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Sample records for acoustic neuromas comparison

  1. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EVENTS DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing ... Brain Freeze ? READ MORE Read More What is acoustic neuroma? Identifying an AN Learn More Get Info ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  4. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  5. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing ... Italian Japanese Korean Portuguese Romanian Spanish What is Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... 30041 770-205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org The world’s #1 acoustic neuroma resource Click to learn more... ... is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords World Language Videos Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare ...

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... a healthcare provider Request a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare ...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... a patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects ... To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation Surgery Choosing a healthcare provider Request a patient kit ...

  9. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma ... 8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn ...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree ... info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational ...

  12. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  13. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  14. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Spanish Washington Support Group Leslie of Stone Mountain, ... Providers Acoustic Neuroma Association Donate Now Newly Diagnosed What is AN? Request a Patient Kit Treatment Options Get Support Find a Provider Discussion Forum ...

  15. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Association 600 Peachtree Parkway Suite 108 ... About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video English English ...

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  17. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts ... Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video English English Arabic Catalan Chinese ( ...

  19. Facial neuroma masquerading as acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Eli T; Kaur, Gurvinder; Ivan, Michael E; Bloch, Orin; Cheung, Steven W; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-10-01

    Facial nerve neuromas are rare benign tumors that may be initially misdiagnosed as acoustic neuromas when situated near the auditory apparatus. We describe a patient with a large cystic tumor with associated trigeminal, facial, audiovestibular, and brainstem dysfunction, which was suspicious for acoustic neuroma on preoperative neuroimaging. Intraoperative investigation revealed a facial nerve neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle and internal acoustic canal. Gross total resection of the tumor via retrosigmoid craniotomy was curative. Transection of the facial nerve necessitated facial reanimation 4 months later via hypoglossal-facial cross-anastomosis. Clinicians should recognize the natural history, diagnostic approach, and management of this unusual and mimetic lesion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Cumming, GA 30041 770-205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org The world’s #1 acoustic neuroma resource Click to ... Cumming, GA 30041 770-205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual ...

  1. Bilateral acoustic neuromas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, V T; Byrnes, D P; Walby, A P; Kerr, A G

    1993-10-01

    This article reviews 12 patients with bilateral acoustic neuromas. The sex incidence was equal and the mean age at diagnosis was 26.2 years. The family history was positive in nine of the patients. Five patients have had incomplete surgical removal of acoustic neuromas on both sides. Two of them are completely deaf and the other three have severe sensorineural hearing loss in one ear and no hearing in the other ear. In five patients the tumour on one side has been operated on and the other side is being observed with at least short-term preservation of good hearing. The remaining two patients died of intra-cranial complications, one of them post-operatively. Four patients developed facial palsy immediately following surgery and one developed facial weakness 6 months after surgery. Guidelines are discussed for the care of these patients including the timing of surgery and alternative treatment options (observation, radio-surgery and chemotherapy). This is essentially a group of young individuals who have had multiple operations for bilateral acoustic tumours and associated manifestations and for whom the disease and the sequelae of treatment can be tragic.

  2. MR of acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide

    1989-01-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T 1 -weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author)

  3. [Treatment of giant acoustic neuromas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samprón, Nicolás; Altuna, Xabier; Armendáriz, Mikel; Urculo, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the treatment modality and outcome of a series of patients with giant acoustic neuromas, a particular type of tumour characterised by their size (extracanalicular diameter of 4cm or more) and high morbidity and mortality. This was a retrospective unicentre study of patients with acoustic neuromas treated in a period of 12 years. In our institutional series of 108 acoustic neuromas operated on during that period, we found 13 (12%) cases of giant acoustic neuromas. We reviewed the available data of these cases, including presentation and several clinical, anatomical, and microsurgical aspects. All patients were operated on by the same neurosurgeon and senior author (EU) using the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach and complete microsurgical removal was achieved in 10 cases. In one case, near total removal was deliberately performed, in another case a CSF shunt was placed as the sole treatment measure, and in the remaining case no direct treatment was given. One patient died in the immediate postoperative period. One year after surgery, 4 patients showed facial nerve function of iii or more in the House-Brackman scale. The 4 most important prognostic characteristics of giant acoustic neuromas are size, adhesion to surrounding structures, consistency and vascularity. Only the first of these is evident in neuroimaging. Giant acoustic neuromas are characterised by high morbidity at presentation as well as after treatment. Nevertheless, the objective of complete microsurgical removal with preservation of cranial nerve function is attainable in some cases through the suboccipital retrosigmoid approach. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Calculating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas: comparison of ABC/2 formula with planimetry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi-Lin; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Juan, Chun-Jung; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    The ABC/2 equation is commonly applied to measure the volume of intracranial hematoma. However, the precision of ABC/2 equation in estimating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas is less addressed. The study is to evaluate the accuracy of the ABC/2 formula by comparing with planimetry method for estimating the tumor volumes. Thirty-two patients diagnosed with acoustic neuroma received contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of brain were recruited. The volume was calculated by the ABC/2 equation and planimetry method (defined as exact volume) at the same time. The 32 patients were divided into three groups by tumor volume to avoid volume-dependent overestimation (6 ml). The tumor volume by ABC/2 method was highly correlated to that calculated by planimetry method using linear regression analysis (R2=0.985). Pearson correlation coefficient (r=0.993, pABC/2 formula is an easy method in estimating the tumor volume of acoustic neuromas that is not inferior to planimetry method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Shop ANA Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Acoustic ... 205-8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home ...

  6. Vestibular Schwannoma or acoustic neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hekmatara M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannoma is the most common tumor of the posterior fossa of the skull. Patients referred with the primary otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, imbalance, and the cranial nerve palsy. Thirty-three patients were operated and treated by a team of otolaryngologist and neurosurgeon, anudiometrist, and internist. Patients'chiefcomplaint was due to 94% hearing loss and 27% tinnitus. They scarcely complain of vertigo. If a patient refers with the palsy or paralysis of facial nerve preoperation, we must think of the facial nerve schwannoma or hemangioma or congential cholestoma or malignant metastases rather than acoustic neuroma. The best way for preoperative diagnosis is audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brain Response, and SDS (speech discrimination score with 90% success, but computer Tomography (CT scan and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image are the valuable anatomic diagnostic radiographic devices. The best method of operation is translabirynthine approach (TLA, since it has the advantages such as an easy access to nerve paths and being the nearest path to CPA (Cerebellopontine Angle. Physicians ought to talk to patients about the importance of the microscopic surgery, surgical methods, and their probable diverse effects such as hearing loss, facial nerve palsy, and intracranial problems.

  7. Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Hideyuki; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Flannery, Thomas J.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas, we assessed tumor control, clinical outcomes, and the risk of adverse radiation effects in patients whose tumors progressed after initial management. Methods and Materials: During a 21-year experience at our center, 1,352 patients underwent SRS as management for their acoustic neuromas. We retrospectively identified 6 patients who underwent SRS twice for the same tumor. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-71 years). All patients had imaging evidence of tumor progression despite initial SRS. One patient also had incomplete surgical resection after initial SRS. All patients were deaf at the time of the second SRS. The median radiosurgery target volume at the time of the initial SRS was 0.5 cc and was 2.1 cc at the time of the second SRS. The median margin dose at the time of the initial SRS was 13 Gy and was 11 Gy at the time of the second SRS. The median interval between initial SRS and repeat SRS was 63 months (range, 25-169 months). Results: At a median follow-up of 29 months after the second SRS (range, 13-71 months), tumor control or regression was achieved in all 6 patients. No patient developed symptomatic adverse radiation effects or new neurological symptoms after the second SRS. Conclusions: With this limited experience, we found that repeat SRS for a persistently enlarging acoustic neuroma can be performed safely and effectively.

  8. Resection planning for robotic acoustic neuroma surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrayer, Kepra L.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Noble, Jack H.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma surgery is a procedure in which a benign mass is removed from the Internal Auditory Canal (IAC). Currently this surgical procedure requires manual drilling of the temporal bone followed by exposure and removal of the acoustic neuroma. This procedure is physically and mentally taxing to the surgeon. Our group is working to develop an Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Robot (ANSR) to perform the initial drilling procedure. Planning the ANSR's drilling region using pre-operative CT requires expertise and around 35 minutes' time. We propose an approach for automatically producing a resection plan for the ANSR that would avoid damage to sensitive ear structures and require minimal editing by the surgeon. We first compute an atlas-based segmentation of the mastoid section of the temporal bone, refine it based on the position of anatomical landmarks, and apply a safety margin to the result to produce the automatic resection plan. In experiments with CTs from 9 subjects, our automated process resulted in a resection plan that was verified to be safe in every case. Approximately 2 minutes were required in each case for the surgeon to verify and edit the plan to permit functional access to the IAC. We measured a mean Dice coefficient of 0.99 and surface error of 0.08 mm between the final and automatically proposed plans. These preliminary results indicate that our approach is a viable method for resection planning for the ANSR and drastically reduces the surgeon's planning effort.

  9. Hydroxyapatite cement cranioplasty in translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga, Moisês A; Chen, Douglas A

    2002-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite cement cranioplasty (HAC) after translabyrinthine resection of acoustic neuroma is a promising new technique for wound reconstruction. This study reviews the efficacy of HAC for the prevention of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage and the long-term wound outcomes of HAC versus abdominal fat graft (AFG) reconstruction. This retrospective study of l08 consecutive acoustic neuromas operated on by Pittsburgh Ear Associates uses chart review, telephone interview, and mail questionnaire data. Fifty-four patients received AFG dural repair, and 54 patients received HAC. Seven AFG patients (12.5%) had CSF leaks versus 2 (3.7%) of the overall group of 54 HAC patients. However, none (0%) of the 47 HAC patients had CSF leakage with current HAC techniques. HAC also produced significantly less postauricular wound depression and superior cosmetic results in comparison with AFG. Although HAC patients experienced less postoperative discomfort, wound complications requiring medical or surgical intervention were extremely uncommon in both groups. HAC offers significant CSF leakage control and long-term cosmetic and comfort advantages over AFG alone. We recommend HAC as the standard closure technique for translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery.

  10. Dose and diameter relationships for facial, trigeminal, and acoustic neuropathies following acoustic neuroma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L. Dade

    1996-01-01

    Purpose and objective: To define the relationships between dose and tumor diameter for the risks of developing trigeminal, facial, and acoustic neuropathies after acoustic neuroma radiosurgery, a large single-institution experience was analyzed. Materials and methods: Two hundred and thirty-eight patients with unilateral acoustic neuromas who underwent Gamma knife radiosurgery between 1987-1994 with 6-91 months of follow-up (median 30 months) were studied. Minimum tumor doses were 12-20 Gy (median 15 Gy). Transverse tumor diameter varied from 0.3-5.5 cm (median 2.1 cm). The relationships of dose and diameter to the development of cranial neuropathies were delineated by multivariate logistic regression. Results: The development of post-radiosurgery neuropathies affecting cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII were correlated with minimum tumor dose and transverse tumor diameter (P min for VIII where P=0.10). A comparison of the dose-diameter response curves showed the acoustic nerve to be the most sensitive to doses of 12-16 Gy and the facial nerve to be the least sensitive. Conclusion: The risks of developing trigeminal, facial, and acoustic neuropathies following acoustic neuroma radiosurgery can be predicted from the transverse tumor diameter and the minimum tumor dose using models constructed from data presently available

  11. Acoustic neuromas: single dose vs fractionated therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M; Debus, J; Lohr, F; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Wannenmacher, M

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgical treatment (RS) of acoustic neuromas is a well established treatment. However, few data are available concerning conformal fractionated radiotherapy (FT) of this tumor entity. We evaluated treatment outcome and toxicity for both treatment modalities in 41 patients treated at our institution between 1984 and 1997. Material and Methods: All treatments were performed using a specially adapted linear accelerator and circular collimators for convergent beam RS or multi-leaf collimators (leaf thickness 1 or 3mm) for multi-field RS or fractionated treatment. 22 patients (7 male, 15 female, median age 60 years, range 20-83 years) were treated radiosurgically with single doses between 7 and 28 Gray (median 15 Gy) prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 10.5 ccm with a median volume of 3.4 ccm. The median number of isocenters was 2 (1-4 isocenters). One patient was treated by a multi-field technique (14 isocentric irregularly shaped noncoplanar fields). 19 patients (5 male, 14 female, median age 55 years, range 20-81 years) were treated with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy. Median dose was 60 Gray with a median daily fraction size of 2 Gy and a median of 3 (1-4) irregularly shaped isocentric fields. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 32.4 ccm (median 15 ccm). Median follow-up was 30 months (7-149 months) for radiosurgical and 30 months (2-88 months) for fractionated treatment. Seven patients who underwent fractionated treatment had previously undergone neurosurgical resection on the contralateral side. One had undergone radiosurgery on the opposite side before. Results: All tumors were locally controlled. A volume reduction of more than 20% was seen in 16% after RS and 18% following FT. Typical posttherapeutic central reduction of contrast media enhancement was found in 73% following RS after a median of 8 (3-12) months and in 63% following FT after a median of 6 (1-12) months. Temporary brainstem edema was diagnosed in 4

  12. Four cases of acoustic neuromas with normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, M; Peterein, J; Goebel, J; Neely, J G

    1995-05-01

    In 95 percent of the cases, patients with acoustic neuromas will have some magnitude of hearing loss in the affected ear. This paper reports on four patients who had acoustic neuromas and normal hearing. Results from the case history, audiometric evaluation, auditory brainstem response (ABR), electroneurography (ENOG), and vestibular evaluation are reported for each patient. For all patients, the presence of unilateral tinnitus was the most common complaint. Audiologically, elevated or absent acoustic reflex thresholds and abnormal ABR findings were the most powerful diagnostic tools.

  13. The Top 50 Most-Cited Articles on Acoustic Neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaifi, Abrar; AlMutairi, Othman; Allhaidan, Maha; Alsaleh, Saad; Ajlan, Abdulrazag

    2018-03-01

    Acoustic neuroma is the most common extra-axial primary cerebellopontine angle tumor in adults. A plethora of studies have been published on acoustic neuroma, but none of the previous works have highlighted the most influential articles. Our objective was to perform a bibliometric analysis of the 50 most-cited articles on acoustic neuroma. We performed a title-specific search on the Scopus database using the following search terms: "acoustic neuroma," "vestibular schwannoma," and "cerebellopontine angle." We recorded the 50 most-cited articles and reviewed them. The 50 most-cited articles had an average of 175 citations per article. All articles were published between 1980 and 2006, with 1997 the most prolific year, when 7 articles were published. The journals Neurosurgery and Laryngoscope published 10 and 8 of these articles, respectively. The most common study categories were nonsurgical management (17/50) and surgical management (13/50). Studies were predominantly published by otolaryngologists (22/50) and neurosurgeons (14/50). Douglas Kondziolka was the author with the highest number of contributions, with 7 publications. The majority of the articles were produced in the United States (64%). Identifying articles on acoustic neuroma with the most impact provides an important overview of the historical development of treatment methods and publication trends related to this condition. A finalized, comprehensive list of the most important works represents an excellent tool that can serve as a guide for evidence-based clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Carcinomatous meningitis appearing as acoustic neuromas. Two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astner, S.T.; Nieder, C.; Grosu, A.L.; Stock, K.; Gaa, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: For acoustic neuromas, stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy) has been established as an important alternative to microsurgery. In most cases initial symptoms are slow progression of unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus or vertigo or acute hearing loss with vertigo. MRI scan shows a contrast-enhancing tumor within the inner auditory channel. If the patient undergoes primary radiotherapy, diagnosis is usually not verified histologically. Therefore, careful evaluation of the medical history is mandatory despite a typical appearance on the MRI scan. If medical history does not match with acoustic neuroma, further diagnostics are necessary to rule out infectious disease or carcinomatous meningitis. Case Report: Two patients with hearing loss, vertigo and the diagnosis of acoustic neuromas by MRI scan were referred for radiotherapy. In both cases the symptoms progressed very rapidly, not typical of acoustic neuromas, and in both patients repeated liquor puncture finally revealed carcinomatous meningitis. One patient died during therapy; in the second patient intrathecal chemotherapy and additional radiotherapy of the skull base led to partial remission continuing for several months. Conclusion: Before primary radiotherapy of small intrameatal lesions diagnosis must be reassessed carefully. This is especially true for bilateral lesions suspicious for acoustic neuromas and rapid progression and persistence of clinical symptoms where carcinomatous meningitis has to be taken into account. (orig.)

  15. Carcinomatous meningitis appearing as acoustic neuromas. Two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astner, S T; Nieder, C; Grosu, A L [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Stock, K [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Gaa, J [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2007-05-15

    Background: For acoustic neuromas, stereotactic radiotherapy (radiosurgery or stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy) has been established as an important alternative to microsurgery. In most cases initial symptoms are slow progression of unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus or vertigo or acute hearing loss with vertigo. MRI scan shows a contrast-enhancing tumor within the inner auditory channel. If the patient undergoes primary radiotherapy, diagnosis is usually not verified histologically. Therefore, careful evaluation of the medical history is mandatory despite a typical appearance on the MRI scan. If medical history does not match with acoustic neuroma, further diagnostics are necessary to rule out infectious disease or carcinomatous meningitis. Case Report: Two patients with hearing loss, vertigo and the diagnosis of acoustic neuromas by MRI scan were referred for radiotherapy. In both cases the symptoms progressed very rapidly, not typical of acoustic neuromas, and in both patients repeated liquor puncture finally revealed carcinomatous meningitis. One patient died during therapy; in the second patient intrathecal chemotherapy and additional radiotherapy of the skull base led to partial remission continuing for several months. Conclusion: Before primary radiotherapy of small intrameatal lesions diagnosis must be reassessed carefully. This is especially true for bilateral lesions suspicious for acoustic neuromas and rapid progression and persistence of clinical symptoms where carcinomatous meningitis has to be taken into account. (orig.)

  16. Early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma by the vestibular test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haid, T; Rettinger, G; Berg, M; Wigand, M E

    1981-11-01

    In a series of 390 cases with suspicion of acoustic neurinomas 78 such tumors could be diagnosed, including 12 early stage neurinomas. This relatively high detection quote of small neurinomas is due to a special diagnostical programme: Every patient with unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss, independent of vertigo anamnesis or of the result of X-rays must be further examined by a vestibular test. All 78 patients with acoustic neuroma had pathological vestibular findings. The positional test turned out to be the most sensitive examination in the early diagnosis of acoustic neuromas and yields a still higher incidence than the thermic test: 95% of the patients with a neuroma showed pathological findings in the positional test. Every patient suffering from an unidentified unilateral and sensoneural hearingloss combined with a pathological result in the positional test must be further checked by a cisternomeatography or computerized tomography using airinsufflation. Every fifth of these patients showed typical signs of an acoustic neuroma in the neuroradiological tests. 68 neuromas are operated today and verfied histologically, 10 patients are still waiting for surgical treatment.

  17. Acoustic neuromas: single dose vs fractionated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.; Debus, J.; Lohr, F.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgical treatment (RS) of acoustic neuromas is a well established treatment. However, few data are available concerning conformal fractionated radiotherapy (FT) of this tumor entity. We evaluated treatment outcome and toxicity for both treatment modalities in 41 patients treated at our institution between 1984 and 1997. Material and Methods: All treatments were performed using a specially adapted linear accelerator and circular collimators for convergent beam RS or multi-leaf collimators (leaf thickness 1 or 3mm) for multi-field RS or fractionated treatment. 22 patients (7 male, 15 female, median age 60 years, range 20-83 years) were treated radiosurgically with single doses between 7 and 28 Gray (median 15 Gy) prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 10.5 ccm with a median volume of 3.4 ccm. The median number of isocenters was 2 (1-4 isocenters). One patient was treated by a multi-field technique (14 isocentric irregularly shaped noncoplanar fields). 19 patients (5 male, 14 female, median age 55 years, range 20-81 years) were treated with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy. Median dose was 60 Gray with a median daily fraction size of 2 Gy and a median of 3 (1-4) irregularly shaped isocentric fields. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 32.4 ccm (median 15 ccm). Median follow-up was 30 months (7-149 months) for radiosurgical and 30 months (2-88 months) for fractionated treatment. Seven patients who underwent fractionated treatment had previously undergone neurosurgical resection on the contralateral side. One had undergone radiosurgery on the opposite side before. Results: All tumors were locally controlled. A volume reduction of more than 20% was seen in 16% after RS and 18% following FT. Typical posttherapeutic central reduction of contrast media enhancement was found in 73% following RS after a median of 8 (3-12) months and in 63% following FT after a median of 6 (1-12) months. Temporary brainstem edema was diagnosed in 4

  18. Long-term mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, David; Mathiesen, Tiit; Prochazka, Michaela; Bergenheim, Tommy; Florentzson, Rut; Harder, Henrik; Nyberg, Gunnar; Siesjö, Peter; Feychting, Maria

    2014-03-01

    There is concern about potential effects of radiofrequency fields generated by mobile phones on cancer risk. Most previous studies have found no association between mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma, although information about long-term use is limited. We conducted a population-based, nation-wide, case-control study of acoustic neuroma in Sweden. Eligible cases were persons aged 20 to 69 years, who were diagnosed between 2002 and 2007. Controls were randomly selected from the population registry, matched on age, sex, and residential area. Postal questionnaires were completed by 451 cases (83%) and 710 controls (65%). Ever having used mobile phones regularly (defined as weekly use for at least 6 months) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.18 (95% confidence interval = 0.88 to 1.59). The association was weaker for the longest induction time (≥10 years) (1.11 [0.76 to 1.61]) and for regular use on the tumor side (0.98 [0.68 to 1.43]). The OR for the highest quartile of cumulative calling time (≥680 hours) was 1.46 (0.98 to 2.17). Restricting analyses to histologically confirmed cases reduced all ORs; the OR for ≥680 hours was 1.14 (0.63 to 2.07). A similar pattern was seen for cordless land-line phones, although with slightly higher ORs. Analyses of the complete history of laterality of mobile phone revealed considerable bias in laterality analyses. The findings do not support the hypothesis that long-term mobile phone use increases the risk of acoustic neuroma. The study suggests that phone use might increase the likelihood that an acoustic neuroma case is detected and that there could be bias in the laterality analyses performed in previous studies.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma: a Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, I.B.; Tator, C.H.

    1998-01-01

    Stereotactically delivered radiation is now an accepted treatment for patients with acoustic neuroma. In some cases, patient preference may be the reason for its selection, while in others neurosurgeons may select it for patients who are elderly or have significant risk factors for conventional surgery. The majority of patients with acoustic neuroma treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery have been treated with the Gamma Knife, with follow ups of over 25 years in some instances. Other radiosurgical modalities utilizing the linear accelerator have been developed and appear promising, but there is no long-term: follow up. Canada does not possess a Gamma Knife facility, and its government-funded hospital and medical insurance agencies have made it difficult for patients to obtain reimbursement for Gamma Knife treatments in other countries. We review the literature to date on the various forms of radiation treatment for acoustic neuroma and discuss the current issues facing physicians and patients in Canada who wish to obtain their treatment of choice. (author)

  20. Early diagnosis of acoustic neuroma by quantitative neurootological and neuroradiological tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haid, C T

    1983-02-01

    Every patient with unilateral and sensoneural loss of hearing, independent of vertigo anamnesis or X-rays must be further examined by a vestibular test. Between 1974 and 1980, 80 acoustic neuromas could be diagnosed, including 12 early stage neuromas. This relatively high detection quote of small neuromas is due to a special diagnostical program: All 80 patients with acoustic neuroma had a pathological vestibular result. The positional test turned out to be the most sensitive examination in the early diagnosis of acoustic neuromas and yields a still higher incidence than the caloric test: 95% of the patients with a neurinoma showed a pathological result in the positional test. So every patient suffering from an unidentified unilateral and sensoneural hearing loss combined with a pathological result in the positional test must be further examined by a cisternomeatography or computerized tomography (using air-insufflation). Every fifth of these patients showed unique hints of an acoustic neuroma in the neuroradiological test.

  1. Summary and consensus in 7th International Conference on acoustic neuroma: An update for the management of sporadic acoustic neuromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor arising from cochleovestibular nerve. Nowadays, various specialties and medical centers are treating this disease, and the multidisciplinary collaboration is the trend. In an effort to promote a uniform standard for reporting clinical results, even for treatment indications, the mainly controversies were posed and discussed during the 7th International Conference on acoustic neuroma, and the agreement was summarized by the Committee of this conference. The main symptoms grading and tumor stage should note its name of classification for making them comparable. The goal of the modern managements for vestibular schwannoma is to improve the quality of life with lower mortality, lower morbidity and better neurological function preservation. The experience of surgical team and their preference might be a major factor for the outcome. Because of lacking of long-term follow-up large data after radiotherapy, and with the development of microsurgery, radiotherapy is now less recommended except for recurrent cases or elderly patients. Keywords: Sporadic acoustic neuroma, Vestibular schwannoma, Management, Symptoms grading, Tumor stage, Microsurgery, Radiotherapy

  2. ''Dural tail'' adjacent to acoustic neuroma on MRI: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunardi, P.; Mastronardi, L.; Nardacci, B.; Acqui, M.; Fortuna, A.

    1993-01-01

    A 'dural tail' on Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI has been often observed adjacent to meningiomas and considered to be useful in distinguishing meningioma of the cerebellopontine angle from acoustic neuroma. However, demonstration of a dural tail adjacent to an acoustic neuroma indicates that this sign is not specific. (orig.)

  3. Conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, Martin; Debus, Juergen; Lohr, Frank; Huber, Peter; Rhein, Bernhard; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Wannenmacher, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of local tumor control and functional outcome following conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for acoustic neuromas. Patients and Methods: From 11/1989 to 9/1999 51 patients with acoustic neuromas have been treated by FSRT. Mean total dose was 57.6 ± 2.5 Gy. Forty-two patients have been followed for at least 12 months and were subject of an outcome analysis. Mean follow-up was 42 months. We analyzed local control, hearing preservation, and facial and trigeminal nerve functional preservation. We evaluated influences of tumor size, age, and association with neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) on outcome and treatment related toxicity. Results: Actuarial 2- and 5-year tumor control rates were 100% and 97.7%, respectively. Actuarial useful hearing preservation rate was 85% at 2 and 5 years. New hearing loss was diagnosed in 4 NF2 patients. Pretreatment normal facial nerve function was preserved in all cases. Two cases of new or impaired trigeminal nerve dysesthesia required medication. No other cranial nerve deficit was observed. In Patients without NF2 tumor size or age had no influence on tumor control and cranial nerve toxicity. Diagnosis of NF2 was associated with higher risk of hearing impairment (p 0.0002), the hearing preservation rate in this subgroup was 60%. Conclusion: FSRT has been shown to be an effective means of local tumor control. Excellent hearing preservation rates and 5th and 7th nerve functional preservation rates were achieved. The results support the conclusion that FSRT can be recommended to patients with acoustic neuromas where special attention has to be taken to preserve useful hearing and normal cranial nerve function. For NF2 patients, FSRT may be the treatment of choice with superior functional outcome compared to treatment alternatives.

  4. Calculation of cranial nerve complication probability for acoustic neuroma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M.; Foote, Kelly D.; Friedman, William A.; Bova, Francis J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Estimations of complications from stereotactic radiosurgery usually rely simply on dose-volume or dose-diameter isoeffect curves. Due to the sparse clinical data available, these curves have typically not considered the target location in the brain, target histology, or treatment plan conformality as parameters in the calculation. In this study, a predictive model was generated to estimate the probability of cranial neuropathies as a result of acoustic schwannoma radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: The dose-volume histogram reduction scheme was used to calculate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) from brainstem dose-volume histograms. The model's fitting parameters were optimized to provide the best fit to the observed complication data for acoustic neuroma patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the University of Florida. The calculation was then applied to the remainder of the patients in the database. Results: The best fit to our clinical data was obtained using n = 0.04, m = 0.15, and no. alphano. /no. betano. = 2.1 Gy -1 . Although the fitting parameter m is relatively consistent with ranges found in the literature, both the volume parameter, n, and no. alphano. /no. betano. are much smaller than the values quoted in the literature. The fit to our clinical data indicates that brainstem, or possibly a specific portion of the brainstem, is more radiosensitive than the parameters in the literature indicate, and that there is very little volume effect; in other words, irradiation of a small fraction of the brainstem yields NTCPs that are nearly as high as those calculated for entire volume irradiation. These new fitting parameters are specific to acoustic neuroma radiosurgery, and the small volume effect that we observe may be an artifact of the fixed relationship of acoustic tumors to specific regions of the brainstem. Applying the model to our patient database, we calculate an average NTCP of 7.2% for patients who had no

  5. Impact of facial paralysis on patients with acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, T; Sheard, C E; Garrud, P; Nikolopoulos, T P; O'Donoghue, G M

    2000-09-01

    To assess the psychological distress, the ways of coping with that stress, and the self-esteem of patients with facial paralysis after acoustic neuroma surgery. Possible predictors and associations between these measures were also explored. Four validated questionnaires were completed by patients with facial paralysis after acoustic neuroma surgery: 1) the Derriford Appearance Scale (DAS) to measure psychological distress, 2) the COPE questionnaire to measure how patients cope with facial paralysis, 3) the Personal Report questionnaire to measure the self-esteem of patients, and 4) the Facial Paralysis Questionnaire (FPQ) to measure the severity of facial paralysis. One hundred three patients with facial paralysis after surgical removal of acoustic tumors. Distress spanned a wide range in these patients. There was no statistically significant association between the level of distress and the grade of facial paralysis or between time since operation and levels of distress. Women had higher levels of distress (P = .02) and a significant negative correlation was found between levels of distress and age (r = -0.28, P = .005). High levels of distress were associated with low levels of self-esteem, as shown by the significant negative correlation between level of distress and self-esteem (r = -0.59, P = .01). A significant correlation between distress and maladaptive coping (r = 0.31, P = .002) was also found. Stepwise multiple regression of the distress scores revealed that self-esteem was the most important contributing factor (standardized coefficient beta -0.60, P = .0001), followed by age (beta -0.24, P = .006) and sex (beta -0.21, P = .04). This model explained 44% of the distress variance. Clinicians must be aware of the distress felt by some patients experiencing facial palsy after acoustic neuroma surgery and that the level of distress may not be related to the clinical grade of the facial nerve paralysis. People with low self-esteem, young people, and women

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Swanson, Jerry W.; Harner, Stephen G.; Beatty, Charles W.; Kline, Robert W.; Stevens, Lorna N.; Hu, Theresa C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife for acoustic neuromas. Methods and Materials: Between January 1990 and January 1993, 36 patients with acoustic neuromas were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife. The median maximum tumor diameter was 21 mm (range: 6-32 mm). Tumor volumes encompassed within the prescribed isodose line varied from 266 to 8,667 mm 3 (median: 3,135 mm 3 ). Tumors ≤ 20 mm in maximum diameter received a dose of 20 Gy to the margin, tumors between 21 and 30 mm received 18 Gy, and tumors > 30 mm received 16 Gy. The dose was prescribed to the 50% isodose line in 31 patients and to the 45%, 55%, 60%, 70%, and 80% isodose line in one patient each. The median number of isocenters per tumor was 5 (range: 1-12). Results: At a median follow-up of 16 months (range: 2.5-36 months), all patients were alive. Thirty-five patients had follow-up imaging studies. Nine tumors (26%) were smaller, and 26 tumors (74%) were unchanged. No tumor had progressed. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of facial neuropathy were 52.2% and 66.5%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidences of trigeminal neuropathy were 33.7% and 58.9%, respectively. The 1- and 2-year actuarial incidence of facial or trigeminal neuropathy (or both) was 60.8% and 81.7%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following were associated with the time of onset or worsening of facial weakness or trigeminal neuropathy: (a) patients five isocenters. The 1- and 2-year actuarial rates of preservation of useful hearing (Gardner-Robertson class I or II) were 100% and 41.7% ± 17.3, respectively. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiosurgery using the gamma knife provides short-term control of acoustic neuromas when a dose of 16 to 20 Gy to the tumor margin is used. Preservation of useful hearing can be accomplished in a significant proportion of patients

  7. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  8. MR of acoustic neuromas; Relationship to cranial nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1989-08-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author).

  9. Treatment of acoustic neuroma: stereotactic radiosurgery vs. microsurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpinos, Marianna; Teh, Bin S.; Zeck, Otto; Carpenter, L. Steven; Phan, Chris; Mai, W.-Y.; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Butler, E. Brian; Gormley, William B.; Woo, Shiao Y.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Two major treatment options are available for patients with acoustic neuroma, microsurgery and radiosurgery. Our objective was to compare these two treatment modalities with respect to tumor growth control, hearing preservation, development of cranial neuropathies, complications, functional outcome, and patient satisfaction. Methods and Materials: To compare radiosurgery with microsurgery, we analyzed 96 patients with unilateral acoustic neuromas treated with Leksell Gamma Knife or microsurgery at Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas, between 1993 and 2000. Radiosurgery technique involved multiple isocenter (1-30 single fraction fixed-frame magnetic resonance imaging) image-based treatment with a mean dose prescription of 14.5 Gy. Microsurgery included translabyrinthine, suboccipital, and middle fossa approaches with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. Preoperative patient characteristics were similar except for tumor size and age. Patients undergoing microsurgery were younger with larger tumors compared to the radiosurgical group. The tumors were divided into small 4.0 cm. Median follow-up of the radiosurgical group was longer than the microsurgical group, 48 months (3-84 months) vs. 24 months (3-72 months). Results: There was no statistical significance in tumor growth control between the two groups, 100% in the microsurgery group vs. 91% in the radiosurgery group (p>0.05). Radiosurgery was more effective than microsurgery in measurable hearing preservation, 57.5% vs. 14.4% (p=0.01). There was no difference in serviceable hearing preservation between the two groups. Microsurgery was associated with a greater rate of facial and trigeminal neuropathy in the immediate postoperative period and at long-term follow-up. The rate of development of facial neuropathy was significantly higher in the microsurgical group than in the radiosurgical group (35% vs. 0%, p<0.01 in the immediate postsurgical period and 35.3% vs. 6.1%, p=0.008, at long

  10. Treatment of acoustic neuroma: stereotactic radiosurgery vs. microsurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinos, Marianna; Teh, Bin S; Zeck, Otto; Carpenter, L Steven; Phan, Chris; Mai, W -Y; Lu, Hsin H; Chiu, J Kam; Butler, E Brian; Gormley, William B; Woo, Shiao Y

    2002-12-01

    Purpose: Two major treatment options are available for patients with acoustic neuroma, microsurgery and radiosurgery. Our objective was to compare these two treatment modalities with respect to tumor growth control, hearing preservation, development of cranial neuropathies, complications, functional outcome, and patient satisfaction. Methods and Materials: To compare radiosurgery with microsurgery, we analyzed 96 patients with unilateral acoustic neuromas treated with Leksell Gamma Knife or microsurgery at Memorial Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas, between 1993 and 2000. Radiosurgery technique involved multiple isocenter (1-30 single fraction fixed-frame magnetic resonance imaging) image-based treatment with a mean dose prescription of 14.5 Gy. Microsurgery included translabyrinthine, suboccipital, and middle fossa approaches with intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. Preoperative patient characteristics were similar except for tumor size and age. Patients undergoing microsurgery were younger with larger tumors compared to the radiosurgical group. The tumors were divided into small <2.0 cm, medium 2.0-3.9 cm, or large >4.0 cm. Median follow-up of the radiosurgical group was longer than the microsurgical group, 48 months (3-84 months) vs. 24 months (3-72 months). Results: There was no statistical significance in tumor growth control between the two groups, 100% in the microsurgery group vs. 91% in the radiosurgery group (p>0.05). Radiosurgery was more effective than microsurgery in measurable hearing preservation, 57.5% vs. 14.4% (p=0.01). There was no difference in serviceable hearing preservation between the two groups. Microsurgery was associated with a greater rate of facial and trigeminal neuropathy in the immediate postoperative period and at long-term follow-up. The rate of development of facial neuropathy was significantly higher in the microsurgical group than in the radiosurgical group (35% vs. 0%, p<0.01 in the immediate postsurgical period and 35

  11. Intermedius nerve involvement and testing in acoustic neuromas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, J; Zilstorff, K

    1975-01-01

    The clinical findings in 125 patients with surgically confirmed acoustic neuromas are presented, with special regard to the involvement of the intermedius nerve in the diagnosis. In assessing the function of the intermedius nerve the examination of the nasolacrimal reflex and the sensation of taste on the anterior two-thirds of the tongue are used. The methods of investigation are described in detail. The material consisted of 20 medium-sized and 105 large tumours; no intracanalicular tumor was found. Hearing loss was the initial symptom in 85% of the patients, 10% had tinitus and 4% vertigo as the first symptom. Apart from the VIII cranial nerve symptoms, a defective nasolacrimal reflex was the most significant evidence of cerebellopontine angle pathology. The test was positive in 65% of the medium-sized tumours, in the entire material, 85%. The figures are higher than the incidence of trigeminal nerve symptoms. This in contrast to the reports of most authors. The tests described are simple and quick to perform, and it is emphasized that they should be applied to all patients with unilateral hearing loss of unknown origin.

  12. Distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome after acoustic neuroma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Joseph L; Jackler, Robert K; Rigby, Peter L; Pitts, Lawrence H; Cheung, Steven W

    2002-07-01

    To define a clinicopathologic syndrome associated with persistent cerebellar dysfunction after acoustic neuroma (AN) excision. Case series derived from radiographic and clinical chart review. Tertiary referral center. In 12 patients with AN, persistent cerebellar dysfunction developed after AN removal. Each case demonstrated abnormality in the ipsilateral cerebellar peduncle on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebellar function and ambulatory status over the first postoperative year. On magnetic resonance imaging scans, the extent of cerebellar peduncle infarcts was variable. It ranged from focal brain injury (2 cm) spanning the full thickness of the peduncle. Peduncular infarcts were associated with large tumor size (average 3.8 cm, range 2.0-5.5 cm diameter). The long-term functional outcomes (>1 yr) varied. Dysmetria was unchanged or improved in over half of the patients (6 of 11 patients). Gait recovered to normal or to preoperative levels in 5 patients. In the 6 patients with persistent impaired mobility, 2 had mild gait disturbance, 3 required regular use of a cane, and 1 has been dependent on a walker. One patient had sustained mild motor weakness. Three of 11 patients remained dependent on others for activities of daily living. Peduncle injury most likely stems from interruption of distal branches of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). These small vessels are intimately related to the capsule of the tumor and may supply both the neoplasm and the brain parenchyma. It has long been recognized that interruption of the proximal segment of the AICA results in severe injury to the pons, with devastating neurologic sequelae. A limited AICA syndrome caused by loss of its distal ramifications seems a more plausible explanation for peduncular infarction than either venous insufficiency or direct surgical trauma.

  13. Enhanced intrinsic radiosensitivity after treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery for an acoustic neuroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Gerard; Martin, Olga A.; Roos, Daniel E.; Lobachevsky, Pavel N.; Potter, Andrew E.; Zacest, Andrew C.; Bezak, Eva; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Roger F.; Leong, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced radiosensitivity is an uncommon phenomenon attributable to deficient DNA repair after radiotherapy which can be assessed with the γ-H2AX assay. Reports of radiosensitivity after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) are uncommon. We describe a case where the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings suggest enhanced radiosensitivity after SRS for an acoustic neuroma.

  14. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhaiem-Sigaux, N. [Dept. of Pathology, Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Ricolfi, F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Torres-Diaz, A.; Keravel, Y. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Henri Mondo Hospital, Creteil (France); Poirier, J. [Dept. of Histology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France)

    1999-10-01

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage. (orig.)

  15. Acoustic neuroma: predominance of Antoni type B cells in tumors of patients with vestibular paresis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stipkovits, E.M.; Graamans, K.; Jansen, G.H.; Velthof, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate whether in patients with acoustic neuroma (AN), the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms is related to the histologic characteristics of the tumor. STUDY DESIGN: The study design was a retrospective clinical study. SETTING: The study was conducted at

  16. Haemorrhagic acoustic neuroma with features of a vascular malformation. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benhaiem-Sigaux, N.; Ricolfi, F.; Torres-Diaz, A.; Keravel, Y.; Poirier, J.

    1999-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with hearing loss presented with vertigo and vomiting. CT tomography and MRI demonstrated a cerebellopontine angle mass with foci of haemorrhage. An angiomatous tumour, with large abnormal veins adhering to the capsule, was completely removed. Histologically, the tumour was an acoustic neuroma with abnormal vascularisation and limited intratumoral haemorrhage. (orig.)

  17. [Clinical and radiological evolution of a group of untreated acoustic neuromas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorihuela-García, Vicente; Llópez-Carratalá, Ignacio; Orts-Alborch, Miguel; Marco-Algarra, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic neuroma is a benign tumour that originates in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve. The main treatment is surgery, but many authors suggest that with elderly patients or in small neuromas we can opt for watchful waiting. This was a retrospective study from 2007 to 2013 that included 27 patients diagnosed of acoustic neuroma that had not been treated due to the size of the tumour, age and comorbidities, or by patient choice. We evaluated overall condition, hearing thresholds, degree of canal paresis and central disorders. After 6 years of follow up, clinical manifestations of 18 patients remained unchanged, 5 patients underwent hearing loss and developed tinnitus, 2 cases had more intense tinnitus and 2 cases had dizziness. The radiological controls by magnetic resonance imaging showed that the initial maximum diameters (5-16mm) increased by 1.7mm on average, with annual growth rates below 0.5mm. In selected cases, such as for small neuromas and in elderly patients, the conservative option of close monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging is an important alternative given that, in our cases, clinical features and radiological image did not suffer major changes. If there were any such changes, therapeutic options could be proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  18. The treatment for acoustic neuromas. Indication and results of gamma knife radiosurgery and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yoshiyasu; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Uyama, Taichi; Morikawa, Toshie; Honda, Yuji; Matsusaka, Yasuhiro; Komiyama, Masaki; Yasui, Toshihiro

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the treatment results of acoustic neuromas in the era of radiosurgery. We treated acoustic neuromas using the following strategy. Small to medium size tumors (below 3 cm) were treated by gamma knife radiosurgery and large tumors (above 3 cm) were treated using a combination of surgery and radiosurgery. Using gamma knife radiosurgery we were able to achieve 96.4% of clinical tumor growth control with 0.7% incidence of trigeminal neuropathy (without new facial neuropathy). We used low dose radiosurgery (average tumor marginal dose 11.8 Gy) with a follow-up of an average of 54 months. For the 17 patients with large tumors treated by the combination of surgery and radiosurgery who could be followed up for over 24 months after radiosurgery, we were able to preserve normal facial function (House-Brackmann grade I-II) in 70.6% of the patients after subtotal removal. High clinical tumor growth control for residual tumor was achieved in 94.1% of subjects with an average of 40 months follow-up. By using this strategy, the treatment outcome for acoustic neuroma is improved from the standpoint of functional outcome and maintaining the patient's quality of life. (author)

  19. A case-case study of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma risk in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasuto; Akiba, Suminori; Kubo, Osami; Yamaguchi, Naohito

    2011-02-01

    Results of case-control studies of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma have been inconsistent. We conducted a case-case study of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma using a self-administered postal questionnaire. A total of 1589 cases identified in 22 hospitals throughout Japan were invited to participate, and 787 cases (51%) actually participated. Associations between laterality of mobile phone use prior to the reference dates (1 and 5 years before diagnosis) and tumor location were analyzed. The overall risk ratio was 1.08 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.93-1.28) for regular mobile phone use until 1 year before diagnosis and 1.14 (95% CI, 0.96-1.40) for regular mobile phone use until 5 years before diagnosis. A significantly increased risk was identified for mobile phone use for >20 min/day on average, with risk ratios of 2.74 at 1 year before diagnosis, and 3.08 at 5 years before diagnosis. Cases with ipsilateral combination of tumor location and more frequently used ear were found to have tumors with smaller diameters, suggesting an effect of detection bias. Furthermore, analysis of the distribution of left and right tumors suggested an effect of tumor-side-related recall bias for recall of mobile phone use at 5 years before diagnosis. The increased risk identified for mobile phone users with average call duration >20 min/day should be interpreted with caution, taking into account the possibilities of detection and recall biases. However, we could not conclude that the increased risk was entirely explicable by these biases, leaving open the possibility that mobile phone use increased the risk of acoustic neuroma. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Organising haematoma mimicking tumour on MRI following resection of acoustic neuroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, J.N.P.; Pigeon, C.N.; Moseley, I.F.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a 26-year-old woman in whom an enhancing, intradural extramedullary mass was found at the craniocervical junction on MRI 3 years after resection of a large acoustic neuroma. The radiological appearances suggested a new tumour, raising the possibility of neurofibromatosis 2, provoking a review of family members in an attempt to confirm the diagnosis, as well as further surgery. Histology of the lesion revealed an organising haematoma, with no evidence of malignancy. The imaging features can be explained by the process by which blood clot in the subarachnoid space is resorbed. Caution is advised in interpreting CT or MRI after neurosurgery. (orig.)

  1. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas: A prospective monocenter study of about 158 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litre, Fabien; Rousseaux, Pascal; Jovenin, Nicolas; Bazin, Arnaud; Peruzzi, Philippe; Wdowczyk, Didier; Colin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of acoustic neuromas. Material and methods: Between January 1996 and December 2009, 158 acoustic neuromas were treated by FSR in 155 patients. They received a dose of 50.4 Gy, with a safety margin of 1–2 mm with a median tumor volume at 2.45 mL (range: 0.17–12.5 mL) and a median follow-up duration at 60 months (range: 24–192). Results: FSR was well tolerated in all patients with mild sequelae consisting in radiation-induced trigeminal nerve impairments (3.2%), Grade 2 facial neuropathies (2.5%), new or aggravated tinnitus (2.1%) and VP shunting (2.5%). The treatment failed in four patients (2.5%) who had subsequent surgery respectively at 20, 38, 45 and 84 months post-FSR. The local tumor control rates were respectively 99.3%, 97.5% and 95.2% at 3, 5 and >7-year of follow-up. For initial Gardner–Robertson Grade 1 and 2 ANs, the preservation of useful hearing was possible in 54% of the cases; only Grade 1 ANs had stabilized during the course of the follow-up with 71% >7 years. However, hearing preservation was not correlated to the initial Koos Stage and to the radiation dose delivered to the cochlea. Tinnitus (70%), vertigo (59%), imbalance (46%) and ear mastoid pain (43%) had greatly improved post-FRS in most patients. Tumor control, hearing preservation and FRS toxicity were quite similar in patients with NF2, cystic acoustic neuroma, prior surgical resection and Koos Stage 4 AN. No secondary tumors were observed. Conclusion: FSR is a safe and effective therapeutic for acoustic neuromas and could be an alternative to microsurgery. Compared to radiosurgery, there are no contraindications for fractioned doses of stereotactic radiotherapy especially for Stage-4 tumors and patients at high risk of hearing loss

  2. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas: A prospective monocenter study of about 158 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litre, Fabien [Hôpital Maison Blanche, Reims Cedex (France); Rousseaux, Pascal [Hôpital Maison Blanche, Reims Cedex (France); Jovenin, Nicolas [Institut Jean Godinot, Reims Cedex (France); Bazin, Arnaud; Peruzzi, Philippe [Hôpital Maison Blanche, Reims Cedex (France); Wdowczyk, Didier; Colin, Philippe [Institut du Cancer Reims Courlancy, Reims (France)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcomes and efficacy of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of acoustic neuromas. Material and methods: Between January 1996 and December 2009, 158 acoustic neuromas were treated by FSR in 155 patients. They received a dose of 50.4 Gy, with a safety margin of 1–2 mm with a median tumor volume at 2.45 mL (range: 0.17–12.5 mL) and a median follow-up duration at 60 months (range: 24–192). Results: FSR was well tolerated in all patients with mild sequelae consisting in radiation-induced trigeminal nerve impairments (3.2%), Grade 2 facial neuropathies (2.5%), new or aggravated tinnitus (2.1%) and VP shunting (2.5%). The treatment failed in four patients (2.5%) who had subsequent surgery respectively at 20, 38, 45 and 84 months post-FSR. The local tumor control rates were respectively 99.3%, 97.5% and 95.2% at 3, 5 and >7-year of follow-up. For initial Gardner–Robertson Grade 1 and 2 ANs, the preservation of useful hearing was possible in 54% of the cases; only Grade 1 ANs had stabilized during the course of the follow-up with 71% >7 years. However, hearing preservation was not correlated to the initial Koos Stage and to the radiation dose delivered to the cochlea. Tinnitus (70%), vertigo (59%), imbalance (46%) and ear mastoid pain (43%) had greatly improved post-FRS in most patients. Tumor control, hearing preservation and FRS toxicity were quite similar in patients with NF2, cystic acoustic neuroma, prior surgical resection and Koos Stage 4 AN. No secondary tumors were observed. Conclusion: FSR is a safe and effective therapeutic for acoustic neuromas and could be an alternative to microsurgery. Compared to radiosurgery, there are no contraindications for fractioned doses of stereotactic radiotherapy especially for Stage-4 tumors and patients at high risk of hearing loss.

  3. Radiosurgery supported in the lineal accelerator for the acoustic neuroma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Ortega, M.; Gutierrez Diaz, J.; Rodriguez Villaba, S.; Garcia Berrocal, I.; Samblas Garcia, J.; Bustos Perez de Salcedo, J.C.; Ortiz de Urbina, D.; Donckaster Clavero, G.; Delgado Rodriguez, J.M.; Sansivirini Valle, F.

    1996-01-01

    Radiosurgery becomes in a great interest technique in acoustic neuroma treatments. We present preliminary results over 74 neurinomas patients in our Unit. From August 1991 to August 1994, 74 consecutive patients with acoustic neuromas, median age 50 yrs. has been treated in our Unit. A SRS 200 radiosurgery system was employed using a 6 MV photon beam Linear Accelerator as radiation source. In every case treatment dose was lesser than 18 gy (14-16 Gy). Before treatment all patients were evaluated with MRI and neurological examination, acoustic test included. This screening was repeated each six months during the follow up. Tumoral control was defined both, as no changes or diminishing in tumoral size, observed in sequential MRI studies with gadolinium and comparable techniques. The median fallow up is 18 months. Tumor control is 88,5%. In 30 patients control means dismissing in tumoral size. In 10 patients tumoral progression was evident, in a half of their a neurofibromatosis type II was previously diagnosed. The neurological function during the follow up shown improve or estabilitation in symptoms, for 85% VII pair patients, 83% in VII pair patients, 86% in V pair patients and 83% in cerebellar disfunction patients. Although preliminaries, this dates showing the efficacy of radiosurgery in tumoral control of patients with neurinomas with doses laser than 18 Gy. This dose are safe with toxicities around 15%, mainly in transitory presentations. (Auhtor) 67 refs

  4. [Descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis in treating unilateral facial palsy after acoustic neuroma resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiantao; Li, Mingchu; Chen, Ge; Guo, Hongchuan; Zhang, Qiuhang; Bao, Yuhai

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the efficiency of the descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis for the severe facial palsy after acoustic neuroma resection. The clinical data of 14 patients (6 males, 8 females, average age 45. 6 years old) underwent descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis for treatment of unilateral facial palsy was analyzed retrospectively. All patients previously had undergone resection of a large acoustic neuroma. House-Brackmann (H-B) grading system was used to evaluate the pre-, post-operative and follow up facial nerve function status. 12 cases (85.7%) had long follow up, with an average follow-up period of 24. 6 months. 6 patients had good outcome (H-B 2 - 3 grade); 5 patients had fair outcome (H-B 3 - 4 grade) and 1 patient had poor outcome (H-B 5 grade) Only 1 patient suffered hemitongue myoparalysis owing to the operation. Descending hypoglossal branch-facial nerve anastomosis is effective for facial reanimation, and it has little impact on the function of chewing, swallowing and pronunciation of the patients compared with the traditional hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis.

  5. Environmental risk factors for sporadic acoustic neuroma (Interphone Study Group, Germany)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlehofer, B; Schlaefer, K; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    The only known risk factor for sporadic acoustic neuroma is high-dose ionising radiation. Environmental exposures, such as radiofrequency electromagnetic fields and noise are under discussion, as well as an association with allergic diseases. We performed a population-based case-control study.......31; 95% CI 1.15-4.66), and for hay fever (OR=2.20; 95% CI 1.09-4.45), but not for ionising radiation (OR=0.91; 95 % CI 0.51-1.61) or regular mobile phone use (OR=0.67; 95% CI 0.38-1.19). The study confirms results of recently published studies, although the pathogenetic mechanisms are still unknown....

  6. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon; Shin, Dongoh; Park, Sungho; Chung, Weon Kuu; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  7. Risk of a second cancer from scattered radiation in acoustic neuroma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyunho; Sung, Jiwon [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dongoh [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungho [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Weonkuu; Jahng, Geonho; Kim, Dongwook [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The present study aimed to compare the risk of a secondary cancer from scattered and leakage doses in patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a secondary cancer were estimated using the corresponding secondary doses measured at various organs by using radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, liver, bowel, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were 14.6, 1.7, 0.9, 0.8, 0.6, 0.6, and 0.6 cGy, respectively, for IMRT whereas they were 19.1, 1.8, 2.0, 0.6, 0.4, 0.4, and 0.4 cGy, respectively, for VMAT, and 22.8, 4.6, 1.4, 0.7, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.5 cGy, respectively, for SRS. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A lifetime attributable risk evaluation estimated that more than 0.03% of acoustic neuroma (AN) patients would get radiation-induced cancer within 20 years of receiving radiation therapy. The organ with the highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN was the thyroid. We found that the LAR could be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  8. Clinical predictors of facial nerve outcome after translabyrinthine resection of acoustic neuromas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Schramm, David R; Benoit, Brien G

    2007-01-01

    The translabyrinthine approach to acoustic neuroma resection offers excellent exposure for facial nerve dissection with 95% preservation of anatomic continuity. Acceptable outcome in facial asymptomatic patients is reported at 64-90%, but transient postoperative deterioration often occurs. The objective of this study was to identify preoperative clinical presentation and intraoperative surgical findings that predispose patients to facial nerve dysfunction after acoustic neuroma surgery. The charts of 128 consecutive translabyrinthine patients were examined retrospectively to identify new clinical and intraoperative predictors of facial nerve outcome. Postoperative evaluation of patients to normal function or mild asymmetry upon close inspection (House-Brackmann grades of I or II) was defined as an acceptable outcome, with obvious asymmetry to no movement (grades III to VI) defined as unacceptable. Intraoperative nerve stimulation was performed in all cases, and clinical grading was performed by a single neurosurgeon in all cases. Among patients with no preoperative facial nerve deficit, 87% had an acceptable result. Small size (P mA (P< 0.01) were reaffirmed as predictive of functional nerve preservation. Additionally, preoperative tinnitus (P = 0.03), short duration of hearing loss (P< 0. 01), and lack of subjective tumour adherence to the facial nerve (P = 0.02) were independently correlated with positive outcome. Our experience with the translabyrinthine approach reveals the previously unestablished associations of facial nerve outcome to include presence of tinnitus and duration of hypoacusis. Independent predictors of tumour size and nerve stimulation thresholds were reaffirmed, and the subjective description of tumour adherence to the facial nerve making dissection more difficult appears to be important.

  9. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... below: ? Brain Tumors Brain Disorders AVMs Radiosurgery Gamma Knife Linac Radiotherapy Overview Childhood Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy Radiation Injury Treatment Day Making a Decision Centers of Excellence BRAIN TALK® ...

  10. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy and single high-dose radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma: early results of a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, O.W.M.; Wolbers, J.G.; Baayen, J.C.; Slotman, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the local control and toxicity rate in acoustic neuroma patients treated with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 37 consecutive patients treated with stereotactic radiation therapy for acoustic neuroma. All patients had progressive tumors, progressive symptoms, or both. Mean tumor diameter was 2.3 cm (range 0.8-3.3) on magnetic resonance (MR) scan. Dentate patients were given a dose of 5 x 4 Gy or 5 x 5 Gy and edentate patients were given a dose of 1 x 10 Gy or 1 x 12.50 Gy prescribed to the 80% isodose. All patients were treated with a single isocenter. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 25 months (range 12-61), the actuarial local control rate at 5 years was 91% (only 1 patient failed). The actuarial rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 66% in previously-hearing patients. The actuarial rate of freedom from trigeminal nerve toxicity was 97% at 5 years. No patient developed facial nerve toxicity or other complications. Conclusion: In this unselected series, fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy and linear accelerator-based radiosurgery give excellent local control in acoustic neuroma. It combines a high rate of preservation of hearing with a very low rate of other toxicity, although follow-up is relatively short

  11. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D [Kyung Hee University International Med. Serv., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, W [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  12. Use of piezosurgery for internal auditory canal drilling in acoustic neuroma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Kaminsky, Jan

    2011-10-01

    Piezosurgery is based on microvibrations generated by the piezoelectrical effect and has a selective bone-cutting ability with preservation of soft tissue. This study examined the applicability of Piezosurgery compared to rotating drills (RD) for internal auditory canal (IAC) opening in acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery. Piezosurgery was used in eight patients for IAC drilling in AN surgery. After exposition of the IAC and tumor, the posterior wall of the IAC was drilled using Piezosurgery instead of RD. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to practicability, safety, preciseness of bone cutting, preservation of cranial nerves, influences on neurophysiological monitoring, and facial nerve and hearing outcome. Piezosurgery was successfully used for selective bone cutting, while cranial nerves were structurally and functionally preserved, which could be measured by means of neuromonitoring. Piezosurgery guaranteed a safe and precise cut by removing bone layer by layer in a shaping way. Compared to RD, limited influence on neurophysiological monitoring attributable to Piezosurgery was noted, allowing for continuous neuromonitoring. No disadvantage due to microvibrations was noticed concerning hearing function. The angled tip showed better handling in right-sided than in left-sided tumors in the hands of a right-handed surgeon. The short, thick handpiece may be improved for more convenient handling. Piezosurgery is a safe tool for selective bone cutting for opening of the IAC with preservation of facial nerve and hearing function in AN surgery. Piezosurgery has the potential to replace RD for this indication because of its safe and precise bone-cutting properties.

  13. Prognostic factors for hearing preservation following observation-only versus stereotactic irradiation (STI) in patients with acoustic neuroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Tooru

    1998-01-01

    Prognostic factors for hearing preservation following observation-only versus STI were compared in patients with acoustic neuroma. There were 48 patients with acoustic neuroma treated by fractionated STI. Between 1991 and 1997, patients were given 36 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (36 Gy/20 Fr/5 wks) to 44 Gy/22 Fr/6 wks followed by a 4 Gy boost. A linear accelerator was used for irradiation. Twenty-three patients with acoustic neuroma who were followed without any treatment (observation-only group) were selected as matched controls. The largest hearing loss was observed at the frequency of 2 kHz in the observation-only group and at 1-2 kHz in the STI group. Hearing loss at lkHz was more frequent in the STI group (p<0.01). There were no significant prognostic factors which predicted hearing preservation in the observation-only group. Stereotactic irradiation has been suggested to damage to cochlear nerve function in patients whose cochlear nerve had been impaired already. Tumor control rate of STI appeared to be as good as single fraction radiosurgery rates in the literature and better than in the observation-only group. Hearing preservation rate in the STI group was as good as in the observation-only group and appeared to be better than single fraction radiosurgery. In conclusion, because there were no factors predictive of hearing preservation in the observation-only group, it is difficult to select patients for observation only. Fractionated STI is potentially the treatment of choice, resulting in the same hearing preservation rate as achieved with observation only, although longer follow-up periods are needed. (author)

  14. Acoustic neuroma risk in relation to mobile telephone use: Results of the INTERPHONE international case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabi

    2011-01-01

    Background: The rapid increase in mobile telephone use has generated concern about possible health risks of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from these devices. Methods: A case-control study of 1105 patients with newly diagnosed acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) and 2145 controls...... was conducted in 13 countries using a common protocol. Past mobile phone use was assessed by personal interview. In the primary analysis, exposure time was censored at one year before the reference date (date of diagnosis for cases and date of diagnosis of the matched case for controls); analyses censoring...

  15. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma): Predicting the Risk of Hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Ceri; Micallef, Caroline; Gonsalves, Adam; Wharram, Bev; Ashley, Sue; Brada, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and predictive factors for the development of hydrocephalus in patients with acoustic neuromas (AN) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seventy-two patients with AN were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy between 1998 and 2007 (45-50 Gy in 25-30 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks). The pretreatment MRI scan was assessed for tumor characteristics and anatomic distortion independently of subsequent outcome and correlated with the risk of hydrocephalus. Results: At a median follow-up of 49 months (range, 1-120 months), 5-year event-free survival was 95%. Eight patients (11%) developed hydrocephalus within 19 months of radiotherapy, which was successfully treated. On univariate analysis, pretreatment factors predictive of hydrocephalus were maximum diameter (p = 0.005), proximity to midline (p = 0.009), displacement of the fourth ventricle (p = 0.02), partial effacement of the fourth ventricle (p < 0.001), contact with the medulla (p = 0.005), and more brainstem structures (p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for fourth ventricular effacement, no other variables remained independently associated with hydrocephalus formation. Conclusions: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy results in excellent tumor control of AN, albeit with a risk of developing hydrocephalus. Patients at high risk, identified as those with larger tumors with partial effacement of the fourth ventricle before treatment, should be monitored more closely during follow-up. It would also be preferable to offer treatment to patients with progressive AN while the risk of hydrocephalus is low, before the development of marked distortion of fourth ventricle before tumor diameter significantly exceeds 2 cm.

  16. Validation of the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodder, Wouter L; Adan, Guleed H; Chean, Chung S; Lesser, Tristram H; Leong, Samuel C

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the strength of content validity within the facial dysfunction domain of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life (PANQOL) Scale and to compare how it correlates with a facial dysfunction-specific QOL instrument (Facial Clinimetric Evaluation, FaCE). The study design is online questionnaire survey. Members of the British Acoustic Neuroma Association received both PANQOL questionnaires and the FaCE scale. 158 respondents with self-identified facial paralysis or dysfunction had completed PANQOL and FaCE data sets for analysis. The mean composite PANQOL score was 53.5 (range 19.2-93.5), whilst the mean total FaCE score was 50.9 (range 10-95). The total scores of the PANQOL and FaCE correlated moderate (r = 0.48). Strong correlation (r = 0.63) was observed between the PANQOL's facial dysfunction domain and the FaCE total score. Of all the FaCE domains, social function was strongly correlated with the PANQOL facial dysfunction domain (r = 0.66), whilst there was very weak-to-moderate correlation (range 0.01-0.43) to the other FaCE domains. The current study has demonstrated a strong correlation between the facial dysfunction domains of PANQOL with a facial paralysis-specific QOL instrument.

  17. Hearing preservation after low dose linac radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma depends on initial hearing and time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Daniel E.; Potter, Andrew E.; Zacest, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess long term outcomes and factors determining hearing preservation after low dose linac stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuroma (AN) at the Royal Adelaide Hospital using prospectively collected data. Material and methods: Between 1994 and 2010, 102 patients had SRS for AN. Five patients had neurofibromatosis type 2, six sporadic cases had relapsed after surgery, and the remaining 91 sporadic cases had primary SRS. Dose was 12 or 14 Gy. Sustained changes ⩾ 2 mm in any diameter were deemed significant, and useful hearing was defined as inter-aural pure tone average (PTA) ⩽ 50 dB. Possible prognostic factors for hearing retention were tested by dividing the patients at pre-specified cutpoints: age (60 years), maximum tumour diameter (20 mm), initial PTA (20 dB) and dose (12 vs 14 Gy). Results: Eighty-four of the 91 sporadic primary SRS cases were evaluable for tumour control with at least one post-treatment MRI. Their median follow-up was 65 mo (range 10–184 mo). Eighty-two (97.6%) were controlled, the remaining two requiring salvage surgery for progression at 5.75 and 9.75 years. Also, one of the post-operative cases required surgery at 2.1 years after SRS. For the 50 sporadic primary SRS patients with initially useful hearing, median age was 56 (range 21–76), median initial PTA 16 dB (range −11 to +45 dB) and median tumour diameter 21 mm (range 10–33 mm). Four received 14 Gy, the rest 12 Gy. After SRS, 19 patients (38%) retained useful hearing. The Kaplan–Meier estimated preservation rate at 5 years was 50% (95% CI 36–64%) but by 10 years, this had fallen to 23% (95% CI 12–41%). On univariate analysis, the only significant factor was initial PTA (P < 0.0001). The estimated risk of hearing loss after SRS for patients with initial PTA ⩾ 20 dB was 5.0 (95% CI 2.2–11.2) times that with PTA < 20 dB. Conclusions: Tumour control was excellent (99/102 = 97% freedom from surgical salvage). Hearing preservation was strongly

  18. Management of a patient undergoing sitting position craniotomy for acoustic neuroma with co-existing interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Suvarna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old woman with acoustic neuroma associated with occupational interstitial lung disease (ILD was successfully managed for sitting position craniotomy using carefully titrated desflurane-based anaesthesia. The anaesthetic challenges included maintenance an adequate depth of anaesthesia, reducing perioperative airway events and ensuring smooth recovery. While dealing with ILD patient in sitting position, careful risk assessment is important because it will help us predict the course of the perioperative events. Balanced general anaesthesia using desflurane fulfilled the requirement of good depth and smooth recovery in this patient. Though there are reports of maintenance of anaesthesia with other inhalational agents, there are scanty reports of using desflurane in these cases.

  19. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neuroma. Volume changes and hearing results after 89-month median follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranzinger, Manfred; Fastner, Gerd; Zehentmayr, Franz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Oberascher, Gerhard; Merz, Florian; Rahim, Hassan; Nairz, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate toxicity and local control following hypofractionated stereotactic radiation treatment with special focus on changes in tumor volume and hearing capacity. In all, 29 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma were treated between 2001 and 2007 within a prospective radiation protocol (7 x 4 Gy ICRU dose). Median tumor volume was 0.9 ml. Follow-up started at 6 months and was repeated annually with MRI volumetry and audiometry. Hearing preservation was defined as preservation of Class A/B hearing according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (1995). No patient had any intervention after a median imaging follow-up of 89.5 months, one patient showed radiological progression. Transient increase of tumor volume developed in 17/29 patients, whereas 22/29 patients (75.9 %) presented with a volume reduction at last follow-up. A total of 21 patients were eligible for hearing evaluation. Mean pure tone average (PTA) deteriorated from 39.3 to 65.9 dB and mean speech discrimination score (SDS) dropped from 74.3 to 38.1 %. The 5-year actuarial Class A/B hearing preservation rate was 50.0 ± 14.4 %. Radiation increases only minimally, if at all, the hearing deterioration which emerges by observation alone. Presbyacusis is not responsible for this deterioration. Transient tumor enlargement is common. Today radiation of small- and medium-sized acoustic neuroma can be performed with different highly conformal techniques as fractionated treatment or single low-dose radiosurgery with equal results regarding tumor control, hearing preservation, and side effects. Hypofractionation is more comfortable for the patient than conventional regimens and represents a serious alternative to frameless radiosurgery. (orig.) [de

  20. SU-E-T-14: A Comparative Study Between Forward and Inverse Planning in Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Acoustic Neuroma Tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopishankar, N; Agarwal, Priyanka; Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, S S; Rath, G K; Chander, S; Sharma, B S [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate forward and inverse planning methods for acoustic neuroma cases treated in Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Five patients with acoustic neuroma tumour abutting brainstem were planned twice in LGP TPS (Version 10.1) using TMR10 algorithm. First plan was entirely based on forward planning (FP) in which each shot was chosen manually. Second plan was generated using inverse planning (IP) for which planning parameters like coverage, selectivity, gradient index (GI) and beam-on time threshold were set. Number of shots in IP was automatically selected by objective function using iterative process. In both planning methods MRI MPRAGE sequence images were used for tumour localization and planning. A planning dose of 12Gy at 50% isodose level was chosen. Results and Discussion: Number of shots used in FP was greater than IP and beam-on time in FP was in average 1.4 times more than IP. One advantage of FP was that the brainstem volume subjected to 6Gy dose (25% isodose) was less in FP than IP. Our results showed use of more number of shots as in FP results in GI less than or equal to 2.55 which is close to its lower limit. Dose homogeneity index (DHI) analysis of FP and IP showed average values of 0.59 and 0.67 respectively. General trend in GK for planning in acoustic neuroma cases is to use small collimator shots to avoid dose to adjacent critical structures. More number of shots and prolonged treatment time causes inconvenience to the patients. Similarly overuse of automatic shot shaping as in IP results in increased scatter dose. A compromise is required in shot selection for these cases. Conclusion: IP method could be used in acoustic neuroma cases to decrease treatment time provided the source sector openings near brainstem are shielded or adjusted appropriately to reduce brainstem dose.

  1. Use of mobile phones and cordless phones is associated with increased risk for glioma and acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Hansson Mild, Kjell

    2013-04-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO evaluation of the carcinogenic effect of RF-EMF on humans took place during a 24-31 May 2011 meeting at Lyon in France. The Working Group consisted of 30 scientists and categorised the radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF), as Group 2B, i.e., a 'possible', human carcinogen. The decision on mobile phones was based mainly on the Hardell group of studies from Sweden and the IARC Interphone study. We give an overview of current epidemiological evidence for an increased risk for brain tumours including a meta-analysis of the Hardell group and Interphone results for mobile phone use. Results for cordless phones are lacking in Interphone. The meta-analysis gave for glioma in the most exposed part of the brain, the temporal lobe, odds ratio (OR)=1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-2.81 in the ≥10 years (>10 years in the Hardell group) latency group. Ipsilateral mobile phone use ≥1640h in total gave OR=2.29, 95% CI=1.56-3.37. The results for meningioma were OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.31-4.98 and OR=1.35, 95% CI=0.81-2.23, respectively. Regarding acoustic neuroma ipsilateral mobile phone use in the latency group ≥10 years gave OR=1.81, 95% CI=0.73-4.45. For ipsilateral cumulative use ≥1640h OR=2.55, 95% CI=1.50-4.40 was obtained. Also use of cordless phones increased the risk for glioma and acoustic neuroma in the Hardell group studies. Survival of patients with glioma was analysed in the Hardell group studies yielding in the >10 years latency period hazard ratio (HR)=1.2, 95% CI=1.002-1.5 for use of wireless phones. This increased HR was based on results for astrocytoma WHO grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme). Decreased HR was found for low-grade astrocytoma, WHO grades I-II, which might be caused by RF-EMF exposure leading to tumour-associated symptoms and earlier detection and surgery with better

  2. Validation of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life Scale (PANQOL) for Spanish-Speaking Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Maria Del Mar; Carrillo, Alvaro; Polo, Ruben; Fernandez, Borja; Alonso, Daniel; Vaca, Miguel; Cordero, Adela; Perez, Cecilia; Muriel, Alfonso; Cobeta, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    Objective To perform translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-Life Scale (PANQOL) to the Spanish language. Study Design Prospective study. Setting Tertiary neurotologic referral center. Subjects and Methods PANQOL was translated and translated back, and a pretest trial was performed. The study included 27 individuals diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma. Inclusion criteria were adults with untreated vestibular schwannoma, diagnosed in the past 12 months. Feasibility, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and ceiling and floor effects were assessed for the present study. Results The mean overall score of the PANQOL was 69.21 (0-100 scale, lowest to highest quality of life). Cronbach's α was 0.87. Intraclass correlation coefficient was performed for each item, with an overall score of 0.92. The κ coefficient scores were between moderate and almost perfect in more than 92% of patients. Anxiety and energy domains of the PANQOL were correlated with both physical and mental components of the SF-12. Hearing, balance, and pain domains were correlated with the SF-12 physical component. Facial and general domains were not significantly correlated with any component of the SF-12. Furthermore, the overall score of the PANQOL was correlated with the physical component of the SF-12. Conclusion Feasibility, internal consistency, reliability, and construct validity outcomes in the current study support the validity of the Spanish version of the PANQOL.

  3. Multistep translation and cultural adaptation of the Penn acoustic neuroma quality-of-life scale for German-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristin, Julia; Glaas, Marcel Fabian; Stenin, Igor; Albrecht, Angelika; Klenzner, Thomas; Schipper, Jörg; Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin

    2017-11-01

    Monitoring the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) has garnered increasing interest. In German-speaking countries, there is no disease-specific questionnaire available similar to the "Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality-of-life Scale" (PANQOL). We translated the PANQOL for German-speaking patients based on a multistep protocol that included not only a forward-backward translation but also linguistic and sociocultural adaptations. The process consists of translation, synthesis, back translation, review by an expert committee, administration of the prefinal version to our patients, submission and appraisal of all written documents by our research team. The required multidisciplinary team for translation comprised head and neck surgeons, language professionals (German and English), a professional translator, and bilingual participants. A total of 123 patients with VS underwent microsurgical procedures via different approaches at our clinic between January 2007 and January 2017. Among these, 72 patients who underwent the translabyrinthine approach participated in the testing of the German-translated PANQOL. The first German version of the PANQOL questionnaire was created by a multistep translation process. The responses indicate that the questionnaire is simple to administer and applicable to our patients. The use of a multistep process to translate quality-of-life questionnaires is complex and time-consuming. However, this process was performed properly and resulted in a version of the PANQOL for assessing the quality of life of German-speaking patients with VS.

  4. Pooled analysis of case-control studies on acoustic neuroma diagnosed 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 and use of mobile and cordless phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael; Söderqvist, Fredrik; Mild, Kjell Hansson

    2013-10-01

    We previously conducted a case-control study of acoustic neuroma. Subjects of both genders aged 20-80 years, diagnosed during 1997-2003 in parts of Sweden, were included, and the results were published. We have since made a further study for the time period 2007-2009 including both men and women aged 18-75 years selected from throughout the country. These new results for acoustic neuroma have not been published to date. Similar methods were used for both study periods. In each, one population-based control, matched on gender and age (within five years), was identified from the Swedish Population Registry. Exposures were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire supplemented by a phone interview. Since the number of acoustic neuroma cases in the new study was low we now present pooled results from both study periods based on 316 participating cases and 3,530 controls. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index (SEI). Use of mobile phones of the analogue type gave odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0-4.3, increasing with >20 years latency (time since first exposure) to OR = 7.7, 95% CI = 2.8-21. Digital 2G mobile phone use gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.1, increasing with latency >15 years to an OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 0.8-4.2. The results for cordless phone use were OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.1, and, for latency of >20 years, OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 1.7-26. Digital type wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones and cordless phones) gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.0 increasing to OR = 8.1, 95% CI = 2.0-32 with latency >20 years. For total wireless phone use, the highest risk was calculated for the longest latency time >20 years: OR = 4.4, 95% CI = 2.2-9.0. Several of the calculations in the long latency category were based on low numbers of exposed cases. Ipsilateral use resulted in a higher risk than contralateral for both mobile and cordless phones. OR increased per 100 h

  5. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neuroma. Volume changes and hearing results after 89-month median follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranzinger, Manfred; Fastner, Gerd [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Zehentmayr, Franz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, radART - Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies, Salzburg (Austria); Oberascher, Gerhard [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Merz, Florian; Rahim, Hassan [Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Medical Radiation Protection Unit, Salzburg (Austria); Nairz, Olaf [Clinic Bad Trissl, Oberaudorf (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate toxicity and local control following hypofractionated stereotactic radiation treatment with special focus on changes in tumor volume and hearing capacity. In all, 29 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma were treated between 2001 and 2007 within a prospective radiation protocol (7 x 4 Gy ICRU dose). Median tumor volume was 0.9 ml. Follow-up started at 6 months and was repeated annually with MRI volumetry and audiometry. Hearing preservation was defined as preservation of Class A/B hearing according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (1995). No patient had any intervention after a median imaging follow-up of 89.5 months, one patient showed radiological progression. Transient increase of tumor volume developed in 17/29 patients, whereas 22/29 patients (75.9 %) presented with a volume reduction at last follow-up. A total of 21 patients were eligible for hearing evaluation. Mean pure tone average (PTA) deteriorated from 39.3 to 65.9 dB and mean speech discrimination score (SDS) dropped from 74.3 to 38.1 %. The 5-year actuarial Class A/B hearing preservation rate was 50.0 ± 14.4 %. Radiation increases only minimally, if at all, the hearing deterioration which emerges by observation alone. Presbyacusis is not responsible for this deterioration. Transient tumor enlargement is common. Today radiation of small- and medium-sized acoustic neuroma can be performed with different highly conformal techniques as fractionated treatment or single low-dose radiosurgery with equal results regarding tumor control, hearing preservation, and side effects. Hypofractionation is more comfortable for the patient than conventional regimens and represents a serious alternative to frameless radiosurgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war die Evaluierung der Toxizitaet und der lokalen Tumorkontrolle einer hypofraktionierten stereotaktischen Bestrahlung mit besonderem Augenmerk auf Veraenderungen von Tumorvolumen und

  6. Associação entre tamanho e potencial proliferativo em neurinomas do acústico Size and proliferative index correlation in acoustic neuromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Inácio de Tella

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Schwanomas do acústico são os tumores mais freqüentes localizados no ângulo pontocerebelar. Os mecanismos moleculares que levam a sua geração e crescimento ainda não são bem conhecidos. Várias características clínicas, radiológicas e imuno-histoquímicas já foram estudadas e correlacionadas ao crescimento tumoral. Estudamos e correlacionamos aspectos clínicos e imuno-histoquímicos (MIB-1 de 11 schwanomas do acústico operados no Hospital São Paulo/UNIFESP. O tamanho dos tumores correlacionou-se com o índice proliferativo (Ki-67, não havendo correlação com significância estatística entre a idade dos pacientes, duração dos sintomas e índice proliferativo.Acoustic neuromas are the most common tumors in the cerebellopontine angle. The molecular mechanisms involved in generation and growth of these tumors are not completly elucidated. Many radiological, clinic and imunohistochemystry data were correlated to tumor growth. We studied 11 acoustic neuromas surgically treated at Hospital São Paulo/Unifesp and correlated clinical and radiological data with proliferative index (Ki-67. The size of the tumors were positively correlationated with proliferative index. No other correlation had statistic significativity.

  7. Occupation and risk of glioma, meningioma and acoustic neuroma: results from a German case-control study (interphone study group, Germany)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samkange-Zeeb, F; Schlehofer, B; Schüz, J

    2010-01-01

    /electronic and transport, and the risk of glioma, meningioma and acoustic neuroma. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study involving a total of 844 cases and 1688 controls conducted from 2000 to 2003, detailed information on life-long job histories was collected during personal interviews and used to create job...... calendars for each participant. Job title, job activity, job number, and the starting and ending dates of the activity were recorded for all activities with duration of at least 1 year. Reported occupational activities were coded according to the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988...... (ISCO 88). For the analyses we focused on six a priori defined occupational sectors, namely chemical, metal, agricultural, construction, electrical/electronic and transport. Multiple conditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS...

  8. Pooled analysis of case-control studies on acoustic neuroma diagnosed 1997–2003 and 2007–2009 and use of mobile and cordless phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARDELL, LENNART; CARLBERG, MICHAEL; SÖDERQVIST, FREDRIK; MILD, KJELL HANSSON

    We previously conducted a case-control study of acoustic neuroma. Subjects of both genders aged 20–80 years, diagnosed during 1997–2003 in parts of Sweden, were included, and the results were published. We have since made a further study for the time period 2007–2009 including both men and women aged 18–75 years selected from throughout the country. These new results for acoustic neuroma have not been published to date. Similar methods were used for both study periods. In each, one population-based control, matched on gender and age (within five years), was identified from the Swedish Population Registry. Exposures were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire supplemented by a phone interview. Since the number of acoustic neuroma cases in the new study was low we now present pooled results from both study periods based on 316 participating cases and 3,530 controls. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed, adjusting for age, gender, year of diagnosis and socio-economic index (SEI). Use of mobile phones of the analogue type gave odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.0–4.3, increasing with >20 years latency (time since first exposure) to OR = 7.7, 95% CI = 2.8–21. Digital 2G mobile phone use gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1–2.1, increasing with latency >15 years to an OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 0.8–4.2. The results for cordless phone use were OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1–2.1, and, for latency of >20 years, OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 1.7–26. Digital type wireless phones (2G and 3G mobile phones and cordless phones) gave OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1–2.0 increasing to OR = 8.1, 95% CI = 2.0–32 with latency >20 years. For total wireless phone use, the highest risk was calculated for the longest latency time >20 years: OR = 4.4, 95% CI = 2.2–9.0. Several of the calculations in the long latency category were based on low numbers of exposed cases. Ipsilateral use resulted in a higher risk than contralateral for both mobile and cordless

  9. Management of acoustic neuromas with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT): Long-term results in 106 patients treated in a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Volk, Sigrid; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Thilmann, Christoph; Debus, Juergen

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcome and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas in 106 patients treated in a single institution. Patients and Methods: Between October 1989 and January 2004, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) was performed in 106 patients with acoustic neuroma (AN). The median total dose applied was 57.6 Gy in median single fractions of 1.8 Gy in five fractions per week. The median irradiated tumor volume was 3.9 mL (range, 2.7-30.7 mL). The median follow-up time was 48.5 months (range, 3-172 months). Results: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was well tolerated in all patients. Actuarial local tumor control rates at 3- and 5- years after FSRT were 94.3% and 93%, respectively. Actuarial useful hearing preservation was 94% at 5 years. The presence of neurofibromatosis (NF-2) significantly adversely influenced hearing preservation in patients that presented with useful hearing at the initiation of RT (p = 0.00062). Actuarial hearing preservation without the diagnosis of NF-2 was 98%. In cases with NF-2, the hearing preservation rate was 64%. Cranial nerve toxicity other than hearing impairment was rare. The rate of radiation induced toxicity to the trigeminal and facial nerve was 3.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Conclusion: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is safe and efficacious for the treatment of AN, with mild toxicity with regard to hearing loss and cranial nerve function. FSRT might be considered as an equieffective treatment modality compared to neurosurgery and therefore represents an interesting alternative therapy for patients with AN

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... 8211 info@ANAUSA.org About ANA Mission, Vision & Values Leadership & Staff Annual Reports Shop ANA Home Learn Educational Video English English Arabic Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese ( ...

  12. Treatment of Acoustic Neuroma

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    ... Home Learn Treatment Options Overview English English Arabic Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Danish French German Greek ... for delivering stereotactic radiation have improved, an increasing number of patients have chosen to receive stereotactic radiosurgery ...

  13. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  1. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  2. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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    Full Text Available ... Provider List Member Portal Back Webinar Library Newsletter Library Patient Info Booklets Research Back ANA Survey/Registry AN Research Back Keck Medicine of USC Massachusetts General Hospital University of California, Irvine A.N.S.R.S. Study Yale ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

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  4. SU-F-T-611: Critical Analysis and Efficacy of Linac Based (Beam Modulator) and Cyberknife Treatment Plans for Acoustic Neuroma/schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KP, Karrthick; Kataria, T; Thiyagarajan, R; Selvan, T; Abhishek, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the critical analysis and efficacy of Linac and Cyberknife (CK) treatment plans for acoustic neuroma/schwannoma. Methods: Twelve of acoustic neuroma/schwannoma patients were taken for these study that. Treatment plans were generated in Multiplan treatment planning system (TPS) for CK using 5,7.5 and 10mm diameter collimators. Target volumes were in the range of 0.280 cc to 9.256 cc. Prescription dose (Rx) ranges from 1150cGy to 1950cGy delivered over 1 to 3 Fractions. For same patients stereotactic Volumetric modulated arc plans were generated using Elekta Linac with MLC thickness of 4mm in Monaco TPS. Appropriate calculation algorithms and grid size were used with same Rx and organ at risk (OAR) constrains for both Linac and CK plans. Treatment plans were developed to achieve at least 95% of the target volume to receive the Rx. The dosimetric indices such as conformity index (CI), coverage, OAR dose and volume receiving 50% of Rx (V50%) were used to evaluate the plans. Results: Target volumes ranges from 0.280 cc to 3.5cc shows the CI of 1.16±0.109 and 1.53±0.360 for cyberknife and Linac plans respectively. For small volume targets, the OARs were well spared in CK plans. There are no significant differences in CI and OAR doses were observed between CK and Linac plans that have the target volume >3.5 cc. Perhaps the V50% were lesser in CK plans, and found to be 12.8± 8.4 and 22.8 ± 15.0 for CK and Linac respectively. Conclusion: The analysis shows the importance of collimator size for small volume targets. The target volumes >3.5 cc can be treated in Linac as comparable with CK. For targets <3.5cc CK plans showed superior plan quality with better CI and OAR sparing than the Linac based plans. Further studies may require evaluating the clinical advantage of CK robotic system.

  5. Intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation for preservation of facial nerve function in patients with large acoustic neuroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bai-yun; TIAN Yong-ji; LIU Wen; LIU Shu-ling; QIAO Hui; ZHANG Jun-ting; JIA Gui-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various monitoring techniques have been used routinely in the treatment of the lesions in the skull base, iatrogenic facial paresis or paralysis remains a significant clinical problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation on preservation of facial nerve function.Method From January to November 2005, 19 patients with large acoustic neuroma were treated using intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation (TCEMEP) for preservation of facial nerve function. The relationship between the decrease of MEP amplitude after tumor removal and the postoperative function of the facial nerve was analyzed.Results MEP amplitude decreased more than 75% in 11 patients, of which 6 presented significant facial paralysis (H-B grade 3), and 5 had mild facial paralysis (H-B grade 2). In the other 8 patients, whose MEP amplitude decreased less than 75%, 1 experienced significant facial paralysis, 5 had mild facial paralysis, and 2 were normal.Conclusions Intraoperative TCEMEP can be used to predict postoperative function of the facial nerve. The decreased MEP amplitude above 75 % is an alarm point for possible severe facial paralysis.

  6. Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma mimicking temporomandibular disorders: a case report Schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico imitando desordens temporomandibulares: um relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício A. Bisi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma. Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case.Aproximadamente 6 a 16% dos pacientes com sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal apresentam tumores intracranianos, sendo mais comum o schwannoma vestibular (neurinoma do acústico. Alguns sintomas relatados pelos pacientes são perda da audição, zumbido, dores de cabeça, vertigens e distúrbios trigeminais. Uma resposta muscular aumentada na musculatura associada da cabeça e do pescoço também pode ser observada, o que pode mimetizar sinais e sintomas de desordens temporomandibulares. Nestes casos é de grande valia o uso de imagem de ressonância magnética (IRM para detecção de tumores. É importante, também, a diferenciação de dores miofasciais e neurálgicas, pois ambas podem apresentar características semelhantes, mas com origens e tratamentos diferentes. O objetivo desse trabalho foi demonstrar através de relato de caso clínico a associação entre sintomas de neuralgia trigeminal, tumores intracranianos e disfunção temporomandibular.

  7. Validation of self-reported start year of mobile phone use in a Swedish case-control study on radiofrequency fields and acoustic neuroma risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, David; Bottai, Matteo; Mathiesen, Tiit; Prochazka, Michaela; Feychting, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The possible effect of radiofrequency exposure from mobile phones on tumor risk has been studied since the late 1990s. Yet, empirical information about recall of the start of mobile phone use among adult cases and controls has never been reported. Limited knowledge about recall errors hampers interpretations of the epidemiological evidence. We used network operator data to validate the self-reported start year of mobile phone use in a case-control study of mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma risk. The answers of 96 (29%) cases and 111 (22%) controls could be included in the validation. The larger proportion of cases reflects a more complete and detailed reporting of subscription history. Misclassification was substantial, with large random errors, small systematic errors, and no significant differences between cases and controls. The average difference between self-reported and operator start year was -0.62 (95% confidence interval: -1.42, 0.17) years for cases and -0.71 (-1.50, 0.07) years for controls, standard deviations were 3.92 and 4.17 years, respectively. Agreement between self-reported and operator-recorded data categorized into short, intermediate and long-term use was moderate (kappa statistic: 0.42). Should an association exist, dilution of risk estimates and distortion of exposure-response patterns for time since first mobile phone use could result from the large random errors in self-reported start year. Retrospective collection of operator data likely leads to a selection of "good reporters", with a higher proportion of cases. Thus, differential recall cannot be entirely excluded.

  8. Probabilistic Multiple-Bias Modeling Applied to the Canadian Data From the Interphone Study of Mobile Phone Use and Risk of Glioma, Meningioma, Acoustic Neuroma, and Parotid Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoli, F; Siemiatycki, J; McBride, M L; Parent, M-É; Richardson, L; Bedard, D; Platt, R; Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Krewski, D

    2017-10-01

    We undertook a re-analysis of the Canadian data from the 13-country case-control Interphone Study (2001-2004), in which researchers evaluated the associations of mobile phone use with the risks of brain, acoustic neuroma, and parotid gland tumors. In the main publication of the multinational Interphone Study, investigators concluded that biases and errors prevented a causal interpretation. We applied a probabilistic multiple-bias model to address possible biases simultaneously, using validation data from billing records and nonparticipant questionnaires as information on recall error and selective participation. In our modeling, we sought to adjust for these sources of uncertainty and to facilitate interpretation. For glioma, when comparing those in the highest quartile of use (>558 lifetime hours) to those who were not regular users, the odds ratio was 2.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 3.4). After adjustment for selection and recall biases, the odds ratio was 2.2 (95% limits: 1.3, 4.1). There was little evidence of an increase in the risk of meningioma, acoustic neuroma, or parotid gland tumors in relation to mobile phone use. Adjustments for selection and recall biases did not materially affect interpretation in our results from Canadian data. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Direct costs of microsurgical management of radiosurgically amenable intracranial pathology in Germany: an analysis of meningiomas, acoustic neuromas, metastases and arteriovenous malformations of less than 3 cm in diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellis, G.; Nagel, R.; Vollmar, C.; Steiger, H.-J.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the analysis was to appreciate and compare the effective direct costs of microsurgical treatment of intracranial pathology potentially amenable to radiosurgery as they arose in 1998-99. Treatment costs of 127 microsurgically treated patients harboring an arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma, meningioma or brain metastasis potentially amenable to radiosurgery were reviewed. Costs for the surgical procedure, ICU rare, medical and nursing care on the ward, interclinical bills (ICB) for services provided by other departments and the overhead for basic hotel service were added. For comparison gamma knife costs were calculated by dividing the global operating cost of the gamma knife centre by the number of patients treated in 1999. Average hospitalization time for the entire microsurgical patients was 15.4 + 8.6 days. The patients spent an average of 1.2 ± 2.8 days on ICU. Average operating time for all patients, including preparation, was 393 ± 118 minutes. Average costs for the microsurgical therapy were Eur 10814 ± 6108. These consisted of Eur 1417 ± 426 for the surgical procedure, Eur 1188 ± 2658 for ICU care, Eur 2333 ± 1582 for medical and nursing care on the ward, Eur 1671 ± 1433 for interclinical bills and Eur 4204 ± 2338 for basic hotel service (overhead, Eur 273 per day). 70 % of the microsurgically treated patients needed ancillary inpatient rehabilitation or radiotherapy resulting in an average additional cost for all patients of Eur 2744. Furthermore 20 % of the microsurgically treated patients required an unplanned readmission after discharge, resulting in an average additional costs for all patients of Eur 1684. Average overall costs per patient including ancillary therapy and unplanned read-missions amounted to Eur 15242. For comparison, gamma knife treatment costs per patient amounted to Eur 7920 in 1999. The current analysis showed that for established radiosurgical indications the primary costs of microsurgery

  10. Palisaded encapsulated neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesh S Manchanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Palisaded encapsulated neuroma (PEN is a benign cutaneous or mucosal neural tumor which, usually, presents as a solitary, firm, asymptomatic, papule or nodule showing striking predilection for the face. It occurs commonly in middle age, and there is no sex predilection. Oral PEN are not common, and these lesions must be distinguished from other peripheral nerve sheath tumors such as the neurofibroma, neurilemma (schwannoma, and traumatic neuroma. The major challenge in dealing with lesions of PEN is to avoid the misdiagnosis of neural tumors that may be associated with systemic syndromes such as neurofibromatosis and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2B. Here, we present a case of benign PEN of the gingiva in the left anterior mandibular region, laying importance on immunohistochemical staining in diagnosing such lesions.

  11. [Operative treatment of painful neuromas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokvis, Annemieke; Coert, J Henk

    2011-01-01

    3-5% of patients with traumatic or iatrogenic peripheral nerve injury develop a painful neuroma, especially following trauma of small cutaneous sensory nerve branches. Neuroma pain is difficult to treat and often leads to loss of function and reduction of quality of life. Patients with a painful neuroma present with spontaneous electric, shooting or burning pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia and cold intolerance. The diagnosis is based on the medical history and physical examination, supplemented by Tinel's test and a diagnostic nerve blockade. Lasting pain relief is possible by means of surgical neuroma treatment performed by a plastic surgeon. Surgical treatment consists of repair or denervation of the nerve with relocation of the nerve stump in bone or muscle tissue or a vein. Referral of neuroma patients without delay to a plastic surgeon or multidisciplinary consultation is important, because the symptoms become increasingly difficult to treat over time. 3-5% of patients with traumatic or iatrogenic peripheral nerve injury develop a painful neuroma, especially following trauma of small cutaneous sensory nerve branches. Neuroma pain is difficult to treat and often leads to loss of function and reduction of quality of life. Patients with a painful neuroma present with spontaneous electric, shooting or burning pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia and cold intolerance. The diagnosis is based on the medical history and physical examination, supplemented by Tinel's test and a diagnostic nerve blockade. Lasting pain relief is possible by means of surgical neuroma treatment performed by a plastic surgeon. Surgical treatment consists of repair or denervation of the nerve with relocation of the nerve stump in bone or muscle tissue or a vein. Referral of neuroma patients without delay to a plastic surgeon or multidisciplinary consultation is important, because the symptoms become increasingly difficult to treat over time.

  12. A free vein graft cap influences neuroma formation after nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Manasseri, Benedetto; Risitano, Giovanni; Geuna, Stefano; Di Scipio, Federica; La Rosa, Paola; Delia, Gabriele; D'Alcontres, Francesco Stagno; Colonna, Michele R

    2009-01-01

    : Neuroma formation is a major problem in nerve surgery and consensus about its prevention has not been reached. It has been suggested that vein covering can reduce neuroma formation in transected nerves. In this article, the Authors propose an easy and novel method of covering by nerve stump capping with a free vein graft. : Neuroma-like lesions were created on the rat thigh sectioning the femoral nerve above its division in 16 animals. The proximal nerve stump was invaginated into the lumen of a 1.5 cm long femoral free vein graft on the right side, and the vein was closed on itself by microsurgical sutures to form a cap for the nerve stump. On the left side acting as the control neuroma, the nerve was cut and left uncovered. Histological and immunohistochemical assessment was used to quantify the degree of neuroma formation. : Significant differences were found in both neuroma size and axon-glia organization between the treated and control sides indicating that free vein graft capping reduced neuroma formation in comparison to uncovered nerve stumps. : Our results confirm that vein-covering of a transected nerve stump can be effective in reducing neuroma formation. Moreover, unlike previous works that buried the nerve into an adjacent vein left in place, our experiments showed that also the use of a free vein graft cap can hinder neuroma formation. Although translation of rat experiments to the clinics should be dealt with caution, our data suggest a careful clinical use of the technique. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2009.

  13. Morton neuroma: MRI diagnostic value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelin, Enrique G.; Aparicio, Rocio; Dutto, Santiago; Rodriguez Lucero, Javier

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI in Morton's Neuroma (MN). Material and methods: 23 patients with clinical diagnosis of MN were examined under two different protocols, with a 1.5 T Magnet. 1) T1, FSET2, FIR, T1 with contrast enhancement and fat suppression; 2) T1, FSET2, FIR without contrast enhancement (i.v. Gadolinium). Results: In the first group MN was found in 7 patients. In the second group 14 patients were studied, 7 with positive MR for neuroma, and 9 with negative MR. 6 were true-negative and 3 were false-negative. The Fisher Test between both groups was p < 0.05. Conclusion: MRI is effective for the diagnosis of Morton neuroma. The use of gadolinium and fat suppression significantly improved the detection of Morton neuroma, allowing better measurements of the lesion. These findings do not correlate with previous papers that do not encourage the use of i.v. Gadolinium. (author)

  14. MRI features of peripheral traumatic neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Shivani [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology Section, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Belzberg, Allan J. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Montgomery, Elizabeth A. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Pathology, Oncology and Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fayad, Laura M. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Musculoskeletal Imaging Section Chief, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States); The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    To describe the MRI appearance of traumatic neuromas on non-contrast and contrast-enhanced MRI sequences. This IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study retrospectively reviewed 13 subjects with 20 neuromas. Two observers reviewed pre-operative MRIs for imaging features of neuroma (size, margin, capsule, signal intensity, heterogeneity, enhancement, neurogenic features and denervation) and the nerve segment distal to the traumatic neuroma. Descriptive statistics were reported. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationship between size of neuroma and parent nerve. Of 20 neuromas, 13 were neuromas-in-continuity and seven were end-bulb neuromas. Neuromas had a mean size of 1.5 cm (range 0.6-4.8 cm), 100 % (20/20) had indistinct margins and 0 % (0/20) had a capsule. Eighty-eight percent (7/8) showed enhancement. All 100 % (20/20) had tail sign; 35 % (7/20) demonstrated discontinuity from the parent nerve. None showed a target sign. There was moderate positive correlation (r = 0.68, p = 0.001) with larger neuromas arising from larger parent nerves. MRI evaluation of the nerve segment distal to the neuroma showed increased size (mean size 0.5 cm ± 0.4 cm) compared to the parent nerve (mean size 0.3 cm ± 0.2 cm). Since MRI features of neuromas include enhancement, intravenous contrast medium cannot be used to distinguish neuromas from peripheral nerve sheath tumours. The clinical history of trauma with the lack of a target sign are likely the most useful clues. (orig.)

  15. CT and MRI of haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asari, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Katayama, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Itoh, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Tsuchida, S. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan)); Ohmoto, T. (Dept. of Neurological Surgery, Okayama Univ. Medical School, Okayama City (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    Six patients with haemorrhage into intracranial neuromas were studied by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 0.5 T with spin-echo pulse sequences. The nature of the tumour and the presence of a haematoma were confirmed by surgery and microscopic examination in all cases. Four neuromas arose from the acoustic nerves and two from the trigeminal. Four of the six patients suffered from sudden onset or rapid worsening of symptoms including headache, vertigo and/or hemifacial motor and sensory disturbances. CT in the acute stage revealed a hyperdense area or a fluid-fluid level (FFL). The hyperdense area disappeared on CT repeated in the chronic stage. On MRI in subacute and chronic stages the haemorrhage showed hyperintensity on both T1 and T2 weighting in five cases examined between 16 and 46 days after the onset, and isointensity on T1 weighting and an FFL on T2 weighting in one case examined 12 days after the onset of symptoms. A well-defined low intensity rim indicating prior haemorrhage was observed on T2-weighted images in three cases. MRI was more effectie than CT in detecting haemorrhage into the tumours and in staging it. (orig.)

  16. Neuromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RAC) Information OIG Opioid and Chronic Pain Management OSHA Off-Label Use Physician Payment Sunshine Act (Open ... a treatment plan that best suits your individual case. Padding and Taping: Special padding at the ball ...

  17. Swimming Training Reduces Neuroma Pain by Regulating Neurotrophins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jinge; Yu, Tingting; Xu, Yongming; Pu, Shaofeng; Lv, Yingying; Zhang, Xin; DU, Dongping

    2018-01-01

    Neuroma formation after peripheral nerve transection leads to severe neuropathic pain in amputees. Previous studies suggested that physical exercise could bring beneficial effect on alleviating neuropathic pain. However, the effect of exercise on neuroma pain still remained unclear. In addition, long-term exercise can affect the expression of neurotrophins (NT), such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play key roles in nociceptor sensitization and nerve sprouting after nerve injury. Here, we investigated whether long-term swimming exercise could relieve neuroma pain by modulating NT expression. We used a tibial neuroma transposition (TNT) rat model to mimic neuroma pain. After TNT surgery, rats performed swimming exercise for 5 wk. Neuroma pain and tactile sensitivities were detected using von Frey filaments. Immunofluorescence was applied to analyze neuroma formation. NGF and BDNF expressions in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. TNT led to neuroma formation, induced neuroma pain, and mechanical allodynia in hind paw. Five-week swimming exercise inhibited neuroma formation and relieved mechanical allodynia in the hind paw and neuroma pain in the lateral ankle. The analgesic effect lasted for at least 1 wk, even when the exercise ceased. TNT elevated the expressions of BDNF and NGF in peripheral neuroma, dorsal root ganglion, and the spinal cord to different extents. Swimming also decreased the elevation of NT expression. Swimming exercise not only inhibits neuroma formation induced by nerve transection but also relieves pain behavior. These effects might be associated with the modulation of NT.

  18. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  19. A Comparison of Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. c.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method a first order model, and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices.

  20. A pilot study on acoustic regulations for schools – Comparison between selected countries in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Guigou-Carter, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    of descriptors and limit values for acoustic requirements. The paper includes examples of acoustic regulations for schools, including specific sound insulation requirements on airborne and impact sound insulation, limit values for noise from traffic and from service equipment and in addition on reverberation......Acoustic regulations for schools exist in most countries in Europe, the main reasons being improving learning conditions for pupils and work conditions for teachers. As a pilot study, comparison between requirements in selected countries in Europe has been carried out. The findings show a diversity...... time for class rooms. Furthermore, the discrepancies between countries are being discussed and some priorities for adjusting acoustic regulations in some countries indicated....

  1. Acoustic Neuroma: Questions to Discuss with Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or how a bite of bread tastes with dinner. Leverage your strengths for a more positive life Strengths are built-in capacities for certain thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. 5 ways to keep your memory sharp The way you live, what you eat and drink, and how you treat your body ...

  2. [Treatment of painful neuromas via end-to-side neurorraphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszmann, O C; Moser, V; Frey, M

    2010-08-01

    Management of the painful neuroma has been subject to controversy since the earliest descriptions of this disabling problem. Today, treatment is limited to resection of the neuroma and implantation of the nerve in a muscle at a location where it is safe from irritation and trauma. This however is not attainable in many cases and it is our clinical experience, that nerves without a target remain a source of constant discomfort and pain. Recently we reported of the feasibility of neuroma prevention through end-to-side neurorraphy into adjacent sensory and/or motor nerves to provide a target for axons deprived of their endorgan. Here we report of our first clinical experience with this method in sixteen patients with longstanding upper and lower extremity neuromas. 16 patients were included in this study. All had neuromas of different sensory nerves of both the upper and lower extremity. 11 were of iatrogenic origin, 5 were caused by different traumas. 8 had previous attempts to surgically treat the neuroma. Finally, all were treated by end-to-side neurorraphy into adjacent nerves. Postoperatively quantitative sensorymotor testing was performed to evaluate possible changes of nerve function of the recipient nerves. Pain was evaluated by visual analogue score and changes in pain medication. In no patient a sensory or motor deficit or painful sensations were induced in the target area of the recipient nerve. Some had dysaesthesias for about 6 months, which finally subsided. All but 1 patient improved in their symptoms at a follow-up of more than 2 years. Previous experimental work and present clinical results suggest that axons of a severed peripheral nerve that are provided with a pathway and target through an end-to-side coaptation will either be pruned or establish some type of end-organ contact so that a neuroma can be prevented without inducing sensory or motor dysfunctions in the recipient nerve. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  3. Acoustic design of open plan schools and comparison of requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Petersen, Claus; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    between groups and satisfac¬tory speech intelligibility internally in groups. This paper describes the newest Danish requirements and recommendations for such open plan areas and presents the design, measurements and subjective evaluation of two newer Danish schools. According to the users, the general...... conditions at both schools are satisfactory due to both optimized acoustical conditions and teaching methods adapted to the special open environment. The results from room acoustical modelling, verification measurements and questionnaire survey are presented and evaluated in relation to the newest Danish...

  4. Comparison of acoustic voice characteristics in smoking and nonsmoking teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šehović Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Voice of vocal professionals is exposed to great temptations, i.e. there is a high probability of voice alterations. Smoking, allergies and respiratory infections greatly affect the voice, which can change its acoustic characteristics. In smokers, the vocal cords mass increases, resulting in changes in vocal fold vibratory cycle. Pathological changes of vocal folds deform the acoustic signal and affect voice production. As vocal professionals, teachers are much more affected by voice disorders than average speakers. The aim of this study was to examine the differences in acoustic parameters of voice between smoking and nonsmoking teachers, in a sample of vocal professionals. The sample consisted of 60 female subjects, aged from 25 to 59. For voice analysis we used Computer lab, model 4300, 'Kay Elemetrics Corporation'. The statistical significance of differences in the values of acoustic parameters between smokers and nonsmokers was tested by ANOVA. Results showed that in the sample of female teachers, professional use of voice combined with the smoking habit can be linked to the changes in voice parameters. Comparing smokers and nonsmokers, average values of the parameters in short-term and long-term disturbances of frequency and amplitude proved to be significantly different.

  5. Endobronchial neurogenic tumor: A combination of traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Tandon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuromas are uncommon and benign lesions arising from a peripheral nerve injury during surgery. Here we describe a case with histopathologic features of both a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma in a patient without integumentary physical exam findings nor prior surgical history. A 54 year old male was admitted for surgical debridement of a foot ulcer. During pre-operative evaluation and review of imaging multiple CT scans revealed a stable, 4 mm endobronchial lesion in the left lower lobe. Given history of nicotine abuse, bronchoscopy was performed. Bronchoscopy showed a pearly, polypoid lesion. Histopathological results showed strong positivity for S-100 protein and spindle cell proliferation. Repeat CT chest showed no new lesions in the bronchial tree. The rarity of this case is noted not only by the limited number of bronchial neurogenic tumors, but the combined features in this case of a traumatic neuroma and neurofibroma which has not been described.

  6. Traumatic facial nerve neuroma with facial palsy presenting in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James H; Burger, Peter C; Boahene, Derek Kofi; Niparko, John K

    2010-07-01

    To describe the management of traumatic neuroma of the facial nerve in a child and literature review. Sixteen-month-old male subject. Radiological imaging and surgery. Facial nerve function. The patient presented at 16 months with a right facial palsy and was found to have a right facial nerve traumatic neuroma. A transmastoid, middle fossa resection of the right facial nerve lesion was undertaken with a successful facial nerve-to-hypoglossal nerve anastomosis. The facial palsy improved postoperatively. A traumatic neuroma should be considered in an infant who presents with facial palsy, even in the absence of an obvious history of trauma. The treatment of such lesion is complex in any age group but especially in young children. Symptoms, age, lesion size, growth rate, and facial nerve function determine the appropriate management.

  7. The comparison of acoustic and psychic parameters of subjective tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Erkan; Deniz, Murat

    2012-02-01

    We aim to assess the correlation between audiometric data, and psychotic and acoustic measures associated with subjective tinnitus (ST) and to clarify the importance of the psychological process in determining the degree of subjective annoyance and disability due to tinnitus. Fifty-four patients experiencing unilateral ST were allocated for the study. Acoustic assessment of patients including LDL (loudness discomfort levels), MML (minimum masking level) and RI (residual inhibition) was performed. Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) tests were performed for the psychological aspects of subjective annoyance. RI was positive in 23 patients with 13 frequency-matched stimuli at 8,000 Hz. Masking treatment response was successful in 16 RI-positive patients. Mean and standard deviation (SD) of THI scores were 38.77 ± 23.63. Ten patients (%18.51) with tinnitus had ≥ 17 points score, which was significant for BDI. Mean and SD were 5.01 ± 2.31 for VAS-1 scores (severity of tinnitus), 7.98 ± 2.79 for VAS-2 (frequency and duration of tinnitus), 5.77 ± 2.72 for VAS-3 (discomfort level), 3.56 ± 3.30 for VAS-4 (attention deficit) and 3.31 ± 3.31 for VAS-5 (sleep disorders). A significant correlation was found between the tinnitus duration time, age, gender and THI scores (P 0.05). RI might be largely frequency dependent and was found as an indicator for the masking treatment response. We did not notice statistically significant correlations between audiometric data and THI and BDI. There were correlations between with VAS and LDL and with MML and RI. VAS was simpler and easier for the assessment of ST. We should consider the psychological aspects of ST and assess it as a symptom separately with acoustic and psychotic tests.

  8. Traumatic neuroma after torticollis surgery: a rare occurrence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 Serrano Falcón C, Serrano Falcn MDM, Ruiz Villaverde R, Linares Solano J,. Serrano Ortega S. Amputation neuromas after neck surgery. Dermatol Online. J 2005; 11:2. 3 Lee IJ, Lim SY, Song HS, Park MC. Complete tight fibrous band release and resection in congenital muscular torticollis. J Plast Reconstr Aes Surg ...

  9. Comparison between air CT and MRI in the detection of small acoustic neurinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Aiko; Seto, Hikaru; Kakishita, Masao

    1989-02-01

    Air CT proved useful in yielding images of acoustic tumors as an air filling defect in 11 (24%) of 46 patients. Six of the 11 tumors were small ones of less than 1 cm in diameter. Air CT was also able to exclude an intracanalicular tumor in 29 patients (63%). MRI was performed for comparison in eight patients (nine tumors) already diagnosed by air CT as having an acoustic tumor. MRI detected eight (89%) of nine tumors. A false negative result on MRI was obtained only in one intracanalicular tumor (4.3 mm in size). This was considered to be attributable to limitations of spatial resolution including the wide slice thickness. A protocol for radiological investigation and management of patients whose clinical symptoms and/or audiovestibular examination are highly indicative of acoustic tumor is proposed and discussed. (author).

  10. Comparison between air CT and MRI in the detection of small acoustic neurinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Aiko; Seto, Hikaru; Kakishita, Masao

    1989-01-01

    Air CT proved useful in yielding images of acoustic tumors as an air filling defect in 11 (24%) of 46 patients. Six of the 11 tumors were small ones of less than 1 cm in diameter. Air CT was also able to exclude an intracanalicular tumor in 29 patients (63%). MRI was performed for comparison in eight patients (nine tumors) already diagnosed by air CT as having an acoustic tumor. MRI detected eight (89%) of nine tumors. A false negative result on MRI was obtained only in one intracanalicular tumor (4.3 mm in size). This was considered to be attributable to limitations of spatial resolution including the wide slice thickness. A protocol for radiological investigation and management of patients whose clinical symptoms and/or audiovestibular examination are highly indicative of acoustic tumor is proposed and discussed. (author)

  11. Penile Traumatic Neuroma: A Late Complication of Penile Dorsal Neurotomy to Treat Premature Ejaculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jun Park

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The main complications of SDN are recurrence of premature ejaculation, pain or paresthesia on the glans penis, and erectile dysfunction. However, no traumatic neuroma has been reported as a complication. We report that a traumatic neuroma can occur after SDN.

  12. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Muhammad Ali; Khan, Ishrat; Thomas, Cherian

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography are used widely for the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of these two modalities as diagnostic tools in Morton's neuroma. Fifty feet of 47 consecutive patients (39 women and 8 men; mean age, 46 years; age range, 36-64 years) who presented between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2008, were included in the study. Twenty-five feet were investigated with ultrasonography and 25 with MRI. Morton's neuroma was confirmed surgically and histologically in all of the patients. A Student unpaired t test was applied. Twenty-two MRIs were diagnostic (sensitivity, 88%). Three patients with negative MRI findings underwent ultrasonography and were found to have a neuroma smaller than 5 mm. Twenty-four ultrasound scans demonstrated the neuroma (sensitivity, 96%), with five neuromas being smaller than 5 mm. Ultrasonography has a slightly higher sensitivity in the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma, particularly of neuromas smaller than 5 mm, and should be the preferred imaging modality in suspected cases, and MRI should be reserved for cases with equivocal diagnosis.

  13. The acoustics of public squares/places: A comparison between results from a computer simulation program and measurements in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paini, Dario; Rindel, Jens Holger; Gade, Anders

    2004-01-01

    or a band during, for instance, music summer festivals) and the best position for the audience. A further result could be to propose some acoustic adjustments to achieve better acoustic quality by considering the acoustic parameters which are typically used for concert halls and opera houses.......In the contest of a PhD thesis, in which the main purpose is to analyse the importance of the public square/place (“agora”) as a meeting point of sound and music, with particular regard to its use for concerts (amplified or not), a first step was done, making comparisons between measurement in situ...

  14. Acoustic Measurements in Opera Houses: Comparison Between Different Techniques and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAUSTI, P.; FARINA, A.

    2000-04-01

    In room acoustics, many objective parameters to quantify subjective impressions have been introduced. These quantities can be measured by using a wide variety of powerful tools and equipment. The results can be influenced by the measurement techniques and instruments used. Furthermore, the results also depend on the measurement positions and on the condition of the hall (full, empty, etc.). The aim of this work is to define a tightly standardized measurement procedure for the collection of a complete objective description of an opera house's acoustics. In this paper some of the results obtained by the authors after measurements made in three different halls are presented. Comparisons were made both between different hardware and software tools (real-time analyzer, DAT, PC-board, source, microphones, post-processing software) and between different measurement methods (interrupted stationary noise, true-impulse, pseudo-random white noise with impulse-response doconvolution, sine sweep) as well as between different positions in the halls, with and without the presence of musicians and audience. The results have shown that the differences obtained when using different measurement techniques and equipment are not of significant importance. The only effective differences were found regarding the recording techniques, as the monaural measurements give appreciably different results from the average of left and right channel of binaural measurements. Slightly different results were alsofound between true impulsive sources (pistol shots, balloons) and omni-directional (dodecahedral) loudspeakers. Attention must be paid to the signal-to-noise ratio, as this can influence the correct calculation of some acoustical parameters. Some differences, not as great as expected, were found in the results with and without the musicians in the orchestra shell and with and without the audience in the hall. This is probably due to the high sound absorption that is typical in Italian opera

  15. A comparison between acoustic properties and heat effects in biogenic (magnetosomes) and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Józefczak, A.; Leszczyński, B.; Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles show unique properties and find many applications because of the possibility to control their properties using magnetic field. Magnetic nanoparticles are usually synthesized chemically and modification of the particle surface is necessary. Another source of magnetic nanoparticles are various magnetotactic bacteria. These biogenic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) represent an attractive alternative to chemically synthesized iron oxide particles because of their unique characteristics and a high potential for biotechnological and biomedical applications. This work presents a comparison between acoustic properties of biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions. Experimental studies have shown the influence of a biological membrane on the ultrasound properties of magnetosomes suspension. Finally the heat effect in synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles is also discussed. The experimental study shows that magnetosomes present good heating efficiency. - Highlights: • A biogenic and abiotic magnetite nanoparticle suspensions are investigated. • A comparison between ultrasonic properties and heat effects is presented. • Magnetosomes and abiotic magnetite nanoparticles exhibit good heating efficiency.

  16. A quantitative evaluation of gross versus histologic neuroma formation in a rabbit forelimb amputation model: potential implications for the operative treatment and study of neuromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuiken Todd A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical treatment of neuromas involves excision of neuromas proximally to the level of grossly "normal" fascicles; however, proximal changes at the axonal level may have both functional and therapeutic implications with regard to amputated nerves. In order to better understand the retrograde "zone of injury" that occurs after nerve transection, we investigated the gross and histologic changes in transected nerves using a rabbit forelimb amputation model. Methods Four New Zealand White rabbits underwent a forelimb amputation with transection and preservation of the median, radial, and ulnar nerves. After 8 weeks, serial sections of the amputated nerves were then obtained in a distal-to-proximal direction toward the brachial plexus. Quantitative histomorphometric analysis was performed on all nerve specimens. Results All nerves demonstrated statistically significant increases in nerve cross-sectional area between treatment and control limbs at the distal nerve end, but these differences were not observed 10 mm more proximal to the neuroma bulb. At the axonal level, an increased number of myelinated fibers were seen at the distal end of all amputated nerves. The number of myelinated fibers progressively decreased in proximal sections, normalizing at 15 mm proximally, or the level of the brachial plexus. The cross-sectional area of myelinated fibers was significantly decreased in all sections of the treatment nerves, indicating that atrophic axonal changes proceed proximally at least to the level of the brachial plexus. Conclusions Morphologic changes at the axonal level extend beyond the region of gross neuroma formation in a distal-to-proximal fashion after nerve transection. This discrepancy between gross and histologic neuromas signifies the need for improved standardization among neuroma models, while also providing a fresh perspective on how we should view neuromas during peripheral nerve surgery.

  17. Recurrent neuroma formation after lateral arm free flap coverage with neurorraphy to the posteroantebrachial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Steven L; Gordon, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    We report a patient with previous wrist trauma and development of a symptomatic neuroma of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. The patient had previously been successfully treated with lateral arm free flap coverage with neurorrhaphy to a segment of the posteroantebrachial cutaneous nerve carried with the flap. Two years following this procedure the patient experienced re-onset of symptoms prompting surgical exploration of the area. At the time of operation a recurrent neuroma was found at the free distal terminus of the transferred posteroantebrachial cutaneous nerve. The neuroma was repositioned into the distal radius via a burr hole with relief of symptoms.

  18. Biliary stricture due to neuroma after an innocent blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinelos, P; Dimiropoulos, S; Galanis, I; Tsolkas, P; Paroutoglu, G; Arvaniti, M; Katsiba, D; Baltaglannis, S; Pilpilidis, I; Papagiannis, A; Vaslliadis, I

    2002-10-01

    A traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract is rarely associated with biliary obstruction. However, when it arises in the common bile duct (CBD) and is associated with obstructive jaundice, it is difficult to distinguish it from bile duct cancer. We describe a patient who developed obstructive jaundice and itching, due to CBD stricture, 8 years after innocent blunt abdominal trauma. The stricture was resected and hepatico-jejunal anastomosis was performed. Histological examination revealed a traumatic neuroma and a fibrous scar around the common bile duct. Symptoms disappeared following surgical removal of the lesion. Blunt abdominal injury may cause the late onset of a fibrous scar and traumatic neuroma in the common bile duct. To our knowledge, a traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract after blunt abdominal trauma has not been reported previously. We review the clinical picture of this relatively rare problem, along with its diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

  19. Palisaded Encapsulated (Solitary Circumscribed) Neuroma of the Buccal Mucosa: a Rare Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarbashi-Moghadam, Saede; Lotfi, Ali; Salehi Zalani, Saman; Mokhtari, Sepideh

    2017-12-01

    The rarity of oral soft tissue spindle cell tumors combined with overlapping microscopic patterns can make challenges in their diagnosis and treatment. Oral cavity palisaded encapsulated neuroma is an uncommon lesion which occurs often on the hard palate. It is essential for oral pathologists to be familiar with its histopathology of this lesion is essential since many lesions are probably diagnosed microscopically as neurofibroma or schwannoma. Here, we report a case of oral palisaded encapsulated (solitary circumscribed) neuroma in an unusual site.

  20. A comparison of SONAH and IBEM for near-field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller

    2008-01-01

    Among the popular techniques for acoustic source identification in complex environments are the Statistically Optimal Near Acoustic Holography (SONAH) and the Inverse Boundary Element Method (IBEM). These two methods are quite different regarding the underlying assumptions and the practical...

  1. Ultrasonographic features of traumatic neuromas in breast cancer patients after mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa Sung Sung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic (US features of traumatic neuromas in breast cancer patients after mastectomy. Methods This study was performed with approval from our Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Six traumatic neuromas in five patients were included in this study. The US findings of traumatic neuromas were evaluated retrospectively by two radiologists according to the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS lexicon. The final assessment was also recorded. Results On US, all six lesions presented as a mass within the pectoralis muscle layer (mean size, 4.8 mm; range, 3.9 to 5.5 mm. Of the six masses, four had an oval shape with a circumscribed margin, and two had an irregular shape and an indistinct margin. They were all hypoechoic. Two lesions showed a non-parallel orientation. On color Doppler examinations, two lesions showed internal vascularity. Strain elastography was performed for four neuromas, resulting in scores of 1 (n=1, 4 (n=2, and 5 (n=1. The final assessment categories were BI-RADS 3 (n=2, 4A (n=2, and 4B (n=2. Conclusion On US, an oval shape, circumscribed margin, parallel orientation, and hypoechogenicity were the most frequent features of traumatic neuromas in breast cancer patients after mastectomy. Neuromas may show increased vascularity on color Doppler imaging and present as a hard mass on elastography.

  2. Ultrasonographic features of traumatic neuromas in breast cancer patients after mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Hwa Sung; Kim, Young Seon [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic (US) features of traumatic neuromas in breast cancer patients after mastectomy. This study was performed with approval from our Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Six traumatic neuromas in five patients were included in this study. The US findings of traumatic neuromas were evaluated retrospectively by two radiologists according to the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. The final assessment was also recorded. On US, all six lesions presented as a mass within the pectoralis muscle layer (mean size, 4.8 mm; range, 3.9 to 5.5 mm). Of the six masses, four had an oval shape with a circumscribed margin, and two had an irregular shape and an indistinct margin. They were all hypoechoic. Two lesions showed a non-parallel orientation. On color Doppler examinations, two lesions showed internal vascularity. Strain elastography was performed for four neuromas, resulting in scores of 1 (n=1), 4 (n=2), and 5 (n=1). The final assessment categories were BI-RADS 3 (n=2), 4A (n=2), and 4B (n=2). On US, an oval shape, circumscribed margin, parallel orientation, and hypoechogenicity were the most frequent features of traumatic neuromas in breast cancer patients after mastectomy. Neuromas may show increased vascularity on color Doppler imaging and present as a hard mass on elastography.

  3. A Comparison of Acoustic Field Measurement by a Microphone and by an Optical Interferometric Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bálek

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to show that our optical method for measuring acoustic pressure is in some way superior to measurement using a microphone. Measurement of the integral acoustic pressure in the air by a laser interferometric probe is compared with measurement using a microphone. We determined the particular harmonic components in the acoustic field in the case of relatively high acoustic power in the ultrasonic frequency range.

  4. A comparison of partially specular radiosity and ray tracing for room acoustics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, C. Walter; Muehleisen, Ralph T.

    2005-04-01

    Partially specular (PS) radiosity is an extended form of the general radiosity method. Acoustic radiosity is a form of bulk transfer of radiant acoustic energy. This bulk transfer is accomplished through a system of energy balance equations that relate the bulk energy transfer of each surface in the system to all other surfaces in the system. Until now acoustic radiosity has been limited to modeling only diffuse surface reflection. The new PS acoustic radiosity method can model all real surface types, diffuse, specular and everything in between. PS acoustic radiosity also models all real source types and distributions, not just point sources. The results of the PS acoustic radiosity method are compared to those of well known ray tracing programs. [Work supported by NSF.

  5. Software for objective comparison of vocal acoustic features over weeks of audio recording: KLFromRecordingDays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Soderstrom

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available KLFromRecordingDays allows measurement of Kullback–Leibler (KL distances between 2D probability distributions of vocal acoustic features. Greater KL distance measures reflect increased phonological divergence across the vocalizations compared. The software has been used to compare *.wav file recordings made by Sound Analysis Recorder 2011 of songbird vocalizations pre- and post-drug and surgical manipulations. Recordings from individual animals in *.wav format are first organized into subdirectories by recording day and then segmented into individual syllables uttered and acoustic features of these syllables using Sound Analysis Pro 2011 (SAP. KLFromRecordingDays uses syllable acoustic feature data output by SAP to a MySQL table to generate and compare “template” (typically pre-treatment and “target” (typically post-treatment probability distributions. These distributions are a series of virtual 2D plots of the duration of each syllable (as x-axis to each of 13 other acoustic features measured by SAP for that syllable (as y-axes. Differences between “template” and “target” probability distributions for each acoustic feature are determined by calculating KL distance, a measure of divergence of the target 2D distribution pattern from that of the template. KL distances and the mean KL distance across all acoustic features are calculated for each recording day and output to an Excel spreadsheet. Resulting data for individual subjects may then be pooled across treatment groups and graphically summarized and used for statistical comparisons. Because SAP-generated MySQL files are accessed directly, data limits associated with spreadsheet output are avoided, and the totality of vocal output over weeks may be objectively analyzed all at once. The software has been useful for measuring drug effects on songbird vocalizations and assessing recovery from damage to regions of vocal motor cortex. It may be useful in studies employing other

  6. Software for objective comparison of vocal acoustic features over weeks of audio recording: KLFromRecordingDays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderstrom, Ken; Alalawi, Ali

    KLFromRecordingDays allows measurement of Kullback-Leibler (KL) distances between 2D probability distributions of vocal acoustic features. Greater KL distance measures reflect increased phonological divergence across the vocalizations compared. The software has been used to compare *.wav file recordings made by Sound Analysis Recorder 2011 of songbird vocalizations pre- and post-drug and surgical manipulations. Recordings from individual animals in *.wav format are first organized into subdirectories by recording day and then segmented into individual syllables uttered and acoustic features of these syllables using Sound Analysis Pro 2011 (SAP). KLFromRecordingDays uses syllable acoustic feature data output by SAP to a MySQL table to generate and compare "template" (typically pre-treatment) and "target" (typically post-treatment) probability distributions. These distributions are a series of virtual 2D plots of the duration of each syllable (as x-axis) to each of 13 other acoustic features measured by SAP for that syllable (as y-axes). Differences between "template" and "target" probability distributions for each acoustic feature are determined by calculating KL distance, a measure of divergence of the target 2D distribution pattern from that of the template. KL distances and the mean KL distance across all acoustic features are calculated for each recording day and output to an Excel spreadsheet. Resulting data for individual subjects may then be pooled across treatment groups and graphically summarized and used for statistical comparisons. Because SAP-generated MySQL files are accessed directly, data limits associated with spreadsheet output are avoided, and the totality of vocal output over weeks may be objectively analyzed all at once. The software has been useful for measuring drug effects on songbird vocalizations and assessing recovery from damage to regions of vocal motor cortex. It may be useful in studies employing other species, and as part of speech

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Hyaluronic Acid Injection for the Management of Morton's Neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; Hwang, Il-Yeong; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Lee, Jae Woo; Kang, Seung Woo

    2018-02-01

    Morton's neuroma is one of the common causes of forefoot pain. In the present study, hyaluronic acid injection was performed on patients to determine the efficacy and adverse effects of hyaluronic acid in management of Morton's neuroma. Eighty-three patients with Morton's neuroma in their third intermetatarsal space with definite Mulder's click were included in the study. Those with severe forefoot deformities such as forefoot cavus or hallux valgus on plain X-rays were excluded. Ultrasound-guided hyaluronic acid injections were performed on all patients weekly for 3 weeks. Pain during walking using visual analogue scale (VAS) and AOFAS Forefoot Scale were prospectively evaluated preinjection, and at 2, 4, 6, 12 months postinjection. Significant improvement in VAS and AOFAS Forefoot Scale were seen overall at 2 months after hyaluronic acid injections ( P hyaluronic injection was clinically effective for pain relief and functional improvement for at least 12 months in patients with Morton's neuroma. However, numbness associated with Morton's neuroma should be addressed more cautiously since it may persist without much improvement. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  8. A comparison of point counts with a new acoustic sampling method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We showed that the estimates of species richness, abundance and community composition based on point counts and post-hoc laboratory listening to acoustic samples are very similar, especially for a distance limited up to 50 m. Species that were frequently missed during both point counts and listening to acoustic samples ...

  9. Three Cycles of Radiofrequency Ablation Are More Efficacious Than Two in the Management of Morton's Neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David; Parr, Adam; Bryceson, William

    2018-04-01

    Morton's neuroma is a common cause of forefoot pain. Outcomes of conservative therapy are mixed and many patients undergo operative intervention. Radiofrequency ablation has recently gained favor as a treatment option, although the optimal regime is unknown. This study investigates the effectiveness of 2 versus 3 cycles of radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of Morton's neuroma. We surveyed a cohort of patients with Morton's neuroma who had progressed to radiofrequency ablation after failed conservative treatment. Patients received either 2 or 3 cycles of radiofrequency ablation by a single surgeon. We assessed patients based on their change in numerical pain rating scale, symptom improvement, complications, and progression to surgical excision through a series of telephone interviews. Outcomes between the 2 treatment arms were compared by parametric tests. Twenty-eight patients were included in the study. Eighteen patients with 21 neuromas received 2 cycles and 10 patients with 11 neuromas received 3 cycles. Mean time of follow-up was 12.9 months. Overall, 88% of patients were either very or moderately satisfied with their outcome. In patients who received 2 cycles mean numerical pain scores decreased from 7.9 ± 1.1 to 3.4 ± 2.4 postprocedure. Three patients progressed to operative excision. In patients who received 3 cycles, numerical pain scores decreased from 8.0 ± 1.0 to 1.5 ± 2.0 postprocedure. One patient progressed to operative excision. Patients who received 3 cycles had reduced medium-term pain postoperatively compared with 2 cycles (3.4 ± 2.4 vs 1.5 ± 2.0, P = .011). Radiofrequency ablation provides a high rate of patient satisfaction in the treatment of Morton's neuroma with few side effects. It appears that 3 cycles may be superior to 2 cycles but a randomized controlled trial will be required to confirm these results. Intervention, Level III: Comparative study without concurrent controls.

  10. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  11. Filippo Civinini (1805-1844 and the discovery of plantar neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathological abnormality (neuroma related to the painful foot condition commonly called “Morton’s metatarsalgia” was first observed in 1835 by Filippo Civinini (1805-1844 of Pistoia, in course of a cadaverous dissection, and clearly described in the anatomic letter entitled “Su un nervoso gangliare rigonfiamento alla pianta del piede” (“On the neural gangliar swelling of the foot sole”. In this study a brief review on the history of Morton’s metatarsalgia is carried out, and the importance of Civinini in the discovery of the neuroma of the III intermetatarsal web is underlined.

  12. Comparison between sensitivities of quality control methods using ultrasonic waves, radiography and acoustic emission for the thick welded joint testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, Michel; Birac, Claude

    1981-09-01

    The testing of the thick welded joints of the nuclear industry is carried out by radiography and ultrasonics on completion of welding. When a fault is found, its repair requires a sometimes deep cut down to the position of the fault, then filling in of the cut by hand welding with a coated electrode. This very costly operation also involves the risk of causing new defects when building up by hand. Listening to the acoustic emission during the welding has been considered in order to seek the possibility of detecting defects when they appear, or soon after. The industrial use of this method would make an instant repair of the defective areas possible at less cost and with greater reliability. The study presented concerns the comparison between the results of the various non-destructive testing methods: radiography, ultrasonics and acoustic emission, for a thick welded joint in which the defects have been brought about [fr

  13. Acoustic design of open-plan offices and comparison of requirements in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Claus Møller; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2018-01-01

    In the Nordic countries, most office buildings include open-plan offices. However, to optimize working conditions, such spaces require special acoustic design to obtain reasonable sound attenuation between groups and satisfactory speech intelligibility internally in groups, although optimal worki...

  14. Comparison of PAM Systems for Acoustic Monitoring and Further Risk Mitigation Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Stefan; Kreimeyer, Roman; Knoll, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    We present results of the SIRENA 2011 research cruises conducted by the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) and joined by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Geophysics (FWG), Bundeswehr Technical Centre (WTD 71) and the Universities of Kiel and Pavia. The cruises were carried out in the Ligurian Sea. The main aim of the FWG was to test and evaluate the newly developed towed hydrophone array as a passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tool for risk mitigation applications. The system was compared with the PAM equipment used by the other participating institutions. Recorded sounds were used to improve an automatic acoustic classifier for marine mammals, and validated acoustic detections by observers were compared with the results of the classifier.

  15. A comparison of auditory evoked potentials to acoustic beats and to binaural beats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Hillel; Starr, Arnold; Michalewski, Henry J; Dimitrijevic, Andrew; Bleich, Naomi; Mittelman, Nomi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cortical brain responses evoked by amplitude modulated acoustic beats of 3 and 6 Hz in tones of 250 and 1000 Hz with those evoked by their binaural beats counterparts in unmodulated tones to indicate whether the cortical processes involved differ. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to 3- and 6-Hz acoustic and binaural beats in 2000 ms duration 250 and 1000 Hz tones presented with approximately 1 s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source current density estimates of ERP components to beats-evoked oscillations were determined and compared across beat types, beat frequencies and base (carrier) frequencies. All stimuli evoked tone-onset components followed by oscillations corresponding to the beat frequency, and a subsequent tone-offset complex. Beats-evoked oscillations were higher in amplitude in response to acoustic than to binaural beats, to 250 than to 1000 Hz base frequency and to 3 Hz than to 6 Hz beat frequency. Sources of the beats-evoked oscillations across all stimulus conditions located mostly to left temporal lobe areas. Differences between estimated sources of potentials to acoustic and binaural beats were not significant. The perceptions of binaural beats involve cortical activity that is not different than acoustic beats in distribution and in the effects of beat- and base frequency, indicating similar cortical processing. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  17. Comparison of radio-telemetric home range analysis and acoustic detection for Little Brown Bat habitat evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    With dramatic declines of bat populations due to mortality caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (White-nose Syndrome), assessing habitat preferences of bats in the northeastern US is now critical to guide the development of regional conservation efforts. In the summer of 2012, we conducted fixed-station simultaneous telemetry to determine nocturnal spatial use and fixed-kernel home-range estimates of available habitat of a Myotis lucifugus (Le Conte) (Little Brown Bat) maternity colony in an artificial bat house. In summers of 2011 and 2012, we also deployed a 52-ha grid of 4 × 4 Anabat acoustic detectors over five 6–8-day sampling periods in various riparian and non-riparian environments in close proximity to the same bat house. The mean telemetry home range of 143 ha for bats (n = 7) completely overlapped the acoustic grid. Rankings of habitats from telemetry data for these 7 bats and 5 additional bats not included in home-range calculations but added for habitat-use measures (n = 13) revealed a higher proportional use of forested riparian habitats than other types at the landscape scale. Pair-wise comparisons of habitats indicated that bats were found significantly closer to forested riparian habitats and forests than to open water, developed areas, fields, shrublands, or wetland habitats at the landscape scale. Acoustic sampling showed that naïve occupancy was 0.8 and 0.6 and mean nightly detection probabilities were 0.23 and 0.08 at riparian and non-riparian sites, respectively. Our findings suggest that Little Brown Bats select forested riparian and forested habitats for foraging at the landscape scale but may be most easily detected acoustically at riparian sites when a simple occupancy determination for an area is required.

  18. A comparison of auditory evoked potentials to acoustic beats and to binaural beats

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, H; Starr, A; Michalewski, HJ; Dimitrijevic, A; Bleich, N; Mittelman, N

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cortical brain responses evoked by amplitude modulated acoustic beats of 3 and 6 Hz in tones of 250 and 1000 Hz with those evoked by their binaural beats counterparts in unmodulated tones to indicate whether the cortical processes involved differ. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded to 3- and 6-Hz acoustic and binaural beats in 2000 ms duration 250 and 1000 Hz tones presented with approximately 1 s intervals. Latency, amplitude and source cur...

  19. Analysis of shallow water experimental acoustic data including normal mode model comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McHugh, R.; Simons, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    Ss part of a propagation model validation exercise experimental acoustic and oceanographic data was collected from a shallow-water, long-range channel, off the west coast of Scotland. Temporal variability effects in this channel were assessed through visual inspection of stacked plots, each of which

  20. Comparison of Comet Enflow and VA One Acoustic-to-Structure Power Flow Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2010-01-01

    Comet Enflow is a commercially available, high frequency vibroacoustic analysis software based on the Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA). In this method the same finite element mesh used for structural and acoustic analysis can be employed for the high frequency solutions. Comet Enflow is being validated for a floor-equipped composite cylinder by comparing the EFEA vibroacoustic response predictions with Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) results from the commercial software program VA One from ESI Group. Early in this program a number of discrepancies became apparent in the Enflow predicted response for the power flow from an acoustic space to a structural subsystem. The power flow anomalies were studied for a simple cubic, a rectangular and a cylindrical structural model connected to an acoustic cavity. The current investigation focuses on three specific discrepancies between the Comet Enflow and the VA One predictions: the Enflow power transmission coefficient relative to the VA One coupling loss factor; the importance of the accuracy of the acoustic modal density formulation used within Enflow; and the recommended use of fast solvers in Comet Enflow. The frequency region of interest for this study covers the one-third octave bands with center frequencies from 16 Hz to 4000 Hz.

  1. Comparison of Medical and Voice Therapy for reflux Laryngitis Based on Acoustic and Laryngeal Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Dehestani Ardakani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reflux laryngitis is extremely common among patients with voice disorder. Medical therapy approaches are not efficient enough. The main goal of this study is to assess the acoustic and laryngeal characteristics of patients with dysphonia before and after medical or voice therapy, and to evaluate the effectiveness of each.Methods: In this retrospective study, 16 reflux laryngitis patients were assessed. Five received complete voice therapy, tow ceased voice therapy and nine received medication. Perceptual voice evaluation was performed by a speech-language pathologist, the severity of voice problem was calculated, based on the affected acoustic and laryngeal characteristics pre- and post-treatment.Results: Post-treatment evaluation in patients who received complete voice therapy indicates 80 percent improvement in the severity of disorder and 100 percent improvement in the perceptual voice evaluation. After medical therapy, we observed that voice disorder and perceptual voice evaluation are improved 44 and 66 percent respectively. The improvement was statistically significant in both treatment approaches: complete voice therapy (P=0.039 and medical therapy (p=0.017.Conclusion: In patients with reflux laryngitis, most acoustic and laryngeal characteristics were normal and satisfying after the treatment. It can be concluded that the proficiency of voice therapy in improving the acoustic and laryngeal characteristics is comparable to medical therapy

  2. Acoustical and Perceptual Comparison of Noise Reduction and Compression in Hearing Aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    Noise reduction and dynamic-range compression are generally applied together in hearing aids but may have opposite effects on amplification. This study evaluated the acoustical and perceptual effects of separate and combined processing of noise reduction and compression. Recordings of the output of

  3. Comparisons of auditorium acoustics measurements as a function of location in halls (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, J. S.; Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    In a measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls measurements were made at 30 or more combinations of source and receiver position in each hall. Each of the three measurement teams (the University of Florida, the Danish Technical University, and the National Research Council of Canada) made paral....... The measurement results were also used to examine the influence of different measurement equipment and measurement procedures on the within hall variations of the various acoustical quantities. [Work partially supported by the Concert Hall Research Group.]...... parallel measurements of a number of modern room acoustics quantities using different equipment and measurement procedures. These results are compared on a seat-by-seat basis and the differences are explained in terms of earlier systematic studies of the effects of measurement procedure details...

  4. Investigations of the efficiency of acoustical holography especially in comparison to focussed beams in NDT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the project, the basic knowledge for the practicable application of the linear acoustical holography has been developed. For the application and construction of focusing probes the most important parameters have been determined. The activities for the holography with numerical construction have been concentrated on the reconstruction procedure, the probes, the manipulation and the external controle of time gates. The optimal parameters for holographic scannings have been determined. Practical experiences are showing an acceptable agreement between reconstruction and real flaw sizes, depending on the kind and position of the flaws. The acoustical holography seems to be especially suited for the determination of flaw extensions in depth whereas focusing probes can be applied with more advantage for the extensions in length. (orig.) [de

  5. Comparison of microscopic and endoscopic view of the internal acoustic meatus: A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montibeller, Guilherme Ramina; Hendrix, Philipp; Fries, Fabian N; Becker, Kurt W; Oertel, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    The endoscope is thought to provide an improved exposure of the internal acoustic meatus after retrosigmoid craniotomy for microsurgical resection of intrameatal tumors. The aim of this study is to quantify the differences in internal acoustic meatus (IAM) exposure comparing microscopic and endoscopic visualization. A retrosigmoid approach was performed on 5 cadaver heads. A millimeter gauge was introduced into the internal acoustic meatus, and examinations with a surgical microscope and 0°, 30° and 70° rigid endoscopes were performed. The extent of IAM depth visualized with the microscope and the different angled endoscopes were analyzed. The microscopic view allowed an average IAM depth visualization of 2.8 mm. The endoscope allowed an improved exposure of IAM in all cases. The 0°, 30° and 70° endoscopes permitted an exposure that was respectively 96% (5.5 mm), 139% (6.7 mm) and 200% (8.4 mm) more lateral than the microscopic view. Angled optics, however, provided an image distortion, specifically the 70° endoscope. The endoscope provides a superior visualization of the IAM compared to the microscope when using a retrosigmoid approach. The 30° endoscope represented an ideal compromise of superior visualization with marginal image distortion. Additional implementation of the endoscope into microsurgery of intrameatal tumors likely facilitates complete tumor removal and might spare facial and vestibulocochlear function. Clin. Anat. 31:398-403, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Traumatic Neuroma in a Breast Cancer Patient After Modified Radical Mastectomy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Young; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Tae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ku Sang [Dept. of Surgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Yim, Hyunee [Dept. of Pathology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Traumatic neuromas are rare benign lesions that develop from non-neoplastic proliferation of axons, schwann cells, and fibroblasts at the proximal end of transected or injured nerves as a result of trauma or surgery. We present the case of a traumatic neuroma in a 47-year-old female who was treated with a right modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer 14 years ago. Ultrasound examination revealed an oval-shaped hypoechoic nodule at the 9-O'clock position in the right chest wall. Color Doppler imaging showed no increased blood flow and a positron emission tomography-computed tomography examination revealed no fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in this nodule. The typical histologic findings were present.

  7. Traumatic Neuroma in a Breast Cancer Patient After Modified Radical Mastectomy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Young; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Kim, Tae Hee; Kim, Ku Sang; Yim, Hyunee

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic neuromas are rare benign lesions that develop from non-neoplastic proliferation of axons, schwann cells, and fibroblasts at the proximal end of transected or injured nerves as a result of trauma or surgery. We present the case of a traumatic neuroma in a 47-year-old female who was treated with a right modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer 14 years ago. Ultrasound examination revealed an oval-shaped hypoechoic nodule at the 9-O'clock position in the right chest wall. Color Doppler imaging showed no increased blood flow and a positron emission tomography-computed tomography examination revealed no fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in this nodule. The typical histologic findings were present.

  8. A comparison of inverse boundary element method and near-field acoustical holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuhmacher, Andreas; Hald, Jørgen; Saemann, E.-U.

    1999-01-01

    An inverse boundary element method (IBEM) is used to estimate the surface velocity of a rolling tyre from measurements of the near-field pressure. Subsequently, the sound pressure is calculated over a finite plane surface next to the tyre from the reconstructed velocity field on the tyre surface........ In order to verify the reconstruction process, part of the measurement data is used together with Near-Field Acoustical Holography (NAH). Estimated distributions of sound pressure and particle velocity over a plane surface obtained from the two methods are compared....

  9. Manual therapy in the management of a patient with a symptomatic Morton's Neuroma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sault, Josiah D; Morris, Matthew V; Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2016-02-01

    Patients with Morton's neuroma are rarely referred to physical therapy. This case reports the resolution of pain, increase in local pressure pain thresholds, and improvement of scores on the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure following a course of joint based manual therapy for a patient who had failed standard conservative medical treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroma prevention by end-to-side neurorraphy: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszmann, Oskar C; Korak, Klaus J; Rab, Matthias; Grünbeck, Matthias; Lassmann, Hans; Frey, Manfred

    2003-11-01

    The successful treatment of painful neuromas remains a difficult goal to attain. In this report we explore the feasibility of neuroma prevention by insertion of the proximal end of a nerve through an end-to-side neurorraphy into an adjacent mixed nerve to provide a pathway and target for axons deprived of their end organ. Experiments were performed on a total of twenty 250-g Sprague-Dawley rats. Two groups of 10 animals were prepared. Group A served as an anatomic control. In group B the right saphenous nerve was transected and implanted end-to-side through an epineurial window into the tibial nerve distal to the trifurcation of the sciatic nerve. After 12 weeks the corresponding sensory neurons were identified by retrograde labeling techniques and histomorphometric analysis of the proximal and distal tibial nerve segments, and regular histology of the end-to-side site were performed. The results of the retrograde labeling of the corresponding sensory neuron pool of the saphenus nerve showed extensive labelling of the L1 to L3 spinal ganglions after intracutaneous tracer application of the planta pedis. The morphology of the end-to-side coaptation site and histomorphologic analysis prove that sensory neurons penetrate the perineurial sheath and axons regenerate along the tibial Schwann cell tubes toward their targets. Axons of a severed peripheral nerve that are provided with a pathway and target through an end-to-side coaptation will either be pruned or establish some type of end-organ contact so that a neuroma can be prevented. Whether these axons will lead to disturbing sensations such as paresthesia or dysesthesia in the newly found environment or remain silent codwellers, this experiment cannot answer. Long-term results of future clinical work will have to decide whether the prevention of the neuroma through end-to-side coaptation will be an appropriate therapy for this difficult problem.

  11. Ultrasound versus magnetic resonance imaging for Morton neuroma: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bignotti, Bianca; Martinoli, Carlo [University of Genoa, Radiology Department, Genoa, Genova (Italy); Signori, Alessio; Sormani, Maria Pia [University of Genoa, Institute of Statistics, Department of Health Sciences, Genoa (Italy); Molfetta, Luigi [University of Genoa, Department of Neurosciences, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics (DINOGMI), Genoa (Italy); Tagliafico, Alberto [University of Genoa, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    To compare ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma. Studies that assessed the diagnostic accuracy of US and MRI for Morton's neuroma were retrieved from major medical libraries independently by two reviewers up to 1 April 2014. Predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria were adopted. 277 studies were initially found, and the meta-analysis was conducted on 14 studies. US sensitivity was studied in five studies, MRI sensitivity in three studies, and both in six studies. All studies used surgery as the reference standard. A high sensitivity (SE) of diagnostic testing was observed for both US (SE (95 % CI) = 0.91 (0.83-0.96)) and MRI (SE (95 % CI) = 0.90 (0.82-0.96)) with no significant differences between the two modalities in diagnosis (Q test p = 0.88). For MRI, specificity of test was 1.00 with a pooled estimation of 1.00 (0.73-1.00), while the pooled specificity was 0.854 (95 % CI: 0.41-1.00) for US. No differences were observed between US and MRI in study design (p = 0.76). This meta-analysis shows that the SE of US (0.91) is equal to (p = 0.88) that of MRI (0.90) for identification of Morton's neuroma. (orig.)

  12. Novel model for end-neuroma formation in the amputated rabbit forelimb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuiken Todd A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The forelimb amputee poses many reconstructive challenges in the clinical setting, and there is a paucity of established surgical models for study. To further elucidate the pathogenic process in amputation neuroma formation, we created a reproducible, well-tolerated rabbit forelimb amputation model. Methods Upon approval from the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, 5 New Zealand White rabbits underwent left forelimb amputation. During this initial surgery, the median, radial and ulnar nerves were transected 1.6-2.5 (mean 2.0 cm distal to the brachial plexus, transposed onto the anterior chest wall and preserved at length. Six weeks subsequent to the amputation, the distal 5 mm of each neuroma was excised, and the remaining stump underwent histomorphometric analysis. Results The nerve cross sectional areas increased by factors of 1.99, 3.17, and 2.59 in the median (p = 0.077, radial (p Conclusion Given that the surgical model appears well-tolerated by the rabbits and that patterns of morphologic change are consistent and reproducible, we are encouraged to further investigate the utility of this model in the pathogenesis of neuroma formation.

  13. T1-nerve root neuroma presenting with apical mass and Horner's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podnar Simon

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appearance of dumbbell neuroma of the first thoracic root is extremely rare. The extradural component of a T1-dumbbell neuroma may present as an apical mass. The diagnosis of hand weakness is complex and may be delayed in T1-neuroma because of absence of the palpable cervical mass. One-stage removal of a T1-root neuroma and its intrathoracic extension demanded an extended posterior midline approach in the sitting position. Case presentation A 51-year old man had suffered a traumatic partial tendon rupture of his wrist flexor muscles 6 years ago. Since the incident he occasionally felt fullness and tenderness in the affected forearm with some tingling in his fingers bilaterally. During the last two years the hand weakness was continuous and hypotrophy of the medial flexor and intrinsic hand muscles had become apparent. Electrophysiological studies revealed an ulnar neuropathy in addition to mild median and radial nerve dysfunction, including a mild contralateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The diagnostic work-up for multiple mononeuropathy in the upper extremity was negative. Repeated electrophysiological studies revealed fibrillations in the C7 paravertebral muscles on the affected side. Chest x-ray revealed a large round apical mass on the affected side. A Horner's syndrome was noted at this point of diagnostic work-up. MRI of the cervical and thoracic spine revealed a dumbbell T1 neuroma enlarging the intervertebral foramen at T1-2 and a 5 cm large extradural tumor with extension into the apex of the ipsilateral lung. The patient underwent surgery in sitting position using a left dorsal midline approach. Although the T1 root could not be preserved, the patient's neurological condition was unchanged after the surgery. Conclusion Extended posterior midline exposure described here using hemilaminectomy, unilateral facetectomy and costo-transversectomy is efficient and safe for one-stage removal of dumbbell tumors at the T1

  14. An evidence-based case of acoustic/vestibular schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A vestibular schwannoma, often called an acoustic neuroma/schwannoma, is a benign primary intracranial tumor of the myelin-forming cells of the vestibulo-cochlear nerve (8 th cranial nerve. This tumor arises from the Schwann cells responsible for the myelin sheath that helps keep peripheral nerves insulated. [1] Approximately, 3000 cases are diagnosed each year in the United States with a prevalence of about 1 in 100,000 worldwide. It comprises 5-10% of all intracranial neoplasms in adults. Incidence peaks in the fifth and sixth decades and both sexes are affected equally. Studies in Denmark published in 2004 show the incidence of 17.4/million. Most acoustic neuromas are diagnosed in patients between the ages of 30 and 60, and men and women appear to be affected equally. [2] The case illustrated here is a rare one of acoustic/vestibular schwannoma a surgical conditions, treated with Lycopodium, which produced improvement on both subjective and objective parameters.

  15. A comparison of decentralized, distributed, and centralized vibro-acoustic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Kenneth D; Baumann, Oliver N; Gardonio, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    Direct velocity feedback control of structures is well known to increase structural damping and thus reduce vibration. In multi-channel systems the way in which the velocity signals are used to inform the actuators ranges from decentralized control, through distributed or clustered control to fully centralized control. The objective of distributed controllers is to exploit the anticipated performance advantage of the centralized control while maintaining the scalability, ease of implementation, and robustness of decentralized control. However, and in seeming contradiction, some investigations have concluded that decentralized control performs as well as distributed and centralized control, while other results have indicated that distributed control has significant performance advantages over decentralized control. The purpose of this work is to explain this seeming contradiction in results, to explore the effectiveness of decentralized, distributed, and centralized vibro-acoustic control, and to expand the concept of distributed control to include the distribution of the optimization process and the cost function employed.

  16. Retrieving Tract Variables From Acoustics: A Comparison of Different Machine Learning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Vikramjit; Nam, Hosung; Espy-Wilson, Carol Y; Saltzman, Elliot; Goldstein, Louis

    2010-09-13

    Many different studies have claimed that articulatory information can be used to improve the performance of automatic speech recognition systems. Unfortunately, such articulatory information is not readily available in typical speaker-listener situations. Consequently, such information has to be estimated from the acoustic signal in a process which is usually termed "speech-inversion." This study aims to propose and compare various machine learning strategies for speech inversion: Trajectory mixture density networks (TMDNs), feedforward artificial neural networks (FF-ANN), support vector regression (SVR), autoregressive artificial neural network (AR-ANN), and distal supervised learning (DSL). Further, using a database generated by the Haskins Laboratories speech production model, we test the claim that information regarding constrictions produced by the distinct organs of the vocal tract (vocal tract variables) is superior to flesh-point information (articulatory pellet trajectories) for the inversion process.

  17. Feasibility of the left ventricular volume measurement by acoustic quantification method. Comparison with ultrafast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimoto, Shigehiro; Nakatani, Satoshi; Tanaka, Norio; Uematsu, Masaaki; Beppu, Shintaro; Nagata, Seiki; Hamada, Seiki; Takamiya, Makoto; Miyatake, Kunio

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic quantification (AQ: the real-time automated boundary detection system) allows instantaneous measurement of cardiac chamber volumes. The feasibility of this method was evaluated by comparing the left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with AQ to those derived from ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT), which enables accurate measurements of LV volumes even in the presence of LV asynergy, in 23 patients (8 with ischemic heart disease, 5 with cardiomyopathy, 3 with valvular heart disease). Both LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes obtained with the AQ method were in good agreement with those obtained with UFCT (y=1.04χ-16.9, r=0.95; y=0.87χ+15.7, r=0.91; respectively). AQ was reliable even in the presence of LV asynergy. Interobserver variability for the AQ measurement was 10.2%. AQ provides a new, clinically useful method for real-time accurate estimation of the left ventricular volume. (author)

  18. Feasibility of the left ventricular volume measurement by acoustic quantification method. Comparison with ultrafast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomimoto, Shigehiro; Nakatani, Satoshi; Tanaka, Norio; Uematsu, Masaaki; Beppu, Shintaro; Nagata, Seiki; Hamada, Seiki; Takamiya, Makoto; Miyatake, Kunio [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic quantification (AQ: the real-time automated boundary detection system) allows instantaneous measurement of cardiac chamber volumes. The feasibility of this method was evaluated by comparing the left ventricular (LV) volumes obtained with AQ to those derived from ultrafast computed tomography (UFCT), which enables accurate measurements of LV volumes even in the presence of LV asynergy, in 23 patients (8 with ischemic heart disease, 5 with cardiomyopathy, 3 with valvular heart disease). Both LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes obtained with the AQ method were in good agreement with those obtained with UFCT (y=1.04{chi}-16.9, r=0.95; y=0.87{chi}+15.7, r=0.91; respectively). AQ was reliable even in the presence of LV asynergy. Interobserver variability for the AQ measurement was 10.2%. AQ provides a new, clinically useful method for real-time accurate estimation of the left ventricular volume. (author).

  19. Comparison of procedures for determination of acoustic nonlinearity of some inhomogeneous materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1983-01-01

    for an evaluation of the second order nonlinearity ratio B/A as a tissue characterizing parameter on a par with attenuation, impedance, etc. The several techniques used for the determination of B/A roughly fall into two main groups, finite-amplitude methods and thermo-dynamic-acoustic methods. The B/A values...... determined using various techniques of the two main groups are strongly scattered, showing a dependence on the procedure used, which makes it difficult to draw any valid conclusions. The paper discusses advantages and disadvantages of the techniques used hitherto, aiming at an explanation of the reasons...... for the deviations between the present B/A results for biological media. The necessary accuracy in the determination and the reliability in the exploitation of B/A as a tissue characterizing parameter for clinical use are emphasized....

  20. Visual and acoustic communication in non-human animals: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, G G; Ryan, M J

    2000-09-01

    The visual and auditory systems are two major sensory modalities employed in communication. Although communication in these two sensory modalities can serve analogous functions and evolve in response to similar selection forces, the two systems also operate under different constraints imposed by the environment and the degree to which these sensory modalities are recruited for non-communication functions. Also, the research traditions in each tend to differ, with studies of mechanisms of acoustic communication tending to take a more reductionist tack often concentrating on single signal parameters, and studies of visual communication tending to be more concerned with multivariate signal arrays in natural environments and higher level processing of such signals. Each research tradition would benefit by being more expansive in its approach.

  1. Cardiac auscultation training of medical students: a comparison of electronic sensor-based and acoustic stethoscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyte, Henning; Jensen, Torstein; Gjesdal, Knut

    2005-01-01

    Background To determine whether the use of an electronic, sensor based stethoscope affects the cardiac auscultation skills of undergraduate medical students. Methods Forty eight third year medical students were randomized to use either an electronic stethoscope, or a conventional acoustic stethoscope during clinical auscultation training. After a training period of four months, cardiac auscultation skills were evaluated using four patients with different cardiac murmurs. Two experienced cardiologists determined correct answers. The students completed a questionnaire for each patient. The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points. Results No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65). Grading and characterisation of murmurs and, if present, report of non existing murmurs were also rated. None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups. Conclusion Whether an electronic or a conventional stethoscope was used during training and testing did not affect the students' performance on a cardiac auscultation test. PMID:15882458

  2. Cardiac auscultation training of medical students: a comparison of electronic sensor-based and acoustic stethoscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Torstein

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether the use of an electronic, sensor based stethoscope affects the cardiac auscultation skills of undergraduate medical students. Methods Forty eight third year medical students were randomized to use either an electronic stethoscope, or a conventional acoustic stethoscope during clinical auscultation training. After a training period of four months, cardiac auscultation skills were evaluated using four patients with different cardiac murmurs. Two experienced cardiologists determined correct answers. The students completed a questionnaire for each patient. The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points. Results No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65. Grading and characterisation of murmurs and, if present, report of non existing murmurs were also rated. None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups. Conclusion Whether an electronic or a conventional stethoscope was used during training and testing did not affect the students' performance on a cardiac auscultation test.

  3. Comparison of Visual and Acoustic Emission Observations in a Four Point Bending Experiment on Barre Granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing Qiuyi; Einstein, Herbert H.

    2017-09-01

    We present an experimental study in which a pre-notched specimen of Barre Granite was subjected to four point bending under crack mouth opening displacement control. The experimental observations consisted of load-displacement measurements, acoustic emissions, and photography on a macroscopic ( cm) as well as microscopic ( μm) scale. These observations were compared and analysed to better understand process zone development and crack propagation. Load-displacement data showed that the load reaches its maximum at crack initiation, and the machine input work is constant while the crack propagates. AE moment magnitudes between Mw = -6 to -10 were observed, and focal mechanisms consisted of both shear and tensile components. During process zone development, AE formed a large cloud of events located near the notch tip and then tended to occur away from the notch tip as the crack propagated. Image analysis at the microscopic scale showed that microcracks formed and coalesced during process zone development; specifically, the microcracks initiated in tension and then propagated as a series of en-echelon cracks. In general, the synthesis of the three observations showed that a wider bulb of activity at lower energy tended to occur during process zone development, while crack propagation tended to be more spatially concentrated and contained higher energy.

  4. Speech Perception With Combined Electric-Acoustic Stimulation: A Simulation and Model Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Tobias; Adel, Youssef; Fastl, Hugo; Baumann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to simulate speech perception with combined electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS), verify the advantage of combined stimulation in normal-hearing (NH) subjects, and then compare it with cochlear implant (CI) and EAS user results from the authors' previous study. Furthermore, an automatic speech recognition (ASR) system was built to examine the impact of low-frequency information and is proposed as an applied model to study different hypotheses of the combined-stimulation advantage. Signal-detection-theory (SDT) models were applied to assess predictions of subject performance without the need to assume any synergistic effects. Speech perception was tested using a closed-set matrix test (Oldenburg sentence test), and its speech material was processed to simulate CI and EAS hearing. A total of 43 NH subjects and a customized ASR system were tested. CI hearing was simulated by an aurally adequate signal spectrum analysis and representation, the part-tone-time-pattern, which was vocoded at 12 center frequencies according to the MED-EL DUET speech processor. Residual acoustic hearing was simulated by low-pass (LP)-filtered speech with cutoff frequencies 200 and 500 Hz for NH subjects and in the range from 100 to 500 Hz for the ASR system. Speech reception thresholds were determined in amplitude-modulated noise and in pseudocontinuous noise. Previously proposed SDT models were lastly applied to predict NH subject performance with EAS simulations. NH subjects tested with EAS simulations demonstrated the combined-stimulation advantage. Increasing the LP cutoff frequency from 200 to 500 Hz significantly improved speech reception thresholds in both noise conditions. In continuous noise, CI and EAS users showed generally better performance than NH subjects tested with simulations. In modulated noise, performance was comparable except for the EAS at cutoff frequency 500 Hz where NH subject performance was superior. The ASR system showed similar behavior

  5. Comparison of Estimation Techniques for Vibro-Acoustic Transfer Path Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo França Padilha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibro-acoustic Transfer Path Analysis (TPA is a tool to evaluate the contribution of different energy propagation paths between a source and a receiver, linked to each other by a number of connections. TPA is typically used to quantify and rank the relative importance of these paths in a given frequency band, determining the most significant one to the receiver. Basically, two quantities have to be determined for TPA: the operational forces at each transfer path and the Frequency Response Functions (FRF of these paths. The FRF are obtained either experimentally or analytically, and the influence of the mechanical impedance of the source can be taken into account or not. The operational forces can be directly obtained from measurements using force transducers or indirectly estimated from auxiliary response measurements. Two methods to obtain the operational forces indirectly – the Complex Stiffness Method (CSM and the Matrix Inversion Method (MIM – associated with two possible configurations to determine the FRF – including and excluding the source impedance – are presented and discussed in this paper. The effect of weak and strong coupling among the paths is also commented considering the techniques previously presented. The main conclusion is that, with the source removed, CSM gives more accurate results. On the other hand, with the source present, MIM is preferable. In the latter case, CSM should be used only if there is a high impedance mismatch between the source and the receiver. Both methods are not affected by a higher or lower degree of coupling among the transfer paths.

  6. Comparison between acoustic radiation force impulse quantification data and perfusion-CT parameters in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, Michael, E-mail: michael.esser@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Schneeweiß, Sven, E-mail: sven.schneeweiss@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Kolb, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.kolb@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Kurucay, Mustafa, E-mail: mustafa.kurucay@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Ruff, Christer, E-mail: christer.ruff@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Nikolaou, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.nikolaou@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Horger, Marius, E-mail: marius.horger@med.uni-tuebingen.de

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • HCC tissue stiffness did not correlate with the degree of tumor vascularization. • HCC tissue stiffness declined while increasing HCC distance to the skin surface. • HCC tissue stiffness showed higher values the larger the respective tumor was. • Poorly differentiated HCCs showed increased values of tumor tissue stiffness. - Abstract: Objective: To find out, if ultrasound elastography of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can predict patterns of tumor perfusion in volume perfusion computed tomography (VPCT). Material and methods: 25 consecutive patients (mean age, 68.9; range, 51–85 years) with liver cirrhosis suspected of HCC underwent VPCT and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography the same day. Quantitative elasticity values were registered, while blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and hepatic perfusion index (HPI) of the HCC lesions were calculated. Additionally, we identified histologic WHO grading, lesion size and localization. The Siemens Acuson S 3000 HELX-System with Virtual Touch™-Software and Siemens Somatom Definition Flash with Syngo{sup ®} software were used. Results: A total of 43 HCC lesions were assessed. Mean shear wave velocity was 2.6 m/s (range, 1.1–4.3 m/s). There was no significant linear correlation between the elasticity values and BF (p = 0.751), BV (p = 0.426) and HPI (p = 0.437). However, elasticity values were higher, the larger the tumor was (p = 0.008). Shear wave velocity declined with increasing distance of the HCC to the skin surface (p = 0.028) and depending on liver segment. In addition, elasticity values were higher in less differentiated HCCs. This trend was not statistically significant (p = 0.842). Conclusion: Tissue elasticity in HCC does not correlate with the degree of tumor vascularization, but calculated values are influenced both by the tumor size and localization inside the liver.

  7. A comparison of acoustic montoring methods for common anurans of the northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Corinne; Donovan, Therese; Mickey, Ruth M.; Katz, Jonathan; Mitchell, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Many anuran monitoring programs now include autonomous recording units (ARUs). These devices collect audio data for extended periods of time with little maintenance and at sites where traditional call surveys might be difficult. Additionally, computer software programs have grown increasingly accurate at automatically identifying the calls of species. However, increased automation may cause increased error. We collected 435 min of audio data with 2 types of ARUs at 10 wetland sites in Vermont and New York, USA, from 1 May to 1 July 2010. For each minute, we determined presence or absence of 4 anuran species (Hyla versicolor, Pseudacris crucifer, Anaxyrus americanus, and Lithobates clamitans) using 1) traditional human identification versus 2) computer-mediated identification with software package, Song Scope® (Wildlife Acoustics, Concord, MA). Detections were compared with a data set consisting of verified calls in order to quantify false positive, false negative, true positive, and true negative rates. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed a strong (P method, and focal species, as well as a trend in the main effect of rain (P = 0.059). Overall, human surveyors had the lowest total error rate (methods. Total error rates varied by species, ranging from 4% for A. americanus to 26% for L. clamitans. The presence of rain may reduce false negative rates. For survey minutes where anurans were known to be calling, the odds of a false negative were increased when fewer individuals of the same species were calling.

  8. Comparison of grain to grain orientation and stiffness mapping by spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy and EBSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, A F; Li, W; Sharples, S; Withers, P J

    2017-07-01

    Our aim was to establish the capability of spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) to map grain orientations and the anisotropy in stiffness at the sub-mm to micron scale by comparing the method with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) undertaken within a scanning electron microscope. In the former the grain orientations are deduced by measuring the spatial variation in elastic modulus; conversely, in EBSD the elastic anisotropy is deduced from direct measurements of the crystal orientations. The two test-cases comprise mapping the fusion zones for large TIG and MMA welds in thick power plant austenitic and ferritic steels, respectively; these are technologically important because, among other things, elastic anisotropy can cause ultrasonic weld inspection methods to become inaccurate because it causes bending in the paths of sound waves. The spatial resolution of SRAS is not as good as that for EBSD (∼100 μm vs. ∼a few nm), nor is the angular resolution (∼1.5° vs. ∼0.5°). However the method can be applied to much larger areas (currently on the order of 300 mm square), is much faster (∼5 times), is cheaper and easier to perform, and it could be undertaken on the manufacturing floor. Given these advantages, particularly to industrial users, and the on-going improvements to the method, SRAS has the potential to become a standard method for orientation mapping, particularly in cases where the elastic anisotropy is important over macroscopic/component length scales. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Comparison of acoustic doppler current profiler and Price AA mechanical current meter measurements made during the 2011 Mississippi River Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Patrick; Mueller, David; Pratt, Thad

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River and Tributaries project performed as designed during the historic 2011 Mississippi River flood, with many of the operational decisions based on discharge targets as opposed to stage. Measurement of discharge at the Tarbert Landing, Mississippi range provides critical information used in operational decisions for the floodways located in Louisiana. Historically, discharge measurements have been made using a Price AA current meter and the mid-section method, and a long record exists based on these types of measurements, including historical peak discharges. Discharge measurements made using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat have been incorporated into the record since the mid 1990's, and are used along with the Price AA mid-section measurements. During the 2011 flood event, both methods were used and appeared to provide different results at times. The apparent differences between the measurement techniques are due to complex hydrodynamics at this location that created large spatial and temporal fluctuations in the flow. The data and analysis presented herein show the difference between the two methods to be within the expected accuracy of the measurements when the measurements are made concurrently. The observed fluctuations prevent valid comparisons of data collected sequentially or even with different observation durations.

  10. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  11. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  12. The accuracy of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Duan, X.; Yu, X.; Wang, H.; Dong, X.; Xiang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the accuracy of MRI versus ultrasound for Morton's neuroma. Materials and methods: A search was undertaken for clinical studies published in any language in PubMed up to the date of December 2013. Studies assessing the accuracy of the ultrasound or MRI for the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma were included. Data were pooled for meta-analysis. Study selection, data collection, and extraction were performed independently by two authors. Meta-disc 1.4 and Revman 5.2 software were applied for statistical analysis. Results: The study included 12 studies; 217 patients underwent MRI and 241 underwent ultrasound examinations. There appeared greater diagnostic accuracy for ultrasound than MRI for the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma (ultrasound sensitivity 90%, specificity 88%, positive likelihood ratio 2.77, negative likelihood ratio 0.16 versus MRI sensitivity 93%, specificity 68%, positive likelihood ratio 1.89, negative likelihood ratio 0.19). Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that ultrasound can provide better accuracy for the diagnosis of Morton's neuroma than MRI

  13. Residual stress measurement with focused acoustic waves and direct comparison with X-ray diffraction stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathish, Shamachary; Moran, Thomas J.; Martin, Richard W.; Reibel, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The technique of measuring small changes in acoustic wave velocity due to external or internal stress has been used for quantitative determination of residual stress in materials during the last decade. Application of similar methodology with focused acoustic waves leads to residual stress measurement with spatial resolution of a few millimeters to a few microns. The high spatial resolution residual stress measurement required development of new methodologies in both the design of acoustic lenses and the instrumentation for acoustic wave velocity determination. This paper presents two new methodologies developed for the measurement of residual stress with spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The design of new type of acoustic lens for achieving higher spatial resolution in residual stress measurement is introduced. Development of instrumentation for high precision local surface wave velocity measurement will be presented. Residual stresses measured around a crack tip in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V using a focused beam will be compared with X-ray diffraction measurements performed on the same region of the sample. Results of residual stress measurements along a direction perpendicular to the electron beam weld in a sample of Ti-6A1-4V, determined using focused acoustic waves and X-ray diffraction technique, are also presented. The spatial resolution and penetration depth of X-rays and focused acoustic beams with reference to residual stress measurements are discussed

  14. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  15. Comparison of Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) from Fiber-Optic Cable to Three Component Geophones in an Underground Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speece, M. A.; Nesladek, N. J.; Kammerer, C.; Maclaughlin, M.; Wang, H. F.; Lord, N. E.

    2017-12-01

    We conducted experiments in the Underground Education Mining Center on the Montana Tech campus, Butte, Montana, to make a direct comparison between Digital Acoustic Sensing (DAS) and three-component geophones in a mining setting. The sources used for this project where a vertical sledgehammer, oriented shear sledgehammer, and blasting caps set off in both unstemmed and stemmed drillholes. Three-component Geospace 20DM geophones were compared with three different types of fiber-optic cable: (1) Brugg strain, (2) Brugg temperature, and (3) Optical Cable Corporation strain. We attached geophones to the underground mine walls and on the ground surface above the mine. We attached fiber-optic cables to the mine walls and placed fiber-optic cable in boreholes drilled through an underground pillar. In addition, we placed fiber-optic cables in a shallow trench at the surface of the mine. We converted the DAS recordings from strain rate to strain prior to comparison with the geophone data. The setup of the DAS system for this project led to a previously unknown triggering problem that compromised the early samples of the DAS traces often including the first-break times on the DAS records. Geophones clearly recorded the explosives; however, the large amount of energy and its close distance from the fiber-optic cables seemed to compromise the entire fiber loop. The underground hammer sources produced a rough match between the DAS records and the geophone records. However, the sources on the surface of the mine, specifically the sources oriented inline with the fiber-optic cables, produced a close match between the fiber-optic traces and the geophone traces. All three types of fiber-optic cable that were in the mine produced similar results, and one type did not clearly outperform the others. Instead, the coupling of the cable to rock appears to be the most important factor determining DAS data quality. Moreover, we observed the importance of coupling in the boreholes, where

  16. Comparison of acoustic shock waves generated by micro and nanosecond lasers for a smart laser surgery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguendon Kenhagho, Hervé K.; Rauter, Georg; Guzman, Raphael; C. Cattin, Philippe; Zam, Azhar

    2018-02-01

    Characterization of acoustic shock wave will guarantee efficient tissue differentiation as feedback to reduce the probability of undesirable damaging (i.e. cutting) of tissues in laser surgery applications. We ablated hard (bone) and soft (muscle) tissues using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and a microsecond pulsed Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm. When the intense short ns-pulsed laser is applied to material, the energy gain causes locally a plasma at the ablated spot that expands and propagates as an acoustic shock wave with a rarefaction wave behind the shock front. However, when using a μs-pulsed Er:YAG laser for material ablation, the acoustic shock wave is generated during the explosion of the ablated material. We measured and compared the emitted acoustic shock wave generated by a ns-pulsed Nd:YAG laser and a μs-pulsed Er:YAG laser measured by a calibrated microphone. As the acoustic shock wave attenuates as it propagates through air, the distance between ablation spots and a calibrated microphone was at 5 cm. We present the measurements on the propagation characteristics of the laser generated acoustic shock wave by measuring the arrival time-of-flight with a calibrated microphone and the energy-dependent evolution of acoustic parameters such as peak-topeak pressure, the ratio of the peak-to-peak pressures for the laser induced breakdown in air, the ablated muscle and the bone, and the spectral energy.

  17. Comparison of spatial frequency domain features for the detection of side attack explosive ballistics in synthetic aperture acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Josh; Anderson, Derek T.; Luke, Robert H.; Ball, John E.; Keller, James M.; Havens, Timothy C.

    2016-05-01

    Explosive hazards in current and former conflict zones are a threat to both military and civilian personnel. As a result, much effort has been dedicated to identifying automated algorithms and systems to detect these threats. However, robust detection is complicated due to factors like the varied composition and anatomy of such hazards. In order to solve this challenge, a number of platforms (vehicle-based, handheld, etc.) and sensors (infrared, ground penetrating radar, acoustics, etc.) are being explored. In this article, we investigate the detection of side attack explosive ballistics via a vehicle-mounted acoustic sensor. In particular, we explore three acoustic features, one in the time domain and two on synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) beamformed imagery. The idea is to exploit the varying acoustic frequency profile of a target due to its unique geometry and material composition with respect to different viewing angles. The first two features build their angle specific frequency information using a highly constrained subset of the signal data and the last feature builds its frequency profile using all available signal data for a given region of interest (centered on the candidate target location). Performance is assessed in the context of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves on cross-validation experiments for data collected at a U.S. Army test site on different days with multiple target types and clutter. Our preliminary results are encouraging and indicate that the top performing feature is the unrolled two dimensional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) of SAA beamformed imagery.

  18. Comparison of acoustic regulations for housing and schools in selected countries in Europe and South America – A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machimbarrena, Maria; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic regulations for housing and schools exist in most countries in Europe, the main reasons being protection of health of citizens in their homes and optimizing learning conditions in schools. Comparative studies in Europe have shown a high diversity of descriptors and limit values for acous......Acoustic regulations for housing and schools exist in most countries in Europe, the main reasons being protection of health of citizens in their homes and optimizing learning conditions in schools. Comparative studies in Europe have shown a high diversity of descriptors and limit values...... of requirements. As a pilot study, acoustic regulations in three countries in South America, namely Argentina, Brazil and Chile, have been considered. The findings indicate weaker requirements than typical in Europe, and at both continents there is a joint challenge to review regulatory requirements in those...... includes examples of specific acoustic requirements on airborne and impact sound insulation, noise from traffic and from service equipment for housing and schools and in addition on reverberation time for class rooms and discusses the opportunities for future cooperation on optimizing acoustic regulations....

  19. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  20. A comparison between national scheme for the acoustic classification of dwellings in Europe and in the U.S

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    , focusing on sound insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant...... scheme may facilitate exchanging experiences about constructions fulfilling different classes, reducing trade barriers, and finally increasing the sound insulation of dwellings....... diversity in terms of descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal ”acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO...

  1. Remission of severe restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep after bilateral excision of multiple foot neuromas: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lettau Ludwig A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Restless legs syndrome is a sensorimotor neurological disorder characterized by an urge to move the legs in response to uncomfortable leg sensations. While asleep, 70 to 90 percent of patients with restless legs syndrome have periodic limb movements in sleep. Frequent periodic limb movements in sleep and related brain arousals as documented by polysomnography are associated with poorer quality of sleep and daytime fatigue. Restless legs syndrome in middle age is sometimes associated with neuropathic foot dysesthesias. The causes of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep are unknown, but the sensorimotor symptoms are hypothesized to originate in the central nervous system. We have previously determined that bilateral forefoot digital nerve impingement masses (neuromas may be a cause of both neuropathic foot dysesthesias and the leg restlessness of restless legs syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report of bilateral foot neuromas as a cause of periodic limb movements in sleep. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian woman with severe restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep and bilateral neuropathic foot dysesthesias was diagnosed as having neuromas in the second, third, and fourth metatarsal head interspaces of both feet. The third interspace neuromas represented regrowth (or 'stump' neuromas that had developed since bilateral third interspace neuroma excision five years earlier. Because intensive conservative treatments including repeated neuroma injections and various restless legs syndrome medications had failed, radical surgery was recommended. All six neuromas were excised. Leg restlessness, foot dysesthesias and subjective sleep quality improved immediately. Assessment after 18 days showed an 84 to 100 percent reduction of visual analog scale scores for specific dysesthesias and marked reductions of pre-operative scores of the Pittsburgh sleep

  2. Novel experimental surgical strategy to prevent traumatic neuroma formation by combining a 3D-printed Y-tube with an autograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolleboom, Anne; de Ruiter, Godard C W; Coert, J Henk; Tuk, Bastiaan; Holstege, Jan C; van Neck, Johan W

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Traumatic neuromas may develop after nerve injury at the proximal nerve stump, which can lead to neuropathic pain. These neuromas are often resistant to therapy, and excision of the neuroma frequently leads to recurrence. In this study, the authors present a novel surgical strategy to prevent neuroma formation based on the principle of centro-central anastomosis (CCA), but rather than directly connecting the nerve ends to an autograft, they created a loop using a 3D-printed polyethylene Y-shaped conduit with an autograft in the distal outlets. METHODS The 3D-printed Y-tube with autograft was investigated in a model of rat sciatic nerve transection in which the Y-tube was placed on the proximal sciatic nerve stump and a peroneal graft was placed between the distal outlets of the Y-tube to form a closed loop. This model was compared with a CCA model, in which a loop was created between the proximal tibial and peroneal nerves with a peroneal autograft. Additional control groups consisted of the closed Y-tube and the extended-arm Y-tube. Results were analyzed at 12 weeks of survival using nerve morphometry for the occurrence of neuroma formation and axonal regeneration in plastic semi-thin sections. RESULTS Among the different surgical groups, the Y-tube with interposed autograft was the only model that did not result in neuroma formation at 12 weeks of survival. In addition, a 13% reduction in the number of myelinated axons regenerating through the interposed autograft was observed in the Y-tube with autograft model. In the CCA model, the authors also observed a decrease of 17% in the number of myelinated axons, but neuroma formation was present in this model. The closed Y-tube resulted in minimal nerve regeneration inside the tube together with extensive neuroma formation before the entrance of the tube. The extended-arm Y-tube model clearly showed that the majority of the regenerating axons merged into the Y-tube arm, which was connected to the autograft

  3. Comparison of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) to liver biopsy histologic scores in the evaluation of chronic liver disease: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mazhar; Robinson, Charlotte; Owen, David; Yoshida, Eric M; Harris, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) is a novel non invasive technique studying the localized mechanical properties of tissue by utilising short, high intensity acoustic pulses (shear wave pulses) to assess the mechanical response (tissue displacement), providing a measure of tissue elasticity. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of ARFI imaging as a non-invasive method for the assessment of liver fibrosis compared to liver biopsy scores. A prospective blind comparison study of ARFI elastography (Virtual Touch Imaging., ACUSON S2000 Ultrasound Unit, Siemens, Mountain View CA) in a consecutive series of patients who underwent liver biopsy for assessment of fibrosis in chronic liver disease. ARFI shear-wave propagation velocity was measured in meters per second. Mean ARFI velocities were compared with both Batts-Ludwig (F0 to F4) and Modified Ishak scores (F0 to F4) for fibrosis in liver biopsy findings. Twenty-one patients with chronic liver disease (Hepatitis C (HCV) =16, Hepatitis B (HBV) = 1, both HCV and HBV = 1 Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) = 1, others = 2) underwent ARFI and liver biopsy on the same day. The Spearman correlation coefficients between the median values of the ARFI measurements and the histological fibrosis stage of the Modified Ishak score and Batts-Lud- (3) wig score were both highly significant (p shak score in chronic liver disease. It.s accuracy in prediction of severe fibrosis and cirrhosis is maximal in comparison with earlier stages.

  4. Vowel Acoustics in Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis: Comparison of Clear, Loud, and Slow Speaking Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjaden, Kris; Lam, Jennifer; Wilding, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of clear speech, increased vocal intensity, and rate reduction on acoustic characteristics of vowels was compared in speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD), speakers with multiple sclerosis (MS), and healthy controls. Method: Speakers read sentences in habitual, clear, loud, and slow conditions. Variations in clarity,…

  5. Morton's Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram Softball Injuries to the Foot and Ankle Your feet ... ankles take a beating when you are playing softball. Softball players should be aware of the following ...

  6. The use of multimedia as an adjunct to the informed consent process for Morton's neuroma resection surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Calvin; Ammon, Peter; Beischer, Andrew D

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess if a computer-based multimedia education module (MEM) improved patients' comprehension when used as an adjunct to the standard verbal consent process for Morton's neuroma resection surgery. Nineteen patients (15 females and 4 males) considered candidates for Morton's neuroma resection surgery were prospectively recruited. A standardized verbal discussion was had with each patient regarding risks and benefits of surgery, alternative treatments, and the usual postoperative course. Patient understanding was then assessed with a questionnaire. Each patient subsequently viewed the MEM and the questionnaire was repeated. Patients also rated ease of understanding and satisfaction with both methods of patient education. Patients answered a significantly greater proportion of correct answers after viewing the MEM module (85%), compared to verbal discussion alone (61%) (P = .002). Patients rated both the ease of understanding of the module and amount of information provided by the module as a mean of 9.3 cm on a 10 cm Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The majority of patients (76%) rated the multimedia tool as having answered their questions about surgery as well or better than the treating surgeon. An interactive multimedia educational tool was a useful adjunct to the informed consent process for patients considering Morton's neuroma resection surgery. Level II, prospective cohort study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Mesoscale analysis of failure in quasi-brittle materials: comparison between lattice model and acoustic emission data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, David; Verdon, Laura; Lefort, Vincent; Grassl, Peter; Saliba, Jacqueline; Regoin, Jean-Pierre; Loukili, Ahmed; Pijaudier-Cabot, Gilles

    2015-10-25

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the development and the evolution of the fracture process zone during fracture and damage in quasi-brittle materials. A model taking into account the material details at the mesoscale is used to describe the failure process at the scale of the heterogeneities. This model is used to compute histograms of the relative distances between damaged points. These numerical results are compared with experimental data, where the damage evolution is monitored using acoustic emissions. Histograms of the relative distances between damage events in the numerical calculations and acoustic events in the experiments exhibit good agreement. It is shown that the mesoscale model provides relevant information from the point of view of both global responses and the local failure process. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huanyang; Chan, C T

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  9. Topological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  10. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  11. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  12. Natural vs human-induced changes at the Tauranga Harbour area (New Zealand): a time -series acoustic seabed classification comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capperucci, Ruggero Maria; Bartholomä, Alexander; Renken, Sabrina; De Lange, Willem

    2013-04-01

    The Tauranga Harbour Bay (New Zealand) is a mesotidal estuary system, enclosed by the Matakana barrier island. It hosts the leading export port in New Zealand and the second largest import port by value. Coastal changes are well documented over the last decades, mainly at the southern entrance of the area, between Matakana Island and Mt. Maunganui. It is an extremely dynamic environment, where natural processes are strongly influenced by human activities. In particular, the understanding of the recent evolution of the system is crucial for policymakers. In fact, the cumulative impact due to the maintenance of the port (mainly dredging activities, shipping, facilities construction, but also increasing tourism) and its already approved expansion clashes with the claim of the local Maori communities, which recently leaded to a court action. A hydroacoustic multiple-device survey (Side-scan Sonar SSS, Multibeam Echo-sounder MBES and Single Beam Echo-sounder) coupled with sediment sampling was carried out in March 2011 over an area of 0.8 km2, southern Matakana Island, along the Western Channel. The area is not directly impacted by dredging activities, resulting in an optimal testing site for assessing indirect effects of human disturbance on coastal dynamics. The main goals were: 1. To test the response of different acoustic systems in such a highly dynamic environment; 2. To study the influence of dredging activities on sediment dynamics and habitat changes, by means of comparing the current data with existing ones, in order to distinguish between natural and human induced changes Results demonstrate a good agreement between acoustic classifications from different systems. They seem to be mainly driven by the sediment distribution, with a distinctive fingerprint given by shells and shell fragments. Nevertheless, the presence of relevant topographic features (i.e. large bedform fields) influences swath-looking systems (SSS and MBES). SSS and MBES classifications tend

  13. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  14. Observations at the CNS-PNS border of ventral roots connected to a neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sten Remahl

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that numerous sprouts originating from a neuroma, after nerve injury in neonatal animals, can invade spinal nerve roots. In this study the border between the central and peripheral nervous system (CNS-PNS border of ventral roots in kittens was examined with both light and electron microscopy after early postnatal sciatic nerve resection. A transient ingrowth of substance P positive axons was observed into the CNS, but no spouts remained 6 weeks after the injury. Using serial sections and electron microscopy it was possible to identify small bundles of unmyelinated axons that penetrated from the root fascicles for a short distance into the CNS. These axons ended blindly, sometimes with a growth cone-like terminal swelling filled with vesicles. The axon bundles were accompanied by p75 positive cells in both the root fascicles and the pia mater, but not in the CNS. It may thus be suggested that neurotrophin presenting p75 positive cells could facilitate axonal growth into the pia mater and that the lack of such cells in the CNS compartment might contribute to the failure of growth into the CNS. A maldevelopment of myelin sheaths at the CNS-PNS border of motor axons was observed and it seems possible that this could have consequences for the propagation of action potential across this region after neonatal nerve injury.

  15. A comparison of passive and active acoustic sampling for a bat community impacted by White-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    In the summers of 2011 and 2012, we compared passive and active acoustic sampling for bats at 31 sites at Fort Drum Military Installation, New York. We defined active sampling as acoustic sampling that occurred in 30-min intervals between the hours of sunset and 0200 with a user present to manipulate the directionality of the microphone. We defined passive sampling as acoustic sampling that occurred over a 12-h period (1900–0700 hours) without a user present and with the microphone set in a predetermined direction. We detected seven of the nine possible species at Fort Drum, including the federally endangered Indiana bat Myotis sodalis, the proposed-for-listing northern bat M. septentrionalis, the little brown bat M. lucifugus, and the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus, which are impacted by white-nose syndrome (WNS); and the eastern red bat Lasiurus borealis, the hoary bat L. cinereus, and the silver-haired bat Lasionycteris noctivagans, which are not known to be impacted by WNS. We did not detect two additional WNS-impacted species known to historically occur in the area: the eastern small-footed bat Myotis leibii and the tri-colored bat Perimyotis subflavus. Single-season occupancy models revealed lower detection probabilities of all detected species using active sampling versus passive sampling. Additionally, overall detection probabilities declined in detected WNS-impacted species between years. A paired t-test of simultaneous sampling on 21 occasions revealed that overall recorded foraging activity per hour was greater using active than passive sampling for big brown bats and greater using passive than active sampling for little brown bats. There was no significant difference in recorded activity between methods for other WNS-impacted species, presumably because these species have been so reduced in number that their “apparency” on the landscape is lower. Finally, a cost analysis of standard passive and active sampling protocols revealed that passive

  16. Comparação entre as análises auditiva e acústica nas disartrias Comparison between auditory-perceptual and acoustic analyses in dysarthrias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Zazo Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    , loudness (adequate, decreased or increased, pitch (adequate, low or high, vocal attack (isochronic, sudden or breathy, and voice stability (stable or unstable. Acoustic analyses were made with GRAM 5.1.7 Program that considered voice quality and spectrographic tracing, and Vox Metria Program to obtain objective measures. RESULTS: The comparison between auditory-perceptual and acoustic data showed no correlation for all the parameters analyzed. It was found a significant difference between breathiness and shimmer alteration (p=0.048, and between breathiness and harmonics definition (p=0.040, evidencing correlation between noise presence during emission and breathiness. CONCLUSION: Acoustic analysis associated to auditory-perceptual analysis provided different but complementary data, helping the clinical diagnosis of dysarthias.

  17. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  18. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  19. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  20. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  1. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Mueller, David S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks.

  2. Task-oriented comparison of power spectral density estimation methods for quantifying acoustic attenuation in diagnostic ultrasound using a reference phantom method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M; Nam, Kibo; Hall, Timothy J; Zagzebski, James A

    2013-07-01

    Reported here is a phantom-based comparison of methods for determining the power spectral density (PSD) of ultrasound backscattered signals. Those power spectral density values are then used to estimate parameters describing α(f), the frequency dependence of the acoustic attenuation coefficient. Phantoms were scanned with a clinical system equipped with a research interface to obtain radiofrequency echo data. Attenuation, modeled as a power law α(f)= α0 f (β), was estimated using a reference phantom method. The power spectral density was estimated using the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), Welch's periodogram, and Thomson's multitaper technique, and performance was analyzed when limiting the size of the parameter-estimation region. Errors were quantified by the bias and standard deviation of the α0 and β estimates, and by the overall power-law fit error (FE). For parameter estimation regions larger than ~34 pulse lengths (~1 cm for this experiment), an overall power-law FE of 4% was achieved with all spectral estimation methods. With smaller parameter estimation regions as in parametric image formation, the bias and standard deviation of the α0 and β estimates depended on the size of the parameter estimation region. Here, the multitaper method reduced the standard deviation of the α0 and β estimates compared with those using the other techniques. The results provide guidance for choosing methods for estimating the power spectral density in quantitative ultrasound methods.

  3. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  5. Building Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, James

    This chapter summarizes and explains key concepts of building acoustics. These issues include the behavior of sound waves in rooms, the most commonly used rating systems for sound and sound control in buildings, the most common noise sources found in buildings, practical noise control methods for these sources, and the specific topic of office acoustics. Common noise issues for multi-dwelling units can be derived from most of the sections of this chapter. Books can be and have been written on each of these topics, so the purpose of this chapter is to summarize this information and provide appropriate resources for further exploration of each topic.

  6. Comparison of Postoperative Respiratory Monitoring by Acoustic and Transthoracic Impedance Technologies in Pediatric Patients at Risk of Respiratory Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Mario; Kalin, Megan; Griffin, Allison; Minhajuddin, Abu; Ding, Lili; Williams, Timothy; Ishman, Stacey; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Kurth, C Dean; Szmuk, Peter

    2017-06-01

    In children, postoperative respiratory rate (RR) monitoring by transthoracic impedance (TI), capnography, and manual counting has limitations. The rainbow acoustic monitor (RAM) measures continuous RR noninvasively by a different methodology. Our primary aim was to compare the degree of agreement and accuracy of RR measurements as determined by RAM and TI to that of manual counting. Secondary aims include tolerance and analysis of alarm events. Sixty-two children (2-16 years old) were admitted after tonsillectomy or receiving postoperative patient/parental-controlled analgesia. RR was measured at regular intervals by RAM, TI, and manual count. Each TI or RAM alarm resulted in a clinical evaluation to categorize as a true or false alarm. To assess accuracy and degree of agreement of RR measured by RAM or TI compared with manual counting, a Bland-Altman analysis was utilized showing the average difference and the limits of agreement. Sensitivity and specificity of RR alarms by TI and RAM are presented. Fifty-eight posttonsillectomy children and 4 patient/parental-controlled analgesia users aged 6.5 ± 3.4 years and weighting 35.3 ± 22.7 kg (body mass index percentile 76.6 ± 30.8) were included. The average monitoring time per patient was 15.9 ± 4.8 hours. RAM was tolerated 87% of the total monitoring time. The manual RR count was significantly different from TI (P = .007) with an average difference ± SD of 1.39 ± 10.6 but were not significantly different from RAM (P = .81) with an average difference ± SD of 0.17 ± 6.8. The proportion of time when RR measurements differed by ≥4 breaths was 22% by TI and was 11% by RAM. Overall, 276 alarms were detected (mean alarms/patient = 4.5). The mean number of alarms per patient were 1.58 ± 2.49 and 2.87 ± 4.32 for RAM and TI, respectively. The mean number of false alarms was 0.18 ± 0.71 for RAM and 1.00 ± 2.78 for TI. The RAM was found to have 46.6% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.64), 95

  7. A comparison of acoustic levitation with microgravity processing for containerless solidification of ternary Al-Cu-Sn alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, N.; Hong, Z. Y.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2015-07-01

    The containerless rapid solidification of liquid ternary Al-5 %Cu-65 %Sn immiscible alloy was accomplished at both ultrasonic levitation and free fall conditions. A maximum undercooling of 185 K (0.22 T L) was obtained for the ultrasonically levitated alloy melt at a cooling rate of about 122 K s-1. Meanwhile, the cooling rate of alloy droplets in drop tube varied from 102 to 104 K s-1. The macrosegregation was effectively suppressed through the complex melt flow under ultrasonic levitation condition. In contrast, macrosegregation became conspicuous and core-shell structures with different layers were formed during free fall. The microstructure formation mechanisms during rapid solidification at containerless states were investigated in comparison with the conventional static solidification process. It was found that the liquid phase separation and structural growth kinetics may be modulated by controlling both alloy undercooling and cooling rate.

  8. Accumulation of Kv7.2 channels in putative ectopic transduction zones of mice nerve-end neuromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-García Jose A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of M-type currents has been proposed as a new strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain due to their role in regulating neuronal excitability. Using electrophysiological techniques we showed previously that the opening of Kv7 channels with retigabine, blocked ectopic discharges from axotomized fibers but did not alter transduction at intact skin afferents. We hypothesized that after nerve damage, accumulation of Kv7 channels in afferent fibers may increase M-type currents which then acquired a more important role at regulating fiber excitability. Findings In this study, we used an immunohistochemical approach to examine patterns of expression of Kv7.2 channels in afferent fibers after axotomy and compared them to patterns of expression of voltage gated Na+ channels (Nav which are key electrogenic elements in peripheral axons known to accumulate in experimental and human neuromas. Axotomy induced an enlargement and narrowing of the nodes of Ranvier at the proximal end of the neuroma together with a dramatic demyelination and loss of structure at its distal end in which naked accumulations of Nav were present. In addition, axotomy also induced accumulations of Kv7.2 that co-localized with those of Nav channels. Conclusions Whilst Nav channels are mandatory for initiation of action potentials, (i.e. responsible for the generation/propagation of ectopic discharges an increased accumulation of Kv7.2 channels after axotomy may represent a homeostatic compensation to over excitability in axotomized fibers, opening a window for a peripheral action of M-current modulators under conditions of neuropathy.

  9. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  10. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marco A. B., E-mail: marcobrizzotti@gmail.com [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-090 (Brazil); Bernassau, Anne L. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 05508-030 (Brazil)

    2016-07-25

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  11. Acoustic levitation of a large solid sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Bernassau, Anne L.; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that acoustic levitation can levitate spherical objects much larger than the acoustic wavelength in air. The acoustic levitation of an expanded polystyrene sphere of 50 mm in diameter, corresponding to 3.6 times the wavelength, is achieved by using three 25 kHz ultrasonic transducers arranged in a tripod fashion. In this configuration, a standing wave is created between the transducers and the sphere. The axial acoustic radiation force generated by each transducer on the sphere was modeled numerically as a function of the distance between the sphere and the transducer. The theoretical acoustic radiation force was verified experimentally in a setup consisting of an electronic scale and an ultrasonic transducer mounted on a motorized linear stage. The comparison between the numerical and experimental acoustic radiation forces presents a good agreement.

  12. Acoustic emission on stressed concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, P.; Birac, C.; Prunelle, D. de; Contre, M.; Astruc, M.; Kavyrchine, M.

    1983-08-01

    In a first part of this study, a comparison is made between the mechanical behaviour and the acoustic emission measurements on laboratory specimen during four points bending tests. The specimen were made of plain or/and reinforced concrete. The second part confirms, on real reinforced beams, the laboratory study results

  13. Acoustic Territoriality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Under the heading of "Gang i København" a number of initiatives was presented by the Lord Mayer and the Technical and Environmental Mayer of Copenhagen in May 2006. The aim of the initiative, which roughly translates to Lively Copenhagen, was both to make Copenhagen a livelier city in terms of city...... this article outline a few approaches to a theory of acoustic territoriality....

  14. Preliminary study of acoustic analysis for evaluating speech-aid oral prostheses: Characteristic dips in octave spectrum for comparison of nasality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yen-Liang; Hung, Chao-Ho; Chen, Po-Yueh; Chen, Wei-Chang; Hung, Shih-Han

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic analysis is often used in speech evaluation but seldom for the evaluation of oral prostheses designed for reconstruction of surgical defect. This study aimed to introduce the application of acoustic analysis for patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) due to oral surgery and rehabilitated with oral speech-aid prostheses. The pre- and postprosthetic rehabilitation acoustic features of sustained vowel sounds from two patients with VPI were analyzed and compared with the acoustic analysis software Praat. There were significant differences in the octave spectrum of sustained vowel speech sound between the pre- and postprosthetic rehabilitation. Acoustic measurements of sustained vowels for patients before and after prosthetic treatment showed no significant differences for all parameters of fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, noise-to-harmonics ratio, formant frequency, F1 bandwidth, and band energy difference. The decrease in objective nasality perceptions correlated very well with the decrease in dips of the spectra for the male patient with a higher speech bulb height. Acoustic analysis may be a potential technique for evaluating the functions of oral speech-aid prostheses, which eliminates dysfunctions due to the surgical defect and contributes to a high percentage of intelligible speech. Octave spectrum analysis may also be a valuable tool for detecting changes in nasality characteristics of the voice during prosthetic treatment of VPI. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Acoustic lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittmer, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  16. North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory: Analysis of Shadow Zone Arrivals and Acoustic Propagation in Numerical Ocean Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dushaw, Brian

    2009-01-01

    ... depth of the receiver lies well below the depths of the predicted cusps. Several models for the temperature and salinity in the North Pacific Ocean were obtained and processed to enable simulations of acoustic propagation for comparison to the observations...

  17. Panel acoustic contribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Formulations are derived to analyze the relative panel acoustic contributions of a vibrating structure. The essence of this analysis is to correlate the acoustic power flow from each panel to the radiated acoustic pressure at any field point. The acoustic power is obtained by integrating the normal component of the surface acoustic intensity, which is the product of the surface acoustic pressure and normal surface velocity reconstructed by using the Helmholtz equation least squares based nearfield acoustical holography, over each panel. The significance of this methodology is that it enables one to analyze and rank relative acoustic contributions of individual panels of a complex vibrating structure to acoustic radiation anywhere in the field based on a single set of the acoustic pressures measured in the near field. Moreover, this approach is valid for both interior and exterior regions. Examples of using this method to analyze and rank the relative acoustic contributions of a scaled vehicle cabin are demonstrated.

  18. Quantifying Dysphonia Severity Using a Spectralcepstral-Based Acoustic Index: Comparisons with Auditory-Perceptual Judgements from the CAPE-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson; JettE, Marie E.; Meltzner, Geoffrey S.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between acoustic spectral/cepstral measures and listener severity ratings in normal and disordered voice samples. CAPE-V sentence samples and the vowel /[script]/were elicited from eight normal speakers and 24 patients with varying degrees of dysphonia severity. Samples were analysed for measures of the…

  19. Acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  20. Acoustic cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K

  1. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  2. Interior acoustic cloak

    OpenAIRE

    Wael Akl; A. Baz

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic cloaks have traditionally been intended to externally surround critical objects to render these objects acoustically invisible. However, in this paper, the emphasis is placed on investigating the application of the acoustic cloaks to the interior walls of acoustic cavities in an attempt to minimize the noise levels inside these cavities. In this manner, the acoustic cloaks can serve as a viable and efficient alternative to the conventional passive noise attenuation treatments which a...

  3. Recent experiments on acoustic leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, J.; Arnaoutis, N.

    1984-01-01

    In the ASB-sodium loop a series of injection experiments with water, helium, argon and nitrogen was performed. The aim of these tests was to get: a comparison of the acoustic signals, generated by water and gas injections with regard to intensity and frequency content; an experimental basis for the design of an acoustic calibration source. The experimental set-up, the variation parameters and first results will be discussed. The principal design of an acoustic calibration source and its range of application will be given. (author)

  4. Speech pattern recognition for forensic acoustic purposes

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Martínez, Marcelo; Aldana Blanco, Andrea Lorena; Guzmán Palacios, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The present paper describes the development of a software for analysis of acoustic voice parameters (APAVOIX), which can be used for forensic acoustic purposes, based on the speaker recognition and identification. This software enables to observe in a clear manner, the parameters which are sufficient and necessary when performing a comparison between two voice signals, the suspicious and the original one. These parameters are used according to the classic method, generally used by state entit...

  5. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  6. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  7. Acoustics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kuttruff, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    This definitive textbook provides students with a comprehensive introduction to acoustics. Beginning with the basic physical ideas, Acoustics balances the fundamentals with engineering aspects, applications and electroacoustics, also covering music, speech and the properties of human hearing. The concepts of acoustics are exposed and applied in:room acousticssound insulation in buildingsnoise controlunderwater sound and ultrasoundScientifically thorough, but with mathematics kept to a minimum, Acoustics is the perfect introduction to acoustics for students at any level of mechanical, electrical or civil engineering courses and an accessible resource for architects, musicians or sound engineers requiring a technical understanding of acoustics and their applications.

  8. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  9. Interior acoustic cloak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Akl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic cloaks have traditionally been intended to externally surround critical objects to render these objects acoustically invisible. However, in this paper, the emphasis is placed on investigating the application of the acoustic cloaks to the interior walls of acoustic cavities in an attempt to minimize the noise levels inside these cavities. In this manner, the acoustic cloaks can serve as a viable and efficient alternative to the conventional passive noise attenuation treatments which are invariably heavy and bulky. The transformation acoustics relationships that govern the operation of this class of interior acoustic cloaks are presented. Physical insights are given to relate these relationships to the reasons behind the effectiveness of the proposed interior acoustic cloaks. Finite element models are presented to demonstrate the characteristics of interior acoustic cloaks used in treating the interior walls of circular and square cavities both in the time and frequency domains. The obtained results emphasize the effectiveness of the proposed interior cloaks in eliminating the reflections of the acoustic waves from the walls of the treated cavities and thereby rendering these cavities acoustically quiet. It is important to note here that the proposed interior acoustic cloaks can find applications in acoustic cavities such as aircraft cabins and auditoriums as well as many other critical applications.

  10. Percutaneous MR-Guided Cryoablation of Morton’s Neuroma: Rationale and Technical Details After the First 20 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Garnon, Julien; Ramamurthy, Nitin; Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Caudrelier, Jean; Thenint, Marie-Aude; Rao, Pramod; Koch, Guillaume; Gangi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesThe purpose of this study is to discuss technical aspects and rationales of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided cryoablation (CA) of Morton’s neuroma (MN); preliminary clinical experience is also retrospectively reviewed.MethodsProcedures were performed under local anaesthesia on an outpatient basis. Lesion size and location, procedural (technical success, procedural time, complications) and clinical outcomes (patient satisfaction according to a four-point scale, residual pain according to a 0–10 visual analogue scale and instances of “stump neuroma”) were assessed via chart review and cross-sectional telephone survey after the 20th case.ResultsTwenty patients (15 female, 5 male; mean age 50.3 years) were included; 24 MN (mean size 12.7 mm) were treated. Technical success was 100 %. Mean procedural time was 40.9 ± 10.4 min (range 35–60). One minor complication (superficial cellulitis) was reported (4.2 %). Follow-up (mean 19.7 months) was available for 18/24 MN. Patient satisfaction on a per-lesion basis was as follows: “completely satisfied” in 77.7 %, “satisfied with minor reservations” in 16.6 % and “satisfied with major reservations” in 5.7 % of cases. Mean pain score at last follow-up post-CA was 3.0. No instances of “stump neuroma” were reported.ConclusionsMR-guided CA of MN is a novel therapy which appears technically feasible. Clinical advantages of the procedure are high patient satisfaction, reduced risk of “stump neuroma” syndrome and good patient tolerance on an outpatient basis. Further, prospective studies are needed to confirm these encouraging results.

  11. Percutaneous MR-Guided Cryoablation of Morton’s Neuroma: Rationale and Technical Details After the First 20 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: gigicazzato@hotmail.it; Garnon, Julien [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS (France); Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France); Ramamurthy, Nitin [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Caudrelier, Jean; Thenint, Marie-Aude; Rao, Pramod; Koch, Guillaume; Gangi, Afshin [Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, HUS (France); Department of Interventional Radiology, Nouvel Hôpital Civil (France)

    2016-10-15

    ObjectivesThe purpose of this study is to discuss technical aspects and rationales of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided cryoablation (CA) of Morton’s neuroma (MN); preliminary clinical experience is also retrospectively reviewed.MethodsProcedures were performed under local anaesthesia on an outpatient basis. Lesion size and location, procedural (technical success, procedural time, complications) and clinical outcomes (patient satisfaction according to a four-point scale, residual pain according to a 0–10 visual analogue scale and instances of “stump neuroma”) were assessed via chart review and cross-sectional telephone survey after the 20th case.ResultsTwenty patients (15 female, 5 male; mean age 50.3 years) were included; 24 MN (mean size 12.7 mm) were treated. Technical success was 100 %. Mean procedural time was 40.9 ± 10.4 min (range 35–60). One minor complication (superficial cellulitis) was reported (4.2 %). Follow-up (mean 19.7 months) was available for 18/24 MN. Patient satisfaction on a per-lesion basis was as follows: “completely satisfied” in 77.7 %, “satisfied with minor reservations” in 16.6 % and “satisfied with major reservations” in 5.7 % of cases. Mean pain score at last follow-up post-CA was 3.0. No instances of “stump neuroma” were reported.ConclusionsMR-guided CA of MN is a novel therapy which appears technically feasible. Clinical advantages of the procedure are high patient satisfaction, reduced risk of “stump neuroma” syndrome and good patient tolerance on an outpatient basis. Further, prospective studies are needed to confirm these encouraging results.

  12. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  13. Tethys Acoustic Metadata Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Tethys database houses the metadata associated with the acoustic data collection efforts by the Passive Acoustic Group. These metadata include dates, locations...

  14. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Han, Xiaole; Xia, Dong; Liu, Taolin; Lang, Hao

    2018-01-13

    Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  15. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  16. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of attenuation-driven acoustic streaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David; Yeomans, J M

    2003-01-01

    We show that lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model the attenuation-driven acoustic streaming produced by a travelling wave. Comparisons are made to analytical results and to the streaming pattern produced by an imposed body force approximating the Reynolds stresses. We predict the streaming patterns around a porous material in an attenuating acoustic field

  18. Comparison of acoustic properties of tethered flight sounds for wild, mass-reared, and irradiated melon flies, Dacus cucurbitae COQUILLETT (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanmiya, Kenkichi; Nakagawa, Kohjin; Tanaka, Akira; Kamiwada, Hidemi.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic properties of tethered flight sounds produced by the male melon fly, Dacus cucurbitae COQUILLETT in wild (W-), mass-reared (M-), and irradiated (I-) strains were analyzed. Properties included fundamental frequency (FFQ), peak power density of FFQ (PPD), overall root mean square value (ORMS), total harmonic RMS (THRMS), total harmonic distortion (THDIST), bandwidth of FFQ (BWFF), and the number of harmonics and wing-strokes. M- and I-strains developed FFQ 3 days earlier than the W-strain. The W-strain had a greater variance in the mean, and overall lower values for FFQ, PPD, and ORMS than M- and I-strains. The fluctuation of acoustic properties of wild strain with aging was markedly different from that of the laboratory strains. The fact that values of these parameters for laboratory strains developed at earlier adult age and continued relatively high may by due to selection effects. No significant differences were observed between laboratory strains resulting from effect of irradiation. There were, however, significant differences among the 6 parameters in 8 age groups which were recognized for 12 cases between W- and I-, 8 between W- and M-, and 4 between M- and I-strains. (author)

  19. Effect of fMRI acoustic noise on non-auditory working memory task: comparison between continuous and pulsed sound emitting EPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Bartsch, Andreas J; Radue, Ernst W; Klarhöfer, Markus; Seifritz, Erich; Scheffler, Klaus

    2005-11-01

    Conventional blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is accompanied by substantial acoustic gradient noise. This noise can influence the performance as well as neuronal activations. Conventional fMRI typically has a pulsed noise component, which is a particularly efficient auditory stimulus. We investigated whether the elimination of this pulsed noise component in a recent modification of continuous-sound fMRI modifies neuronal activations in a cognitively demanding non-auditory working memory task. Sixteen normal subjects performed a letter variant n-back task. Brain activity and psychomotor performance was examined during fMRI with continuous-sound fMRI and conventional fMRI. We found greater BOLD responses in bilateral medial frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, left hippocampus, right superior frontal gyrus, right precuneus and right cingulate gyrus with continuous-sound compared to conventional fMRI. Conversely, BOLD responses were greater in bilateral cingulate gyrus, left middle and superior frontal gyrus and right lingual gyrus with conventional compared to continuous-sound fMRI. There were no differences in psychomotor performance between both scanning protocols. Although behavioral performance was not affected, acoustic gradient noise interferes with neuronal activations in non-auditory cognitive tasks and represents a putative systematic confound.

  20. Parametric Room Acoustic Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Svidt, Kjeld; Molin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses different room acoustics software and the opportunities they offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs. The first step consists in the testing and benchmarking of different tools on the basis of accuracy, speed...... and interoperability with Grasshopper 3d. The focus will be placed to the benchmarking of three different acoustic analysis tools based on raytracing. To compare the accuracy and speed of the acoustic evaluation across different tools, a homogeneous set of acoustic parameters is chosen. The room acoustics parameters...... included in the set are reverberation time (EDT, RT30), clarity (C50), loudness (G), and definition (D50). Scenarios are discussed for determining at different design stages the most suitable acoustic tool. Those scenarios are characterized, by the use of less accurate but fast evaluation tools to be used...

  1. Comparison of measurement standards of the acoustic pressure in air in the low frequency range: COOMET.AUV.A-K2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    A bilateral regional comparison of national microphone standards from 2 Hz to 250 Hz was carried out between the DP NDI 'Systema' (Ukraine) and the VNIIFTRI (Russia) from July to September 2009. The comparison, COOMET.AUV.A-K2, was based on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones type LSIP. The comparison results have been linked to the established key comparison reference value (KCRV) of CCAUV.A-K2. The degrees of equivalence, expressed as the deviation from the established KCRV and its expanded uncertainty (k = 2), have been determined, and the comparison result is in agreement with the KCRV within the estimated uncertainties at all employed frequencies. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  2. Acoustic Metamaterials in Aeronautics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Palma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials, man-made composites that are scaled smaller than the wavelength, have demonstrated a huge potential for application in acoustics, allowing the production of sub-wavelength acoustic absorbers, acoustic invisibility, perfect acoustic mirrors and acoustic lenses for hyper focusing, and acoustic illusions and enabling new degrees of freedom in the control of the acoustic field. The zero, or even negative, refractive sound index of metamaterials offers possibilities for the control of acoustic patterns and sound at sub-wavelength scales. Despite the tremendous growth in research on acoustic metamaterials during the last decade, the potential of metamaterial-based technologies in aeronautics has still not been fully explored, and its utilization is still in its infancy. Thus, the principal concepts mentioned above could very well provide a means to develop devices that allow the mitigation of the impact of civil aviation noise on the community. This paper gives a review of the most relevant works on acoustic metamaterials, analyzing them for their potential applicability in aeronautics, and, in this process, identifying possible implementation areas and interesting metabehaviors. It also identifies some technical challenges and possible future directions for research with the goal of unveiling the potential of metamaterials technology in aeronautics.

  3. Physics of thermo-acoustic sound generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschewski, M.; Boehm, R.; Prager, J.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Harrer, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a generalized analytical model of thermo-acoustic sound generation based on the analysis of thermally induced energy density fluctuations and their propagation into the adjacent matter. The model provides exact analytical prediction of the sound pressure generated in fluids and solids; consequently, it can be applied to arbitrary thermal power sources such as thermophones, plasma firings, laser beams, and chemical reactions. Unlike existing approaches, our description also includes acoustic near-field effects and sound-field attenuation. Analytical results are compared with measurements of sound pressures generated by thermo-acoustic transducers in air for frequencies up to 1 MHz. The tested transducers consist of titanium and indium tin oxide coatings on quartz glass and polycarbonate substrates. The model reveals that thermo-acoustic efficiency increases linearly with the supplied thermal power and quadratically with thermal excitation frequency. Comparison of the efficiency of our thermo-acoustic transducers with those of piezoelectric-based airborne ultrasound transducers using impulse excitation showed comparable sound pressure values. The present results show that thermo-acoustic transducers can be applied as broadband, non-resonant, high-performance ultrasound sources.

  4. Field Comparisons of the Elwha Bedload Sampler and an Acoustic Gravel-transport Sensor: Middle Fork of the Piedra River, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, J.; Ryan, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    Ten simultaneous bedload measurements were made with an Elhwa sampler and an acoustic-gravel-transport sensor (GTS) on the Middle Fork of the Piedra River in southwestern Colorado near the end of the spring freshet in water year 2001. The purpose was to compare bedload samples with acoustic measurements acquired under field conditions. Upstream of the measurement site, the river drains 86 km2 of andesite, ash flows, tuffs, and breccias in the San Juan Mountains, contributing a relatively high sediment load to the river system. The channel transitions from step-pools at high elevations to a plane bed with a slope of 0.018 in the study reach. Channel width, mean depth and bank-full velocity at the site are: 13.6 m, 0.52, and 1.5 m s-1. The D50 of the riverbed surface is 0.08 m which is 6 to 40 times larger than the D50s of the bedload samples. D16 and D84 of the bed = 0.02 and 0.21 m respectively. Water discharges from 7.3 to 9.3 m3 s-1 transported about 0.01 kg of gravel m-1 s-1 in the channel. Transport of coarse gravel (8-64 mm) ranged from 0.00063 to 0.024 kg m-1 s-1. The Elwha sampler is a portable, pressure-differential trap with a 0.2 m wide by 0.1 m high opening. The acoustic sensor is a 0.025-m wide by 0.1 m high strip of PVDF piezoelectric film connected to a signal processor and bonded to an aluminum pressure plate. When the plate is struck by stones, the GTS produces signal peaks with areas that are accurate measures of stone momentum. The GTS was calibrated with steels balls dropped on the pressure plate in still water to develop a curve of ball momentum as a function of peak areas. Based on these calibrations, the standard error of the GTS momentum estimates is 0.0017 kg m s-1. Five transects with 30 verticals, each occupied for 60 s, were completed with the sampler and GTS separated by < 1 m. Five additional verticals were occupied for about 1800 s each with the instruments separated by < 0.5 m. The trapped material was sieved and weighed and the water

  5. Primary calibration in acoustics metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milhomem, T A Bacelar; Soares, Z M Defilippo

    2015-01-01

    SI unit in acoustics is realized by the reciprocity calibrations of laboratory standard microphones in pressure field, free field and diffuse field. Calibrations in pressure field and in free field are already consolidated and the Inmetro already done them. Calibration in diffuse field is not yet consolidated, however, some national metrology institutes, including Inmetro, are conducting researches on this subject. This paper presents the reciprocity calibration, the results of Inmetro in recent key comparisons and the research that is being developed for the implementation of reciprocity calibration in diffuse field

  6. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  7. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  8. Comparison of interfacial properties of electrodeposited single carbon fiber/epoxy composites using tensile and compressive fragmentation tests and acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Man; Kim, Jin-Won; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2002-03-01

    Interfacial and microfailure properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composites were evaluated using both tensile fragmentation and compressive Broutman tests with an aid of acoustic emission (AE). A monomeric and two polymeric coupling agents were applied via the electrodeposition (ED) and the dipping applications. A monomeric and a polymeric coupling agent showed significant and comparable improvements in interfacial shear strength (IFSS) compared to the untreated case under both tensile and compressive tests. Typical microfailure modes including cone-shaped fiber break, matrix cracking, and partial interlayer failure were observed under tension, whereas the diagonal slipped failure at both ends of the fractured fiber exhibited under compression. Adsorption and shear displacement mechanisms at the interface were described in terms of electrical attraction and primary and secondary bonding forces. For both the untreated and the treated cases AE distributions were separated well in tension, whereas AE distributions were rather closely overlapped in compression. It might be because of the difference in molecular failure energies and failure mechanisms between tension and compression. The maximum AE voltage for the waveform of either carbon or large-diameter basalt fiber breakages in tension exhibited much larger than that in compression. AE could provide more likely the quantitative information on the interfacial adhesion and microfailure.

  9. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  10. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  11. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  12. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  13. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  14. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  15. A comparison of supervised classification methods for the prediction of substrate type using multibeam acoustic and legacy grain-size data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stephens

    Full Text Available Detailed seabed substrate maps are increasingly in demand for effective planning and management of marine ecosystems and resources. It has become common to use remotely sensed multibeam echosounder data in the form of bathymetry and acoustic backscatter in conjunction with ground-truth sampling data to inform the mapping of seabed substrates. Whilst, until recently, such data sets have typically been classified by expert interpretation, it is now obvious that more objective, faster and repeatable methods of seabed classification are required. This study compares the performances of a range of supervised classification techniques for predicting substrate type from multibeam echosounder data. The study area is located in the North Sea, off the north-east coast of England. A total of 258 ground-truth samples were classified into four substrate classes. Multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, and a range of secondary features derived from these datasets were used in this study. Six supervised classification techniques were tested: Classification Trees, Support Vector Machines, k-Nearest Neighbour, Neural Networks, Random Forest and Naive Bayes. Each classifier was trained multiple times using different input features, including i the two primary features of bathymetry and backscatter, ii a subset of the features chosen by a feature selection process and iii all of the input features. The predictive performances of the models were validated using a separate test set of ground-truth samples. The statistical significance of model performances relative to a simple baseline model (Nearest Neighbour predictions on bathymetry and backscatter were tested to assess the benefits of using more sophisticated approaches. The best performing models were tree based methods and Naive Bayes which achieved accuracies of around 0.8 and kappa coefficients of up to 0.5 on the test set. The models that used all input features didn't generally perform well

  16. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Solar Dynamics Observatory-Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler-velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time - distance helioseismology pipeline (Zhao et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2010) has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross-covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time - distance helioseismology: a Gabor-wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004). Using Doppler-velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument onboard SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference traveltime perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet-Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997) and Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002). We investigated the relationships among

  17. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time-distance helioseismology pipeline has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time-distance helioseismology: a Gabor wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, 2004). Using Doppler velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference travel-time perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (1997) and Gizon and Birch (2002). We investigated the relationships among these three travel-time definitions, their sensitivities to fitting parameters, and estimated the random errors they produce

  18. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shao-Sheng R.; Allen Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. This paper describes the implementation of acoustic modeling for design purposes by incrementally increasing model fidelity and validating the accuracy of the model while predicting the noise of sources under various conditions. During FY 07, a simple-geometry Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model was developed and validated using a physical mockup and acoustic measurements. A process for modeling the effects of absorptive wall treatments and the resulting reverberation environment were developed. During FY 08, a model with more complex and representative geometry of the Orion Crew Module (CM) interior was built, and noise predictions based on input noise sources were made. A corresponding physical mockup was also built. Measurements were made inside this mockup, and comparisons were made with the model and showed excellent agreement. During FY 09, the fidelity of the mockup and corresponding model were increased incrementally by including a simple ventilation system. The airborne noise contribution of the fans was measured using a sound intensity technique, since the sound power levels were not known beforehand. This is opposed to earlier studies where Reference Sound Sources (RSS) with known sound power level were used. Comparisons of the modeling result with the measurements in the mockup showed excellent results. During FY 10, the fidelity of the mockup and the model were further increased by including an ECLSS (Environmental Control and Life Support System) wall, associated closeout panels, and the gap between ECLSS wall and mockup wall. The effect of sealing the gap and adding sound absorptive treatment to ECLSS wall were also modeled and validated.

  19. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  20. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  1. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  2. Acoustic leak detection of LMFBR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo

    1993-01-01

    The development of a water leak detector with short response time for LMFBR steam generators is required to prevent the failure propagation caused by the sodium-water reaction and to maintain structural safety in steam generators. The development of an acoustic leak detector assuring short response time has attracted. The purpose of this paper is to confirm the basic detection feasibility of the active acoustic leak detector, and to investigate the leak detection method by erasing the background noise by spectrum analysis of the passive acoustic leak detector. From a comparison of the leak detection sensitivity of the active and the passive method, the active method is not influenced remarkably by the background noise, and it has possibility to detect microleakage with short response time. We anticipate a practical application of the active method in the future. (author)

  3. The acoustic environment in large HTGR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    Well-known techniques for estimating acoustic vibration of structures have been applied to a General Atomic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design. It is shown that one must evaluate internal loss factors for both fluid and structure modes, as well as radiation loss factors, to avoid large errors in estimated structural response. At any frequency above 1350 rad/s there are generally at least 20 acoustic modes contributing to acoustic pressure, so statistical energy analysis may be employed. But because the gas circuit consists mainly of high-aspect-ratio cavities, reverberant fields are nowhere isotropic below 7500 rad/s, and in some regions are not isotropic below 60 000 rad/s. In comparison with isotropic reverberant fields, these anistropic fields enhance the radiation efficiencies of some structural modes at low frequencies, but have surprisingly little effect at most frequencies. The efficiency of a dipole sound source depends upon its orientation. (Auth.)

  4. Evaluation of Hepatic Steatosis by Using Acoustic Structure Quantification US in a Rat Model: Comparison with Pathologic Examination and MR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Kyung Bun; Han, Joon Koo

    2017-11-01

    Purpose To determine factors that significantly affect the focal disturbance (FD) ratio calculated with an acoustic structure quantification (ASQ) technique in a dietary-induced fatty liver disease rat model and to assess the diagnostic performance of the FD ratio in the assessment of hepatic steatosis by using histopathologic examination as a standard of reference. Materials and Methods Twenty-eight male F344 rats were fed a methionine-choline-deficient diet with a variable duration (3.5 days [half week] or 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks; four rats in each group). A control group of four rats was maintained on a standard diet. At the end of each diet period, ASQ ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy were performed. Then, the rat was sacrificed and histopathologic examination of the liver was performed. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic performance of the FD ratio in the evaluation of the degree of hepatic steatosis. The Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between the ordinal values, and multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify significant determinant factors for the FD ratio. Results The diagnostic performance of the FD ratio in the assessment of the degree of hepatic steatosis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 1.000 for 5%-33% steatosis, 0.981 for >33% to 66% steatosis, and 0.965 for >66% steatosis) was excellent and was comparable to that of MR spectroscopy. There was a strong negative linear correlation between the FD ratio and the estimated fat fraction at MR spectroscopy (Spearman ρ, -0.903; P analysis showed that the degree of hepatic steatosis (P ratio. Conclusion The FD ratio may potentially provide good diagnostic performance in the assessment of the degree of hepatic steatosis, with a strong negative linear correlation with the estimated fat fraction at MR spectroscopy. The degree of steatosis and

  5. Calibration of acoustic emission transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leschek, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for calibrating an acoustic emission transducer to be used in a pre-set frequency range. The absolute reception sensitivity of a reference transducer is determined at frequencies selected within the frequency range. The reference transducer and the acoustic emission transducer are put into acoustic communication with the surface of a limited acoustic medium representing an equivalent acoustic load appreciably identical to that of the medium in which the use of the acoustic emission transducer is intended. A blank random acoustic noise is emitted in the acoustic medium in order to establish a diffuse and reverberating sound field, after which the output responses of the reference transducer and of the acoustic emission transducer are obtained with respect to the diffuse and reverberating field, for selected frequencies. The output response of the acoustic emission transducer is compared with that of the reference transducer for the selected frequencies, so as to determine the reception sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducer [fr

  6. Parametric Room Acoustic workflows with real-time acoustic simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates and assesses the opportunities that real-time acoustic simulation offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs from early design stages......The paper investigates and assesses the opportunities that real-time acoustic simulation offer to engage in parametric acoustics workflow and to influence architectural designs from early design stages...

  7. Ion acoustic waves in the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnett, D.A.; Frank, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    Plasma wave measurements on the Helios I and 2 spacecraft have revealed the occurrence of electric field turbulence in the solar wind at frequencies between the electron and ion plasma frequencies. Wavelength measurements with the Imp 6 spacecraft now provide strong evidence that these waves are short-wavelength ion acoustic waves which are Doppler-shifted upward in frequency by the motion of the solar wind. Comparison of the Helios results with measurements from the earth-orbiting Imp 6 and 8 spacecraft shows that the ion acoustic turbulence detected in interplanetary space has characteristics essentially identical to those of bursts of electrostatic turbulence generated by protons streaming into the solar wind from the earth's bow shock. In a few cases, enhanced ion acoustic wave intensities have been observed in direct association with abrupt increases in the anisotropy of the solar wind electron distribution. This relationship strongly suggests that the ion acoustic waves detected by Helios far from the earth are produced by an electron heat flux instability, as was suggested by Forslund. Possible related mechanisms which could explain the generation of ion acoustic waves by protons streaming into the solar wind from the earth's bow shock are also considered

  8. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy for rapid imaging of material microstructure and grain orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Richard J; Li, Wenqi; Coulson, Jethro; Clark, Matt; Somekh, Michael G; Sharples, Steve D

    2014-01-01

    Measuring the grain structure of aerospace materials is very important to understand their mechanical properties and in-service performance. Spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy is an acoustic technique utilizing surface acoustic waves to map the grain structure of a material. When combined with measurements in multiple acoustic propagation directions, the grain orientation can be obtained by fitting the velocity surface to a model. The new instrument presented here can take thousands of acoustic velocity measurements per second. The spatial and velocity resolution can be adjusted by simple modification to the system; this is discussed in detail by comparison of theoretical expectations with experimental data. (paper)

  9. Transmission acoustic microscopy investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, Roman; Kolosov, Oleg; Levin, Vadim; Lobkis, Oleg

    The nature of acoustic contrast, i.e. the connection of the amplitude and phase of the output signal of the acoustic microscope with the local values of the acoustic parameters of the sample (density, elasticity, viscosity) is a central problem of acoustic microscopy. A considerable number of studies have been devoted to the formation of the output signal of the reflection scanning acoustic microscope. For the transmission acoustic microscope (TAM) this problem has remained almost unstudied. Experimental investigation of the confocal system of the TAM was carried out on an independently manufactured laboratory mockup of the TAM with the working frequency of the 420 MHz. Acoustic lenses with the radius of curvature of about 500 microns and aperture angle of 45 deg were polished out in the end faces of two cylindrical sound conductors made from Al2O3 single crystals with an axis parallel to the axis C of the crystal (the length of the sound conductor is 20 mm; diameter, 6 mm). At the end faces of the sound conductor, opposite to the lenses, CdS transducers with a diameter of 2 mm were disposed. The electric channel of the TAM provided a possibility for registering the amplitude of the microscope output signal in the case of the dynamic range of the 50 dB.

  10. The accidental (acoustical) tourist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kirk, Wayne

    2002-11-01

    The acoustical phenomenon observed at an ancient temple in the Great Ball Court at Chichen Itza was described as ''little short of amazing--an ancient whispering gallery'' by Silvanus G. Morley, leader of the Carnegie Institute's archaeological team that excavated and restored these structures in the 1920s. Since then, many others have experienced the extraordinary acoustics at Chichen Itza and other Maya sites. Despite these reports, archaeologists and acousticians have until recently shown little interest in understanding these phenomena. After experiencing Chichen Itza's remarkable acoustics as a tourist in 1994, the author commenced collecting and disseminating information about acoustical phenomena there and at other Mayan sites, hoping to stimulate interest among archaeologists and acousticians. Were these designs accidental or intentional? If intentional, how was the knowledge obtained? How were acoustical features used? This paper highlights the author's collection of anecdotal reports of mysterious Mayan acoustics (http://http://www.ianlawton.com/pa1.htm), recommended reading for scientists and engineers who wish to pursue this fascinating study. Also recounted are some of the reactions of archaeologists-ranging from curious, helpful, and insightful to humorous and appalling--to outsiders' efforts to bring serious scientific attention to the new field of acoustical archaeology.

  11. Translational illusion of acoustic sources by transformation acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Li, Shichao; He, Sailing

    2017-09-01

    An acoustic illusion of creating a translated acoustic source is designed by utilizing transformation acoustics. An acoustic source shifter (ASS) composed of layered acoustic metamaterials is designed to achieve such an illusion. A practical example where the ASS is made with naturally available materials is also given. Numerical simulations verify the performance of the proposed device. The designed ASS may have some applications in, e.g., anti-sonar detection.

  12. Acoustic building infiltration measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Raman, Ganesh

    2018-04-10

    Systems and methods of detecting and identifying a leak from a container or building. Acoustic pressure and velocity are measured. Acoustic properties are acquired from the measured values. The acoustic properties are converted to infiltration/leakage information. Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH) may be one method to detect the leakages from a container by locating the noise sources.

  13. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  14. Deep Water Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    the Deep Water project and participate in the NPAL Workshops, including Art Baggeroer (MIT), J. Beron- Vera (UMiami), M. Brown (UMiami), T...Kathleen E . Wage. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea. J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 134(4...estimate of the angle α during PhilSea09, made from ADCP measurements at the site of the DVLA. Sim. A B1 B2 B3 C D E F Prof. # 0 4 4 4 5 10 16 20 α

  15. Radiation acoustics and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyamshev, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics, developing on the boundary of acoustics, nuclear physics, elementary particles and high-energy physics. Its fundamentals are laying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of penetrating radiation with matter. The study of radiation-acoustical effects leads to the new opportunities in the penetration radiation research (acoustical detection, radiation-acoustical dosimetry), study of the physical parameters of matter, in a solution of some applied problems of nondestructive testing, and also for the radiation-acoustical influence on physical and chemical structure of the matter. Results of theoretical and experimental investigations are given. Different mechanisms of the sound generation by penetrating radiation of liquids and solids are considered. Some applications - the radiation acoustical microscopy and visualisation, the acoustical detection of high energy X-ray particles and possibility of using of high energy neutrino beams in geoacoustics - are discussed

  16. Acoustic characteristics of the flow over different shapes of nozzle chevrons,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel CRUNTEANU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a comparison between different types of chevrons and their influence on the acoustic power level radiated by the flow over them. The comparison was performed using a two-dimensional simulation of the flow over four different shapes of chevrons resulting propagation of the acoustic waves for each shape. Acoustic characteristics were revealed studying the main flow parameters (pressure, velocity, kinetic energy in order to be able to discover the most efficient shape of chevron regarding the acoustic power level emitted.

  17. Study of the tactile perception of bathroom tissues: Comparison between the sensory evaluation by a handfeel panel and a tribo-acoustic artificial finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieulin, C; Pailler-Mattei, C; Vargiolu, R; Lancelot, S; Zahouani, H

    2017-02-01

    Tactile perception is one of the sensorial modes most stimulated by our daily environment. In particular, perceived softness is an important parameter for judging the sensory quality of surfaces and fabrics. Unfortunately, its assessment greatly depends on the tactile sense of each person, which in turn depends on many factors. Currently, the predominant method for evaluating the tactile perception of fabrics is the human handfeel panel. This qualitative approach does not permit the quantitative measure of touch feel perception. In this study, we present a new artificial finger device to investigate the tactile sensing of ten bathroom tissues. It enables simultaneously measuring the friction and vibrations caused when sliding an artificial finger on the surface of the tissue. The comparison between the results obtained with the artificial finger and the tactile perception evaluated using a handfeel panel showed that the artificial finger is able to separate the two parts of the tactile perception of bathroom tissues: softness and surface texture (velvetiness). The statistical analysis suggests that there is a good correlation between the vibrations measured with the artificial finger and the softness evaluated by the panel. It then shows that the friction measured by the artificial finger is related to the surface texture of a bathroom tissue. The ability of the artificial finger to mimic human touch is demonstrated. Finally, a Principal Component Analysis orders the signatures of the tactile perception of the bathroom tissues in four different groups. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  19. Acoustic Casimir Effect

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Homes, Christopher

    1997-01-01

    ...). When the indirect manifestations of the ZPF are interpreted as due to radiation pressure, acoustic noise can provide an excellent analog to investigate the Casimir effect as well as other effects due to the ZPF...

  20. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  1. Electrostatic ion acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, A.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, certain aspects of plasma physics are illustrated through a study of electrostatic ion acoustic waves. The paper consists of three Sections. Section II deals with linear properties of the ion acoustic wave including derivation of the dispersions relation with the effect of Landau damping and of an ambient magnetic field. The section also introduces the excitation processes of the ion acoustic wave due to an electron drift or to a stimulated Brillouin scattering. The nonlinear properties are introduced in Section III and IV. In Section III, incoherent nonlinear effects such as quasilinear and mode-coupling saturations of the instability are discussed. The coherent nonlinear effects such as the generation of ion acoustic solitons, shocks and weak double layers are presented in Section IV. (Auth.)

  2. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  3. Acoustic MIMO signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yiteng; Chen, Jingdong

    2006-01-01

    A timely and important book addressing a variety of acoustic signal processing problems under multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) scenarios. It uniquely investigates these problems within a unified framework offering a novel and penetrating analysis.

  4. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  5. Acoustic Igniter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  6. Department of Cybernetic Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of the theory, instrumentation and applications of methods and systems for the measurement, analysis, processing and synthesis of acoustic signals within the audio frequency range, particularly of the speech signal and the vibro-acoustic signal emitted by technical and industrial equipments treated as noise and vibration sources was discussed. The research work, both theoretical and experimental, aims at applications in various branches of science, and medicine, such as: acoustical diagnostics and phoniatric rehabilitation of pathological and postoperative states of the speech organ; bilateral ""man-machine'' speech communication based on the analysis, recognition and synthesis of the speech signal; vibro-acoustical diagnostics and continuous monitoring of the state of machines, technical equipments and technological processes.

  7. Acoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  8. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  9. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  10. Acoustic waves in polydispersed bubbly liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubaidullin, D A; Gubaidullina, D D; Fedorov, Yu V

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves in polydispersed mixtures of liquid with two sorts of gas bubbles each of which has its own bubble size distribution function is studied. The system of the differential equations of the perturbed motion of a mixture is presented, the dispersion relation is obtained. Equilibrium speed of sound, low-frequency and high-frequency asymptotes of the attenuation coefficient are found. Comparison of the developed theory with known experimental data is presented

  11. Acoustic waves in polydispersed bubbly liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Gubaidullina, D. D.; Fedorov, Yu V.

    2014-11-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves in polydispersed mixtures of liquid with two sorts of gas bubbles each of which has its own bubble size distribution function is studied. The system of the differential equations of the perturbed motion of a mixture is presented, the dispersion relation is obtained. Equilibrium speed of sound, low-frequency and high-frequency asymptotes of the attenuation coefficient are found. Comparison of the developed theory with known experimental data is presented.

  12. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  13. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating establishment...

  14. Magnetoactive Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kunhao; Fang, Nicholas X; Huang, Guoliang; Wang, Qiming

    2018-04-11

    Acoustic metamaterials with negative constitutive parameters (modulus and/or mass density) have shown great potential in diverse applications ranging from sonic cloaking, abnormal refraction and superlensing, to noise canceling. In conventional acoustic metamaterials, the negative constitutive parameters are engineered via tailored structures with fixed geometries; therefore, the relationships between constitutive parameters and acoustic frequencies are typically fixed to form a 2D phase space once the structures are fabricated. Here, by means of a model system of magnetoactive lattice structures, stimuli-responsive acoustic metamaterials are demonstrated to be able to extend the 2D phase space to 3D through rapidly and repeatedly switching signs of constitutive parameters with remote magnetic fields. It is shown for the first time that effective modulus can be reversibly switched between positive and negative within controlled frequency regimes through lattice buckling modulated by theoretically predicted magnetic fields. The magnetically triggered negative-modulus and cavity-induced negative density are integrated to achieve flexible switching between single-negative and double-negative. This strategy opens promising avenues for remote, rapid, and reversible modulation of acoustic transportation, refraction, imaging, and focusing in subwavelength regimes. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Acoustic and categorical dissimilarity of musical timbre: Evidence from asymmetriesbetween acoustic and chimeric sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eSiedenburg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Exp. 1. A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Exp. 2A. We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Exp. 2B and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R^2 = .88 was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception.

  16. Acoustic and Categorical Dissimilarity of Musical Timbre: Evidence from Asymmetries Between Acoustic and Chimeric Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedenburg, Kai; Jones-Mollerup, Kiray; McAdams, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity ratings. Using a Gammatone-filterbank-based sound transformation, we created tones that were rated as less familiar than recorded tones from orchestral instruments and that were harder to associate with an unambiguous sound source (Experiment 1). A subset of transformed tones, a set of orchestral recordings, and a mixed set were then rated on pairwise dissimilarity (Experiment 2A). We observed that recorded instrument timbres clustered into subsets that distinguished timbres according to acoustic and categorical properties. For the subset of cross-category comparisons in the mixed set, we observed asymmetries in the distribution of ratings, as well as a stark decay of inter-rater agreement. These effects were replicated in a more robust within-subjects design (Experiment 2B) and cannot be explained by acoustic factors alone. We finally introduced a novel model of timbre dissimilarity based on partial least-squares regression that compared the contributions of both acoustic and categorical timbre descriptors. The best model fit (R2 = 0.88) was achieved when both types of descriptors were taken into account. These findings are interpreted as evidence for an interplay of acoustic and categorical information in timbre dissimilarity perception. PMID:26779086

  17. Acoustic manipulation: Bessel beams and active carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we address the interaction of zero-order acoustic Bessel beams as an acoustic manipulation tool, with an active spherical shell, as a carrier in drug, agent, or material delivery systems, in order to investigate the controllability of exerted acoustic radiation force as the driver. The active body is comprised of a spherical elastic shell stimulated in its monopole mode of vibrations with the same frequency as the incident wave field via an internally bonded and spatially uniformly excited piezoelectric actuator. The main aim of this work is to examine the performance of a nondiffracting and self-reconstructing zero-order Bessel beam to obtain the full manipulability condition of active carriers in comparison with the case of a plane wave field. The results unveil some unique potentials of the Bessel beams in the company of active carriers, with emphasis on the consumed power of the actuation system. This paper will widen the path toward the single-beam robust acoustic manipulation techniques and may lead to the prospect of combined tweezers and fields, with applications in delivery systems, microswimmers, and trapper designs.

  18. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  19. Sea Turtle Acoustic Telemetry Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Acoustic transmitters attached to sea turtles captured in various fishing gear enable the animals to be passively tracked. Acoustic receivers set up in an array...

  20. Perspective: Acoustic metamaterials in transition

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying; Yang, Min; Sheng, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials derive their novel characteristics from the interaction between acoustic waves with designed structures. Since its inception seventeen years ago, the field has been driven by fundamental geometric and physical principles

  1. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  2. Acoustic Levitation Containerless Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whymark, R. R.; Rey, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    This research program consists of the development of acoustic containerless processing systems with applications in the areas of research in material sciences, as well as the production of new materials, solid forms with novel and unusual microstructures, fusion target spheres, and improved optical fibers. Efforts have been focused on the containerless processing at high temperatures for producing new kinds of glasses. Also, some development has occurred in the areas of containerlessly supporting liquids at room temperature, with applications in studies of fluid dynamics, potential undercooling of liquids, etc. The high temperature area holds the greatest promise for producing new kinds of glasses and ceramics, new alloys, and possibly unusual structural shapes, such as very uniform hollow glass shells for fusion target applications. High temperature acoustic levitation required for containerless processing has been demonstrated in low-g environments as well as in ground-based experiments. Future activities include continued development of the signals axis acoustic levitator.

  3. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  4. Topological Acoustic Delay Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwang; Tian, Ye; Cheng, Ying; Wei, Qi; Liu, Xiaojun; Christensen, Johan

    2018-03-01

    Topological protected wave engineering in artificially structured media is at the frontier of ongoing metamaterials research that is inspired by quantum mechanics. Acoustic analogues of electronic topological insulators have recently led to a wealth of new opportunities in manipulating sound propagation with strikingly unconventional acoustic edge modes immune to backscattering. Earlier fabrications of topological insulators are characterized by an unreconfigurable geometry and a very narrow frequency response, which severely hinders the exploration and design of useful devices. Here we establish topologically protected sound in reconfigurable phononic crystals that can be switched on and off simply by rotating its three-legged "atoms" without altering the lattice structure. In particular, we engineer robust phase delay defects that take advantage of the ultrabroadband reflection-free sound propagation. Such topological delay lines serve as a paradigm in compact acoustic devices, interconnects, and electroacoustic integrated circuits.

  5. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  6. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  7. Acoustic Liners for Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael G (Inventor); Grady, Joseph E (Inventor); Kiser, James D. (Inventor); Miller, Christopher (Inventor); Heidmann, James D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An improved acoustic liner for turbine engines is disclosed. The acoustic liner may include a straight cell section including a plurality of cells with straight chambers. The acoustic liner may also include a bent cell section including one or more cells that are bent to extend chamber length without increasing the overall height of the acoustic liner by the entire chamber length. In some cases, holes are placed between cell chambers in addition to bending the cells, or instead of bending the cells.

  8. Acoustic integrated extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we der...

  9. Acoustic phenomena during boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorofeev, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Applied and theoretical significance of investigation into acoustic phenomena on boiling is discussed. Effect of spatial and time conditions on pressure vapour bubble has been elucidated. Collective effects were considered: acoustic interaction of bubbles, noise formation ion developed boiling, resonance and hydrodynamic autooscillations. Different methods for predicting heat transfer crisis using changes of accompanying noise characteristics were analysed. Principle peculiarities of generation mechanism of thermoacoustic autooscillations were analysed as well: formation of standing waves; change of two-phase medium contraction in a channel; relation of alternating pressure with boiling process as well as with instantaneous and local temperatures of heat transfer surface and liquid in a boundary layer

  10. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-19

    LE O CEAN RAPHIC I TITUTI Appli d Oc:ean Physics and E11gi1i,ering Depar1111,11t vember 9, 2017 Dr. Robert Headrick ffice of Naval Resear h, ode...UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department...2015). [3] J.F. Lynch and A.E. Newhall, "Shallow water acoustics", book chapter in "Practical Underwater Acoustics," L. Bjorno, T. Neighbors, and D

  11. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, D.W.; Whittaker, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal

  12. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the security of handling special nuclear materials at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a sensitive acoustic emission detector has been developed that will detect forcible entry through block or tile walls, concrete floors, or concrete/steel vault walls. A small, low-powered processor was designed to convert the output from a sensitive, crystal-type acoustic transducer to an alarm relay signal for use with a supervised alarm loop. The unit may be used to detect forcible entry through concrete, steel, block, tile, and/or glass

  13. Room Acoustical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mechel, Fridolin

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the theory of room acoustical fields and revises the Mirror Source Methods for practical computational use, emphasizing the wave character of acoustical fields.  The presented higher methods include the concepts of “Mirror Point Sources” and “Corner sources which allow for an excellent approximation of complex room geometries and even equipped rooms. In contrast to classical description, this book extends the theory of sound fields describing them by their complex sound pressure and the particle velocity. This approach enables accurate descriptions of interference and absorption phenomena.

  14. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  15. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  16. Formation of large-amplitude dust ion-acoustic shocks in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical studies of self-steepening and shock formation of large-amplitude dust ion-acoustic waves in dusty plasmas are presented. A comparison is made between the nondispersive two fluid model, which predicts the formation of large-amplitude compressive and rarefactive dust ion-acoustic shocks, Vlasov simulations, and recent laboratory experiments

  17. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  18. Comparison of acoustic data from a 102 mm conic nozzle as measured in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Mckie, J.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative program between the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), England, and the NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to compare acoustic measurements made in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The acoustic measurements were made in both facilities using the same 102 mm conical nozzle supplied by the RAE. The nozzle was tested by each organization using its respective jet test rig. The mounting hardware and nozzle exit conditions were matched as closely as possible. The data from each wind tunnel were independently analyzed by the respective organization. The results from these tests show good agreement. In both facilities, interference with acoustic measurement is evident at angles in the forward quadrant.

  19. Vibro-acoustic modeling and analysis of a coupled acoustic system comprising a partially opened cavity coupled with a flexible plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuangxia; Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Liu, Zhigang

    2018-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling and solution method of a three-dimensional (3D) coupled acoustic system comprising a partially opened cavity coupled with a flexible plate and an exterior field of semi-infinite size, which is ubiquitously encountered in architectural acoustics and is a reasonable representation of many engineering occasions. A general solution method is presented to predict the dynamic behaviors of the three-dimensional (3D) acoustic coupled system, in which the displacement of the plate and the sound pressure in the cavity are respectively constructed in the form of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional modified Fourier series with several auxiliary functions introduced to ensure the uniform convergence of the solution over the entire solution domain. The effect of the opening is taken into account via the work done by the sound pressure acting at the coupling aperture that is contributed from the vibration of particles on the acoustic coupling interface and on the structural-acoustic coupling interface. Both the acoustic coupling between finite cavity and exterior field and the structural-acoustic coupling between flexible plate and interior acoustic field are considered in the vibro-acoustic modeling of the three-dimensional acoustic coupled acoustic system. The dynamic responses of the coupled structural-acoustic system are obtained using the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure based on the energy expressions for the coupled system. The accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method are validated through numerical examples and comparison with results obtained by the boundary element analysis. Furthermore, the influence of the opening and the cavity volume on the acoustic behaviors of opened cavity system is studied.

  20. Improved acoustic levitation apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, L. H.; Johnson, J. L.; Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Concave driver and reflector enhance and shape levitation forces in acoustic resonance system. Single-mode standing-wave pattern is focused by ring element situated between driver and reflector. Concave surfaces increase levitating forces up to factor of 6 as opposed to conventional flat surfaces, making it possible to suspend heavier objects.

  1. Acoustic cavitation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, L. A.

    1981-09-01

    The primary thrust of this study was toward a more complete understanding of general aspects of acoustic cavitation. The effect of long-chain polymer additives on the cavitation threshold was investigated to determine if they reduced the acoustic cavitation threshold in a similar manner to the observed reduction in the cavitation index in hydrodynamic cavitation. Measurements were made of the acoustic cavitation threshold as a function of polymer concentration for additives such as guar gum and polyethelene oxide. The measurements were also made as a function of dissolved gas concentration, surface tension and viscosity. It was determined that there was a significant increase in the acoustic cavitation threshold for increased concentrations of the polymer additives (measurable effects could be obtained for concentrations as low as a few parts per million). One would normally expect that an additive that reduces surface tension to decrease the pressure required to cause a cavity to grow and thus these additives, at first thought, should reduce the threshold. However, even in the hydrodynamic case, the threshold was increased. In both of the hydrodynamic cases considered, the explanation for the increased threshold was given in terms of changed fluid dynamics rather than changed physical properties of the fluid.

  2. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  3. Portable acoustic myography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bartels, Else Marie

    2013-01-01

    Muscle sound gives a local picture of muscles involved in a particular movement and is independent of electrical signals between nerve and muscle. Sound recording (acoustic myography) is a well-known noninvasive technique that has suffered from not being easily applicable, as well as not being able...

  4. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...

  5. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  6. Underwater Acoustic Networking Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Otnes, Roald; Casari, Paolo; Goetz, Michael; Husøy, Thor; Nissen, Ivor; Rimstad, Knut; van Walree, Paul; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This literature study presents an overview of underwater acoustic networking. It provides a background and describes the state of the art of all networking facets that are relevant for underwater applications. This report serves both as an introduction to the subject and as a summary of existing protocols, providing support and inspiration for the development of network architectures.

  7. Acoustic Surface Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Merely the presence of compressible entities, known as bubbles, greatly enriches the physical phenomena encountered when introducing ultrasound in a liquid. Mediated by the response of these bubbles, the otherwise diffuse and relatively low energy density of the acoustic field can induce strong,

  8. Select Internet Resources on Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Davis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Merriam-Webster (2016 defines acoustics as, “a science that deals with the production, control, transmission, reception, and effects of sounds.” According to Rossing (2014, the study of acoustics began in ancient Greece with Pythagoras’ study of vibrating strings on musical instruments. Since those early beginnings, famous scientists including Rayleigh, Alexander Graham Bell, and Thomas Edison, have helped expand the field of acoustics to include architectural, physical, engineering, structural, underwater, physiological and psychological, musical acoustics, and speech. Acoustics is a highly interdisciplinary field and researchers may need resources from physics, medicine, and engineering to understand all aspects of their research.

  9. Acoustic emission characterization of the tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, D.R.; Arora, A.

    1983-01-01

    The processes accompanying the tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia (ZrO 2 ) have been studied using acoustic emission and electron microscopy in an attempt to characterize the different mechanisms by which the transformation can be accommodated in bulk materials. Experiments in which the acoustic emission is detected as specimens are cooled through the transformation, following densification by sintering, are described. For comparison, the acoustic emission from free, nominally unconstrained powders similarly cooled through the transformation is reported. The existence of distinct processes accompanying the phase transformation is established on the basis of postexperiment multiparametric correlation analysis of the acoustic emission

  10. Holograms for acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-22

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  11. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  12. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  13. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    present study employs the COMSOL Multphysics framework to solve the coupled eigenvalue problem using the finite element approach. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluated the gas flow inside of a solid rocket motor using St. Robert's law modeling solid propellant burn rate, slip boundary conditions, and the supersonic outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the eigenvalues of the AVPE. The mathematics model is truncated at the nozzle sonic line, where a zero flux boundary condition is self-satisfying. The remaining boundaries are modeled with a zero flux boundary condition, assuming zero acoustic absorption on all surfaces. Pertinent results from these analyses are the complex valued eigenvalue and eigenvectors. Comparisons are made to the French results to evaluate the modeling approach. A comparison of the French results with that of the present analysis is displayed in figures 1 and 2, respectively. The graphic shows the first tangential eigenvector's real (a) and imaginary (b) values.

  14. The availability of the detection method of internal valve leakage using acoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Akio

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the availability of acoustic method to the internal leakage of the valves at power plants. The acoustic method was applied to the valves at the site, and the background noise was measured for the abnormal plantcondition. From the comparison of the background noise date with the experimental results as to relation between leakage flow and acoust signal, the minimum leakage flow rates that can be detected by the acoust signal was suggested. When the background levels are higher than the acoust signal, the method described below was considered that the analysis the remainder among the background noise frequency spectrum and the acoustic signal spectrum become a very useful leak detection method. A few experimental examples of the spectrum analysis that varied the background noise characteristic were given. (author)

  15. A visual acoustic high-pressure cell for the study of critical behavior of nonsimple mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar-Ricardo, A.; Temtem, M.; Casimiro, T.; Ribeiro, N.

    2004-10-01

    A visual acoustic high-pressure cell was constructed for the determination of critical data of multicomponent mixtures. The cell was specially designed to include two piezoelectric transducers and two sapphire windows that make this cell well suited to investigate the critical behavior of mixtures, simultaneously using the acoustic technique and the direct visual inspection of the critical opalescence. Critical data obtained on the binary mixtures of CO2+CHF3 were used for comparison with values given in literature using the traditional methods. The acoustic results are in agreement with those obtained by the conventional methods, within the combined experimental errors. Comparison of visual and acoustic data enabled the evaluation of the applicability of the acoustic technique to study the critical behavior of multicomponent mixtures.

  16. Education in acoustics in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyara, Federico

    2002-11-01

    Over the last decades, education in acoustics (EA) in Argentina has experienced ups and downs due to economic and political issues interfering with long term projects. Unlike other countries, like Chile, where EA has reached maturity in spite of the acoustical industry having shown little development, Argentina has several well-established manufacturers of acoustic materials and equipment but no specific career with a major in acoustics. At the university level, acoustics is taught as a complementary--often elective--course for careers such as architecture, communication engineering, or music. In spite of this there are several research centers with programs covering environmental and community noise, effects of noise on man, acoustic signal processing, musical acoustics and acoustic emission, and several national and international meetings are held each year in which results are communicated and discussed. Several books on a variety of topics such as sound system, architectural acoustics, and noise control have been published as well. Another chapter in EA is technical and vocational education, ranging between secondary and postsecondary levels, with technical training on sound system operation or design. Over the last years there have been several attempts to implement master degrees in acoustics or audio engineering, with little or no success.

  17. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  18. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  19. An acoustic prion assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Hayward

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic prion assay has been demonstrated for sheep brain samples. Only five false positives and no false negatives were observed in a test of 45 positive and 45 negative samples. The acoustic prion sensor was constructed using a thickness shear mode quartz resonator coated with a covalently bound recombinant prion protein. The characteristic indicator of a scrapie infected sheep brain sample was an observed shoulder in the frequency decrease in response to a sample.The response of the sensor aligns with a conformational shift in the surface protein and with the propagation mechanism of the disease. This alignment is evident in the response timing and shape, dependence on concentration, cross species behaviour and impact of blood plasma. This alignment is far from sufficient to prove the mechanism of the sensor but it does offer the possibility of a rapid and inexpensive additional tool to explore prion disease. Keywords: Prions, Thickness shear mode quartz sensor

  20. CHROMOSPHERIC HEATING BY ACOUSTIC WAVES COMPARED TO RADIATIVE COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, M.; Heinzel, P.; Švanda, M.; Jurčák, J. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (v.v.i.), Fričova 298, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Del Moro, D.; Berrilli, F. [Department of Physics, University of Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-20

    Acoustic and magnetoacoustic waves are among the possible candidate mechanisms that heat the upper layers of the solar atmosphere. A weak chromospheric plage near the large solar pore NOAA 11005 was observed on 2008 October 15, in the Fe i 617.3 nm and Ca ii 853.2 nm lines of the Interferometric Bidimemsional Spectrometer attached to the Dunn Solar Telescope. In analyzing the Ca ii observations (with spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.″4 and 52 s) the energy deposited by acoustic waves is compared to that released by radiative losses. The deposited acoustic flux is estimated from the power spectra of Doppler oscillations measured in the Ca ii line core. The radiative losses are calculated using a grid of seven one-dimensional hydrostatic semi-empirical model atmospheres. The comparison shows that the spatial correlation of the maps of radiative losses and acoustic flux is 72%. In a quiet chromosphere, the contribution of acoustic energy flux to radiative losses is small, only about 15%. In active areas with a photospheric magnetic-field strength between 300 and 1300 G and an inclination of 20°–60°, the contribution increases from 23% (chromospheric network) to 54% (a plage). However, these values have to be considered as lower limits and it might be possible that the acoustic energy flux is the main contributor to the heating of bright chromospheric network and plages.

  1. Curcumin protects against acoustic trauma in the rat cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyalıç, Harun; Gevrek, Fikret; Karaman, Serhat

    2017-08-01

    In this study we evaluated the therapeutic utility of curcumin in a rodent model of acoustic trauma using histopathology, immunohistochemical, and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAEs) measurements. 28 Wistar albino rats were included in the study and randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups. The first group (group 1) served as the control and was exposed to acoustic trauma alone. Group 2 was the curcumin group. Group 3 was the curcumin plus acoustic trauma group. Group 4 was the saline plus acoustic trauma group. Otoacoustic emission measurements were collected at the end of the experiment and all animals were sacrificed. Cochlea were collected and prepared for TUNEL (TdT-mediated deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick end-labelling) staining assay. Group 3 maintained baseline DPOAEs values at 3000 Hz, 4000 Hz and 8000 Hz on the 3rd and 5th day of the experiment. DPOAEs results were correlated with the immunohistochemical and histopathological findings in all groups. In comparison to the histopathologic control group, Group 1 exhibited a statistically significant increase in apoptotic indices in the organ of Corti, inner hair cell, and outer hair cell areas (p curcumin may protect the cochlear tissues from acoustic trauma in rats. Curcumin injection prior to or after an acoustic trauma reduces cochlear hair cell damage and may protect against hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The acoustics of snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  3. Osmotic Acoustic Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Technology Transfer at (401) 832-1511. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT Approved for Public Release Distribution is unlimited Attorney Docket No...in the enclosure through osmosis. Valves open at a specified time after the liquid injection to free flood between the enclosure and the...the timing of the salt jets and the free-flooding valves enables a repeatable Attorney Docket No. 300070 4 of 14 acoustic pulse at low

  4. Ocean acoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornuelle, Bruce D; Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A

    2008-01-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was proposed in 1979 by Walter Munk and Carl Wunsch as an analogue to x-ray computed axial tomography for the oceans. The oceans are opaque to most electromagnetic radiation, but there is a strong acoustic waveguide, and sound can propagate for 10 Mm and more with distinct multiply-refracted ray paths. Transmitting broadband pulses in the ocean leads to a set of impulsive arrivals at the receiver which characterize the impulse response of the sound channel. The peaks observed at the receiver are assumed to represent the arrival of energy traveling along geometric ray paths. These paths can be distinguished by arrival time, and by arrival angle when a vertical array of receivers is available. Changes in ray arrival time can be used to infer changes in ocean structure. Ray travel time measurements have been a mainstay of long-range acoustic measurements, but the strong sensitivity of ray paths to range-dependent sound speed perturbations makes the ray sampling functions uncertain in real cases. In the ray approximation travel times are sensitive to medium changes only along the corresponding eigenrays. Ray theory is an infinite-frequency approximation, and its eikonal equation has nonlinearities not found in the acoustic wave equation. We build on recent seismology results (kernels for body wave arrivals in the earth) to characterize the kernel for converting sound speed change in the ocean to travel time changes using more complete propagation physics. Wave-theoretic finite frequency kernels may show less sensitivity to small-scale sound speed structure.

  5. Spectral identification of sperm whales from Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center passive acoustic recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia A.; Richard, Blake; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    2005-09-01

    The Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC) made a series of passive broadband acoustic recordings in the Gulf of Mexico and Ligurian Sea to study noise and marine mammal phonations. The collected data contain a large amount of various types of sperm whale phonations, such as isolated clicks and communication codas. It was previously reported that the spectrograms of the extracted clicks and codas contain well-defined null patterns that seem to be unique for individuals. The null pattern is formed due to individual features of the sound production organs of an animal. These observations motivated the present studies of adapting human speech identification techniques for deep-diving marine mammal phonations. A three-state trained hidden Markov model (HMM) was used with the phonation spectra of sperm whales. The HHM-algorithm gave 75% accuracy in identifying individuals when it had been initially tested for the acoustic data set correlated with visual observations of sperm whales. A comparison of the identification accuracy based on null-pattern similarity analysis and the HMM-algorithm is presented. The results can establish the foundation for developing an acoustic identification database for sperm whales and possibly other deep-diving marine mammals that would be difficult to observe visually. [Research supported by ONR.

  6. Anisotropy of acoustic properties in paratellurite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parygin, Vladimir N.

    1996-01-01

    One of the peculiarities of the TeO 2 crystal consists of its strong acoustic anisotropy. This anisotropy demonstrates itself by acoustic energy walk-off and anisotropic distortion of an acoustic beam. Four constants completely characterise the acoustic anisotropy of the medium. In this paper these constants are calculated for various directions of the acoustic beam in crystal. (authors)

  7. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    acoustic communications, acoustic navigation, or acoustic remote sensing of the ocean interior . RELATED PROJECTS The 2015 CANAPE pilot study was a...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Canada Basin Acoustic Propagation Experiment (CANAPE...ocean structure. Changes in sea ice and the water column affect both acoustic propagation and ambient noise. This implies that what was learned

  8. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  9. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  10. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  11. Acoustic emission measurement during instrumented impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crostack, H.A.; Engelhardt, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Results of instrumented impact tests are discussed. On the one hand the development of the loading process at the hammer tup was recorded by means of a piezoelectric transducer. This instrumentation supplied a better representation of the load versus time than the conventional strain gauges. On the other hand the different types of acoustic emission occurring during a test could be separated. The acoustic emission released at the impact of the hammer onto the specimen is of lower frequency and its spectrum is strongly decreasing with increasing frequency. Plastic deformation also emits signals of lower frequency that are of quasi-continuous character. Both signal types can be discriminated by filtering. As a consequence typical burst signal were received afterwards that can be correlated with crack propagation. Their spectra exhibit considerable portions up to about 1.9 MHz. The development in time of the burst signals points to the kind of crack propagation resp. its sequence of appearance. However, definitive comparison between load and acoustic emission should become possible, only when the disadvantages of the common load measurement can be reduced, e.g. by determining the load directly at the specimen instead of the hammer tup

  12. Acoustic window planning for ultrasound acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbl, Rüdiger; Virga, Salvatore; Rackerseder, Julia; Frisch, Benjamin; Navab, Nassir; Hennersperger, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Autonomous robotic ultrasound has recently gained considerable interest, especially for collaborative applications. Existing methods for acquisition trajectory planning are solely based on geometrical considerations, such as the pose of the transducer with respect to the patient surface. This work aims at establishing acoustic window planning to enable autonomous ultrasound acquisitions of anatomies with restricted acoustic windows, such as the liver or the heart. We propose a fully automatic approach for the planning of acquisition trajectories, which only requires information about the target region as well as existing tomographic imaging data, such as X-ray computed tomography. The framework integrates both geometrical and physics-based constraints to estimate the best ultrasound acquisition trajectories with respect to the available acoustic windows. We evaluate the developed method using virtual planning scenarios based on real patient data as well as for real robotic ultrasound acquisitions on a tissue-mimicking phantom. The proposed method yields superior image quality in comparison with a naive planning approach, while maintaining the necessary coverage of the target. We demonstrate that by taking image formation properties into account acquisition planning methods can outperform naive plannings. Furthermore, we show the need for such planning techniques, since naive approaches are not sufficient as they do not take the expected image quality into account.

  13. Angular momentum transport by tidal acoustic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical expression of the braking torque on a Jacobian ellipsoid rotating steadily in an enviromental gas is given, based on the assumption that the ellipsoid rotates around its shortest principal axis with an angular momentum slightly larger than that at the bifurcation point of the Maclaurin spheroid. This braking torque is effected by the gravitational interaction between the ellipsoid matter and a spiral density configuration in the environmental gas. This spiral configuration which is called a tidal acoustic wave, is caused by the zone of silence effect in a supersonic flow. With respect to a coordinates system rotating with the ellipsoid, a supersonic region appears outside a certain radius. In this supersonic region, the effect of the non-axisymmetric fluctuation in the ellipsoid potential propagates along the downstream branches of the Mach waves. This one-sided response of the supersonic part causes the tidal acoustic wave. The discussion is restricted to the equatorial plane, and an acoustic approximation of the basic equations is used under the assumption that the self-gravity effect of the environmental gas is negligable in comparison to the main gravity of the ellipsoid. The results are applied to the pre- and post-Main sequence phases of a rotating star, and relating astrophysical problems are discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Angular momentum transport by tidal acoustic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, T [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1976-05-01

    An analytical expression of the braking torque on a Jacobian ellipsoid rotating steadily in an enviromental gas is given, based on the assumption that the ellipsoid rotates around its shortest principal axis with an angular momentum slightly larger than that at the bifurcation point of the Maclaurin spheroid. This braking torque is effected by the gravitational interaction between the ellipsoid matter and a spiral density configuration in the environmental gas. This spiral configuration which is called a tidal acoustic wave, is caused by the zone of silence effect in a supersonic flow. With respect to a coordinates system rotating with the ellipsoid, a supersonic region appears outside a certain radius. In this supersonic region, the effect of the non-axisymmetric fluctuation in the ellipsoid potential propagates along the downstream branches of the Mach waves. This one-sided response of the supersonic part causes the tidal acoustic wave. The discussion is restricted to the equatorial plane, and an acoustic approximation of the basic equations is used under the assumption that the self-gravity effect of the environmental gas is negligable in comparison to the main gravity of the ellipsoid. The results are applied to the pre- and post-Main sequence phases of a rotating star, and relating astrophysical problems are discussed.

  15. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow-Water Mud Acoustics William L. Siegmann...models and methods that explain observed material and acoustic properties of different physical types of shallow-ocean mud sediments. Other goals...are to assess prior data relating to the acoustic properties of mud and to provide guidance in the development and interpretation of experiments. A

  16. Coupled Acoustic-Mechanical Bandgaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Kook, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    medium and the presence of acoustic resonances. It is demonstrated that corrugation of the plate structure can introduce bending wave bandgaps and bandgaps in the acoustic domain in overlapping and audible frequency ranges. This effect is preserved also when taking the physical coupling between the two...... domains into account. Additionally, the coupling is shown to introduce extra gaps in the band structure due to modal interaction and the appearance of a cut-on frequency for the fundamental acoustic mode....

  17. Acoustic Communications Measurement Systems (ACOMMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Design and develop adaptive signal processing techniques to improve underwater acoustic communications and networking. Phase coherent and incoherent signal...

  18. Sinusoidal Representation of Acoustic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Masaaki

    Sinusoidal representation of acoustic signals has been an important tool in speech and music processing like signal analysis, synthesis and time scale or pitch modifications. It can be applicable to arbitrary signals, which is an important advantage over other signal representations like physical modeling of acoustic signals. In sinusoidal representation, acoustic signals are composed as sums of sinusoid (sine wave) with different amplitudes, frequencies and phases, which is based on the timedependent short-time Fourier transform (STFT). This article describes the principles of acoustic signal analysis/synthesis based on a sinusoid representation with focus on sine waves with rapidly varying frequency.

  19. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  20. Tunable coupled surface acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M. M.; Santos, P. V.; Kosevich, Yu. A.; Cantarero, A.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate the electric tuning of the acoustic field in acoustic microcavities (MCs) defined by a periodic arrangement of metal stripes within a surface acoustic delay line on LiNbO3 substrate. Interferometric measurements show the enhancement of the acoustic field distribution within a single MC, the presence of a "bonding" and "anti-bonding" modes for two strongly coupled MCs, as well as the positive dispersion of the "mini-bands" formed by five coupled MCs. The frequency and amplitude of the resonances can be controlled by the potential applied to the metal stripes.

  1. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-01-01

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation

  2. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  3. NDE Acoustic Microscopy Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to develop advanced, more effective high-resolution micro-NDE materials characterization methods using scanning acoustic microscopy. The laboratory's...

  4. Ion-acoustic plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychenkov, V.Y.; Silin, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    A theory is developed of the nonlinear state that is established in a plasma as a result of development of ion-acoustic instability. Account is taken simultaneously of the linear induced scattering of the waves by the ions and of the quasilinear relaxation of the electrons by the ion-acoustic pulsations. The distribution of the ion-acoustic turbulence in frequency and in angle is obtained. An Ohm's law is established and expressions are obtained for the electronic heat flux and for the relaxation time of the electron temperature in a turbulent plasma. Anomalously large absorption and scattering of the electromagnetic waves by the ion-acoustic pulsations is predicted

  5. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  6. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  7. ["An Italian Court recognizes the occupational origin of a trigeminal neuroma in a mobile telephone user: a case-study of the complex relationships between science and laws"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagorio, Susanna; Vecchia, P

    2011-01-01

    Scientific knowledge is essential for the resolution of disputes in law and administrative applications (such as toxic tort litigation and workers' compensation) and provides essential input for public policy decisions. There are no socially agreed-upon rules for the application of this knowledge except in the law. On a practical level, the legal system lacks the ability to assess the validity of scientific knowledge that can be used as evidence and therefore relies heavily on expert opinion. A key issue is how to ensure that professionals in any field provide judges with sound advice, based on relevant and reliable scientific evidence. The search for solutions to this problem seems particularly urgent in Italy, a country where a number of unprecedented verdicts of guilt have been pronounced in trials involving personal injuries from exposure to electromagnetic fields. An Italian Court has recently recognized the occupational origin of a trigeminal neuroma in a mobile telephone user, and ordered the Italian Workers' Compensation Authority (INAIL) to award the applicant compensation for a high degree (80%) of permanent disability. We describe and discuss the salient aspects of this sentence as a case-study in the framework of the use (and misuse) of scientific evidence in toxic-tort litigations. Based on the motivations of the verdict, it appears that the judge relied on seriously flawed expert testimonies. The "experts" who served in this particular trial were clearly inexperienced in forensic epidemiology in general, as well as in the topic at hand. Selective overviews of scientific evidence concerning cancer risks from mobile phone use were provided, along with misleading interpretations of findings from relevant epidemiologic studies (including the dismissal of the Interphone study results on the grounds of purported bias resulting from industry funding). The necessary requirements to proceed to causal inferences at individual level were not taken into account

  8. MRI of acoustic neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kunihiko; Niitsu, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yumiko; Anno, Izumi; Kuramoto, Kenmei; Itai, Yuji

    1994-01-01

    Thirty six patients were studied with a 1.5 T superconductive magnetic resonance imager. Small neurinomas appeared as homogenous intensities, large neurinomas as heterogenous intensities in T 1 and T 2 weighted images. Dural tail representing reactive change of the meninges was seen in our three acoustic neurinomas. High resolution, thin slice, MR imaging was particularly useful for intracanalicular tumor to see the relationship between the tumor and facial nerve. Total or near-total removal of tumor was performed in thirteen cases, in which functional preservation of the cochlear nerve was achieved in only three cases. (author)

  9. Lecture Notes On Acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Han

    2005-09-01

    This book mentions string vibration and wave, one-dimension wave and wave equation, characteristic impedance, governing equation of string, and wave energy from string, wave equation of wave and basic physical quantity like one-dimension wave equation, sound unit, sound intensity and energy, sound movement in a surface of discontinuity with transmission loss of sound by partition, and Snell's law, radiation, scatter and diffraction and sound in closed space with Sabine's theory, sound characteristic of closed space and duct acoustics.

  10. Oscillating acoustic streaming jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudjed, Brahim; Botton, Valery; Henry, Daniel; Millet, Severine; Ben Hadid, Hamda; Garandet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present paper provides the first experimental investigation of an oscillating acoustic streaming jet. The observations are performed in the far field of a 2 MHz circular plane ultrasound transducer introduced in a rectangular cavity filled with water. Measurements are made by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in horizontal and vertical planes near the end of the cavity. Oscillations of the jet appear in this zone, for a sufficiently high Reynolds number, as an intermittent phenomenon on an otherwise straight jet fluctuating in intensity. The observed perturbation pattern is similar to that of former theoretical studies. This intermittently oscillatory behavior is the first step to the transition to turbulence. (authors)

  11. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms...... exchanging experiences about constructions fulfilling different classes, reducing trade barriers, and finally increasing the sound insulation of dwellings.......Schemes for the classification of dwellings according to different building performances have been proposed in the last years worldwide. The general idea behind these schemes relates to the positive impact a higher label, and thus a better performance, should have. In particular, focusing on sound...

  12. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  13. Complete de-Dopplerization and acoustic holography for external noise of a high-speed train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Diange; Wen, Junjie; Miao, Feng; Wang, Ziteng; Gu, Xiaoan; Lian, Xiaomin

    2016-09-01

    Identification and measurement of moving sound sources are the bases for vehicle noise control. Acoustic holography has been applied in successfully identifying the moving sound source since the 1990s. However, due to the high demand for the accuracy of holographic data, currently the maximum velocity achieved by acoustic holography is just above 100 km/h. The objective of this study was to establish a method based on the complete Morse acoustic model to restore the measured signal in high-speed situations, and to propose a far-field acoustic holography method applicable for high-speed moving sound sources. Simulated comparisons of the proposed far-field acoustic holography with complete Morse model, the acoustic holography with simplified Morse model and traditional delay-and-sum beamforming were conducted. Experiments with a high-speed train running at the speed of 278 km/h validated the proposed far-field acoustic holography. This study extended the applications of acoustic holography to high-speed situations and established the basis for quantitative measurements of far-field acoustic holography.

  14. A numerical study on acoustic behavior in gas turbine combustor with acoustic resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I Sun; Sohn, Chae Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic behavior in gas turbine combustor with acoustic resonator is investigated numerically by adopting linear acoustic analysis. Helmholtz-type resonator is employed as acoustic resonator to suppress acoustic instability passively. The tuning frequency of acoustic resonator is adjusted by varying its length. Through harmonic analysis, acoustic-pressure responses of chamber to acoustic excitation are obtained and the resonant acoustic modes are identified. Acoustic damping effect of acoustic resonator is quantified by damping factor. As the tuning frequency of acoustic resonator approaches the target frequency of the resonant mode to be suppressed, mode split from the original resonant mode to lower and upper modes appears and thereby complex patterns of acoustic responses show up. Considering mode split and damping effect as a function of tuning frequency, it is desirable to make acoustic resonator tuned to broad-band frequencies near the maximum frequency of those of the possible upper modes

  15. Spacecraft Internal Acoustic Environment Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, SShao-sheng R.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic modeling can be used to identify key noise sources, determine/analyze sub-allocated requirements, keep track of the accumulation of minor noise sources, and to predict vehicle noise levels at various stages in vehicle development, first with estimates of noise sources, later with experimental data. In FY09, the physical mockup developed in FY08, with interior geometric shape similar to Orion CM (Crew Module) IML (Interior Mode Line), was used to validate SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) acoustic model development with realistic ventilation fan sources. The sound power levels of these sources were unknown a priori, as opposed to previous studies that RSS (Reference Sound Source) with known sound power level was used. The modeling results were evaluated based on comparisons to measurements of sound pressure levels over a wide frequency range, including the frequency range where SEA gives good results. Sound intensity measurement was performed over a rectangular-shaped grid system enclosing the ventilation fan source. Sound intensities were measured at the top, front, back, right, and left surfaces of the and system. Sound intensity at the bottom surface was not measured, but sound blocking material was placed tinder the bottom surface to reflect most of the incident sound energy back to the remaining measured surfaces. Integrating measured sound intensities over measured surfaces renders estimated sound power of the source. The reverberation time T6o of the mockup interior had been modified to match reverberation levels of ISS US Lab interior for speech frequency bands, i.e., 0.5k, 1k, 2k, 4 kHz, by attaching appropriately sized Thinsulate sound absorption material to the interior wall of the mockup. Sound absorption of Thinsulate was modeled in three methods: Sabine equation with measured mockup interior reverberation time T60, layup model based on past impedance tube testing, and layup model plus air absorption correction. The evaluation/validation was

  16. Acoustic Levitation With One Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Rudnick, I.; Elleman, D. D.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Report discusses acoustic levitation in rectangular chamber using one driver mounted at corner. Placement of driver at corner enables it to couple effectively to acoustic modes along all three axes. Use of single driver reduces cost, complexity and weight of levitation system below those of three driver system.

  17. Acoustic Levitation With One Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.

    1987-01-01

    Higher resonator modes enables simplification of equipment. Experimental acoustic levitator for high-temperature containerless processing has round cylindrical levitation chamber and only one acoustic transducer. Stable levitation of solid particle or liquid drop achieved by exciting sound in chamber to higher-order resonant mode that makes potential well for levitated particle or drop at some point within chamber.

  18. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  19. Acoustic engineering and technology '90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring, testing and diagnosis in machines, production processes and products enhance the uptimes and profitability of machinery and plants. 18 papers discuss the current state of the art of acoustic monitoring systems including integrated factory planning as well as industrial health, and noise protection. (DG) [de

  20. Scattering Of Nonplanar Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Judith M.; Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents theoretical study of scattering of nonplanar acoustic waves by rigid bodies. Study performed as part of effort to develop means of predicting scattering, from aircraft fuselages, of noise made by rotating blades. Basic approach was to model acoustic scattering by use of boundary integral equation to solve equation by the Galerkin method.

  1. Acoustical Properties of Contemporary Mosques

    OpenAIRE

    Karaman Özgül Yılmaz; Güzel Neslihan Onat

    2017-01-01

    Religious buildings are important for many communities because of their representation of different beliefs. In such structures, the sense of individuality or unity & togetherness are created according to variable worship activities; these different uses have also different acoustical requirements. In order to create the desired feeling in the space at the required time, rooms should be evaluated in terms of acoustical conditions.

  2. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  3. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  4. Acoustic Emission Technology and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Y. S.; Lim, S. H.; Eom, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Jung, H. K.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic emission is the elastic wave that is generated by the rapid release of energy from the localized sources within a material. After the observation of acoustic emission phenomenon in 1950, the research and further investigation had been performed. Acoustic emission examination becomes a rapidly matured nondestructive testing method with demonstrated capabilities for characterizing material behavior and for detecting the defect. It is of interest as a possible passive monitoring technique for detecting, locating and characterizing the defects in component and structure. Acoustic emission technology has recently strengthened the on-line monitoring application for the detection of incipient failures and the assurance of structural integrity. The field of acoustic emission testing is still growing vigorously and presents many challenges. Especially, acoustic emission has been successfully applied in the leak detection of primary pressure boundary of nuclear power plants. In this state-of-art report, the principle, measurement and field applications of acoustic emission technique is reviewed and summarized. Acoustic emission technology will contribute to the assurance of nuclear safety as the on-line monitoring technique of structural integrity of NSSS components and structures

  5. Electron/electron acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The electron acoustic wave becomes a normal mode of an unmagnetized collisionless plasma in the presence of two electron components with similar densities, but strongly disparate temperatures. The characteristic frequency of this mode is the plasma frequency of the cooler electron component. If these two electron components have a relative drift speed several times the thermal speed of the cooler component, the electron/electron acoustic instability may arise. This paper describes the parametric dependences of the threshold drift speed and maximum growth rate of this instability, and compares these with the same properties of the electron/ion acoustic instability. Under the condition of zero current, the electron/ion acoustic instability typically has the lower threshold drift speed, so that observation of the electron/electron acoustic instability is a strong indication of the presence of an electrical current in the plasma

  6. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  7. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  8. Acoustics and Hearing

    CERN Document Server

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  9. Omnidirectional ventilated acoustic barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-long; Zhu, Yi-fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-11-01

    As an important problem in acoustics, sound insulation finds applications in a great variety of situations. In the existing schemes, however, there has always been a trade-off between the thinness of sound-insulating devices and their ventilating capabilities, limiting their potentials in the control of low-frequency sound in high ventilation environments. Here, we design and experimentally implement an omnidirectional acoustic barrier with a planar profile, subwavelength thickness ( 0.18 λ ), yet high ventilation. The proposed mechanism is based on the interference between the resonant scattering of discrete states and the background scattering of continuous states which induces a Fano-like asymmetric transmission profile. Benefitting from the binary-structured design of the coiled unit and hollow pipe, it maximally simplifies the design and fabrication while ensuring the ventilation for all the non-resonant units with open tubes. The simulated and measured results agree well, showing the effectiveness of our proposed mechanism to block low frequency sound coming from various directions while allowing 63% of the air flow to pass. We anticipate our design to open routes to design sound insulators and to enable applications in traditionally unattainable cases such as those calling for noise reduction and cooling simultaneously.

  10. [Acoustical parameters of toys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harazin, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Toys play an important role in the development of the sight and hearing concentration in children. They also support the development of manipulation, gently influence a child and excite its emotional activities. A lot of toys emit various sounds. The aim of the study was to assess sound levels produced by sound-emitting toys used by young children. Acoustical parameters of noise were evaluated for 16 sound-emitting plastic toys in laboratory conditions. The noise level was recorded at four different distances, 10, 20, 25 and 30 cm, from the toy. Measurements of A-weighted sound pressure levels and noise levels in octave band in the frequency range from 31.5 Hz to 16 kHz were performed at each distance. Taking into consideration the highest equivalent A-weighted sound levels produced by tested toys, they can be divided into four groups: below 70 dB (6 toys), from 70 to 74 dB (4 toys), from 75 to 84 dB (3 toys) and from 85 to 94 dB (3 toys). The majority of toys (81%) emitted dominant sound levels in octave band at the frequency range from 2 kHz to 4 kHz. Sound-emitting toys produce the highest acoustic energy at the frequency range of the highest susceptibility of the auditory system. Noise levels produced by some toys can be dangerous to children's hearing.

  11. Review of Progress in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A. B.; Pérez, Nicolás; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic levitation uses acoustic radiation forces to counteract gravity and suspend objects in mid-air. Although acoustic levitation was first demonstrated almost a century ago, for a long time, it was limited to objects much smaller than the acoustic wavelength levitating at fixed positions in space. Recent advances in acoustic levitation now allow not only suspending but also rotating and translating objects in three dimensions. Acoustic levitation is also no longer restricted to small objects and can now be employed to levitate objects larger than the acoustic wavelength. This article reviews the progress of acoustic levitation, focusing on the working mechanism of different types of acoustic levitation devices developed to date. We start with a brief review of the theory. Then, we review the acoustic levitation methods to suspend objects at fixed positions, followed by the techniques that allow the manipulation of objects. Finally, we present a brief summary and offer some future perspectives for acoustic levitation.

  12. Comments on ''The optimization of electronic precision in ultrasonic velocity measurements: A comparison of the time interval averaging and sing around methods'' [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 73, 1833--1837 (1983)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karplus, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    J. D. Aindow and R. C. Chivers [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 73, 1833 (1983)] compared the precision of the direct ''time-of-flight'' technique with the ''sing-around'' method for sound velocity measurement. Their conclusion is changed by the newer, faster, commercial clocks (2 ns HP5345<0.1 ns HP5370), giving the advantage to the time of flight method. The analysis is herewith augmented by calculating the time jitter in terms of signal to noise ratio, which was correctly shown to be negligible with 100-ns clocks, but becomes increasingly more significant with faster clocks

  13. Perceptual structure of adductor spasmodic dysphonia and its acoustic correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannito, Michael P; Doiuchi, Maki; Murry, Thomas; Woodson, Gayle E

    2012-11-01

    To examine the perceptual structure of voice attributes in adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin treatment and identify acoustic correlates of underlying perceptual factors. Reliability of perceptual judgments is considered in detail. Pre- and posttreatment trial with comparison to healthy controls, using single-blind randomized listener judgments of voice qualities, as well as retrospective comparison with acoustic measurements. Oral readings were recorded from 42 ADSD speakers before and after treatment as well as from their age- and sex-matched controls. Experienced judges listened to speech samples and rated attributes of overall voice quality, breathiness, roughness, and brokenness, using computer-implemented visual analog scaling. Data were adjusted for regression to the mean and submitted to principal components factor analysis. Acoustic waveforms, extracted from the reading samples, were analyzed and measurements correlated with perceptual factor scores. Four reliable perceptual variables of ADSD voice were effectively reduced to two underlying factors that corresponded to hyperadduction, most strongly associated with roughness, and hypoadduction, most strongly associated with breathiness. After treatment, the hyperadduction factor improved, whereas the hypoadduction factor worsened. Statistically significant (P<0.01) correlations were observed between perceived roughness and four acoustic measures, whereas breathiness correlated with aperiodicity and cepstral peak prominence (CPPs). This study supported a two-factor model of ADSD, suggesting perceptual characterization by both hyperadduction and hypoadduction before and after treatment. Responses of the factors to treatment were consistent with previous research. Correlations among perceptual and acoustic variables suggested that multiple acoustic features contributed to the overall impression of roughness. Although CPPs appears to be a partial correlate of perceived

  14. Sound insulation and energy harvesting based on acoustic metamaterial plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouar, Badreddine; Oudich, Mourad; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of artificially designed sub-wavelength acoustic materials, denoted acoustic metamaterials (AMM), has significantly broadened the range of materials responses found in nature. These engineered materials can indeed manipulate sound/vibration in surprising ways, which include vibration/sound insulation, focusing, cloaking, acoustic energy harvesting …. In this work, we report both on the analysis of the airborne sound transmission loss (STL) through a thin metamaterial plate and on the possibility of acoustic energy harvesting. We first provide a theoretical study of the airborne STL and confronted them to the structure-borne dispersion of a metamaterial plate. Second, we propose to investigate the acoustic energy harvesting capability of the plate-type AMM. We have developed semi-analytical and numerical methods to investigate the STL performances of a plate-type AMM with an airborne sound excitation having different incident angles. The AMM is made of silicone rubber stubs squarely arranged in a thin aluminum plate, and the STL is calculated at low-frequency range [100Hz to 3kHz] for an incoming incident sound pressure wave. The obtained analytical and numerical STL present a very good agreement confirming the reliability of developed approaches. A comparison between computed STL and the band structure of the considered AMM shows an excellent agreement and gives a physical understanding of the observed behavior. On another hand, the acoustic energy confinement in AMM with created defects with suitable geometry was investigated. The first results give a general view for assessing the acoustic energy harvesting performances making use of AMM.

  15. Four-jet impingement: Noise characteristics and simplified acoustic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, C.; Housman, J.A.; Kiris, C.C.; Barad, M.F.; Hutcheson, F.V.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Large eddy simulation of unique four jet impingement configuration. • Characterization of flow features using POD, FFT, and wavelet decomposition. • Noise source identification utilizing causality method. • Development of simplified acoustic model utilizing equivalent source method. • Comparison with experimental data from BENS experiment. - Abstract: The noise generation mechanisms for four directly impinging supersonic jets are investigated employing implicit large eddy simulations with a higher-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme. Although these types of impinging jet configurations have been used in many experiments, a detailed investigation of the noise generation mechanisms has not been conducted before. The flow field is highly complex and contains a wide range of temporal and spatial scales relevant for noise generation. Proper orthogonal decomposition is utilized to characterize the unsteady nature of the flow field involving unsteady shock oscillations, large coherent turbulent flow structures, and the sporadic appearance of vortical flow structures in the center of the four-jet impingement region. The causality method based on Lighthills acoustic analogy is applied to link fluctuations of flow quantities inside the source region to the acoustic pressure in the far field. It will be demonstrated that the entropy fluctuation term plays a vital role in the noise generation process. Consequently, the understanding of the noise generation mechanisms is employed to develop a simplified acoustic model of the four-jet impingement device by utilizing the equivalent source method. Finally, three linear acoustic four-jet impingement models of the four-jet impingement device are used as broadband noise sources inside an engine nacelle and the acoustic scattering results are validated against far-field acoustic experimental data.

  16. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Nicolás, E-mail: nico@fisica.edu.uy [Centro Universitario de Paysandú, Universidad de la República, Paysandú (Uruguay); Andrade, Marco A. B. [Institute of Physics, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Canetti, Rafael [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Adamowski, Julio C. [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, Escola Politécnica, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-14

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator.

  17. Experimental determination of the dynamics of an acoustically levitated sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez, Nicolás; Andrade, Marco A. B.; Canetti, Rafael; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2014-01-01

    Levitation of solids and liquids by ultrasonic standing waves is a promising technique to manipulate materials without contact. When a small particle is introduced in certain areas of a standing wave field, the acoustic radiation force pushes the particle to the pressure node. This movement is followed by oscillations of the levitated particle. Aiming to investigate the particle oscillations in acoustic levitation, this paper presents the experimental and numerical characterization of the dynamic behavior of a levitated sphere. To obtain the experimental response, a small sphere is lifted by the acoustic radiation force. After the sphere lift, it presents a damped oscillatory behavior, which is recorded by a high speed camera. To model this behavior, a mass-spring-damper system is proposed. In this model, the acoustic radiation force that acts on the sphere is theoretically predicted by the Gor'kov theory and the viscous forces are modeled by two damping terms, one term proportional to the square of the velocity and another term proportional to the particle velocity. The proposed model was experimentally verified by using different values of sound pressure amplitude. The comparison between numerical and experimental results shows that the model can accurately describe the oscillatory behavior of the sphere in an acoustic levitator

  18. Acoustic black holes: recent developments in the theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor

    2014-08-01

    Acoustic black holes are relatively new physical objects that have been introduced and investigated mainly during the last decade. They can absorb almost 100% of the incident wave energy, and this makes them very attractive for such traditional engineering applications as vibration damping in different engineering structures and sound absorption in gases and liquids. They also could be useful for some ultrasonic devices using Lamb wave propagation to provide anechoic termination for such waves. So far, acoustic black holes have been investigated mainly for flexural waves in thin plates, for which the required gradual changes in local wave velocity with distance can be easily achieved by changing the plates' local thickness. The present paper provides a brief review of the theory of acoustic black holes, including their comparison with optic black holes introduced about five years ago. Review is also given of the recent experimental work carried out at Loughborough University on damping structural vibrations using the acoustic black hole effect. This is followed by the discussion on potential applications of the acoustic black hole effect for sound absorption in air.

  19. Radiation dominated acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinhong; Kang, Yuejun; Ai, Ye

    2015-10-01

    Acoustophoresis-based particle manipulation in microfluidics has gained increasing attention in recent years. Despite the fact that experimental studies have been extensively performed to demonstrate this technique for various microfluidic applications, numerical simulation of acoustophoresis driven by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) has still been largely unexplored. In this work, a numerical model taking into account the acoustic-piezoelectric interaction was developed to simulate the generation of a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW) field and predict the acoustic pressure field in the liquid. Acoustic radiation dominated particle tracing was performed to simulate acoustophoresis of particles with different sizes undergoing a SSAW field. A microfluidic device composed of two interdigital transducers (IDTs) for SAW generation and a microfluidic channel was fabricated for experimental validation. Numerical simulations could well capture the focusing phenomenon of particles to the pressure nodes in the experimental observation. Further comparison of particle trajectories demonstrated considerably quantitative agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results with fitting in the applied voltage. Particle switching was also demonstrated using the fabricated device that could be further developed as an active particle sorting device. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of human breast cancer by scanning acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Malyarenko, Eugene; Seviaryn, Fedar; Yuan, Ye; Sherman, Mark; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Gierach, Gretchen; Greenway, Christopher W.; Maeva, Elena; Strumban, Emil; Duric, Neb; Maev, Roman

    2013-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to characterize human breast cancer tissues by the measurement of microacoustic properties. Methods: We investigated eight breast cancer patients using acoustic microscopy. For each patient, seven blocks of tumor tissue were collected from seven different positions around a tumor mass. Frozen sections (10 micrometer, μm) of human breast cancer tissues without staining and fixation were examined in a scanning acoustic microscope with focused transducers at 80 and 200 MHz. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained sections from the same frozen breast cancer tissues were imaged by optical microscopy for comparison. Results: The results of acoustic imaging showed that acoustic attenuation and sound speed in cancer cell-rich tissue regions were significantly decreased compared with the surrounding tissue regions, where most components are normal cells/tissues, such as fibroblasts, connective tissue and lymphocytes. Our observation also showed that the ultrasonic properties were influenced by arrangements of cells and tissue patterns. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that attenuation and sound speed imaging can provide biomechanical information of the tumor and normal tissues. The results also demonstrate the potential of acoustic microscopy as an auxiliary method for operative detection and localization of cancer affected regions.

  1. Relaxation time of acoustically disturbed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, K.S.; Abrahamyan, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The conservation time of an acoustic structure in plasma after relieving of external acoustic influence is investigated. Dependences of the conservation time on discharge parameters are presented. It is asserted that the plasma becomes an anisotropic uniaxial medium with an acoustic superlattice under the acoustic influence

  2. Acoustics of friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Adnan

    2002-04-01

    This article presents an overview of the acoustics of friction by covering friction sounds, friction-induced vibrations and waves in solids, and descriptions of other frictional phenomena related to acoustics. Friction, resulting from the sliding contact of solids, often gives rise to diverse forms of waves and oscillations within solids which frequently lead to radiation of sound to the surrounding media. Among the many everyday examples of friction sounds, violin music and brake noise in automobiles represent the two extremes in terms of the sounds they produce and the mechanisms by which they are generated. Of the multiple examples of friction sounds in nature, insect sounds are prominent. Friction also provides a means by which energy dissipation takes place at the interface of solids. Friction damping that develops between surfaces, such as joints and connections, in some cases requires only microscopic motion to dissipate energy. Modeling of friction-induced vibrations and friction damping in mechanical systems requires an accurate description of friction for which only approximations exist. While many of the components that contribute to friction can be modeled, computational requirements become prohibitive for their contemporaneous calculation. Furthermore, quantification of friction at the atomic scale still remains elusive. At the atomic scale, friction becomes a mechanism that converts the kinetic energy associated with the relative motion of surfaces to thermal energy. However, the description of the conversion to thermal energy represented by a disordered state of oscillations of atoms in a solid is still not well understood. At the macroscopic level, friction interacts with the vibrations and waves that it causes. Such interaction sets up a feedback between the friction force and waves at the surfaces, thereby making friction and surface motion interdependent. Such interdependence forms the basis for friction-induced motion as in the case of

  3. Anti-sound and Acoustical Cloaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veturia CHIROIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The principles by which the acoustics can be mimicked in order to reduce or cancel the vibrational field are based on anti-sound concept which can be materialized by acoustic cloaks. Geometric transformations open an elegant way towards the unconstrained control of sound through acoustic metamaterials. Acoustic cloaks can be achieved through geometric transformations which bring exotic metamaterial properties into the acoustic equations. Our paper brings new ideas concerning the technological keys for manufacturing of novel metamaterials based on the spatial compression of Cantor structures, and the architecture of 3D acoustic cloaks in a given frequency band, with application to architectural acoustics.

  4. Acoustic of monolithic dome structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Refat Ismail

    2018-03-01

    The interior of monolithic domes have perfect, concave shapes to ensure that sound travels through the dome and perfectly collected at different vocal points. These dome structures are utilized for domestic use because the scale allows the focal points to be positioned across daily life activities, thereby affecting the sonic comfort of the internal space. This study examines the various acoustic treatments and parametric configurations of monolithic dome sizes. A geometric relationship of acoustic treatment and dome radius is established to provide architects guidelines on the correct selection of absorption needed to maintain the acoustic comfort of these special spaces.

  5. Perspective: Acoustic metamaterials in transition

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2017-12-15

    Acoustic metamaterials derive their novel characteristics from the interaction between acoustic waves with designed structures. Since its inception seventeen years ago, the field has been driven by fundamental geometric and physical principles that guide the structure design rules as well as provide the basis for wave functionalities. Recent examples include resonance-based acoustic metasurfaces that offer flexible control of acoustic wave propagation such as focusing and re-direction; parity-time (PT)-symmetric acoustics that utilizes the general concept of pairing loss and gain to achieve perfect absorption at a single frequency; and topological phononics that can provide one-way edge state propagation. However, such novel functionalities are not without constraints. Metasurface elements rely on resonances to enhance their coupling to the incident wave; hence, its functionality is limited to a narrow frequency band. Topological phononics is the result of the special lattice symmetry that must be fixed at the fabrication stage. Overcoming such constraints naturally forms the basis for further developments. We identify two emergent directions: Integration of acoustic metamaterial elements for achieving broadband characteristics as well as acoustic wave manipulation tasks more complex than the single demonstrative functionality; and active acoustic metamaterials that can adapt to environment as well as to go beyond the constraints on the passive acoustic metamaterials. Examples of a successful recent integration of multi-resonators in achieving broadband sound absorption can be found in optimal sound-absorbing structures, which utilize causality constraint as a design tool in realizing the target-set absorption spectrum with a minimal sample thickness. Active acoustic metamaterials have also demonstrated the capability to tune bandgaps as well as to alter property of resonances in real time through stiffening of the spring constants, in addition to the PT symmetric

  6. Industrial installation surveillance acoustic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Jean; Audenard, Bernard.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this invention is the detection of possible impacts of bodies migrating inside the installation, using acoustic sensors of the waves emitted at the time of impact of the migrating bodies. This device makes it possible to take into account only those acoustic signals relating to the impacts of bodies migrating in the area under surveillance, to the exclusion of any other acoustic or electric perturbing phenomenon. The invention has a preferential use in the case of a linear shape installation in which a fluid flows at high rate, such as a section of the primary system of a pressurized water nuclear reactor [fr

  7. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  8. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-01-01

    -domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original

  9. Theoretical vibro-acoustic modeling of acoustic noise transmission through aircraft windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloufi, Badr; Behdinan, Kamran; Zu, Jean

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fully vibro-acoustic model for sound transmission across a multi-pane aircraft window is developed. The proposed model is efficiently applied for a set of window models to perform extensive theoretical parametric studies. The studied window configurations generally simulate the passenger window designs of modern aircraft classes which have an exterior multi-Plexiglas pane, an interior single acrylic glass pane and a dimmable glass ("smart" glass), all separated by thin air cavities. The sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics of three different models, triple-, quadruple- and quintuple-paned windows identical in size and surface density, are analyzed for improving the acoustic insulation performances. Typical results describing the influence of several system parameters, such as the thicknesses, number and spacing of the window panes, on the transmission loss are then investigated. In addition, a comparison study is carried out to evaluate the acoustic reduction capability of each window model. The STL results show that the higher frequencies sound transmission loss performance can be improved by increasing the number of window panels, however, the low frequency performance is decreased, particularly at the mass-spring resonances.

  10. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species.

  11. A study on the spectrum analyzing of internal leak in valve for power plant using acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Sun Ki; Lee, Jun Shin; Sohn, Seok Man

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the availability of acoustic emission method to the internal leak of the valves at nuclear power plants. The acoustic emission method was applied to the valves at the site, and the background noise was measured for the abnormal plant condition. From the comparison of the background noise data with the experimental results as to relation between leak flow and acoustic signal, the minimum leak flow rates that can be detected by acoustic signal was suggested. When the background levels are higher than the acoustic signal, the method described below was considered that the analysis the remainder among the background noise frequency spectrum and the acoustic signal spectrum become a very useful leak detection method. A few experimental examples of the spectrum analysis that varied the background noise characteristic were given

  12. An investigation of the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition engine operating with biodiesel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, D.; Tesfa, B.; Yuan, X.; Wang, R.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, an experimental investigation has been carried out on the acoustic characteristics of a compression ignition (CI) engine running with biodiesel blends under steady state operating conditions. The experiment was conducted on a four-cylinder, four-stroke, direct injection and turbocharged diesel engine which runs with biodiesel (B50 and B100) and pure diesel. The signals of acoustic, vibration and in-cylinder pressure were measured during the experiment. To correlate the combustion process and the acoustic characteristics, both phenomena have been investigated. The acoustic analysis resulted in the sound level being increased with increasing of engine loads and speeds as well as the sound characteristics being closely correlated to the combustion process. However, acoustic signals are highly sensitive to the ambient conditions and intrusive background noise. Therefore, the spectral subtraction was employed to minimize the effects of background noise in order to enhance the signal to noise ratio. In addition, the acoustic characteristics of CI engine running with different fuels (biodiesel blends and diesel) was analysed for comparison. The results show that the sound energy level of acoustic signals is slightly higher when the engine fuelled by biodiesel and its blends than that of fuelled by normal diesel. Hence, the acoustic characteristics of the CI engine will have useful information for engine condition monitoring and fuel content estimation.

  13. An Experimental Introduction to Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Andy Nicholas; Magruder, Robert H.

    2017-11-01

    Learning and understanding physics requires more than studying physics texts. It requires doing physics. Doing research is a key opportunity for students to connect physical principles with their everyday experience. A powerful way to introduce students to research and technique is through subjects in which they might find interest. Presented is an experiment that serves to introduce an advanced undergraduate or high school student to conducting research in acoustics via an experiment involving a standard dreadnought acoustic guitar, recording industry-related equipment, and relevant industrial analysis software. This experimental process is applicable to a wide range of acoustical topics including both acoustic and electric instruments. Also, the student has a hands-on experience with relevant audio engineering technology to study physical principles.

  14. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  15. Physical acoustics principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    2012-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume IV, Part B: Applications to Quantum and Solid State Physics provides an introduction to the various applications of quantum mechanics to acoustics by describing several processes for which such considerations are essential. This book discusses the transmission of sound waves in molten metals. Comprised of seven chapters, this volume starts with an overview of the interactions that can happen between electrons and acoustic waves when magnetic fields are present. This text then describes acoustic and plasma waves in ionized gases wherein oscillations are subject to hydrodynamic as well as electromagnetic forces. Other chapters examine the resonances and relaxations that can take place in polymer systems. This book discusses as well the general theory of the interaction of a weak sinusoidal field with matter. The final chapter describes the sound velocities in the rocks composing the Earth. This book is a valuable resource for physicists and engineers.

  16. Acoustic holograms of active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We propose a method to study solar magnetic regions in the solar interior with the principle of optical holography. A magnetic region in the solar interior scatters the solar background acoustic waves. The scattered waves and background waves could form an interference pattern on the solar surface. We investigate the feasibility of detecting this interference pattern on the solar surface, and using it to construct the three-dimensional scattered wave from the magnetic region with the principle of optical holography. In solar acoustic holography, the background acoustic waves play the role of reference wave; the magnetic region plays the role of the target object; the interference pattern, acoustic power map, on the solar surface plays the role of the hologram.

  17. PVT Degradation Studies: Acoustic Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dib, Gerges [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. This document reports on a study of acoustic techniques to determine whether they can provide a diagnostic for the fogging of PVT. Different ultrasound techniques were employed for detecting the level of internal fogging in PVT, including wave velocity measurements, attenuation, nonlinear acoustics, and acoustic microscopy. The results indicate that there are linear relations between the wave velocity and wave attenuation with the level of internal fogging. The effects of fogging on ultrasound wave attenuation is further verified by acoustic microscopy imaging, where regions with fog in the specimen demonstration higher levels of attenuation compared to clear regions. Results from the nonlinear ultrasound measurements were inconclusive due to high sensitivities to transducer coupling and fixture variabilities.

  18. Acoustic holograms of active regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Dean-Yi [Physics Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chou@phys.nthu.edu.tw

    2008-10-15

    We propose a method to study solar magnetic regions in the solar interior with the principle of optical holography. A magnetic region in the solar interior scatters the solar background acoustic waves. The scattered waves and background waves could form an interference pattern on the solar surface. We investigate the feasibility of detecting this interference pattern on the solar surface, and using it to construct the three-dimensional scattered wave from the magnetic region with the principle of optical holography. In solar acoustic holography, the background acoustic waves play the role of reference wave; the magnetic region plays the role of the target object; the interference pattern, acoustic power map, on the solar surface plays the role of the hologram.

  19. Acoustic Characterization of Mesoscale Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D; Huber, R; Chambers, D; Cole, G; Balogun, O; Spicer, J; Murray, T

    2007-03-13

    This report describes the science and engineering performed to provide state-of-the-art acoustic capabilities for nondestructively characterizing mesoscale (millimeter-sized) objects--allowing micrometer resolution over the objects entire volume. Materials and structures used in mesoscale objects necessitate the use of (1) GHz acoustic frequencies and (2) non-contacting laser generation and detection of acoustic waves. This effort demonstrated that acoustic methods at gigahertz frequencies have the necessary penetration depth and spatial resolution to effectively detect density discontinuities, gaps, and delaminations. A prototype laser-based ultrasonic system was designed and built. The system uses a micro-chip laser for excitation of broadband ultrasonic waves with frequency components reaching 1.0 GHz, and a path-stabilized Michelson interferometer for detection. The proof-of-concept for mesoscale characterization is demonstrated by imaging a micro-fabricated etched pattern in a 70 {micro}m thick silicon wafer.

  20. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  1. A programmable nonlinear acoustic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianzhi Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic metamaterials with specifically designed lattices can manipulate acoustic/elastic waves in unprecedented ways. Whereas there are many studies that focus on passive linear lattice, with non-reconfigurable structures. In this letter, we present the design, theory and experimental demonstration of an active nonlinear acoustic metamaterial, the dynamic properties of which can be modified instantaneously with reversibility. By incorporating active and nonlinear elements in a single unit cell, a real-time tunability and switchability of the band gap is achieved. In addition, we demonstrate a dynamic “editing” capability for shaping transmission spectra, which can be used to create the desired band gap and resonance. This feature is impossible to achieve in passive metamaterials. These advantages demonstrate the versatility of the proposed device, paving the way toward smart acoustic devices, such as logic elements, diode and transistor.

  2. Active acoustical impedance using distributed electrodynamical transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, M; David, P; Berthillier, M

    2009-02-01

    New miniaturization and integration capabilities available from emerging microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology will allow silicon-based artificial skins involving thousands of elementary actuators to be developed in the near future. SMART structures combining large arrays of elementary motion pixels coated with macroscopic components are thus being studied so that fundamental properties such as shape, stiffness, and even reflectivity of light and sound could be dynamically adjusted. This paper investigates the acoustic impedance capabilities of a set of distributed transducers connected with a suitable controlling strategy. Research in this domain aims at designing integrated active interfaces with a desired acoustical impedance for reaching an appropriate global acoustical behavior. This generic problem is intrinsically connected with the control of multiphysical systems based on partial differential equations (PDEs) and with the notion of multiscaled physics when a dense array of electromechanical systems (or MEMS) is considered. By using specific techniques based on PDE control theory, a simple boundary control equation capable of annihilating the wave reflections has been built. The obtained strategy is also discretized as a low order time-space operator for experimental implementation by using a dense network of interlaced microphones and loudspeakers. The resulting quasicollocated architecture guarantees robustness and stability margins. This paper aims at showing how a well controlled semidistributed active skin can substantially modify the sound transmissibility or reflectivity of the corresponding homogeneous passive interface. In Sec. IV, numerical and experimental results demonstrate the capabilities of such a method for controlling sound propagation in ducts. Finally, in Sec. V, an energy-based comparison with a classical open-loop strategy underlines the system's efficiency.

  3. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  4. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  5. Acoustical Properties of Contemporary Mosques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaman Özgül Yılmaz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Religious buildings are important for many communities because of their representation of different beliefs. In such structures, the sense of individuality or unity & togetherness are created according to variable worship activities; these different uses have also different acoustical requirements. In order to create the desired feeling in the space at the required time, rooms should be evaluated in terms of acoustical conditions.

  6. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed

  7. Acoustic Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccus, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    The Logistics Reduction (LR) project within the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is tasked with reducing logistical mass and repurposing logistical items. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bags (MCTB) are designed to be the same external volume as a regular cargo transfer bag, the common logistics carrier for the International Space Station. After use as a cargo bag, the MCTB can be unzipped and unfolded to be reused. This Acoustic MCTBs transform into acoustic blankets after the initial logistics carrying objective is complete.

  8. Development of acoustic particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Tadayoshi; Hinode, Fujio; Konno, Osamu

    1999-01-01

    To detect acoustic sign from electron, determination of acoustic radiation from high energy electron and detector were studied. When charge particles pass through medium, energy loss generates local expansion and contraction of medium and pressure compression wave. We need caustic element with 10 -5 Pa the minimum acoustic receive sensitivity and from 10 to 100 kHz frequency sensitivity characteristic. Elements were made by Low-Q materials, piezoelectric materials (PZT). Various sharp of elements were constructed and measured. 50 mm spherical element showed 38 m V/Pa, the best sensitivity. Our developed acoustic element could detect acoustic radiation generated by electron beam from accelerator. The wave sharp detected proved the same as bipolar wave, which was given theoretically. The pressure generated by beam was proportional to the energy loss E. 200 MeV electron beam existed about 95% particles on the incident axis. So that acoustic detector on the axis proved to detect sound wave generated on the beam axis. (S.Y.)

  9. Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

    1990-09-01

    An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

  10. Experiments on stress dependent borehole acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Kane, Michael R; Winkler, Kenneth; Wang, Canyun; Johnson, David Linton

    2011-10-01

    In the laboratory setup, a borehole traverses a dry sandstone formation, which is subjected to a controlled uniaxial stress in the direction perpendicular to the borehole axis. Measurements are made in a single loading-unloading stress cycle from zero to 10 MPa and then back down to zero stress. The applied stress and the presence of the borehole induce anisotropy in the bulk of the material and stress concentration around the borehole, both azimuthally and radially. Acoustic waves are generated and detected in the water-filled borehole, including compressional and shear headwaves, as well as modes of monopole, dipole, quadrupole, and higher order azimuthal symmetries. The linear and non-linear elastic parameters of the formation material are independently quantified, and utilized in conjunction with elastic theories to predict the characteristics of various borehole waves at zero and finite stress conditions. For example, an analytic theory is developed which is successfully used to estimate the changes of monopole tube mode at low frequency resulted from uniaxial stress, utilizing the measured material third order elasticity parameters. Comparisons between various measurements as well as that between experiments and theories are also presented. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  11. 12th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 12th annual meeting in Villa Clythia, Fréjus, France, from 16th to 18th January 2013. This series of meetings is a collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. This year, attendees got the opportunity to see the French Riviera with its Mediterranean vegetation covered by a nice thick snow layer. The participants heard 34 excellent oral presentations and saw 3 posters covering an exciting and diverse range of subjects and of frequencies, from ultrasonic wave propagation in chocolate to metamaterials applied to seismic waves for protecting buildings. Among them, invited talks were given by Pr F A Duck ( Enhanced healing by ultrasound: clinical effects and mechanisms), Pr. J-C Valiére, who actually gave two invited talks ( 1. Measurement of audible acoustic particle velocity using laser: Principles, signal processing and applications, 2. Acoustic pots in ancient and medieval buildings: Literary analysis of ancient texts and comparison with recent observations in French churches), Dr P Huthwaite ( Ultrasonic imaging through the resolution of inverse problems), Dr X Lurton ( Underwater acoustic systems on oceanographic research vessels: principles and applications), Dr S Guenneau ( From platonics to seismic metamaterials). For the fifth consecutive year AFPAC is followed by the publication of its proceedings with 12 peer-reviewed papers which cover the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France. Alain Lhémery (CEA, France) and Nader Saffari (UCL, United Kingdom) French Riviera 12th AFPAC — Villa Clythia, Fréjus (French Riviera), the 17th of January 2013

  12. Acoustics of the Intonarumori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2005-04-01

    The Intonarumori were a family of musical instruments invented by the Italian futurist composer and painter Luigi Russolo. Each Intonarumori was made of a wooden parallelepiped sound box, inside which a wheel of different sizes and materials was setting into vibration a catgut or metal string. The pitch of the string was varied by using a lever, while the speed of the wheel was controlled by the performer using a crank. At one end of the string there was a drumhead that transmitted vibrations to the speaker. Unfortunately, all the original Intonarumori were destroyed after a fire during World War II. Since then, researchers have tried to understand the sound production mechanism of such instruments, especially by consulting the patents compiled by Russolo or by reading his book ``The art of noise.'' In this paper we describe the acoustics of the Intonarumori. Based on such description, we propose physical models that simulate such instruments. The intonarumori's string is modeled using a one dimensional waveguide, which is excited either by an impact or a friction model. The body of the instrument is modeled using a 3-D rectangular mesh, while the horn is considered as an omnidirectional radiator.

  13. Introduction to nonlinear acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnø, Leif

    2010-01-01

    A brief review of the basic principles of fluid mechanics needed for development of linear and nonlinear ultrasonic concepts will be given. The fundamental equations of nonlinear ultrasonics will be derived and their physical properties explained. It will be shown how an originally monochromatic finite-amplitude ultrasonic wave, due to nonlinear effects, will distort during its propagation in time and space to form higher harmonics to its fundamental frequency. The concepts of shock formation will be presented. The material nonlinearity, described by the nonlinearity parameter B/A of the material, and the convective nonlinearity, described by the ultrasonic Mach Number, will be explained. Two procedures for determination of B/A will briefly be described and some B/A-values characterizing biological materials will be presented. Shock formation, described by use of the Goldberg Number,and Ultrasonic Saturation will be discussed.. An introduction to focused ultrasonic fields will be given and it will be shown how the ultrasonic intensity will vary axially and laterally in and near the focal region and how the field parameters of interest to biomedical applications may be described by use of the KZK-Model. Finally, an introduction will be given to the parametric acoustic array formed by mixing and interaction of two monochromatic, finite-amplitude ultrasonic waves in a liquid and the potentials of this mixing process in biomedical ultrasound will briefly be mentioned.

  14. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  15. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    focusing of E. coli bacteria and 0.6 µm particles is achieved. These particles are considerably smaller than the critical particle size of approximately 2 µm for the usual half-wavelength resonance in a rectangular channel. The fifth study presents a quantitative comparison of analytical, numerical...

  16. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  17. Acoustic loading effects on oscillating rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the interaction between an infinite acoustic medium and a cluster of circular rods is described. The acoustic field due to oscillating rods and the acoustic loading on the rods are first solved in a closed form. The acoustic loading is then used as a forcing function for rod responses, and the acousto-elastic couplings are solved simultaneously. Numerical examples are presented for several cases to illustrate the effects of various system parameters on the acoustic reaction force coefficients. The effect of the acoustic loading on the coupled eigenfrequencies are discussed

  18. A comparison of single-suture and double-suture incision closures in seaward-migrating juvenile Chinook salmon implanted with acoustic transmitters: implications for research in river basins containing hydropower structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Cook, Katrina V.; Eppard, M. B.

    2013-07-15

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the ability to make shorter incisions that may warrant using only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known if one suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed, particularly when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site such as when migrating fish experience pressure changes associated with passage at hydroelectric dams. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Juvenile Chinook salmon were surgically implanted with a 2012 Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) transmitter (0.30 g) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g) and incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. Mortality and tag retention were monitored and fish were examined after 7 and 14 days to evaluate tissue responses. In a separate experiment, surgically implanted fish were exposed to simulated turbine passage and then examined for expulsion of transmitters, expulsion of viscera through the incision, and mortal injury. With incisions closed using a single suture, there was no mortality or tag loss and similar or reduced tissue reaction compared to incisions closed with two sutures. Further, surgery time was significantly reduced when one suture was used, which leads to less handling and reduced stress. No tags were expelled during pressure scenarios and expulsion of viscera only occurred in two non-mortally injured fish (5%) with single sutures that were also exposed to very high pressure changes. No viscera expulsion was present in fish exposed to pressure scenarios likely representative of hydroturbine passage at many Columbia River dams (e.g. <2.7 ratio of pressure change; an acclimation pressure of 146.2 absolute kpa and a lowest exposure pressure of ~ 53.3 absolute kpa). Based on these results, we recommend the use of a

  19. Validity and reliability of acoustic analysis of respiratory sounds in infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphick, H; Lancaster, G; Solis, A; Majumdar, A; Gupta, R; Smyth, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the validity and reliability of computerised acoustic analysis in the detection of abnormal respiratory noises in infants. Methods: Blinded, prospective comparison of acoustic analysis with stethoscope examination. Validity and reliability of acoustic analysis were assessed by calculating the degree of observer agreement using the κ statistic with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: 102 infants under 18 months were recruited. Convergent validity for agreement between stethoscope examination and acoustic analysis was poor for wheeze (κ = 0.07 (95% CI, –0.13 to 0.26)) and rattles (κ = 0.11 (–0.05 to 0.27)) and fair for crackles (κ = 0.36 (0.18 to 0.54)). Both the stethoscope and acoustic analysis distinguished well between sounds (discriminant validity). Agreement between observers for the presence of wheeze was poor for both stethoscope examination and acoustic analysis. Agreement for rattles was moderate for the stethoscope but poor for acoustic analysis. Agreement for crackles was moderate using both techniques. Within-observer reliability for all sounds using acoustic analysis was moderate to good. Conclusions: The stethoscope is unreliable for assessing respiratory sounds in infants. This has important implications for its use as a diagnostic tool for lung disorders in infants, and confirms that it cannot be used as a gold standard. Because of the unreliability of the stethoscope, the validity of acoustic analysis could not be demonstrated, although it could discriminate between sounds well and showed good within-observer reliability. For acoustic analysis, targeted training and the development of computerised pattern recognition systems may improve reliability so that it can be used in clinical practice. PMID:15499065

  20. Acoustic constituents of prosodic typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masahiko

    Different languages sound different, and considerable part of it derives from the typological difference of prosody. Although such difference is often referred to as lexical accent types (stress accent, pitch accent, and tone; e.g. English, Japanese, and Chinese respectively) and rhythm types (stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed rhythms; e.g. English, Spanish, and Japanese respectively), it is unclear whether these types are determined in terms of acoustic properties, The thesis intends to provide a potential basis for the description of prosody in terms of acoustics. It argues for the hypothesis that the source component of the source-filter model (acoustic features) approximately corresponds to prosody (linguistic features) through several experimental-phonetic studies. The study consists of four parts. (1) Preliminary experiment: Perceptual language identification tests were performed using English and Japanese speech samples whose frequency spectral information (i.e. non-source component) is heavily reduced. The results indicated that humans can discriminate languages with such signals. (2) Discussion on the linguistic information that the source component contains: This part constitutes the foundation of the argument of the thesis. Perception tests of consonants with the source signal indicated that the source component carries the information on broad categories of phonemes that contributes to the creation of rhythm. (3) Acoustic analysis: The speech samples of Chinese, English, Japanese, and Spanish, differing in prosodic types, were analyzed. These languages showed difference in acoustic characteristics of the source component. (4) Perceptual experiment: A language identification test for the above four languages was performed using the source signal with its acoustic features parameterized. It revealed that humans can discriminate prosodic types solely with the source features and that the discrimination is easier as acoustic information increases. The

  1. Radiological evaluation of acoustic neurinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Park, Chang Yun; Choi, Byung So [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-04-15

    All 25 patients surgically proven acoustic neurinoma was analysed clinically, radiographically at Severance Hospital of Yonsei Univ. The patients not proved surgically in spite of clinical diagnosis of acoustic neurinoma was excluded from this study. The results are summarized as follows; The clinical findings are; 1. The incidence of tumor in female was twice more frequent than in male and the range of age was 20-50 years peak of age at onset of symptom. 2. The clinical symptoms were variable from unilateral hearing impairment or less (100%), headache (84%) to tinnitus (60%) in order of frequency. 3. The tumor growth in the left cerebellopontine angle was twice more than in the right side with the radio of 16:8. However, in one case bilateral simultaneous growth of acoustic neurinoma was noted. The radiological findings are: The best radiographic method to study the shape and size of internal acoustic canal to demonstrate erosion or destruction of petrous pyramida was considered to be straight frontal view and tomography of the skull in our series. 1. The shape of internal acoustic canal in tumors were straight (in 2 cases), bulbous (in 12 cases), and flared (in 11 cases). Particularly there was erosion or destruction of petrous bone in all of the flared cases of canal. 2. The acoustic meatal erosion was mainly suprameatal in 14 cases of 17 which was noted definite erosion radiographically. 3. The difference of height (vertical diameter) of both side of acoustic canal were follows; 6 cases among 25 was in the range of 0-2 mm measurement, remainder was more than 2 mm. Hence the variation in greater than 1 mm in between both sides of canal in same patient should be regard as abnormal as of acoustic neurinoma. 4. The carotid angiogram shows hydrocephalic pattern in 12 cases among 17. 5. In the vertebral angiogram of 8 cases, anterolateral displacement of basilar artery (in 6 caes), the upward displacement of superior cerebellar artery (in 4 cases) was common findings

  2. Radiological evaluation of acoustic neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Park, Chang Yun; Choi, Byung So

    1974-01-01

    All 25 patients surgically proven acoustic neurinoma was analysed clinically, radiographically at Severance Hospital of Yonsei Univ. The patients not proved surgically in spite of clinical diagnosis of acoustic neurinoma was excluded from this study. The results are summarized as follows; The clinical findings are; 1. The incidence of tumor in female was twice more frequent than in male and the range of age was 20-50 years peak of age at onset of symptom. 2. The clinical symptoms were variable from unilateral hearing impairment or less (100%), headache (84%) to tinnitus (60%) in order of frequency. 3. The tumor growth in the left cerebellopontine angle was twice more than in the right side with the radio of 16:8. However, in one case bilateral simultaneous growth of acoustic neurinoma was noted. The radiological findings are: The best radiographic method to study the shape and size of internal acoustic canal to demonstrate erosion or destruction of petrous pyramida was considered to be straight frontal view and tomography of the skull in our series. 1. The shape of internal acoustic canal in tumors were straight (in 2 cases), bulbous (in 12 cases), and flared (in 11 cases). Particularly there was erosion or destruction of petrous bone in all of the flared cases of canal. 2. The acoustic meatal erosion was mainly suprameatal in 14 cases of 17 which was noted definite erosion radiographically. 3. The difference of height (vertical diameter) of both side of acoustic canal were follows; 6 cases among 25 was in the range of 0-2 mm measurement, remainder was more than 2 mm. Hence the variation in greater than 1 mm in between both sides of canal in same patient should be regard as abnormal as of acoustic neurinoma. 4. The carotid angiogram shows hydrocephalic pattern in 12 cases among 17. 5. In the vertebral angiogram of 8 cases, anterolateral displacement of basilar artery (in 6 caes), the upward displacement of superior cerebellar artery (in 4 cases) was common findings

  3. Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2018-01-01

    The theoretical foundation of acoustic radiation pressure in plane wave beams is reexamined. It is shown from finite deformation theory and the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest Adiabatic Principle that the Brillouin stress tensor (BST) is the radiation stress in Lagrangian coordinates (not Eulerian coordinates) and that the terms in the BST are not the momentum flux density and mean excess Eulerian stress but are simply contributions to the variation in the wave oscillation period resulting from changes in path length and true wave velocity, respectively, from virtual variations in the strain. It is shown that the radiation stress in Eulerian coordinates is the mean Cauchy stress (not the momentum flux density, as commonly assumed) and that Langevin's second relation does not yield an assessment of the mean Eulerian pressure, since the enthalpy used in the traditional derivations is a function of the thermodynamic tensions - not the Eulerian pressure. It is shown that the transformation between Lagrangian and Eulerian quantities cannot be obtained from the commonly-used expansion of one of the quantities in terms of the particle displacement, since the expansion provides only the difference between the value of the quantity at two different points in Cartesian space separated by the displacement. The proper transformation is obtained only by employing the transformation coefficients of finite deformation theory, which are defined in terms of the displacement gradients. Finite deformation theory leads to the result that for laterally unconfined, plane waves the Lagrangian and Eulerian radiation pressures are equal with the value (1/4)(2K) along the direction of wave propagation, where (K) is the mean kinetic energy density, and zero in directions normal to the propagation direction. This is contrary to the Langevin result that the Lagrangian radiation pressure in the propagation direction is equal to (2K) and the BST result that the Eulerian radiation pressure in that direction

  4. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  5. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  6. Development of acoustic leak detection system in PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, H.; Kuroha, M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of an acoustic leak detector is under way at PNC as a detection system that has potential of quick response and high reliability for larger steam generators of future LMFBR plants. The studies have two aspects, i.e., an acoustic wave analysis in various sodium-water reactions and a background noise (BGN) analysis in a sodium-heated 50MWt steam generator (50MWGS). In the former analysis, wave profiles of the sodium-water reaction sound were analyzed and compared with those of inert gas injection sound. The comparison revealed that there were no wave profiles specific to a sodium-water reaction sound. The latter clarified that major acoustic sources in the steam generator were sodium flow and steam generation/flow and that the water leak rate at which a noise level was comparable with that of the background noise was about 0.5 g/sec. in the evaporator of 50MWSG. The estimation of acceleration levels of BGN and leak sounds in other plants reveals that an intermediate leak is detectable in the Monju evaporator with a present acoustic detection system. (author). 2 refs, 9 figs

  7. A Treatise on Acoustic Radiation. Volume 2. Acoustic Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Newton) V (meter/sec) acoustical p (Newton/meter2 ) U (meter 3/sec) To display Eq. 1.53.1 in simple form we take time to be given by exp(- iot ) and choose...if all the C-component edges and e-drivers are in the tree, all the L-component "A edges and idrivers are in the cotree, all the algebraic equations...momentum and mass of the elastic field then become, (a) Al - V -T + F 278 W-4. ,-,- * * * 4 % • *.• Design of Acoustic Transducers IOT (b) I + VV-s

  8. Matching Impedances and Modes in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature differences accommodated with tunable coupler. Report discusses schemes for coupling sound efficiently from cool outside atmosphere into hot acoustic-levitation chamber. Theoretical studies have practical implications for material-processing systems that employ acoustic levitation.

  9. Interaction of langmuir and ion acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Jae

    1991-01-01

    Interaction of Langmuir and ion acoustic waves in a plasma is described by Landau-Ginzburg type of equation when the group velocity of the Langmuir wave is equal to the wave velocity of ion acoustic wave. (Author)

  10. Acoustic remote sensing of ocean flows

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.

    Acoustic techniques have become powerful tools for measurement of ocean circulation mainly because of the ability of acoustic signals to travel long distances in water, and the inherently non-invasive nature of measurement. The satellite remote...

  11. Subwoofer and nanotube butterfly acoustic flame extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Mayo, Nathanael K.; Baughman, Ray H.; Mills, Brent T.; Habtour, Ed

    2017-01-01

    Nonchemical flame control using acoustic waves from a subwoofer and a lightweight carbon nanotube thermoacoustic projector was demonstrated. The intent was to manipulate flame intensity, direction and propagation. The mechanisms of flame suppression using low frequency acoustic waves were discussed.

  12. Golden Gate and Pt. Reyes Acoustic Detections

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains detections of acoustic tagged fish from two general locations: Golden Gate (east and west line) and Pt. Reyes. Several Vemco 69khz acoustic...

  13. Prototype acoustic resonance spectroscopy monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, D.N.; Olinger, C.T.

    1996-03-01

    This report reports on work performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Program Office for Technical Assistance (POTAS). In this work, we investigate possible applications of nondestructive acoustics measurements to facilitate IAEA safeguards at bulk processing facilities. Two different acoustic techniques for verifying the internal structure of a processing tank were investigated. During this effort we also examined two acoustic techniques for assessing the fill level within a processing tank. The fill-level measurements could be made highly portable and have an added safeguards advantage that they can also detect stratification of fill material. This later application may be particularly useful in confirming the absence of stratification in plutonium processing tanks before accountability samples are withdrawn

  14. Acoustic energy propagation around railways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Petra

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with the issues of acoustic energy propagation around railways. The research subject was noise emission spreading into the surroundings during the passage of trains over a directly travelled steel bridge construction. Noise emissions were measured using direct measurements in the field. The measurements were performed in two measurement profiles. The noise exposures A LAE measured near the steel bridge construction were compared against the noise exposures A LAE captured on an open track. From the difference of these data, the noise level of the steel bridge structure was determined. Part of the research was to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction of the railway track superstructure on the acoustic situation in the given section of the railway track. The article describes the methodology of measurements, including the processing and evaluation of measured data. The article points out the noise levels of the steel bridge construction and assesses changes in the acoustic situation after the reconstruction.

  15. Software-based acoustical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Miyara, Federico

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a detailed introduction to the use of software in combination with simple and economical hardware (a sound level meter with calibrated AC output and a digital recording system) to obtain sophisticated measurements usually requiring expensive equipment. It emphasizes the use of free, open source, and multiplatform software. Many commercial acoustical measurement systems use software algorithms as an integral component; however the methods are not disclosed. This book enables the reader to develop useful algorithms and provides insight into the use of digital audio editing tools to document features in the signal. Topics covered include acoustical measurement principles, in-depth critical study of uncertainty applied to acoustical measurements, digital signal processing from the basics, and metrologically-oriented spectral and statistical analysis of signals. The student will gain a deep understanding of the use of software for measurement purposes; the ability to implement software-based...

  16. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show that at resona......We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  17. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenhave, P E [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  18. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenhave, P.E. [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  19. Acoustic Localization with Infrasonic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threatt, Arnesha; Elbing, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Numerous geophysical and anthropogenic events emit infrasonic frequencies (<20 Hz), including volcanoes, hurricanes, wind turbines and tornadoes. These sounds, which cannot be heard by the human ear, can be detected from large distances (in excess of 100 miles) due to low frequency acoustic signals having a very low decay rate in the atmosphere. Thus infrasound could be used for long-range, passive monitoring and detection of these events. An array of microphones separated by known distances can be used to locate a given source, which is known as acoustic localization. However, acoustic localization with infrasound is particularly challenging due to contamination from other signals, sensitivity to wind noise and producing a trusted source for system development. The objective of the current work is to create an infrasonic source using a propane torch wand or a subwoofer and locate the source using multiple infrasonic microphones. This presentation will present preliminary results from various microphone configurations used to locate the source.

  20. Acoustic evaluation of wood quality in standing trees. Part I, Acoustic wave behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Peter Carter

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic wave velocities in standing trees or live softwood species were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Tree velocities were compared with acoustic velocities measured in corresponding butt logs through a resonance acoustic method. The experimental data showed a skewed relationship between tree and log acoustic measurements. For most trees tested,...

  1. A survey of acoustic conditions and noise levels in secondary school classrooms in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Bridget; Conetta, Robert; Dockrell, Julie; Connolly, Daniel; Cox, Trevor; Mydlarz, Charles

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic survey of secondary schools in England has been undertaken. Room acoustic parameters and background noise levels were measured in 185 unoccupied spaces in 13 schools to provide information on the typical acoustic environment of secondary schools. The unoccupied acoustic and noise data were correlated with various physical characteristics of the spaces. Room height and the amount of glazing were related to the unoccupied reverberation time and therefore need to be controlled to reduce reverberation to suitable levels for teaching and learning. Further analysis of the unoccupied data showed that the introduction of legislation relating to school acoustics in England and Wales in 2003 approximately doubled the number of school spaces complying with current standards. Noise levels were also measured during 274 lessons to examine typical levels generated during teaching activities in secondary schools and to investigate the influence of acoustic design on working noise levels in the classroom. Comparison of unoccupied and occupied data showed that unoccupied acoustic conditions affect the noise levels occurring during lessons. They were also related to the time spent in disruption to the lessons (e.g., students talking or shouting) and so may also have an impact upon student behavior in the classroom.

  2. Controlling Sample Rotation in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Rotation of acoustically levitated object stopped or controlled according to phase-shift monitoring and control concept. Principle applies to square-cross-section levitation chamber with two perpendicular acoustic drivers operating at same frequency. Phase difference between X and Y acoustic excitation measured at one corner by measuring variation of acoustic amplitude sensed by microphone. Phase of driver adjusted to value that produces no rotation or controlled rotation of levitated object.

  3. Acoustic-gravity nonlinear structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jovanović

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A catalogue of nonlinear vortex structures associated with acoustic-gravity perturbations in the Earth's atmosphere is presented. Besides the previously known Kelvin-Stewart cat's eyes, dipolar and tripolar structures, new solutions having the form of a row of counter-rotating vortices, and several weakly two-dimensional vortex chains are given. The existence conditions for these nonlinear structures are discussed with respect to the presence of inhomogeneities of the shear flows. The mode-coupling mechanism for the nonlinear generation of shear flows in the presence of linearly unstable acoustic-gravity waves, possibly also leading to intermittency and chaos, is presented.

  4. Physical foundations of technical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Malecki, I

    1969-01-01

    Physical Foundations of Technical Acoustics discusses theoretical foundations of acoustical engineering. It is not so much a technical compendium as a systematic statement of physical laws so conceived that technologists might find in it all the information they need to become acquainted with the physical meaning and mathematical expression of phenomena they encounter in their work. To facilitate the acquirement of notions, which lie beyond a layman's grasp, the plan of narration adopted consists in beginning with the simplest idealized cases and then gradually moving on to the truest possibl

  5. Acoustic design by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    To bring down noise levels in human surroundings is an important issue and a method to reduce noise by means of topology optimization is presented here. The acoustic field is modeled by Helmholtz equation and the topology optimization method is based on continuous material interpolation functions...... in the density and bulk modulus. The objective function is the squared sound pressure amplitude. First, room acoustic problems are considered and it is shown that the sound level can be reduced in a certain part of the room by an optimized distribution of reflecting material in a design domain along the ceiling...

  6. Reciprocity principle in duct acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.

    1979-01-01

    Various reciprocity relations in duct acoustics have been derived on the basis of the spatial reciprocity principle implied in Green's functions for linear waves. The derivation includes the reciprocity relations between mode conversion coefficients for reflection and transmission in nonuniform ducts, and the relation between the radiation of a mode from an arbitrarily terminated duct and the absorption of an externally incident plane wave by the duct. Such relations are well defined as long as the systems remain linear, regardless of acoustic properties of duct nonuniformities which cause the mode conversions.

  7. Aero-acoustic Computations of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Michelsen, Jess; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2002-01-01

    A numerical algorithm for acoustic noise generation is extended to 3D flows. The approach involves two parts comprising a viscous incompressible flow part and an inviscid acoustic part. In order to simulate noise generated from a wind turbine, the incompressible and acoustic equations are written...

  8. The Acoustical Apparatus of Rudolph Koenig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the history of Rudolph Koenig's contribution to the development of acoustical apparatus. Contributions include the clock fork to determine absolute acoustic frequencies, a forerunner of the oscilloscope called the manometric flame, and an acoustic interference apparatus used in the Fourier synthesis of musical sounds. (MDH)

  9. Predicting and auralizing acoustics in classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2005-01-01

    Although classrooms have fairly simple geometries, this type of room is known to cause problems when trying to predict their acoustics using room acoustics computer modeling. Some typical features from a room acoustics point of view are: Parallel walls, low ceilings (the rooms are flat), uneven...

  10. Design of acoustic devices by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study is to design and optimize structures and devices that are subjected to acoustic waves. Examples are acoustic lenses, sound walls, waveguides and loud speakers. We formulate the design problem as a topology optimization problem, i.e. distribute material in a design domain...... such that the acoustic response is optimized....

  11. Multiscale modeling of acoustic shielding materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, K.; Dommelen, van J.A.W.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2012-01-01

    It is very important to protect high-tech systems from acoustic excitation when operating in a noisy environment. Some passive absorbing materials such as acoustic foams can improve the performance which depends on the interaction of the acoustic wave and the microstructure of the foam.

  12. Acoustic communication in plant–animal interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schöner, M.G.; Simon, R.; Schöner, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant–animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound

  13. Optical measurement of acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation through transparent object

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Furusawa, Toshiaki; Sasao, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Kogure; Naoki, Kondo

    2013-01-01

    It is known that macroscopic objects can be levitated for few to several hundred micrometers by near-field acoustic field and this phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). Although there are various experiments conducted to measure integrated acoustic pressure on the object surface, up to now there was no direct method to measure pressure distribution. In this study we measured the acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation via pressure-sensitive paint.

  14. Aero-acoustics noise assessment for Wind-Lens turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashem, I.; Mohamed, M.H.; Hafiz, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces an aero-acoustic computational study that investigates the noise caused by one of the most promising wind energy conversion concepts, namely the 'Wind-Lens' technology. The hybrid method - where the flow field and acoustic field are solved separately, was deemed to be an appropriate tool to compute this study. The need to investigate this phenomenon increased gradually, since the feasibility of utilizing Wind-Lens turbine within densely populated cities and urban areas depends largely on their noise generation. Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation and its integral solution are used to predict the noise radiating to the farfield. CFD Simulations of transient three-dimensional flow field using (URANS) unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are computed to acquire the acoustic sources location and sound intensity. Then, the noise propagates from the before-mentioned sources to pre-defined virtual microphones positioned in different locations. ANSYS-FLUENT is used to calculate the flow field on and around such turbines which is required for the FW-H code. Some effective parameters are investigated such as Wind-Lens shape, brim height and tip speed ratio. Comparison of the noise emitted from the bare wind turbine and different types of Wind-Lens turbine reveals that, the Wind-Lens generates higher noise intensity. - Highlights: • Aero-acoustic noise generated by wind turbines are one of the major challenges. • Noise from wind turbine equipped with a brimmed diffuser is investigated. • A computational aero-acoustic study using the hybrid method is introduced. • Effective parameters are studied such Wind-Lens shape, brim height and speed ratio. • The optimal shape has a moderate power coefficient and the less noise generation.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    nanotubes (unless encapsulated or housed) are quite fragile and are susceptible to disintegration especially if the nanotubes are touched or moved too...The acoustic impedance (defined as the product of material density and sound speed) of the top shell 12 should match the Attorney Docket No. 300009

  16. Acoustic Holography With Incoherent Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Raangs, R.

    2005-01-01

    In near field acoustic holography the sound field is scanned near the surface of the vibrating object; from these measurements the vibration of the structure can be calculated. In the case of correlated sources one reference signal is sufficient. When incoherent sources are present the separation of

  17. Wind Turbine Acoustic Day 2018

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jesper; Søndergaard, Bo; Hünerbein, Sabine Von

    The bi-annual event entitled Wind Turbine Acoustic Day dealing with wind turbine noise issues organized by DTU Wind Energy took place on May, 17th 2018 as its third edition. The abstracts and slides for the presentations are reported....

  18. Topology optimization for acoustic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a method to control acoustic properties in a room with topology optimization is presented. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room can be minimized by distribution of material in a design domain along the ceiling in 2D and 3D. Nice 0-1 designs...

  19. Pillar-type acoustic metasurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Yabin; Bonello, Bernard; Moiseyenko, Rayisa

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate acoustic metasurfaces consisting of either a single pillar or a line of identical pillars on a thin plate, and we report on the dependence on the geometrical parameters of both the monopolar compressional and dipolar bending modes. We show that for specific dimensions...

  20. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise...