals (δ(H) 7.53 and 7.98) referenced to 2-dimethyl-2-silapentane-5-sulfonate-d(6) sodium salt (DSS-d(6)) after simple solvent extraction from processed foods. All recoveries from several kinds of processed foods, spiked at their specified maximum Japanese usage levels (0.6-2.5 g kg(-1)) and at 0.13 g kg(-1) and 0.063 g kg(-1), were greater than 80%. The limit of quantification was confirmed as 0.063 g kg(-1) in processed foods, which was sufficiently low for the purposes of monitoring BA. The accuracy of the proposed method is equivalent to the conventional method using steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method was both rapid and simple. Moreover, it provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. Therefore, the proposed method is a useful and practical tool for determining BA levels in processed foods.

  5. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-07-13

    An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.013 g kg(-1)) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg(-1) (beverage: 0.0063 g kg(-1)) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg(-1) for foods (and 0.0063 g kg(-1) for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times for human lung cancer and lung tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Yoshifumi; Shioya, Sumie; Kurita, Daisaku; Ohta, Takashi; Haida, Munetaka; Ohta, Yasuyo [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Suda, Syuichi; Fukuzaki, Minoru

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2}, for lung cancer tissue, and other samples of lung tissue obtained from surgical specimens. The samples were nine squamous cell carcinomas, five necrotic squamous cell carcinomas, 15 adenocarcinomas, two benign mesotheliomas, and 13 fibrotic lungs. The relaxation times were measured with a 90 MHz NMR spectrometer and the results were correlated with histological changes. The values of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} for squamous cell carcinoma and mesothelioma were significantly longer than those of adenocarcinoma and fibrotic lung tissue. There were no significant differences in values of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} between adenocarcinoma and lung tissue. The values of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} for benign mesothelioma were similar to those of squamous cell carcinoma, which suggested that increases in T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} are not specific to malignant tissues. (author).

  7. H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Novel Urinary Biomarkers for Lung Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCClay, Joseph L.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Isern, Nancy G.; O' Connell, Thomas M.; Wooten, Jan B.; Zedler, Barbara K.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Webb, B. T.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Murrelle, Edward L.; Leppert, Mark F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2010-06-04

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airflow limitation, is a serious and growing public health concern. The major environmental risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but the biological mechanisms underlying COPD are not well understood. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify metabolites associated with lung function in COPD. Plasma and urine were collected from 197 adults with COPD and from 195 adults without COPD. Samples were assayed using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer, and the resulting spectra were analyzed against quantitative spirometric measures of lung function. After correcting for false discoveries and adjusting for covariates (sex, age, smoking) several spectral regions in urine were found to be significantly associated with baseline lung function. These regions correspond to the metabolites trigonelline, hippurate and formate. Concentrations of each metabolite, standardized to urinary creatinine, were associated with baseline lung function (minimum p-value = 0.0002 for trigonelline). No significant associations were found with plasma metabolites. Two of the three urinary metabolites positively associated with baseline lung function, i.e. hippurate and formate, are often related to gut microflora. This suggests that the microbiome composition is variable between individuals with different lung function. Alternatively, the nature and origins of all three associated metabolites may reflect lifestyle differences affecting overall health. Our results will require replication and validation, but demonstrate the utility of NMR metabolomics as a screening tool for identifying novel biomarkers of lung disease or disease risk.

  8. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Zueqian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  9. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  10. Direct nuclear magnetic resonance observation of odorant binding to mouse odorant receptor MOR244-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jessica L; Jeerage, Kavita M; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Mammals are able to perceive and differentiate a great number of structurally diverse odorants through the odorant's interaction with odorant receptors (ORs), proteins found within the cell membrane of olfactory sensory neurons. The natural gas industry has used human olfactory sensitivity to sulfur compounds (thiols, sulfides, etc.) to increase the safety of fuel gas transport, storage, and use through the odorization of this product. In the United States, mixtures of sulfur compounds are used, but the major constituent of odorant packages is 2-methylpropane-2-thiol, also known as tert-butyl mercaptan. It has been fundamentally challenging to understand olfaction and odorization due to the low affinity of odorous ligands to the ORs and the difficulty in expressing a sufficient number of OR proteins. Here, we directly observed the binding of tert-butyl mercaptan and another odiferous compound, cis-cyclooctene, to mouse OR MOR244-3 on living cells by saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This effort lays the groundwork for resolving molecular mechanisms responsible for ligand binding and resulting signaling, which in turn will lead to a clearer understanding of odorant recognition and competition.

  11. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the dynamics of organofluorine interactions with a dissolved humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, James G; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Simpson, Andre J

    2016-02-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of the interactions between organofluorine compounds and humic acids will contribute to an improved understanding of the role that Natural Organic Matter plays as a mediator in the fate, transport and distribution of these contaminants in the environment. Here, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy-based diffusion measurements are used to estimate the association dynamics between dissolved humic acid and selected organofluorine compounds: pentafluoroaniline, pentafluorophenol, potassium perfluorooctane sulfonate, and perfluorooctanoic acid. Under the conditions used here, the strength of the association with humic acid increases linearly as temperature decreases for all compounds except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits divergent behavior with a non-linear decrease in the extent of interaction as temperature decreases. A general interaction mechanism controlled largely by desolvation effects is suggested for all compounds examined here except for perfluorooctanoic acid, which exhibits a specific mode of interaction consistent with a proteinaceous binding site. Reverse Heteronuclear Saturation Transfer Difference NMR is used to confirm the identity and nature of the humic acid binding sites.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) as a tool for the study of the metabolism of Rickettsia slovaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, Lara; Busto, Jesús H; Peregrina, Jesús M; Santibáñez, Sonia; Portillo, Aránzazu; Avenoza, Alberto; Oteo, José A

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsial infections are caused by intracellular bacteria. They do not grow in standard culture media so there are limitations in routine practice to study their metabolism. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used for identification of metabolites in biological samples. Vero cells infected with Rickettsia slovaca as well as uninfected cells were monitored by (1)H NMR showing the presence of ethanol and lactic acid. As no differences were observed, labeled compounds were added into cultures. When D-[1-13C]glucose was monitored by (13)C NMR no differences among infected and uninfected cells were observed in metabolic profiles. Glucose was transformed into ethanol in all cultures. Monitored experiments carried out with [2-13C]glycine showed differences between infected and uninfected cell cultures spectra. Glycine was partially transformed into serine, but the amount of the serine formed was larger in those infected. Moreover, L-[2-13C]leucine, L-[1-13C]isoleucine and L-[15N]tyrosine were evaluated. No differences among infected and uninfected cells were observed in the metabolic profiles when tyrosine and leucine were monitored. The amino acid L-[1-13C]isoleucine exhibited different metabolism in presence of the R. slovaca, showing a promising behavior as biomarker. In this work we focused on finding one or more compounds that could be metabolized specifically by R. slovaca and could be used as an indicator of its activity.

  13. Discriminating poststroke depression from stroke by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianqi; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Dan; Wang, Lin; Yu, Lijun; Wu, Hongjing; Wang, Dan; Qiu, Xuerong

    2016-01-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD), the most common psychiatric disease that stroke survivors face, is estimated to affect ~30% of poststroke patients. However, there are still no objective methods to diagnose PSD. In this study, to explore the differential metabolites in the urine of PSD subjects and to identify a potential biomarker panel for PSD diagnosis, the nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic method was applied. Ten differential metabolites responsible for discriminating PSD subjects from healthy control (HC) and stroke subjects were found, and five of these metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers (lactate, α-hydroxybutyrate, phenylalanine, formate, and arabinitol). The panel consisting of these five metabolites provided excellent performance in discriminating PSD subjects from HC and stroke subjects, achieving an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.946 in the training set (43 HC, 45 stroke, and 62 PSD subjects). Moreover, this panel could classify the blinded samples from the test set (31 HC, 33 stroke, and 32 PSD subjects) with an area under the curve of 0.946. These results laid a foundation for the future development of urine-based objective methods for PSD diagnosis and investigation of PSD pathogenesis.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabolomics and liver diseases: Recent advances and future clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amathieu, Roland; Triba, Mohamed Nawfal; Goossens, Corentine; Bouchemal, Nadia; Nahon, Pierre; Savarin, Philippe; Le Moyec, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is defined as the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. It is an "omics" technique that is situated downstream of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. Metabolomics is recognized as a promising technique in the field of systems biology for the evaluation of global metabolic changes. During the last decade, metabolomics approaches have become widely used in the study of liver diseases for the detection of early biomarkers and altered metabolic pathways. It is a powerful technique to improve our pathophysiological knowledge of various liver diseases. It can be a useful tool to help clinicians in the diagnostic process especially to distinguish malignant and non-malignant liver disease as well as to determine the etiology or severity of the liver disease. It can also assess therapeutic response or predict drug induced liver injury. Nevertheless, the usefulness of metabolomics is often not understood by clinicians, especially the concept of metabolomics profiling or fingerprinting. In the present work, after a concise description of the different techniques and processes used in metabolomics, we will review the main research on this subject by focusing specifically on in vitro proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomics approaches in human studies. We will first consider the clinical point of view enlighten physicians on this new approach and emphasis its future use in clinical "routine".

  15. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics study of earthworm Perionyx excavatus in vermifiltration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Xulei; Laserna, Anna Karen Carrasco; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-10-01

    In this study, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach was used to characterize the metabolic response of the earthworm Perionyx excavatus in continuous vermifiltration for two months under hydraulic loading rates of 1m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1) and 1.5m(3)m(-2)d(-1) (VF1.5). Both VF1 and VF1.5 showed higher removal of chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen than the biofilter without earthworms. Principal component analysis of the NMR spectra of earthworm metabolites showed significant separations between those not subjected to wastewater filtration (control) and VF1 or VF1.5. Temporal variations of earthworm biomass, and the identified metabolites that are significantly different between control, VF1 and VF1.5 revealed that worms underwent increasing metabolic activity within 20days in VF1 and 14days in VF1.5, then decreasing metabolic activity. The use of NMR-based metabolomics in monitoring earthworm metabolism was demonstrated to be a novel approach in studying engineered vermifiltration systems.

  16. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based investigation on propylene glycol toxicosis in a Holstein cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raun Birgitte-Marie L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unknown which metabolites are responsible for propylene glycol (PG-induced toxicosis, and a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms explaining incidences of abnormal behaviour of dairy cows fed PG is therefore needed. Methods The study included three cows of which one developed PG toxicosis. In order to investigate how the metabolism of PG differed in the cow developing toxicosis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was applied on ruminal fluids and blood plasma samples obtained before and after feeding with PG. Results PG toxicosis was characterized by dyspnea and ruminal atony upon intake of concentrate containing PG. The oxygen saturation of arterial blood haemoglobin and the oxygen pressure in arterial blood decreased along with the appearance of the clinical symptoms. NMR revealed differences in plasma and ruminal content of several metabolites between the cow responding abnormally to PG and the two control cows. Conclusion It is concluded that PG-toxicosis is likely caused by pulmonary vasoconstriction, but no unusual metabolites directly related to induction of this condition could be detected in the plasma or the ruminal fluid.

  17. Advanced characterisation of encapsulated lipid powders regarding microstructure by time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Annika; Anzmann, Theresa; Weiss, Jochen; Kohlus, Reinhard

    2017-03-15

    Encapsulation is an established technique to protect sensitive materials from environmental stress. In order to understand the physical protection mechanism against oxidation, knowledge about the powder microstructure is required. Time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) has the potential to determine the surface oil (SO) and droplet size distribution by relaxation and restricted self-diffusion, respectively. The amount of SO, the retention and encapsulation efficiency are determined based on a lipid balance. The oil load of the initial powder and after SO removal is measured by TD-NMR. The results correlate with gravimetric and photometric references. The oil droplet size obtained by TD-NMR correlates well with static light scattering. The diameter of droplets in emulsions and dried powder both measured by TD-NMR, correlates (r = 0.998), implying that oil droplets embedded in a solid matrix can be measured. Summarising, TD-NMR allows analysis of the microstructure of encapsulated lipid powders, in a rapid, simple and non-destructive way.

  18. Determination of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations using quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzuo Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop the selection criteria of proton signals for the determination of scutellarin using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR, which is the main bioactive compound in breviscapine preparations for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. The methyl singlet signal of 3-(trimethylsilylpropionic-2,2,3,3-d4 acid sodium salt was selected as the internal standard for quantification. The molar concentration of scutellarin was determined by employing different proton signals. To obtain optimum proton signals for the quantification, different combinations of proton signals were investigated according to two selection criteria: the recovery rate of qNMR method and quantitative results compared with those obtained with ultra-performance liquid chromatography. As a result, the chemical shift of H-2′ and H-6′ at δ 7.88 was demonstrated as the most suitable signal with excellent linearity range, precision, and recovery for determining scutellarin in breviscapine preparations from different manufacturers, batch numbers, and dosage forms. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed to evaluate the determination results. The results demonstrated that the selection criteria of proton signals established in this work were reliable for the qNMR study of scutellarin in breviscapine preparations.

  19. The effect of rough surfaces on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance relaxation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nordin, Matias

    2015-01-01

    Most theoretical treatments of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) assume ideal smooth geometries (i.e. slabs, spheres or cylinders) with well-defined surface-to-volume ratios (S/V). This same assumption is commonly adopted for naturally occurring materials, where the pore geometry can differ substantially from these ideal shapes. In this paper the effect of surface roughness on the T2 relaxation spectrum is studied. By homogenization of the problem using an electrostatic approach it is found that the effective surface relaxivity can increase dramatically in the presence of rough surfaces. This leads to a situation where the system responds as a smooth pore, but with significantly increased surface relaxivity. As a result: the standard approach of assuming an idealized geometry with known surface-to-volume and inverting the T2 relaxation spectrum to a pore size distribution is no longer valid. The effective relaxivity is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of roughness but strongly dependent on the width...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabonomic profiling using tO2PLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirwan, Gemma M., E-mail: gemma.kirwan@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, City Campus, Vic 3001 (Australia); Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Hancock, Timothy [Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Hassell, Kathryn [Biotechnology and Environmental Biology, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Vic 3083 (Australia); Niere, Julie O. [Department of Chemistry, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, City Campus, Vic 3001 (Australia); Nugegoda, Dayanthi [Biotechnology and Environmental Biology, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Vic 3083 (Australia); Goto, Susumu [Bioinformatics Center, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Adams, Michael J. [Department of Chemistry, School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, City Campus, Vic 3001 (Australia)

    2013-06-05

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Transposition of O2PLS input matrix (tO2PLS) to analyze metabonomics data. •tO2PLS specific components describe features that separate and define sample groups. •Application of tO2PLS to a {sup 1}H NMR metabonomics study of black bream fish. -- Abstract: Blood plasma collected from adult fish (black bream, Sparidae) exposed to a dose of 5 mg kg{sup −1} 17β-estradiol underwent metabonomic profiling using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). An extension of the orthogonal 2 projection to latent structure (O2PLS) analysis, tO2PLS, was proposed and utilized to classify changes between the control and experimental metabolic profiles. As a bidirectional modeling tool, O2PLS examines the (variable) commonality between two different data blocks, and extracts the joint correlations as well as the unique variations present within each data block. tO2PLS is a proposed matrix transposition of O2PLS to allow for commonality between experiments (spectral profiles) to be observed, rather than between sample variables. tO2PLS analysis highlighted two potential biomarkers, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and choline, that distinguish between control and 17β-estradiol exposed fish. This study presents an alternative way of examining spectroscopic (metabolite) data, providing a method for the visual assessment of similarities and differences between control and experimental spectral features in large data sets.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance metabonomic profiling using tO2PLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Gemma M; Hancock, Timothy; Hassell, Kathryn; Niere, Julie O; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Goto, Susumu; Adams, Michael J

    2013-06-05

    Blood plasma collected from adult fish (black bream, Sparidae) exposed to a dose of 5 mg kg(-1) 17β-estradiol underwent metabonomic profiling using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). An extension of the orthogonal 2 projection to latent structure (O2PLS) analysis, tO2PLS, was proposed and utilized to classify changes between the control and experimental metabolic profiles. As a bidirectional modeling tool, O2PLS examines the (variable) commonality between two different data blocks, and extracts the joint correlations as well as the unique variations present within each data block. tO2PLS is a proposed matrix transposition of O2PLS to allow for commonality between experiments (spectral profiles) to be observed, rather than between sample variables. tO2PLS analysis highlighted two potential biomarkers, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) and choline, that distinguish between control and 17β-estradiol exposed fish. This study presents an alternative way of examining spectroscopic (metabolite) data, providing a method for the visual assessment of similarities and differences between control and experimental spectral features in large data sets.

  2. Investigation of reinforcement of the modified carbon black from wasted tires by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jie; YANG Yong-rong; REN Xiao-hong; STAPF Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis has the potential of transforming waste into recyclable products. Pyrolytic carbon black (PCB) is one of the most important products from the pyrolysis of used tires. Techniques for surface modifications of PCB have been developed. One of the most significant applications for modified PCB is to reinforce the rubber matrix to obtain high added values. The transverse relaxation and the chain dynamics of vulcanized rubber networks with PCB and modified PCB were studied and compared with those of the commercial carbon blacks using selective 1H transverse relaxation (T2) experiments and dipolar correlation effect (DCE) experiments on the stimulated echo. Demineralization and coupling agent modification not only intensified the interactions between the modified PCB and the neighboring polyisoprene chains, but also increased the chemical cross-link density of the vulcanized rubber with modified PCB. The mechanical testing of the rubbers with different kinds of carbon blacks showed that the maximum strain of the rubber with modified PCB was improved greatly. The mechanical testing results confirmed the conclusion obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). PCB modified by the demineralization and NDZ-105 titanate coupling agent could be used to replace the commercial semi-reinforcing carbon black.

  3. [Characterization of biochar by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong-yu; Jin, Jie; Yan, Yu; Han, Lan-fang; Kang, Ming-jie; Wang, Zi-ying; Zhao, Ye; Sun, Ke

    2014-12-01

    The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300, 450 and 600 °C) to obtain the biochars used in the present study. The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass. The results showed that the H/C, O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the increase in the pyrolysis temperatures. The surface polarity and ash content of the grass-derived biochars were higher than those of the wood-derived biochars. The minerals of the wood-derived biochars were mainly covered by the organic matter; in contrast, parts of the mineral surfaces of the grass-derived biochars were not covered by organic matter? The 13C NMR of the low temperature-derived biochars revealed a large contribution of aromatic carbon, aliphatic carbon, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon, while the high temperature-derived biochars contained a large amount of aromatic carbon. Moreover, the wood-derived biochars produced at low heat treatment temperatures contained more lignin residues than grass-derived ones, probably due to the existence of high lignin content in the feedstock soures of wood-derived biochars. The results of the study would be useful for environmental application of biochars.

  4. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  5. Properties of Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes investigated by 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance. We show that there are two types of Cs cations depending on the insertion level. Indeed, at low concentrations, Static spectra analysis shows that the Cs (α)+ species are fully ionized, i.e. α equal ca.1, while at higher concentrations a second paramagnetically shifted line appears, indicating the formation of Cs (β)+ ions with β < α ∼ +1. At low concentrations and low temperatures the Cs (α)+ ions exhibit a weak hyperfine coupling to the SWCNT conduction electrons, whereas, at higher temperatures, a thermally activated slow-motion diffusion process of the Cs (α)+ ions occurs along the interstitial channels present within the carbon nanotube bundles. At high concentrations, the Cs (β)+ ions seem to occupy well defined positions relative to the carbon lattice. As a matter of fact, the Korringa relaxation behavior suggests a strong hyperfine coupling between Cs nuclei and conduction electrons in the carbon nanotubes and a partial charge transfer, which suggest a plausible Cs(6s)-C(2p) hybridization. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of PEO-chitosan based polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, J.P.; Lopes, L.V.S. [IFSC, Universidade de Sao Paulo, PO Box 369, 13560-970 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Pawlicka, A. [IQSC, Universidade de Sao Paulo, PO Box 780, 13560-970 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil); Fuentes, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Angamos 0610, Antofagasta (Chile); Retuert, P.J. [Department of Material Sciences, Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Tupper 2069, Santiago (Chile); Gonzalez, G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile)

    2007-12-31

    This work investigates lithium dynamics in a series of polymer electrolytes formed by poly(ethylene oxide) PEO, chitosan (QO), amino propil siloxane (pAPS) and lithium perchlorate by means of nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Lithium ({sup 7}Li) lineshapes and spin-lattice relaxation times were measured as a function of temperature. The results suggest that the chemical functionality of QO, particularly the amine group, participate in coordinating lithium ion in the composites. The competition between QO and PEO for lithium ions is evident in the binary system. In the ternary electrolyte containing PEO, QO and pAPS, it is observed that the lithium ions can competitively interact with the two polymers. The heterogeneity, at a local microscopic scale, is revealed by a temperature-dependent equilibrium of lithium ion concentration between at least two different microphases; on 37dominated by the interactions with chitosan and the other one with polyether. The data of the ternary electrolyte was analysed by assuming two lithium dynamics, the first one associated to the motion of the lithium ion dissolved in PEO and the second one associated to those complexed by the chitosan. (author)

  7. Monitoring of metabolic profiling and water status of Hayward kiwifruits by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, D; Mannina, L; Proietti, N; Sobolev, A P; Tomassini, A; Miccheli, A; Di Cocco, M E; Capuani, G; De Salvador, R; Delfini, M

    2010-10-15

    The metabolic profiling of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa, Hayward cultivar) aqueous extracts and the water status of entire kiwifruits were monitored over the season (June-December) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies. The metabolic profiling of aqueous kiwifruit extracts was investigated by means of high field NMR spectroscopy. A large number of water-soluble metabolites were assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The change in the metabolic profiles monitored over the season allowed the kiwifruit development to be investigated. Specific temporal trends of aminoacids, sugars, organic acids and other metabolites were observed. The water status of kiwifruits was monitored directly on the intact fruit measuring the T(2) spin-spin relaxation time by means of a portable unilateral NMR instrument, fully non-invasive. Again, clear trends of the relaxation time were observed during the monitoring period. The results show that the monitoring of the metabolic profiling and the monitoring of the water status are two complementary means suitable to have a complete view of the investigated fruit.

  8. Metabolomics with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in a Drosophila melanogaster Model of Surviving Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Bakalov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients surviving sepsis demonstrate sustained inflammation, which has been associated with long-term complications. One of the main mechanisms behind sustained inflammation is a metabolic switch in parenchymal and immune cells, thus understanding metabolic alterations after sepsis may provide important insights to the pathophysiology of sepsis recovery. In this study, we explored metabolomics in a novel Drosophila melanogaster model of surviving sepsis using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, to determine metabolite profiles. We used a model of percutaneous infection in Drosophila melanogaster to mimic sepsis. We had three experimental groups: sepsis survivors (infected with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with oral linezolid, sham (pricked with an aseptic needle, and unmanipulated (positive control. We performed metabolic measurements seven days after sepsis. We then implemented metabolites detected in NMR spectra into the MetExplore web server in order to identify the metabolic pathway alterations in sepsis surviving Drosophila. Our NMR metabolomic approach in a Drosophila model of recovery from sepsis clearly distinguished between all three groups and showed two different metabolomic signatures of inflammation. Sham flies had decreased levels of maltose, alanine, and glutamine, while their level of choline was increased. Sepsis survivors had a metabolic signature characterized by decreased glucose, maltose, tyrosine, beta-alanine, acetate, glutamine, and succinate.

  9. Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Ona, Ositadinma; Majors, Paul D.

    2008-02-18

    Bacterial biofilms are complex, three-dimensional, communities that are found nearly everywhere in nature1 and are being recognized as the cause of treatment-resistant infections1 2. Advanced methods are required to characterize their collective and spatial patterns of metabolism however most techniques are invasive or destructive. Here we describe the use of a combined confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopy system to monitor structure, mass transport, and metabolism in active biofilms. Non-invasive NMR methods provide macroscopic structure along with spatially-resolved metabolite profiles and diffusion measurements. CLSM enables monitoring of cells by fluorescent protein reporters to investigate biofilm structure and gene expression concurrently. A planar sample chamber design facilitates depth-resolved measurements on 140 nL sample volumes under laminar flow conditions. The techniques and approaches described here are applicable to environmental and medically relevant microbial communities, thus providing key metabolic information for promoting beneficial biofilms and treating associated diseases.

  10. High-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic footprinting for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagle, Christopher; Christie, Megan A; Winnike, Jason H; McClelland, Randall E; Ludlow, John W; O'Connell, Thomas M; Gamcsik, Michael P; MacDonald, Jeffrey M

    2008-06-01

    We report a high-throughput (HTP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for analysis of media components and a metabolic schematic to help easily interpret the data. Spin-lattice relaxation values and concentrations were measured for 19 components and 2 internal referencing agents in pure and 2-day conditioned, hormonally defined media from a 3-dimensional (3D) multicoaxial human bioartificial liver (BAL). The (1)H NMR spectral signal-to-noise ratio is 21 for 0.16 mM alanine in medium and is obtained in 12 min using a 400 MHz NMR spectrometer. For comparison, 2D gel cultures and 3D multicoaxial BALs were batch cultured, with medium changed every day for 15 days after inoculation with human liver cells in Matrigel-collagen type 1 gels. Glutamine consumption was higher by day 8 in the BAL than in 2D culture; lactate production was lower through the 15-day culture period. Alanine was the primary amino acid produced and tracked with lactate or urea production. Glucose and pyruvate consumption were similar in the BAL and 2D cultures. NMR analysis permits quality assurance of the bioreactor by identifying contaminants. Ethanol was observed because of a bioreactor membrane "wetting" procedure. A biochemical scheme is presented illustrating bioreactor metabolomic footprint results and demonstrating how this can be translated to modify bioreactor operational parameters or quality assurance issues.

  11. Microfluidic integration of wirebonded microcoils for on-chip applications in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Robert Ch; Höfflin, Jens; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G.

    2014-04-01

    We present an integrated microfluidic device for on-chip nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of microscopic samples. The devices are fabricated by means of a MEMS compatible process, which joins the automatic wirebond winding of solenoidal microcoils and the manufacturing of a complex microfluidic network using dry-photoresist lamination. The wafer-scale cleanroom process is potentially capable of mass fabrication. Since the non-invasive NMR analysis technique is rather insensitive, particularly when microscopic sample volumes are to be investigated, we also focus on the optimization of the wirebonded microcoil for this purpose. The on-chip measurement of NMR signals from a 20 nl sample are evaluated for imaging analysis of microparticles, as well as for spectroscopy. Whereas the latter revealed that the sensitivity of the MEMS microcoil is comparable with hand-wound devices and achieves a full-width-half-maximum linewidth of 8 Hz, the imaging experiment demonstrated 10 μm isotropic spatial resolution within an experiment time of 38 min for a 3D image with a field of view of 1 mm × 1 mm × 0.5 mm (500 000 voxels).

  12. A review on the applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology for investigating fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsanami, Naser; Sun, Jianmeng; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the recent applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology for characterizing fractures. The paper aims to help researchers in extending the existing reservoir characterization methods (which are commonly used in conventional hydrocarbon reservoirs) for appropriate usage in unconventional resources. This is because some techniques for quantifying and qualifying fractures have been investigated in conventional sandstone and carbonate reservoirs, but the reality for unconventional resources is that such techniques are still poorly developed. Fractures are necessary for economical production of petroleum from many low-permeability reservoirs. The characterization of fractures by well logging technology is of great interest in the petroleum industry. The main purpose of this study is to review the characterization techniques that are developed either for identifying fractures or distinguishing fracture porosity from matrix porosity. This concept plays a leading role in providing availability of an optimized well completion program. The results of this study indicated that in terms of both sandstone and carbonate tight reservoirs, there have not been many steps taken toward the aforementioned goal up to now. Nevertheless, these steps are valuable enough to be counted on and could serve a meaningful function in treating hydrocarbon reservoirs. Because of the ongoing changes in today's petroleum industry, development of a comprehensive methodology will create greater economic benefits in unconventional reservoirs than in the conventional ones.

  13. Application of two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to differentiation of beer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatib, Alfi [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Wilson, Erica G. [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kim, Hye Kyong [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lefeber, Alfons W.M. [Division of NMR, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Erkelens, Cornelis [Division of NMR, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Choi, Young Hae [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Verpoorte, Robert [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-02-16

    A number of ingredients in beer that directly or indirectly affect its quality require an unbiased wide-spectrum analytical method that allows for the determination of a wide array of compounds for its efficient control. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a method that clearly meets this description as the broad range of compounds in beer is detectable. However, the resulting congestion of signals added to the low resolution of {sup 1}H NMR spectra makes the identification of individual components very difficult. Among two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques that increase the resolution, J-resolved NMR spectra were successfully applied to the analysis of 2-butanol extracts of beer as overlapping signals in {sup 1}H NMR spectra were fully resolved by the additional axis of the coupling constant. Principal component analysis based on the projected J-resolved NMR spectra showed a clear separation between all of the six brands of pilsner beer evaluated in this study. The compounds responsible for the differentiation were identified by 2D NMR spectra including correlated spectroscopy and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation spectra together with J-resolved spectra. They were identified as nucleic acid derivatives (adenine, uridine and xanthine), amino acids (tyrosine and proline), organic acid (succinic and lactic acid), alcohol (tyrosol and isopropanol), cholines and carbohydrates.

  14. Introduction of the Floquet-Magnus expansion in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugène S; Charpentier, Thibault

    2011-07-28

    In this article, we present an alternative expansion scheme called Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) used to solve a time-dependent linear differential equation which is a central problem in quantum physics in general and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in particular. The commonly used methods to treat theoretical problems in solid-state NMR are the average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and the Floquet theory (FT), which have been successful for designing sophisticated pulse sequences and understanding of different experiments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the FME scheme in the context of solid state NMR and we compare this approach with other series expansions. We present a modified FME scheme highlighting the importance of the (time-periodic) boundary conditions. This modified scheme greatly simplifies the calculation of higher order terms and shown to be equivalent to the Floquet theory (single or multimode time-dependence) but allows one to derive the effective Hamiltonian in the Hilbert space. Basic applications of the FME scheme are described and compared to previous treatments based on AHT, FT, and static perturbation theory. We discuss also the convergence aspects of the three schemes (AHT, FT, and FME) and present the relevant references.

  15. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance: From chemical structure to food authenticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segre, Annalaura

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR is a powerful technique able to give us a relevant contribution in food analysis. In this review, some practical aspects of this technique (sample preparation, acquisition time, relaxation delay, etc as well as some methods of spectral assignment of the spectra (2D and 1D selective technique are reported. Some examples of NMR quantitative analyses are reported. In particular, the results relative to the NMR study of olive oils are discussed, among these: the comparison between conventional analyses and the NMR analysis in the olive oil characterization; the NMR determination of minor components such as squalene, cyclo-arthenol and chlorophyll in olive oil; the panel test and its relationship with NMR data; the geographical characterization of olive oils.La resonancia magnética nuclear (RMN es una técnica poderosa capaz de generar una contribución relevante en análisis de alimentos. En esta revisión, se describen algunos aspectos prácticos de la técnica (preparación de la muestra, tiempo de adquisición, retraso en la relajación, etc junto con algunos métodos espectrales de asignación del espectro (técnicas selectivas 2D y 1D. También se describen algunos ejemplos del análisis cuantitativo. En particular, se discuten los resultados relativos al estudio RMN de los aceites de oliva, entre estos: la comparación entre los análisis convencionales y los análisis por RMN en la caracterización del aceite de oliva; la determinación de componentes menores del aceite de oliva, como el escualeno, cicloartenol y clorofilas; el panel sensorial y su relación con los datos de RMN; y la caracterización geográfica de los aceites de oliva.

  16. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  17. Acoustic cardiac triggering: a practical solution for synchronization and gating of cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 7 Tesla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff Florian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To demonstrate the applicability of acoustic cardiac triggering (ACT for imaging of the heart at ultrahigh magnetic fields (7.0 T by comparing phonocardiogram, conventional vector electrocardiogram (ECG and traditional pulse oximetry (POX triggered 2D CINE acquisitions together with (i a qualitative image quality analysis, (ii an assessment of the left ventricular function parameter and (iii an examination of trigger reliability and trigger detection variance derived from the signal waveforms. Results ECG was susceptible to severe distortions at 7.0 T. POX and ACT provided waveforms free of interferences from electromagnetic fields or from magneto-hydrodynamic effects. Frequent R-wave mis-registration occurred in ECG-triggered acquisitions with a failure rate of up to 30% resulting in cardiac motion induced artifacts. ACT and POX triggering produced images free of cardiac motion artefacts. ECG showed a severe jitter in the R-wave detection. POX also showed a trigger jitter of approximately Δt = 72 ms which is equivalent to two cardiac phases. ACT showed a jitter of approximately Δt = 5 ms only. ECG waveforms revealed a standard deviation for the cardiac trigger offset larger than that observed for ACT or POX waveforms. Image quality assessment showed that ACT substantially improved image quality as compared to ECG (image quality score at end-diastole: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, ACT = 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.04 while the comparison between ECG vs. POX gated acquisitions showed no significant differences in image quality (image quality score: ECG = 1.7 ± 0.5, POX = 2.0 ± 0.5, p = 0.34. Conclusions The applicability of acoustic triggering for cardiac CINE imaging at 7.0 T was demonstrated. ACT's trigger reliability and fidelity are superior to that of ECG and POX. ACT promises to be beneficial for cardiovascular magnetic resonance at ultra-high field strengths including 7.0 T.

  18. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  19. Zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2012-09-14

    We present the theoretical description and experimental demonstration of a zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling (ZQ-SDR) technique for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of (13)C-labeled molecules, including proteins, under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The ZQ-SDR technique combines zero-quantum recoupling pulse sequence blocks with randomly varying chemical shift precession periods to create randomly amplitude- and phase-modulated effective homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. To a good approximation, couplings between different (13)C spin pairs become uncorrelated under ZQ-SDR, leading to spin dynamics (averaged over many repetitions of the ZQ-SDR sequence) that are fully described by an orientation-dependent N × N polarization transfer rate matrix for an N-spin system, with rates that are inversely proportional to the sixth power of internuclear distances. Suppression of polarization transfers due to non-commutivity of pairwise couplings (i.e., dipolar truncation) does not occur under ZQ-SDR, as we show both analytically and numerically. Experimental demonstrations are reported for uniformly (13)C-labeled L-valine powder (at 14.1 T and 28.00 kHz MAS), uniformly (13)C-labeled protein GB1 in microcrystalline form (at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS), and partially labeled (13)C-labeled protein GB1 (at 14.1 T and 40.00 kHz MAS). The experimental results verify that spin dynamics under ZQ-SDR are described accurately by rate matrices and suggest the utility of ZQ-SDR in structural studies of (13)C-labeled solids.

  20. NMR-DMF: a modular nuclear magnetic resonance-digital microfluidics system for biological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ka-Meng; Mak, Pui-In; Law, Man-Kay; Martins, Rui P

    2014-12-07

    We present a modular nuclear magnetic resonance-digital microfluidics (NMR-DMF) system as a portable diagnostic platform for miniaturized biological assays. With increasing number of combinations between designed probes and a specific target, NMR has become an accurate and rapid assay tool, which is capable of detecting particular kinds of proteins, DNAs, bacteria and cells with a customized probe quantitatively. Traditional sample operation (e.g., manipulation and mixing) relied heavily on human efforts. We herein propose a modular NMR-DMF system to allow the electronic automation of multi-step reaction-screening protocols. A figure-8 shaped coil is proposed to enlarge the usable inner space of a portable magnet by 4.16 times, generating a radio frequency (RF) excitation field in the planar direction. By electronically managing the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) effects over an electrode array, preloaded droplets with the inclusion of biological constituents and targets can be programmed to mix and be guided to the detection site (3.5 × 3.5 mm(2)) for high-sensitivity NMR screening (static B field: 0.46 T, RF field: 1.43 mT per ampere), with the result (voltage signal) displayed in real-time. To show the system's utility, automated real-time identification of 100 pM of avidin in a 14 μL droplet was achieved. The system shows promise as a robust and portable diagnostic device for a wide variety of biological analyses and screening applications.

  1. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J., E-mail: JMitchell16@slb.com [Schlumberger Gould Research, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0EL (United Kingdom); Chandrasekera, T. C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T{sub 2}, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T{sub 2} provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T{sub 2} distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T{sub 2} is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form −ant{sub e}{sup k} (where n is the number and t{sub e} the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T{sub 2} distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  2. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; Suszeptibilitaetseffekte in der Kernspinresonanzbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziener, Christian Herbert

    2008-07-01

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  3. Structural and Quantitative Analysis of Three C-Glycosylflavones by Variable Temperature Proton Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful tool in drug analysis because of its speed, precision, and efficiency. In present study, the application of variable temperature proton quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (VT-1H-qNMR for the calibration of three C-glycosylflavones including orientin, isoorientin, and schaftoside as reference substances was reported. Since there was conformational equilibrium due to the restricted rotation around the C(sp3-C(sp2 bond in C-glycosylflavones, the conformational behaviors were investigated by VT-NMR and verified by molecular mechanics (MM calculation. The VT-1H-qNMR method was validated including the linearity, limit of quantification, precision, and stability. The results were consistent with those obtained from mass balance approach. VT-1H-qNMR can be deployed as an effective tool in analyzing C-glycosylflavones.

  4. Structural and Quantitative Analysis of Three C-Glycosylflavones by Variable Temperature Proton Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dai, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful tool in drug analysis because of its speed, precision, and efficiency. In present study, the application of variable temperature proton quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (VT-1H-qNMR) for the calibration of three C-glycosylflavones including orientin, isoorientin, and schaftoside as reference substances was reported. Since there was conformational equilibrium due to the restricted rotation around the C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond in C-glycosylflavones, the conformational behaviors were investigated by VT-NMR and verified by molecular mechanics (MM) calculation. The VT-1H-qNMR method was validated including the linearity, limit of quantification, precision, and stability. The results were consistent with those obtained from mass balance approach. VT-1H-qNMR can be deployed as an effective tool in analyzing C-glycosylflavones. PMID:28243484

  5. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Pulse Sequences and Probes to Study Biomacromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosman, M; Krishnan, V V; Maxwell, R

    2001-02-26

    The determination of the three dimensional structures at high resolution of biomolecules, such as proteins and nucleic acids, enables us to understand their function at the molecular level. At the present time, there are only two methods available for determining such structures, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Compared to well-established X-ray diffraction techniques, NMR methodology is relatively new and has many areas in which improvement can still be attained. In this project, we focused on the development of new NMR probes and pulse sequences that were tailored to tackle specific problems that are not adequately addressed by current technology. Probes are the hardware that contain the radio frequency (RF) circuitry used to both excite and detect the NMR signals. Pulse sequences are composed of a series of RF pulses and delays, which are applied to the sample held within the magnetic field by the probe, so as to manipulate the nuclear spins. Typically, a probe is developed for a specific set of nuclei and types of experiments and the pulse sequences are then written to use the probe in an optimal manner. In addition, the inter-development of instrumentation and methods are determined by the specific biological question to be examined. Thus our efforts focused on addressing an area of importance in NMR Structural Biology namely more effective ways to use the phosphorus ({sup 31}P) nucleus. Phosphorus is a very important biological element that is strategically located in nucleic acids, where it imparts negative charge and flexibility to RNA and DNA. It is also a component of the cellular membrane and thus interacts with membrane proteins. It is used in mechanisms to signal, activate or deactivate enzymes; and participates in energy storage and release. However, the phosphorus nucleus exhibits certain properties, such as poor spectral dispersion, low sensitivity of detection, and fast relaxation, which limit its effective use

  6. Examination of funnel chests by X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography: First results and experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raithel, H.J.; Hartung, M.; Gruennewig, B.; Willital, G.

    1983-01-01

    Funnel chest (pectus excavatum) is a congenital malformation of the thorax. Operative correction must presently be regarded as the treatment of choise. In addition to cosmetical and psychological reasons, there are mainly functional aspects justifying a surgery. The indication for surgery results mostly from the objective clinical-diagnostical findings. This article describes the efficiency of both X-ray computerized tomography and also nuclear magnetic resonance tomography (NMR-CAT) which has only recently been introduced to clinical diagnostics.

  7. Chemical structural studies of natural lignin by dipolar dephasing solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Two natural lignins, one from a gymnosperm wood the other from angiosperm wood, were examined by conventional solid-state and dipolar dephasing 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The results obtained from both techniques show that the structure of natural lignins is consistent with models of softwood and hardwood lignin. The dipolar dephasing NMR data provide a measure of the degree of substitution on aromatic rings which is consistent with the models. ?? 1987.

  8. Methylamine metabolism in Hansenula polymorpha: an in vivo 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, J G; Bellion, E

    1991-01-01

    Methylamine uptake, oxidation, and assimilation were studied in Hansenula polymorpha, a methylotrophic yeast. The constitutive ammonia transport system was shown to be effective at accumulating methylamine within cells cultured with methylamine or ammonia as a nitrogen source. [13C]methylamine oxidation rates were measured in vivo in methylamine-adapted cells by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and were found to be lower than its uptake rate into the cells. The 13C label of methylamine was foun...

  9. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Ni, Qingwen; Collier, Hughbert A.

    2000-09-22

    This report contains eight sections. Some individual subsections contain lists of references as well as figures and conclusions when appropriate. The first section includes the introduction and summary of the first-year project efforts. The next section describes the results of the project tasks: (1) implementation of theoretical relations between effect dispersion and the stochastic medium, (2) imaging analyses using core and well log data, (3) construction of dispersion and attenuation models at the core and borehole scales in poroelastic media, (4) petrophysics and a catalog of core and well log data from Siberia Ridge field, (5) acoustic/geotechnical measurements and CT imaging of core samples from Florida carbonates, and (6) development of an algorithm to predict pore size distribution from NMR core data. The last section includes a summary of accomplishments, technology transfer activities and follow-on work for Phase II.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of resistively and optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance in the ν =2 /3 fractional quantum Hall regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Keiichirou; Nagase, Katsumi; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2016-08-01

    We observe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in the fractional quantum Hall regime at the Landau-level filling factor of ν =2 /3 from simultaneous measurement of longitudinal resistance and photoluminescence (PL). The dynamic nuclear-spin polarization is induced by applying a huge electronic current at the spin phase transition point of ν =2 /3 . The NMR spectra obtained from changes in resistance and PL intensity are qualitatively the same; that is, the Knight-shift (spin-polarized region) and zero-shift (spin-unpolarized region) resonances are observed in both. The observed change in PL intensity is interpreted as a consequence of the trion scattering induced by polarized nuclear spins. We conclude that both detection methods probe almost the same local phenomena.

  11. Homometallic and Heterometallic Antiferromagnetic Rings: Magnetic Properties Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casadei, Cecilia [Univ. of Pavia (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis is to investigate the local magnetic properties of homometallic Cr8 antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring and the changes occurring by replacing one Cr3+ ion with diamagnetic Cd2+ (Cr7Cd) and with Ni2+ (Cr7Ni). In the heterometallic ring a redistribution of the local magnetic moment is expected in the low temperature ground state. We have investigated those changes by both 53Cr-NMR and 19F-NMR. We have determined the order of magnitude of the transferred hyperfine coupling constant 19F - M+ where M+ = Cr3+, Ni2+ in the different rings. This latter result gives useful information about the overlapping of the electronic wavefunctions involved in the coordinative bond.

  12. The Effect of Electronic Paramagnetism on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Frequencies in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, C. H.; Herring, C.; Knight, W. D.

    1950-09-22

    Observations on the shifts of nuclear resonances in metals ( Li{sup 7}, Na{sup 23}, Cu {sup 63}, Be{sup 9}, Pb{sup 207}, Al{sup 27}, and Ca{sup 69} ) due to free electron paramagnetism; comparison with theoretical values.

  13. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance system with continuous flow of polarized water to obtain the traceability to static magnetic fields; Sistema de ressonancia magnetica nuclear com fluxo continuo de agua polarizada para obtencao da rastreabilidade para campos magneticos estaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ramon Valls; Nazarre, Diego Joriro, E-mail: ramon@ipt.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a system to obtain the traceability of field or magnetic induction intensity in the range of 2 μT up to 2 T, even in the presence of magnetic field gradients or noisy environments. The system is based on a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer, built in streaming water. The calibration procedure of a coil for magnetic field generation is described, as well as the results obtained and the estimated uncertainty (author)

  15. Maintenance of high-energy brain phosphorous compounds during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in men. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows noninvasive studies of cerebral energy-rich phosphorous compounds in humans. In an attempt to characterize the relationship between peripheral blood glucose concentrations and whole-brain phosphate metabolism during insulin...

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of freeze-thaw damage in natural pumice concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the damage propagation features of the pore structure of natural pumice lightweight aggregate concrete (LWC under freeze-thaw cyclic action. After freeze-thaw cycling, we conducted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests on the concrete and acquired the porosity, distribution of transverse relaxation time T2, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results. The results showed the following. The T2 distribution of the LWC prior to freeze-thaw cycling presented four peaks representative of a preponderance of small pores. After 50, 100, 150, and 200 freeze-thaw cycles, the total area of the T2 spectrum and the porosity increased significantly. The MRI presented the changing spatial distribution of pores within the LWC during freeze-thaw cycling. Ultrasonic testing technology was applied simultaneously to analyze the NMR results, which verified that the new NMR technology demonstrated high accuracy and practicability for research regarding freeze-thaw concrete damage.En este trabajo se analiza la propagación de los daños que se producen en la estructura porosa de hormigón aligerado a base de piedra pómez natural sometido a la acción cíclica de hielo-deshielo. Después de realizarse los ensayos de hielo-deshielo, el hormigón se analizó mediante resonancia magnética nuclear (RMN, determinándose la porosidad y la distribución del tiempo de relajación transversal, T2, y registrándose las imágenes captadas por resonancia magnética. De acuerdo con los resultados obtenidos, antes de los ciclos de hielo-deshielo la distribución de T2 del hormigón aligerado presentaba cuatro picos, indicativos de un predominio de poros pequeños. Después de que se sometiera a 50, 100, 150, y 200 ciclos, se observó un aumento importante tanto de la porosidad como de la superficie total del espectro de T2. Las imágenes captadas por resonancia magnética evidenciaron la modificación de la distribución espacial de los poros del

  17. Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1991 "for his contributions to the development of the methodology of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy": Richard R. Ernst

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    Prof. Richard R. Ernst presents "The domestication of nuclear spins by chemists and biologists".The usage of nuclear spins in chemistry and biology for exploring the structure and dynamics of matter is discussed. The main emphasis is put on the methodological aspects of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that are responsible for the success of this powerful analytical technique.

  18. Determining diffusion coefficients of ionic liquids by means of field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruk, D. [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Słoneczna 54, PL-10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A. [Universität Bayreuth, Experimentalphysik II, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Rachocki, A. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Korpała, A. [Department of Biophysics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Łazarza 16, 31-530 Kraków, Poland and Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Singh, R. K. [Ionic Liquid and Solid State Ionics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)

    2014-06-28

    Field Cycling Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FC NMR) relaxation studies are reported for three ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMIM-SCN, 220–258 K), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIM-BF{sub 4}, 243–318 K), and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIM-PF{sub 6}, 258–323 K). The dispersion of {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate R{sub 1}(ω) is measured in the frequency range of 10 kHz–20 MHz, and the studies are complemented by {sup 19}F spin-lattice relaxation measurements on BMIM-PF{sub 6} in the corresponding frequency range. From the {sup 1}H relaxation results self-diffusion coefficients for the cation in EMIM-SCN, BMIM-BF{sub 4}, and BMIM-PF{sub 6} are determined. This is done by performing an analysis considering all relevant intra- and intermolecular relaxation contributions to the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation as well as by benefiting from the universal low-frequency dispersion law characteristic of Fickian diffusion which yields, at low frequencies, a linear dependence of R{sub 1} on square root of frequency. From the {sup 19}F relaxation both anion and cation diffusion coefficients are determined for BMIM-PF{sub 6}. The diffusion coefficients obtained from FC NMR relaxometry are in good agreement with results reported from pulsed- field-gradient NMR. This shows that NMR relaxometry can be considered as an alternative route of determining diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions in ionic liquids.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure and dynamics of the response regulator Sma0114 from Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheftic, Sarah R; Garcia, Preston P; White, Emma; Robinson, Victoria L; Gage, Daniel J; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2012-09-04

    Receiver domains control intracellular responses triggered by signal transduction in bacterial two-component systems. Here, we report the solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure and dynamics of Sma0114 from the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, the first such characterization of a receiver domain from the HWE-kinase family of two-component systems. The structure of Sma0114 adopts a prototypical α(5)/β(5) Rossman fold but has features that set it apart from other receiver domains. The fourth β-strand of Sma0114 houses a PFxFATGY sequence motif, common to many HWE-kinase-associated receiver domains. This sequence motif in Sma0114 may substitute for the conserved Y-T coupling mechanism, which propagates conformational transitions in the 455 (α4-β5-α5) faces of receiver domains, to prime them for binding downstream effectors once they become activated by phosphorylation. In addition, the fourth α-helix of the consensus 455 face in Sma0114 is replaced with a segment that shows high flexibility on the pico- to nanosecond time scale by (15)N relaxation data. Secondary structure prediction analysis suggests that the absence of helix α4 may be a conserved property of the HWE-kinase-associated family of receiver domains to which Sma0114 belongs. In spite of these differences, Sma0114 has a conserved active site, binds divalent metal ions such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) that are required for phosphorylation, and exhibits micro- to millisecond active-site dynamics similar to those of other receiver domains. Taken together, our results suggest that Sma0114 has a conserved active site but differs from typical receiver domains in the structure of the 455 face that is used to effect signal transduction following activation.

  20. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR - A new method for exploration of ground water and aquifer properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Yaramanci

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR method is a fairly new technique in geophysics to assess ground water, i.e. existence, amount and productibility by measurements at the surface. The NMR technique used in medicine, physics and lately in borehole geophysics was adopted for surface measurements in the early eighties, and commercial equipment for measurements has been available since the mid nineties. The SNMR method has been tested at sites in Northern Germany with Quaternary sand and clay layers, to examine the suitability of this new method for groundwater exploration and environmental investigations. More information is obtained by SNMR, particularly with respect to aquifer parameters, than with other geophysical techniques. SNMR measurements were carried out at three borehole locations, together with 2D and 1D direct current geoelectrics and well logging (induction log, gamma-ray log and pulsed neutron-gamma log. Permeabilities were calculated from the grain-size distributions of core material determined in the laboratory. It is demonstrated that the SNMR method is able to detect groundwater and the results are in good agreement with other geophysical and hydrogeological data. Using the SNMR method, the water content of the unsaturated and saturated zones (i.e. porosity of an aquifer can be reliably determined. This information and resistivity data permit in-situ determination of other aquifer parameters. Comparison of the SNMR results with borehole data clearly shows that the water content determined by SNMR is the free or mobile water in the pores. The permeabilities estimated from the SNMR decay times are similar to those derived from sieve analysis of core material. Thus, the combination of SNMR with geoelectric methods promises to be a powerful tool for studying aquifer properties.

  1. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics study of metabolic profiling in immunoglobulin a nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Sui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic renal failure among primary glomerulonephritis patients. The ability to diagnose immunoglobulin A nephropathy remains poor. However, renal biopsy is an inconvenient, invasive, and painful examination, and no reliable biomarkers have been developed for use in routine patient evaluations. The aims of the present study were to identify immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients, to identify useful biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy and to establish a human immunoglobulin A nephropathy metabolic profile. METHODS: Serum samples were collected from immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients who were not using immunosuppressants. A pilot study was undertaken to determine disease-specific metabolite biomarker profiles in three groups: healthy controls (N = 23, low-risk patients in whom immunoglobulin A nephropathy was confirmed as grades I-II by renal biopsy (N = 23, and high-risk patients with nephropathies of grades IV-V (N = 12. Serum samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by applying multivariate pattern recognition analysis for disease classification. RESULTS: Compared with the healthy controls, both the low-risk and high-risk patients had higher levels of phenylalanine, myo-Inositol, lactate, L6 lipids ( = CH-CH2-CH = O, L5 lipids (-CH2-C = O, and L3 lipids (-CH2-CH2-C = O as well as lower levels of β -glucose, α-glucose, valine, tyrosine, phosphocholine, lysine, isoleucine, glycerolphosphocholine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, alanine, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and 1-methylhistidine. CONCLUSIONS: These metabolites investigated in this study may serve as potential biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Point scoring of pattern recognition analysis was able to distinguish immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients from healthy controls. However, there were no obvious differences between the low-risk and high-risk groups in our

  2. Influence of Hemolysis on Analytic Results of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-based Metabonomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao LIU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the changes of small molecular metabolites and their content in plasma samples due to hemolysis so as to analyze the influence of hemolysis of plasma samples on metabonomic study. Methods: Healthy adult males undergoing physical examination without drug administration history in recent period were selected to collect 10 hemolytic plasma samples and 10 hemolysis-free samples from them. Spectrograms of hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR were collected and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG pulse sequence was used to inhibit the production of broad peak by protein and lipid, and SIMCA-P+12.0 software was applied to conduct mode recognition and Pearson correlation analysis.Results: CPMG-1H NMR plasma metabolism spectrums showed that compared with hemolysis-free samples, hemolytic samples were evidently higher in the contents of acetate, acetone and pyruvic acid, but markedly lower in that of glucose. In addition, the chemical shift of glycine-CH2 in hemolysis group moved to the lower field. Orthogonal partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA was further applied to initiate mode recognition analysis and the results demonstrated that hemolysis group was prominently higher in the contents of metabolites, such as leucine, valine, lysine, acetate, proline, acetone, pyruvic acid, creatine, creatinine, glycine, glycerol, serine and lactic acid, but obviously lower in the contents of isoleucine and glucose than hemolysis-free group. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that in hemolytic samples, the contents of eucine, valine, lysine, proline, N-acetyl-glycoprotein, creatine, creatinine, glycerol and serine were higher but that of isoleucine was lower.Conclusion: Hemolysis can lead to the changes of multiple metabolite content and influence the analytic results of metabonomics, so in practical operation, hemolytic samples should be excluded from the study.

  3. Absolute quantitative analysis for sorbic acid in processed foods using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, Takashi, E-mail: ohtsuki@nihs.go.jp [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Sato, Kyoko; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko [National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method using qHNMR was applied and validated to determine SA in processed foods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method has good accuracy, precision, selectiveness, and linearity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method is more rapid and simple than the conventional method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that the proposed method is reliable for the accurate determination of SA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method can be used for the monitoring of SA in processed foods. - Abstract: An analytical method using solvent extraction and quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance (qHNMR) spectroscopy was applied and validated for the absolute quantification of sorbic acid (SA) in processed foods. The proposed method showed good linearity. The recoveries for samples spiked at the maximum usage level specified for food in Japan and at 0.13 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.013 g kg{sup -1}) were larger than 80%, whereas those for samples spiked at 0.063 g kg{sup -1} (beverage: 0.0063 g kg{sup -1}) were between 56.9 and 83.5%. The limit of quantification was 0.063 g kg{sup -1} for foods (and 0.0063 g kg{sup -1} for beverages containing Lactobacillus species). Analysis of the SA content of commercial processed foods revealed quantities equal to or greater than those measured using conventional steam-distillation extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification. The proposed method was rapid, simple, accurate, and precise, and provided International System of Units traceability without the need for authentic analyte standards. It could therefore be used as an alternative to the quantification of SA in processed foods using conventional method.

  4. Inlfuence of Hemolysis on Analytic Results of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-based Metabonomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore the changes of small molecular metabolites and their content in plasma samples due to hemolysis so as to analyze the influence of hemolysis of plasma samples on metabonomic study. Methods: Healthy adult males undergoing physical examination without drug administration history in recent period were selected to collect 10 hemolytic plasma samples and 10 hemolysis-free samples from them. Spectrograms of hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) were collected and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence was used to inhibit the production of broad peak by protein and lipid, and SIMCA-P+12.0 software was applied to conduct mode recognition and Pearson correlation analysis. Results: CPMG-1H NMR plasma metabolism spectrums showed that compared with hemolysis-free samples, hemolytic samples were evidently higher in the contents of acetate, acetone and pyruvic acid, but markedly lower in that of glucose. In addition, the chemical shift of glycine-CH2 in hemolysis group moved to the lower ifeld. Orthogonal partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was further applied to initiate mode recognition analysis and the results demonstrated that hemolysis group was prominently higher in the contents of metabolites, such as leucine, valine, lysine, acetate, proline, acetone, pyruvic acid, creatine, creatinine, glycine, glycerol, serine and lactic acid, but obviously lower in the contents of isoleucine and glucose than hemolysis-free group. Pearson correlation analysis indicated that in hemolytic samples, the contents of eucine, valine, lysine, proline, N-acetyl-glycoprotein, creatine, creatinine, glycerol and serine were higher but that of isoleucine was lower. Conclusion: Hemolysis can lead to the changes of multiple metabolite content and inlfuence the analytic results of metabonomics, so in practical operation, hemolytic samples should be excluded from the study.

  5. Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcu, Romulus VF; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 deg C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  6. Rotor design for high pressure magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Romulus V. F.; Hoyt, David W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Sears, Jesse A.; Loring, John S.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 °C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  7. Characteristics of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging response in fracture oil and gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Lizhi; Li Kui, E-mail: xiaolizhi@cup.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources and Prospecting, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Fracture oil and gas reservoirs exist in large numbers. The accurate logging evaluation of fracture reservoirs has puzzled petroleum geologists for a long time. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging is an effective new technology for borehole measurement and formation evaluation. It has been widely applied in non-fracture reservoirs, and good results have been obtained. But its application in fracture reservoirs has rarely been reported in the literature. This paper studies systematically the impact of fracture parameters (width, number, angle, etc), the instrument parameter (antenna length) and the borehole condition (type of drilling fluid) on NMR logging by establishing the equation of the NMR logging response in fracture reservoirs. First, the relationship between the transverse relaxation time of fluid-saturated fracture and fracture aperture in the condition of different transverse surface relaxation rates was analyzed; then, the impact of the fracture aperture, dip angle, length of two kinds of antennas and mud type was calculated through forward modeling and inversion. The results show that the existence of fractures affects the NMR logging; the characteristics of the NMR logging response become more obvious with increasing fracture aperture and number of fractures. It is also found that T{sub 2} distribution from the fracture reservoir will be affected by echo spacing, type of drilling fluids and length of antennas. A long echo spacing is more sensitive to the type of drilling fluid. A short antenna is more effective for identifying fractures. In addition, the impact of fracture dip angle on NMR logging is affected by the antenna length.

  8. Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of organic content in shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Kirkland, Catherine; Vogt, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (LF-NMR) relaxometry is a non-invasive technique commonly used to assess hydrogen-bearing fluids in petroleum reservoir rocks. Longitudinal T1 and transverse T2 relaxation time measurements made using LF-NMR on conventional reservoir systems provides information on rock porosity, pore size distributions, and fluid types and saturations in some cases. Recent improvements in LF-SNMR instrument electronics have made it possible to apply these methods to assess highly viscous and even solid organic phases within reservoir rocks. T1 and T2 relaxation responses behave very differently in solids and liquids, therefore the relationship between these two modes of relaxation can be used to differentiate organic phases in rock samples or to characterize extracted organic materials. Using T1-T2 correlation data, organic components present in shales, such as kerogen and bitumen, can be examined in laboratory relaxometry measurements. In addition, implementation of a solid-echo pulse sequence to refocus some types of T2 relaxation during correlation measurements allows for improved resolution of solid phase photons. LF-NMR measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time correlations were carried out on raw oil shale samples from resources around the world. These shales vary widely in mineralogy, total organic carbon (TOC) content and kerogen type. NMR results were correlcated with Leco TOC and geochemical data obtained from Rock-Eval. There is excellent correlation between NMR data and programmed pyrolysis parameters, particularly TOC and S2, and predictive capability is also good. To better understand the NMR response, the 2D NMR spectra were compared to similar NMR measurements made using high-field (HF) NMR equipment.

  9. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of myocardial perfusion using the paramagnetic contrast agent manganese gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, S; Lange, R A; Kulkarni, P V; Katz, J; Parkey, R W; Willerson, J T; Peshock, R M

    1989-08-01

    Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging studies have indicated that coronary occlusion does not produce sufficient changes in standard tissue relaxation times to allow the detection of acute ischemia. To identify acute myocardial perfusion abnormalities, the use of the paramagnetic agent manganese gluconate combined with calcium gluconate (MnGlu/CaGlu) was investigated in canine models of acute coronary artery occlusion. In vitro studies showed that MnGlu/CaGlu was a more efficient relaxing agent than gadolinium-DTPA (relaxivity of 7.8 versus 5.1 s-1 mM-1) and demonstrated affinity for normal myocardium. The distribution of MnGlu/CaGlu as measured by manganese-54 tracer studies was proportional to myocardial blood flow in both normal and ischemic tissue. Hearts excised from dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of 0.035 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu were imaged ex vivo using a relatively spin-lattice relaxation time (T1)-weighted gradient reversal technique (repetition time [TR] 50 ms and echo time [TE] 9 ms). These images showed increased signal intensity in the normally perfused myocardium with a mean signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.55 +/- 0.12 (mean +/- SD). In vivo images obtained in nine dogs after coronary artery occlusion and administration of the same dose of MnGlu/CaGlu demonstrated the region of hypoperfused myocardium in six dogs with a signal intensity ratio of hypoperfused to normal myocardium of 0.64 +/- 0.23 (p less than 0.05 versus control). When a higher dose of 0.1 mM/kg MnGlu/CaGlu was utilized and in vivo imaging was performed using a relatively spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted (TR gated, TE 60 ms) spin-echo sequence in six dogs, the signal intensity of normal myocardium was decreased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics study of metabolic profiling in immunoglobulin a nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Weiguo; Che, Wenti; Guimai, Zuo; Chen, Jiejing [181st Hospital Guangxi, Central Laboratory, Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases Research, Guangxi Province (China); Li, Liping [Guangxi Normal University, The Life Science College, Guangxi Province (China); Li, Wuxian [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education Ministry, Chongqiong Medical University, Chongqing (China); Dai, Yong [Clinical Medical Research Center, the Second Clinical Medical College of Jinan University (Shenzhen People' s Hospital), Shenzhen, Guangdong Province (China)

    2012-07-01

    Objectives: Immunoglobulin A nephropathy is the most common cause of chronic renal failure among primary glomerulonephritis patients. The ability to diagnose immunoglobulin A nephropathy remains poor. However, renal biopsy is an inconvenient, invasive, and painful examination, and no reliable biomarkers have been developed for use in routine patient evaluations. The aims of the present study were to identify immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients, to identify useful biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy and to establish a human immunoglobulin A nephropathy metabolic profile. Methods: Serum samples were collected from immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients who were not using immunosuppressants. A pilot study was undertaken to determine disease-specific metabolite biomarker profiles in three groups: healthy controls (N = 23), low-risk patients in whom immunoglobulin A nephropathy was confirmed as grades I-II by renal biopsy (N = 23), and high-risk patients with nephropathies of grades IV-V (N = 12). Serum samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by applying multivariate pattern recognition analysis for disease classification. Results: Compared with the healthy controls, both the low-risk and high-risk patients had higher levels of phenylalanine, myo-inositol, lactate, L6 lipids ( CH-CH{sub 2}-CH = O), L5 lipids (-CH{sub 2}-C = O), and L3 lipids (-CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-C = O) as well as lower levels of {beta}-glucose, {alpha}-glucose, valine, tyrosine, phosphocholine, lysine, isoleucine, glycerolphosphocholine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, alanine, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate, and 1-methylhistidine. Conclusions: These metabolites investigated in this study may serve as potential biomarkers of immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Point scoring of pattern recognition analysis was able to distinguish immunoglobulin A nephropathy patients from healthy controls. However, there were no obvious differences between the low-risk and high

  11. Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, B.deB. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

  12. Porosities and permeability of Paleozoic sandstones derived from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorand, Rachel; Koch, Andreas; Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    A major obstacle for an increased use of geothermal energy often lies in the high success risk for the development of geothermal reservoirs due to the unknown rock properties. In general, the ranges of porosity and permeability in existing compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties for specific sites. Usually, conservative assumptions are made about these properties, resulting in greater drilling depth and increased exploration cost. In this study, data from direct measurements on thirty-three sandstones from different borehole locations and depths enable to derive statistical values of the desired hydraulic properties for selected sandstones in the German subsurface. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements to estimate the porosity and the permeability of sandstones from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Besides NMR standard poro-perm-measurements were performed on the samples to obtain independent data sets for comparison. Porosity was measured by Archimedes principle and pore-size distribution by mercury injection. Also permeability was determined by gas flow measurements taking into account the Klinkenberg effect. The porosities of the studied samples vary between 0 % and 16 %. NMR yields suitable porosity results whereas the porosities obtain by T1 relaxation measurements fit better to the Archimedes porosities than the porosities obtained by T2 relaxation measurements. For porosities up to 10 %, T2 relaxation measurements overestimate the porosity. Furthermore, we calculate the effective porosity using a cutoff time of 3 ms. This effective porosity agrees much better with Archimedes porosities, particularly for the low porosity samples. The gas permeability of studied sandstones varies between 10-21 m2 and 2.10-17 m2. A large number of empirical relationships between relaxation times and gas permeability have been published. We have applied several of these relationships to select the appropriate law for

  13. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  14. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT2 measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  15. Robust determination of surface relaxivity from nuclear magnetic resonance DT(2) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Xiang; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to probe into geological materials such as hydrocarbon reservoir rocks and groundwater aquifers. It is unique in its ability to obtain in situ the fluid type and the pore size distributions (PSD). The T1 and T2 relaxation times are closely related to the pore geometry through the parameter called surface relaxivity. This parameter is critical for converting the relaxation time distribution into the PSD and so is key to accurately predicting permeability. The conventional way to determine the surface relaxivity ρ2 had required independent laboratory measurements of the pore size. Recently Zielinski et al. proposed a restricted diffusion model to extract the surface relaxivity from the NMR diffusion-T2 relaxation (DT2) measurement. Although this method significantly improved the ability to directly extract surface relaxivity from a pure NMR measurement, there are inconsistencies with their model and it relies on a number of preset parameters. Here we propose an improved signal model to incorporate a scalable LT and extend their method to extract the surface relaxivity based on analyzing multiple DT2 maps with varied diffusion observation time. With multiple diffusion observation times, the apparent diffusion coefficient correctly describes the restricted diffusion behavior in samples with wide PSDs, and the new method does not require predetermined parameters, such as the bulk diffusion coefficient and tortuosity. Laboratory experiments on glass beads packs with the beads diameter ranging from 50 μm to 500 μm are used to validate the new method. The extracted diffusion parameters are consistent with their known values and the determined surface relaxivity ρ2 agrees with the expected value within ±7%. This method is further successfully applied on a Berea sandstone core and yields surface relaxivity ρ2 consistent with the literature.

  16. 2D aquifer characterization and improved prediction of hydraulic conductivity using surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosch, Raphael; Günther, Thomas; Müller-Petke, Mike; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2014-05-01

    We present recent studies on the characterization of shallow aquifers using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). NMR can help to gather detailed information about the water content and pore size related NMR relaxation time, of porous and water saturated material. The field application of surface NMR uses large wire loops placed at the surface of the Earth allows imaging the subsurface down to around hundred meters. First, a sophisticated inversion scheme is presented to simultaneously determine the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of the water content and the NMR relaxation time (T2*) in the subsurface from a surface NMR survey. The outstanding features of the new inversion scheme are its robustness to noisy data and the potential to distinguish aquifers of different lithology due to their specific NMR relaxation time. The successful application of the inversion scheme is demonstrated on two field cases both characterized by channel structures in the glacial sediments of Northern Germany. Second, we revise the prediction of hydraulic conductivity from NMR measurements for coarse-grained and unconsolidated sediments, commonly found in shallow aquifers. The presented Kozeny-Godefroy model replaces the empirical factors in known relations with physical, structural, and intrinsic NMR parameters. It additionally accounts for bulk water relaxation and is not limited to fast diffusion conditions. This improves the prediction of the hydraulic conductivity for clay-free sediments with grain sizes larger than medium sand. The model is validated by laboratory measurements on glass beads and sand samples. Combining the new inversion scheme and petrophysical model allows 2D imaging of the hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface from a surface NMR survey.

  17. Energetics of endurance exercise in young horses determined by nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux Marie-Hélène, Olivia Luck

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-term endurance exercise severely affects metabolism in both human and animal athletes resulting in serious risk of metabolic disorders during or after competition. Young horses (up to 6 years old can compete in races up to 90 km despite limited scientific knowledge of energetic metabolism responses to long distance exercise in these animals. The hypothesis of this study was that there would be a strong effect of endurance exercise on the metabolomic profiles of young horses and that the energetic metabolism response in young horses would be different from that of more experienced horses. Metabolomic profiling is a powerful method that combines Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectrometry with supervised orthogonal projection on latent structure (OPLS statistical analysis. 1H-NMR spectra were obtained from plasma samples drawn from young horses (before and after competition. The spectra obtained before and after the race from the same horse (92 samples were compared using OPLS. The statistical parameters showed the robustness of the model (R2Y=0.947, Q2Y=0.856 and CV-ANOVA p-value < 0.001. For confirmation of the predictive value of the model, a test set of 104 sample spectra were projected by the model, which provided perfect predictions as the area under the receiving-operator curve was 1. The metabolomic profile determined with the OPLS model showed that glycemia after the race was lower than glycemia before the race, despite the involvement of lipid and protein catabolism. An OPLS model was calculated to compare spectra obtained on plasma taken after the race from 6-year-old horses and from experienced horses (cross-validated ANOVA p-value < 0.001. The comparison of metabolomic profiles in young horses to those from experienced horses showed that experienced horses maintained their glycemia with higher levels of lactate and a decrease of plasma lipids after the race.

  18. Examination of cucurbit[7]uril and its host-guest complexes by diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheate, Nial J; Kumar, P G Anil; Torres, Allan M; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R; Price, William S

    2008-02-28

    The self-diffusion of cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and its host-guest complexes in D2O has been examined using pulsed gradient spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. CB[7] diffuses freely at a concentration of 2 mM with a diffusion coefficient (D) of 3.07 x 10(-10) m(2) s(-1). At saturation (3.7 mM), CB[7] diffuses more slowly (D = 2.82 x 10(-10) m(2) s(-1)) indicating that it partially self-associates. At concentrations between 2 and 200 mM, CsCl has no effect on the diffusion coefficient of CB[7] (1 mM). Conversely, CB[7] (2 mM) significantly affects the diffusion of 133Cs+ (1 mM), decreasing its diffusion coefficient from 1.86 to 0.83 x 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). Similar changes in the rate of diffusion of other alkali earth metal cations are observed upon the addition of CB[7]. The diffusion coefficient of 23Na+ changes from 1.26 to 0.90 x 10(-9) m(2) s(-1) and 7Li+ changes from 3.40 to 3.07 x 10(-9) m(2) s(-1). In most cases, encapsulation of a variety of inorganic and organic guests within CB[7] decreases their rates of diffusion in D2O. For instance, the diffusion coefficient of the dinuclear platinum complex trans-[[PtCl(NH3)2}2mu-dpzm](2+) (where dpzm is 4,4'-dipyrazolylmethane) decreases from 4.88 to 2.95 x 10(-10) m(2) s(-1) upon encapsulation with an equimolar concentration of CB[7].

  19. Characterisation of human embryonic stem cells conditioning media by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A MacIntyre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell culture media conditioned by human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs provide a complex supplement of protein and metabolic factors that support in vitro proliferation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. However, the conditioning process is variable with different media batches often exhibiting differing capacities to maintain hESCs in culture. While recent studies have examined the protein complement of conditioned culture media, detailed information regarding the metabolic component of this media is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a (1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1H-NMR metabonomics approach, 32 metabolites and small compounds were identified and quantified in media conditioned by passage 11 HFFs (CMp11. A number of metabolites were secreted by HFFs with significantly higher concentration of lactate, alanine, and formate detected in CMp11 compared to non-conditioned media. In contrast, levels of tryptophan, folate and niacinamide were depleted in CMp11 indicating the utilisation of these metabolites by HFFs. Multivariate statistical analysis of the (1H-NMR data revealed marked age-related differences in the metabolic profile of CMp11 collected from HFFs every 24 h over 72 h. Additionally, the metabolic profile of CMp11 was altered following freezing at -20°C for 2 weeks. CM derived from passage 18 HFFs (CMp18 was found to be ineffective at supporting hESCs in an undifferentiated state beyond 5 days culture. Multivariate statistical comparison of CMp11 and CMp18 metabolic profiles enabled rapid and clear discrimination between the two media with CMp18 containing lower concentrations of lactate and alanine as well as higher concentrations of glucose and glutamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: (1H-NMR-based metabonomics offers a rapid and accurate method of characterising hESC conditioning media and is a valuable tool for monitoring, controlling and optimising hESC culture media preparation.

  20. Conformational selection and functional dynamics of calmodulin: a (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Joshua; Prosser, R Scott

    2014-09-16

    Calcium-bound calmodulin (CaM-4Ca(2+)) is innately promiscuous with regard to its protein interaction network within the cell. A key facet of the interaction process involves conformational selection. In the absence of a binding peptide, CaM-4Ca(2+) adopts an equilibrium between a native state (N) and a weakly populated near-native peptide-bound-like state (I), whose lifetime is on the order of 1.5 ms at 37 °C, based on (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion measurements. This peptide-bound-like state of CaM-4Ca(2+) is entropically stabilized (ΔS = 280 ± 35 J mol(-1) K(-1)) relative to the native state, water-depleted, and likely parental to specific bound states. Solvent depletion, conformational selection, and flexibility of the peptide-bound-like state may be important in priming the protein for binding. At higher temperatures, the exchange rate, kex, appears to markedly slow, suggesting the onset of misfolded or off-pathway states, which retards interconversion between N and I. (19)F NMR CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments with both CaM-4Ca(2+) and the separate N-terminal and C-terminal domains reveal the cooperative role of the two domains in the binding process and the flexibility of the N-terminal domain in facilitating binding. Thus, when calcium binds, calmodulin establishes its interaction with a multitude of protein binding partners, through a combination of conformational selection to a state that is parental to the peptide-bound state and, finally, induced fit.

  1. Characterization via nuclear magnetic resonance of Portland cement and related materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christopher Lane

    The physicochemical and engineering performance properties of several API class G and H ordinary Portland cements (OPCs) from various foreign and domestic sources have been investigated. The engineering performance properties are found to vary from sample to sample, and sources for this variation were sought out and identified. Magic angle spinning (MAS) 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were marked by unusual relaxation behavior due to paramagnetism inherent in OPCs. A model system was created to mimic the paramagnetism of the cements and the system's relaxation behavior was analyzed. The iron in the calcium aluminoferrite (C4AF) provides the paramagnetism sufficient to substantially increase the relaxation rates of the 29Si in the tricalcium silicate (C3S) and dicalcium silicate (C2S) of cement. Several relaxation techniques were evaluated for analyzing cement relaxation, and saturation recovery was identified as the preferred technique. Correlations of data from the saturation recovery experiments with engineering performance properties, especially the strength development of cement pastes, were obtained facilely. An error analysis of the NMR and engineering performance testing techniques was conducted, which indicated that NMR measurements produced less error than the engineering performance tests. A best practice, modified from the saturation recovery experiment, is proposed for use in property correlations. Additionally, 13C MAS NMR was used to characterize various fluorinated single-walled carbon nanotubes (F-SWNTs), which proved surprisingly effective in attenuating 13C-19F dipolar interactions and quantifying the extent of functionalization present at high degrees of reaction. The mixed-metal nanocluster known as FeMoC was also characterized by MAS NMR. The impact of the paramagnetic Fe3+ in the Keplerate cage on the 31P nuclei in the caged Keggin ion of FeMoC was evident in the greatly reduced relaxation times measured.

  2. Progress in spin dynamics solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance with the application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an historical overview of theoretical approaches used for describing spin dynamics under static or rotating experiments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. The article gives a brief historical overview for major theories in nuclear magnetic resonance and the promising theories. We present the first application of Floquet-Magnus expansion to chemical shift anisotropy when irradiated by BABA pulse sequence.

  3. Contribution to the study of nuclear resonance in magnetic media (1963); Contribution a l'etude de la resonance nucleaire dans les milieux magnetique (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann-Boutron, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-06-15

    An attempt is made to interpret the results of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments made by various workers on ferro and ferrimagnetic compounds of the iron group. The problems encountered are the following: effects of the dipolar fields and the hyperfine structure anisotropy; signal intensity; frequency pulling due to the Suhl-Nakamura interaction between nuclear spins ; nuclear relaxation and ferrimagnetic resonance in single domain samples of impure YIG; nuclear relaxation in the Bloch walls of insulators. The results of our calculations are generally in good agreement with experiment. (author) [French] On se propose d'interpreter les resultats d'experiences de resonance magnetique nucleaire fates par divers auteurs sur des composes ferro et ferrimagnetiques du groupe du fer. Les problemes abordes sont les suivants: effets des champs dipolaires et de l'anisotropie de structure hyperfine; intensite des signaux; deplacement de frequence du a l'interaction de Suhl-Nakamura entre spins nucleaires; relaxation nucleaire et resonance ferrimagnetique dans les echantillons monodomaines de grenat de fer et d'yttrium impur; relaxation nucleaire dans les parois de Bloch des isolants. Les resultats des calculs sont generalement en bon accord avec l'experience. (auteur)

  4. Evaluation of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and collagen by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy; Avaliacao da polivinilpirrolidona e do colageno por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de baixo campo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paula de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano]. E-mail: pmcosta@ima.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    Blends of natural and synthetic polymers represent a new class of materials with better mechanical properties and biocompatibility than those of the single components. Collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are well known for their important biological properties. The blending of collagen with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) makes it possible to obtain new materials in which strong interactions between the synthetic and biological components occur. Do to the excellent biocompatibility of these polymers, this blend has been much studied intending biomedical applications. And a one technique that can provide important information on molecular mobility, compatibility and even evaluate the interactions that can occur with these polymers is the Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Thus, the purpose of this work is to evaluate collagen and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. From the values of relaxation times obtained, we can conclude that these materials have different interactions, and different mobility domains, confirming the heterogeneity and complexity of these materials. (author)

  5. 139La nuclear magnetic resonance characterisation of La2O3 and La1-xSrxMO3 where M = Cr, Mn or Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastow, T J

    1994-02-01

    139La Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra have been used to obtain nuclear quadrupole coupling parameters for La2O3 and a series of perovskites La1-xSrxMO3 (where M = Cr, Mn or Co). Depending on the doping level of SrO2 these materials are either paramagnetic or ferromagnetic at room temperature. Magnetic transferred hyperfine effects are strongly in evidence in the Mn compounds. A 59Co NMR spectrum was observed in LaCoO3. A precision measurement of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant in La2O3 was made by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy.

  6. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  7. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  8. H Nuclear magnetic resonance based metabonomics data analysis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Arjmand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systematic inflammatory disorder that may affect many tissues and organs, but principally attacks synovial joints and it is a common rheumatic disease with many subtypes. Nuclear Magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectrometers with high sensitivity, resolution and dynamic range has permitted the rapid, simultaneous investigation of complex mixtures of endogenous or exogenous components present in biological materials. Metabonomics is the systematic study of chemical finger print resulted from cell reactions and could be used as a new biomarker for early disease diagnosis. In the present investigation, we studied serum metabolic profile in rheumatoid arthritis (RA in order to find out the metabolic finger print pattern of the disease. Materials and methods: In our metabonomics study serum samples were collected from 16 patients with active RA, and from equal number of healthy subjects. They were evaluated during a one-year follow-up with the assessment of disease activity and 1H NMR spectroscopy of sera samples. In all the cases, the presence of active rheumatoid arthritis was shown by an increase in the T1 values of the synovium of the joints. We specified and classified all metabolites using PCA, PLSDA chemometrics methods. Chenomx (Trail Version and ProMetab codes in Matlab software environments were used for our data analysis. Results were compared with the NMR metabolite data bank (www.metabolomics.ca. Anti-CCP, ANA and urea were also analyzed by ElISA and colorimetric methods respectively. Results: The most changes identified in this study were in the biosynthesis pathways of steroid hormones, biotin, fatty acids, amino acids (Leucine, Valin and isoleucine and also linoleic acid. Conclusion: In rheumatoid arthritis disease, the activation of the immune system consumes larg amounts of energy. The main donor of free energy in cells is ATP, which is generated by both glycolysis and oxidative

  9. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  10. Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Applications in Yttrium Type Zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoxiong

    Molecular self-diffusion measurements by Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) spectroscopy can be applied to numerous fields. PFG NMR spectroscopy usually requires no special labeling for measuring hydrocarbon self-diffusion in a variety of samples. This is a significant advantage over using radioactive isotopes or photolabeled molecules since no special sample preparation or handling is required. A single set of experiments can yield diffusion coefficients and often can be performed in a few hours. The range of diffusion coefficients (10^{ -4} cm^2/s-10 ^{-10} cm^2/s) which can be determined by PFG NMR covers most ranges of molecular diffusion. This work describes the design of a PFG NMR spectrometer for measuring hydrocarbon self-diffusion in zeolites. The principles of PFG NMR spectroscopy are illustrated. A pulsed field gradient 60 MHz NMR spectrometer was constructed. Diffusion data were acquired by PFG NMR for standard samples of water, ammonia and glycerol and are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Following verification of spectrometer performance, the self-diffusion coefficients of isobutane in cation exchanged Y type zeolites were determined. The results show that the mobility of molecules in zeolites depends on the nature of the cations. For small crystallite zeolites, intercrystalline and intracrystalline diffusion has been observed. The effective diffusion coefficients strongly depend on the concentration of adsorbate as well as the packing method. Large discrepancies between diffusion coefficients in zeolites measured by PFG NMR and by adsorption rate experiments have been reported. Surface area, crystallite size, percentage of water in the zeolite, percentage of cation exchanged into the zeolite and other physical chemical properties effect hydrocarbon diffusivity. Detailed methods for determining these properties are discussed. As an extended study of zeolite catalysts, the adsorption of ethylene on

  11. Monitoring of organic contaminants in sediments using low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Rupert, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The effective monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. Recent geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity, complex conductivity, and ground penetrating radar have been successfully applied to characterize organic contaminants in the subsurface and to monitor remediation process both in laboratory and in field. Low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical tool sensitive to the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of hydrogen-bearing fluids in geological materials and shows promise as a novel method for monitoring contaminant remediation. This laboratory research focuses on measurements on synthetic samples to determine the sensitivity of NMR to the presence of organic contaminants and improve understanding of relationships between NMR observables, hydrological properties of the sediments, and amount and state of contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) has been selected as a representative organic contaminant. Three types of porous media (pure silica sands, montmorillonite clay, and various sand-clay mixtures with different sand/clay ratios) were prepared as synthetic sediments. NMR relaxation time (T2) and diffusion-relaxation (D - T2) correlation measurements were performed in each sediment saturated with water and toluene mixed fluid at assorted concentrations (0% toluene and 100% water, 1% toluene and 99% water, 5% toluene and 95% water, 25% toluene and 75% water, and 100% toluene and 0% water) to 1) understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR responses in each fluid mixture, 2) investigate the role of clay content on T2 relaxation of each fluid, 3) quantify the amount hydrocarbons in the presence of water in each sediment, and 4) resolve hydrocarbons from water in D - T2 map. Relationships between the compositions of porous media, hydrocarbon concentration, and hydraulic

  12. Self-energy Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Parameters within Quantum Electrodynamics Perturbation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Aucar

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A theory for the calculation of self-energy corrections to the nuclear magnetic parameters is given in this paper. It is based on the S-matrix formulation of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (QED. Explicit expressions for the various terms of the S-matrix are given. The interpretation of the self-energy, one- and two-vertex terms and some perspective for possible future developments are discussed.

  13. Transition-Selective Pulses in Zero-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjolander, Tobias F; Tayler, Michael C D; King, Jonathan P; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2016-06-30

    We use low-amplitude, ultralow frequency pulses to drive nuclear spin transitions in zero and ultralow magnetic fields. In analogy to high-field NMR, a range of sophisticated experiments becomes available as these allow narrow-band excitation. As a first demonstration, pulses with excitation bandwidths 0.5-5 Hz are used for population redistribution, selective excitation, and coherence filtration. These methods are helpful when interpreting zero- and ultralow-field NMR spectra that contain a large number of transitions.

  14. PARAMETERS OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN PATIENTS WITH CONGENITAL NARROWING OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIU HAZAEL MORALES-RANGEL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the morphological parameters of magnetic resonance in patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal with patients with low back pain. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective, observational study was conducted with measurements in the axial and sagittal magnetic resonance sections of the vertebral body and canal of the lumbar spine of 64 patients with diagnosis of low back pain, which were compared with resonance images taken from 31 Mexican patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal. Results: The results show that patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal in the axial sections have a difference in diameters, being L2<13.9 mm, L3<13.3 mm, L4<12.9 mm, L5<13.1 mm, compared with controls L2<20.5 mm, L3<20.5 mm, L4<19.3 mm, L5<18.1 mm with p = 0.000. Conclusions: We found different measurements in the Mexican population compared to those found by similar studies. With the parameters obtained, it would be possible to make the proper diagnosis, surgical planning, and treatment.

  15. Nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance in metallic powders in the presence of strong quadrupole interaction: Rhenium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitropoulos, C.; Maglione, M.; Borsa, F.

    1988-03-01

    The nuclear-magnetic-resonance and nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR-NMR) spectra of /sup 187/Re and /sup 185/Re in a powder of rhenium metal were measured in the temperature range 5--10 K both in zero field and with an external magnetic field. The zero-field NQR spectrum is severely broadened by a nonuniform distribution of quadrupole interactions. The average quadrupole coupling frequencies measured at 5 K are, for the two isotopes, ..nu../sub Q/ = 39 +- 0.2 MHz (/sup 187/Re) and ..nu../sub Q/ = 40.8 +- 0.3 MHz (/sup 185/Re). The spectra obtained in the presence of an external magnetic field can be interpreted satisfactorily in terms of transitions among the eigenstates of the full Hamiltonian (Zeeman plus quadrupolar). Measurements of relaxation rates yield T/sub 1/T = 0.03 sK, indicating a relaxation mechanism driven by the hyperfine interaction with the conduction electrons. The feasibility of NQR-NMR studies in small metal particles in the presence of strong inhomogeneous quadrupole interactions is assessed

  16. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  17. Solvent effects on zero-point vibrational corrections to optical rotations and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Ruud, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of solvent effects on the zero-point vibrational corrections (ZPVC) to optical rotations and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of solvated molecules. The model used to calculate vibrational corrections rely on an expansion of the potential and property surfaces around an effective molecular geometry and includes both harmonic and anharmonic corrections. Numerical examples are presented for ( S)-propylene oxide in various solvents as well as for acetone and the three diazene molecules. We find that solvent effects on the ZPVCs may be significant and in some cases crucial to accurately predict solvent shifts on molecular properties.

  18. [sup 27]Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Ce[sub 3]Al[sub 11] at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavilano, J.L. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)); Hunziker, J. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)); Buechi, S. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland)); Fisk, Z. (Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)); Ott, H.R. (Lab. fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH-Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland))

    1994-02-01

    We have measured the [sup 27]Al nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, spectra of oriented powder of the intermetallic compound Ce[sub 3]Al[sub 11] at temperatures between 0.03 K and 20 K, and frequencies of 2.815 MHz, 3.925 MHz, 9.208 MHz and 74.81 MHz. In the paramagnetic state the NMR spectra show the quadrupolar-split contribution of the four inequivalent Al-sites with strongly temperature-dependent Knigth shifts. The NMR spectra indicate the onset of a ferromagnetic phase below 6.2 K transforming into a sinusoidally modulated antiferromagnetic state below 3.3 K. (orig.)

  19. Experimental implementation of a three qubit quantum game with corrupt source using nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Avik; Sivapriya, K; Kumar, Anil

    2007-08-01

    In a three player quantum 'Dilemma' game each player takes independent decisions to maximize his/her individual gain. The optimal strategy in the quantum version of this game has a higher payoff compared to its classical counterpart. However, this advantage is lost if the initial qubits provided to the players are from a noisy source. We have experimentally implemented the three player quantum version of the 'Dilemma' game as described by Johnson, [N.F. Johnson, Phys. Rev. A 63 (2001) 020302(R)] using nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor and have experimentally verified that the payoff of the quantum game for various levels of corruption matches the theoretical payoff.

  20. Experimentally Obtaining the Likeness of Two Unknown Qubits on a Nuclear-Magnetic-Resonance Quantum Information Processor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛飞; 杜江峰; 周先意; 韩荣典; 吴季辉

    2003-01-01

    We study the discrimination of quantum states from the other way around, i.e. the likeness of two quantum states. The fidelity is used to describe the likeness of two quantum states. Then we present a scheme to obtain the fidelity of two unknown qubits directly from the integral area of the spectra of the assistant qubit (spin) on a nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum information processor. Finally, we demonstrate the scheme on a three-qubit quantum information processor. The experimental data are consistent with the theoretical expectation with an average error of 0.05, which confirms the scheme.

  1. Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of soil humic fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Hawkins, B.L.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cross polarization, magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize humic fractions isolated from different soils. The humic acid fractions are more aromatic than the humin fractions, probably due to the higher polysaccharide content of humins. However, fulvic acid fractions are more aromatic than the corresponding humic acid and humin fractions. These results can be interpreted in terms of the isolation procedure, because the high affinity of Polyclar AT for phenols results in higher aromaticities as compared with other isolation methods (e.g. charcoal).

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imager)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoshinori [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    MRI is a widely used diagnostic imaging modality because it has excellent diagnostic capabilities, is safe to use and generates images not affected by bone artifacts. Images are obtained by utilizing the phenomenon of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) by which protons located in a static magnetic field absorb radio frequency (RF) pulses with a specific frequency and release a part of the energy as a NMR signal. Potentially MRI has the ability to provide functional and metabolic information (such as flow, temperature, diffusion, neuron activity) in addition to morphological information. This paper describes the imaging principles and provides a general outline of some applications: flow imaging, metabolite imaging and temperature imaging. (J.P.N.).

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements and Electronic Structure of Pu(IV) in [(Me)4N]2PuCl6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounce, Andrew M; Yasuoka, Hiroshi; Koutroulakis, Georgios; Lee, Jeongseop A; Cho, Herman; Gendron, Frédéric; Zurek, Eva; Scott, Brian L; Trujillo, Julie A; Slemmons, Alice K; Cross, Justin N; Thompson, Joe D; Kozimor, Stosh A; Bauer, Eric D; Autschbach, Jochen; Clark, David L

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis, electronic structure, and characterization via single-crystal X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility of (Me4N)2PuCl6 are reported. NMR measurements were performed to both search for the direct (239)Pu resonance and to obtain local magnetic and electronic information at the Cl site through (35)Cl and (37)Cl spectra. No signature of (239)Pu NMR was observed. The temperature dependence of the Cl spectra was simulated by diagonalizing the Zeeman and quadrupolar Hamiltonians for (35)Cl, (37)Cl, and (14)N isotopes. Electronic structure calculations predict a magnetic Γ5 triplet ground state of Pu(IV) in the crystalline electric field of the undistorted PuCl6 octahedron. A tetragonal distortion would result in a very small splitting (∼20 cm(-1)) of the triplet ground state into a nonmagnetic singlet and a doublet state. The Cl shifts have an inflection point at T ≈ 15 K, differing from the bulk susceptibility, indicating a nonmagnetic crystal field ground state. The Cl spin-lattice relaxation time is constant to T = 15 K, below which it rapidly increases, also supporting the nonmagnetic crystal field ground state.

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  5. Spin-Density-Wave-Type Ordering of LaCoGe Revealed by 59Co- and 139La-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karube, Kosuke; Hattori, Taisuke; Ishida, Kenji; Tamura, Nobuhiko; Deguchi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Noriaki K.

    2013-08-01

    The low-temperature magnetic properties of LaCoGe with the tetragonal CeFeSi-type structure were investigated by 59Co- and 139La-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) measurements. The nuclear spin--lattice relaxation rate divided by the temperature, 1/(T1T), gradually increases with decreasing temperature and shows a kink at approximately 18 K, below which an inhomogeneous internal field appears at the Co nuclear site. These results indicate that antiferromagnetic ordering occurs below TN˜ 18 K. However, an internal field was not observed at the La nuclear site below TN. Taking all NMR results into account, we conclude that spin-density-wave (SDW)-type ordering occurs, where magnetic correlations are of the checkerboard type [\\mbi{Q}=(π,π)] in the ab-plane and have a long periodicity along the c-axis with inhomogeneous ordered moments pointing to the c-axis.

  6. Relaxation-allowed nuclear magnetic resonance transitions by interference between the quadrupolar coupling and the paramagnetic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Wen; Jerschow, Alexej

    2007-02-14

    Of the various ways in which nuclear spin systems can relax to their ground states, the processes involving an interference between different relaxation mechanisms, such as dipole-dipole coupling and chemical shift anisotropy, have become of great interest lately. The authors show here that the interference between the quadrupolar coupling and the paramagnetic interaction (cross-correlated relaxation) gives rise to nuclear spin transitions that would remain forbidden otherwise. In addition, frequency shifts arise. These would be reminiscent of residual anisotropic interactions when there are none. While interesting from a fundamental point of view, these processes may become relevant in magnetic resonance imaging experiments which involve quadrupolar spins, such as (23)Na, in the presence of contrast agents. Geometrical constraints in paramagnetic molecule structures may likewise be derived from these interference effects.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance Knight shifts in the presence of strong spin-orbit and crystal-field potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisson, D. M.; Curro, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in materials with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Nuclear magnetic resonance is a valuable microscopic probe of such systems because of the hyperfine interactions between the nuclear spins and the electron degrees of freedom. In materials with weak SOC the NMR Knight shift contains two contributions: one from the electron orbital susceptibility and the other from the electron spin susceptibility. These contributions can be separated by plotting the Knight shift versus the bulk susceptibility and extracting the slope and intercept. Here we examine the case where the SOC is non-negligible, in which case the slope and intercept are no longer simply related to these two contributions. These results have important implications for NMR studies of heavy fermions, as well as 4d and 5d systems.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  9. Profiling human blood serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a comprehensive tool for the evaluation of hemodialysis efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromke, Marika; Palomino-Schätzlein, Martina; Mayer, Horst; Pfeffer, Stefan; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Luy, Burkhard; Hausberg, Martin; Muhle-Goll, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Hemodialysis remains the standard therapy to treat patients affected with end-stage renal disease by removing metabolites accumulated in blood plasma. The efficiency of hemodialysis is mainly monitored by urea clearance, which is routinely checked in clinical laboratory practice. However, there is mounting evidence that the clearance behavior of selected single metabolites is not sufficient to predict long-term outcome of treatment. To address this problem, we evaluated the potential of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for monitoring hemodialysis efficiency by comprehensive profiling of blood serum metabolites. We carried out a pilot study with a cohort of end-stage chronic kidney disease patients (n = 29), analyzing their serum prior and immediately after hemodialysis. To account for supposed variability in the accumulation of metabolites and efficiency of hemodialysis, patients' blood sera were repeatedly collected over a period of several months. Our results revealed that the metabolic profile in terms of concentrations varied considerably between patients but was comparably constant on the patient's level over the period of 4 months. Interestingly, also the individual clearance of the metabolites was characteristic for each patient. Thus, it is conceivable that the observed patient-dependent clearance patterns reflect to some extent the patients' long-term perspectives. We conclude that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is an optimal tool to complement traditional clinical methods based on a single variable, providing comprehensive and much more global information, which is crucial for patient evaluation and the development of improved treatments of kidney failure.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, and nuclear magnetic resonance study of chitosan-coated Mn(₁-x)Zn(x)Fe₂O₄ nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, S Manjura; Srivastava, C; Venkatesha, N; Chattopadhyay, K

    2013-12-01

    Ultra-fine crystallites of Mn(₁-x)Zn(x)Fe₂O₄ series (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) were synthesized through wet chemical co-precipitation method followed by calcination at 200 °C for 4 hours. Formation of ferrites was confirmed by X-ray diffraction, TEM selected area diffraction (SAD) and Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR). Nanocrystallites of different compositions in the series were coated with biocompatible chitosan in order to investigate their possible application as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Chitosan coating examined by FTIR, revealed a strong bonding of chitosan molecules to the surface of the ferrite nanocrystallites. Spin-spin, τ₂ relaxivities of nuclear spins of hydrogen protons of the solutions for different ferrites were measured from concentration dependence of relaxation time by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). All the compositions Mn(₁-x)Zn(x)Fe₂O₄ of series possess higher values of τ₂ relaxivity thus making them suitable as contrast agents for τ₂ weighted imaging by MRI.

  11. Relativistic theory of nuclear magnetic resonance parameters in a Gaussian basis representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzelnigg, Werner; Liu, Wenjian

    2009-07-28

    The calculation of NMR parameters from relativistic quantum theory in a Gaussian basis expansion requires some care. While in the absence of a magnetic field the expansion in a kinetically balanced basis converges for the wave function in the mean and for the energy with any desired accuracy, this is not necessarily the case for magnetic properties. The results for the magnetizability or the nuclear magnetic shielding are not even correct in the nonrelativistic limit (nrl) if one expands the original Dirac equation in a kinetically balanced Gaussian basis. This defect disappears if one starts from the unitary transformed Dirac equation as suggested by Kutzelnigg [Phys. Rev. A 67, 032109 (2003)]. However, a new difficulty can arise instead if one applies the transformation in the presence of the magnetic field of a point nucleus. If one decomposes certain contributions, the individual terms may diverge, although their sum is regular. A controlled cancellation may become difficult and numerical instabilities can arise. Various ways exist to avoid these singularities and at the same time get the correct nrl. There are essentially three approaches intermediate between the transformed and the untransformed formulation, namely, the bispinor decomposition, the decomposition of the lower component, and the hybrid unitary transformation partially at operator and partially at matrix level. All three possibilities were first considered by Xiao et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 214101 (2007)] in a different context and in a different nomenclature. Their analysis and classification in a more general context are given here for the first time. Use of an extended balanced basis has no advantages and has other drawbacks and is not competitive, while the use of a restricted magnetic balance basis can be justified.

  12. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  13. Theory for cross effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic-angle spinning in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: the importance of level crossings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-28

    We present theoretical calculations of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) due to the cross effect in nuclear magnetic resonance under magic-angle spinning (MAS). Using a three-spin model (two electrons and one nucleus), cross effect DNP with MAS for electron spins with a large g-anisotropy can be seen as a series of spin transitions at avoided crossings of the energy levels, with varying degrees of adiabaticity. If the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T(1e) is large relative to the MAS rotation period, the cross effect can happen as two separate events: (i) partial saturation of one electron spin by the applied microwaves as one electron spin resonance (ESR) frequency crosses the microwave frequency and (ii) flip of all three spins, when the difference of the two ESR frequencies crosses the nuclear frequency, which transfers polarization to the nuclear spin if the two electron spins have different polarizations. In addition, adiabatic level crossings at which the two ESR frequencies become equal serve to maintain non-uniform saturation across the ESR line. We present analytical results based on the Landau-Zener theory of adiabatic transitions, as well as numerical quantum mechanical calculations for the evolution of the time-dependent three-spin system. These calculations provide insight into the dependence of cross effect DNP on various experimental parameters, including MAS frequency, microwave field strength, spin relaxation rates, hyperfine and electron-electron dipole coupling strengths, and the nature of the biradical dopants.

  14. Acoustic resonance for nonmetallic mine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of acoustic resonance for detection of plastic mines was investigated by researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Instrumentation and Controls Division under an internally funded program. The data reported in this paper suggest that acoustic resonance is not a practical method for mine detection. Representative small plastic anti-personnel mines were tested, and were found to not exhibit detectable acoustic resonances. Also, non-metal objects known to have strong acoustic resonances were tested with a variety of excitation techniques, and no practical non-contact method of exciting a consistently detectable resonance in a buried object was discovered. Some of the experimental data developed in this work may be useful to other researchers seeking a method to detect buried plastic mines. A number of excitation methods and their pitfalls are discussed. Excitation methods that were investigated include swept acoustic, chopped acoustic, wavelet acoustic, and mechanical shaking. Under very contrived conditions, a weak response that could be attributed to acoustic resonance was observed, but it does not appear to be practical as a mine detection feature. Transfer properties of soil were investigated. Impulse responses of several representative plastic mines were investigated. Acoustic leakage coupling, and its implications as a disruptive mechanism were investigated.

  15. NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) and macromolecular migration in a melt or in concentrated solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addad, J. P. C.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the migration process of long polymer molecules in a melt or in concentrated solutions as it may be observed from the dynamics of the transverse magnetization of nuclear spins linked to these chains. The low frequency viscoelastic relaxation of polymer systems is known to be mainly controlled by the mechanism of dissociation of topological constraints excited on chains and which are called entanglements. This mechanism exhibits a strong dependence upon the chain molecular weight. These topological constraints also govern the diffusion process of polymer chains. So, the accurate description of the diffusion motion of a chain may be a convenient way to characterize disentanglement processes necessarily involved in any model proposed to explain viscoelastic effects.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  17. Solid-state 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of three aluminum-centered dyes

    KAUST Repository

    Mroué, Kamal H.

    2010-02-01

    We report the first solid-state 27Al NMR study of three aluminum phthalocyanine dyes: aluminum phthalocyanine chloride, AlPcCl (1); aluminum-1,8,15,22-tetrakis(phenylthio)-29H,31H-phthalocyanine chloride, AlPc(SPh)4Cl (2); and aluminum-2,3-naphthalocyanine chloride, AlNcCl (3). Each of these compounds contains Al3+ ions coordinating to four nitrogen atoms and a chlorine atom. Solid-state 27Al NMR spectra, including multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning (MQMAS) spectra and quadrupolar Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (QCPMG) spectra of stationary powdered samples have been acquired at multiple high magnetic field strengths (11.7, 14.1, and 21.1 T) to determine their composition and number of aluminum sites, which were analyzed to extract detailed information on the aluminum electric field gradient (EFG) and nuclear magnetic shielding tensors. The quadrupolar parameters for each 27Al site were determined from spectral simulations, with quadrupolar coupling constants (CQ) ranging from 5.40 to 10.0 MHz and asymmetry parameters (η) ranging from 0.10 to 0.50, and compared well with the results of quantum chemical calculations of these tensors. We also report the largest 27Al chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA), with a span of 120 ± 10 ppm, observed directly in a solid material. The combination of MQMAS and computational predictions are used to interpret the presence of multiple aluminum sites in two of the three samples.

  18. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-basedmetabonomic study in patients with cirrhosis and hepaticencephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    AIM To identify plasma metabolites used as biomarkersin order to distinguish cirrhotics from controls and encephalopathics.METHODS: A clinical study involving stable cirrhoticpatients with and without overt hepatic encephalopathywas designed. A control group of healthy volunteers wasused. Plasma from those patients was analysed using1H - nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Weused the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill sequence to processthe sample spectra at ambient probe temperature. Weused a gated secondary irradiation field for water signalsuppression. Samples were calibrated and referencedusing the sodium trimethyl silyl propionate peak at0.00 ppm. For each sample 128 transients (FID's)were acquired into 32 K complex data points over aspectral width of 6 KHz. 30 degree pulses were appliedwith an acquisition time of 4.0 s in order to achievebetter resolution, followed by a recovery delay of 12s, to allow for complete relaxation and recovery ofthe magnetisation. A metabolic profile was created forstable cirrhotic patients without signs of overt hepaticencephalopathy and encephalopathic patients as wellas healthy controls. Stepwise discriminant analysis wasthen used and discriminant factors were created todifferentiate between the three groups.RESULTS: Eighteen stabled cirrhotic patients, eighteenpatients with overt hepatic encephalopathy and seventeenhealthy volunteers were recruited. Patients with cirrhosishad significantly impaired ketone body metabolism, ureasynthesis and gluconeogenesis. This was demonstratedby higher concentrations of acetoacetate (0.23 ± 0.02vs 0.05 ± 0.00, P 〈 0.01), and b-hydroxybutarate (0.58± 0.14 vs 0.08 ± 0.00, P 〈 0.01), lower concentrationsof glutamine (0.44 ± 0.08 vs 0.63 ± 0.03, P 〈 0.05),histidine (0.16 ± 0.01 vs 0.36 ± 0.04, P 〈 0.01) andarginine (0.08 ± 0.01 vs 0.14 ± 0.02, P 〈 0.03) andhigher concentrations of glutamate (1.36 ± 0.25 vs0.58 ± 0.04, P 〈 0.01), lactate (1

  19. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis of heavy crude oil mixtures with emphasis in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sandra L. [Department of Chemistry, QOPNA, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Silva, Artur M.S., E-mail: artur.silva@ua.pt [Department of Chemistry, QOPNA, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ribeiro, Jorge C. [Petrogal SA, Laboratory of Matosinhos Refinery, Rua Belchior Robles, 4452-852 Leca da Palmeira, Matosinhos (Portugal); Martins, Fernando G. [LEPAE, University of Porto, Engineering Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Da Silva, Francisco A.; Silva, Carlos M. [Department of Chemistry, CICECO, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: The chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques used to characterize heavy crude oils, although more focused in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the technique of choice, due to its capability to provide great information on the chemical nature of individual types of proton and carbon atoms in different and complex mixtures of crude oils are described. This review is based on 65 references and describes in a critical and interpretative ways the advantages of the NMR spectroscopy as a main technique to be used in crude oil refining industries that want to characterize crude oil fractions and the obtained refined products. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromatogrfaphic and spectroscopic techniques used to characterize heavy crude oils have been reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This review describes in a critical and interpretative ways the advantages of the NMR spectroscopy as a main technique to be used in crude oil refining industries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The progress in the interpretation of the NMR spectra and of different multivariate data analyses and their potential in the identification and characterization of hydrocarbons and their physical and chemical properties have also been reviewed. - Abstract: The state of the art in the characterization of heavy crude oil mixtures is presented. This characterization can be done by different techniques, such as gas chromatography (GC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), infrared spectroscopy (IR), Raman spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is the technique of choice due to its capability to provide information on the chemical nature of individual types of hydrogen and carbon atoms in different and complex mixtures of crude oils. The progress made in the interpretation of the NMR spectra with the development of new NMR

  20. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  1. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  2. Molecular interactions between green tea catechins and cheese fat studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidinejad, Ali; Birch, Edward J; Hindmarsh, Jason; Everett, David W

    2017-01-15

    Molecular integrations between green tea catechins and milk fat globules in a cheese matrix were investigated using solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Full-fat cheeses were manufactured containing free catechin or free green tea extract (GTE), and liposomal encapsulated catechin or liposomal encapsulated GTE. Molecular mobility of the carbon species in the cheeses was measured by a wide-line separation technique. The (1)H evolution frequency profile of the (13)C peak at 16ppm obtained for the control cheese and cheeses containing encapsulated polyphenols (catechin or GTE) were similar, however, the spectrum was narrower for cheeses containing free polyphenols. Differences in spectral width indicates changes in the molecular mobility of --CH3- or -C-C-PO4- species through hydrophobic and/or cation-π associations between green tea catechins and cheese fat components. However, the similar spectral profile suggests that encapsulation protects cheese fat from interaction with catechins.

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Original Water Saturation and Mobile Water Saturation in Low Permeability Sandstone Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shu-Sheng; YE Li-You; XIONG Wei; GUO He-Kun; HU Zhi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ We use nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR)and centrifugation to measure the original water saturation and mobile water saturation of cores from the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas reservoir,and compare the NMR results with the corresponding field data.It is shown that the NMR water saturation after 300 psi centrifugation effectively represents the original water saturation measured by weighing fresh cores.There is a good correlation between mobile water saturation and the water production performance of the corresponding gas wells.The critical mobile water saturation whether reservoir produces water of the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas is 6%.The higher the mobile water saturation,the greater the water production rate of gas well.This indicates that well's water production performance can be forecasted by mobile water saturation of cores.

  4. Investigation of bacterial spore structure by high resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, R G; Lillford, P J

    2001-01-22

    High resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of spores of Bacillus cereus, an outer coatless mutant B. subtilis 322, an inner coatless mutant B. subtilis 325 and of germinated spores of B. subtilis CMCC 604 were carried out. Structural differences in the coats, mainly protein of spores were reflected by NMR spectra which indicated also differences in molecular mobility of carbohydrates which was partially attributed to the cortex. Dipicolinic acid (DPA) of spores of B. cereus displayed a high degree of solid state order and may be crystalline. Heat activation was studied on spores of B. subtilis 357 lux + and revealed a structural change when analysed by TEM but this was not associated with increases in molecular mobility since no effects were measured by NMR.

  5. Structure–function–folding relationships and native energy landscape of dynein light chain protein: nuclear magnetic resonance insights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P M Krishna Mohan; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2009-09-01

    The detailed characterization of the structure, dynamics and folding process of a protein is crucial for understanding the biological functions it performs. Modern biophysical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have provided a way to obtain accurate structural and thermodynamic information on various species populated on the energy landscape of a given protein. In this context, we review here the structure–function–folding relationship of an important protein, namely, dynein light chain protein (DLC8). DLC8, the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex, acts as a cargo adaptor. The protein exists as a dimer under physiological conditions and dissociates into a pure monomer below pH 4. Cargo binding occurs at the dimer interface. Dimer stability and relay of perturbations through the dimer interface are anticipated to be playing crucial roles in the variety of functions the protein performs. NMR investigations have provided great insights into these aspects of DLC8 in recent years.

  6. Selective carbon 13 enrichment of side chain carbons of ginkgo lignin traced by carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture); Robert, D.R. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee); Terashima, N. (Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States))

    Although carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([sup 13]C-NMR) is widely used in lignin structural studies, serious difficulties are encountered in the assignments of [sup 13]C signals because of their extensive overlaps resulting from the complex structure of lignin and of delicate detection of minor structures. To overcome these difficulties, specifically [sup 13]C-enriched precursors of lignin biosynthesis, coniferin-[side chain-[beta]-[sup 13]C] and coniferin-[side chain-[gamma]-[sup 13]C], were administered to growing stems of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). The NMR analysis of the milled wood lignins isolated from the newly formed xylem showed that selective enrichment of specific carbons of protolignin in the cell wall was achieved without seriously disturbing the lignin biosynthesis. The presence of saturated methylene side chains in the protolignin was shown for the first time by this selective enrichment technique in combination with NMR analysis. (authors). 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Is it Possible to Extract Brain Metabolic Pathways Information from In Vivo H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Data?

    CERN Document Server

    de Lara, Alejandro Chinea Manrique

    2010-01-01

    In vivo H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important tool for performing non-invasive quantitative assessments of brain tumour glucose metabolism. Brain tumours are considered as fast-growth tumours because of their high rate of proliferation. In addition, tumour cells exhibit profound genetic, biochemical and histological differences with respect to the original non-transformed cellular types. Therefore, there is a strong interest from the clinical investigator point of view in understanding the role of brain metabolites in normal and pathological conditions and especially on the development of early tumour detection techniques. Unfortunately, current diagnosis techniques ignore the dynamic aspects of these signals. It is largely believed that temporal variations of NMR Spectra are noisy or just simply do not carry enough information to be exploited by any reliable diagnosis procedure. Thus, current diagnosis procedures are mainly based on empirical observations extracted from single avera...

  8. A study of J-coupling spectroscopy using the Earth's field nuclear magnetic resonance inside a laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Chen, Ming-Jye; Yang, Hong-Chang; Lee, Shin-Yi; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Shieh-Yueh

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, an instrumentation of the Earth's field nuclear magnetic resonance (EFNMR) inside a laboratory is presented. A lock-in analysis (LIA) technique was proposed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A SNR of 137.8 was achieved in a single measurement for 9 ml tap water, and the LIA technique significantly enhanced the SNR to 188 after a 10-average in a noisy laboratory environment. The proton-phosphorus coupling in trimethyl phosphate ((CH(3)O)(3)PO) with J-coupling J[H,F]=(10.99±0.013) Hz has been demonstrated. The LIA technique improves the SNR, and a 2.6-fold improvement in SNR over that of the frequency-adjusted averaging is achieved. To reduce the noise in EFNMR, it was suggested that the LIA technique and the first order gradient shim be used to achieve a subhertz linewidth.

  9. (1)H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Plasma Metabolic Profiling of Dairy Cows with Fatty Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuang; Sun, Ling-Wei; Xia, Cheng; Zhang, Hong-You; Zheng, Jia-San; Wang, Jun-Song

    2016-02-01

    Fatty liver is a common metabolic disorder of dairy cows during the transition period. Historically, the diagnosis of fatty liver has involved liver biopsy, biochemical or histological examination of liver specimens, and ultrasonographic imaging of the liver. However, more convenient and noninvasive methods would be beneficial for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows. The plasma metabolic profiles of dairy cows with fatty liver and normal (control) cows were investigated to identify new biomarkers using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance. Compared with the control group, the primary differences in the fatty liver group included increases in β-hydroxybutyric acid, acetone, glycine, valine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, citrulline, and isobutyrate, and decreases in alanine, asparagine, glucose, γ-aminobutyric acid glycerol, and creatinine. This analysis revealed a global profile of endogenous metabolites, which may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of fatty liver in dairy cows.

  10. Mild hydration of didecyldimethylammonium chloride modified DNA by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance and by sorption isotherm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harańczyk, H.; Kobierski, J.; Nizioł, J.; Hebda, E.; Pielichowski, J.; Zalitacz, D.; Marzec, M.; El-Ghayoury, A.

    2013-01-01

    The gaseous phase hydration of deoxyribonucleic acid and didecyldimethylammonium chloride (C19H42ClN) complexes (DNA-DDCA) was observed using hydration kinetics, sorption isotherm, and high power nuclear magnetic resonance. Three bound water fractions were distinguished: (i) a very tightly bound water not removed by incubation over silica gel, (ii) a tightly bound water saturating with the hydration time t1h = (0.59 ± 0.04) h, and a loosely bound water fraction, (iii) with the hydration time t2h = (20.9 ± 1.3) h. Proton free induction decay was decomposed into the signal associated with the solid matrix of DNA-DDCA complex (T2S∗≈ 30 μs) and two liquid signal components coming from tightly bound (T2L1∗≈ 100 μs) and from loosely bound water fraction (T2L2∗≈ 1000 μs).

  11. ¹H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance monitoring of the degradation of margarines of varied compositions when heated to high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibargoitia, María L; Sopelana, P; Guillén, María D

    2014-12-15

    In this study, (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was used to monitor the evolution of three margarines of varied compositions when submitted to heating at 180°C in an oven with aeration. Heating causes degradation of polyunsaturated acyl groups and this depends not only on their unsaturation degree, but also on the concentration of the different acyl groups. The evolution of monounsaturated groups varies depending on the disappearance rate of the groups with higher unsaturation degree. Heat treatment also causes hydrolysis reactions that lead to a reduction in 1-monoglycerides and an increase in 1,2-diglycerides, especially in the margarines with higher water content, as well as degradation of some vegetable sterols. Different types of aldehydes and epoxides were identified and quantified, above all in the margarine with the highest proportion of polyunsaturated groups, especially linoleic; some of these are toxic, such as 4-hydroxy- and 4,5-epoxy-2-alkenals.

  12. The identification of acetylcholine and choline in oat seedlings by gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tretyn

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Four methods of isolation and purification of choline esters from green 7-day-old oat ( Avena sativa L. cv. Diadem seedlings were tested The results showed that the best recovery of acetylcholine and choline from plant tissues was obtained using an extraction solution composed of 15% 1N formic acid and 85%, acetone followed by precipitation of both these substances with ammonium reineckate. The presence of acetylcholine and choline in the plant extracts was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and gas chromatography. In the case of gas chromatography, after isolation and purification of the studied compounds from the plant material, estrification of choline followed by N-demethylation of acetylcholine and estrified choline were performed The demethylation reaction was conducted in a reaction mixture of 50 mM sodium thiophenolate and 25 mM thiophenol in anhydrous acetone. After its completion, the mixture was removed with pentanone and the demethylated esters were extracted into chloroform.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance in contemporary art: the case of ''Moon Surface'' by Turcato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proietti, Noemi; Di Tullio, Valeria; Capitani, Donatella [CNR, Area della Ricerca di Roma, Magnetic Resonance Laboratory ' ' Annalaura Segre' ' , Istituto di Metodologie Chimiche, Monterotondo (Rome) (Italy); Tomassini, Roberta; Guiso, Marcella [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Dipartimento di Chimica, Rome (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methodologies were applied to characterize the constitutive materials and the state of degradation of a contemporary painting. The investigation was mandatory to plan a suitable restoration. Noninvasive, portable NMR allowed the detection of degraded regions of the painting based on the measurement of longitudinal relaxation time. A few samples were investigated by high resolution solid state NMR and NMR in solution, which allowed us to identify the polyurethane constituting the artefact, to investigate the microstructure in detail, and to assess that the degradation process mostly affected the ethylene units used to cap the polypropylene oxide polymeric chain. As a matter of fact, a shortening of longitudinal relaxation time was accompanied by a degradation of ethylene units. The degradation of the inorganic loading was investigated by {sup 27}Al MAS, which evidenced the absence of penta-coordinated aluminum in degraded samples. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Metabolic Comparative Analysis of Two Apple Varieties with Different Resistances to Apple Scab Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciubba, Fabio; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Gianferri, Raffaella; Capuani, Giorgio; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Fontanari, Marco; Gorietti, Daniela; Delfini, Maurizio

    2015-09-23

    Apple scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is the most serious disease of the apple worldwide. Two cultivars (Malus domestica), having different degrees of resistance against fungi attacks, were analyzed by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Aqueous and organic extracts of both apple flesh and skin were studied, and over 30 metabolites, classified as organic acids, amino acids, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, lipids, sterols, and other metabolites, were quantified by means of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments. The metabolic profiles of the two apple cultivars were compared, and the differences were correlated with the different degrees of resistance to apple scab by means of univariate analysis. Levels of metabolites with known antifungal activity were observed not only to be higher in the Almagold cultivar but also to show different correlation patterns in comparison to Golden Delicious, implying a difference in the metabolic network involved in their biosynthesis.

  15. Three dimensional gel dosimetry by use of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Deene, Y.; De Wagter, C.; Van Duyse, B.; Achten, E.; De Neve, W. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; De Poorter, J. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Magnetic Resonance

    1995-12-01

    As co-monomers are found to polymerize by radiation, they are eligible for constructing a three dimensional dosimeter. Another kind of three dimensional dosimeter, based on the radiation sensitivity of the ferrous ions in a Fricke solution, was tested in a previous study. However, a major problem that occurs in this kind of gel dosimeters is the diffusion of the ferric and ferrous ions. The co-monomer gels are more stable. The degree of polymerisation is visualized with a clinical MRI system. Acrylamide and N,N-methylene-bis-acrylamide are dissolved in a gel composed of gelatin and water. By irradiation the co-monomers are polymerized to polyacrylamide. The gel is casted in humanoid forms. As such, a simulation of the irradiation of the patient can be performed. Magnetic resonance relaxivity images of the irradiated gel display the irradiation dose. The images of the gel are fused with the radiological images of the patient. Quantitation of the dose response of the co-monomer gel is obtained through calibration by test tubes.

  16. Imaging Prostate Cancer Invasion with Multi-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods: The Metabolic Boyden Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Pilatus

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The physiological milieu within solid tumors can influence invasion and metastasis. To determine the impact of the physiological environment and cellular metabolism on cancer cell invasion, it is necessary to measure invasion during well-controlled modulation of the physiological environment. Recently, we demonstrated that magnetic resonance imaging can be used to monitor cancer cell invasion into a Matrigel layer [Artemov D, Pilatus U, Chou S, Mori N, Nelson JB, and Bhujwalla ZM. (1999. Dynamics of prostate cancer cell invasion studied in vitro by NMR microscopy. Mag Res Med 42, 277–282.]. Here we have developed an invasion assay (“Metabolic Boyden Chamber” that combines this capability with the properties of our isolated cell perfusion system. Long-term experiments can be performed to determine invasion as well as cellular metabolism under controlled environmental conditions. To characterize the assay, we performed experiments with prostate cancer cell lines preselected for different invasive characteristics. The results showed invasion into, and degradation of the Matrigel layer, by the highly invasive/metastatic line (MatLyLu, whereas no significant changes were observed for the less invasive/metastatic cell line (DU-145. With this assay, invasion and metabolism was measured dynamically, together with oxygen tensions within the cellular environment and within the Matrigel layer. Such a system can be used to identify physiological and metabolic characteristics that promote invasion, and evaluate therapeutic interventions to inhibit invasion.

  17. Case-study magnetic resonance imaging and acoustic investigation of the effects of vocal warm-up on two voice professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Horáček, Jaromir; Havlík, Radan

    2012-07-01

    Vocal warm-up (WU)-related changes were studied in one male musical singer and one female speech trainer. They sustained vowels before and after WU in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) device. Acoustic recordings were made in a studio. The vocal tract area increased after WU, a formant cluster appeared between 2 and 4.5 kHz, and SPL increased. Evidence of larynx lowering was only found for the male. The pharyngeal inlet over the epilaryngeal outlet ratio (A(ph)/A(e)) increased by 10%-28%, being 3-4 for the male and 5-7 for the female. The results seem to represent different voice training traditions. A singer's formant cluster may be achievable without a high A(ph)/A(e) (≥ 6), but limitations of the 2D method should be taken into account.

  18. Starch biosynthesis and intermediary metabolism in maize kernels. Quantitative analysis of metabolite flux by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glawischnig, Erich; Gierl, Alfons; Tomas, Adriana; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2002-12-01

    The seeds of cereals represent an important sink for metabolites during the accumulation of storage products, and seeds are an essential component of human and animal nutrition. Understanding the metabolic interconversions (networks) underpinning storage product formation could provide the foundation for effective metabolic engineering of these primary nutritional sources. In this paper, we describe the use of retrobiosynthetic nuclear magnetic resonance analysis to establish the metabolic history of the glucose (Glc) units of starch in maize (Zea mays) kernels. Maize kernel cultures were grown with [U-(13)C(6)]Glc, [U-(13)C(12)]sucrose, or [1,2-(13)C(2)]acetate as supplements. After 19 d, starch was hydrolyzed, and the isotopomer composition of the resulting Glc was determined by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. [1,2-(13)C(2)]Acetate was not incorporated into starch. [U-(13)C(6)]Glc or [U-(13)C(12)]sucrose gave similar labeling patterns of polysaccharide Glc units, which were dominated by [1,2,3-(13)C(3)]- and [4,5,6-(13)C(3)]-isotopomers, whereas the [U-(13)C(6)]-, [3,4,5,6-(13)C(4)]-, [1,2-(13)C(2)]-, [5,6-(13)C(2)], [3-(13)C(1)], and [4-(13)C(1)]-isotopomers were present at lower levels. These isotopomer compositions indicate that there is extensive recycling of Glc before its incorporation into starch, via the enzymes of glycolytic, glucogenic, and pentose phosphate pathways. The relatively high abundance of the [5,6-(13)C(2)]-isotopomer can be explained by the joint operation of glycolysis/glucogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway.

  19. Pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of brain tissue extracts from rats anesthetized with propofol or isoflurane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: General anesthesia is routinely used as a surgical procedure and its safety has been endorsed by clinical outcomes; however, its effects at the molecular level have not been elucidated. General anesthetics influence glucose metabolism in the brain. However, the effects of anesthetics on brain metabolites other than those related to glucose have not been well characterized. We used a pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to visualize the changes in holistic brain metabolic phenotypes in response to the widely used intravenous anesthetic propofol and the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were randomized into five groups (n = 7 each group. Propofol and isoflurane were administered to two groups each, for 2 or 6 h. The control group received no anesthesia. Brains were removed directly after anesthesia. Hydrophilic compounds were extracted from excised whole brains and measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All spectral data were processed and analyzed by principal component analysis for comparison of the metabolite profiles. Data were visualized by plotting principal component (PC scores. In the plots, each point represents an individual sample. The propofol and isoflurane groups were clustered separately on the plots, and this separation was especially pronounced when comparing the 6-h groups. The PC scores of the propofol group were clearly distinct from those of the control group, particularly in the 6-h group, whereas the difference in PC scores was more subtle in the isoflurane group and control groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study showed that propofol and isoflurane exerted differential effects on holistic brain metabolism under anesthesia.

  20. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.

    1985-12-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness.

  1. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garitezi, T. M., E-mail: thalesmg@ifi.unicamp.br; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” UNICAMP, Campinas, SP 13083-859 (Brazil); Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, FSU, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4005 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    We report high field {sup 75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T{sub 0}≃128  K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency ν{sub Q}≃2.57(1)  MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe–As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T{sub 0} in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T{sub 0} suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  2. Properties of K,Rb-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, R.

    2015-09-18

    We present a detailed experimental study on how magnetic and electronic properties of Rb,K-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods can be derived from 13C nuclear magnetic resonance investigations. Ring currents do play a basic role in those systems; in particular, the inner cavities of nanotubes offer an ideal environment to investigate the magnetism at the nanoscale. We report the largest diamagnetic shifts down to −68.3 ppm ever observed in carbon allotropes, which is connected to the enhancement of the aromaticity of the nanotube envelope upon intercalation. The metallization of intercalated peapods is evidenced from the chemical shift anisotropy and spin-lattice relaxation (T1) measurements. The observed relaxation curves signal a three-component model with two slow and one fast relaxing components. We assigned the fast component to the unpaired electrons charged C60 that show a phase transition near 100 K. The two slow components can be rationalized by the two types of charged C60 at two different positions with a linear regime following Korringa behavior, which is typical for metallic system and allow us to estimate the density of sate at Fermi level n(EF).

  3. Comparison between Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Estimating Coronary Heart Disease Risk Associated with LDL and HDL Particle Size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Arsenault; I. Lemieux; J.P. Després; N.J. Wareham; E.S.G. Stroes; J.J.P. Kastelein; K.T. Khaw; S.M. Boekholdt

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are both widely accepted methods for measuring LDL and HDL particle size. However, whether or not GGE- or NMR-measured LDL or HDL particle size predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) risk to a similar ext

  4. High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of the Active Site of Chymotrypsin. II. Polarization of Histidine 57 by Substrate Analogues and Competitive Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robillard, G.; Shulman, R.G.

    1974-01-01

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance signal of the His57-Asp102 hydrogen bonded proton in the charge relay system of chymotrypsinogen A and chymotrypsin Aδ has been monitored to determine the influence of substrate analogues and competitive inhibitors on the electronic state of the active site regi

  5. In-Situ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Strain, Temperature, and Strain-Rate Variations of Deformation-Induced Vacancy Concentration in Aluminum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linga Murty, K.; Detemple, K.; Kanert, O.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1998-01-01

    Critical strain to serrated flow in solid solution alloys exhibiting dynamic strain aging (DSA) or Portevin–LeChatelier effect is due to the strain-induced vacancy production. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques can be used to monitor in situ the dynamical behavior of point and line defects

  6. 360-MHz 1H nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy of sialyl-oligosaccharides from patients with sialidosis (mucolipidosis I and II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Dorland, L.; Haverkamp, J.; Strecker, G.; Michalski, J.-C.; Fournet, b.; Spik, G.; Montreuil, J.

    1978-01-01

    360-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were recorded of 10 sialyl-oligosaccharides isolated form urine of sialidosis patients. Their structures are related to the complex aspareagine-linked glydan chains of glycoproteins. By correlation of these spectra and comparison with spectra of refe

  7. Humanitarian mine detection by acoustic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.

    1998-03-01

    The JASON Committee at MITRE Corp. was tasked by DARPA to inquire into suitable technologies for humanitarian mine detection. Acoustic resonance was one of the very few technologies that the JASONs determined might be promising for the task, but was as yet unexplored at the time that they conducted their inquiry. The objective of this Seed Money investigation into acoustic resonance was to determine if it would be feasible to use acoustic resonance to provide an improvement to present methods for humanitarian mine detection. As detailed in this report, acoustic resonance methods do not appear to be feasible for this task. Although acoustic resonant responses are relatively easy to detect when they exist, they are very difficult to excite by the non-contact means that must be used for buried objects. Despite many different attempts, this research did not discover any practical means of using sound to excite resonant responses in objects known to have strong resonances. The shaker table experiments did see an effect that might be attributable to the resonance of the object under test, but the effect was weak, and exploited the a priori knowledge of the resonant frequency of the object under test to distinguish it from the background. If experiments that used objects known to have strong acoustic resonances produced such marginal results, this does not seem to be a practical method to detect objects with weak resonances or non-existent resonances. The results of this work contribute to the ORNL countermine initiative. ORNL is exploring several unconventional mine detection technologies, and is proposed to explore others. Since this research has discovered some major pitfalls in non-metallic mine detection, this experience will add realism to other strategies proposed for mine detection technologies. The experiment provided hands-on experience with inert plastic mines under field conditions, and gives ORNL additional insight into the problems of developing practical

  8. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  9. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  10. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  11. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging after acoustic neuroma surgery. Influence of packing materials in the drilled internal auditory canal on assessment of residual tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umezu, Hiromichi; Seki, Yojiro [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    Serial magnetic resonance (MR) images taken after acoustic neuroma surgery were analyzed to evaluate the pattern and timing of postoperative contrast enhancement in 22 patients who underwent acoustic neuroma removal via the suboccipital transmeatal approach. The opened internal auditory canal (IAC) was covered with a muscle piece in nine patients and with fibrin glue in 13. A total of 56 MR imaging examinations were obtained between days 1 and 930 after surgery. MR imaging showed linear enhancement at the IAC within the first 2 days after surgery, and revealed nodular enhancement on day 3 or later in patients with a muscle piece. MR imaging tended to show linear enhancement at the IAC, irrespective of the timing of the examination in the patients with fibrin glue. Postoperative MR imaging on day 3 or later showed the incidence of nodular enhancement in patients with muscle was significantly higher than in patients with fibrin glue. The results illustrate the difficulty in differentiating nodular enhancement of a muscle piece from tumor by a single postoperative MR imaging study. Therefore, fibrin glue is generally advocated as a packing material of the IAC because it rarely shows masslike enhancement on postoperative MR imaging. When a muscle piece is used in patients at high risk for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks, MR imaging should be obtained within the first 2 days after surgery, since benign enhancement of muscle will not occur and obscure the precise extent of tumor resection. (author)

  12. Evaluation of cartilage composition and degradation by high-resolution magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jürgen; Huster, Daniel; Fuchs, Beate; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann, Jörn; Arnold, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are accompanied by a progressive destruction of the cartilage layers of the joints. Although the number of patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is steadily increasing, degradation mechanisms of cartilage are not yet understood, and methods for early diagnosis are not available. Although some information on pathogenesis could be obtained from the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of degradation products in the supernatants of cartilage specimens incubated with degradation-causing agents, the most direct information on degradation processes would come from the native cartilage as such. To obtain highly resolved NMR spectra of cartilage, application of the recently developed high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR technique is advisable to obtain small line-widths of individual cartilage resonances. This technique is nowadays commercially available for most NMR spectrometers and has the considerable advantage that the same pulse sequences as in high-resolution NMR can be applied. Except for a MAS spinning equipment, no solid-state NMR hardware is required. Therefore, this method can be easily implemented. Here, we describe the most important requirements that are necessary to record HR-MAS NMR spectra. The capabilities of the HR-MAS technique are discussed for the 1H and 13C NMR spectra of cartilage.

  13. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Ross

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI, sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry.

  14. Conformational Plasticity of the NNRTI-Binding Pocket in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase: A Fluorine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Naima G; Ishima, Rieko; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2016-07-19

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) is a major drug target in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. RT inhibitors currently in use include non-nucleoside, allosteric RT inhibitors (NNRTIs), which bind to a hydrophobic pocket, distinct from the enzyme's active site. We investigated RT-NNRTI interactions by solution (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using singly (19)F-labeled RT proteins. Comparison of (19)F chemical shifts of fluorinated RT and drug-resistant variants revealed that the fluorine resonance is a sensitive probe for identifying mutation-induced changes in the enzyme. Our data show that in the unliganded enzyme, the NNRTI-binding pocket is highly plastic and not locked into a single conformation. Upon inhibitor binding, the binding pocket becomes rigidified. In the inhibitor-bound state, the (19)F signal of RT is similar to that of drug-resistant mutant enzymes, distinct from what is observed for the free state. Our results demonstrate the power of (19)F NMR spectroscopy to characterize conformational properties using selectively (19)F-labeled protein.

  15. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis for the Rapid and Accurate Characterization of Hexacosanoylceramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Charles W; Simonsick, William J; Bogusky, Michael J; Celikay, Recep W; Guare, James P; Newton, Randall C

    2016-06-28

    Ceramides are a central unit of all sphingolipids which have been identified as sites of biological recognition on cellular membranes mediating cell growth and differentiation. Several glycosphingolipids have been isolated, displaying immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activities. These molecules have generated considerable interest as potential vaccine adjuvants in humans. Accurate analyses of these and related sphingosine analogues are important for the characterization of structure, biological function, and metabolism. We report the complementary use of direct laser desorption ionization (DLDI), sheath flow electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) and high-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis for the rapid, accurate identification of hexacosanoylceramide and starting materials. DLDI does not require stringent sample preparation and yields representative ions. Sheath-flow ESI yields ions of the product and byproducts and was significantly better than monospray ESI due to improved compound solubility. Negative ion sheath flow ESI provided data of starting materials and products all in one acquisition as hexacosanoic acid does not ionize efficiently when ceramides are present. NMR provided characterization of these lipid molecules complementing the results obtained from MS analyses. NMR data was able to differentiate straight chain versus branched chain alkyl groups not easily obtained from mass spectrometry.

  16. Acquisition of High Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers for Research in Molecular Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    projects may aid in the design of new therapeutic agents to control blood loss and/or wound healing. During the past quarter, further work has...Resonant, Parallel Lm Match 1H ω2(Lm + L) = 1 Ct ωLm = RZ0 In the above, L and Ct are the sample inductor and resonant capacitor, respectively

  17. Study of a DNA Duplex by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Molecular Dynamics Simulations. Validation of Pulsed Dipolar Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Distance Measurements Using Triarylmethyl-Based Spin Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomzov, Alexander A; Sviridov, Eugeniy A; Shernuykov, Andrey V; Shevelev, Georgiy Yu; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Bagryanskaya, Elena G

    2016-06-16

    Pulse dipole-dipole electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy (double electron-electron resonance [DEER] or pulse electron-electron double resonance [PELDOR] and double quantum coherence [DQC]) allows for measurement of distances in biomolecules and can be used at low temperatures in a frozen solution. Recently, the possibility of distance measurement in a nucleic acid at a physiological temperature using pulse EPR was demonstrated. In these experiments, triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals with long memory time of the electron spin served as a spin label. In addition, the duplex was immobilized on modified silica gel particles (Nucleosil DMA); this approach enables measurement of interspin distances close to 4.5 nm. Nevertheless, the possible influence of TAM on the structure of a biopolymer under study and validity of the data obtained by DQC are debated. In this paper, a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods was used for verification of interspin distances measured by the X-band DQC method. NMR is widely used for structural analysis of biomolecules under natural conditions (room temperature and an aqueous solution). The ultraviolet (UV) melting method and thermal series (1)H NMR in the range 5-95 °C revealed the presence of only the DNA duplex in solution at oligonucleotide concentrations 1 μM to 1.1 mM at temperatures below 40 °C. The duplex structures and conformation flexibility of native and TAM-labeled DNA complexes obtained by MD simulation were the same as the structure obtained by NMR refinement. Thus, we showed that distance measurements at physiological temperatures by the X-band DQC method allow researchers to obtain valid structural information on an unperturbed DNA duplex using terminal TAM spin labels.

  18. Spatial location of indomethacin associated with unimeric amphiphilic carrier macromolecules as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, David E; Moretti, Alysha; Uhrich, Kathryn E

    2016-07-01

    A combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques including, proton NMR, relaxation analysis, two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy, has been used to demonstrate the spatial location of indomethacin within a unimolecular micelle. Understanding the location of drugs within carrier molecules using such NMR techniques can facilitate rational carrier design. In addition, this information provides insight to encapsulation efficiency of different drugs to determine the most efficient system for a particular bioactive. This study demonstrates that drugs loaded by the unimolecular amphiphile under investigation are not necessarily encapsulated but reside or localize to the periphery or interfacial region of the carrier molecule. The results have further implications as to the features of the unimolecular carrier that contribute to drug loading. In addition, evidence of drug retention associated with the unimolecular surfactant is possible in organic media, as well as in an aqueous environment. Such findings have implications for rational carrier design to correlate the carrier features to the drug of interest and indicate the strong retention capabilities of the unimolecular micelle for delivery applications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-bound structure of the antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Mi-Hwa; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kushibiki, Takahiro; Nakazumi, Taichi; Tomisawa, Satoshi; Abe, Chiharu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Demura, Makoto; Kawano, Keiichi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are components of the innate immune system and may be potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics because they exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The AMP cecropin P1 (CP1), isolated from nematodes found in the stomachs of pigs, is known to exhibit antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we investigated the interaction between CP1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, using circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). CD results showed that CP1 formed an α-helical structure in a solution containing LPS. For NMR experiments, we expressed (15) N-labeled and (13) C-labeled CP1 in bacterial cells and successfully assigned almost all backbone and side-chain proton resonance peaks of CP1 in water for transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (Tr-NOE) experiments in LPS. We performed (15) N-edited and (13) C-edited Tr-NOE spectroscopy for CP1 bound to LPS. Tr-NOE peaks were observed at the only C-terminal region of CP1 in LPS. The results of structure calculation indicated that the C-terminal region (Lys15-Gly29) formed the well-defined α-helical structure in LPS. Finally, the docking study revealed that Lys15/Lys16 interacted with phosphate at glucosamine I via an electrostatic interaction and that Ile22/Ile26 was in close proximity with the acyl chain of lipid A.

  20. Analysis of factors causing signal loss in the measurement of lung tissue water by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzaki, Minoru [Tokai Univ. Junior Coll., Tokyo (Japan); Shioya, Sumie; Haida, Munetaka

    1997-05-01

    The water content of lung, brain, and muscle tissue was measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and compared with gravimetric determinations. The NMR signal intensity of water was measured by a single 90 degree pulse and by a spin-echo sequence. The absolute water content was determined by the difference in the sample`s weight before and after desiccation. The NMR detectable water in each tissue was expressed as a percentage of the signal intensity for an equal weight of distilled water. Using the single pulse measurement, 67% of the gravimetrically-measured water was detected in collapsed lung samples (consisting of about 47% retained air), in contrast to 96% for brain and 98% for muscle. For degassed lung samples, the NMR detectability of water increased to 87% with the single pulse measurement and to 90% with the spin-echo measurement, but the values remained significantly less than those of brain or muscle. Factors that caused the NMR signal loss of 33% in collapsed lung samples were: air-tissue interfaces (20%), microscopic field inhomogeneity (3%), and a water component with an extremely short magnetization decay time constant (10%). (author)

  1. Acoustic/Magnetic Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, J. S.; Namkung, M.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution sensor fast, portable, does not require permanent bonding to structure. Sensor measures nondestructively type (compressive or tensile) and magnitude of stresses and stress gradients present in class of materials. Includes precise high-resolution acoustic interferometer, sending acoustic transducer, receiving acoustic transducer, electromagnet coil and core, power supply, and magnetic-field-measuring device such as Hall probe. This measurement especially important for construction and applications where steel is widely used. Sensor useful especially for nondestructive evaluation of stress in steel members because of portability, rapid testing, and nonpermanent installation.

  2. Peptide backbone orientation and dynamics in spider dragline silk and two-photon excitation in nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eles, P.T

    2005-07-01

    In the first part of the dissertation, spider dragline silk is studied by solid state NMR techniques. The dependence of NMR frequency on molecular orientation is exploited using the DECODER experiment to determine the orientation of the protein backbone within the silk fibre. Practical experimental considerations require that the silk fibres be wound about a cylindrical axis perpendicular to the external magnetic field, complicating the reconstruction of the underlying orientation distribution and necessitating the development of numerical techniques for this purpose. A two-component model of silk incorporating static b-sheets and polyglycine II helices adequately fits the NMR data and suggests that the b-sheets are well aligned along the silk axis (20 FWHM) while the helices are poorly aligned (68 FWHM). The effects of fibre strain, draw rate and hydration on orientation are measured. Measurements of the time-scale for peptide backbone motion indicate that when wet, a strain-dependent fraction of the poorly aligned component becomes mobile. This suggests a mechanism for the supercontraction of silk involving latent entropic springs that undergo a local strain-dependent phase transition, driving supercontraction. In the second part of this dissertation a novel method is developed for exciting NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) by rf irradiation at multiple frequencies that sum to (or differ by) the resonance frequency. This is fundamentally different than traditional NMR experiments where irradiation is applied on-resonance. With excitation outside the detection bandwidth, two-photon excitation allows for detection of free induction signals during excitation, completely eliminating receiver dead-time. A theoretical approach to describing two-photon excitation is developed based on average Hamiltonian theory. An intuition for two-photon excitation is gained by analogy to the coherent absorption of multiple photons requiring conservation of total energy and

  3. Measuring the Magnetic Field Using the Zeeman Effect in Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance of GaSe and InSe Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Samila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance method with a fast Fourier transform of the free induction decay signals, the influence of a weak magnetic field (0 ÷ 10 Gauss on NQR spectral lines 69Ga and 115In in layered semiconductors GaSe and InSe was investigated. It has been found that the splitting of resonance lines, caused by the Zeeman effect, can be used to determine the magnitude and direction of the applied magnetic field.

  4. Enhancement of DFT-calculations at petascale: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Hybrid Density Functional Theory and Car-Parrinello calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varini, Nicola; Ceresoli, Davide; Martin-Samos, Layla; Girotto, Ivan; Cavazzoni, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    One of the most promising techniques used for studying the electronic properties of materials is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach and its extensions. DFT has been widely applied in traditional solid state physics problems where periodicity and symmetry play a crucial role in reducing the computational workload. With growing compute power capability and the development of improved DFT methods, the range of potential applications is now including other scientific areas such as Chemistry and Biology. However, cross disciplinary combinations of traditional Solid-State Physics, Chemistry and Biology drastically improve the system complexity while reducing the degree of periodicity and symmetry. Large simulation cells containing of hundreds or even thousands of atoms are needed to model these kind of physical systems. The treatment of those systems still remains a computational challenge even with modern supercomputers. In this paper we describe our work to improve the scalability of Quantum ESPRESSO (Giannozzi et al., 2009 [3]) for treating very large cells and huge numbers of electrons. To this end we have introduced an extra level of parallelism, over electronic bands, in three kernels for solving computationally expensive problems: the Sternheimer equation solver (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, package QE-GIPAW), the Fock operator builder (electronic ground-state, package PWscf) and most of the Car-Parrinello routines (Car-Parrinello dynamics, package CP). Final benchmarks show our success in computing the Nuclear Magnetic Response (NMR) chemical shift of a large biological assembly, the electronic structure of defected amorphous silica with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals and the equilibrium atomic structure of height Porphyrins anchored to a Carbon Nanotube, on many thousands of CPU cores.

  5. Validity of the electrical model representation of the effects of nuclear magnetic resonance (1961); Validite de la representation par modele electrique des effets de resonance magnetique nucleaire (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    When studying the behaviour of a magnetic resonance transducer formed by the association of an electrical network and of a set of nuclear spins, it is possible to bring about a representation that is analytically equivalent by means of an entirely electrical model, available for transients as well as steady-state. A detailed study of the validity conditions justifies its use in most cases. Also proposed is a linearity criterion of Bloch's equations in transient state that is simply the prolongation of the well-known condition of non-saturation in the steady-state. (author) [French] L'etude du comportement d'un transducteur a resonance magnetique forme de l'association d'un reseau electrique et d'un ensemble de noyaux dotes de spin, montre qu'il est possible d'en deduire une representation analytiquement equivalente au moyen d'un modele entierement electrique utilisable pour un regime transitoire aussi bien que pour un regime permanent. Une etude detaillee des conditions de validite permet d'en justifier l'emploi dans la majorite des cas. On propose enfin un critere de linearite des equations de Bloch en regime transitoire, qui constitue un prolongement de la condition connue de non-saturation en regime stationnaire. (auteur)

  6. Materials for Bulk Acoustic Resonators and Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebl, Hans-Peter

    2003-03-01

    Highly selective solidly mounted bulk acoustic wave (BAW) band pass filters are suited for mobile and wireless systems in the GHz frequency range between 0.8 and 10 GHz. Electro-acoustic thin film BAW resonators are the building blocks these BAW filters. Piezoelectric materials used in these resonators include mainly AlN or ZnO which can be deposited by dedicated thin film sputter deposition techniques. Using these piezo-electric materials and using suited materials for the acoustic Bragg reflector, BAW resonators with high quality factors can be fabricated. The achievable filter bandwidth is approximately 4Alternatively, also ferroelectric thin films might be used to achieve higher coupling coefficient and thus filter bandwidth. BAW resonators and filters have been designed and fabricated on 6" Silicon and glass wafers. Results are presented for resonators and filters operating between 1.95 and 8 GHz. The talk will give an overview of the material aspects which are important for BAW devices. It will be shown that modeling of the resonator and filter response using 1D electro-acoustic simulation (1,2) which includes losses is essential to extract acoustic and electrical material parameters. (1) Solidly Mounted Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters for the Ghz Frequency Range, H.P. Loebl, C. Metzmacher , D.N.Peligrad , R. Mauczok , M. Klee , W. Brand , R.F. Milsom , P.Lok , F.van Straten , A. Tuinhout , J.W.Lobeek, IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002. (2) Combined Acoustic-Electromagnetic Simulation Of Thin-Film Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters, R.F. Milsom, H-P. Löbl, D.N. Peligrad, J-W. Lobeek, A. Tuinhout, R. H. ten Dolle IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002.

  7. Hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance of the nitrogenase iron protein (Cp2) from Clostridium pasteurianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J; Gaillard, J; Moulis, J M

    1988-08-09

    Proton NMR spectra (250 MHz) of the nitrogenase iron protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp2) were found to display 9 or 10 paramagnetically shifted resonances in the 15-50 ppm range. The most shifted resonances belonged to two approximately equal subsets having temperature dependences of opposite sign. The latter occurrence is consistent with the interaction of the corresponding protons with an antiferromagnetically coupled metal center. The number of proton resonances of Cp2, their positions, and their temperature dependences were similar to those observed in spectra of (4Fe-4S)+ ferredoxins, particularly those of the latter that contain a single tetranuclear cluster, such as the ferredoxin from Bacillus stearothermophilus. The effects of several adenine nucleotides on the paramagnetically shifted proton resonances of Cp2 have been investigated. Whereas MgAMP had no effect at all, MgADP and MgATP were found to induce different modifications, which in both cases involved approximately half only of the shifted proton resonances. These data suggest that nucleotide binding affects mainly one part of the iron-sulfur cluster. A remarkable feature of the spectra of Cp2 in the presence of MgATP is the grouping of the shifted proton resonances in sets of two or four having identical chemical shifts and temperature dependences. A nearly perfect 2-fold symmetry is thus suggested for the arrangement of the cysteine protons around the active site. These observations lend support to the proposal that the (4Fe-4S) cluster is held symmetrically between the two identical subunits and are consistent with the existence of two MgATP binding sites on nitrogenase iron proteins.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. A set of triple-resonance nuclear magnetic resonance experiments for structural characterization of organophosphorus compounds in mixture samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskela, Harri, E-mail: Harri.T.Koskela@helsinki.fi [VERIFIN, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR pulse experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of organophosphorus (OP) compounds in complex matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selective extraction of {sup 1}H, {sup 31}P, and {sup 13}C chemical shifts and connectivities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More precise NMR identification of OP nerve agents and their degradation products. - Abstract: The {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy utilizes J{sub CH} couplings in molecules, and provides important structural information from small organic molecules in the form of carbon chemical shifts and carbon-proton connectivities. The full potential of the {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C correlation NMR spectroscopy has not been realized in the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) related verification analyses due to the sample matrix, which usually contains a high amount of non-related compounds obscuring the correlations of the relevant compounds. Here, the results of the application of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P triple-resonance NMR spectroscopy in characterization of OP compounds related to the CWC are presented. With a set of two-dimensional triple-resonance experiments the J{sub HP}, J{sub CH} and J{sub PC} couplings are utilized to map the connectivities of the atoms in OP compounds and to extract the carbon chemical shift information. With the use of the proposed pulse sequences the correlations from the OP compounds can be recorded without significant artifacts from the non-OP compound impurities in the sample. Further selectivity of the observed correlations is achieved with the application of phosphorus band-selective pulse in the pulse sequences to assist the analysis of multiple OP compounds in mixture samples. The use of the triple-resonance experiments in the analysis of a complex sample is shown with a test mixture containing typical scheduled OP compounds, including the characteristic degradation

  9. Evaluation of One-Sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for Remote Detection of Explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Si:znal-to-Noise Ratic 0:’ -:.-e NMR Exceri."ent", Journal o_ magnetji c Resonance 2 4, :4. 1. Hu.;chnson, ed. , The ARRL Handbook f4or tne Radio...6. 3. M. Dobratz, ed., LLNL Exzlos -4-ves Handbook -- Prc,_ert_-es o~Chemical E’xolosives and Explosives Simulants, ner: cfCalifornia Technical

  10. One- and Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with a Diamond Quantum Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, J. M.; Chang, K.; Armijo, J.; Cujia, K.; Rosskopf, T.; Maze, J. R.; Degen, C. L.

    2016-05-01

    We report on Fourier spectroscopy experiments performed with near-surface nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond chip. By detecting the free precession of nuclear spins rather than applying a multipulse quantum sensing protocol, we are able to unambiguously identify the NMR species devoid of harmonics. We further show that, by engineering different Hamiltonians during free precession, the hyperfine coupling parameters as well as the nuclear Larmor frequency can be selectively measured with up to five digits of precision. The protocols can be combined to demonstrate two-dimensional Fourier spectroscopy. Presented techniques will be useful for mapping nuclear coordinates in molecules deposited on diamond sensor chips, en route to imaging their atomic structure.

  11. Acoustic Resonance between Ground and Thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Matsumura

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low frequency acoustic waves called "acoustic gravity waves" or "infrasounds" are theoretically expected to resonate between the ground and the thermosphere. This resonance is a very important phenomenon causing the coupling of the solid Earth, neutral atmosphere, and ionospheric plasma. This acoustic resonance, however, has not been confirmed by direct observations. In this study, atmospheric perturbations on the ground and ionospheric disturbances were observed and compared with each other to confirm the existence of resonance. Atmospheric perturbations were observed with a barometer, and ionospheric disturbances were observed using the HF Doppler method. An end point of resonance is in the ionosphere, where conductivity is high and the dynamo effect occurs. Thus, geomagnetic observation is also useful, so the geomagnetic data were compared with other data. Power spectral density was calculated and averaged for each month. Peaks appeared at the theoretically expected resonance frequencies in the pressure and HF Doppler data. The frequencies of the peaks varied with the seasons. This is probably because the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere varies with the seasons, as does the reflection height of infrasounds. These results indicate that acoustic resonance occurs frequently.

  12. Complete Proton and Carbon Assignment of Triclosan via One- and Two- Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Students from an upper-division undergraduate spectroscopy class analyzed one- and two-dimensional 400 MHz NMR spectroscopic data from triclosan in CDCl3. Guided assignment of all proton and carbon signals was completed via 1D proton and carbon, nuclear Overhauser effect (nOe), distortionless enhanc...

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of DNP-ready trehalose obtained by solid state mechanochemical amorphization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filibian, M; Elisei, E; Colombo Serra, S; Rosso, A; Tedoldi, F; Cesàro, A; Carretta, P

    2016-06-22

    (1)H nuclear spin-lattice relaxation and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) have been studied in amorphous samples of trehalose sugar doped with TEMPO radicals by means of mechanical milling, in the 1.6-4.2 K temperature range. The radical concentration was varied between 0.34 and 0.81%. The highest polarization of 15% at 1.6 K, observed in the sample with concentration 0.50%, is of the same order of magnitude of that reported in standard frozen solutions with TEMPO. The temperature and concentration dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1, dominated by the coupling with the electron spins, were found to follow power laws with an exponent close to 3 in all samples. The observed proportionality between 1/T1 and the polarization rate 1/Tpol, with a coefficient related to the electron polarization, is consistent with the presence of Thermal Mixing (TM) and a good contact between the nuclear and the electron spins. At high electron concentration additional relaxation channels causing a decrease in the nuclear polarization must be considered. These results provide further support for a more extensive use of amorphous DNP-ready samples, obtained by means of comilling, in dissolution DNP experiments and possibly for in vivo metabolic imaging.

  14. Characterization of the AT180 epitope of phosphorylated Tau protein by a combined nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amniai, Laziza [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Lippens, Guy, E-mail: guy.lippens@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Landrieu, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.landrieu@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS-UMR 8576 UGSF-IFR 147, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} pThr231 of the Tau protein is necessary for the binding of the AT180 antibody. {yields} pSer235 of the Tau protein does not interfere with the AT180 recognition of pThr231. {yields} Epitope mapping is efficiently achieved by combining NMR and FRET spectroscopy. -- Abstract: We present here the characterization of the epitope recognized by the AT180 monoclonal antibody currently used to define an Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathological form of the phosphorylated Tau protein. Some ambiguity remains as to the exact phospho-residue(s) recognized by this monoclonal: pThr231 or both pThr231 and pSer235. To answer this question, we have used a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize in a qualitative and quantitative manner the phospho-residue(s) essential for the epitope recognition. Data from the first step of NMR experiments are used to map the residues bound by the antibodies, which were found to be limited to a few residues. A fluorophore is then chemically attached to a cystein residue introduced close-by the mapped epitope, at arginine 221, by mutagenesis of the recombinant protein. The second step of Foerster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the AT180 antibody tryptophanes and the phospho-Tau protein fluorophore allows to calculate a dissociation constant Kd of 30 nM. We show that the sole pThr231 is necessary for the AT180 recognition of phospho-Tau and that phosphorylation of Ser235 does not interfere with the binding.

  15. Electrostatic Energetics of Bacillus subtilis Ribonuclease P Protein Determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Histidine pKa Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Pamela L; Daniels, Kyle G; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-09-08

    The pKa values of ionizable groups in proteins report the free energy of site-specific proton binding and provide a direct means of studying pH-dependent stability. We measured histidine pKa values (H3, H22, and H105) in the unfolded (U), intermediate (I), and sulfate-bound folded (F) states of RNase P protein, using an efficient and accurate nuclear magnetic resonance-monitored titration approach that utilizes internal reference compounds and a parametric fitting method. The three histidines in the sulfate-bound folded protein have pKa values depressed by 0.21 ± 0.01, 0.49 ± 0.01, and 1.00 ± 0.01 units, respectively, relative to that of the model compound N-acetyl-l-histidine methylamide. In the unliganded and unfolded protein, the pKa values are depressed relative to that of the model compound by 0.73 ± 0.02, 0.45 ± 0.02, and 0.68 ± 0.02 units, respectively. Above pH 5.5, H22 displays a separate resonance, which we have assigned to I, whose apparent pKa value is depressed by 1.03 ± 0.25 units, which is ∼0.5 units more than in either U or F. The depressed pKa values we observe are consistent with repulsive interactions between protonated histidine side chains and the net positive charge of the protein. However, the pKa differences between F and U are small for all three histidines, and they have little ionic strength dependence in F. Taken together, these observations suggest that unfavorable electrostatics alone do not account for the fact that RNase P protein is intrinsically unfolded in the absence of ligand. Multiple factors encoded in the P protein sequence account for its IUP property, which may play an important role in its function.

  16. Phospholipid composition and organization of cytochrome c oxidase preparations as determined by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, A; Seelig, J

    1985-05-14

    The molecular organization as well as the composition of the phospholipids in cytochrome c oxidase preparations (bovine heart) were investigated by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance. In the so-called 'lipid-rich' preparation the lipids were found to form a fluid bilayer around the enzyme since the 31P-NMR spectrum was characteristic of a fast, axially symmetric motion of the phosphate groups with a chemical shift anisotropy of delta sigma = -45 ppm. In contrast, the 'lipid-depleted' cytochrome c oxidase gave rise to a broader spectrum where the motion of the phospholipids was no longer axially symmetric. Nevertheless, the total width of the spectrum was still considerably narrower than observed for immobilized phospholipids in solid crystals. Both enzyme preparations were dissolved in 1% detergent solution and used for high-resolution 31P-NMR spectroscopy. Narrow lines of about 20 Hz linewidth were obtained for both types of enzyme preparations, and well-resolved resonances could be assigned to cardiolipin, phosphatidylethanolamin and phosphatidylcholine. The major differences between lipid-rich and lipid-depleted cytochrome c oxidase were the absolute amount of phospholipid associated with the protein and the relative contribution of the individual lipid classes to the 31P-NMR spectrum. For lipid-rich cytochrome c oxidase about 130 molecules phospholipid were bound per enzyme (approx. 11 cardiolipins, 54 phosphatidylethanolamines and 64 phosphatidylcholines). For lipid-depleted cytochrome c oxidase only 6-18 lipids were bound per enzyme (1 or 2 cardiolipins, 3-8 phosphatidylethanolamines and 2-8 phosphatidylcholines). In contrast to earlier suggestions that cardiolipin is the only remaining lipid in lipid-depleted cytochrome c oxidase, the 31P-NMR studies demonstrate that all three lipids remain associated with the protein.

  17. Educational simulator app and web page for exploring Nuclear and Compass Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G.

    and enhanced responsiveness was added. Android App conversion was accomplished using Adobe PhoneGap[4]. The basis for the graphical spin simulation is the semi-classical Bloch vector equation[5] for a proton in combined stationary and oscillating magnetic fields, B0 and B1. For providing intuitive insight...

  18. High-Throughput Screening by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (HTS by NMR) for the Identification of PPIs Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bainan; Barile, Elisa; De, Surya K; Wei, Jun; Purves, Angela; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the ever so complex field of drug discovery has embraced novel design strategies based on biophysical fragment screening (fragment-based drug design; FBDD) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and/or structure-guided approaches, most often using X-ray crystallography and computer modeling. Experience from recent years unveiled that these methods are more effective and less prone to artifacts compared to biochemical high-throughput screening (HTS) of large collection of compounds in designing protein inhibitors. Hence these strategies are increasingly becoming the most utilized in the modern pharmaceutical industry. Nonetheless, there is still an impending need to develop innovative and effective strategies to tackle other more challenging targets such as those involving protein-protein interactions (PPIs). While HTS strategies notoriously fail to identify viable hits against such targets, few successful examples of PPIs antagonists derived by FBDD strategies exist. Recently, we reported on a new strategy that combines some of the basic principles of fragment-based screening with combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening. The approach, termed HTS by NMR, combines the advantages of combinatorial chemistry and NMR-based screening to rapidly and unambiguously identify bona fide inhibitors of PPIs. This review will reiterate the critical aspects of the approach with examples of possible applications.

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, David J.; Dou, Shichen; Colby, Ralph H.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2012-01-07

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the dynamics of poly(ethylene oxide)-based lithium sulfonate ionomer samples that have low glass transition temperatures. 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the bulk polymer and lithium ions, respectively, were analyzed in samples with a range of ion contents. The temperature dependence of T1 values along with the presence of minima in T1 enabled correlation times and activation energies to be obtained for both the segmental motion of the polymer backbone and the hopping motion of lithium cations. Similar activation energies of both the polymer and lithium ions in the lower ion content samples indicate that the polymer segmental motion and lithium ion hopping motion are correlated even though their respective correlation times differ significantly. A divergent trend is observed for correlation times and activation energies of the highest ion content sample due to the presence of ionic aggregation. Details about the polymer and cation dynamics on the nanosecond timescale are discussed and complement the findings of X-ray scattering and Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering experiments.

  20. Noninvasive measurement of brain glycogen by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Oz, Gülin

    2011-12-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors, including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen noninvasively, but, in the past several years, the development of a noninvasive localized (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has allowed the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, (13) C-glucose is administered intravenously, and its incorporation into and washout from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia, and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest that glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, (13) C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions.

  1. Zebrafish brain lipid characterization and quantification by ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amerongen, Yvonne F; Roy, Upasana; Spaink, Herman P; de Groot, Huub J M; Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jürgen; Alia, A

    2014-06-01

    Lipids play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Zebrafish models for these diseases have been recently developed. The detailed brain lipid composition of the adult zebrafish is not known, and therefore, the representativeness of these models cannot be properly evaluated. In this study, we characterized the total lipid composition of healthy adult zebrafish using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A close resemblance of the zebrafish brain composition is shown in comparison to the human brain. Moreover, several lipids involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (i.e., cholesterol, phosphatidylcholine, docosahexaenoic acid, and further, polyunsaturated fatty acids) are detected and quantified. These lipids might represent useful biomarkers in future research toward human therapies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with high-performance thin-layer chromatography was used for further characterization of zebrafish brain lipids. Our results show that the lipid composition of the zebrafish brain is rather similar to the human brain and thus confirms that zebrafish represents a good model for studying various brain diseases.

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of a Novel Globular Domain in RBM10 Containing OCRE, the Octamer Repeat Sequence Motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bryan T; Serrano, Pedro; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The OCtamer REpeat (OCRE) has been annotated as a 42-residue sequence motif with 12 tyrosine residues in the spliceosome trans-regulatory elements RBM5 and RBM10 (RBM [RNA-binding motif]), which are known to regulate alternative splicing of Fas and Bcl-x pre-mRNA transcripts. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure determination showed that the RBM10 OCRE sequence motif is part of a 55-residue globular domain containing 16 aromatic amino acids, which consists of an anti-parallel arrangement of six β strands, with the first five strands containing complete or incomplete Tyr triplets. This OCRE globular domain is a distinctive component of RBM10 and is more widely conserved in RBM10s across the animal kingdom than the ubiquitous RNA recognition components. It is also found in the functionally related RBM5. Thus, it appears that the three-dimensional structure of the globular OCRE domain, rather than the 42-residue OCRE sequence motif alone, confers specificity on RBM10 intermolecular interactions in the spliceosome.

  3. Advanced characterization of pores and fractures in coals by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates capabilities of low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) in advanced, nondestructive, and quantitative characterization of pore types, producible porosity, pore structure, and spatial disposition of pore-fractures in coals. Results show that the NMR transverse relaxation time (T2) at 0.5–2.5, 20–50, and >100 ms correspond to pores of <0.1 μm, >0.1 μm, and fractures, respectively. A much higher T2 spectrum peak reflects a much better development of pores (or fractures) corresponding to the T2, and vice versa. Three basic components in coals, i.e., the pores (or fractures), coal matrix, and minerals have their distinctive range of CT numbers. Among these, the CT number of pores is commonly less than 600 HU. The producible porosity, which is a determination of permeability, can be calculated by T2 cutoff value (T2C) of coal NMR. The coal pore structure can be efficiently estimated by the newly proposed "T2C based model". Finally, μCT scan was proven capable of modeling and spatial visualization of pores and fractures.

  4. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics reveals sex-specific metabolic changes of gastrodin intervention in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Li; Yuan-Wei Jia; Jun-Song Wang; Ming-Hua Yang; Kelvin D G Wang; Ling-Yi Kong

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics on sex-specific metabolic changes of gastrodin intervention in rats.Methods:In this research,1HNMR-based metabolomics was used for the first time to investigate metabolic changes following chronic intervention with gastrodin in rats.Results:24 endogenous metabolites were identified.Body weight, daily diet and the total volume of urine in in each day of each rat were measured synchronously.Modifications in12 metabolites were observed following gastrodin intervention, indicating gastrodin-induced alterations in carbohydrate and energy metabolism.Interestingly, these metabolic changes were not totally identical in female and male rats.Some metabolic changes arising from gastrodin intervention showed sexual dimorphism includingLDL/VLDL and lactate which were on the decrease in the female but on the increase in the male, together with arginine/ornithine, creatine, and glycerol which were on the increase in the female but on the decrease in the male.While the decrease in pyruvate, succinate and glutamate was only shown in the male and the increase in valine,α-ketoglutarate, glycine and glucose was only in the female. Conclusions:This research shows the sex-specific metabolic response toGAS intervention, weatherGAS is a healthy dietary supplement for the male merits further investigation.

  5. Structural and dynamic properties of amorphous solid dispersions: the role of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Amrit; Geppi, Marco; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) are one of the frontier strategies to improve solubility and dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs and hence tackling the growing challenges in oral bioavailability. Pharmaceutical performance, physicochemical stability, and downstream processability of ASD largely rely on the physical structure of the product. This necessitates in-depth characterization of ASD microstructure. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR) techniques bear the ultimate analytical capabilities to provide the molecular level information on the dynamics and phase compositions of amorphous dispersions. SS-NMR spectroscopy/relaxometry, as a single and nondestructive technique, can reveal diverse and critical structural information of complex ASD formulations that are barely amenable from any other existing technique. The purpose of the current article is to review the recent most important studies on various sophisticated and information-rich one-dimensional and two-dimensional SS-NMR spectroscopy/relaxometry for the analysis of molecular mobility, miscibility, drug-carrier interactions, crystallinity, and crystallization in ASD. Some specific examples on microstructural elucidations of challenging ASD using multidimensional and multinuclear SS-NMR are presented. Additionally, some relevant examples on the utility of solution-NMR and NMR-imaging techniques for the investigation of the dissolution behavior of ASD are gathered.

  6. Single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance for condition monitoring of cross-linked polyethylene exposed to aggressive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A; Piechatzek, A; Schmitt, G; Siegmund, G

    2015-08-05

    The potential of single-sided Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to monitor truly non-invasive changes in polymer materials during aging under aggressive media is for the first time evaluated. For this, the NMR method is used in combination with other condition monitoring methods including mechanical measurements, mass uptake, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is validated by studying for the first time the aging kinetics of silane cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) exposed to media used in oil and gas production and transportation, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, sulphur solvents, and corrosion inhibitors in combination with CO2 and H2S. All investigated parameters changed, with the strongest effects detected for the NMR chain mobility and in the presence of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a universal linear correlation curve could be established between the depression of the tensile strength and the chain mobility. This result represents a fundamental step towards establishing single-sided NMR as a new analytical tool for in situ condition monitoring of polyethylene working under sour conditions. The proposed approach can be easily extended to other polymer materials.

  7. Kinetic and equilibrium constants of phytic acid and ferric and ferrous phytate derived from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heighton, Lynne; Schmidt, Walter F; Siefert, Ronald L

    2008-10-22

    Inositol phosphates are metabolically derived organic phosphates (P) that increasingly appear to be an important sink and source of P in the environment. Salts of myo-inositol hexakisdihydrogen phosphate (IHP) or more commonly phytate are the most common inositol phosphates in the environment. IHP resists acidic dephosphorylation and enzymatic dephosphorylation as ferric or ferrous IHP. Mobility of IHP iron complexes is potentially pH and redox responsive, making the time scale and environmental fate and transport of the P associated with the IHP of interest to the mass balance of phosphorus. Ferric and ferrous complexes of IHP were investigated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (1)H NMR) and enzymatic dephosphorylation. Ferrous IHP was found to form quickly and persist for a longer period then ferric IHP. Dissociation constants derived from (1)H NMR experiments of chemically exchanging systems at equilibrium were 1.11 and 1.19 and formation constants were 0.90 and 0.84 for ferric and ferrous IHP, respectively. The recovery of P from enzymatic dephosphorylation of ferric and ferrous IHP was consistent with the magnitude of the kinetic and equilibrium rate constants.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-11-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologues are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residue 16 to 41 and from residue 55 to 76. The helices of PcrG are partially formed, have similar backbone dynamics, and are flexible. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from position 9 to 76 is involved in binding to PcrV. PcrG adds to the growing list of partially folded or unstructured proteins with important roles in type III secretion.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure.

  10. Added value of nuclear magnetic resonance logging as delineation tool in EHO context : an example from Orinoco Heavy oil belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, F.; Mus, E. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Petrocedeno; Marcos, J. [Baker Hughes, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    In preparation for the upcoming implementation of a thermal oil recovery project, an intensive delineation campaign was recently conducted in a specific area of the Junin block main field of Petrocedeno, operated by Petroleos de Venezuela SA (PDVSA) Petrocedeno joint venture. A complete acquisition program was defined in terms of conventional logging (GR, resistivity, neutron/density, sonic, formation pressure), coring, and unconventional logging with imagery logs and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with the objective of delineating the field. The purpose of this paper was to show the significant added value and step forward the NMR acquisition brought in fluid and reservoir characterization. The paper described the input of standard NMR logging, including fluid characterization; petrophysical support; tool limitation; NMR gamma inversion reprocessing; methodology; and application to EOR project area. Applications for field development were also presented including application for cold and hot production development. It was concluded that the NMR is a suitable tool for fluid characterization and for improving future development of the Petrocedeno extra heavy oil field. It has the capability of identifying fluids that are poorly characterized, or not characterized, by conventional logs. 10 refs., 18 figs.

  11. Seasonal changes in the metabolic fingerprint of 21 grass and legume cultivars studied by nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Jensen, Christian S; Pedersen, Morten Greve; Didion, Thomas; Petersen, Bent O; Duus, Jens Ø; Larsen, Mette K; Nielsen, Jacob Holm

    2010-04-14

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based approach was introduced for metabolic fingerprinting of 21 grass and legume cultivars in the present study. Applying principal component analysis (PCA) on the fingerprints obtained on water extracts, it was possible to elucidate the variation between cultivars and the magnitude of changes in the metabolic fingerprint between the spring growth and the second regrowth. Consequently, the potential of the method for tracking differences and changes related to cultivar and season was demonstrated. In addition, partial least-squares (PLS) regressions revealed correlations between the NMR fingerprints and the value of the grasses as animal feed evaluated as concentration of sugars, neutral detergent fibres (NDF) (R = 0.82), indigestible neutral detergent fibres (iNDF) (R = 0.90), and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) (R = 0.75). The correlations between these parameters and the NMR fingerprint could mainly be ascribed to differences in spectral intensities from signals assigned to malic acid (2.40 and 4.70 ppm), choline (3.27 ppm), and glucose (5.24 ppm), and the biochemical rationale for this relation is discussed.

  12. Clustering dynamics in water/methanol mixtures: a nuclear magnetic resonance study at 205 k

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Spooren, Jeroen; Branca, Caterina; Leone, Nancy; Broccio, Matteo; Kim, Chansoo; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Stanley, H Eugene; Mallamace, Francesco

    2008-08-28

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) experiments have been performed to measure the spin-lattice, T1, and spin-spin, T2, relaxation times of the three functional groups in water/methanol mixtures at different methanol molar fractions (XMeOH=0, 0.04, 0.1, 0.24, 0.5, 1) as a function of temperature in the range 205 K

  13. Structural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, Rémi; Viel, Stéphane; Hidalgo, Manuel; Allard-Breton, Béatrice; Thévand, André; Charles, Laurence

    2009-11-03

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been combined to achieve the complete microstructural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA-PMMA) copolymer synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization. Various PMAA-PMMA species could be identified which mainly differ in terms of terminaisons. 1H and 13C NMR experiments revealed the structure of the end-groups as well as the proportion of each co-monomer in the copolymers. These end-group masses were further confirmed from m/z values of doubly charged copolymer anions detected in the single stage mass spectrum. In contrast, copolymer composition derived from MS data was not consistent with NMR results, obviously due to strong mass bias well known to occur during electrospray ionization of these polymeric species. Tandem mass spectrometry could reveal the random nature of the copolymer based on typical dissociation reactions, i.e., water elimination occurred from any two contiguous MAA units while MAA-MMA pairs gave rise to the loss of a methanol molecule. Polymer backbone cleavages were also observed to occur and gave low abundance fragment ions which allowed the structure of the initiating end-group to be confirmed.

  14. Structural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, Remi [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Viel, Stephane [Aix-Marseille Universite - CNRS, UMR 6263: Institut des Sciences Moleculaires de Marseille, Chimiometrie et Spectrometries, F-13397 Marseille (France); Hidalgo, Manuel; Allard-Breton, Beatrice [ARKEMA, Centre de Recherche Rhone Alpes, Rue Henri Moissan, F-69493 Pierre-Benite (France); Thevand, Andre [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France); Charles, Laurence, E-mail: laurence.charles@univ-provence.fr [Universites Aix-Marseille I, II et III - CNRS, UMR 6264: Laboratoire Chimie Provence, Spectrometries Appliquees a la Chimie Structurale, F-13397 Marseille (France)

    2009-11-03

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been combined to achieve the complete microstructural characterization of a poly(methacrylic acid)-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMAA-PMMA) copolymer synthesized by nitroxide-mediated polymerization. Various PMAA-PMMA species could be identified which mainly differ in terms of terminaisons. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR experiments revealed the structure of the end-groups as well as the proportion of each co-monomer in the copolymers. These end-group masses were further confirmed from m/z values of doubly charged copolymer anions detected in the single stage mass spectrum. In contrast, copolymer composition derived from MS data was not consistent with NMR results, obviously due to strong mass bias well known to occur during electrospray ionization of these polymeric species. Tandem mass spectrometry could reveal the random nature of the copolymer based on typical dissociation reactions, i.e., water elimination occurred from any two contiguous MAA units while MAA-MMA pairs gave rise to the loss of a methanol molecule. Polymer backbone cleavages were also observed to occur and gave low abundance fragment ions which allowed the structure of the initiating end-group to be confirmed.

  15. The importance of 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for reference standard validation in analytical sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovi Kelman

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the importance of recording at least a (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectrum to verify identity of standards used in analyses of organic materials irrespective of source. We show the importance of this approach with an example of a quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC study undertaken with green tea extracts that required the use of several polyphenols as standards. In the course of the study one of these standards [(--epigallocatechin, EGC], although having the physical appearance and appropriate HPLC chromatographic behavior of EGC, proved by (1H-NMR to be a completely different class of molecule. For us, this raised significant questions concerning validity of many published pieces of research that used quantitative HPLC methods without first performing rigorous validation of the employed standards prior to their use. This paper clearly illustrates the importance of validation of all standards used in analysis of organic materials by recording at least a (1H-NMR spectrum of them prior to their use.

  16. Comparative proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amantadine complexes formed in aqueous solutions with three major cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis-Cieplak, Agnieszka; Sitkowski, Jerzy; Kolodziejski, Waclaw

    2014-01-01

    Host-guest complexes of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD, respectively) with amantadine (1-aminoadamantane, AMA; an antiviral agent) were characterized in aqueous solutions using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Host-guest molecular interactions were manifested by changes in the chemical shifts of AMA protons. NMR Job's plots showed that the stoichiometry of all the studied complexes was 1:1. Two-dimensional T-ROESY experiments demonstrated that the complexes were formed by different degrees of incorporation of the adamantyl group of AMA into the CD cavity. The mode of AMA binding was proposed. The AMA molecule came into the α-CD cavity (the smallest size) or β-CD cavity (the intermediate size) through its wide entrance to become shallowly or deeply accommodated, respectively. In the complex of AMA with γ-CD (the largest cavity size), the adamantyl group was also quite deeply inserted into the CD cavity, but it arrived there through the narrow cavity entrance. It was found that the adamantyl group of AMA was best accommodated by the β-CD cavity. The binding constants Kaa of the studied complexes (in M(-1) ), determined from DOSY NMR, were fairly high; their values in an ascending order were: α-CD (183) < γ-CD (306) ≪ β-CD (5150).

  17. Dynamics of water-alcohol mixtures: Insights from nuclear magnetic resonance, broadband dielectric spectroscopy, and triplet solvation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, D.; Schuster, B.; Rosenstihl, M.; Schneider, S.; Blochowicz, T.; Stühn, B.; Vogel, M. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Talluto, V.; Walther, T. [Institut für Angewandte Physik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstraße 7, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-03-21

    We combine {sup 2}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), and triplet solvation dynamics (TSD) to investigate molecular dynamics in glass-forming mixtures of water and propylene glycol in very broad time and temperature ranges. All methods yield consistent results for the α process of the studied mixtures, which hardly depends on the composition and shows Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence as well as Cole-Davidson spectral shape. The good agreement between BDS and TDS data reveals that preferential solvation of dye molecules in microheterogeneous mixtures does not play an important role. Below the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, NMR and BDS studies reveal that the β process of the mixtures shows correlation times, which depend on the water concentration, but exhibit a common temperature dependence, obeying an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of E{sub a} = 0.54  eV, as previously reported for mixtures of water with various molecular species. Detailed comparison of NMR and BDS correlation functions for the β process unravels that the former decay faster and more stretched than the latter. Moreover, the present NMR data imply that propylene glycol participates in the β process and, hence, it is not a pure water process, and that the mechanism for molecular dynamics underlying the β process differs in mixtures of water with small and large molecules.

  18. Development of a three-dimensional cell culture system based on microfluidics for nuclear magnetic resonance and optical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Vicent; Berganzo, Javier; Monge, Rosa; Martínez-Bisbal, M Carmen; Villa, Rosa; Celda, Bernardo; Fernandez, Luis

    2014-11-01

    A new microfluidic cell culture device compatible with real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented here. The intended application is the long-term monitoring of 3D cell cultures by several techniques. The system has been designed to fit inside commercially available NMR equipment to obtain maximum readout resolution when working with small samples. Moreover, the microfluidic device integrates a fibre-optic-based sensor to monitor parameters such as oxygen, pH, or temperature during NMR monitoring, and it also allows the use of optical microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy. This manuscript reports the initial trials culturing neurospheres inside the microchamber of this device and the preliminary images and spatially localised spectra obtained by NMR. The images show the presence of a necrotic area in the interior of the neurospheres, as is frequently observed in histological preparations; this phenomenon appears whenever the distance between the cells and fresh nutrients impairs the diffusion of oxygen. Moreover, the spectra acquired in a volume of 8 nl inside the neurosphere show an accumulation of lactate and lipids, which are indicative of anoxic conditions. Additionally, a basis for general temperature control and monitoring and a graphical control software have been developed and are also described. The complete platform will allow biomedical assays of therapeutic agents to be performed in the early phases of therapeutic development. Thus, small quantities of drugs or advanced nanodevices may be studied long-term under simulated living conditions that mimic the flow and distribution of nutrients.

  19. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic detection of oligomannosidic n glycans in alpha-mannosidosis: a method of monitoring treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenarius, Derk Frederik Matthaus; Svendsen, John-Sigurd; Malm, Dag

    2011-10-01

    In Alpha-mannosidosis (MIM 248500) the patients accumulate mainly unbranched oligosaccharide chains in the lysosomes in all body tissues, including the brain. With ensuing therapeutic modalities in man (BMT and ERT) non-invasive methods of monitoring the effect of treatment are needed. Paramount is the possible effect of the treatment on the brain, since this organ is regarded as difficult to reach because of the blood-brain barrier. We therefore performed proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain in two untreated patients, and a 16-year-old patient treated with BMT at the age of 10 to assess whether this non-invasive method could be applied in the monitoring of the accumulation of abnormal chemicals in the brain of patients. We found an abnormal peak that was not present in the treated patient. A similar pattern was also found in MRS of urine from patients, reflecting the concentration of oligosaccharides in serum and tissues. We therefore conclude that MRS can be a useful method to monitor the effect of treatment for Alpha-Mannosidosis.

  20. Membranes, peptides, and disease: unraveling the mechanisms of viral proteins with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Matthew T; Yu, Tsyr-Yan

    2014-01-01

    The interplay between peptides and lipid bilayers drives crucial biological processes. For example, a critical step in the replication cycle of enveloped viruses is the fusion of the viral membrane and host cell endosomal membrane, and these fusion events are controlled by viral fusion peptides. Thus such membrane-interacting peptides are of considerable interest as potential pharmacological targets. Deeper insight is needed into the mechanisms by which fusion peptides and other viral peptides modulate their surrounding membrane environment, and also how the particular membrane environment modulates the structure and activity of these peptides. An important step toward understanding these processes is to characterize the structure of viral peptides in environments that are as biologically relevant as possible. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) is uniquely well suited to provide atomic level information on the structure and dynamics of both membrane-associated peptides as well as the lipid bilayer itself; further ssNMR can delineate the contribution of specific membrane components, such as cholesterol, or changing cellular conditions, such as a decrease in pH on membrane-associating peptides. This paper highlights recent advances in the study of three types of membrane associated viral peptides by ssNMR to illustrate the more general power of ssNMR in addressing important biological questions involving membrane proteins.