WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic measurements

  1. Measuring acoustic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Fristrup, Kurt M; Johnson, Mark P; Tyack, Peter L; Witt, Matthew J; Blondel, Philippe; Parks, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    1. Many organisms depend on sound for communication, predator/prey detection and navigation. The acoustic environment can therefore play an important role in ecosystem dynamics and evolution. A growing number of studies are documenting acoustic habitats and their influences on animal development, behaviour, physiology and spatial ecology, which has led to increasing demand for passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) expertise in the life sciences. However, as yet, there has been no synthesis of data processing methods for acoustic habitat monitoring, which presents an unnecessary obstacle to would-be PAM analysts. 2. Here, we review the signal processing techniques needed to produce calibrated measurements of terrestrial and aquatic acoustic habitats. We include a supplemental tutorial and template computer codes in matlab and r, which give detailed guidance on how to produce calibrated spectrograms and statistical analyses of sound levels. Key metrics and terminology for the characterisation of biotic, abiotic and anthropogenic sound are covered, and their application to relevant monitoring scenarios is illustrated through example data sets. To inform study design and hardware selection, we also include an up-to-date overview of terrestrial and aquatic PAM instruments. 3. Monitoring of acoustic habitats at large spatiotemporal scales is becoming possible through recent advances in PAM technology. This will enhance our understanding of the role of sound in the spatial ecology of acoustically sensitive species and inform spatial planning to mitigate the rising influence of anthropogenic noise in these ecosystems. As we demonstrate in this work, progress in these areas will depend upon the application of consistent and appropriate PAM methodologies.

  2. Software-based acoustical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Miyara, Federico

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a detailed introduction to the use of software in combination with simple and economical hardware (a sound level meter with calibrated AC output and a digital recording system) to obtain sophisticated measurements usually requiring expensive equipment. It emphasizes the use of free, open source, and multiplatform software. Many commercial acoustical measurement systems use software algorithms as an integral component; however the methods are not disclosed. This book enables the reader to develop useful algorithms and provides insight into the use of digital audio editing tools to document features in the signal. Topics covered include acoustical measurement principles, in-depth critical study of uncertainty applied to acoustical measurements, digital signal processing from the basics, and metrologically-oriented spectral and statistical analysis of signals. The student will gain a deep understanding of the use of software for measurement purposes; the ability to implement software-based...

  3. Fundamentals of Acoustics. Psychoacoustics and Hearing. Acoustical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Ahumada, Al (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    These are 3 chapters that will appear in a book titled "Building Acoustical Design", edited by Charles Salter. They are designed to introduce the reader to fundamental concepts of acoustics, particularly as they relate to the built environment. "Fundamentals of Acoustics" reviews basic concepts of sound waveform frequency, pressure, and phase. "Psychoacoustics and Hearing" discusses the human interpretation sound pressure as loudness, particularly as a function of frequency. "Acoustic Measurements" gives a simple overview of the time and frequency weightings for sound pressure measurements that are used in acoustical work.

  4. Wind turbines acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Iannace, Gino

    2017-07-01

    The importance of wind turbines has increased over the last few years throughout the European Community. The European energy policy guidelines state that for the year 2020 20% of all energy must be produced by alternative energy sources. Wind turbines are an important type of energy production without petrol. A wind speed in a range from 2.5 m/s to 25.0 m/s is needed. One of the obstacles to the widespread diffusion of wind turbine is noise generation. This work presents some noise measurements of wind turbines in the South of Italy, and discusses the noise problems for the people living near wind farms.

  5. Measuring ship acoustic signatures against mine threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F. de; Quesson, B.A.J.; Ainslie, M.A.; Vermeulen, R.C.N.

    2012-01-01

    The NATO standard ‘AMP-15’ [1] provides procedures for the measurement and reporting of the acoustic signature of ships and for the establishment of acoustic signature goals to counter the naval mine threat. Measurements are carried out at dedicated shallow water acoustic ranges. Measurements

  6. Measuring aeolian sand transport using acoustic sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, Ate; Rheenen, van Hans; Ellis, J.T.; Sherman, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic sensors are frequently used to measure aeolian saltation. Different approaches are used to process the signals from these instruments. The goal of this paper is to describe and discuss a method to measure aeolian saltation with acoustic sensors. In a laboratory experiment, we measured

  7. Acoustic Communications Measurement Systems (ACOMMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Design and develop adaptive signal processing techniques to improve underwater acoustic communications and networking. Phase coherent and incoherent signal...

  8. Acoustic power measurements of oscillating flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic power of an oscillating flame is measured. A turbulent premixed propane/air flame is situated near a pressure antinode of a standing wave in a laboratory combustion chamber. This standing wave is generated by a piston. The fluctuating heat release of the flame will supply acoustic power

  9. Eliminating transducer distortion in acoustic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.; Torras Rosell, Antoni; McWalter, Richard Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the in uence of nonlinear components that contaminate the linear response of acoustic transducer, and presents a method for eliminating the in uence of nonlinearities in acoustic measurements. The method is evaluated on simulated as well as experimental data, and is shown...

  10. Reflectance measurement validation using acoustic horns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetshwane, Daniel M; Neely, Stephen T

    2015-10-01

    Variability in wideband acoustic reflectance (and absorbance) measurements adversely affects the clinical utility of reflectance for diagnosis of middle-ear disorders. A reflectance standard would encourage consistency across different measurement systems and help identify calibration related issues. Theoretical equations exist for the reflectance of finite-length exponential, conical, and parabolic acoustic horns. Reflectance measurements were repeatedly made in each of these three horn shapes and the results were compared to the corresponding theoretical reflectance. A method is described of adjusting acoustic impedance measurements to compensate for spreading of the wave front that propagates from the small diameter sound port of the probe to the larger diameter of the acoustic cavity. Agreement between measured and theoretical reflectance was less than 1 dB at most frequencies in the range from 0.2 to 10 kHz. Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.95 between measured and theoretical time-domain reflectance within the flare region of the horns. The agreement suggests that the distributed reflectance of acoustic horns may be useful for validating reflectance measurements made in human ear canals; however, refinements to reflectance measurement methods may still be needed.

  11. Near Source Acoustical Particle Velocity Measurements with Ambient Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Jelmer; Philippens, D.R.; de Boer, Andries

    2007-01-01

    An acoustical measurement very near a structure can be a cheap alternative to other contactless vibration measurement techniques such as laser vibrometry. However, measurements of the acoustical pressure suffer greatly from ambient noise, making these measurements unsuitable for many industrial

  12. IN SITU MEASUREMENTS OF THE ACOUSTIC TARGET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acoustic target strength (TS) of Cape horse mackerel Trachurus trachurus capensis was measured in situ at 38 kHz during two surveys over the Namibian continental shelf in 1998 and 1999 using a SIMRAD EK500 echosounder/ES38D submersible split-beam transducer. Scattered aggregations of horse mackerel ...

  13. Measuring Norwegian dialect distances using acoustic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, Wilbert; Johnson, Keith; Gooskens, Charlotte

    Levenshtein distance has become a popular tool for measuring linguistic dialect distances, and has been applied to Irish Gaelic, Dutch, German and other dialect groups. The method, in the current state of the art, depends upon phonetic transcriptions, even when acoustic differences are used the

  14. Acoustic Hygrometer Based on Reverberation Time Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motegi, Takahiro; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a hygrometer operated by acoustic means is proposed. It is important to measure spatial average humidity for environmental management in a room. In a large space, it is difficult to determine spatial average humidity because conventional sensors measure only local humidity at the measurement point. The proposed acoustic hygrometer utilizes the relationship between the sound attenuation coefficient and humidity. To measure the sound attenuation coefficient, reverberation time in a room is utilized. An acoustic hygrometer based on reverberation time achieves a noncontact measurement of spatial average humidity. As a practical examination, relative humidity (RH) was measured on the basis of reverberation time in a chamber, and compared with reference values. The humidity measurement accuracy of the hygrometer was evaluated by statistical means because the measured reverberation time showed variability. From the results, the possibility of humidity measurement with an accuracy of about 5% RH at 50% RH or more using this hygrometer was verified. Here, the unit of RH is % RH.

  15. Velocity measurement by vibro-acoustic Doppler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Alireza; Urban, Matthew W; Kinnick, Randall R; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2012-04-01

    We describe the theoretical principles of a new Doppler method, which uses the acoustic response of a moving object to a highly localized dynamic radiation force of the ultrasound field to calculate the velocity of the moving object according to Doppler frequency shift. This method, named vibro-acoustic Doppler (VAD), employs two ultrasound beams separated by a slight frequency difference, Δf, transmitting in an X-focal configuration. Both ultrasound beams experience a frequency shift because of the moving objects and their interaction at the joint focal zone produces an acoustic frequency shift occurring around the low-frequency (Δf) acoustic emission signal. The acoustic emission field resulting from the vibration of the moving object is detected and used to calculate its velocity. We report the formula that describes the relation between Doppler frequency shift of the emitted acoustic field and the velocity of the moving object. To verify the theory, we used a string phantom. We also tested our method by measuring fluid velocity in a tube. The results show that the error calculated for both string and fluid velocities is less than 9.1%. Our theory shows that in the worst case, the error is 0.54% for a 25° angle variation for the VAD method compared with an error of -82.6% for a 25° angle variation for a conventional continuous wave Doppler method. An advantage of this method is that, unlike conventional Doppler, it is not sensitive to angles between the ultrasound beams and direction of motion.

  16. Managing Measurement Uncertainty in Building Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Scrosati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In general, uncertainties should preferably be determined following the principles laid down in ISO/IEC Guide 98-3, the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM:1995. According to current knowledge, it seems impossible to formulate these models for the different quantities in building acoustics. Therefore, the concepts of repeatability and reproducibility are necessary to determine the uncertainty of building acoustics measurements. This study shows the uncertainty of field measurements of a lightweight wall, a heavyweight floor, a façade with a single glazing window and a façade with double glazing window that were analyzed by a Round Robin Test (RRT, conducted in a full-scale experimental building at ITC-CNR (Construction Technologies Institute of the National Research Council of Italy. The single number quantities and their uncertainties were evaluated in both narrow and enlarged range and it was shown that including or excluding the low frequencies leads to very significant differences, except in the case of the sound insulation of façades with single glazing window. The results obtained in these RRTs were compared with other results from literature, which confirm the increase of the uncertainty of single number quantities due to the low frequencies extension. Having stated the measurement uncertainty for a single measurement, in building acoustics, it is also very important to deal with sampling for the purposes of classification of buildings or building units. Therefore, this study also shows an application of the sampling included in the Italian Standard on the acoustic classification of building units on a serial type building consisting of 47 building units. It was found that the greatest variability is observed in the façade and it depends on both the great variability of window’s typologies and on workmanship. Finally, it is suggested how to manage the uncertainty in building acoustics, both for one single

  17. Simultaneous measurements of room acoustic parameters using different measuring equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmrast, Tor; Gade, Anders Christian; Winsvold, Bjørn

    1996-01-01

    In a cooperation between Stattsbyg, Norway, Norsonic, Norway, and Department of Acoustic Technology, a number of room acoustic parameters have been determined in Oslo Concert Hall. All measurements were carried out on the same day, using the same amplifier, microphone and loudspeaker, and the sam...... measurement positions, but the three partners had their own measurement system. Very good agreement was obtained in the measurements of reverberation time and early decay time, but the agreement between the different measurement of 'clarity' (C80) was poorer....

  18. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  19. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Duvoort, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G.C.; Hoffman, K.D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been

  20. A comparison between acoustic mode measurements and acoustic finite element analysis performed for SAAB SF 340

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeransson, P.; Green, I.

    1986-03-01

    In order to verify an acoustic finite element package, measured and calculated eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies for Saab SF 340 cabin acoustics were compared. The measurements were performed in an acoustic mockup. For the analysis, a two dimensional model of the cross section of the fuselage was used. The comparison shows quite good agreement, the discrepancies being due to the representation of the flexible wall of the fuselage as rigid in the analysis.

  1. Acoustic Measurements of Rectangular Nozzles With Bevel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2012-01-01

    A series of convergent rectangular nozzles of aspect ratios 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 were constructed with uniform exit velocity profiles. Additional nozzles were constructed that extended the wide lip on one side of these nozzles to form beveled nozzles. Far-field acoustic measurements were made and analyzed, and the results presented. The impact of aspect ratio on jet noise was similar to that of enhanced mixing devices: reduction in aft, peak frequency noise with an increase in broadside, high frequency noise. Azimuthally, it was found that rectangular jets produced more noise directed away from their wide sides than from their narrow sides. The azimuthal dependence decreased at aft angles where noise decreased. The effect of temperature, keeping acoustic Mach number constant, was minimal. Since most installations would have the observer on the wide size of the nozzle, the increased high frequency noise has a deleterious impact on the observer. Extending one wide side of the rectangular nozzle, evocative of an aft deck in an installed propulsion system, increased the noise of the jet with increasing length. The impact of both aspect ratio and bevel length were relatively well behaved, allowing a simple bilinear model to be constructed relative to a simple round jet.

  2. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  3. Extreme Low Frequency Acoustic Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is an extremely low frequency (ELF) microphone and acoustic measurement system capable of infrasound detection in a portable and easily deployable form factor. In one embodiment of the invention, an extremely low frequency electret microphone comprises a membrane, a backplate, and a backchamber. The backchamber is sealed to allow substantially no air exchange between the backchamber and outside the microphone. Compliance of the membrane may be less than ambient air compliance. The backplate may define a plurality of holes and a slot may be defined between an outer diameter of the backplate and an inner wall of the microphone. The locations and sizes of the holes, the size of the slot, and the volume of the backchamber may be selected such that membrane motion is substantially critically damped.

  4. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  5. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM), also referred to as an ultrasonic flowmeter, has been an operational tool for the measurement of streamflow since 1965. Very little information is available concerning AVM operation, performance, and limitations. The purpose of this report is to consolidate information in such a manner as to provide a better understanding about the application of this instrumentation to streamflow measurement. AVM instrumentation is highly accurate and nonmechanical. Most commercial AVM systems that measure streamflow use the time-of-travel method to determine a velocity between two points. The systems operate on the principle that point-to-point upstream travel-time of sound is longer than the downstream travel-time, and this difference can be monitored and measured accurately by electronics. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measurable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected. AVM systems used in streamflow measurement generally operate with a resolution of ?0.01 meter per second but this is dependent on system frequency, path length, and signal attenuation. In some applications the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Presently used minicomputer systems, although expensive to purchase and maintain, perform well. Increased use of AVM systems probably will be realized as smaller, less expensive, and more conveniently operable microprocessor-based systems become readily available. Available AVM equipment should be capable of flow measurement in a wide variety of situations heretofore untried. New signal-detection techniques and communication linkages can provide additional flexibility to the systems so that operation is possible in more river and estuary situations.

  6. Methods for measuring acoustic power of an ultrasonic neurosurgical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosić, Antonio; Ivancević, Bojan; Svilar, Dragoljub; Stimac, Tihomir; Paladino, Josip; Oresković, Darko; Jurjević, Ivana; Klarica, Marijan

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of the acoustic power in high-energy ultrasonic devices is complex due to occurrence of the strong cavitation in front of the sonotrode tip. In our research we used three methods for characterization of our new ultrasonic probe for neuroendoscopic procedures. The first method is based on the electromechanical characterization of the device measuring the displacement of the sonotrode tip and input electrical impedance around excitation frequency with different amounts of the applied electrical power The second method is based on measuring the spatial pressure magnitude distribution of an ultrasound surgical device produced in an anechoic tank. The acoustic reciprocity principle is used to determinate the derived acoustic power of equivalent ultrasound sources at frequency components present in the spectrum of radiated ultrasonic waves. The third method is based on measuring the total absorbed acoustic power in the restricted volume of water using the calorimetric method. In the electromechanical characterization, calculated electroacoustic efficiency factor from equivalent electrical circuits is between 40-60%, the same as one obtained measuring the derived acoustic power in an anechoic tank when there is no cavitation. When cavitation activity is present in the front of the sonotrode tip the bubble cloud has a significant influence on the derived acoustic power and decreases electroacoustic efficiency. The measured output acoustic power using calorimetric method is greater then derived acoustic power, due to a large amount of heat energy released in the cavitation process.

  7. Taking advantage of acoustic inhomogeneities in photoacoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Anabela; Handschin, Charles; Metwally, Khaled; Garci, Houssem; Riedinger, Christophe; Mensah, Serge; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes a method for improving the localization and the quantification of the optical parameters in photoacoustic (PA) tomography of biological tissues that are intrinsically heterogeneous in both optical and acoustic properties. It is based on the exploitation of both the PA signal, generated by the heterogeneous optical structures, and the secondary acoustic echoes due to the interaction between a primary PA wave generated near the tissue surface and the heterogeneous acoustic structures. These secondary echoes can also be collected through proper measurements of the PA signals. The experimental procedure is presented along with the method to filter the signal and the reconstruction algorithm that includes the account of the acoustic information.

  8. De-Dopplerization of Acoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-10

    band energy obtained from fractional octave band digital filters generates a de-Dopplerized spectrum without complex resampling algorithms. An...energy obtained from fractional octave band digital filters generates a de-Dopplerized spectrum without complex resampling algorithms. An equation...observer case. Previous efforts using a fixed array to record acoustic emissions, resulting from the motion of the acoustic source only, have been

  9. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  10. Analysis of Reverberation Time Field Measurement Results in Building Acoustics

    OpenAIRE

    D. Mašović; M. Öğüç

    2013-01-01

    Sound level difference between two rooms depends on both sound reduction between the rooms and their acoustical properties, such as the absorption in the receiving room. In order to abstract the influence of the rooms and assess only the sound reduction between them, relevant building acoustics standards offer two ways of normalizing a measured sound level difference – according to the reverberation time and the equivalent sound absorption area in the receiving room. In both cases measurement...

  11. Measurements of different acoustic conditions in small rectangular rooms

    OpenAIRE

    González Pacheco, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Impulse response measurements are carried out in laboratory facilities at Ecophon, Sweden, simulating a typical classroom with varying suspended ceilings and furniture arrangements. The aim of these measurements is to build a reliable database of acoustical parameters in order to have enough data to validate the new acoustical simulation tool which is under development at Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, Denmark. The different classroom configurations are also simulated using ODEON Room A...

  12. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken L. Telschow

    2004-08-01

    Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for

  13. Acoustic measurement of bubble size in an inkjet printhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeurissen, Roger; van der Bos, Arjan; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; de Jong, Jos; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-11-01

    The volume of a bubble in a piezoinkjet printhead is measured acoustically. The method is based on a numerical model of the investigated system. The piezo not only drives the system but it is also used as a sensor by measuring the current it generates. The numerical model is used to predict this current for a given bubble volume. The inverse problem is to infer the bubble volume from an experimentally obtained piezocurrent. By solving this inverse problem, the size and position of the bubble can thus be measured acoustically. The method is experimentally validated with an inkjet printhead that is augmented with a glass connection channel, through which the bubble was observed optically, while at the same time the piezocurrent was measured. The results from the acoustical measurement method correspond closely to the results from the optical measurement.

  14. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  15. Acoustic measurement of bubble size in an inkjet printhead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, R.J.M.; van der Bos, J.A.; van der Bos, Arjan; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; Wijshoff, H.; de Jong, J.; de Jong, Jos; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    The volume of a bubble in a piezoinkjet printhead is measured acoustically. The method is based on a numerical model of the investigated system. The piezo not only drives the system but it is also used as a sensor by measuring the current it generates. The numerical model is used to predict this

  16. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  17. Intersession repeatability of acoustic rhinometry measurements in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ahmari, Mohammed Dhafer; Wedzicha, Jadwiga Anna; Hurst, John Robert

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic rhinometry is a rapid, reliable and non-invasive technique for the evaluation of conditions associated with impaired nasal patency. This study aimed to examine the intersession repeatability of acoustic rhinometry measurements of unilateral and combined nasal parameters in a group of healthy volunteers. Twenty healthy volunteers were studied. In each subject, acoustic rhinometry measurements were performed on five consecutive days, with multiple recordings. Five clinically relevant parameters were measured in each session and the intersession repeatability of these measurements was expressed in terms of mean coefficient of variation, intraclass correlation coefficient and inter-item correlations. Intraclass correlation coefficients showed a high, and greater repeatability over time for all the combined (mean) values compared to the unilateral values. All intraclass correlations for combined values were ≥0.80 confirming almost perfect agreement. All intraclass correlations and inter-item correlations were associated with Pmeasurements. Acoustic rhinometry provides highly repeatable measurements of nasal patency, which is best for combined (mean) nasal parameters. This property makes it suitable for use in the diagnosis and follow-up of conditions associated with nasal obstruction, either structural or functional.

  18. Acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates exposed to smoking during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Beatriz Paloma Corrêa; Roque, Nayara Michelle Costa de Freitas; Gamero, Marcella Scigliano; Durante, Alessandra Spada

    2017-04-01

    To analyze acoustic absorbance using wideband tympanometry in neonates exposed to passive smoking during pregnancy. A study comprising 54 neonates in the control group (CG - unexposed) and 19 in the study group (SG - exposed) was carried out. Subjects were submitted to the wideband tympanometry test and subsequent analysis of absorbance of 17 frequencies. Low frequencies had a lower level of absorbance compared to high frequencies for both ambient and peak pressures, with no difference between the groups. No effect of passive smoking on acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phase behaviour and phase separation kinetics measurement using acoustic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammar, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    Speed of sound and acoustic wave attenuation are sensitive to fluid phase composition and to the presence of liquid-liquid interfaces. In this work, the use of an acoustic array comprising 64 elements as a non-intrusive sensor for liquid-liquid interface, phase separation kinetics measurement in bulk fluids, and local composition measurement in porous media is illustrated. Three benchmark examples: the phase behaviour of methanol + mixed hexanes and methanol + heptane mixtures at 25.0 °C and 1 bar, and Athabasca bitumen + heptane in a synthetic silica porous medium at 22.5 °C and 1 bar, illustrate the accuracy of liquid-liquid interface and potential research and industrial applications of the technique. Liquid-liquid interfaces can be detected independently using both speed of sound and acoustic wave attenuation measurements. The precision of the interface location measurement is 300 μm. As complete scans can be performed at a rate of 1 Hz, phase separation kinetics and diffusion of liquids within porous media are readily tracked. The technique is expected to find application where the fluids or porous media are opaque to visible light and where other imaging techniques are not readily applied, or are too costly. A current limitation is that the acoustic probes must be cooled to less than 315 K in order for them to operate.

  20. Mobile Communication Devices, Ambient Noise, and Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; Ysenbaert, Femke; Zarowski, Andrzej; Vanspauwen, Robby

    2017-03-01

    The ability to move with mobile communication devices (MCDs; ie, smartphones and tablet computers) may induce differences in microphone-to-mouth positioning and use in noise-packed environments, and thus influence reliability of acoustic voice measurements. This study investigated differences in various acoustic voice measures between six recording equipments in backgrounds with low and increasing noise levels. One chain of continuous speech and sustained vowel from 50 subjects with voice disorders (all separated by silence intervals) was radiated and re-recorded in an anechoic chamber with five MCDs and one high-quality recording system. These recordings were acquired in one condition without ambient noise and in four conditions with increased ambient noise. A total of 10 acoustic voice markers were obtained in the program Praat. Differences between MCDs and noise condition were assessed with Friedman repeated-measures test and posthoc Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, both for related samples, after Bonferroni correction. (1) Except median fundamental frequency and seven nonsignificant differences, MCD samples have significantly higher acoustic markers than clinical reference samples in minimal environmental noise. (2) Except median fundamental frequency, jitter local, and jitter rap, all acoustic measures on samples recorded with the reference system experienced significant influence from room noise levels. Fundamental frequency is resistant to recording system, environmental noise, and their combination. All other measures, however, were impacted by both recording system and noise condition, and especially by their combination, often already in the reference/baseline condition without added ambient noise. Caution is therefore warranted regarding implementation of MCDs as clinical recording tools, particularly when applied for treatment outcomes assessments. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relating acoustics and human outcome measures in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Timothy Yuan-Ting

    Hospital noise has been an area of concern for medical professionals and researchers for the last century. Researchers have attempted to characterize the soundscape of hospital wards and have made some preliminary links between noise and human outcomes. In the past, most of the research has used traditional acoustic metrics. These traditional metrics, such as average sound level, are readily measured using sound level meters and have been the primary results reported in previous studies. However, it has been shown that these traditional metrics may be insufficient in fully characterizing the wards. The two studies presented here use traditional metrics and nontraditional metrics to define the soundscape of hospital wards. The uncovered links, between both sound level metrics and psychoacoustic metrics and patient physiological measurements, are discussed. Correlations and risk ratios demonstrate the presence and the strength of these relationships. These results demonstrate the relationships between hospital acoustics and patient physiological arousal. Additionally, the effects of adding absorption in a hospital ward are presented. Sound level, sound power, reverberation time and other acoustic metrics are directly affected. The speech intelligibility in these wards is evaluated in order to highlight the temporal nature of speech intelligibility. With both studies combined, both traditional and nontraditional acoustic measures are shown to have statistically significant relationships to both patient and staff outcomes.

  2. Real-time temperature field measurement based on acoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yong; Jia, Jiabin; Polydorides, Nick

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic tomography can be used to measure the temperature field from the time-of-flight (TOF). In order to capture real-time temperature field changes and accurately yield quantitative temperature images, two improvements to the conventional acoustic tomography system are studied: simultaneous acoustic transmission and TOF collection along multiple ray paths, and an offline iteration reconstruction algorithm. During system operation, all the acoustic transceivers send modulated and filtered wideband Kasami sequences simultaneously to facilitate fast and accurate TOF measurements using cross-correlation detection. For image reconstruction, the iteration process is separated and executed offline beforehand to shorten computation time for online temperature field reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of the developed methods are validated in the simulation study. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the processing time per frame from 160 ms to 20 ms, while the reconstruction error remains less than 5%. Hence, the proposed method has great potential in the measurement of rapid temperature change with good temporal and spatial resolution.

  3. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in workrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1997-01-01

    Experimental work has been done in nine halls with volumes ranging from 693 to 123.978 cubic metres. The equivalent absorption area has been determined from absorption coefficients of the surfaces, calculated from reverberation time measurements and estimated from sound pressure level measurement...

  4. Energy Based Acoustic Measurement Senors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research focuses on fully developing energy density sensors that will yield a significant benefit both for measurements of interest to NASA, as well as for...

  5. A System for Acoustic Field Measurement Employing Cartesian Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczodrak Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A system setup for measurements of acoustic field, together with the results of 3D visualisations of acoustic energy flow are presented in the paper. Spatial sampling of the field is performed by a Cartesian robot. Automatization of the measurement process is achieved with the use of a specialized control system. The method is based on measuring the sound pressure (scalar and particle velocity(vector quantities. The aim of the system is to collect data with a high precision and repeatability. The system is employed for measurements of acoustic energy flow in the proximity of an artificial head in an anechoic chamber. In the measurement setup an algorithm for generation of the probe movement path is included. The algorithm finds the optimum path of the robot movement, taking into account a given 3D object shape present in the measurement space. The results are presented for two cases, first without any obstacle and the other - with an artificial head in the sound field.

  6. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers noncontacting ultrasonic measurements using EMATS

    CERN Document Server

    Hirao, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    This second edition provides comprehensive information on electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs), from the theory and physical principles of EMATs to the construction of systems and their applications to scientific and industrial ultrasonic measurements on materials. The original version has been complemented with selected ideas on ultrasonic measurement that have emerged since the first edition was released. The book is divided into four parts: PART I offers a self-contained description of the basic elements of coupling mechanisms along with the practical designing of EMATs for various purposes. Several implementations to compensate for EMATs’ low transfer efficiency are provided, along with useful tips on how to make an EMAT. PART II describes the principle of electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR), which makes the most of EMATs’ contactless nature and is the most successful amplification mechanism for precise measurements of velocity and attenuation. PART III applies EMAR to studying physical ...

  7. Analysis of Reverberation Time Field Measurement Results in Building Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mašović

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sound level difference between two rooms depends on both sound reduction between the rooms and their acoustical properties, such as the absorption in the receiving room. In order to abstract the influence of the rooms and assess only the sound reduction between them, relevant building acoustics standards offer two ways of normalizing a measured sound level difference – according to the reverberation time and the equivalent sound absorption area in the receiving room. In both cases measurement procedure requires reverberation time measurements in the receiving room, from which the equivalent sound absorption area can be assessed using Sabine’s formula. This paper analyses more than 300 results of reverberation time field measurements and provides an insight into its typical values in buildings. The measurements are done by five teams of building acoustics engineers, mostly involved in the international EU COST Action TU0901. The results are gathered in a unique database as a part of the STSM (Short Term Scientific Mission.

  8. Atypical prosody in Asperger syndrome: perceptual and acoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipe, Marisa G; Frota, Sónia; Castro, São Luís; Vicente, Selene G

    2014-08-01

    It is known that individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) may show no problems with regard to what is said (e.g., lexical content) but tend to have difficulties in how utterances are produced, i.e., they may show prosodic impairments. In the present study, we focus on the use of prosodic features to express grammatical meaning. Specifically, we explored the sentence type difference between statements and questions that is conveyed by intonation, using perceptual and acoustic measurements. Children aged 8 and 9 years with AS (n = 12) were matched according to age and nonverbal intelligence with typically developing peers (n = 17). Although children with AS could produce categorically accurate prosodic patterns, their prosodic contours were perceived as odd by adult listeners, and acoustic measurements showed alterations in duration and pitch. Additionally, children with AS had greater variability in fundamental frequency contours compared to typically developing peers.

  9. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  10. Acoustic doppler methods for remote measurements of ocean flows - a review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.

    The evolution of acoustic doppler methods for remote measurements of ocean flows has been briefly reviewed in historical perspective. Both Eulerian and profiling methods have been discussed. Although the first acoustic Doppler current meter has been...

  11. Development of Optical Measurement Techniques for Thermo-Acoustic Diagnostics: Fibre-Optic Microphone, Rayleigh-Scattering, and Acoustic PIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Konle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-acoustic investigations require reliable measurement techniques in hot environments for pressure, density fluctuations with a high dynamic range and acoustic particle velocity. This paper presents recent developments of optical measurement techniques in combustion diagnostics. A fibre-optic microphone based on the interferometric detection of membrane deflections was designed to measure acoustic pressure oscillations. Due to the heat resistant design, the sensor has an upper temperature limitation of approximately 970 K. Rayleigh-Scattering measurements, using the density dependent intensity of scattered light were performed in an unconfined flame with approximately 1600 K to study amplitude and phase distribution of the flame pulsation. Acoustic particle velocity can be determined applying acoustic PIV (particle image velocimetry technique. This paper shows a way to measure simultaneously the acoustic particle velocity and the locally resolved mean flow velocity of a turbulent flow. Together these non-invasive techniques are applicable to study thermo-acoustic processes and sound generation in combustion chambers or turbines.

  12. Objective measurement of inhaler inhalation flow profile using acoustic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacalle, H.; Taylor, T.E.; Marco, S.; Reilly, R.B.

    2016-07-01

    Patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are mostly treated with inhalers that deliver medication directly to their airways. Drug delivery from dry powder inhalers (DPIs) is very much reliant on the inhalation manoeuvre, specifically the peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), inspiratory capacity (IC) and inhalation rise time (IRT) of the inhalation. It has been widely reported that patients may not follow correct inhalation technique while using their inhaler. In this study, a novel acoustic method is proposed to accurately estimate inhalation flow profile using only one inhalation recording for calibration. An Ellipta DPI was placed inside an airtight container with a spirometer connected in order to measure inhalation flow parameters. An acoustic recording device (Inhaler Compliance Assessment (INCA)) was also attached to the DPI. Inhalation audio and flow signals were recorded simultaneously. The data were collected from 20 healthy subjects while performing inhaler inhalations at a range of inspiratory flow rates. A power law regression model was computed to obtain the relationship between the acoustic envelope of the inhalation and flow profile of each recording. Each model was tested on the remaining audio signals to estimate flow profile. The average estimation error was found to be 10.5±0.3% for estimating flow profile from audio signals. Inhalation flow profile parameters (PIFR, IC and IRT) could then be measured from the estimated flow profile with high accuracy giving information on user inhalation technique. This method may assist in improving patient inhaler adherence and overall disease control. (Author)

  13. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m^3;. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a new measurement method to attain the elastic properties of snow.

  14. Predicting the intelligibility of deaf children's speech from acoustic measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchanski, Rosalie M.; Geers, Ann E.; Brenner, Christine M.; Tobey, Emily A.

    2004-05-01

    A weighted combination of speech-acoustic measures may provide an objective assessment of speech intelligibility in deaf children that could be used to evaluate the benefits of sensory aids and rehabilitation programs. This investigation compared the accuracy of two different approaches, multiple linear regression and a simple neural net. These two methods were applied to identical sets of acoustic measures, including both segmental (e.g., voice-onset times of plosives, spectral moments of fricatives, second formant frequencies of vowels) and suprasegmental measures (e.g., sentence duration, number and frequency of intersentence pauses). These independent variables were obtained from digitized recordings of deaf children's imitations of 11 simple sentences. The dependent measure was the percentage of spoken words from the 36 McGarr Sentences understood by groups of naive listeners. The two predictive methods were trained on speech measures obtained from 123 out of 164 8- and 9-year-old deaf children who used cochlear implants. Then, predictions were obtained using speech measures from the remaining 41 children. Preliminary results indicate that multiple linear regression is a better predictor of intelligibility than the neural net, accounting for 79% as opposed to 65% of the variance in the data. [Work supported by NIH.

  15. Acoustic and aerodynamic measures of the voice during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Adrienne B; Gross, Heather E

    2015-01-01

    Known influences of sex hormones on the voice would suggest pregnancy hormones could have an effect, yet studies using acoustic measures have not indicated changes. Additionally, no examination of the voice before the third trimester has been reported. Effect of pregnancy on the voice is relatively unexplored yet could be quite relevant to female speakers and singers. It is possible that spectral and aerodynamic measures would be more sensitive to tissue-level changes caused by pregnancy hormones. In this first longitudinal study of a 32-year-old woman's pregnancy, weekly voice samples were analyzed for acoustic (fundamental frequency, perturbation ratios of shimmer and jitter, Harmonic-to-Noise Ratio, spectral measures, and maximum phonation time) and aerodynamic (average airflow, peak flow, AC/DC ratio, open quotient, and speed quotient) parameters. All measures appeared generally stable during weeks 11-39 of pregnancy compared with 21 weeks postpartum. Slight decrease in minimum airflow and open speed quotient may reflect suspected vocal fold tissue changes. It is recommended that future studies monitor and test correlations among hormone levels, visual analyses of vocal fold mucosa, aerodynamic function, and glottal efficiency. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Composite Materials and Measurement of Their Acoustic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshio; Kitatuji, Mituyoshi

    2004-05-01

    A composite material consists of two or more materials and its optimum acoustic properties can be designed by selecting its constituents. Unidirectional composite materials have a very low transverse Poisson’s ratio of less than 0.1. By considering such composite material features, the applications of carbon fiber-epoxy and highly crystalline polyethylene fiber-polyurethane composite materials to a medical transducer array are proposed. The sound velocities and densities of the composite materials are measured and their transverse Poisson’s ratios are calculated from experimental data.

  17. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics.

  18. Patch near field acoustic holography based on particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing

    2009-01-01

    Patch near field acoustic holography (PNAH) based on sound pressure measurements makes it possible to reconstruct the source field near a source by measuring the sound pressure at positions on a surface. that is comparable in size to the source region of concern. Particle velocity is an alternative...... input quantity for NAH, and the advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based NAH and as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has recently been demonstrated. This paper......, PNAH based on particle velocity measurements can give better results than the pressure-based PNAH with a reduced number of iterations. A simulation study, as well as an experiment carried out with a pressure-velocity sound intensity probe, demonstrates these findings....

  19. Measurement of incident sound power using near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    The conventional method of measuring the insertion loss of a partition relies on an assumption of the sound field in the source room being diffuse and the classical relation between the spatial average of the mean square pressure in the source room and the incident sound power per unit area......; and it has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using ‘statistically optimised near field acoustic holography’ (SONAH......). The purpose is to examine whether one should use a correction similar to the well-known ‘Waterhouse correction’ when the incident sound power is deduced from the sound pressure in the source room....

  20. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  1. Utilization of old vibro-acoustic measuring equipment to grasp basic concepts of vibration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darula, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to show that even old vibro-acoustic (analog) equipment can be used as a very suitable teaching equipment to grasp basic principles of measurements in an era, when measurement equipments are more-or-less treated as ‘black-boxes’, i.e. the user cannot see directly how...

  2. Aero-acoustic Measurement and Monitoring of Dynamic Pressure Fields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative and practical measurement and monitoring system optimally defines dynamic pressure fields, including sound fields. It is based on passive acoustic...

  3. Instrumentation Suite for Acoustic Propagation Measurements in Complex Shallow Water Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Obtain at-sea measurements to test theoretical and modeling predictions of acoustic propagation in dynamic, inhomogeneous, and nonisotropic shallow water...

  4. An Ultrasonic Caliper Device for Measuring Acoustic Nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Christopher; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Maxwell, Adam D.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Wang, Yak-Nam; MacConaghy, Brian; Kreider, Wayne

    In medical and industrial ultrasound, it is often necessary to measure the acoustic properties of a material. A specific medical application requires measurements of sound speed, attenuation, and nonlinearity to characterize livers being evaluated for transplantation. For this application, a transmission-mode caliper device is proposed in which both transmit and receive transducers are directly coupled to a test sample, the propagation distance is measured with an indicator gage, and receive waveforms are recorded for analysis. In this configuration, accurate measurements of nonlinearity present particular challenges: diffraction effects can be considerable while nonlinear distortions over short distances typically remain small. To enable simple estimates of the nonlinearity coeffcient from a quasi-linear approximation to the lossless Burgers' equation, the calipers utilize a large transmitter and plane waves are measured at distances of 15-50 mm. Waves at 667 kHz and pressures between 0.1 and 1 MPa were generated and measured in water at different distances; the nonlinearity coeffcient of water was estimated from these measurements with a variability of approximately 10%. Ongoing efforts seek to test caliper performance in other media and improve accuracy via additional transducer calibrations.

  5. Acoustical measurements on stages of nine U.S. concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Bradley, J S

    1993-01-01

    A measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls included acoustical measurements on the stage of each hall. Two teams (from the National Research Council of Canada, and the Technical University of Denmark) made measurements of the acoustical quantities suggested by Gade: the ``support'' family...

  6. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  7. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  8. Acoustically measured seasonal patterns of Zooplankton in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, R. E.; McGehee, D. E.; Greenlaw, C. F.; Holliday, D. V.

    Zooplankton biovolumes and sizes were determined from high-frequency acoustical measurements taken from an undulating SeaSoar vehicle on three cruises in the northern Arabian Sea. Cruises in 1994 and 1995 encompassed the periods of the winter Northeast Monsoon (November 28-December 17, 1994), the summer Southwest Monsoon (June 21 to July 13, 1995), and the Fall Intermonsoon (September 18 to October 11, 1995). Data are discussed from three sampling grids and their interconnecting transects in offshore waters. Zooplankton biovolumes varied seasonally, with lowest biovolumes during the summer Southwest Monsoon, intermediate during the Fall Intermonsoon and highest during the winter Northeast Monsoon. Biovolumes were highest near the surface and decreased with increasing depth. The smallest size-class (0.05-0.16 mm equivalent spherical radius) dominated the biovolume throughout most of the water column. Larger size-classes sometimes dominated the near-surface layers. Mesoscale variability was consistently observed in all areas on all cruises.

  9. Acoustic measurements in the collimation region of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Deboy, D; Baccigalupi, C; Burkart, F; Cauchi, M; Derrez, C S; Lendaro, J; Masi, A; Spiezia, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01

    The LHC accelerator at CERN has the most advanced collimation system ever being installed. The collimators intercept unavoidable particle losses and therefore are essential to avoid beam induced quenches of the superconducting magnets. In addition, they provide passive machine protection against mis-kicked beams. During material robustness tests on a LHC collimator prototype in 2004 and 2006, vibration and acoustic measurements have shown that a beam impact detection system should be feasible using accelerometers and microphones as sensors in the LHC. Recently, such sensors have been installed close to the primary collimators in the LHC tunnel. First analyses of raw data show that the system is sensitive enough to detect beam scraping on collimators. Therefore, the implementation of a sophisticated acousticmonitoring system is under investigation. It may be useful not only to detect beam impacts on primary collimators in case of failure, but also to derive further information on beam losses that occur during ...

  10. Acoustic measurement of the granular density of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the vibrational density of states (DOS) in glasses reveal that an excess number of low-frequency modes, as compared to the Debye scaling seen in crystalline materials, is associated with a loss of mechanical rigidity. An excess number of modes have also been observed experimentally in colloids and in simulations of idealized granular materials near the jamming point. However, there have not been any experimental measurements in an athermal granular system. We experimentally probe the material by mimicking thermal motion with acoustic waves, thereby allowing us to measure a DOS like quantity by analogy with conventional solid state techniques. Our system is made up of two dimensional photoelastic disks which allow visualization of the internal force structure, and a voice coil driver provides a white noise signal to excite a broad spectrum of vibrations. The sound is then detected with piezoelectric sensors embedded inside a subset of the particles. These measurements give us the particle velocities, from which we are able to compute a DOS by taking the Fourier transform of the velocity autocorrelation function. We measure this DOS as a function of the confining pressure and degree of disorder and find that the peak in the density of states shifts to higher frequency as the system pressure is increased.

  11. Near-field acoustic holography with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    Near-field acoustic holography (NAH) is a powerful sound source identification technique that makes it possible to reconstruct and extract all the information of the sound field radiated by a source in a very efficient manner, readily providing a complete representation of the acoustic field under...... examination. This is crucial in many areas of acoustics where such a thorough insight into the sound radiated by a source can be essential. This study examines novel acoustic array technology in near-field acoustic holography and sound source identification. The study focuses on three aspects, namely the use...... of particle velocity measurements and combined pressure-velocity measurements in NAH, the relation between the near-field and the far-field radiation from sound sources via the supersonic acoustic intensity, and finally, the reconstruction of sound fields using rigid spherical microphone arrays. Measurement...

  12. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  13. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  14. Proton range verification in homogeneous materials through acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wei; Jones, Kevin C.; Petro, Scott; Kassaee, Alireza; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Avery, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Clinical proton beam quality assurance (QA) requires a simple and accurate method to measure the proton beam Bragg peak (BP) depth. Protoacoustics, the measurement of the pressure waves emitted by thermal expansion resulting from proton dose deposition, may be used to obtain the depth of the BP in a phantom by measuring the time-of-flight of the pressure wave. Rectangular and cylindrical phantoms of different materials (aluminum, lead, and polyethylene) were used for protoacoustic studies. Four different methods for analyzing the protoacoustic signals are compared. Data analysis shows that, for Methods 1 and 2, plastic phantoms have better accuracy than metallic ones because of the lower speed of sound. Method 3 does not require characterizing the speed of sound in the material, but it results in the largest error. Method 4 exhibits minimal error, less than 3 mm (with an uncertainty  ⩽1.5 mm) for all the materials and geometries. Psuedospectral wave-equation simulations (k-Wave MATLAB toolbox) are used to understand the origin of acoustic reflections within the phantom. The presented simulations and experiments show that protoacoustic measurements may provide a low cost and simple QA procedure for proton beam range verification as long as the proper phantoms and calculation methods are used.

  15. Outcomes Measurement in Voice Disorders: Application of an Acoustic Index of Dysphonia Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this experiment was to assess the ability of an acoustic model composed of both time-based and spectral-based measures to track change following voice disorder treatment and to serve as a possible treatment outcomes measure. Method: A weighted, four-factor acoustic algorithm consisting of shimmer, pitch sigma, the ratio of…

  16. Acoustic measurements on trees and logs: a review and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic technologies have been well established as material evaluation tools in the past several decades, and their use has become widely accepted in the forest products industry for online quality control and products grading. Recent research developments on acoustic sensing technology offer further opportunities to evaluate standing trees and logs for general wood...

  17. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  18. Acoustic Measurements of an Uninstalled Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Brown, Clifford A.; Shook, Tony D.; Winkel, James; Kolacz, John S.; Podboy, Devin M.; Loew, Raymond A.; Mirecki, Julius H.

    2012-01-01

    Sound pressure measurements were recorded for a prototype of a spacecraft cabin ventilation fan in a test in the NASA Glenn Acoustical Testing Laboratory. The axial fan is approximately 0.089 m (3.50 in.) in diameter and 0.223 m (9.00 in.) long and has nine rotor blades and eleven stator vanes. At design point of 12,000 rpm, the fan was predicted to produce a flow rate of 0.709 cu m/s (150 cfm) and a total pressure rise of 925 Pa (3.72 in. of water) at 12,000 rpm. While the fan was designed to be part of a ducted atmospheric revitalization system, no attempt was made to throttle the flow or simulate the installed configuration during this test. The fan was operated at six speeds from 6,000 to 13,500 rpm. A 13-microphone traversing array was used to collect sound pressure measurements along two horizontal planes parallel to the flow direction, two vertical planes upstream of the fan inlet and two vertical planes downstream of the fan exhaust. Measurements indicate that sound at blade passing frequency harmonics contribute significantly to the overall audible noise produced by the fan at free delivery conditions.

  19. Membrane hydrophone phase characteristics through nonlinear acoustics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Philip E; Gandhi, Gaurav; Lewin, Peter A

    2011-11-01

    This work considers the need for both the amplitude and phase to fully characterize polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane hydrophones and presents a comprehensive discussion of the nonlinear acoustic measurements utilized to extract the phase information and the experimental results taken with two widely used PVDF membrane hydrophones up to 100 MHz. A semi-empirical computer model utilized the hyperbolic propagation operator to predict the nonlinear pressure field and provide the complex frequency response of the corresponding source transducer. The PVDF hydrophone phase characteristics, which were obtained directly from the difference between the computer-modeled nonlinear field simulation and the corresponding measured harmonic frequency phase values, agree to within 10% with the phase predictions obtained from receive-transfer-function simulations based on software modeling of the membrane's physical properties. Cable loading effects and membrane hydrophone resonances were distinguished and identified through a series of impedance measurements and receive transfer function simulations on the hydrophones including their hard-wired coaxial cables. The results obtained indicate that the PVDF membrane hydrophone's phase versus frequency plot exhibits oscillations about a monotonically decreasing line. The maxima and minima inflection point slopes occur at the membrane thickness resonances and antiresonances, respectively. A cable resonance was seen at 100 MHz for the hydrophone with a 1-m cable attached, but not seen for the hydrophone with a shorter 0.65-m cable.

  20. The influence of the group delay of digital filters on acoustic decay measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobreira-Seoane, Manuel A.; Cabo, David Pérez; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the error due to the phase response of digital filters on acoustic decay measurements is analyzed. There are two main sources of errors when an acoustic decay is filtered: the error due to the bandwidth of the filters related to their magnitude response, and the error due to their p...... of the acoustic decay for narrow filters at low frequencies and low reverberation times (BT...

  1. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  2. Logopenic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia are differentiated by acoustic measures of speech production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E; Vogel, Adam P; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis...

  3. Imaging of acoustic attenuation and speed of sound maps using photoacoustic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Rene; Manohar, Srirang; Purwar, Y.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Slump, Cornelis H.; van Leeuwen, Ton; McAleavey, S.A.; D'Hooge, J.

    Photoacoustic imaging is an upcoming medical imaging modality with the potential of imaging both optical and acoustic properties of objects. We present a measurement system and outline reconstruction methods to image both speed of sound and acoustic attenuation distributions of an object using only

  4. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.; De Vries, D.; Lindau, A.

    2013-01-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various

  5. Effects of Various Architectural Parameters on Six Room Acoustical Measures in Auditoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wei-Hwa

    The effects of architectural parameters on six room acoustical measures were investigated by means of correlation analyses, factor analyses and multiple regression analyses based on data taken in twenty halls. Architectural parameters were used to estimate acoustical measures taken at individual locations within each room as well as the averages and standard deviations of all measured values in the rooms. The six acoustical measures were Early Decay Time (EDT10), Clarity Index (C80), Overall Level (G), Bass Ratio based on Early Decay Time (BR(EDT)), Treble Ratio based on Early Decay Time (TR(EDT)), and Early Inter-aural Cross Correlation (IACC80). A comprehensive method of quantifying various architectural characteristics of rooms was developed to define a large number of architectural parameters that were hypothesized to effect the acoustical measurements made in the rooms. This study quantitatively confirmed many of the principles used in the design of concert halls and auditoria. Three groups of room architectural parameters such as the parameters associated with the depth of diffusing surfaces were significantly correlated with the hall standard deviations of most of the acoustical measures. Significant differences of statistical relations among architectural parameters and receiver specific acoustical measures were found between a group of music halls and a group of lecture halls. For example, architectural parameters such as the relative distance from the receiver to the overhead ceiling increased the percentage of the variance of acoustical measures that was explained by Barron's revised theory from approximately 70% to 80% only when data were taken in the group of music halls. This study revealed the major architectural parameters which have strong relations with individual acoustical measures forming the basis for a more quantitative method for advancing the theoretical design of concert halls and other auditoria. The results of this study provide

  6. Influence of Architectural Features and Styles on Various Acoustical Measures in Churches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Antonio Pedro Oliveira De.

    This work reports on acoustical field measurements made in a major survey of 41 Catholic churches in Portugal that were built in the last 14 centuries. A series of monaural and binaural acoustical measurements was taken at multiple source/receiver positions in each church using the impulse response with noise burst method. The acoustical measures were Reverberation Time (RT), Early Decay Time (EDT), Clarity (C80), Definition (D), Center Time (TS), Loudness (L), Bass Ratios based on the Reverberation Time and Loudness rm (BR_-RT and rm BR_-L), Rapid Speech Transmission Index (RASTI), and the binaural Coherence (COH). The scope of this research is to investigate how the acoustical performance of Catholic churches relates to their architectural features and to determine simple formulas to predict acoustical measures by the use of elementary architectural parameters. Prediction equations were defined among the acoustical measures to estimate values at individual locations within each room as well as the mean values in each church. Best fits with rm R^2~0.9 were not uncommon among many of the measures. Within and interchurch differences in the data for the acoustical measures were also analyzed. The variations of RT and EDT were identified as much smaller than the variations of the other measures. The churches tested were grouped in eight architectural styles, and the effect of their evolution through time on these acoustical measures was investigated. Statistically significant differences were found regarding some architectural styles that can be traced to historical changes in Church history, especially to the Reformation period. Prediction equations were defined to estimate mean acoustical measures by the use of fifteen simple architectural parameters. The use of the Sabine and Eyring reverberation time equations was tested. The effect of coupled spaces was analyzed, and a new algorithm for the application of the Sabine equation was developed, achieving an average of

  7. Absorption characteristics of an acoustic material at oblique incidence measured with the two-microphone technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minten, M.; Cops, A.; Lauriks, W.

    1988-02-01

    The two-microphone technique has been extended to the direct determination of the specific acoustic impedance, which is one of the basic quantities in acoustics. This method can be used to determine some acoustical characteristics of an absorbing sample (such as the reflection coefficient, characteristic acoustic impedance, and sound absorption coefficient) from the specific acoustic impedance. All measurements have been carried out in an anechoic room. It will be shown that the distance to the sample and the microphone spacing are critical parameters due to the standing waves in front of the sample. Some simple theoretical models are used to evaluate the accuracy of the results. At normal incidence the results are also compared with the results of Kundt tube measurements.

  8. Measuring Turbulence from Moored Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters. A Manual to Quantifying Inflow at Tidal Energy Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thomson, Jim [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Talbert, Joe [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); DeKlerk, Alex [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology for measuring hub height inflow turbulence using moored acoustic Doppler velocimiters (ADVs). This approach is motivated by the shortcomings of alternatives. For example, remote velocity measurements (i.e., from acoustic Doppler profilers) lack sufficient precision for device simulation, and rigid tower-mounted measurements are very expensive and technically challenging in the tidal environment. Moorings offer a low-cost, site-adaptable and robust deployment platform, and ADVs provide the necessary precision to accurately quantify turbulence.

  9. The Feasibility of Performing Particle Tracking Based Flow Measurements with Acoustic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Katija, K., S. P. Colin, J. H. Costello, and J. O. Dabiri. 2011. “Quantitatively Measuring In - Situ Flows Using a Self-Contained Underwater... Measurements with Acoustic Cameras” ERDC/CHL SR-17-1 ii Abstract Modern science lacks the capability to quantify flow velocity fields in turbid...transparent fluid (so the camera can observe the light reflected by the particles). Acoustic-based flow measurement equipment used in the field (e.g

  10. Measurements of seismo-acoustic energy by the RMS method using the WLIS apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornowski, J. (Glowny Instytut Gornictwa (Poland))

    1991-12-01

    Presents the RMS seismo-acoustic method of rock burst hazard evaluation performed by means of the WLIS multichannel seismo-acoustic pulse counter. Measuring conditions in the RMS method, effect of the roof-seam boundary, energy attenuation by the environment, and directional characteristics of geophones are discussed. Measurement results are presented on the example of measurements conducted in the Zabrze-Bielszowice Centrum and Siemianowice black coal mines. Bar diagrams of energy distribution of individual pulses are shown. 9 refs.

  11. Nonperturbing measurements of spatially distributed underwater acoustic fields using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, Andy R; Petzing, Jon N; Tyrer, John R

    2004-01-01

    Localized changes in the density of water induced by the presence of an acoustic field cause perturbations in the localized refractive index. This relationship has given rise to a number of nonperturbing optical metrology techniques for recording measurement parameters from underwater acoustic fields. A method that has been recently developed involves the use of a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) targeted at a fixed, nonvibrating, plate through an underwater acoustic field. Measurements of the rate of change of optical pathlength along a line section enable the identification of the temporal and frequency characteristics of the acoustic wave front. This approach has been extended through the use of a scanning LDV, which facilitates the measurement of a range of spatially distributed parameters. A mathematical model is presented that relates the distribution of pressure amplitude and phase in a planar wave front with the rate of change of optical pathlength measured by the LDV along a specifically orientated laser line section. Measurements of a 1 MHz acoustic tone burst generated by a focused transducer are described and the results presented. Graphical depictions of the acoustic power and phase distribution recorded by the LDV are shown, together with images representing time history during the acoustic wave propagation.

  12. Simultaneous measurements of room-acoustic parameters using different measuring equipment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmrast, Tor; Gade, Anders Christian; Winsvold, Bjorn

    1998-01-01

    known room-acoustic parameters. For the reverberation time parameters RT and EDT, very good agreement was found between the three main measuring equipments. For Ts and C80 the agreement between these three is good/fair for the higher frequencies, but less good for the bass, especially C80....... The measurements with Electric Pulse and Pistol as signals (analyzed through Norsonic+MatLab) indicate good agreement for the reverberation times, but EDT is somewhat higher for the Pistol. For Ts and C80 the Electric Impulse and especially the Pistol give less clearness (higher Ts and lower C80), compared...

  13. Acoustic and manual measurements of methane ebullition in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, R. K.; Palace, M. W.; Lennartz, J. M.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Ewing, S. A.; Harden, J. W.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Controls on the magnitude and frequency of methane (CH4) release through ebullition (bubbling) in water saturated ecosystems such as bogs, fens and lakes are important to both the atmospheric and ecosystems science community. In order to understand the response of these ecosystems to future climate forcing, we need to systematically monitor ebullition from these ecosystems over many seasons and across a multitude of landscape morphologies. We have developed and field tested an inexpensive array of sampling/monitoring instruments to identify the frequency and magnitude of bubbling events which allows us to correlate bubble data with potential drivers such as changes in hydrostatic pressure, wind and temperature. The instrument consists of a nested, inverted funnel design with a hydrophone for detecting bubbles that rise through the peat. The design offers a way to sample the gas collected in the funnels to determine the concentration of CH4. Laboratory calibration of the instrument resulted in an equation that relates frequency of bubbles hitting the hydrophone with bubble volume. Audio data was recorded continuously using a digital audio recorder attached to two ebullition sensors and could be deployed remotely for up to 20 days. Time, fundamental frequency, and estimated bubble size were determined using MATLAB code. Manual bubble flux measurements were also made for comparison to the acoustically sensed ebullition. Instruments were deployed in summers 2011-2013 at a temperate fen (Sallie's Fen, NH, USA) and a subarctic mire (Stordalen, Abisko, Sweden). We also recorded ebullition at two locations in subarctic Alaska (APEX Research Site, Fairbanks, AK and Innoko National Wildlife Refuge) during summer 2011. Ebullition was observed at all sites with highest daily rates in fen versus bog sites. Observed distributions of bubble events correlate with published models of ebullition based on peat density.

  14. Laboratory investigation of a passive acoustic method for measurement of underwater gas seep ebullition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chad A; Wilson, Preston S

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are of interest as a low-power means of quantifying underwater point-source gas ebullition. Toward the development of systems for logging natural seep activity, laboratory experiments were performed that exploited the bubble's Minnaert natural frequency for the measurement of gas flow from a model seep. Results show agreement among acoustic, optical, and gas trap ebullition measurements over the range of emission rates from 0 to 10 bubbles per second. A mathematical model is proposed to account for the real gas behavior of bubbles which cannot be approximated as ideal, such as methane at marine depths exceeding 30 m. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  15. Acoustic impedances of ear canals measured by impedance tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciric, Dejan; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    During hearing sensitivity tests, the sound field is commonly generated by an earphone placed on a subject ear. One of the factors that can affect the sound transmission in the ear is the acoustic impedance of the ear canal. Its importance is related to the contribution of other elements involved...

  16. Acoustic measurements of soil-pipeflow and internal erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal erosion of soil pipes can lead to embankment failures, landslides, and gully erosion. Therefore, non-intrusive methods are needed to detect and monitor soil pipeflow and the resulting internal erosion. This paper presents a laboratory study using both active and passive acoustic techniques ...

  17. Roman Theatres; Comparison of acoustic measurements and simulation results from Aspendos Theatre, Turkey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders; Nielsen, Martin Lisa; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2004-01-01

    Room acoustic measurements have been carried out in the best preserved of all Roman theatres, the Aspendos Theatre in Turkey. The results are compared with simulated values from a rough as well as a very detailed ODEON model of the theatre.......Room acoustic measurements have been carried out in the best preserved of all Roman theatres, the Aspendos Theatre in Turkey. The results are compared with simulated values from a rough as well as a very detailed ODEON model of the theatre....

  18. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary: Analysis of experimental measurements and numerical modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sreeram

    Underwater intrusion detection is an ongoing security concern in port and harbor areas. Of particular interest is to detect SCUBA divers, unmanned underwater vehicles and small boats from their acoustic signature. A thorough understanding of the effects of the shallow water propagating medium on acoustic signals can help develop new technologies and improve the performance of existing acoustic based surveillance systems. The Hudson River Estuary provides us with such a shallow water medium to conduct research and improve our knowledge of shallow water acoustics. Acoustic propagation in the Hudson River Estuary is highly affected by the temporal and spatial variability of salinity and temperature due to tides, freshwater inflows, winds etc. The primary goal of this research is to help develop methodologies to predict the formation of an acoustic field in the realistic environment of the lower Hudson River Estuary. Shallow water high-frequency acoustic propagation experiments were conducted in the Hudson River near Hoboken, New Jersey. Channel Impulse Response (CIR) measurements were carried out in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz for distances up to 200 meters in a water depth of 8-10 meters which formed the basis for experimental Transmission Loss (TL). CIR data was also utilized to demonstrate multi-path propagation in shallow water. Acoustic propagation models based on Ray Theory and Parabolic Equation methods were implemented in the frequency band from 10 to 100 kHz and TL was estimated. The sound velocity profiles required as input by acoustic propagation models were calculated from in-situ measurements of temperature, salinity and depth. Surface reflection loss was obtained from CIR data and incorporated into the acoustic propagation models. Experimentally obtained TL was used to validate the acoustic model predictions. An outcome of this research is an operational acoustic transmission loss (TL) forecast system based on the existing, Stevens New York

  19. On Mass Loading and Dissipation Measured with Acoustic Wave Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Voinova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize current trends in the analysis of physical properties (surface mass density, viscosity, elasticity, friction, and charge of various thin films measured with a solid-state sensor oscillating in a gaseous or liquid environment. We cover three different types of mechanically oscillating sensors: the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring, surface acoustic wave (SAW, resonators and magnetoelastic sensors (MESs. The fourth class of novel acoustic wave (AW mass sensors, namely thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (TFBARs on vibrating membranes is discussed in brief. The paper contains a survey of theoretical results and practical applications of the sensors and includes a comprehensive bibliography.

  20. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude. 4. Experiences with Modifications of the Acoustic Structuring Test. Research Bulletin. No. 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Kai

    Four new versions of an acoustic structuring test were developed, administered, and analyzed in order to produce better tests and to contribute to better understanding of the abilities measured by these tests. The tests consist of tape recordings of patterns of musical notes played on an electric organ or an acoustic guitar. Item analyses and…

  1. Granular temperature measured experimentally in a shear flow by acoustic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2017-09-01

    Granular temperature may control high-speed granular flows, yet it is difficult to measure in laboratory experiments. Here we utilize acoustic energy to measure granular temperature in dense shear flows. We show that acoustic energy captures the anticipated behavior of granular temperature as a function of grain size in quartz sand shear flows. We also find that granular temperature (through its proxy acoustic energy) is nearly linearly proportional to inertial number, and dilation is proportional to acoustic energy raised to the power 0.6 ±0.2 . This demonstrates the existence of a relationship between granular temperature and dilation. It is also consistent with previous results on dilation due to externally imposed vibration, thus showing that internally and externally induced vibrations have identical results on granular shear flows.

  2. Comprehensive evaluation of the acoustic impulse-response of apples as a measure of fruit quality

    OpenAIRE

    Landahl, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic impulse-response technique is a means to evaluate apple quality. In this work the effect of physiological changes in the fruit on the physical measurements of fruit quality are examined. In the acoustic impulse-response technique the fruit is mechanically excited by an impact force and starts to vibrate at its own natural frequency. The resulting sound waves are then recorded and analysed. It is a fast method and yields a produce-averaged value: the stiffness factor. Experimen...

  3. Comparison between psycho-acoustics and physio-acoustic measurement to determine optimum reverberation time of pentatonic angklung music concert hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsono, Anugrah S.; Merthayasa, I. G. N.; Suprijanto

    2015-09-01

    This research tried to compare psycho-acoustics and Physio-acoustic measurement to find the optimum reverberation time of soundfield from angklung music. Psycho-acoustic measurement was conducted using a paired comparison method and Physio-acoustic measurement was conducted with EEG Measurement on T3, T4, FP1, and FP2 measurement points. EEG measurement was conducted with 5 persons. Pentatonic angklung music was used as a stimulus with reverberation time variation. The variation was between 0.8 s - 1.6 s with 0.2 s step. EEG signal was analysed using a Power Spectral Density method on Alpha Wave, High Alpha Wave, and Theta Wave. Psycho-acoustic measurement on 50 persons showed that reverberation time preference of pentatonic angklung music was 1.2 second. The result was similar to Theta Wave measurement on FP2 measurement point. High Alpha wave on T4 measurement gave different results, but had similar patterns with psycho-acoustic measurement

  4. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  5. Measuring derived acoustic power of an ultrasound surgical device in the linear and nonlinear operating modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosić, Antonio; Ivancević, Bojan; Svilar, Dragoljub

    2009-06-01

    The method for measuring derived acoustic power of an ultrasound point source in the form of a sonotrode tip has been considered in the free acoustic field, according to the IEC 61847 standard. The main objective of this work is measuring averaged pressure magnitude spatial distribution of an sonotrode tip in the free acoustic field conditions at different electrical excitation levels and calculation of the derived acoustic power at excitation frequency (f0 approximately 25 kHz). Finding the derived acoustic power of an ultrasonic surgical device in the strong cavitation regime of working, even in the considered laboratory conditions (anechoic pool), will enable better understanding of the biological effects on the tissue produced during operation with the considered device. The pressure magnitude spatial distribution is measured using B&K 8103 hydrophone connected with a B&K 2626 conditioning amplifier, digital storage oscilloscope LeCroy Waverunner 474, where pressure waveforms in the field points are recorded. Using MATLAB with DSP processing toolbox, averaged power spectrum density of recorded pressure signals in different field positions is calculated. The measured pressure magnitude spatial distributions are fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. In the linear operating mode, using the acoustic reciprocity principle, the sonotrode tip is theoretically described as radially oscillating sphere (ROS) and transversely oscillating sphere (TOS) in the vicinity of pressure release boundary. The measured pressure magnitude spatial distribution is fitted with theoretical curves, describing the pressure field of the considered theoretical models. The velocity and displacement magnitudes with derived acoustic power of equivalent theoretical sources are found, and the electroacoustic efficiency factor is calculated. When the transmitter is excited at higher electrical power levels, the displacement magnitude of sonotrode tip is increased, and nonlinear behaviour

  6. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  7. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Ph.D., Jorge O.

    2002-06-10

    The objective of the project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This will be accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging were linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of cores and theoretical modeling.

  8. Periodic flow instabilities during Lone Star Geyser (YNP) eruptions, as deduced from acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Johnston, M. J.; Rudolph, M. L.; Karlstrom, L.; Sohn, R. A.; Murphy, F.; McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Soule, S. A.; Meertens, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    We performed continuous acoustic measurements during four days at Lone Star Geyser, Yellowstone National Park, USA. The microphone was located at 10 meters from the geyser's cone, and the acoustic signal was sampled at 1000 Hz. The 3-hour-long eruptive cycle at Lone Star Geyser contains several water fountaining episodes followed by the main eruption, which generally lasts 25 minutes. During the 30 main eruptions that we studied, the acoustic signal patterns are very similar, and indicate the flow is unstable and clearly follows a pulsating regime. The period of the acoustic pulses drastically increases during the liquid to steam transition in the flow. This abrupt change in the flow regime corresponds to the start of the ground deflation recorded by tiltmeters, and could be due to a transition from hydro-static to vapor-static conditions in the vent.

  9. Measurement of the acoustic radiation force on a sphere embedded in a soft solid

    CERN Document Server

    Lidon, Pierre; Taberlet, Nicolas; Manneville, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force exerted on a small sphere located at the focus of an ultrasonic beam is measured in a soft gel. It is proved to evolve quadratically with the local amplitude of the acoustic field. Strong oscillations of the local pressure are observed and attributed to an acoustic Fabry-P{\\'e}rot effect between the ultrasonic emitter and the sphere. Taking this effect into account with a simple model, a quantitative link between the radiation force and the acoustic pressure is proposed and compared to theoretical predictions in the absence of dissipation. The discrepancy between experiment and theory suggests that dissipative effects should be taken into account for fully modeling the observations.

  10. Measurement of drug lipophilicity and pKa using acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Cooper, Matthew A

    2012-03-20

    Lipophilicity of chemicals and drug candidates is normally described in terms of octanol/water partitioning and log P. We investigated an alternate approach to lipophilicity determination using a mimic of an alkyl alcohol with compound partitioning quantified using acoustic sensing. A self-assembled monolayer composed of HSC(10)(CH(2)CH(2)O)(6)C(18) was formed on planar gold electrodes of a piezoelectric acoustic sensor. The system was challenged with compounds covering a 4-log range of log D values. As compounds partitioned in the interfacial layer, changes in sensor resonant frequency were found to correlate with compound partition coefficients (log P) and with distribution coefficients (log D). Linear concordance (R(2) = 0.933) was established between log(-dF/M(w)t) and log P and with log D in both water and biological buffers at variant pH (pH 5.2 to 7.8). In turn, drug pK(a) could be determined by profiling log D changes during pH titration. The lipophilicity/pH profile of a weakly basic drug (quinine; pK(a) = 7.95) was sigmoidal with respect to -dF/M(w) values, with a profile inverse to that of a weakly acidic drug (naproxen; pK(a) = 4.15).

  11. Acoustic and Perceived Measurements Certifying Tango as Voice Treatment Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafiadis, Dionysios; Kosma, Evangelia I; Chronopoulos, Spyridon K; Papadopoulos, Aggelos; Toki, Eugenia I; Vassiliki, Siafaka; Ziavra, Nausica

    2017-07-11

    Voice disorders are affecting everyday life in many levels, and their prevalence has been studied extensively in certain and general populations. Notably, several factors have a cohesive influence on voice disorders and voice characteristics. Several studies report that health and environmental and psychological etiologies can serve as risk factors for voice disorders. Many diagnostic protocols, in the literature, evaluate voice and its parameters leading to direct or indirect treatment intervention. This study was designed to examine the effect of tango on adult acoustic voice parameters. Fifty-two adults (26 male and 26 female) were recruited and divided into four subgroups (male dancers, female dancers, male nondancers, and female nondancers). The participants were asked to answer two questionnaires (Voice Handicap Index and Voice Evaluation Form), and their voices were recorded before and after the tango dance session. Moreover, water consumption was investigated. The study's results indicated that the voices' acoustic characteristics were different between tango dancers and the control group. The beneficial results are far from prominent as they prove that tango dance can serve stand-alone as voice therapy without the need for hydration. Also, more research is imperative to be conducted on a longitudinal basis to obtain a more accurate result on the required time for the proposed therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-05-04

    It is commonly recognized that suspended-sediment concentrations in rivers can change rapidly in time and independently of water discharge during important sediment‑transporting events (for example, during floods); thus, suspended-sediment measurements at closely spaced time intervals are necessary to characterize suspended‑sediment loads. Because the manual collection of sufficient numbers of suspended-sediment samples required to characterize this variability is often time and cost prohibitive, several “surrogate” techniques have been developed for in situ measurements of properties related to suspended-sediment characteristics (for example, turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustics). Herein, we present a new physically based method for the simultaneous measurement of suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended‑sand median grain size in rivers, using multi‑frequency arrays of single-frequency side‑looking acoustic-Doppler profilers. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the incoherent scattering of sound by random suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of theory that relates acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We develop the theory and methods, and demonstrate the application of the method at six study sites on the Colorado River and Rio Grande, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustic attenuation and backscatter measurements over many years. The method produces acoustical measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and suspended-sand concentration (in units of mg/L), and acoustical measurements of suspended-sand median grain size (in units of mm) that are generally in good to excellent agreement with concurrent physical measurements of these quantities in the river cross sections at

  13. Acoustic methods for measuring the porosities of porous materials incorporating dead-end pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Thomas; Leclaire, Philippe; Panneton, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    The acoustic properties of porous materials containing dead-end (DE) pores have been proposed by Dupont et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094903 (2011)]. In the theoretical description, two physical parameters were defined (the dead-end porosity and the average length of the dead-end pores). With the knowledge of the open porosity (measured with non-acoustic methods), and the measurement of kinematic porosity (also called the Biot porosity in this article), it is possible to deduce the dead-end porosity. Two acoustic methods for measuring the Biot porosity for a wide range of porosities are proposed. These methods are based on acoustic transmission and on the low and high frequency behaviors of acoustic indicators. The low frequency method is valid for high porosities. It involves measurements in a transmission tube and the knowledge of the theoretical asymptotic behavior of the phase velocity at high frequencies. The high frequency method is based on ultrasonic measurements and on the high frequency asymptotic behavior of the transmission coefficient. It is well adapted for material with relatively low values of porosity. Good precision was found for both methods and materials containing dead end porosity were tested.

  14. An acoustic thermometer for air refractive index estimation in long distance interferometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Marco; Astrua, Milena; Zucco, Massimo

    2018-02-01

    We present a method to measure the temperature along the path of an optical interferometer based on the propagation of acoustic waves. It exploits the high sensitivity of the speed of sound to air temperature. In particular, it takes advantage of a technique where the generation of acoustic waves is synchronous with the amplitude modulation of a laser source. A photodetector converts the laser light into an electronic signal used as a reference, while the incoming acoustic waves are focused on a microphone and generate the measuring signal. Under this condition, the phase difference between the two signals substantially depends on the temperature of the air volume interposed between the sources and the receivers. A comparison with traditional temperature sensors highlighted the limit of the latter in the case of fast temperature variations and the advantage of a measurement integrated along the optical path instead of a sampling measurement. The capability of the acoustic method to compensate for the interferometric distance measurements due to air temperature variations has been demonstrated to the level of 0.1 °C corresponding to 10‑7 on the refractive index of air. We applied the method indoor for distances up to 27 m, outdoor at 78 m and finally tested the acoustic thermometer over a distance of 182 m.

  15. A note on the influence of the averaging time and the frequency resolution on the accuracy of acoustic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    1997-01-01

    This note deals with measurement accuracy in some typical acoustic measurements, measurement of sound pressure and sound intensity in one-third octave bands, and measurement of acoustic transfer functions with a multi-channel FFT analyser. The purpose is to demonstrate by simple examples how...

  16. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertilä Pasi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  17. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Pertilä

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  18. Final Report: Geothermal dual acoustic tool for measurement of rock stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A. [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  19. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  20. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  1. Acoustic measurement of suspensions of clay and silt particles using single frequency attenuation and backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of ultrasonic acoustic technology to measure the concentration of fine suspended sediments has the potential to greatly increase the temporal and spatial resolution of sediment measurements while reducing the need for personnel to be present at gauging stations during storm events. The conv...

  2. Time-of-Flight Adjustment Procedure for Acoustic Measurements in Structural Timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbiel F. Llana; Guillermo Iñiguez-Gonzalez; Francisco Arriaga; Xiping Wang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of timber length on time-of-flight acoustic longitudinal measurements was investigated on the structural timber of four Spanish species: radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), laricio pine (Pinus nigra Arn.), and maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.). Time-of-flight longitudinal measurements were conducted on 120 specimens of...

  3. Simultaneous measurement of surface tension and viscosity using freely decaying oscillations of acoustically levitated droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, J.; Kilzer, A.; Petermann, M.

    2018-01-01

    Oscillations of small liquid drops around a spherical shape have been of great interest to scientists measuring physical properties such as interfacial tension and viscosity, over the last few decades. A powerful tool for contactless positioning is acoustic levitation, which has been used to simultaneously determine the surface tension and viscosity of liquids at ambient pressure. In order to extend this acoustic levitation measurement method to high pressure systems, the method is first evaluated under ambient pressure. To measure surface tension and viscosity using acoustically levitated oscillating drops, an image analysis method has to be developed and factors which may affect measurement, such as sound field or oscillation amplitude, have to be analyzed. In this paper, we describe the simultaneous measurement of surface tension and viscosity using freely decaying shape oscillations of acoustically levitated droplets of different liquids (silicone oils AK 5 and AK 10, squalane, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, 1-heptanol, and 1-octanol) in air. These liquids vary in viscosity from 2 to about 30 mPa s. An acoustic levitation system, including an optimized standing wave acoustic levitator and a high-speed camera, was used for this study. An image analysis was performed with a self-written Matlab® code. The frequency of oscillation and the damping constant, required for the determination of surface tension and viscosity, respectively, were calculated from the evolution of the equatorial and polar radii. The results and observations are compared to data from the literature in order to analyze the accuracy of surface tension and viscosity determination, as well as the effect of non-spherical drop shape or amplitude of oscillation on measurement.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of surface tension and viscosity using freely decaying oscillations of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, J; Kilzer, A; Petermann, M

    2018-01-01

    Oscillations of small liquid drops around a spherical shape have been of great interest to scientists measuring physical properties such as interfacial tension and viscosity, over the last few decades. A powerful tool for contactless positioning is acoustic levitation, which has been used to simultaneously determine the surface tension and viscosity of liquids at ambient pressure. In order to extend this acoustic levitation measurement method to high pressure systems, the method is first evaluated under ambient pressure. To measure surface tension and viscosity using acoustically levitated oscillating drops, an image analysis method has to be developed and factors which may affect measurement, such as sound field or oscillation amplitude, have to be analyzed. In this paper, we describe the simultaneous measurement of surface tension and viscosity using freely decaying shape oscillations of acoustically levitated droplets of different liquids (silicone oils AK 5 and AK 10, squalane, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, 1-heptanol, and 1-octanol) in air. These liquids vary in viscosity from 2 to about 30 mPa s. An acoustic levitation system, including an optimized standing wave acoustic levitator and a high-speed camera, was used for this study. An image analysis was performed with a self-written Matlab® code. The frequency of oscillation and the damping constant, required for the determination of surface tension and viscosity, respectively, were calculated from the evolution of the equatorial and polar radii. The results and observations are compared to data from the literature in order to analyze the accuracy of surface tension and viscosity determination, as well as the effect of non-spherical drop shape or amplitude of oscillation on measurement.

  5. Comparisons of auditorium acoustics measurements as a function of location in halls (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, J. S.; Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    In a measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls measurements were made at 30 or more combinations of source and receiver position in each hall. Each of the three measurement teams (the University of Florida, the Danish Technical University, and the National Research Council of Canada) made...... parallel measurements of a number of modern room acoustics quantities using different equipment and measurement procedures. These results are compared on a seat-by-seat basis and the differences are explained in terms of earlier systematic studies of the effects of measurement procedure details....... The measurement results were also used to examine the influence of different measurement equipment and measurement procedures on the within hall variations of the various acoustical quantities. [Work partially supported by the Concert Hall Research Group.]...

  6. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  7. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  8. Acoustical source reconstruction from non-synchronous sequential measurements by Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Antoni, Jerome; Leclere, Quentin; Jiang, Weikang

    2017-11-01

    Acoustical source reconstruction is a typical inverse problem, whose minimum frequency of reconstruction hinges on the size of the array and maximum frequency depends on the spacing distance between the microphones. For the sake of enlarging the frequency of reconstruction and reducing the cost of an acquisition system, Cyclic Projection (CP), a method of sequential measurements without reference, was recently investigated (JSV,2016,372:31-49). In this paper, the Propagation based Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm (Propagation-FISTA) is introduced, which improves CP in two aspects: (1) the number of acoustic sources is no longer needed and the only making assumption is that of a ;weakly sparse; eigenvalue spectrum; (2) the construction of the spatial basis is much easier and adaptive to practical scenarios of acoustical measurements benefiting from the introduction of propagation based spatial basis. The proposed Propagation-FISTA is first investigated with different simulations and experimental setups and is next illustrated with an industrial case.

  9. Monitoring Concrete Deterioration Due to Reinforcement Corrosion by Integrating Acoustic Emission and FBG Strain Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijie; Xu, Changhang; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Wang, Bo; Song, Gangbing

    2017-03-22

    Corrosion of concrete reinforcement members has been recognized as a predominant structural deterioration mechanism for steel reinforced concrete structures. Many corrosion detection techniques have been developed for reinforced concrete structures, but a dependable one is more than desired. Acoustic emission technique and fiber optic sensing have emerged as new tools in the field of structural health monitoring. In this paper, we present the results of an experimental investigation on corrosion monitoring of a steel reinforced mortar block through combined acoustic emission and fiber Bragg grating strain measurement. Constant current was applied to the mortar block in order to induce accelerated corrosion. The monitoring process has two aspects: corrosion initiation and crack propagation. Propagation of cracks can be captured through corresponding acoustic emission whereas the mortar expansion due to the generation of corrosion products will be monitored by fiber Bragg grating strain sensors. The results demonstrate that the acoustic emission sources comes from three different types, namely, evolution of hydrogen bubbles, generation of corrosion products and crack propagation. Their corresponding properties are also discussed. The results also show a good correlation between acoustic emission activity and expansive strain measured on the specimen surface.

  10. Estimating sediment transport from acoustic measurements in the Venice Lagoon inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defendi, V.; Kovačević, V.; Arena, F.; Zaggia, L.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a 3-year-long (November 2004-November 2007) study based on the use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) to estimate the solid transport through the three inlets of Venice lagoon. In each of the three inlets instruments were mounted both on survey boats and deployed on the channel bed. The three bottom-mounted ADCPs were positioned in the central part of the inlets, continuously monitoring vertical profiles in the water column. Periodic transects along the investigated sections were collected by the boat-mounted ADCP. Both installations measured current speed and acoustic backscatter intensity. The latter expresses the attenuation of acoustic energy due to material in the water column. The conversion of acoustic backscatter into suspended solids concentration (SSC) was carried out by means of direct measurements of concentration; also an indirect method was used. Boat-mounted ADCP acquisitions were used to calibrate and to validate the bottom-mounted ADCP data. Hourly time series of water discharge and SSC were obtained by calculation from the current speed and acoustic backscatter data recorded by the fixed ADCPs. Hourly solid flux time series were computed. The solid flux and SSC time series at the three inlets were analyzed in relation to the hydrodynamic and atmospheric conditions, highlighting the impact of intense meteorological events on the resuspension process. The lagoon sediment budget is estimated to be about 0.5×10 6 t/yr and shows a tendency for sediment loss.

  11. Broadband measurements of the acoustic backscatter cross section of sand particles in suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, C.; Hay, A.E. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada))

    1993-10-01

    A method using a broadband transducer to measure the acoustic backscatter cross section of suspended sand particles is investigated. The frequencies used range from 1.3 to 2.8 MHz, and the sand sizes from 100- to 350-[mu]m diameter. The measurements are made in the transducer near field. The measured form factor is compared with the theoretical result for the movable rigid sphere model, and with previous narrow-band measurements. 29 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Passive acoustic measurement of bedload grain size distribution using self-generated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Teodor; Geay, Thomas; Gervaise, Cédric; Belleudy, Philippe; Zanker, Sebastien

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring sediment transport processes in rivers is of particular interest to engineers and scientists to assess the stability of rivers and hydraulic structures. Various methods for sediment transport process description were proposed using conventional or surrogate measurement techniques. This paper addresses the topic of the passive acoustic monitoring of bedload transport in rivers and especially the estimation of the bedload grain size distribution from self-generated noise. It discusses the feasibility of linking the acoustic signal spectrum shape to bedload grain sizes involved in elastic impacts with the river bed treated as a massive slab. Bedload grain size distribution is estimated by a regularized algebraic inversion scheme fed with the power spectrum density of river noise estimated from one hydrophone. The inversion methodology relies upon a physical model that predicts the acoustic field generated by the collision between rigid bodies. Here we proposed an analytic model of the acoustic energy spectrum generated by the impacts between a sphere and a slab. The proposed model computes the power spectral density of bedload noise using a linear system of analytic energy spectra weighted by the grain size distribution. The algebraic system of equations is then solved by least square optimization and solution regularization methods. The result of inversion leads directly to the estimation of the bedload grain size distribution. The inversion method was applied to real acoustic data from passive acoustics experiments realized on the Isère River, in France. The inversion of in situ measured spectra reveals good estimations of grain size distribution, fairly close to what was estimated by physical sampling instruments. These results illustrate the potential of the hydrophone technique to be used as a standalone method that could ensure high spatial and temporal resolution measurements for sediment transport in rivers.

  13. Acoustic absorption measurement of human hair and skin within the audible frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B F

    2000-11-01

    Utilizing the two-microphone impedance tube method, the acoustic absorption of human skin and hair is measured in the frequency range 1-6 kHz. Various locations on a number of human subjects are measured to determine if the presence of bone or an air pocket affects the acoustic absorption of human skin. The absorption coefficient of human hair is also measured. Additional techniques are utilized to minimize errors due to sample mounting methods. Techniques are employed to minimize potential errors in sensor and sample locations. The results of these measurements are compared to relevant historical papers on similar investigations. Results for skin measurements compare well with previous work. Measured hair absorption data do not agree with previous work in the area but do coincide with expected trends, which previous works do not.

  14. In Situ Acoustic Monitoring of Thermal Spray Process Using High-Frequency Impulse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Walther, Frank; Luo, Weifeng; Haack, Matthias; Nellesen, Jens; Knyazeva, Marina

    2018-01-01

    In order to guarantee their protective function, thermal spray coatings must be free from cracks, which expose the substrate surface to, e.g., corrosive media. Cracks in thermal spray coatings are usually formed because of tensile residual stresses. Most commonly, the crack occurrence is determined after the thermal spraying process by examination of metallographic cross sections of the coating. Recent efforts focus on in situ monitoring of crack formation by means of acoustic emission analysis. However, the acoustic signals related to crack propagation can be absorbed by the noise of the thermal spraying process. In this work, a high-frequency impulse measurement technique was applied to separate different acoustic sources by visualizing the characteristic signal of crack formation via quasi-real-time Fourier analysis. The investigations were carried out on a twin wire arc spraying process, utilizing FeCrBSi as a coating material. The impact of the process parameters on the acoustic emission spectrum was studied. Acoustic emission analysis enables to obtain global and integral information on the formed cracks. The coating morphology and coating defects were inspected using light microscopy on metallographic cross sections. Additionally, the resulting crack patterns were imaged in 3D by means of x-ray microtomography.

  15. A Monte-Carlo investigation of the uncertainty of acoustic decay measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabo, David Pérez; Seoane, Manuel A. Sobreira; Jacobsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    , taking into account the influence of the magnitude response and the phase distortion. It will be shown how the error not only depends on the filter but also on the modal density and the position of the resonances of the system under test within the frequency band. A Monte-Carlo computer simulation has...... of acoustic decay measurements can be estimated. Different filters will be analysed: linear phase FIR and IIR filters both in their direct and time-reversed versions. © European Acoustics Association....

  16. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Barth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre.

  17. Design and development of a synthetic acoustic antenna for highly directional sound measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Design and development of an acoustic microphone array for sound measurements outdoors, with applications in industrial noise and traffic noise. The microphone array has a flexible length of 10 to 76 m and covers the octave band from 125 to 1000 Hz (later extended to 2000 Hz). The angular resolution

  18. Deriving content-specific measures of room acoustic perception using a binaural, nonlinear auditory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dorp Schuitman, Jasper; de Vries, Diemer; Lindau, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Acousticians generally assess the acoustic qualities of a concert hall or any other room using impulse response-based measures such as the reverberation time, clarity index, and others. These parameters are used to predict perceptual attributes related to the acoustic qualities of the room. Various studies show that these physical measures are not able to predict the related perceptual attributes sufficiently well under all circumstances. In particular, it has been shown that physical measures are dependent on the state of occupation, are prone to exaggerated spatial fluctuation, and suffer from lacking discrimination regarding the kind of acoustic stimulus being presented. Accordingly, this paper proposes a method for the derivation of signal-based measures aiming at predicting aspects of room acoustic perception from content specific signal representations produced by a binaural, nonlinear model of the human auditory system. Listening tests were performed to test the proposed auditory parameters for both speech and music. The results look promising; the parameters correlate with their corresponding perceptual attributes in most cases.

  19. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Manuela; Fischer, Gabi; Raabe, Armin; Weisse, Frank [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie; Ziemann, Astrid [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur fuer Meteorologie

    2013-04-15

    A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre. (orig.)

  20. Acoustic emission measurement in the proof loading of an existing bridge affected by ASR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Hordijk, D.A.; de Boer, A.; Bakker, J.; Frangopol, D.M.; van Breugel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Proof loading has been considered as an effective approach in the assessment of existing concrete bridges. This paper presents a study of acoustic emission measurement in a proof loading of an ASR affected concrete slab bridge (Zijlweg bridge). Because of the uncertainty on the mechanical properties

  1. Continuous measurements of discharge from a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler in a tidal river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Buschman, F.A.; Vermeulen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be mounted horizontally at a river bank, yielding single-depth horizontal array observations of velocity across the river. This paper presents a semideterministic, semistochastic method to obtain continuous measurements of discharge from horizontal ADCP

  2. On the local plane wave methods for in situ measurement of acoustic absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnant, Ysbrand H.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address a series of so-called local plane wave methods (LPW) to measure acoustic absorption. As opposed to other methods, these methods do not rely on assumptions of the global sound field, like e.g. a plane wave or diffuse field, but are based on a local plane wave assumption.

  3. Accuracy of measurement of acoustic rhinometry applied to small experimental animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaise, Toshihiko; Ukai, Kotara; Pedersen, Ole Finn

    1999-01-01

    -sectional areas as a function of the distance from the nostril. We modified the equipment used on humans to assess dimensions of nasal airway geometry of small experimental animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of the modified acoustic rhinometry applied to small...

  4. Acoustical Measurement and Biot Model for Coral Reef Detection and Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry M. Manik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are coastal resources and very useful for marine ecosystems. Nowadays, the existence of coral reefs is seriously threatened due to the activities of blast fishing, coral mining, marine sedimentation, pollution, and global climate change. To determine the existence of coral reefs, it is necessary to study them comprehensively. One method to study a coral reef by using a propagation of sound waves is proposed. In this research, the measurement of reflection coefficient, transmission coefficient, acoustic backscattering, hardness, and roughness of coral reefs has been conducted using acoustic instruments and numerical modeling using Biot theory. The results showed that the quantification of the acoustic backscatter can classify the type of coral reef.

  5. Acoustic Reflex Measurements in Normal, Cochlear, and Retrocochlear Lesions -Part1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Shahnaz

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available The cut off points of 90th percentile of acoustic reflex thresholds were determined in the normal and sensory hearing loss.All subjects had measurable hearing(ANSI-1969≤110 dBHL in three frequencies of 500,1000 and 2000Hz.While hearing loss was more than 55dB, The cut off point was higher in studies that NR responses was included.In cases that hearing loss was less than 75dB, 90th percentile can be used in diganosis of retrochochlear lesions.Since Acoustic reflexes are absent in both mentioned pathologies in greater amount of hearing loss,It would be less efficient in diffrential diganisis of cochlear and retrochochlear lesions to use acoustic reflex thresholds under the mentioned circumstances.

  6. Acoustic signal propagation and measurement in natural stream channels for application to surrogate bed load measurements: Halfmoon Creek, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring sediment-generated noise using submerged hydrophones is a surrogate method for measuring bed load transport in streams with the potential for improving estimates of bed load transport through widespread, inexpensive monitoring. Understanding acoustic signal propagation in natural stream e...

  7. Temporal acoustic measures distinguish primary progressive apraxia of speech from primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Joseph R; Hanley, Holly; Utianski, Rene; Clark, Heather; Strand, Edythe; Josephs, Keith A; Whitwell, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if acoustic measures of duration and syllable rate during word and sentence repetition, and a measure of within-word lexical stress, distinguish speakers with primary progressive apraxia of speech (PPAOS) from nonapraxic speakers with the agrammatic or logopenic variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA), and control speakers. Results revealed that the PPAOS group had longer durations and reduced rate of syllable production for most words and sentences, and the measure of lexical stress. Sensitivity and specificity indices for the PPAOS versus the other groups were highest for longer multisyllabic words and sentences. For the PPAOS group, correlations between acoustic measures and perceptual ratings of AOS were moderately high to high. Several temporal measures used in this study may aid differential diagnosis and help quantify features of PPAOS that are distinct from those associated with PPA in which AOS is not present. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of Smartphones and Software on Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth U. Grillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the within-subject variability of voice measures captured using different recording devices (i.e., smartphones and head mounted microphone and software programs (i.e., Analysis of Dysphonia in Speech and Voice (ADSV, Multi-dimensional Voice Program (MDVP, and Praat.  Correlations between the software programs that calculated the voice measures were also analyzed.  Results demonstrated no significant within-subject variability across devices and software and that some of the measures were highly correlated across software programs.  The study suggests that certain smartphones may be appropriate to record daily voice measures representing the effects of vocal loading within individuals.  In addition, even though different algorithms are used to compute voice measures across software programs, some of the programs and measures share a similar relationship.

  9. Influence of Smartphones and Software on Acoustic Voice Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Elizabeth U; Brosious, Jenna N; Sorrell, Staci L; Anand, Supraja

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the within-subject variability of voice measures captured using different recording devices (i.e., smartphones and head mounted microphone) and software programs (i.e., Analysis of Dysphonia in Speech and Voice (ADSV), Multi-dimensional Voice Program (MDVP), and Praat). Correlations between the software programs that calculated the voice measures were also analyzed. Results demonstrated no significant within-subject variability across devices and software and that some of the measures were highly correlated across software programs. The study suggests that certain smartphones may be appropriate to record daily voice measures representing the effects of vocal loading within individuals. In addition, even though different algorithms are used to compute voice measures across software programs, some of the programs and measures share a similar relationship.

  10. Identifying acoustical coupling by measurements and prediction-models for St. Peter's Basilica in Rome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martellotta, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    St. Peter's Basilica is one of the largest buildings in the world, having a huge volume resulting from the addition of different parts. Consequently, sound propagation cannot be interpreted using a conventional approach and requires experimental measures to be compared with statistical-acoustics and geometrical predictions in order to explain the interplay between shape, materials, and sound waves better. In previous research one of the most evident effects, the surprisingly low reverberation time, was believed to result from acoustical coupling phenomena. Taking advantage of more refined measuring techniques available today an acoustic survey was carried out and the results were analyzed using different methods, including Bayesian parameter estimation of multiple slope decays and directional energy plots, which showed that coupling effects actually take place, even though measured reverberation times were longer than those given in previous studies. In addition, experimental results were compared with geometrical- and statistical-acoustic models of the basilica, which showed that careful selection of input data and, in statistical models, the inclusion of phenomena such as direct sound radiation and non-diffuse energy transfer, allow obtaining accurate results. Finally, both models demonstrated that reduced reverberation depends more on increased absorption of decorated surfaces than on coupling effects.

  11. Acoustic Measurements in Opera Houses: Comparison Between Different Techniques and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAUSTI, P.; FARINA, A.

    2000-04-01

    In room acoustics, many objective parameters to quantify subjective impressions have been introduced. These quantities can be measured by using a wide variety of powerful tools and equipment. The results can be influenced by the measurement techniques and instruments used. Furthermore, the results also depend on the measurement positions and on the condition of the hall (full, empty, etc.). The aim of this work is to define a tightly standardized measurement procedure for the collection of a complete objective description of an opera house's acoustics. In this paper some of the results obtained by the authors after measurements made in three different halls are presented. Comparisons were made both between different hardware and software tools (real-time analyzer, DAT, PC-board, source, microphones, post-processing software) and between different measurement methods (interrupted stationary noise, true-impulse, pseudo-random white noise with impulse-response doconvolution, sine sweep) as well as between different positions in the halls, with and without the presence of musicians and audience. The results have shown that the differences obtained when using different measurement techniques and equipment are not of significant importance. The only effective differences were found regarding the recording techniques, as the monaural measurements give appreciably different results from the average of left and right channel of binaural measurements. Slightly different results were alsofound between true impulsive sources (pistol shots, balloons) and omni-directional (dodecahedral) loudspeakers. Attention must be paid to the signal-to-noise ratio, as this can influence the correct calculation of some acoustical parameters. Some differences, not as great as expected, were found in the results with and without the musicians in the orchestra shell and with and without the audience in the hall. This is probably due to the high sound absorption that is typical in Italian opera

  12. Relationship between acoustic measures and judgments of intelligibility in Parkinson’s disease: A within-speaker approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    FEENAUGHTY, LYNDA; TJADEN, KRIS; SUSSMAN, JOAN

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the acoustic basis of within-speaker, across-utterance variation in sentence intelligibility for 12 speakers with dysarthria secondary to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Acoustic measures were also obtained for 12 healthy controls for comparison to speakers with PD. Speakers read sentences using their typical speech style. Acoustic measures of speech rate, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency, sound pressure level and F2 interquartile range (F2 IQR) were obtained. A group of listeners judged sentence intelligibility using a computerized visual-analog scale. Relationships between judgments of intelligibility and acoustic measures were determined for individual speakers with PD. Relationships among acoustic measures were also quantified. Although considerable variability was noted, articulatory rate, fundamental frequency and F2 IQR were most frequently associated with within-speaker variation in sentence intelligibility. Results suggest that diversity among speakers with PD should be considered when interpreting results from group analyses. PMID:24874184

  13. Direct measurement of acoustic intensity: Application to the identification of pressure pulse sources in ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiecassagnet, A.; Bockhoff, M.; Lambert, J. M.

    1981-10-01

    Application of sound intensity measurements in order to study acoustic problems in hydraulic or gas ducts was investigated. Theory demonstrates that it is possible to completely characterize a quasi-stationary plane wave in a duct. The acoustic pressure at two points in a duct and the phase difference between the two signals are measured. For broadband noise, the phase difference is found by simultaneous determination of the Fourier transforms of the pressure signals. With these three values, (a) a measure of the vector intensity which characterizes the global energy flux in a section and especially its direction, (b) the progressive wave rate that is the root of the relation between the pressure minima and maxima, and (c) the distance between the measurement point and the reflector which is the cause of the quasi-stationary wave are obtained. Experiments with pure tones and broadband noise in a Kundt tube and in two hydraulic circuits of different dimensions confirm the method.

  14. Underwater Acoustic Measurements to Estimate Wind and Rainfall in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pensieri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic ambient noise measurements can be analyzed to obtain qualitative and quantitative information about wind and rainfall phenomena over the ocean filling the existing gap of reliable meteorological observations at sea. The Ligurian Sea Acoustic Experiment was designed to collect long-term synergistic observations from a passive acoustic recorder and surface sensors (i.e., buoy mounted rain gauge and anemometer and weather radar to support error analysis of rainfall rate and wind speed quantification techniques developed in past studies. The study period included combination of high and low wind and rainfall episodes and two storm events that caused two floods in the vicinity of La Spezia and in the city of Genoa in 2011. The availability of high resolution in situ meteorological data allows improving data processing technique to detect and especially to provide effective estimates of wind and rainfall at sea. Results show a very good correspondence between estimates provided by passive acoustic recorder algorithm and in situ observations for both rainfall and wind phenomena and demonstrate the potential of using measurements provided by passive acoustic instruments in open sea for early warning of approaching coastal storms, which for the Mediterranean coastal areas constitutes one of the main causes of recurrent floods.

  15. Correlations between Sportsmen’s Morpho-Functional Measurements and Voice Acoustic Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rexhepi Agron M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Since human voice characteristics are specific to each individual, numerous anthropological studies have been oriented to find significant relationships between voice and morpho-functional features. The goal of this study was to identify the correlation between seven morpho-functional variables and six voice acoustic parameters in sportsmen. Methods. Following the protocols of the International Biological Program, seven morpho-functional variables and six voice acoustic parameters have been measured in 88 male professional athletes from Kosovo, aged 17-35 years, during the period of April-October 2013. The statistical analysis was accomplished through the SPSS program, version 20. The obtained data were analysed through descriptive parameters and with Spearman’s method of correlation analysis. Results. Spearman’s method of correlation showed significant negative correlations (R = -0.215 to -0.613; p = 0.05 between three voice acoustic variables of the fundamental frequency of the voice sample (Mean, Minimum, and Maximum Pitch and six morpho-functional measures (Body Height, Body Weight, Margaria-Kalamen Power Test, Sargent Jump Test, Pull-up Test, and VO2max.abs. Conclusions. The significant correlations imply that the people with higher stature have longer vocal cords and a lower voice. These results encourage investigations on predicting sportsmen’s functional abilities on the basis of their voice acoustic parameters.

  16. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline W Wang

    Full Text Available Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties.

  17. Measurement of ultrasonic nonlinear parameter by using electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhichao; Liu, Suzhen; Zhang, Chuang

    2017-02-01

    The nonlinear ultrasonic technology is generally known as an effective method for the microcrack detection. However, most of the previous experimental studies were limited by a contact nonlinearity method. Since measurement by the contact method is affected by the coupling conditions, additional nonlinear coefficient are lead into the measurement. This research presents a novel technique for nonlinear ultrasonic wave measurements that uses a non-contact electromagnetic ultrasonic transducer (EMAT). And for a better understanding and a more in-depth analysis of the macroscopic nonlinear behavior of microcrack, the developed FEM modeling approach was built to simulate microcrack induced nonlinearities manifested in electromagnetic ultrasonic waves and validated experimentally. This study has yielded a quantitative characterization strategy for microcrack using EMAT, facilitating deployment of structural health monitoring by noncontact electromagnetic nondestructive testing.

  18. The Effect of CAPE-V Sentences on Cepstral/Spectral Acoustic Measures in Dysphonic Speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Christopher R

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of connected speech stimuli from the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) on cepstral/spectral acoustic measurements. Recordings from 20 participants seeking treatment for dysphonia were analyzed in this study. The participants read the 6 sentence stimuli from the CAPE-V at a comfortable pitch and loudness. Acoustic measures of cepstral peak prominence (CPP) and its standard deviation, the low-to-high spectral ratio and its standard deviation (LH and LHsd) and the multiparametric measure Cepstral Spectral Index of Dysphonia were acquired from each sentence recording and applied to analyses. A significant main effect for sentence type was present on the measurements of CPP, LH and LHsd. Post hoc pairwise comparisons revealed the most robust effect on CPP from the all-voiced sentence 'We were away a year ago'. For the measures of LH and LHsd, sentence effects were significant for the majority of comparisons. The connected speech stimuli from the CAPE-V affected cepstral/spectral acoustic measurements differentially. These findings support the rationale for using the various CAPE-V stimuli during clinical assessment, and indicate the need for further investigations to inform clinical practice. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Acoustic method for measuring air temperature and humidity in rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2014-05-01

    A method is proposed to determine air temperature and humidity in rooms with a system of sound sources and receivers, making it possible to find the sound velocity and reverberation time. Nomograms for determining the air temperature and relative air humidity are constructed from the found sound velocity and time reverberation values. The required accuracy of measuring these parameters is estimated.

  20. Acoustic pressure measurement of pulsed ultrasound using acousto-optic diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lecheng; Chen, Shili; Xue, Bin; Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zeng, Zhoumo

    2018-01-01

    Compared with continuous ultrasound wave, pulsed ultrasound has been widely used in ultrasound imaging. The aim of this work is to show the applicability of acousto-optic diffraction on pulsed ultrasound transducer. In this paper, acoustic pressure of two ultrasound transducers is measured based on Raman-Nath diffraction. The frequencies of transducers are 5MHz and 10MHz. The pulse-echo method and simulation data are used to evaluate the results. The results show that the proposed method is capable to measure the absolute sound pressure. We get a sectional view of acoustic pressure using a displacement platform as an auxiliary. Compared with the traditional sound pressure measurement methods, the proposed method is non-invasive with high sensitivity and spatial resolution.

  1. The effect of artificial rain on backscattered acoustic signal: first measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titchenko, Yuriy; Karaev, Vladimir; Meshkov, Evgeny; Goldblat, Vladimir

    The problem of rain influencing on a characteristics of backscattered ultrasonic and microwave signal by water surface is considered. The rain influence on backscattering process of electromagnetic waves was investigated in laboratory and field experiments, for example [1-3]. Raindrops have a significant impact on backscattering of microwave and influence on wave spectrum measurement accuracy by string wave gauge. This occurs due to presence of raindrops in atmosphere and modification of the water surface. For measurements of water surface characteristics during precipitation we propose to use an acoustic system. This allows us obtaining of the water surface parameters independently on precipitation in atmosphere. The measurements of significant wave height of water surface using underwater acoustical systems are well known [4, 5]. Moreover, the variance of orbital velocity can be measure using these systems. However, these methods cannot be used for measurements of slope variance and the other second statistical moments of water surface that required for analyzing the radar backscatter signal. An original design Doppler underwater acoustic wave gauge allows directly measuring the surface roughness characteristics that affect on electromagnetic waves backscattering of the same wavelength [6]. Acoustic wave gauge is Doppler ultrasonic sonar which is fixed near the bottom on the floating disk. Measurements are carried out at vertically orientation of sonar antennas towards water surface. The first experiments were conducted with the first model of an acoustic wave gauge. The acoustic wave gauge (8 mm wavelength) is equipped with a transceiving antenna with a wide symmetrical antenna pattern. The gauge allows us to measure Doppler spectrum and cross section of backscattered signal. Variance of orbital velocity vertical component can be retrieved from Doppler spectrum with high accuracy. The result of laboratory and field experiments during artificial rain is presented

  2. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    . According to these experimental results, the acoustic emission measured around setting time was attributed to cavitation events occurring in the pores of the cement paste due to self-desiccation. This paper shows how acoustic emission might be used to indicate the time when the fluid–solid transition occurs...

  3. Acoustic method for permeability measurement of tissue-engineering scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavi, A.; Guglielmone, C.; Pennella, F.; Morbiducci, U.

    2012-10-01

    An accurate intrinsic permeability measurement system has been designed and realized in order to quantify the inter-pore connectivity structure of tissue-engineering scaffolds by using a single (pressure) transducer. The proposed method uses a slow alternating airflow as a fluid medium and allows at the same time a simple and accurate measurement procedure. The intrinsic permeability is determined in the linear Darcy's region, and deviation from linearity due to inertial losses is also quantified. The structural parameters of a scaffold, such as effective porosity, tortuosity and effective length of cylindrical pores, are estimated using the classical Ergun's equation recently modified by Wu et al. From this relation, it is possible to achieve a well-defined range of data and associated uncertainties for characterizing the structure/architecture of tissue-engineering scaffolds. This quantitative analysis is of paramount importance in tissue engineering, where scaffold topological features are strongly related to their biological performance.

  4. Measurement of Acoustic Attenuation and Absorption Coefficients using Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Hugh; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam; ter Haar, Gail

    2007-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of both the attenuation and the absorption coefficient of tissue are required when planning an optimal high intensity focused ultrasound treatment. A novel technique for simple measurement of this parameters has been developed in which a thin-film thermocouple (TFT) is placed between two layers of tissue of different thicknesses. The sample can be rotated about an axis through the junction of the TFT so that it can be insonated from either side leaving the tissue adjacent to the junction unchanged, but changing the overlying thickness. The attenuation and absorption coefficients can be calculated from the heating curves measured in the two orientations. Experiments have been carried out in both tissue mimicking material (TMM) and in ex vivo liver tissue. Weakly focused transducers, resonant at 1.05 MHz, 2.4 MHz and 3.55 MHz were used at free-field spatial peak intensities of 9-14 W/cm2. The temperature rise was measured as a function of time using a TFT. These thermocouples are not subject to the viscous heating artefact that is common to other thermocouple devices and so are advantageous for this purpose. Alignment was achieved with a 3D automated gantry system, which was controlled with specialised software. Timing and data acquisition were also controlled with this software. All experiments were carried out in degassed water. Results for TMM and degassed excised bovine liver are presented.

  5. Fusion of acoustic measurements with video surveillance for estuarine threat detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, Barry; Sutin, Alexander; Kamberov, George; Roh, Heui-Seol; Luczynski, Bart; Burlick, Matt

    2008-04-01

    Stevens Institute of Technology has established a research laboratory environment in support of the U.S. Navy in the area of Anti-Terrorism and Force Protection. Called the Maritime Security Laboratory, or MSL, it provides the capabilities of experimental research to enable development of novel methods of threat detection in the realistic environment of the Hudson River Estuary. In MSL, this is done through a multi-modal interdisciplinary approach. In this paper, underwater acoustic measurements and video surveillance are combined. Stevens' researchers have developed a specialized prototype video system to identify, video-capture, and map surface ships in a sector of the estuary. The combination of acoustic noise with video data for different kinds of ships in Hudson River enabled estimation of sound attenuation in a wide frequency band. Also, it enabled the collection of a noise library of various ships that can be used for ship classification by passive acoustic methods. Acoustics and video can be used to determine a ship's position. This knowledge can be used for ship noise suppression in hydrophone arrays in underwater threat detection. Preliminary experimental results of position determination are presented in the paper.

  6. High Frequency Acoustic Sensor Dedicated to the High Resolution Measurement of Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meignen, Pierre-Antoine; Le Clézio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles

    Through acoustic signature, scanning acoustic microscopy can be used to quantify local mechanical properties of a medium thanks to the generation of surface waves, mostly Rayleigh waves. Despite being quite effective, this method requires to evaluate the mechanical properties of a single point the acquisition of many ultrasonic signals. This process is then time-consuming and is hardly adaptable to quantitative imaging. The solution considered in this paper to speed-up the method is to design a multi-element sensor allowing the extraction of information on Rayleigh waves with a reduced number of acquisitions. The work is conducted along two axes. As a first step, a model allowing the simulation of the acoustic wave behavior at a fluid/solid interface is developed. This model leads to a better understanding of the characterization of the mechanical properties and to the definition of an adapted sensor's design. As a second step, an experimental method for acoustic field reconstruction is used to characterize the multi-elements sensor and measurements of mechanical properties were done.

  7. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  8. Initiation of GPS-Acoustics Measurements on the Continental Slope of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, C. D.

    2016-12-01

    Land-based GPS measurements suggest the megathrust is locked offshore along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. However, land-based data alone lack geometric resolution to constrain the how the slip is distributed. GPS-Acoustic measurements can provide these constraints, but using traditional GPS-Acoustic approaches employing a ship is costly. Wave Gliders, a wave- and solar-powered, remotely-piloted sea surface platform, provide a low cost method for collecting GPS-A data. We have adapted GPS-Acoustic technology to the Wave Glider. In July 2016, the GPS-A Wave Glider was launched on month-long mission to two sites on the continental slope of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. One site is approximately 45 NM offshore central Oregon and the other approximately 50 NM offshore central Washington State. We will report on initial results of the GPS-A data collection and operational experiences of the mission. Wave Glider based GPS-A measurement have the potential to significantly increase the number and frequency of measurements of strain accumulation in Cascadia Subduction Zone and elsewhere.

  9. Sub-Microsecond Temperature Measurement in Liquid Water Using Laser Induced Thermal Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderfer, David W.; Herring, G. C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Mizukaki, Toshiharu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics, we demonstrate non-intrusive and remote sound speed and temperature measurements over the range 10 - 45 C in liquid water. Averaged accuracy of sound speed and temperature measurements (10 s) are 0.64 m/s and 0.45 C respectively. Single-shot precisions based on one standard deviation of 100 or greater samples range from 1 m/s to 16.5 m/s and 0.3 C to 9.5 C for sound speed and temperature measurements respectively. The time resolution of each single-shot measurement was 300 nsec.

  10. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  11. Measurements of acoustic particle velocity in a coaxial duct and its application to a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morii, Jun; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    We present theoretical solutions, based on linear acoustic theory, for axial acoustic particle velocity in an annular region of a coaxial duct. The solutions are expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters h/δ(ν) and R; h and δ(ν), respectively, represent the half of the spacing between two concentric ducts and the characteristic length given by kinematic viscosity of the gas and angular frequency of acoustic oscillations, and R is the radius ratio of the ducts. The validity of the solutions was verified by direct measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The present results are applied to measurements of the acoustic power distribution in a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine with a coaxial duct, which provides experimental evidence for acoustic power feedback in the coaxial duct.

  12. Design and Implementation of an Acoustic X-ray Detector to Measure the LCLS Beam Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, Jennifer L.; /San Jose State U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    On April 11, 2009, first light was seen from LCLS. The present apparatus being used to measure the x-ray beam energy is the Total Energy Sensor which uses a suite of thermal sensors. Another device is needed to cross-check the energy measurements. This new diagnostic tool utilizes radiation acoustic phenomena to determine the x-ray beam energy. A target is hit by the x-rays from the beam, and a voltage is generated in two piezoelectric sensors attached to the target in response to the consequent deformation. Once the voltage is known, the power can be obtained. Thermal sensors will also be attached to the target for calibration purposes. Material selection and design were based on: durability, ultra-high vacuum compatibility, safety and thermal properties. The target material was also chosen for its acoustic properties which were determined from tests using a frequency generator and laser. Initial tests suggest the device will function as anticipated.

  13. Measurements and analysis of acoustic backscattering by elastic cubes and irregular polyhedra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorne, P D; Sun, S; Zhang, J

    1997-01-01

    Underwater acoustic studies of backscattering by submerged targets have generally focused on bodies with spherical and cylindrical symmetry. However, there are interests in scattering by objects which may be characterized by more angular features, with surfaces that tend to be composed of facets...... and edges. To investigate the scattering properties of such bodies, the backscattering by a number of elastic cubes, and irregularly shaped polyhedra, have been studied. Data were collected by measuring the band limited impulse response of the scatterers, using a broadband transducer, which operated...... as a transceiver, both transmitting and receiving signals. To present the scattering measurements nondimensionally a form function definition has been employed to normalize the backscattered signals. The normalized frequency has been expressed as ka, where k is the acoustic wave number, and a is a characteristic...

  14. Measurement of acoustic particle motion in shallow water and its application to geoacoustic inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, David R; Choi, Jee Woong; Dahl, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Within an underwater acoustic waveguide, the interference among multipath arrivals causes a phase difference in orthogonal components of the particle velocity. When two components of the particle velocity are not in phase, the fluid particles follow an elliptical trajectory. This property of the acoustic field can be readily detected by a vector sensor. A non-dimensional vector quantity, the degree of circularity, is used to quantify how much the trajectory resembles a circle. In this paper, vector sensor measurements collected during the 2013 Target and Reverberation Experiment are used to demonstrate the effect of multipath interference on the degree of circularity. Finally, geoacoustic properties representing the sandy sediment at the experimental site are inverted by minimization of a cost function, which quantifies the deviation between the measured and modeled degree of circularity.

  15. Psycho acoustical Measures in Individuals with Congenital Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushlendra; Thomas, Teenu; Bhat, Jayashree S; Ranjan, Rajesh

    2017-12-01

    In congenital visual impaired individuals one modality is impaired (visual modality) this impairment is compensated by other sensory modalities. There is evidence that visual impaired performed better in different auditory task like localization, auditory memory, verbal memory, auditory attention, and other behavioural tasks when compare to normal sighted individuals. The current study was aimed to compare the temporal resolution, frequency resolution and speech perception in noise ability in individuals with congenital visual impaired and normal sighted. Temporal resolution, frequency resolution, and speech perception in noise were measured using MDT, GDT, DDT, SRDT, and SNR50 respectively. Twelve congenital visual impaired participants with age range of 18 to 40 years were taken and equal in number with normal sighted participants. All the participants had normal hearing sensitivity with normal middle ear functioning. Individual with visual impairment showed superior threshold in MDT, SRDT and SNR50 as compared to normal sighted individuals. This may be due to complexity of the tasks; MDT, SRDT and SNR50 are complex tasks than GDT and DDT. Visual impairment showed superior performance in auditory processing and speech perception with complex auditory perceptual tasks.

  16. Comparisons between Computer Simulations of Room Acoustical Parameters and those Measured in Concert Halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Shiokawa, Hiroyoshi; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    1999-01-01

    A number of European concert halls were surveyed in 1989. In this paper comparisons are made between measured room acoustical parameters and those obtained from computer simulations using the ODEON program version 3.1 on two concert halls. One is Musikverein in Vienna and the other is Concertgebouw...... in Amsterdam. Comparisons are also made between the results obtained from computer simulations using models with high geometrical fidelity and those from models with simplifications to geometry on both concert halls....

  17. Measurement of in-duct acoustic properties by using a single microphone with fixed position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Y S; Huang, Lixi

    2004-12-01

    Acoustic properties of sound absorption materials and other acoustic structures can be measured in an impedance tube using the well-established two-microphone method to resolve the two traveling wave components of a standing wave pattern. The accuracy of such measurements depends crucially on the calibration of the two microphones placed in close proximity. To eliminate such calibration, the one-microphone method [Chu, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 80, 555-560 (1986)] uses the same microphone to probe at two positions sequentially using the voltage driving the loudspeaker as a reference signal. A variant of this method is introduced in this study in which the microphone is fixed at one position while a rigid end plate moves between two positions to resolve the standing wave. The sound source is installed as a side branch, and its driving signal is also used as a reference in the two-step measurement. Close agreement is found with the established two-microphone method, and factors which might affect the accuracy of the new technique are discussed. As a demonstration of the robustness of the method, a low-budget electret microphone is used and the result also matches well with those obtained by the two-microphone method with high-quality condenser type microphones.

  18. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Eppard, M. B.

    2010-03-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) is an active sensing technology developed by Portland District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used at hydroelectric projects and in the laboratory for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a measurement and calibration system for evaluating the JSATS component, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The system consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated system has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. It provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The measurement and calibration system has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  19. Measuring discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers from a moving boat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rehmel, Michael S.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Rainville, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is now a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. The technology and methods for making ADCP-based discharge measurements are different from the technology and methods used to make traditional discharge measurements with mechanical meters. Although the ADCP is a valuable tool for measuring streamflow, it is only accurate when used with appropriate techniques. This report presents guidance on the use of ADCPs for measuring streamflow; this guidance is based on the experience of U.S. Geological Survey employees and published reports, papers, and memorandums of the U.S. Geological Survey. The guidance is presented in a logical progression, from predeployment planning, to field data collection, and finally to post processing of the collected data. Acoustic Doppler technology and the instruments currently (2013) available also are discussed to highlight the advantages and limitations of the technology. More in-depth, technical explanations of how an ADCP measures streamflow and what to do when measuring in moving-bed conditions are presented in the appendixes. ADCP users need to know the proper procedures for measuring discharge from a moving boat and why those procedures are required, so that when the user encounters unusual field conditions, the procedures can be adapted without sacrificing the accuracy of the streamflow-measurement data.

  20. Evaluation of stage acoustics in Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall by measuring stage support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Barron, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Stage acoustics is an important characteristic for concert halls, both for the acoustic quality on stage and for the audience. However, relatively little research has been conducted into the question. This study was based on the investigation of an actual concert hall stage, that of the Seoul Arts Center Concert Hall in Korea. The stage acoustics was evaluated in the actual hall, and with two models: a 1:25 scale model and a computer model. The study was based on the stage support parameter ST1 proposed by Gade as a measure of support for individual performers [Acustica 65, 193-203 (1989)]. The variation of support was measured on the empty stage of the actual hall and in the two models. The effect of musicians on stage, the effect of moving the orchestra, the effect of ceiling height and of stage-wall profile were also investigated. Conclusions are drawn both relating to the Seoul Concert Hall stage and stages in general.

  1. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqun Deng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  2. Acoustic measurements on aerofoils moving in a circle at high speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S. E.; Crosby, W.; Lee, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Features of the test apparatus, research objectives and sample test results at the Stanford University rotor aerodynamics and noise facility are described. A steel frame equipped to receive lead shot for damping vibrations supports the drive shaft for rotor blade elements. Sleeve bearings are employed to assure quietness, and a variable speed ac motor produces the rotations. The test stand can be configured for horizontal or vertical orientation of the drive shaft. The entire assembly is housed in an acoustically sealed room. Rotation conditions for hover and large angles of attack can be studied, together with rotational and blade element noises. Research is possible on broad band, discrete frequency, and high speed noise, with measurements taken 3 m from the center of the rotor. Acoustic signatures from Mach 0.3-0.93 trials with a NACA 0012 airfoil are provided.

  3. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  4. An efficient method to measure reliability of underwater acoustic communication links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roee Diamant

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of evaluating the reliability of underwater acoustic communication (UWAC systems. Reliability is a requirement for any communication system and is often defined as the probability to achieve a target bit error rate. Evaluation of system reliability is often performed empirically by conducting a large number of measurements. However, for UWAC, where experiments are expensive and time-consuming, not much data is available to perform such a reliability check. Based on the assumption that the long delay spread is the dominant characteristic of the underwater acoustic channel and for a given channel model, we offer a relaxed practical approach to evaluate the reliability of an UWAC system. As a test case, we show reliability results for the multiple input multiple output (MIMO code division multiple access (CDMA communication system.

  5. Impact of acoustic velocity structure to measurement of ocean bottom crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, R.; Tadokoro, K.; Okuda, T.; Sugimoto, S.; Watanabe, T.; Eto, S.; Ando, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a geodetic method of monitoring crustal deformation under the ocean using kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging. The goal of our research is to achieve sub-centimeter accuracy in measuring oceanic crustal deformation by a very short-time measurement like 10 hours. In this study, we focused on lateral variation of acoustic velocity structure in seawater and introduced an inclined acoustic velocity structure model to improve accuracy of the measurement. We have a few measurement sites along Nankai trough, Japan. In each sites, we deployed a trio of transponders on ocean floor (seafloor benchmark units) within distance comparable with the depth. An ultrasonic signal is generated from a surface vessel drifting over the benchmark unit, which is received and replied by the benchmark unit. In this system, both acoustic velocity structure and the benchmark unit positions were determined simultaneously for the each measurement using a tomographic technique. This tomographic technique was adopted on an assumption that the acoustic velocity structure is horizontally layered and changes only in time, not in space. Ikuta et al., (AGU fall meeting 2009) reported an approach to improve accuracy of benchmark positioning using a new additional assumption. The additional assumption was that the configuration of the transponders trio constituting one benchmark unit does not change. They determined the time evolution of weight center for the fixed transponder triangle between different measurements using all repetitively obtained data sets at once. This is contrasting to the previous method in which each data set for different measurement was solved independently. This assumption worked well in reducing number of unknown parameters. As a result, repeatability of benchmark positioning improved from 5 cm to 3 cm. We conducted numerical experiments synthesizing acoustic travel-time data to evaluate the robustness of this new approach. When acoustic travel-time data is

  6. Measuring rf and acoustic noise on operating 750 kV lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogomol' nyi, P.Ya.; Perelman, L.S.; Rokhinson, P.Z.

    1979-01-01

    In 1975-1977 radio and acoustic noise was measured on three operating 750 kV lines. The rf noise measurements were performed to test the methods of calculating rf noise from corona on line conductors, developed in the USSR, and to compare the measured and rated rf noise levels. The basic parameters of the lines studied are described and the results are compared. Comparison of the expected and measured noise levels shows that on new 750 kV lines the measured generation levels proved to be somewhat higher than expected. This may be explained by two causes: low conductor aging time and the fact that measurements of the rf noise were performed mainly in the autumn and summer. Usually for 2 to 5 years after construction of a line aging of the conductors, in which the noise level gradually decreases is observed, and the mean noise level in good weather is 6 db greater than in winter. It was found that the measured mean rf noise levels on 750 kV lines did not exceed the allowable level which in the USSR is specified as 39 db at 0.5 MHz at a distance of 100 m from the line, and that acoustic noise due to corona on the lines is allowable, i.e., below 57 db, and presents no danger. (LCL)

  7. Twin-tube practical acoustic thermometry: theory and measurements up to 1000 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, G.; Edwards, G.; Veltcheva, R.; de Podesta, M.

    2015-08-01

    We present details of a Practical Acoustic Thermometer (PAT), in which temperature is inferred from measurements of the speed of sound along acoustic waveguides. We describe both the theory of operation, and measurements on three devices at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Because the relationship between the speed of sound in a simple gas and absolute temperature is well understood, the mean temperature along a tube may be estimated from measurements of the frequency-dependent propagation constant. A PAT device made from two tubes of different lengths allows the temperature measurement region to be localised, creating an instrument functionally similar to conventional contact thermometers. Three twin-tube PAT devices were constructed and tested. PAT-A, made of silica, served to validate the technique with differences between the acoustic thermometer and a reference thermocouple of less than 2 °C at temperatures in the range from 100 °C to 1000 °C. PAT-B and PAT-C were made of Inconel-600, potentially more suitable for use in harsh environments. The Inconel devices deviated from expected behaviour in a reproducible manner, which after calibration allowed measurements with errors of less than  ±1 °C in the range to 700 °C. No drift was observed up to 700 °C. The drift observed during prolonged exposure to higher temperatures is described and its likely causes discussed. In the longer term, similar technology may provide a means for the measurement of temperature in harsh environments such as those found in the nuclear industry.

  8. Mathematical justification of the acoustic method for measuring the impedance of the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A V; Dragan, S P

    2015-01-01

    A new method for measuring a complex frequency-dependent acoustic impedance of the respiratory tract based on two-microphone method was developed. The measuring device consists of a waveguide connected through a mouthpiece to the patient's mouth. A sound field with a frequency range from 5 to 100 Hz is created in the waveguide. The impedance of the respiratory tract is determined at free respiration of the patient in the set frequency range; the duration of examination does not exceed 15 s. The criteria for the recognition of respiratory tract pathologies are proposed.

  9. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF. Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB, 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  10. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, William J; Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Shaw, Peter B; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  11. Transverse Acoustic Measurements of Superuid Helium-3 at Fixed and Variable Path Lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Charles Alward

    This thesis describes experiments using transverse zero sound in pure superfluid 3He to probe excitations with energies below the superfluid gap. One main focus is on a collective mode of the order parameter, the imaginary squashing mode. The splitting of this mode in a magnetic field causes acoustic birefringence, which rotates the polarization axis of the transverse sound wave. We have made precise measurements of this rotation in magnetic fields up to 0.11 T and observed the onset of nonlinear field dependence. Our measurements of the linear field dependence disagree with theoretical predictions, which led us to discover that the theory only applies when the sound frequency is close to the mode frequency, a condition not satisfied in our experiments. We extrapolated our data to the region of validity of the theory, and measured attractive sub-dominant f-wave pairing interactions. The other main focus is the construction of an experimental apparatus to enable in situ variation of the acoustic cavity spacing at low temperatures. Recent measurements have indicated a coupling between the transverse sound attenuation and surface Andreev bound states, which are predicted to be Majorana states in the specular scattering limit. A variable path length sample cell would enable measurements of the absolute attenuation of transverse sound, as well as allow for the separation of bulk effects from surface effects. It would also enable experiments looking for transverse zero sound in the normal state of 3He, which is predicted to have a high attenuation length requiring a micron-scale acoustic cavity. We have designed and implemented a diaphragm-based variable path length cell, and discuss our current progress and future prospects.

  12. Measurements of the Acoustic Speaking Voice After Vocal Warm-up and Cooldown in Choir Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofre, Fernanda; Prado, Yuka de Almeida; Rojas, Gleidy Vannesa E; Garcia, Denny Marco; Aguiar-Ricz, Lílian

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acoustic measurements of the vowel /a/ in modal recording before and after a singing voice resistance test and after 30 minutes of absolute rest in female choir singers. This is a prospective cohort study. A total of 13 soprano choir singers with experience in choir singing were evaluated through analysis of acoustic voice parameters at three points in time: before continuous use of the voice, after vocal warm-up and a singing test 60 minutes in duration respecting the pauses for breathing, and after vocal cooldown and an absolute voice rest for 30 minutes. The fundamental frequency increased after the voice resistance test (P = 0.012) and remained elevated after the 30 minutes of voice rest (P = 0.01). The jitter decreased after the voice resistance test (P = 0.02) and after the 30 minutes of voice rest. A significant difference was detected for the acoustic voice parameters relative average perturbation (RAP), (P = 0.05), and pitch perturbation quotient (PPQ), (P = 0.04), compared with the initial time point. The fundamental frequency increased after 60 minutes of singing and remained elevated after vocal cooldown and absolute rest for 30 minutes, proving an efficient parameter for identifying the changes inherent to voice demand during singing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Measuring energy flux of magneto-acoustic wave in the magnetic elements by using IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Hansteen, Viggo; Pereira, Tiago; Leenaarts, Jorritt; Carlsson, Mats

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) has opened a new window to explore the chromospheric/coronal waves that potentially energize the solar atmosphere. By using an imaging spectrograph covering the Si IV and Mg II h&k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Si IV and Mg II k onboard IRIS, we can determine the nature of propagating magneto-acoustic waves just below and in the transition region. In this study, we compute the vertically emergent intensity of the Si IV and Mg II h&k lines from a time series of snapshots of a magnetic element in a two-dimensional Radiative MHD simulation from the Bifrost code. We investigate the synthetic line profiles to detect the slow magneto-acoustic body wave (slow mode) which becomes a slow shock at the lower chromosphere in the magnetic element. We find that the Doppler shift of the line core gives the velocity amplitude of the longitudinal magneto-acoustic body wave. The contribution function of the line core indicates that the formation of Mg II h&k lines is associated with the propagating shocks and therefore the time evolution of the line core intensity represents the propagating shocks projected on the optical surface. We will report on measurement of the energy flux of slow modes in the magnetic elements by using IRIS observations.

  14. Acoustic reflex measurements and the loudness function in sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Uliel

    1980-11-01

    Full Text Available The suprathreshold acoustic reflex responses of forty two ears affected by sensorineural hearing loss of cochlear origin and fifty-eight ears demonstrating normal hearing, were recorded by means of an electro-acoustic impedance meter and attached X-Y recorder. The recordings were done in ascending and descending fashion,  at successively increasing and decreasing 5dB intensity levels from 90-120-90 dB HL respectively, for the individual pure-tone frequencies of 500, 1 000, 2 000 and 4 000 Hz. The contralateral mode of measurement was employed. Analysis of  these recordings indicated that the acoustic reflex  responses could be differentiated into five  characteristic patterns of  growth, which could be depicted upon a continuum of peaked, peaked-rounded, rounded, rounded-flat,  and flat  shapes. The peaked and peaked-rounded patterns were found  to predominate at all four pure-tone frequencies  in the normal ears, while the rounded-fiat  and flat  patterns were found  to predominate only at the higher pure-tone frequencies of 2 000 and 4 000 Hz in the ears affected  by sensorineural hearing loss. This latter relationship was also able to be applied to two disorders of  the loudness functio— loudness recruitment and hyperacusis. It was concluded that the flattened  acoustic reflex  patterns at the higher pure-tone frequencies  constituted a potential diagnostic cue related to the differential  diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss, and to disorders of  the loudness function.

  15. Acoustic reflex measurements and the loudness function in sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Uliel

    1980-08-01

    Full Text Available The suprathreshold acoustic reflex responses of forty two ears affected by sensorineural hearing loss of cochlear origin and fifty-eight ears demonstrating normal hearing, were recorded by means of an electro-acoustic impedance meter and attached X-Y recorder. The recordings were done in ascending and descending fashion,  at successively increasing and decreasing 5dB intensity levels from 90-120-90 dB HL respectively, for the individual pure-tone frequencies of 500, 1 000, 2 000 and 4 000 Hz. The contralateral mode of measurement was employed. Analysis of  these recordings indicated that the acoustic reflex  responses could be differentiated into five  characteristic patterns of  growth, which could be depicted upon a continuum of peaked, peaked-rounded, rounded, rounded-flat,  and flat  shapes. The peaked and peaked-rounded patterns were found  to predominate at all four pure-tone frequencies  in the normal ears, while the rounded-fiat  and flat  patterns were found  to predominate only at the higher pure-tone frequencies of 2 000 and 4 000 Hz in the ears affected  by sensorineural hearing loss. This latter relationship was also able to be applied to two disorders of  the loudness functio— loudness recruitment and hyperacusis. It was concluded that the flattened  acoustic reflex  patterns at the higher pure-tone frequencies  constituted a potential diagnostic cue related to the differential  diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss, and to disorders of  the loudness function.

  16. High-precision measurement of tidal current structures using coastal acoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanzheng; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Zhu, Ze-Nan; Liu, Wenhu; Zhang, Zhongzhe; Fan, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Ruixiang; Dong, Menghong; Wang, Min

    2017-07-01

    A high-precision coastal acoustic tomography (CAT) experiment for reconstructing the current variation in Dalian Bay (DLB) was successfully conducted by 11 coastal acoustic tomography systems during March 7-8, 2015. The horizontal distributions of tidal currents and residual currents were mapped well by the inverse method, which used reciprocal travel time data along 51 successful sound transmission rays. The semi-diurnal tide is dominant in DLB, with a maximum speed of 0.69 m s-1 at the eastern and southwestern parts near the bay mouth that gradually decreases toward the inner bay with an average velocity of 0.31 m s-1. The residual current enters the observational domain from the two flanks of the bay mouth and flows out in the inner bay. One anticyclone and one cyclone were noted inside DLB as was one cyclone at the bay mouth. The maximum residual current in the observational domain reached 0.11 m s-1, with a mean residual current of 0.03 m s-1. The upper 15-m depth-averaged inverse velocities were in excellent agreement with the moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) at the center of the bay, with a root-mean-square difference (RMSD) of 0.04 m s-1 for the eastward and northward components. The precision of the present tomography measurements was the highest thus far owing to the largest number of transmission rays ever recorded. Sensitivity experiments showed that the RMSD between CAT and moored-ADCP increased from 0.04 m s-1 to 0.08 m s-1 for both the eastward and northward velocities when reducing the number of transmission rays from 51 to 11. The observational accuracy was determined by the spatial resolution of acoustic ray in the CAT measurements. The cost-optimal scheme consisted of 29 transmission rays with a spatial resolution of acoustic ray of 2.03 √{ km2 / ray numbers } . Moreover, a dynamic analysis of the residual currents showed that the horizontal pressure gradient of residual sea level and Coriolis force contribute 38.3% and 36

  17. The acoustics of public squares/places: A comparison between results from a computer simulation program and measurements in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paini, Dario; Rindel, Jens Holger; Gade, Anders

    2004-01-01

    In the contest of a PhD thesis, in which the main purpose is to analyse the importance of the public square/place (“agora”) as a meeting point of sound and music, with particular regard to its use for concerts (amplified or not), a first step was done, making comparisons between measurement in situ...... or a band during, for instance, music summer festivals) and the best position for the audience. A further result could be to propose some acoustic adjustments to achieve better acoustic quality by considering the acoustic parameters which are typically used for concert halls and opera houses....

  18. Measurement of Insertion Loss of an Acoustic Treatment in the Presence of Additional Uncorrelated Sound Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Jacob; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    A method to intended for measurement of the insertion loss of an acoustic treatment applied to an aircraft fuselage in-situ is documented in this paper. Using this method, the performance of a treatment applied to a limited portion of an aircraft fuselage can be assessed even though the untreated fuselage also radiates into the cabin, corrupting the intensity measurement. This corrupting noise in the intensity measurement incoherent with the panel vibration of interest is removed by correlating the intensity to reference transducers such as accelerometers. Insertion loss of the acoustic treatments is estimated from the ratio of correlated intensity measurements with and without a treatment applied. In the case of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the fuselage, this technique can be used to assess the performance of noise control methods without requiring treatment of the entire fuselage. Several experimental studies and numerical simulations have been conducted, and results from three case studies are documented in this paper. Conclusions are drawn about the use of this method to study aircraft sidewall treatments.

  19. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  20. In situ Probe Microphone Measurement for Testing the Direct Acoustical Cochlear Stimulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Stieger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypothesis: Acoustical measurements can be used for functional control of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator (DACS.Background: The DACS is a recently released active hearing implant that works on the principle of a conventional piston prosthesis driven by the rod of an electromagnetic actuator. An inherent part of the DACS actuator is a thin titanium diaphragm that allows for movement of the stimulation rod while hermetically sealing the housing. In addition to mechanical stimulation, the actuator emits sound into the mastoid cavity because of the motion of the diaphragm.Methods: We investigated the use of the sound emission of a DACS for intra-operative testing. We measured sound emission in the external auditory canal (PEAC and velocity of the actuators stimulation rod (Vact in five implanted ears of whole-head specimens. We tested the influence various positions of the loudspeaker and a probe microphone on PEAC and simulated implant malfunction in one example.Results: Sound emission of the DACS with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 dB was observed between 0.5 and 5 kHz. Simulated implant misplacement or malfunction could be detected by the absence or shift in the characteristic resonance frequency of the actuator. PEAC changed by <6 dB for variations of the microphone and loudspeaker position.Conclusion: Our data support the feasibility of acoustical measurements for in situ testing of the DACS implant in the mastoid cavity as well as for post-operative monitoring of actuator function.

  1. Galaxy bias and its effects on the Baryon acoustic oscillations measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kushal T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Seo, Hee -Jong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Eckel, Jonathan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Metchnik, Marc [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Pinto, Philip [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Xu, Xiaoying [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-05-31

    The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al. (2009). For the less biased HOD models (b < 3), we do not detect any shift in the acoustic scale relative to the no-bias case, typically 0.10% ± 0.10%. However, the most biased HOD models (b > 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% ± 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1σ systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07%-0.15%.

  2. Amplitude calibration of an acoustic backscattered signal from a bottom-moored ADCP based on long-term measurement series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotukh, V. B.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Kuklev, S. B.

    2017-05-01

    A possible approach to, and preliminary results of, amplitude calibration of acoustic signals backscattered from an ADCP moored at the bottom of the near-shelf zone of the Black Sea is considered. The aim of this work is to obtain vertical profiles of acoustic scattering signal levels, showing the real characteristics of the volume content of suspended sediments in sea water in units of conventional acoustic turbidity for a given signal frequency. In this case, the assumption about the intervals of maximum acoustic transparency and vertical homogeneity of the marine environment in long-term series of ADCP measurements is used. According to this hypothesis, the intervals of the least values of acoustic backscattered signals are detected, an empirical transfer function of the ADCP reception path is constructed, and it is calibrated. Normalized sets of acoustic backscattered signals relative to a signal from a level of conventionally clear water are obtained. New features in the behavior of vertical profiles of an acoustic echo-signal are revealed due to the calibration. The results of this work will be used in subsequent analysis of the vertical and time variations in suspended sediment content in the near-shelf zone of the Black Sea.

  3. Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC) environmental data base review, evaluation, and upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Skalski, J.R.; Faulkner, L.L.; Rodman, C.W.; Carlile, D.W.; Ecker, R.M.; Nicholls, A.K.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, M.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report summarizes the principal issues of public concern, the adequacy of the environmental data base to answer the issues of concern, and the additional data collection required to support a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the proposed Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC). The report is based on a review of the readily available environmental literature and a site visit. Representatives of local, state, and federal agencies were also interviewed for their personal insights and concerns not discovered during the literature review.

  4. Implementation of distributed feedback fiber laser sensor for acoustic measurements in hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rongzhang; Yan, Aidong; Zaghloul, Mohamed A. S.; Lu, Guanyi; Bunger, Andrew P.; Miller, Gary A.; Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-09-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser strain sensor was implemented to measure acoustic emission induced by the hydraulic fracturing process. A study of practical sensor mounting configurations and their characteristics was carried out to find a practical solution. Combining the suitable mounting configuration and ultrahigh strain sensitivity of the DFB fiber laser, the evolution of the hydraulic fracturing process was well monitored. This study shows that fiber lasers can be useful alternatives to piezoelectric sensors in the field of hydraulic fracturing for gas and oil extraction.

  5. Potencials of sap flow evaluation by means of acoustic emission measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2011-01-01

    measurements became possible due to application of psychrometric method (Dixon and Tyree, 1985. There exist also other physical variables carrying important information, which can be measured using different principles. This includes e.g., acoustic methods, which can detect quantitative variation of pulses occurring during cavitation events, associated with interruptions of water columns in vessels. This must not necessarily be a single source of acoustic emissions. In this study we are focused on a general description of acoustic events measurable in a wide range of their spectrum. The first aim was to detect such signals and the second to learn them and gradually analyze in order to better understand the associated processes causing their occurrence and their relations to plant life.

  6. High-Frequency Pulsed-Electro-Acoustic (PEA) Measurements for Mapping Charge Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Kristina; Pearson, Lee; Dennison, J. R.; Doyle, Timothy; Hartley, Kent

    2012-10-01

    High-frequency pulsed-electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements are a non-destructive method used to investigate internal charge distributions in dielectric materials. This presentation discusses the theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments and shows results of PEA measurements. PEA experiments involve a thin dielectric positioned between two conducting electrodes. A voltage signal on the two electrodes generates an electric field across the dielectric, which stimulates embedded charge and creates a pressure wave that propagates within the capacitor. A coupled acoustic sensor then measures the ensuing pressure pulse response. Spatial distributions of the charge profile are obtained from the resultant pressure waveform. Gaussian filters and other signal processing methods are used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in this waveform. Estimates of the charge distribution inside the dielectric are extracted from this analysis. Our ultimate objective is to develop high resolution PEA methods to investigate in vacuo charge deposition in thin film polymeric, ceramic, or glass dielectric materials using medium to high energy (approximately 103 to 107 eV) electron beams.

  7. Correlation of VHI-30 to Acoustic Measurements Across Three Common Voice Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehqan, Ali; Yadegari, Fariba; Scherer, Ronald C; Dabirmoghadam, Peyman

    2017-01-01

    Voice disorders that affect the quality of voice also result in varying degrees of psychological and social problems. The research question here is whether the correlations between Voice Handicap Index (VHI)-30 scores and objective acoustic measures differ in patients with different types of voice disorders. The subjects were divided into three groups: muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), benign mid-membranous vocal fold lesions, and unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). All participants were male. The mean age for the groups were 32.85 ± 8.6 years in the MTD group, 33.24 ± 7.32 years in the benign lesions group, and 34.24 ± 7.51 years in the UVFP group. The participants completed the Persian VHI-30 questionnaire. PRAAT software was used to obtain acoustic analyses. There was a significant correlation between the physical subscale of the VHI-30 and the total score of the VHI-30 and maximum phonation time (MPT) in the MTD group. Also, there was a significant correlation between the total VHI-30 score and the MPT value. There were relatively strong and significant correlations between the physical subscale of the VHI-30 with jitter and shimmer, harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) for the group with benign lesions such as nodules and polyps. Also, in this group, there was a significant correlation between the total VHI-30 score and the jitter value. The physical scale had strong and significant correlations between jitter, shimmer, and HNR in the unilateral paralysis group. Findings suggest that although the VHI-30 and the acoustic measurements of voice provide independent information, they are associated to some extent. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  8. Reproducibility of shear wave velocity measurements by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging of the liver: a study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Aroca, Florentina; Reus, Manuel; Berná-Serna, Juan D; Serrano, Laura; Serrano, Cristina; Gilabert, Amparo; Cepero, Angela

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate interobserver reproducibility using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and to develop an acoustic radiation force impulse scoring system. Fifty healthy volunteers with normal liver function test values were selected for the study. Shear wave velocity measurements, expressed in meters per second, were taken in a deep portion of liver segment 6. Two observers with different levels of experience performed the measurements independently and blindly. All of the measurements taken by the 2 observers were valid, even in volunteers with a body mass index of greater than 28 kg/m(2). The results point to very good interobserver reproducibility of shear wave velocity measurements, with an intraclass coefficient correlation of 0.86 (P measurements using the acoustic radiation force impulse technique and a standardized protocol are accurate and reproducible.

  9. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  10. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  11. Method and apparatus for background signal reduction in opto-acoustic absorption measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengren, L. G. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The sensitivity of an opto-acoustic absorption detector is increased to make it possible to measure trace amounts of constituent gases. A second beam radiation path is created through the sample cell identical to a first path except as to length, alternating the beam through the two paths and minimizing the detected pressure difference for the two paths while the beam wavelength is tuned away from the absorption lines of the sample. Then with the beam wavelength tuned to the absorption line of any constituent of interest, the pressure difference is a measure of trace amounts of the constituent. The same improved detector may also be used for measuring the absorption coefficient of known concentrations of absorbing gases.

  12. Measurement of Elastic Properties of Tissue by Shear Wave Propagation Generated by Acoustic Radiation Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaru, Marie; Azuma, Takashi; Hashiba, Kunio

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) imaging has been developed as a novel elastography technology to diagnose hepatic disease and breast cancer. The accuracy of shear wave speed estimation, which is one of the applications of ARF elastography, is studied. The Young's moduli of pig liver and foie gras samples estimated from the shear wave speed were compared with those measured the static Young's modulus measurement. The difference in the two methods was 8%. Distance attenuation characteristics of the shear wave were also studied using finite element method (FEM) analysis. We found that the differences in the axial and lateral beam widths in pressure and ARF are 16 and 9% at F-number=0.9. We studied the relationship between two branch points in distance attenuation characteristics and the shape of ARF. We found that the maximum measurable length to estimate shear wave speed for one ARF excitation was 8 mm.

  13. Noninvasive Measurement of Acoustic Properties of Fluids Using Ultrasonic Interferometry Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, W.; Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.N.; Lizon, D.C.

    1997-06-15

    A swept-frequency ultrasonic interferometry technique is used for noninvasively determining acoustic properties of fluids inside containers. Measurements over a frequency range 1-15 MHz on six liquid chemicals are presented. Measurements were made with the liquid inside standard rectangular optical glass cells and stainless steel cylindrical shells. A theoretical model based on one-dimensional planar acoustic wave propagation through multi-layered media is employed for the interpretation of the observed resonance (interference) spectrum. Two analytical methods, derived from the transmission model are used for determination of sound speed, sound attenuation coefficient, and density of liquids from the relative amplitude and half-power peak width of the observed resonance peaks. Effects of the container material and geometrical properties, path-length, wall thickness are also studied. This study shows that the interferometry technique and the experimental method developed are capable of accurate determination of sound speed, sound attenuation, and density in fluids completely noninvasively. It is a capable and versatile fluid characterization technique and has many potential NDE applications.

  14. Turbulence Measurements From Moored Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs): Removing Mooring Motion Using Inertial Motion Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcher, L.; Thomson, J.; Harding, S.

    2016-02-01

    High precision, long-duration, ocean turbulence velocity measurements are typically challenging to make more than a few meters below the surface or above the bottom (i.e. from a ship or from a bottom lander). Here we describe and demonstrate a method for measuring turbulence velocity timeseries from a compliant mooring. Turbulence velocity is measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), and mooring motion is measured by inertial motion sensors (IMUs) tightly synchronized with the ADV. IMU measurements of mooring motion are removed from the ADV velocity measurements in post-processing to obtain velocity timeseries in the Earth's reference frame. The accuracy of these measurements is explored in two complimentary ways: 1) velocity spectral shapes are compared with theory, and 2) independent measurements of mooring motion provide bounds on measurement uncertainty. A -5/3 spectral slope at high frequency, and low low-frequency motion indicate that this methodology provides a new and reliable approach to measuring turbulence in the interior of the ocean.

  15. Lightning characterization through acoustic and electromagnetic measurements recorded during the HyMeX SOP1 and simulation of the acoustic nonlinear propagation in realistic thunderstorm meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallin, L.; Coulouvrat, F.; Farges, T.; Marchiano, R.; Defer, E.; Rison, W.; Schulz, W.; Nuret, M.

    2013-12-01

    The goal is to study the transformation of the thunder (amplitude, spectrum) during its travel from the lightning channel towards a detector (microphone, microbarometer), considering propagation distances of less than 50 km and complex local meteorological properties. Inside the European HyMeX project, the SOP1 campaign (2012) took place from September 2012 to November 2012 in South of France. An acoustic station (center: 4.39° E, 44.08° N) composed of a microphone array placed inside a microbarometer array was installed by CEA near city of Uzès. It was located in the center of an LMA network coming with two slow antennas. This network was deployed in France for the first time by the New Mexico Tech and LERMA laboratory. The detections from the European lightning location system EUCLID complete this dataset. During the SOP1 period several storms passed over the station. The post-processings of the records point out days with interesting thunderstorms. Especially during the 26th of October 2012 in the evening (around 8 pm) a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Not too many lightning strokes are detected by EUCLID, the corresponding flashes are then well characterized by the LMA network. Slow antennas present good electric field measurements. The acoustic records have excellent quality. We present for some selected flashes a comparative study of the different measurements (LMA, slow antenna, EUCLID, microphones, microbarometers): focusing on amplitude and spectrum of the thunder waveforms, and on propagation effects due to the meteorological conditions. To quantify the impact of these meteorological conditions on the propagating thunder (from the lightning sources to the acoustic array), a code named Flhoward is used [Dagrau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 130, 20-32, 2011][Coulouvrat, Wave Motion, 49, 50--63, 2012]. It is designed to simulate the nonlinear propagation of acoustic shock waves through a realistic atmosphere model (including temperature

  16. Acoustic measurement of sediment dynamics in the coastal zones using wireless sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakaran, A., II; Paramasivam, A.; Seshachalam, S.; A, C.

    2014-12-01

    Analyzing of the impact of constructive or low energy waves and deconstructive or high energy waves in the ocean are very much significant since they deform the geometry of seashore. The deformation may lead to productive result and also to the end of deteriorate damage. Constructive waves results deposition of sediment which widens the beach where as deconstructive waves results erosion which narrows the beach. Validation of historic sediment transportation and prediction of the direction of movement of seashore is essential to prevent unrecoverable damages by incorporating precautionary measurements to identify the factors that influence sediment transportation if feasible. The objective of this study is to propose a more reliable and energy efficient Information and communication system to model the Coastal Sediment Dynamics. Various factors influencing the sediment drift at a particular region is identified. Consequence of source depth and frequency dependencies of spread pattern in the presence of sediments is modeled. Property of source depth and frequency on sensitivity to values of model parameters are determined. Fundamental physical reasons for these sediment interaction effects are given. Shallow to deep water and internal and external wave model of ocean is obtained intended to get acoustic data assimilation (ADA). Signal processing algorithms are used over the observed data to form a full field acoustic propagation model and construct sound speed profile (SSP). The inversions of data due to uncertainties at various depths are compared. The impact of sediment drift over acoustic data is identified. An energy efficient multipath routing scheme Wireless sensor networks (WSN) is deployed for the well-organized communication of data. The WSN is designed considering increased life time, decreased power consumption, free of threats and attacks. The practical data obtained from the efficient system to model the ocean sediment dynamics are evaluated with remote

  17. Phased Acoustic Array Measurements of a 5.75 Percent Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Nathan J.; Horne, William C.; Elmer, Kevin R.; Cheng, Rui; Brusniak, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Detailed acoustic measurements of the noise from the leading-edge Krueger flap of a 5.75 percent Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft model were recently acquired with a traversing phased microphone array in the AEDC NFAC (Arnold Engineering Development Complex, National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The spatial resolution of the array was sufficient to distinguish between individual support brackets over the full-scale frequency range of 100 to 2875 Hertz. For conditions representative of landing and take-off configuration, the noise from the brackets dominated other sources near the leading edge. Inclusion of flight-like brackets for select conditions highlights the importance of including the correct number of leading-edge high-lift device brackets with sufficient scale and fidelity. These measurements will support the development of new predictive models.

  18. Accurate acoustic power measurement for low-intensity focused ultrasound using focal axial vibration velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chenyang; Guo, Gepu; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong; Hu, Jimin

    2017-07-01

    Low-intensity focused ultrasound is a form of therapy that can have reversible acoustothermal effects on biological tissue, depending on the exposure parameters. The acoustic power (AP) should be chosen with caution for the sake of safety. To recover the energy of counteracted radial vibrations at the focal point, an accurate AP measurement method using the focal axial vibration velocity (FAVV) is proposed in explicit formulae and is demonstrated experimentally using a laser vibrometer. The experimental APs for two transducers agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, showing that AP is proportional to the square of the FAVV, with a fixed power gain determined by the physical parameters of the transducers. The favorable results suggest that the FAVV can be used as a valuable parameter for non-contact AP measurement, providing a new strategy for accurate power control for low-intensity focused ultrasound in biomedical engineering.

  19. CFD Analysis of an Installation Used to Measure the Skin-Friction Penalty of Acoustic Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalart, Philippe R.; Garbaruk, Andrey; Howerton, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    There is a drive to devise acoustic treatments with reduced skin-friction and therefore fuel-burn penalty for engine nacelles on commercial airplanes. The studies have been experimental, and the effects on skin-friction are deduced from measurements of the pressure drop along a duct. We conduct a detailed CFD analysis of the installation, for two purposes. The first is to predict the effects of the finite size of the rig, including its near-square cross-section and the moderate length of the treated patch; this introduces transient and blockage effects, which have not been included so far in the analysis. In addition, the flow is compressible, so that even with homogeneous surface conditions, it is not homogeneous in the streamwise direction. The second purpose is to extract an effective sand-grain roughness size for a particular liner, which in turn can be used in a CFD analysis of the aircraft, leading to actual predictions of the effect of acoustic treatments on fuel burn in service. The study is entirely based on classical turbulence models, with an appropriate modification for effective roughness effects, rather than directly modeling the liners.

  20. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  1. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Carbon Dioxide + Ethanol: Experimental Measurements with Acoustic Method and Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mehl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase behavior of systems composed by supercritical carbon dioxide and ethanol is of great interest, especially in the processes involving supercritical extraction in which ethanol is used as a cosolvent. The development of an apparatus, which is able to perform the measurements of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE at high pressure using a combination of the visual and the acoustic methods, was successful and was proven to be suited for determining the isothermal VLE data of this system. The acoustic method, based on the variation of the amplitude of an ultra-sound signal passing through a mixture during a phase transition, was applied to investigate the phase equilibria of the system carbon dioxide + ethanol at temperatures ranging from 298.2 K to 323.2 K and pressures from 3.0 MPa to 9.0 MPa. The VLE data were correlated with Peng-Robinson equation of state combined with two different mixing rules and the SAFT equations of state as well. The compositions calculated with the models are in good agreement with the experimental data for the isotherms evaluated.

  2. New measurement of the Boltzmann constant k by acoustic thermometry of helium-4 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitre, L.; Sparasci, F.; Risegari, L.; Guianvarc'h, C.; Martin, C.; Himbert, M. E.; Plimmer, M. D.; Allard, A.; Marty, B.; Giuliano Albo, P. A.; Gao, B.; Moldover, M. R.; Mehl, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    The SI unit of temperature will soon be redefined in terms of a fixed value of the Boltzmann constant k derived from an ensemble of measurements worldwide. We report on a new determination of k using acoustic thermometry of helium-4 gas in a 3 l volume quasi-spherical resonator. The method is based on the accurate determination of acoustic and microwave resonances to measure the speed of sound at different pressures. We find for the universal gas constant R  =  8.314 4614(50) J·mol-1·K-1. Using the current best available value of the Avogadro constant, we obtain k  =  1.380 648 78(83)  ×  10-23 J·K-1 with u(k)/k  =  0.60  ×  10-6, where the uncertainty u is one standard uncertainty corresponding to a 68% confidence level. This value is consistent with our previous determinations and with that of the 2014 CODATA adjustment of the fundamental constants (Mohr et al 2016 Rev. Mod. Phys. 88 035009), within the standard uncertainties. We combined the present values of k and u(k) with earlier values that were measured at LNE. Assuming the maximum possible correlations between the measurements, (k present/〈k〉  -  1)  =  0.07  ×  10-6 and the combined u r (k) is reduced to 0.56  ×  10-6. Assuming minimum correlations, (k present/〈k〉  -  1)  =  0.10  ×  10-6 and the combined u r (k) is reduced to 0.48  ×  10-6.

  3. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  4. Age, sex, and vowel dependencies of acoustic measures related to the voice source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, Markus; Shue, Yen-Liang; Alwan, Abeer

    2007-04-01

    The effects of age, sex, and vocal tract configuration on the glottal excitation signal in speech are only partially understood, yet understanding these effects is important for both recognition and synthesis of speech as well as for medical purposes. In this paper, three acoustic measures related to the voice source are analyzed for five vowels from 3145 CVC utterances spoken by 335 talkers (8-39 years old) from the CID database [Miller et al., Proceedings of ICASSP, 1996, Vol. 2, pp. 849-852]. The measures are: the fundamental frequency (F0), the difference between the "corrected" (denoted by an asterisk) first two spectral harmonic magnitudes, H1* - H2* (related to the open quotient), and the difference between the "corrected" magnitudes of the first spectral harmonic and that of the third formant peak, H1* - A3* (related to source spectral tilt). The correction refers to compensating for the influence of formant frequencies on spectral magnitude estimation. Experimental results show that the three acoustic measures are dependent to varying degrees on age and vowel. Age dependencies are more prominent for male talkers, while vowel dependencies are more prominent for female talkers suggesting a greater vocal tract-source interaction. All talkers show a dependency of F0 on sex and on F3, and of H1* - A3* on vowel type. For low-pitched talkers (F0 pitched talkers, H1* - H2* is dependent on F1 or vowel height. For high-pitched talkers there were no significant sex dependencies of H1* - H2* and H1* - A3*. The statistical significance of these results is shown.

  5. Reconstruction method for inversion problems in an acoustic tomography based temperature distribution measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Liu, Shi; Tong, Guowei

    2017-11-01

    In industrial areas, temperature distribution information provides a powerful data support for improving system efficiency, reducing pollutant emission, ensuring safety operation, etc. As a noninvasive measurement technology, acoustic tomography (AT) has been widely used to measure temperature distribution where the efficiency of the reconstruction algorithm is crucial for the reliability of the measurement results. Different from traditional reconstruction techniques, in this paper a two-phase reconstruction method is proposed to ameliorate the reconstruction accuracy (RA). In the first phase, the measurement domain is discretized by a coarse square grid to reduce the number of unknown variables to mitigate the ill-posed nature of the AT inverse problem. By taking into consideration the inaccuracy of the measured time-of-flight data, a new cost function is constructed to improve the robustness of the estimation, and a grey wolf optimizer is used to solve the proposed cost function to obtain the temperature distribution on the coarse grid. In the second phase, the Adaboost.RT based BP neural network algorithm is developed for predicting the temperature distribution on the refined grid in accordance with the temperature distribution data estimated in the first phase. Numerical simulations and experiment measurement results validate the superiority of the proposed reconstruction algorithm in improving the robustness and RA.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of gas concentration and temperature by the ball surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kazushi; Akao, Shingo; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Tsukahara, Yusuke

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture sensor with an amorphous silica sensitive film and realized wide-range measurement from 0.017 ppmv [a frost point (FP) of -99 °C] to 6.0 × 103 ppmv (0 °C FP). However, since the sensitivity of the sensor depends on the temperature, measurement results are disturbed when the temperature largely changes. To overcome this problem, we developed a method to simultaneously measure temperature and gas concentration using a ball SAW sensor. Temperature and concentration is derived by solving equations for the delay time change at two frequencies. When the temperature had a large jump, the delay time change was significantly disturbed, but the water concentration was almost correctly measured, by compensating the sensitivity change using measured temperature. The temperature measured by a ball SAW sensor will also be used to control the ball temperature. This method will make a ball SAW sensor reliable in environments of varying temperatures.

  7. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Ni, Qingwen; Collier, Hughbert A.

    2000-09-22

    This report contains eight sections. Some individual subsections contain lists of references as well as figures and conclusions when appropriate. The first section includes the introduction and summary of the first-year project efforts. The next section describes the results of the project tasks: (1) implementation of theoretical relations between effect dispersion and the stochastic medium, (2) imaging analyses using core and well log data, (3) construction of dispersion and attenuation models at the core and borehole scales in poroelastic media, (4) petrophysics and a catalog of core and well log data from Siberia Ridge field, (5) acoustic/geotechnical measurements and CT imaging of core samples from Florida carbonates, and (6) development of an algorithm to predict pore size distribution from NMR core data. The last section includes a summary of accomplishments, technology transfer activities and follow-on work for Phase II.

  8. On measurement of acoustic pulse arrival angles using a vertical array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    We consider a recently developed method to analyze the angular structure of pulsed acoustic fields in an underwater sound channel. The method is based on the Husimi transform that allows us to approximately link a wave field with the corresponding ray arrivals. The advantage of the method lies in the possibility of its practical realization by a vertical hydrophone array crossing only a small part of the oceanic depth. The main aim of the present work is to find the optimal parameter values of the array that ensure good angular accuracy and sufficient reliability of the algorithm to calculate the arrival angles. Broadband pulses with central frequencies of 80 and 240 Hz are considered. It is shown that an array with a length of several hundred meters allows measuring the angular spectrum with an accuracy of up to 1 degree. The angular resolution is lowered with an increase of the sound wavelength due to the fundamental limitations imposed by the uncertainty relation.

  9. Measuring soft tissue elasticity by monitoring surface acoustic waves using image plane digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguang; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2011-03-01

    The detection of tumors in soft tissues, such as breast cancer, is important to achieve at the earliest stages of the disease to improve patient outcome. Tumors often exhibit a greater elastic modulus compared to normal tissues. In this paper, we report our first study to measure elastic properties of soft tissues by mapping the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with image plane digital holography. The experimental results show that the SAW velocity is proportional to the square root of elastic modulus over a range from 3.7-122kPa in homogeneous tissue phantoms, consistent with Rayleigh wave theory. This technique also permits detection of the interface of two-layer phantoms 10mm deep under surface and the interface depth by quantifying the SAW dispersion.

  10. Effects of measurement procedure and equipment on average room acoustic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Bradley, J S; Siebein, G W

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a measurement tour of nine U.S. concert halls. Three measurements teams, from the University of Florida, the National Research Council of Canada, and the Technical University of Denmark, made parallel sets of measurements using their own equipment and procedures...

  11. Improvement of the accuracy of continuous GPS/Acoustic measurement using a slackly moored buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imano, M.; Kido, M.; Ohta, Y.; Takahashi, N.; Fukuda, T.; Ochi, H.; Honsho, C.; Hino, R.

    2016-12-01

    For the real-time detection of seafloor crustal movement and tsunami associated with large earthquakes, it is necessary to monitor them continuously in their source regions. For this purpose, Tohoku University, JAMSTEC, and JAXA have co-developed a continuous GPS/Acoustic (GPS/A) measurement system using a moored buoy, and the third sea-trial is ongoing for a year in Kumano-nada, Nankai Trough. In this presentation, we report of the positioning accuracy of the continuous GPS/Acoustic measurement in the buoy system. We have adopted the array positioning technique developed by researchers at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography with some improvements. The advantage of this method is that errors in assumed sound velocity and array geometry (relative positions of individual seafloor transponders) little affect positioning results when measurements are conducted in the vicinity of the array center. However, the GPS/A measurement using a moored buoy is generally conducted under much worse condition than the conventional one using a research vessel. In our system, the mooring cable length was determined to be 1.5 times the water depth for safety reasons against strong current. Therefore, the buoy is drifting within a relatively wide area by the wind and the current, and measurements are randomly performed at various points within the area. These features can lead to significant systematic errors in the array positioning, because the effect of errors in pre-defined array geometry increases as the observation point goes farther from the array center. At the moments, the positioning accuracy of GPS/A measurement using a moored buoy is estimated as 0.6/0.7 m, for the EW/NS components, respectively, from the data obtained during the third sea-trial. It is considered that errors in the assumed array geometry result in considerable errors in the array positioning. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the array geometry more precisely in order to improve the accuracy of GPS

  12. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  13. Development of an acoustic measurement protocol to monitor acetabular implant fixation in cementless total hip Arthroplasty: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Quentin; Leuridan, Steven; Henyš, Petr; Roosen, Jorg; Pastrav, Leonard; Mulier, Michiel; Desmet, Wim; Denis, Kathleen; Vander Sloten, Jos

    2017-11-01

    In cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA), the initial stability is obtained by press-fitting the implant in the bone to allow osseointegration for a long term secondary stability. However, finding the insertion endpoint that corresponds to a proper initial stability is currently based on the tactile and auditory experiences of the orthopedic surgeon, which can be challenging. This study presents a novel real-time method based on acoustic signals to monitor the acetabular implant fixation in cementless total hip arthroplasty. Twelve acoustic in vitro experiments were performed on three types of bone models; a simple bone block model, an artificial pelvic model and a cadaveric model. A custom made beam was screwed onto the implant which functioned as a sound enhancer and insertor. At each insertion step an acoustic measurement was performed. A significant acoustic resonance frequency shift was observed during the insertion process for the different bone models; 250 Hz (35%, second bending mode) to 180 Hz (13%, fourth bending mode) for the artificial bone block models and 120 Hz (11%, eighth bending mode) for the artificial pelvis model. No significant frequency shift was observed during the cadaveric experiment due to a lack of implant fixation in this model. This novel diagnostic method shows the potential of using acoustic signals to monitor the implant seating during insertion. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating the auralization of a small room in a virtual sound environment using objective room acoustic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Axel; Marschall, Marton; Dau, Torsten

    ) & reverberation time (T20, T30); - clarity (C7, C50, C80); - interaural cross-correlation (IACC); - speech transmission index (STI); - direct-to-reverberant ratio (DRR). Impulse responses (IRs) were measured in an IEC listening room. The room was then modeled in the room acoustics software ODEON, and the same...

  15. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude: 5, Summary and Conclusions. Research Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Kai

    This report summarizes a series of studies on the ability to structure acoustic material as a measure of musical aptitude. It is divided into two sections. Section one explains the general approach of the study. Behavioralism as a research approach which rejects inner states of being in favor of studying concrete operations, the importance of…

  16. Particle Filter Based Fault-tolerant ROV Navigation using Hydro-acoustic Position and Doppler Velocity Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bo; Blanke, Mogens; Skjetne, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a fault tolerant navigation system for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The navigation system uses hydro-acoustic position reference (HPR) and Doppler velocity log (DVL) measurements to achieve an integrated navigation. The fault tolerant functionality is based on a modied...... the ROV kinematic states, even when sensor failures appear frequently....

  17. Evaluation of photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzer in measuring concentrations of greenhouse gases emitted from feedlot soil/manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzers (PIMAs) are being increasingly utilized to measure concentrations and fluxes of greenhouse gases (i.e., N2O, CO2, and CH4) at the soil surface because of their low cost, portability, and ease of operation. This research evaluated a PIMA in combination with ...

  18. Acoustic and Perceptual Measurement of Expressive Prosody in High-Functioning Autism: Increased Pitch Range and What it Means to Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Aparna; Shaw, Holly

    2012-01-01

    Are there consistent markers of atypical prosody in speakers with high functioning autism (HFA) compared to typically-developing speakers? We examined: (1) acoustic measurements of pitch range, mean pitch and speech rate in conversation, (2) perceptual ratings of conversation for these features and overall prosody, and (3) acoustic measurements of…

  19. Mediterranean water structure in the central Atlantic: Results of remote acoustic and conductivity-temperature-depth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezutskii, V.; Maximov, S. E.; Rodionov, V. B.; Sklyarov, V. E.

    1994-10-01

    In March 1990, combined acoustic and conductivity-temperature-depth measurements were carried out in the central Atlantic (29°-35°N, 20°-26°W) to study volume sound backscattering (VSB) at depths of Mediterranean Intermediate Water (MIW). Spatial variability of VSB in the presence of MIW was found. The influence of the intermittent character of the MIW structure on VSB at depths of 700-1900 m was revealed and examined. The possibility of acoustic detection and monitoring of both meddies and thermohaline fine structure features directly from the sea surface was discovered. This paper presents the first acoustic imaging of the MIW structure and dynamics in the central Atlantic.

  20. Fundamentals of Acoustic Measurements on Trees and Logs and Their Implication to Field Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic technologies have been well established as material evaluation tools in the past several decades, and their use has become widely accepted in the forest products industry for on-line quality control and products grading. Recent research developments on acoustic sensing technology offer further opportunities to evaluate standing trees and logs for general wood...

  1. Matching simulations with measured acoustic data from Roman Theatres using the ODEON programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Lisa; Rindel, Jens Holger; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    2005-01-01

    as possible, it is important to attempt calibration of the models with respect to as many of the relevant acoustic parameters as possible. Thus, besides the overall value of reverberation time, we also try to match the variation with position of other important acoustic parameters, such as Strength...

  2. ESTIMATION METHODS FOR ACOUSTIC IMPROVEMENT OF ROOMS USING MEASUREMENTS OF REVERBERATION TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya S. Shevchenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available  Estimation methods for reverberation time as a main approach for evaluation of premise acoustic characteristics has been considered. The veracity of results, obtained in reverberation camera has been proved. Assessment of acoustic characteristics of lecture-hall has been carried out. 

  3. Measurements of shock-induced guided and surface acoustic waves along boreholes in poroelastic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic experiments on the propagation of guided waves along water-filled boreholes in water-saturated porous materials are reported. The experiments were conducted using a shock tube technique. An acoustic funnel structure was placed inside the tube just above the sample in order to enhance the

  4. Numerical simulation and measurements of acoustic transmissions from Heard Island to the equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Saran, A.K.; Murty, C.S.

    Simulated acoustic propagation showed a gradual deepening of the ray paths from the southern ocean towards tropics. Also the axis of the sound channel deepens from 150 m to 1600 m. Sudden jumps were noticed in the acoustic ray paths in the vicinity...

  5. MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED THERMAL-ACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Robert J. Weber; Jeffrey J. Swetelitsch

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to explore microwave-excited thermal-acoustic (META) phenomena for quantitative analysis of granular and powdered materials, with the culmination of the research to be an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor for coal-fired power plants. This technique of analyzing unburned carbon in fly ash could be a less tedious and time consuming method as compared to the traditional LOI manual procedure. Phase 1 of the research focused on off-line single-frequency thermal-acoustic measurements where an off-line fly ash monitor was constructed that could operate as analytical tool to explore instrument and methodology parameters for quantifying the microwave-excited thermal-acoustic effect of carbon in fly ash, and it was determined that the off-line thermal-acoustic technique could predict the carbon content of a random collection of fly ashes with a linear correlation constant of R{sup 2} = 0.778. Much higher correlations are expected for fly ashes generated from a single boiler. Phase 2 of the research developing a methodology to generate microwave spectra of various powders, including fly ash, coal, and inorganic minerals, and to determine if these microwave spectra could be used for chemical analyses. Although different minerals produced different responses, higher resolution microwave spectra would be required to be able to distinguish among minerals. Phase 3 of the research focused on the development of an on-line fly ash monitor that could be adapted to measure either a thermal-acoustic or thermal-elastic response to due microwave excitation of fly ash. The thermal-acoustic response was successfully employed for this purpose but the thermal-elastic response was too weak to yield a useful on-line device.

  6. Acoustic transducer in system for gas temperature measurement in gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, Upul P.; Claussen, Heiko

    2017-07-04

    An apparatus for controlling operation of a gas turbine engine including at least one acoustic transmitter/receiver device located on a flow path boundary structure. The acoustic transmitter/receiver device includes an elongated sound passage defined by a surface of revolution having opposing first and second ends and a central axis extending between the first and second ends, an acoustic sound source located at the first end, and an acoustic receiver located within the sound passage between the first and second ends. The boundary structure includes an opening extending from outside the boundary structure to the flow path, and the second end of the surface of revolution is affixed to the boundary structure at the opening for passage of acoustic signals between the sound passage and the flow path.

  7. A novel acoustic method for gas flow measurement using correlation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuuttila, M. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Industrial Physics

    1997-12-31

    The study demonstrates a new kind of acoustic method for gas flow measurement. The method uses upstream and downstream propagating low frequency plane wave and correlation techniques for volume flow rate determination. The theory of propagating low frequency plane waves in the pipe is introduced and is proved empirically to be applicable for flow measurement. The flow profile dependence of the method is verified and found to be negligible at least in the region of moderate perturbations. The physical principles of the method were applied in practice in the form of a flowmeter with new design concepts. The developed prototype meters were verified against the reference standard of NMI (Nederlands Meetinstituut), which showed that a wide dynamic range of 1:80 is achievable with total expanded uncertainty below 0.3 %. Also the requirements used for turbine meters of linearity, weighted mean error and stability were shown to be well fulfilled. A brief comparison with other flowmeter types shows the new flowmeter to be competitive. The advantages it offers are a small pressure drop over the meter, no blockage of flow in possible malfunction, no pulsation to flow, essentially no moving parts, and the possibility for bidirectional measurements. The introduced flowmeter is also capable of using the telephone network or a radio-modem to read the consumption of gas and report its operation to the user. (orig.) 51 refs.

  8. Measurement of acoustic absorption coefficient with phase-conjugate ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagin, N. V.; Krutyansky, L. M.; Brysev, A. P.; Bunkin, F. V.

    2011-07-01

    Experimental results on measurements of the acoustic absorption coefficient in test objects that were obtained with two methods, i.e., a standard insert-substitution method and a modification thereof using phase-conjugate waves, are given. Samples of gelatin and biological tissue in vitro (porcine muscle fibers) were used as test objects. Gelatin objects were manufactured that were both homogeneous and with inhomogeneities in the form of a rough surface or inclusions (air bubbles) distributed over the volume. A rough surface leads mainly to phase distortions of a probe beam, while bubble inclusions cause additional field scattering. For all homogeneous samples, both compared methods produce identical results. In the case of inhomogeneous samples including biological tissues, absorption measurement by a standard method may lead to significant errors. It is demonstrated that the use of properties of phase-conjugate waves provides an opportunity to eliminate almost completely the measurement error connected with phase distortions and reduce the error in the case of a medium with scatterers.

  9. Measurement of the acoustic reflectivity of sirenia (Florida manatees) at 171 kHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Jules S; Simonet, Fernando; Roberts, Paul L D; Bowles, Ann E

    2007-01-01

    The Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is an endangered sirenian. At present, its adult population (approximately 2200) seems stable, but tenuous. Manatee-boat collisions are a significant proportion (approximately 25%) of mortalities. Here, the potential use of active sonar for detecting manatees by quantifying sonic reflectivity is explored. In order to estimate reflectivity two methods were used. One method measured live reflections from captive animals using a carefully calibrated acoustic and co-registered optical system. The other method consisted of the analysis of animal tissue in order to obtain estimates of the sound speed and density and to predict reflectivity. The impedance measurement predicts that for a lateral view, the tissue reflectivity is close to 0.13, with a critical grazing angle of 28 degrees. Data measured from live animals indicate that substantial reflections can be recorded, however in many instances observed "empirical target strengths" were less than an experimentally dependent -48-dB threshold. Conclusions favor the hypothesis that the animals reflect substantial amounts of sound; however, the reflections can often be specular, and therefore impractical for observation by a manatee detection sonar operating at 171 kHz.

  10. A Novel Device for Total Acoustic Output Measurement of High Power Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S.; Twomey, R.; Morris, H.; Zanelli, C. I.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a device for ultrasound power measurement applicable over a broad range of medical transducer types, orientations and powers, and which supports automatic measurements to simplify use and minimize errors. Considering all the recommendations from standards such as IEC 61161, an accurate electromagnetic null-balance has been designed for ultrasound power measurements. The sensing element is placed in the water to eliminate errors due to surface tension and water evaporation, and the motion and detection of force is constrained to one axis, to increase immunity to vibration from the floor, water sloshing and water surface waves. A transparent tank was designed so it could easily be submerged in a larger tank to accommodate large transducers or side-firing geometries, and can also be turned upside-down for upward-firing transducers. A vacuum lid allows degassing the water and target in situ. An external control module was designed to operate the sensing/driving loop and to communicate to a local computer for data logging. The sensing algorithm, which incorporates temperature compensation, compares the feedback force needed to cancel the motion for sources in the "on" and "off" states. These two states can be controlled by the control unit or manually by the user, under guidance by a graphical user interface (the system presents measured power live during collection). Software allows calibration to standard weights, or to independently calibrated acoustic sources. The design accommodates a variety of targets, including cone, rubber, brush targets and an oil-filled target for power measurement via buoyancy changes. Measurement examples are presented, including HIFU sources operating at powers from 1 to 100.

  11. Updated determination of the molar gas constant R by acoustic measurements in argon at UVa-CEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, J. J.; Lozano-Martín, D.; Martín, M. C.; Chamorro, C. R.; Villamañán, M. A.; Pérez, E.; García Izquierdo, C.; del Campo, D.

    2017-10-01

    A new determination of the molar gas constant was performed from measurements of the speed of sound in argon at the triple point of water and extrapolation to zero pressure. A new resonant cavity was used. This is a triaxial ellipsoid whose walls are gold-coated steel and which is divided into two identical halves that are bolted and sealed with an O-ring. Microwave and electroacoustic traducers are located in the northern and southern parts of the cavity, respectively, so that measurements of microwave and acoustic frequencies are carried out in the same experiment. Measurements were taken at pressures from 600 kPa to 60 kPa and at 273.16 K. The internal equivalent radius of the cavity was accurately determined by microwave measurements and the first four radial symmetric acoustic modes were simultaneously measured and used to calculate the speed of sound. The improvements made using the new cavity have reduced by half the main contributions to the uncertainty due to the radius determination using microwave measurements which amounts to 4.7 parts in 106 and the acoustic measurements, 4.4 parts in 106, where the main contribution (3.7 parts in 106) is the relative excess half-widths associated with the limit of our acoustic model, compared with our previous measurements. As a result of all the improvements with the new cavity and the measurements performed, we determined the molar gas constant R  =  (8.314 449  ±  0.000 056) J · K-1 · mol-1 which corresponds to a relative standard uncertainty of 6.7 parts in 106. The value reported in this paper lies  -1.3 parts in 106 below the recommended value of CODATA 2014, although still within the range consistent with it.

  12. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements in coastal and estuarine environments: examples from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewetzer, Silke F. K.; Duck, Robert W.; Anderson, James M.

    1999-08-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a means to measure the components of water current velocities in three dimensions. Such instruments have been used widely by the oil industry in deep offshore waters but their application to nearshore coastal and estuarine environments has been principally confined to the USA. Using examples of ADCP datasets acquired from the macrotidal Tay Estuary, eastern Scotland, the principles of field deployment, data acquisition and forms of output are critically summarised. It is shown, for the first time in the Tay Estuary, that vertical current velocities are significant and are particularly so in downwelling zones associated with the development and passage of axially convergent tidal fronts. The improved understanding of three-dimensional water and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal and estuarine waters is crucial to, inter alia, the sustainable management of effluent discharges and, in more general terms, it is predicted on the basis of the Tay case study, that ADCP measurements afford significant opportunities to refine understanding of geomorphological processes in a variety of aquatic environments worldwide.

  13. A method for crack sizing using Laser Doppler Vibrometer measurements of Surface Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Roberto; Vanlanduit, Steve; Vanherzeele, Joris; Guillaume, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The goal of non-destructive testing (NDT) is to determine the position and size of structural defects, in order to measure the quality and evaluate the safety of building materials. Most NDT techniques are rather complex, however, requiring specialized knowledge. In this article, we introduce an experimental method for crack detection that uses Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) and optical measurements. The method is tested on a steel beam engraved with slots of known depth. A simple model to determine the cracks size is also proposed. At the end of the article, we describe a possible application: fatigue crack sizing on a damaged slat track. This technique represents a first step toward a better understanding of the crack growth, especially in its early stages (preferably when the cracks can still be repaired) and when it is possible to assume a linear propagation of the crack front. The ultimate goal of this research program is to develop a useful method of monitoring aircraft components during fatigue testing.

  14. Analysis of the Acoustic and Vibration Measurement in the Disintegration Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Ušalová

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last thirty years there have been many developments in the use of acoustical and vibration measurement and their analysis for monitoring the condition of rotating machinery. These have been in three areas of interest the: detection of machinery pieces faults, the diagnosis and the prognosis. Of these areas, the diagnosis and prognosis still require an expert to determine what analyses to perform and to interpret the results. Currently much effort is being put into the automated fault diagnosis and prognosis. Major benefits come from the ability to predict with a reasonable accuracy how long a machine can safely operate (often a matter of several months from incipient faults are first detected. This article briefly summarizes selected signal processing methods, which are possible to be suggested for the vibroacoustical measurements evalution. These techniques are presented with a reference to their use in the rock disintegration process. Simultaneously, several cases are discussed where a great care must be taken in setting up input parameters or very misleading data would be produced.

  15. Nasal cavity dimensions in guinea pig and rat measured by acoustic rhinometry and fluid-displacement method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straszek, Sune; Pedersen, O.F.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure nasal passageway dimensions in guinea pigs and rats by use of acoustic rhinometry (AR) and by a previously described fluid-displacement method (FDM) (Straszek SP, Taagehoej F, Graff S, and Pedersen OF. J Appl Physiol 95: 635-642, 2003) to investigate...... the potential of AR in pharmacological research with these animals. We measured the area-distance relationships by AR of nasal cavities postmortem in five guinea pigs (Duncan Hartley, 400 g) and five rats (Wistar, 250 g) by using custom-made equipment scaled for the purpose. Nosepieces were made from plastic...... pipette tips and either inserted into or glued onto the nostrils. We used liquid perfluorocarbon in the fluid-displacement study, and it was carried out subsequent to the acoustic measurements. We found for guinea pigs that AR measured a mean volume of 98 mm(3) (95-100 mm(3)) (mean and 95% confidence...

  16. A Study of Acoustic Reflections in Full-Scale Rotor Low Frequency Noise Measurements Acquired in Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbely, Natasha L.; Sim, Ben W.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Goulding, Pat, II

    2010-01-01

    Difficulties in obtaining full-scale rotor low frequency noise measurements in wind tunnels are addressed via residual sound reflections due to non-ideal anechoic wall treatments. Examples illustrated with the Boeing-SMART rotor test in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel facility demonstrated that these reflections introduced distortions in the measured acoustic time histories that are not representative of free-field rotor noise radiation. A simplified reflection analysis, based on the method of images, is used to examine the sound measurement quality in such "less-than-anechoic" environment. Predictions of reflection-adjusted acoustic time histories are qualitatively shown to account for some of the spurious fluctuations observed in wind tunnel noise measurements

  17. Development of an Acoustic Sensor On-Line Gas Temperature Measurement in Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Ariessohn

    2008-06-30

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 2 - Gasification Technologies. The project team includes Enertechnix, Inc. as the main contractor and ConocoPhillips Company as a technical partner, who also provides access to the SG Solutions Gasification Facility (formerly Wabash River Energy Limited), host for the field-testing portion of the research. The objective of this project was to adapt acoustic pyrometer technology to make it suitable for measuring gas temperature inside a coal gasifier, to develop a prototype sensor based on this technology, and to demonstrate its performance through testing on a commercial gasifier. The project was organized in three phases, each of approximately one year duration. The first phase consisted of researching a variety of sound generation and coupling approaches suitable for use with a high pressure process, evaluation of the impact of gas composition variability on the acoustic temperature measurement approach, evaluation of the impact of suspended particles and gas properties on sound attenuation, evaluation of slagging issues and development of concepts to deal with this issue, development and testing of key prototype components to allow selection of the best approaches, and development of a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor that could be tested on an operating gasifier. The second phase consisted of designing and fabricating a series of prototype sensors, testing them in the laboratory, and developing a conceptual design for a field prototype sensor. The third phase consisted of designing and fabricating the field prototype, and testing it in the lab and in a commercial gasifier to demonstrate the ability to obtain accurate measurements of gas temperature in an operating gasifier. Following the completion of the initial 3 year project, several continuations

  18. Assessment of Microphone Phased Array for Measuring Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The specific purpose of the present work was to demonstrate the suitability of a microphone phased array for launch acoustics applications via participation in selected firings of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test is a part of the discontinued Constellation Program Ares I Project, but the basic understanding gained from this test is expected to help development of the Space Launch System vehicles. Correct identification of sources not only improves the predictive ability, but provides guidance for a quieter design of the launch pad and optimization of the water suppression system. This document contains the results of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center assessment.

  19. Advances in Fast-response Acoustically Derived Air-temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoev, I.; Jacobsen, L.; Horst, T. W.; Conrad, B.

    2015-12-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity.The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  20. Ultrafast high strain rate acoustic wave measurements at high static pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Reed, E; Zaug, J

    2008-02-04

    We have used sub-picosecond laser pulses to launch ultra-high strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) nonlinear acoustic waves into a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure medium which has been precompressed in a standard diamond anvil cell. Using ultrafast interferometry, we have characterized acoustic wave propagation into the pressure medium at static compression up to 24 GPa. We find that the velocity is dependent on the incident laser fluence, demonstrating a nonlinear acoustic response which may result in shock wave behavior. We compare our results with low strain, low strain-rate acoustic data. This technique provides controlled access to regions of thermodynamic phase space that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  1. Acoustic Emission Measurement with Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structure Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Walker, James L.; Russell, Sam; Roth, Don; Mabry, Nehemiah; Wilson, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Structural Health monitoring (SHM) is a way of detecting and assessing damage to large scale structures. Sensors used in SHM for aerospace structures provide real time data on new and propagating damage. One type of sensor that is typically used is an acoustic emission (AE) sensor that detects the acoustic emissions given off from a material cracking or breaking. The use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to provide acoustic emission data for damage detection is studied. In this research, FBG sensors are used to detect acoustic emissions of a material during a tensile test. FBG sensors were placed as a strain sensor (oriented parallel to applied force) and as an AE sensor (oriented perpendicular to applied force). A traditional AE transducer was used to collect AE data to compare with the FBG data. Preliminary results show that AE with FBGs can be a viable alternative to traditional AE sensors.

  2. Ultrafast high strain rate acoustic wave measurements at high static pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Reed, Evan J.; Zaug, Joseph M.

    2009-02-01

    We describe experiments demonstrating the generation of ultrafast, high strain rate acoustic waves in a precompressed transparent medium at static pressure up to 24 GPa. We also observe shock waves in precompressed aluminum with transient pressures above 40 GPa under precompression. Using ultrafast interferometry, we determine parameters such as the shock pressure and acoustic wave velocity using multiple and single shot methods. These methods form the basis for material experiments under extreme conditions which are challenging to access using other techniques.

  3. Acoustic measurement and morphological features of organic sediment deposits in combined sewer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnacina, Iacopo; Larrarte, Frédérique; Leonardi, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    The performance of sewer networks has important consequences from an environmental and social point of view. Poor functioning can result in flood risk and pollution at a large scale. Sediment deposits forming in sewer trunks might severely compromise the sewer line by affecting the flow field, reducing cross-sectional areas, and increasing roughness coefficients. In spite of numerous efforts, the morphological features of these depositional environments remain poorly understood. The interface between water and sediment remains inefficiently identified and the estimation of the stock of deposit is frequently inaccurate. In part, this is due to technical issues connected to difficulties in collecting accurate field measurements without disrupting existing morphologies. In this paper, results from an extensive field campaign are presented; during the campaign a new survey methodology based on acoustic techniques has been tested. Furthermore, a new algorithm for the detection of the soil-water interface, and therefore for the correct esteem of sediment stocks is proposed. Finally, results in regard to bed topography, and morphological features at two different field sites are presented and reveal that a large variability in bed forms is present along sewer networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Measuring the 2D baryon acoustic oscillation signal of galaxies in WiggleZ: cosmological constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Samuel R; Kazin, Eyal; Davis, Tamara M; Blake, Chris; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J; Drinkwater, Michael J; Glazebrook, Karl; Jurek, Russell J; Parkinson, David; Pimbblet, Kevin A; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Woods, David

    2017-02-01

    We present results from the 2D anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal present in the final data set from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We analyse the WiggleZ data in two ways: first using the full shape of the 2D correlation function and secondly focusing only on the position of the BAO peak in the reconstructed data set. When fitting for the full shape of the 2D correlation function we use a multipole expansion to compare with theory. When we use the reconstructed data we marginalize over the shape and just measure the position of the BAO peak, analysing the data in wedges separating the signal along the line of sight from that parallel to the line of sight. We verify our method with mock data and find the results to be free of bias or systematic offsets. We also redo the pre-reconstruction angle-averaged (1D) WiggleZ BAO analysis with an improved covariance and present an updated result. The final results are presented in the form of Ω c  h(2), H(z), and DA (z) for three redshift bins with effective redshifts z = 0.44, 0.60, and 0.73. Within these bins and methodologies, we recover constraints between 5 and 22 per cent error. Our cosmological constraints are consistent with flat ΛCDM cosmology and agree with results from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey.

  5. Control of an experiment to measure acoustic noise in the space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Charles B.

    1989-06-01

    The potential use of a general-purpose controller to measure acoustic vibration autonomously in the Space Shuttle Cargo Bay during launch is described. The experimental package will be housed in a Shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The control functions were implemented with software written largely in the C programming language. An IBM MS DOS computer and C cross-compiler were used to generate Z-80 assembly language code, assemble and link this code, and then transfer it to EPROM for use in the experiment's controller. The software is written in a modular fashion to permit adapting it easily to other applications. The software combines the experimental control functions with a menu-driven, diagnostic subsystem to ensure that the software will operate in practice as it does in theory and under test. The experiment uses many peripheral devices controlled by the software described here. These devices include: (1) a solid-state data recorder; (2) a bubble memory storage module; (3) a real-time clock; (4) an RS-232C serial interface; (5) a power control subsystem; (6) a matched filter subsystem to detect activation of the Space Shuttle's auxillary power units five minutes prior to launch; (7) a launch detection subsystem based on vibrational and barometric sensors; (8) analog-to-digital converters; and (9) a heater subsystem. The matched filter design is discussed in detail and the results of a computer simulation of the performance of its most critical sub-circuit are presented.

  6. Measuring the 2D baryon acoustic oscillation signal of galaxies in WiggleZ: cosmological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Samuel R.; Kazin, Eyal; Davis, Tamara M.; Blake, Chris; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick J.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jurek, Russell J.; Parkinson, David; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Poole, Gregory B.; Pracy, Michael; Woods, David

    2017-02-01

    We present results from the 2D anisotropic baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal present in the final data set from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We analyse the WiggleZ data in two ways: first using the full shape of the 2D correlation function and secondly focusing only on the position of the BAO peak in the reconstructed data set. When fitting for the full shape of the 2D correlation function we use a multipole expansion to compare with theory. When we use the reconstructed data we marginalize over the shape and just measure the position of the BAO peak, analysing the data in wedges separating the signal along the line of sight from that parallel to the line of sight. We verify our method with mock data and find the results to be free of bias or systematic offsets. We also redo the pre-reconstruction angle-averaged (1D) WiggleZ BAO analysis with an improved covariance and present an updated result. The final results are presented in the form of Ωc h2, H(z), and DA(z) for three redshift bins with effective redshifts z = 0.44, 0.60, and 0.73. Within these bins and methodologies, we recover constraints between 5 and 22 per cent error. Our cosmological constraints are consistent with flat ΛCDM cosmology and agree with results from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey.

  7. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  8. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: design/operation/preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J L; Marston, T M; Lee, K; Lopes, J L; Lim, R

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  9. Logopenic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia are differentiated by acoustic measures of speech production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrie J Ballard

    Full Text Available Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r(2 = 0.47 with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word

  10. Logopenic and nonfluent variants of primary progressive aphasia are differentiated by acoustic measures of speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Savage, Sharon; Leyton, Cristian E; Vogel, Adam P; Hornberger, Michael; Hodges, John R

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation of logopenic (lvPPA) and nonfluent/agrammatic (nfvPPA) variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia is important yet remains challenging since it hinges on expert based evaluation of speech and language production. In this study acoustic measures of speech in conjunction with voxel-based morphometry were used to determine the success of the measures as an adjunct to diagnosis and to explore the neural basis of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA. Forty-one patients (21 lvPPA, 20 nfvPPA) were recruited from a consecutive sample with suspected frontotemporal dementia. Patients were diagnosed using the current gold-standard of expert perceptual judgment, based on presence/absence of particular speech features during speaking tasks. Seventeen healthy age-matched adults served as controls. MRI scans were available for 11 control and 37 PPA cases; 23 of the PPA cases underwent amyloid ligand PET imaging. Measures, corresponding to perceptual features of apraxia of speech, were periods of silence during reading and relative vowel duration and intensity in polysyllable word repetition. Discriminant function analyses revealed that a measure of relative vowel duration differentiated nfvPPA cases from both control and lvPPA cases (r(2) = 0.47) with 88% agreement with expert judgment of presence of apraxia of speech in nfvPPA cases. VBM analysis showed that relative vowel duration covaried with grey matter intensity in areas critical for speech motor planning and programming: precentral gyrus, supplementary motor area and inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally, only affected in the nfvPPA group. This bilateral involvement of frontal speech networks in nfvPPA potentially affects access to compensatory mechanisms involving right hemisphere homologues. Measures of silences during reading also discriminated the PPA and control groups, but did not increase predictive accuracy. Findings suggest that a measure of relative vowel duration from of a polysyllable word repetition task

  11. Ocean currents and acoustic backscatter data from shipboard ADCP measurements at three North Atlantic seamounts between 2004 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Christian; Denda, Anneke; Christiansen, Svenja; Kaufmann, Manfred; Peine, Florian; Springer, Barbara; Turnewitsch, Robert; Christiansen, Bernd

    2018-04-01

    Seamounts are amongst the most common physiographic structures of the deep-ocean landscape, but remoteness and geographic complexity have limited the systematic collection of integrated and multidisciplinary data in the past. Consequently, important aspects of seamount ecology and dynamics remain poorly studied. We present a data collection of ocean currents and raw acoustic backscatter from shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements during six cruises between 2004 and 2015 in the tropical and subtropical Northeast Atlantic to narrow this gap. Measurements were conducted at seamount locations between the island of Madeira and the Portuguese mainland (Ampère, Seine Seamount), as well as east of the Cape Verde archipelago (Senghor Seamount). The dataset includes two-minute ensemble averaged continuous velocity and backscatter profiles, supplemented by spatially gridded maps for each velocity component, error velocity and local bathymetry. The dataset is freely available from the digital data library PANGAEA at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.883193.

  12. Preclinical evaluation of acoustic radiation force impulse measurements in regions of heterogeneous elasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollerieth, Katharina; Moog, Philipp; Vo-Cong, Minh-Truc; Heemann, Uwe [Nephrology Department, Klinikum Rechts der Isar of the Technical University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Gassmann, Bernhard [Meso International GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Wagenpfeil, Stefan [Institute for Medical Biometry, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Saarland University, Campus Homburg (Saar), Homburg (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability of ultrasound-based shear wave elastography in regions of homogeneous versus heterogeneous elasticity by using two different probes. Using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography, we measured the shear wave velocity (SWV) in different lesions of an elastography phantom with the convex {sub 4}C{sub 1} probe and the linear {sub 9}L{sub 4} probe. The region of interest (ROI) was positioned in such a way that it was partly filled by one of the lesions (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) and partly by the background of the phantom (100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 0%, respectively). The success rate was 98.5%. The measured value and the reference value of SWV correlated significantly (r=0.89, P<0.001). Further, a comparison of the two probes revealed that there was no statistical difference in either the mean or the variance values. However, the deviation of SWV from the reference was higher in the case of the {sub 9}L{sub 4} probe than in the case of the {sub 4}C{sub 1} probe, both overall and in measurements in which the ROI contained structures of different elasticity (P=0.021 and P=0.002). Taking into account all data, for both probes, we found that there was a greater spread and deviation of the SWV from the reference value when the ROI was positioned in structures having different elastic properties (standard deviation, 0.02±0.01 m/sec vs. 0.04±0.04 m/sec; P=0.010; deviation from the reference value, 0.21±0.12 m/sec vs. 0.38±0.27 m/sec; P=0.050). Quantitative ARFI elastography was achievable in structures of different elasticity; however, the validity and the reliability of the SWV measurements decreased in comparison to those of the measurements performed in structures of homogeneous elasticity. Therefore, a convex probe is preferred for examining heterogeneous structures.

  13. The Effects of Musician's Earplugs on Acoustic and Perceptual Measures of Choral and Solo Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Cunningham, Sheri L

    2017-10-25

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of earplugs on acoustical and perceptual measures of choral and solo sound. The researcher tested the effects of musician's earplugs on choral and solo timbre and singer perceptions. Members of an intact women's university choir recorded Dona Nobis Pacem under two conditions, no earplugs and with earplugs over time. Approximately half of the choir members also participated as soloists, recording Over the Rainbow under the same two conditions. All recordings were analyzed using long-term average spectra (LTAS). After participating in each recording session, the participants responded to a questionnaire about ability to hear self (solo and choral context) and ability to hear others (choral context) under two conditions, no earplugs and with earplugs. LTAS results revealed that wearing earplugs in a choral setting caused decreased mean signal energy (>1 dB), resulting in less resonant singing. LTAS results also indicated that wearing earplugs in a solo setting had less effect on mean signal energy, resulting in a mean difference <1 dB in 3 of the 4 weeks studied. Singer questionnaire responses showed that wearing earplugs had a greater effect on participants' ability to hear others than it did on their ability to hear themselves. In the context of this study, it seems that wearing earplugs had more effect on timbre and the ability to receive sufficient auditory feedback in a choral setting than it did in a solo setting. Findings from this study could provide important information when structuring hearing conservation strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elucidating ΛCDM: Impact of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Measurements on the Hubble Constant Discrepancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, G. E.; Watts, D. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Halpern, M.; Hinshaw, G.; Weiland, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    We examine the impact of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements on the discrepancy between the value of the Hubble constant (H 0) inferred from the local distance ladder and that from Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. While the BAO data alone cannot constrain H 0, we show that combining the latest BAO results with WMAP, Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), or South Pole Telescope (SPT) CMB data produces values of H 0 that are 2.4{--}3.1σ lower than the distance ladder, independent of Planck, and that this downward pull was less apparent in some earlier analyses that used only angle-averaged BAO scale constraints rather than full anisotropic information. At the same time, the combination of BAO and CMB data also disfavors the lower values of H 0 preferred by the Planck high-multipole temperature power spectrum. Combining galaxy and Lyα forest BAO with a precise estimate of the primordial deuterium abundance produces {H}0=66.98+/- 1.18 km s‑1 Mpc‑1 for the flat {{Λ }}{CDM} model. This value is completely independent of CMB anisotropy constraints and is 3.0σ lower than the latest distance ladder constraint, although 2.4σ tension also exists between the galaxy BAO and Lyα BAO. These results show that it is not possible to explain the H 0 disagreement solely with a systematic error specific to the Planck data. The fact that tensions remain even after the removal of any single data set makes this intriguing puzzle all the more challenging to resolve.

  15. Measurement of acoustic and anatomic changes in oral and maxillofacial surgery patients

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, Daniel; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Jääsaari, Päivi; Kivelä, Atle; Kuortti, Juha; Luukinen, Jean-Marc; Malinen, Jarmo; Murtola, Tiina; Parkkola, Riitta; Saunavaara, Jani; Soukka, Tero; Vainio, Martti

    2013-01-01

    We describe an arrangement for simultaneous recording of speech and geometry of vocal tract in patients undergoing surgery involving this area. Experimental design is considered from an articulatory phonetic point of view. The speech and noise signals are recorded with an acoustic-electrical arrangement. The vocal tract is simultaneously imaged with MRI. A MATLAB-based system controls the timing of speech recording and MR image acquisition. The speech signals are cleaned from acoustic MRI noise by a non-linear signal processing algorithm. Finally, a vowel data set from pilot experiments is compared with validation data from anechoic chamber as well as with Helmholtz resonances of the vocal tract volume.

  16. Associations between the Transsexual Voice Questionnaire (TVQMtF ) and self-report of voice femininity and acoustic voice measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacakis, Georgia; Oates, Jennifer; Douglas, Jacinta

    2017-11-01

    The Transsexual Voice Questionnaire (TVQMtF ) was designed to capture the voice-related perceptions of individuals whose gender identity as female is the opposite of their birth-assigned gender (MtF women). Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the TVQMtF is ongoing. To investigate associations between TVQMtF scores and (1) self-perceptions of voice femininity and (2) acoustic parameters of voice pitch and voice quality in order to evaluate further the validity of the TVQMtF . A strong correlation between TVQMtF scores and self-ratings of voice femininity was predicted, but no association between TVQMtF scores and acoustic measures of voice pitch and quality was proposed. Participants were 148 MtF women (mean age 48.14 years) recruited from the La Trobe Communication Clinic and the clinics of three doctors specializing in transgender health. All participants completed the TVQMtF and 34 of these participants also provided a voice sample for acoustic analysis. Pearson product-moment correlation analysis was conducted to examine the associations between TVQMtF scores and (1) self-perceptions of voice femininity and (2) acoustic measures of F0, jitter (%), shimmer (dB) and harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR). Strong negative correlations between the participants' perceptions of their voice femininity and the TVQMtF scores demonstrated that for this group of MtF women a low self-rating of voice femininity was associated with more frequent negative voice-related experiences. This association was strongest with the vocal-functioning component of the TVQMtF . These strong correlations and high levels of shared variance between the TVQMtF and a measure of a related construct provides evidence for the convergent validity of the TVQMtF . The absence of significant correlations between the TVQMtF and the acoustic data is consistent with the equivocal findings of earlier research. This finding indicates that these two measures assess different aspects of the voice

  17. Surface Measurements of Precipitation from an Ocean Mooring: The Underwater Acoustic Log from the South China Sea*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.; McPhaden, Michael J.; Freitag, H. Paul

    2000-12-01

    Surface measurements of precipitation in oceanic environments have proven especially difficult to obtain because traditional technologies such as tipping-bucket rain gauges are unsuitable for deployment from oceanic platforms such as ships and moorings. Recently, the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has modified a collection gauge, the R. M. Young Company rain gauge, for long-term deployment on deep ocean moorings. This instrumentation package was deployed during part of the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment. Also deployed on the same mooring were two acoustic rain gauges (ARGs) that monitor precipitation through the interpretation of the high-frequency, from 500 to 50000 Hz, underwater sound field. The mooring was located at 20°22.2N, 116°31.2E and was in place from 7 April-5 June 1998. Unfortunately, pirates stole the surface instrumentation on 6 May 1998, limiting data from the R. M. Young rain gauge to satellite transmissions prior to the attack. The ARGs survived the attack and reported data throughout the deployment. The acoustic data are interpreted to provide quantification of wind speed; detection, classification, and quantification of rainfall; and the detection and quantification of near-surface bubble layers. Percentage-of-time-raining data from the two rainfall measurements are in excellent agreement. Based on comparison with the R. M. Young rain gauge data, modified acoustic rainfall algorithms are proposed. The acoustic detection of several instances of high near-surface bubble injections during extremely heavy rainfall is described.

  18. Acoustics Reflections of Full-Scale Rotor Noise Measurements in NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbely, Natasha Lydia; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Sim, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of current research is to identify the extent of acoustic time history distortions due to wind tunnel wall reflections. Acoustic measurements from the recent full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor test (Fig. 2) will be used to illustrate the quality of noise measurement in the NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test section. Results will be compared to PSU-WOPWOP predictions obtained with and without adjustments due to sound reflections off wind tunnel walls. Present research assumes a rectangular enclosure as shown in Fig. 3a. The Method of Mirror Images7 is used to account for reflection sources and their acoustic paths by introducing mirror images of the rotor (i.e. acoustic source), at each and every wall surface, to enforce a no-flow boundary condition at the position of the physical walls (Fig. 3b). While conventional approach evaluates the "combined" noise from both the source and image rotor at a single microphone position, an alternative approach is used to simplify implementation of PSU-WOPWOP for this reflection analysis. Here, an "equivalent" microphone position is defined with respect to the source rotor for each mirror image that effectively renders the reflection analysis to be a one rotor, multiple microphones problem. This alternative approach has the advantage of allowing each individual "equivalent" microphone, representing the reflection pulse from the associated wall surface, to be adjusted by the panel absorption coefficient illustrated in Fig. 1a. Note that the presence of parallel wall surfaces requires an infinite number of mirror images (Fig. 3c) to satisfy the no-flow boundary conditions. In the present analysis, up to four mirror images (per wall surface) are accounted to achieve convergence in the predicted time histories

  19. Acoustic determination of cracks in welded joints. [by resonant structural vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltanoiu, M.; Criciotoiu, E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic analysis method permits detection of any cracks that might take place and their manner of propagation. The study deals with the cracks produced in experiments to determine the welding technology for a welded gray cast iron workpiece by using piezoelectric transducers to determine vibration acceleration.

  20. Direct measurements of acoustic damping and sound amplification in corrugated pipes with flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golliard, J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.; Vijlbrief, O.; Lunde, K.

    2015-01-01

    The flow-induced pulsations in corrugated pipes result from a feedback loop between an acoustic resonator and the noise amplification at each shear layer in the axisymmetric cavities forming the corrugations. The quality factor of the resonator is determined by the reflection coefficients at the

  1. Acoustic Monitor for Liquid-Solid Slurries Measurements at Low Weight Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. L.L. Tavlarides; Dr. A.S. Sangan

    2004-12-08

    The principle objective of the project was to develop an acoustic probe for determining the weight fraction of particles in a flowing suspension. The suspension can be solid-liquid (S-L) or solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). The work accomplished during the first three years of DOE funding was devoted to the development of a rigorous theory for acoustic wave propagation through solid-liquid (S-L) and solid-gas-liquid (S-G-L). In the first funding period we developed an acoustic probe for S-G-L suspensions that has resulted in a theory, supported by our experiments, to describe small amplitude acoustic wave propagations in dilute suspensions (Norato, 1999; Spelter al., 1999, 2001: Norato et al. 2002). The theory agrees well with experimental data of sound attenuation over a wide range of particle sizes, frequencies, and weight percent solids. We have also completed theoretical and experimental investigation on the effect of entrained gas bubbles on the attenuation. This analysis permits us to determine the S-L weight percent in the presence of bubbles.

  2. Measurement of the acoustic-to-optical phonon coupling in multicomponent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caretta, Antonio; Donker, Michiel C.; Perdok, Diederik W.; Abbaszadeh, Davood; Polyakov, Alexey O.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Palstra, Thomas T. M.; van Loosdrecht, Paul H. M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the acoustic-to-optical up-conversion phonon processes in a multicomponent system. These processes take place during heat transport and limit the efficiency of heat flow. By combining time-resolved optical and heat capacity experiments we quantify the thermal coupling

  3. Methods and Systems for Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler for Measurement of Compact Jets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendricks, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    ... an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). The ADCP is a four-beam, Janus-type ADCP having beams aligned so that each of the beams is at an angle of about 200 to 300 to vertical and at 450 to the fore and aft axis of the vessel, such that two...

  4. Formant Centralization Ratio: A Proposal for a New Acoustic Measure of Dysarthric Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Shimon; Ramig, Lorraine O.; Spielman, Jennifer L.; Fox, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The vowel space area (VSA) has been used as an acoustic metric of dysarthric speech, but with varying degrees of success. In this study, the authors aimed to test an alternative metric to the VSA--the "formant centralization ratio" (FCR), which is hypothesized to more effectively differentiate dysarthric from healthy speech and register…

  5. Measuring fast-temporal sediment fluxes with an analogue acoustic sensor: a wind tunnel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, A.; Minnen, van J.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Seeger, M.

    2013-01-01

    Research objective In this study, we test two passive traps (BEST sampler and MWAC sampler) and one acoustic device (saltiphone) in an aeolian sand wind tunnel to investigate how the experimental setup and the subsequent data processing affect the quantification of the aeolian sand flux. Type of

  6. Application of acoustic emission measurements in the evaluation of prestressed cast in-between decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hemert, P.H.A.; Fennis-Huijben, S.A.A.M.; Hordijk, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of concrete structures, that is built in the sixties and seventies of the twentieth century, need to be re-evaluated. It should be judged whether their capacity is still sufficient for the increased traffic loads. Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive technique that can possibly

  7. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  8. Digital stroboscopic holographic interferometry for power flow measurements in acoustically driven membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keustermans, William; Pires, Felipe; De Greef, Daniël; Vanlanduit, Steve J. A.; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of the eardrum and the ossicles in the hearing chain, it remains an open question how acoustical energy is transmitted between them. Identifying the transmission path at different frequencies could lead to valuable information for the domain of middle ear surgery. In this work a setup for stroboscopic holography is combined with an algorithm for power flow calculations. With our method we were able to accurately locate the power sources and sinks in a membrane. The setup enabled us to make amplitude maps of the out-of-plane displacement of a vibrating rubber membrane at subsequent instances of time within the vibration period. From these, the amplitude maps of the moments of force and velocities are calculated. The magnitude and phase maps are extracted from this amplitude data, and form the input for the power flow calculations. We present the algorithm used for the measurements and for the power flow calculations. Finite element models of a circular plate with a local energy source and sink allowed us to test and optimize this algorithm in a controlled way and without the present of noise, but will not be discussed below. At the setup an earphone was connected with a thin tube which was placed very close to the membrane so that sound impinges locally on the membrane, hereby acting as a local energy source. The energy sink was a little piece of foam carefully placed against the membrane. The laser pulses are fired at selected instants within the vibration period using a 30 mW HeNe continuous wave laser (red light, 632.8 nm) in combination with an acousto-optic modulator. A function generator controls the phase of these illumination pulses and the holograms are recorded using a CCD camera. We present the magnitude and phase maps as well as the power flow measurements on the rubber membrane. Calculation of the divergence of this power flow map provides a simple and fast way of identifying and locating an energy source or sink. In conclusion

  9. Multi-point measurement of the acoustic particle velocity using a novel laser measurement method; Mehrpunktmessungen der Schallschnelle mittels neuartigem Lasermessverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haufe, Daniel; Schluessler, Raimund; Fischer, Andreas; Buettner, Lars; Czarske, Juergen [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur fuer Mess- und Prueftechnik

    2012-07-01

    Reducing aircraft noise requires the analysis of the complex interaction between flow and sound phenomena in jet engine dampers. Therefore a Doppler global velocimeter with laser frequency modulation is used for the first time for the multi-point measurement of the acoustic particle velocity in a Kundt's tube. As a result, particle velocity amplitudes within the hearing range have been resolved, the minimal measurement uncertainty amounts to 3 mm/s at a measurement period of 1 s. The measurement technique has high potential in respect of analyzing and optimizing jet engine dampers. (orig.)

  10. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  11. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  12. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  13. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  14. Simulation and measurement of different hydrophone components for acoustic particle detection; Simulation und Messung verschiedener Hydrophonkomponenten zur akustischen Teilchendetektion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon, K.S.

    2007-01-26

    A study of piezoceramics as sensitive elements for the use in acoustical astroparticle physics is presented in this work. This study aims to develop underwater microphones (hydrophones) in order to detect thermoacoustic sound pulses, which are produced in neutrino interactions. The sensitive elements of the acoustical detectors, the piezo ceramics, are under investigation in this work. Therefore the equations of a piezo are solved in simulations to derive its macroscopic properties. Especially the impedance and the displacement of the piezo as response to applied voltage are of interest. This is correlated with the electrical and mechanical answer of a piezo when sending. For receiving the resulting voltage or the electrical charge due to applied stress are of interest. In the present studies cylinder and hollow cylinder were analyzed. Insight of the interrelationship between the displacement and the impedance is given. The impedance is fitted with an equivalent circuit, to derive the mechanical analog properties. Furthermore the effect of the piezo geometry to the resonance frequencies is explored. Further calculations were made to reveal the sound field produced by a piezo. Measurements of the impedance with a phase-gain-analyser are made. On the other side the displacement is measured using optical interferometry. Beside the simulation and measurements of the piezosensitive elements a study for a trigger-algorithm using the crosscorrelation is introduced. In this study in situ measurements with low signal amplitudes are used to describe noise. To this noise data signals were added and it was examined how well the signals can be reconstructed. Based on the result of this work and taking commercial available piezoceramic materials into account, the optimal sensitive element of an acoustic neutrino detector is a PZT-5A disc with a diameter of 5 mm and a height of 10 mm. A single detector of this kind is able to detect neutrinos with energies more then one PeV as it

  15. Measurements of energy exchange between acoustic fields and non-uniform steady flow fields

    OpenAIRE

    Magiawala, K. R.; Culick, F. E. C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of interactions between acoustic waves and a non-uniform steady flow field. Data have been obtained for a resonance tube having a vent at the center in the lateral boundary, an average flow being introduced at the ends. Experiments have been done for both circular and slot vents, over ranges of both frequency and Mach number. According to the one-dimensional linear stability analysis, the interactions between the longitudinal a...

  16. Modelling acoustic propagation beneath Antarctic sea ice using measured environmental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Polly; Duncan, Alec; Bose, Neil; Williams, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are improving and expanding in situ observations of sea ice for the validation of satellite remote sensing and climate models. Missions under sea ice, particularly over large distances (up to 100 km) away from the immediate vicinity of a ship or base, require accurate acoustic communication for monitoring, emergency response and some navigation systems. We investigate the propagation of acoustic signals in the Antarctic seasonal ice zone using the BELLHOP model, examining the influence of ocean and sea ice properties. We processed available observations from around Antarctica to generate input variables such as sound speed, surface reflection coefficient (R) and roughness parameters. The results show that changes in the sound speed profile make the most significant difference to the propagation of the direct path signal. The inclusion of the surface reflected signals from a flat ice surface was found to greatly decrease the transmission loss with range. When ice roughness was added, the transmission loss increased with roughness, in a manner similar to the direct path transmission loss results. The conclusions of this work are that: (1) the accuracy of acoustic modelling in this environment is greatly increased by using realistic sound speed data; (2) a risk averse ranging model would use only the direct path signal transmission; and (3) in a flat ice scenario, much greater ranges can be achieved if the surface reflected transmission paths are included. As autonomous missions under sea ice increase in scale and complexity, it will be increasingly important for operational procedures to include effective modelling of acoustic propagation with representative environmental data.

  17. Semi-analytical response of acoustic logging measurements in frequency domain

    OpenAIRE

    Muga I.; Pardo D.; Matuszyk P.J.; Torres-Verdin C.

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes a semi-analytical method for simulation of the acoustic response of multipole eccentered sources in a fluid-filled borehole. Assuming a geometry that is invariant with respect to the azimuthal and vertical directions, the solution in frequency domain is expressed in terms of a Fourier series and a Fourier integral. The proposed semi-analytical method builds upon the idea of separating singularities from the smooth part of the integrand when performing the inverse Fourier tr...

  18. On the measurement of high-energetic neutrinos with the IceCube neutrino telescope and with acoustic detection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunck, Matthias

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, two subjects have been addressed to enhance the detection of astrophysical neutrinos with the existing IceCube neutrino telescope as well as to explore new detection methods, namely the acoustic detection. In the first part of this thesis, the determination of the acoustic attenuation length in South-Pole ice is presented. This is part of a feasibility study to investigate the acoustic neutrino detection as a possibility to enhance the detection of the highest-energy neutrinos. For this, the acoustic properties of the ice have to be known, and the South-Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to determine these. The attenuation length is determined using in-situ measurements with SPATS and a retrievable transmitter (pinger), which was deployed in a depth between 190 and 500 m into the water-filled drilling holes. Even though, the unknown angular-dependent sensitivities of the SPATS sensor channels cannot be avoided and are considered as the dominant systematic effect for these measurements. In this thesis, the acoustic attenuation length is calculated by comparing the energy contents of the pinger pulses recorded by the various SPATS sensor channels for different distances between the pinger and the respective channel. The energy was calculated from the Fourier spectra of the pinger pulses for a frequency range between 5 and 35 kHz. The attenuation coefficient is calculated for each channel individually and the weighted mean over the distribution of all considered channels leads to an attenuation length of 264{sup +52} {sub -37} m. The dependence of the attenuation on both depth and frequency has been investigated, showing no indications for either. In the second part, a new event reconstruction method based on a Top-Down approach is presented. The method has been implemented for the IC40 detector and applied to the muon energy reconstruction. The Top-Down method is based on the direct comparison of single measured events with a large sample

  19. A comparison between directly measured and inferred wave speeds from an acoustic propagation experiment in Currituck Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Megan S; Costley, R Daniel; Sagers, Jason D; Lee, Kevin M; McNeese, Andrew R; Hathaway, Kent K; Wilson, Preston S; Smith, Eric W

    2018-01-01

    An acoustic propagation experiment was conducted in Currituck Sound to characterize low-frequency propagation in a very-shallow-water estuarine environment. The water column properties were homogeneous over the study area, and the emphasis of this work is on understanding the propagation effects induced by the estuarine bed. During the experiment, low-frequency sound propagation measurements of waterborne sound and interface waves were acquired, and direct measurements of the compressional and shear wave properties were obtained at high frequencies. The propagation data consist of signals from a Combustive Sound Source recorded on bottom mounted geophones and a vertical line array of hydrophones. A statistical inference method was applied to obtain an estimate of the sediment compressional and shear wave speed profiles as a function of depth within the estuarine bed. The direct measurements were obtained in situ by inserting probes 30 cm into the sediment. Sediment acoustics models were fit to the high-frequency in situ data to enable comparison with the inferred low-frequency wave speeds. Overall, good agreement was found between the directly measured and inferred wave speeds for both the compressional and shear wave data.

  20. The uncertainties calculation of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of heterogeneous non-metallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaryna O. Golofeyeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effective use of heterogeneous non-metallic materials and structures needs measurement of reliable values of dissipation characteristics, as well as common factors of their change during the loading process. Aim: The aim of this study is to prepare the budget for measurement uncertainty of dissipative properties of composite materials. Materials and Methods: The method used to study the vibrational energy dissipation characteristics based on coupling of vibrations damping decrement and acoustic velocity in a non-metallic heterogeneous material is reviewed. The proposed method allows finding the dependence of damping on vibrations amplitude and frequency of strain-stress state of material. Results: Research of the accuracy of measurement method during the definition of decrement attenuation of fluctuations in synthegran was performed. The international approach for evaluation of measurements quality is used. It includes the common practice international rules for uncertainty expression and their summation. These rules are used as internationally acknowledged confidence measure to the measurement results, which includes testing. The uncertainties budgeting of acoustic method for measurement of dissipative properties of materials were compiled. Conclusions: It was defined that there are two groups of reasons resulting in errors during measurement of materials dissipative properties. The first group of errors contains of parameters changing of calibrated bump in tolerance limits, displacement of sensor in repeated placement to measurement point, layer thickness variation of contact agent because of irregular hold-down of resolvers to control surface, inaccuracy in reading and etc. The second group of errors is linked with density and Poisson’s ratio measurement errors, distance between sensors, time difference between signals of vibroacoustic sensors.

  1. Measurement of Acoustic-to-Seismic Conversion Using T-wave Signals Recorded at Ascension Island and Diego Garcia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulli, J. J.; Kofford, A. S.; Newman, K. R.; Krumhansl, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    T-wave signals from sub-sea earthquakes are often recorded on coastal or island seismic stations (Linehan, 1940; Okal, 2008). The physical process of the acoustic-to-seismic conversion is poorly understood but likely depends on factors such as seafloor relief and sediment thickness at the location where the interaction occurs. Quantification of the conversion process is necessary to understand and interpret the seismic recordings, and allow for the calculation of in-water acoustic levels from these recordings where no in-water sensor recordings are available. Applications for this knowledge would include the calculation of in-water explosion yields and seismic airgun source levels. Here we present the measurement of the acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions at Ascension Island and Diego Garcia using hydroacoustic data from the International Monitoring System and broadband seismic data from the Global Seismic Network. For Ascension Island, a volcanic island formed above magmatic plumes, we used T-wave signals from earthquakes on the Central Mid-Atlantic Ridge and associated fracture zones. For Diego Garcia, an atoll of carbonate sequences and no volcanism, we used T-wave signals from earthquakes along the Sumatran Subduction Zone, the Indian Ocean Ridges, and the Chagos Arch. The methodology is based on the smoothed cross-spectra over a frequency band that is common to the acoustic and seismic recordings, typically 2-18 Hz. Preliminary results indicate that at 5 Hz the acoustic-to-seismic conversion is 2-4 times more efficient at Ascension Island than at Diego Garcia (124 nm/s/Pa vs. 51 nm/s/Pa, respectively), but nearly equal at 10 Hz (20 nm/s/Pa). At 15 Hz the conversion is more efficient at Diego Garcia (13 nm/s/Pa vs. 8 nm/s/Pa at Ascension). We also investigate the azimuthal variance of this transfer function, as well as the differences between the three components of seismic motion. As a verification of the methodology, we use the equivalent time domain

  2. New design of the pulsed electro-acoustic upper electrode for space charge measurements during electronic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffaud, J.; Griseri, V.; Berquez, L. [UPS, LAPLACE, Université de Toulouse, 118 Route de Narbonne, Toulouse F-31062, France and CNRS, LAPLACE, Toulouse F-31062 (France)

    2016-07-15

    The behaviour of space charges injected in irradiated dielectrics has been studied for many years for space industry applications. In our case, the pulsed electro-acoustic method is chosen in order to determine the spatial distribution of injected electrons. The feasibility of a ring-shaped electrode which will allow the measurements during irradiation is presented. In this paper, a computer simulation is made in order to determine the parameters to design the electrode and find its position above the sample. The obtained experimental results on polyethylene naphthalate samples realized during electronic irradiation and through relaxation under vacuum will be presented and discussed.

  3. New design of the pulsed electro-acoustic upper electrode for space charge measurements during electronic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffaud, J; Griseri, V; Berquez, L

    2016-07-01

    The behaviour of space charges injected in irradiated dielectrics has been studied for many years for space industry applications. In our case, the pulsed electro-acoustic method is chosen in order to determine the spatial distribution of injected electrons. The feasibility of a ring-shaped electrode which will allow the measurements during irradiation is presented. In this paper, a computer simulation is made in order to determine the parameters to design the electrode and find its position above the sample. The obtained experimental results on polyethylene naphthalate samples realized during electronic irradiation and through relaxation under vacuum will be presented and discussed.

  4. Elastic properties of boron carbide films via surface acoustic waves measured by Brillouin light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, E.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Prieto, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Martin, A.; Prieto, J.E.; Joco, V. [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity has been determined by high resolution Brillouin light scattering to study the mechano-elastic properties of boron carbide films prepared by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The comparison of experimentally observed elastic behaviour with simulations made by considering film composition obtained from elastic recoil detection analysis-time of flight (ERDA-ToF) spectroscopy allows establishing that elastic properties are determined by that of crystalline boron carbide with a lessening of the SAW velocity values due to surface oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Determination of unsteady heat release distribution from acoustic pressure measurements: a reformulation of the inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, P Bala; Sujith, R I; Ramakrishna, M

    2003-08-01

    An integral method is developed to solve the inverse problem of determining the oscillatory heat release distribution from the knowledge of the acoustic pressure field within a combustor. Unlike earlier approaches, in which the problem is formulated in terms of Fredholm integral equation, the inverse problem is reformulated in terms of Volterra integral equation. This reformulation, valid for low Mach numbers (M2 Volterra integral equation is solved using both direct numerical method and implicit least-squares method. The results show that the implicit least-squares method is superior to the direct numerical method and yields accurate determination of heat release at all frequencies.

  6. A METHODOLOGY TO INTEGRATE MAGNETIC RESONANCE AND ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge O. Parra; Chris L. Hackert; Lorna L. Wilson

    2002-09-20

    The work reported herein represents the third year of development efforts on a methodology to interpret magnetic resonance and acoustic measurements for reservoir characterization. In this last phase of the project we characterize a vuggy carbonate aquifer in the Hillsboro Basin, Palm Beach County, South Florida, using two data sets--the first generated by velocity tomography and the second generated by reflection tomography. First, we integrate optical macroscopic (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, as well as petrography, as a first step in characterizing the aquifer pore system. This pore scale integration provides information with which to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well log signatures for NMR well log calibration, interpret ultrasonic data, and characterize flow units at the field scale between two wells in the aquifer. Saturated and desaturated NMR core measurements estimate the irreducible water in the rock and the variable T{sub 2} cut-offs for the NMR well log calibration. These measurements establish empirical equations to extract permeability from NMR well logs. Velocity and NMR-derived permeability and porosity relationships integrated with velocity tomography (based on crosswell seismic measurements recorded between two wells 100 m apart) capture two flow units that are supported with pore scale integration results. Next, we establish a more detailed picture of the complex aquifer pore structures and the critical role they play in water movement, which aids in our ability to characterize not only carbonate aquifers, but reservoirs in general. We analyze petrography and cores to reveal relationships between the rock physical properties that control the compressional and shear wave velocities of the formation. A digital thin section analysis provides the pore size distributions of the rock matrix, which allows us to relate pore structure to permeability and to characterize flow units at the

  7. Characterizing Three-Dimensional Mixing Process in a River Confluence using Hydro-acoustical Backscatter and Flow Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Geunsoo; Kim, Dongsu; Kim, YoungDo; Lyu, Siwan; Kim, Seojun

    2017-04-01

    River confluences are zones where two rivers with different geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics amalgamate, resulting in rapid change in terms of flow regime, sediment entrainment and hydraulic geometry. In these confluence zones, the flow structure is basically complicated responded with concurrent mixing of physical and chemical aquatic properties, and continuous channel morphology could be changed due to erosion and sedimentation. In addition, the confluences are regions in which two rivers join and play an important role in river ecology. In order to characterize the mixing process of confluence for understanding the impacts of a river on the other river, therefore, it has been crucial to analyze the spatial mixing patterns for main streams depending on various inflow conditions of tributaries. However, most conventional studies have mostly relied upon hydraulic or water quality numerical models for understanding mixing pattern analysis of confluences, due to the difficulties to acquire a wide spatial range of in-situ data especially for characterizing this kind of mixing process. Even with intensive in-situ measurements, those researches tended to focus mainly on the hydraulic characteristics such as the flow and morphological complexity of confluence, so that very few studies comprehensively included sediment variation with flow at the same time. In this study, subsequently, flow and sediment mixing characteristics were concurrently investigated in the confluence between Nakdong and Nam river in South Korea, where it has been frequently questioned to determine how Nam river affects Nakdong river that recently have suffered various environmental problems such as green algae bloom and erosion/deposition in the confluence. We basically examined the mixing characteristics of confluence by using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) which were used to measure hydraulic factors such as flow rate and depth, as well as measuring the suspended sediment

  8. A Correction of Random Incidence Absorption Coefficients for the Angular Distribution of Acoustic Energy under Measurement Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2009-01-01

    discrepancies between the measured value and the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient. Therefore the angular distribution of the incident acoustic energy onto an absorber sample should be taken into account. The angular distribution of the incident energy density was simulated using the beam...... tracing method for various room shapes and source positions. The averaged angular distribution is found to be similar to a Gaussian distribution. As a result, an angle-weighted absorption coefficient was proposed by considering the angular energy distribution to improve the agreement between...... the theoretical absorption coefficient and the reverberation room measurement. The angle-weighted absorption coefficient, together with the size correction, agrees satisfactorily with the measured absorption data by the reverberation chamber method. At high frequencies and for large samples, the averaged...

  9. Measurement of the sound power incident on the walls of a reverberation room with near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2010-01-01

    The conventional method of measuring the insertion loss of a partition relies on an assumption of the sound field in the source room being diffuse combined with the classical relation between the spatial average of the mean square pressure in the source room and the incident sound power per unit...... area; and it has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using 'statistically optimised near field acoustic holography......' (SONAH). The purpose is to examine whether one should use a correction similar to the well-known 'Waterhouse correction' when the incident sound power is deduced from the sound pressure in the source room....

  10. Air-coupled acoustic radiation force source for non-contact measurement of soft media elasticity (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroziński, Lukasz; Pelivanov, Ivan; Song, Shaozhen; Yoon, Soon Joon; Li, David S.; Gao, Liang; Shen, Tueng T.; Wang, Ruikang K.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) is commonly used in ultrasound (US)-based elastography to generate shear waves deep within soft tissue. These waves can be detected with different methods, e.g. contact conventional ultrasound imaging probes or contact free magnetic resonance or optical coherence tomography (OCT). For many clinical applications, however, for instance the eye, a totally non-contact system for generation/detection of mechanical waves is needed. Here, we present a method for efficient non-contact excitation of broadband transverse mechanical waves in soft media. The approach is based on pushing the medium under study with a 1 MHz chirped US wave focused to its surface from air. The US beam reflected from the air/medium interface provides the ARF force to the medium surface launching a transient mechanical wave in the transverse (lateral) direction. The design and performance of the air-coupled transducer is discussed. The focal zone, peak pressure and acoustic intensity are measured for transducers with different numerical apertures. Time and frequency characteristics of the propagating mechanical waves, generated in soft tissue, are tracked with a phase-sensitive ultra-fast frame rate OCT imaging system. Application of the proposed method for non-contact, non-invasive, sub-mm resolution elasticity measurement in soft tissue is proposed.

  11. Parametrization of acoustic boundary absorption and dispersion properties in time-domain source/receiver reflection measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hoop, A.T.; Lam, C.H.; Kooij, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form analytic time-domain expressions are obtained for the acoustic pressure associated with the reflection of a monopole point-source excited impulsive acoustic wave by a planar boundary with absorptive and dispersive properties. The acoustic properties of the boundary are modeled as a local

  12. Simulation of non-destructive inspections and acoustic emission measurements involving guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronian, V.; Lhémery, A.; Bonnet-Ben Dhia, A.-S.

    2009-11-01

    In a structure that guides elastic waves, a discontinuity (defect, shape variation) causes scattering (reflection, partial extinction or mode conversion). Two modal formulations have been developed to link separate models dealing with the calculation of the modal decomposition, with the generation and reception of guided waves (GW), with their scattering. The first concerns pulse-echo configurations (involving a single transducer), the other concerns pitch-catch configurations (two transducers involved). A new finite element (FE) method has been developed to compute the scattering by an arbitrary discontinuity, based on the modal decomposition of the field. Perfectly transparent boundary conditions (Dirichlet-to-Neuman boundaries) are developed, allowing the FE computation zone to be reduced to a minimum. A specific variational problem including these boundary conditions was obtained and solved using FE tools. By combining the modal formulations, the new FE scheme and tools for GW radiation, propagation and reception based on the Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method, a new simulation tool has been developed. It can address almost arbitrary configurations of GW nondestructive testing. Moreover, a source inside the FE computation zone can be defined so that configurations of testing by acoustic emission can also be simulated. Examples of use of this tool are shown, some dealing with junctions of complex geometry between two guides, other with surface or bulk sources of acoustic emission.

  13. a Method of Measuring the Dynamic Flow Resistance and the Acoustic Measurement of the Effective Static Flow Resistance in Stratified Rockwool Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, M. A.; Solana, P.; Urchueguía, J. F.

    1998-09-01

    In our work we have analyzed different stratified rockwool samples, with considerable differences regarding density, mean pore diameter, and porosity, by means of a new method for the measurement of the dynamic flow resistance based on the electrical analogy. This method enables us to measure this parameter without the need for placing the sample between two microphones. Our experimental results have been compared to those obtained with a different measurement scheme and, from a theoretical point of view, we have examined the extent to which the capillary pore approximation can be utilized in intermediate flow regimes and Poiseuille flow regimes and in real situations. For this purpose, a static flow resistivity, which was also approximated using an acoustic method and a commonly accepted theoretical approximation, was calculated based on a microscopic study of the samples and the fibre's diameter. Regarding the conclusions obtained, the results show that the new experimental procedure for determining the dynamic flow resistance is of interest in the intermediate and Poiseuille flow regimes in which, within the limitation of our experimental set-up, good results were obtained. The acoustic procedure for measuring a static flow resistivity delivered good results only for a regime close to Poiseuille, which was obtained only with higher density samples.

  14. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers – Theory, evaluation, and results from 14 stations on five rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David; Wright, Scott A.; Griffiths, Ronald; Dean, David

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a physically based method for using two acoustic frequencies to measure suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended-sand median grain size in river cross sections at 15-minute intervals over decadal timescales. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the scattering of sound by suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of the specific theoretical relations among acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We briefly describe the theory and methods, demonstrate the application of the method, and compute biases and errors in the method at 14 stations in the Colorado River and Rio Grande basins, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustical measurements over many years. Quantification of errors in sediment-transport measurements made using this method is essential if the measurements are to be used effectively, e.g., to evaluate uncertainty in long-term sediment loads and budgets

  15. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  16. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, III, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation.

  17. Measure the spatial distribution of corneal elasticity by combining femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and acoustic radiation force elasticity microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Li, Xin; Hu, Mingyong

    2017-08-01

    The unique spatial distribution of corneal elasticity is shown by the nonhomogeneous structure of the cornea. It is critical to understanding how biomechanics control corneal stability and refraction and one way to do this job is non-invasive measurement of this distribution. Femtosecond laser pulses have the ability to induce optical breakdown and produced cavitation in the anterior and posterior cornea. A confocal ultrasonic transducer applied 6.5 ms acoustic radiation forcechirp bursts to the bubble at 1.5 MHz while monitoring bubble position using pulse-echoes at 20 MHz. The laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) were measured in the anterior and posterior cornea with the plasmas that induced by the same femtosecond laser to see whether the laser induced plasmas signals will show relationship to Young's modulus.

  18. Comparison of acoustic doppler current profiler and Price AA mechanical current meter measurements made during the 2011 Mississippi River Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Patrick; Mueller, David; Pratt, Thad

    2012-01-01

    The Mississippi River and Tributaries project performed as designed during the historic 2011 Mississippi River flood, with many of the operational decisions based on discharge targets as opposed to stage. Measurement of discharge at the Tarbert Landing, Mississippi range provides critical information used in operational decisions for the floodways located in Louisiana. Historically, discharge measurements have been made using a Price AA current meter and the mid-section method, and a long record exists based on these types of measurements, including historical peak discharges. Discharge measurements made using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat have been incorporated into the record since the mid 1990's, and are used along with the Price AA mid-section measurements. During the 2011 flood event, both methods were used and appeared to provide different results at times. The apparent differences between the measurement techniques are due to complex hydrodynamics at this location that created large spatial and temporal fluctuations in the flow. The data and analysis presented herein show the difference between the two methods to be within the expected accuracy of the measurements when the measurements are made concurrently. The observed fluctuations prevent valid comparisons of data collected sequentially or even with different observation durations.

  19. Experimental system for in-situ measurement of temperature rise in animal tissue under exposure to acoustic radiation force impulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Ishiguro, Yasunao; Sasanuma, Hideki; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Iwaki

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) has recently been used for tissue elasticity measurement and imaging. On the other hand, it is predicted that a rise in temperature occurs. In-situ measurement of temperature rise in animal experiments is important, yet measurement using thermocouples has some problems such as position mismatch of the temperature measuring junction of the thermocouple and the focal point of ultrasound. Therefore, an in-situ measurement system for solving the above problems was developed in this study. The developed system is composed mainly of an ultrasound irradiation unit including a custom-made focused transducer with a through hole for inserting a thin-wire thermocouple, and a temperature measurement unit including the thermocouple. The feasibility of the developed system was evaluated by means of experiments using a tissue-mimicking material (TMM), a TMM containing a bone model or a chicken bone, and an extracted porcine liver. The similarity between the experimental results and the results of simulation using a finite element method (FEM) implied the reasonableness of in-situ temperature rise measured by the developed system. The developed system will become a useful tool for measuring in-situ temperature rise in animal experiments and obtaining findings with respect to the relationship between ultrasound irradiation conditions and in-situ temperature rise.

  20. Effects of a music therapy voice protocol on speech intelligibility, vocal acoustic measures, and mood of individuals with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneishi, E

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a Music Therapy Voice Protocol (MTVP) on speech intelligibility, vocal intensity, maximum vocal range, maximum duration of sustained vowel phonation, vocal fundamental frequency, vocal fundamental frequency variability, and mood of individuals with Parkinson's disease. Four female patients, who demonstrated voice and speech problems, served as their own controls and participated in baseline assessment (study pretest), a series of MTVP sessions involving vocal and singing exercises, and final evaluation (study posttest). In study pre and posttests, data for speech intelligibility and all acoustic variables were collected. Statistically significant increases were found in speech intelligibility, as rated by caregivers, and in vocal intensity from study pretest to posttest as the results of paired samples t-tests. In addition, before and after each MTVP session (session pre and posttests), self-rated mood scores and selected acoustic variables were collected. No significant differences were found in any of the variables from the session pretests to posttests, across the entire treatment period, or their interactions as the results of two-way ANOVAs with repeated measures. Although not significant, the mean of mood scores in session posttests (M = 8.69) was higher than that in session pretests (M = 7.93).

  1. Design and Analyses of High Aspect Ratio Nozzles for Distributed Propulsion Acoustic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Vance F., III

    2016-01-01

    A series of three convergent, round-to-rectangular high aspect ratio (HAR) nozzles were designed for acoustic testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR). The HAR nozzles had exit area aspect ratios of 8:1, 12:1, and 16:1. The nozzles were designed to mimic a distributed propulsion system array with a slot nozzle. The nozzle designs were screened using Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations. In addition to meeting the geometric constraints required for testing in the NATR, the HAR nozzles were designed to be free of flow features that would produce unwanted noise (e.g., flow separations) and to have uniform flow at the nozzle exit. Multiple methods were used to generate HAR nozzle designs. The final HAR nozzle designs were generated in segments using a computer code that parameterized each segment. RANS screening simulations showed that intermediate nozzle designs suffered flow separation, a normal shockwave at the nozzle exit (caused by an aerodynamic throat produced by boundary layer growth), and non-uniform flow at the nozzle exit. The RANS simulations showed that the final HAR nozzle designs were free of flow separations, but were not entirely successful at producing a fully uniform flow at the nozzle exit. The final designs suffered a pair of counter-rotating vortices along the outboard walls of the nozzle. The 16:1 aspect ratio HAR nozzle had the least uniform flow at the exit plane; the 8:1 aspect ratio HAR nozzles had a fairly uniform flow at the nozzle exit plane.

  2. Virtual Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  3. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  4. Acoustic and Perceptual Measurements of Prosody Production on the Profiling Elements of Prosodic Systems in Children by Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Joshua John; Paul, Rhea

    2013-01-01

    Prosody production atypicalities are a feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but behavioral measures of performance have failed to provide detail on the properties of these deficits. We used acoustic measures of prosody to compare children with ASDs to age-matched groups with learning disabilities and typically developing peers. Overall,…

  5. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  6. Heat flux measured acoustically at Grotto Vent, a hydrothermal vent cluster on the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past several decades, quantifying the heat output has been a unanimous focus of studies at hydrothermal vent fields discovered around the global ocean. Despite their importance, direct measurements of hydrothermal heat flux are very limited due to the remoteness of most vent sites and the complexity of hydrothermal venting. Moreover, almost all the heat flux measurements made to date are snapshots and provide little information on the temporal variation that is expected from the dynamic nature of a hydrothermal system. The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS, https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/covis/) is currently connected to the Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory network (http://www.neptunecanada.ca) to monitor the hydrothermal plumes issuing from a vent cluster (Grotto) on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. COVIS is acquiring a long-term (20-months to date) time series of the vertical flow rate and volume flux of the hydrothermal plume above Grotto through the Doppler analysis of the acoustic backscatter data (Xu et al., 2013). We then estimate the plume heat flux from vertical flow rate and volume flux using our newly developed inverse method. In this presentation, we will briefly summarize the derivation of the inverse method and present the heat-flux time series obtained consequently with uncertainty quantification. In addition, we compare our heat-flux estimates with the one estimated from the plume in-situ temperatures measured using a Remotely Operative Vehicle (ROV) in 2012. Such comparison sheds light on the uncertainty of our heat flux estimation. Xu, G., Jackson, D., Bemis, K., and Rona, P., 2013, Observations of the volume flux of a seafloor hydrothermal plume using an acoustic imaging sonar, Geochemistry, Geophysics Geosystems, 2013 (in press).

  7. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  8. An analysis of the feasibility of using the Hsu-Nielsen calibration method in systems for measuring acoustic emission from partial discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubis, Jerzy; Ranachowski, Zbigniew; Boczar, T.; Lorenc, M.

    The subject of this article is an analysis of the feasibility of using the Hsu-Nielsen calibration method to measure acoustic emission from partial discharges. In the first part of the article the authors present a concept and method of calibration which makes it possible to calibrate the measuring circuit properly. The second part contains the results of experiments which involved calibrating two different acoustic emission analyzers, namely the Izold and the Demy 34 models. In conclusion the authors discuss the practical requirements for proper calibration of the systems in a technical environment.

  9. Noise suppression in curved glass shells using macro-fiber-composite actuators studied by the means of digital holography and acoustic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mokrý

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methods and experimental results of the semi-active control of noise transmission in a curved glass shell with attached piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC actuators. The semi-active noise control is achieved via active elasticity control of piezoelectric actuators by connecting them to an active electric shunt circuit that has a negative effective capacitance. Using this approach, it is possible to suppress the vibration of the glass shell in the normal direction with respect to its surface and to increase the acoustic transmission loss of the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure. The effect of the MFC actuators connected to the negative capacitance shunt circuit on the surface distribution of the normal vibration amplitude is studied using frequency-shifted digital holography (FSDH. The principle of the used FSDH method is described in the paper. The frequency dependence of the acoustic transmission loss through the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure is estimated using measurements of the specific acoustic impedance of the curved glass shell. The specific acoustic impedance is measured using two microphones and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV. The results from the LDV measurements are compared with the FSDH data. The results of the experiments show that using this approach, the acoustic transmission loss in a glass shell can be increased by 36 dB in the frequency range around 247 Hz and by 25 dB in the frequency range around 258 Hz. The experiments indicate that FSDH measurements provide an efficient tool that can be used for fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic transmission loss in large planar structures.

  10. Noise suppression in curved glass shells using macro-fiber-composite actuators studied by the means of digital holography and acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrý, P.; Psota, P.; Steiger, K.; Václavík, J.; Doleček, R.; Lédl, V.; Šulc, M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper presents methods and experimental results of the semi-active control of noise transmission in a curved glass shell with attached piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators. The semi-active noise control is achieved via active elasticity control of piezoelectric actuators by connecting them to an active electric shunt circuit that has a negative effective capacitance. Using this approach, it is possible to suppress the vibration of the glass shell in the normal direction with respect to its surface and to increase the acoustic transmission loss of the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure. The effect of the MFC actuators connected to the negative capacitance shunt circuit on the surface distribution of the normal vibration amplitude is studied using frequency-shifted digital holography (FSDH). The principle of the used FSDH method is described in the paper. The frequency dependence of the acoustic transmission loss through the piezoelectric MFC-glass composite structure is estimated using measurements of the specific acoustic impedance of the curved glass shell. The specific acoustic impedance is measured using two microphones and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The results from the LDV measurements are compared with the FSDH data. The results of the experiments show that using this approach, the acoustic transmission loss in a glass shell can be increased by 36 dB in the frequency range around 247 Hz and by 25 dB in the frequency range around 258 Hz. The experiments indicate that FSDH measurements provide an efficient tool that can be used for fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic transmission loss in large planar structures.

  11. The value of the acoustic voice quality index as a measure of dysphonia severity in subjects speaking different languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryn, Youri; De Bodt, Marc; Barsties, Ben; Roy, Nelson

    2014-06-01

    The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) is a relatively new clinical method to quantify dysphonia severity. Since it partially relies on continuous speech, its performance may vary with voice-related phonetic differences and thus across languages. The present investigation therefore assessed the AVQI's performance in English, Dutch, German, and French. Fifty subjects were recorded reading sentences in the four languages, as well as producing a sustained vowel. These recordings were later edited to calculate the AVQI. The samples were also perceptually rated on overall dysphonia severity by three experienced voice clinicians. The AVQI's cross-linguistic concurrent validity and diagnostic precision were assessed. The results support earlier data, and confirm good cross-linguistic validity and diagnostic accuracy. Although no statistical differences were observed between languages, the AVQI performed better in English and German and less well in French. These results validate the AVQI as a potentially robust and objective dysphonia severity measure across languages.

  12. Auto-inflammatory challenge of the endolymphatic sac - Cochlear damage measured by distortion product oto-acoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael; Friis, Morten; Karlsen, Charlotte Vestrup

    2015-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Twenty-five rats were challenged by an immunologic attack of the endolymphatic sac. After 6 months, distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAE) revealed a dysfunction of the outer hair cells and immunological active cells were observed in the endolymphatic sac. This information...... could contribute to the understanding of Ménière's disease. OBJECTIVES: This study investigated if an autoimmune challenge of the endolymphatic sac could affect DPOAE output measurements in rats. Also, a potential autoimmune cell infiltration of the endolymphatic sac was investigated. METHODS: Eighteen...... Lewis rats were immunized with a crude endolymphatic sac extract in complete Freund's adjuvant. Seven control animals were injected with Freund's adjuvant in saline. Cochlear damage was estimated by DPOAE dynamics 3 weeks and 6 months after the immunization. Infiltrative cells in the endolymphatic sac...

  13. Screen-printed digital microfluidics combined with surface acoustic wave nebulization for hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkkonen, Lucas; Edgar, J Scott; Winters, Daniel; Heron, Scott R; Mackay, C Logan; Masselon, Christophe D; Stokes, Adam A; Langridge-Smith, Patrick R R; Goodlett, David R

    2016-03-25

    An inexpensive digital microfluidic (DMF) chip was fabricated by screen-printing electrodes on a sheet of polyimide. This device was manually integrated with surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) MS to conduct hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) of peptides. The HDX experiment was performed by DMF mixing of one aqueous droplet of angiotensin II with a second containing various concentrations of D2O. Subsequently, the degree of HDX was measured immediately by SAWN-MS. As expected for a small peptide, the isotopically resolved mass spectrum for angiotensin revealed that maximum deuterium exchange was achieved using 50% D2O. Additionally, using SAWN-MS alone, the global HDX kinetics of ubiquitin were found to be similar to published NMR data and back exchange rates for the uncooled apparatus using high inlet capillary temperatures was less than 6%. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Leak Detection in Water-Filled Small-Diameter Polyethylene Pipes by Means of Acoustic Emission Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Martini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of effective strategies to manage leaks represents an essential goal for all utilities involved with drinking water supply in order to reduce water losses affecting urban distribution networks. This study concerns the early detection of leaks occurring in small-diameter customers’ connections to water supply networks. An experimental campaign was carried out in a test bed to investigate the sensitivity of Acoustic Emission (AE monitoring to water leaks. Damages were artificially induced on a polyethylene pipe (length 28 m, outer diameter 32 mm at different distances from an AE transducer. Measurements were performed in both unburied and buried pipe conditions. The analysis permitted the identification of a clear correlation between three monitored parameters (namely total Hits, Cumulative Counts and Cumulative Amplitude and the characteristics of the examined leaks.

  15. Acoustical measurements of sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit inside an historical opera house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin-Ichi; Prodi, Nicola; Sakai, Hiroyuki

    2004-05-01

    To clarify the relationship of the sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit, we conducted acoustical measurements in a typical historical opera house, the Teatro Comunale of Ferrara, Italy. Orthogonal factors based on the theory of subjective preference and other related factors were analyzed. First, the sound fields for a singer on the stage in relation to the musicians in the pit were analyzed. And then, the sound fields for performers in the pit in relation to the singers on the stage were considered. Because physical factors vary depending on the location of the sound source, performers can move on the stage or in the pit to find the preferred sound field.

  16. Resolution of Forces and Strain Measurements from an Acoustic Ground Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald; Waldon, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Conservatism in Typical Vibration Tests was Demonstrated: Vibration test at component level produced conservative force reactions by approximately a factor of 4 (approx.12 dB) as compared to the integrated acoustic test in 2 out of 3 axes. Reaction Forces Estimated at the Base of Equipment Using a Finite Element Based Method were Validated: FEM based estimate of interface forces may be adequate to guide development of vibration test criteria with less conservatism. Element Forces Estimated in Secondary Structure Struts were Validated: Finite element approach provided best estimate of axial strut forces in frequency range below 200 Hz where a rigid lumped mass assumption for the entire electronics box was valid. Models with enough fidelity to represent diminishing apparent mass of equipment are better suited for estimating force reactions across the frequency range. Forward Work: Demonstrate the reduction in conservatism provided by; Current force limited approach and an FEM guided approach. Validate proposed CMS approach to estimate coupled response from uncoupled system characteristics for vibroacoustics.

  17. Atomic force acoustic microscopy: Influence of the lateral contact stiffness on the elastic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Ruiz, F J; Espinoza-Beltrán, F J; Diliegros-Godines, C J; Siqueiros, J M; Herrera-Gómez, A

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force acoustic microscopy is a dynamic technique where the resonances of a cantilever, that has its tip in contact with the sample, are used to quantify local elastic properties of surfaces. Since the contact resonance frequencies (CRFs) monotonically increase with the tip-sample contact stiffness, they are used to evaluate the local elastic properties of the surfaces through a suitable contact mechanical model. The CRFs depends on both, normal and lateral contact stiffness, kN and kS respectively, where the last one is taken either as constant (kS<1), or as zero, leading to uncertainty in the estimation of the elastic properties of composite materials. In this work, resonance spectra for free and contact vibration were used in a finite element analysis of cantilevers to show the influence of kS in the resonance curves due to changes in the kS/kN ratio. These curves have regions for the different vibrational modes that are both, strongly and weakly dependent on kS, and they can be used in a selective manner to obtain a precise mapping of elastic properties. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. How to specify and measure sensitivity in Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2017-04-01

    In Rayleigh-scattering-based Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fiber is transformed into an array of thousands of 'virtual microphones'. This approach has gained tremendous popularity in recent years and is one of the most successful examples of a fiber-optic sensing method which made its way from the academia to the market. Despite the great amount of work done in this field, sensitivity, which is ones of the most critical parameters of any sensing technique, was rarely investigated in this context. In particular, little attention was given to its random characteristics. Without careful consideration of the random aspects of DAS, any attempt to specify its sensitivity or to compare between different DAS modalities is of limited value. Recently we introduced a new statistical parameter which defines DAS sensitivity and enables comparison between the performances of different DAS systems. In this paper we generalize the previous parameter and give a broader, simple and intuitive definition to DAS sensitivity. An important attribute of these parameters is that they can be easily extracted from the static backscatter profile of the sensing fiber. In the paper we derive the relation between DAS sensitivity and the static backscatter profile and present an experimental verification of this relation.

  19. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book chapt......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology.......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  20. Flight parameter estimation using instantaneous frequency and direction of arrival measurements from a single acoustic sensor node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kam W

    2017-03-01

    When an airborne sound source travels past a stationary ground-based acoustic sensor node in a straight line at constant altitude and constant speed that is not much less than the speed of sound in air, the movement of the source during the propagation of the signal from the source to the sensor node (commonly referred to as the "retardation effect") enables the full set of flight parameters of the source to be estimated by measuring the direction of arrival (DOA) of the signal at the sensor node over a sufficiently long period of time. This paper studies the possibility of using instantaneous frequency (IF) measurements from the sensor node to improve the precision of the flight parameter estimates when the source spectrum contains a harmonic line of constant frequency. A simplified Cramer-Rao lower bound analysis shows that the standard deviations in the estimates of the flight parameters can be reduced when IF measurements are used together with DOA measurements. Two flight parameter estimation algorithms that utilize both IF and DOA measurements are described and their performances are evaluated using both simulated data and real data.

  1. Acoustic evaluation of wood quality in standing trees. Part I, Acoustic wave behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Peter Carter

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic wave velocities in standing trees or live softwood species were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Tree velocities were compared with acoustic velocities measured in corresponding butt logs through a resonance acoustic method. The experimental data showed a skewed relationship between tree and log acoustic measurements. For most trees tested,...

  2. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  3. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  4. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  5. Liver and spleen transient elastography and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurements. Performance and comparison of measurements in the same area concurrently assessed for liver fibrosis by biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovato, Francesca M; Atzori, Sebastiana; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Tooley, Vanessa; Marcinkowski, Heather; Crossey, Mary M E; Ladep, Nimzing G; Martines, Giuseppe F; Goldin, Robert D; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2015-09-01

    The estimation of the degree of liver fibrosis is important for prognosis, surveillance, and treatment of chronic liver disease. Although liver biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosis, it is subject to sampling error, while ultrasound-based techniques, such as Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) and transient elastography, have gained popularity. However, no previous comparative study has performed these ultrasound techniques at the time of biopsy. The aim of this study was to compare the reliability of these techniques to define the severity of liver fibrosis in viral hepatitis patients. We compared liver transient elastography and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse measurements, performed along the intended biopsy track, with liver biopsy results in 46 viral hepatitis patients, all measured on the same morning. Fibrosis was measured by histology using the Ishak fibrosis staging. The relative sensitivity and specificity of different incremental cut-off values for both techniques, and the predictive ability of pairwise comparison of the 3 tests (including APRI) and of their combined use with more severe grades of histology-measured liver fibrosis, show that the single variable with greatest sensitivity and specificity is TE with a cut-off of >10.0. Transient elastography has a better performance than ARFI, which has a lower sensitivity, in the diagnosis of severe stages of fibrosis. Also ARFI of the spleen is correlated with Ishak fibrosis staging, and could be a possible additional tool for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  6. Crustal Seismic Attenuation in Germany Measured with Acoustic Radiative Transfer Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebler, Peter J.; Eulenfeld, Tom; Wegler, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    This work is carried out in the context of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). As part of this treaty a verification regime was introduced to detect, locate and characterize nuclear explosion testings. The study of seismology can provide essential information in the form of broadband waveform recordings for the identification and verification of these critical events. A profound knowledge of the Earth's subsurface between source and receiver is required for a detailed description of the seismic wave field. In addition to underground parameters such as seismic velocity or anisotropy, information about seismic attenuation values of the medium are required. Goal of this study is the creation of a comprehensive model of crustal seismic attenuation in Germany and adjacent areas. Over 20 years of earthquake data from the German Central Seismological Observatory data archive is used to estimate the spatial dependent distribution of seismic intrinsic and scattering attenuation of S-waves for frequencies between 0.5 and 20 Hz. The attenuation models are estimated by fitting synthetic seismogram envelopes calculated with acoustic radiative transfer theory to observed seismogram envelopes. This theory describes the propagation of seismic S-energy under the assumption of multiple isotropic scattering, the crustal structure of the scattering medium is hereby represented by a half-space model. We present preliminary results of the spatial distribution of intrinsic attenuation represented by the absorption path length, as well as of scattering attenuation in terms of the mean free path and compare the outcomes to results from previous studies. Furthermore catalog magnitudes are compared to moment magnitudes estimated during the inversion process. Additionally site amplification factors of the stations are presented.

  7. Influence of surface roughness on the measurement of acoustic nonlinearity parameter of solids using contact piezoelectric transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Howard, Alexander; Barnard, Daniel

    2017-10-28

    The current article reports on the experimental study of the influence of surface roughness on the measurement of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter. The nonlinearity parameter was measured using contact piezoelectric transducers, which were calibrated using the reciprocity based technique. Aluminum and steel samples were chosen to study the influence of hardness of the sample on the measurement of the nonlinearity parameter. While, lower Ra value (average asperity height) aluminum samples were more susceptible to surface deformation and scratches from coupling the transducer to the sample, the same could not be observed for steel samples. Results demonstrate a large variation in nonlinearity parameter for aluminum (∼35%) compared to steel (∼2%) between two consecutive experiments, suggesting flattening of asperities after the first experiment. Experiments were also performed with 3 different setup configurations; (1) receiver and transmitter on rough sides, (2) receiver on smooth and transmitter on rough side and (3) receiver on rough and transmitter on smooth side. Results show that least variation in the measured nonlinearity parameter was observed when the receiver was placed on the smooth side, and a 10% variation was observed between the three setup configurations. Finally, a comparison of relative nonlinearity parameter calculated using current or voltage ratio and absolute nonlinearity parameter showed large discrepancies. Conclusions were drawn from the experimental observations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of a Straw Phonation Protocol on Acoustic Measures of an SATB Chorus Singing Two Contrasting Renaissance Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manternach, Jeremy N; Clark, Chad; Daugherty, James F

    2017-07-01

    Researchers have found that semi-occluded vocal tract (SOVT) exercises may increase vocal economy by reducing phonation threshold pressure and effort while increasing or maintaining consistent acoustic output. This research has focused solely on individual singers. Much singing instruction, however, takes place in choral settings. Choral singers may use different resonance strategies or unconsciously adjust their singing based on the ability to hear their own sound in relation to others. Results of studies with individual singers, then, may not be directly applicable to choral settings. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effect of an SOVT protocol (ie, straw phonation) on acoustic changes of conglomerate, choral sound. This is a quasi-experimental, one-group, pretest-posttest design. Participants in this study constituted an intact SATB choir (soprano, alto, tenor, and bass) (N = 15 singers) who performed from memory two unaccompanied pieces of varied tempos from memory, participated in a 4-minute straw phonation protocol with a small stirring straw, and then sang each piece a second time. The long-term average spectrum results indicated small, statistically significant increases in spectral energy for both pieces in the 0-10 kHz (.32 and .20 dB Sound Pressure Level) and 2-4 kHz regions (.46 and .25 dB SPL). These results, although not likely audible to average hearing humans, seem consistent with the assertion that singers enjoy vocal benefits with consistent or increased vocal output. SOVT exercises, therefore, may be useful as a time-efficient way to evoke more efficient and economical singing during choral warm-up and voice building procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  10. Acoustic Doppler current profiler raw measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, 2000-2016, Columbia Environmental Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulliner, Edward A.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    Between the years 2000 and 2016, scientists and technicians from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) have collected over 400 field-days worth of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, primarily for the purposes of assessing physical aquatic habitat for the pallid sturgeon. Scientists and technicians collected data using boat-mounted Teledyne Rio Grande ADCPs, which were processed using customized scripting tools and archived in standardized formats. To assess longitudinal variability in depth and velocity distributions along the Missouri River, as well as compare the Missouri River to its unaltered analog, the Yellowstone River, we compiled the collected datasets into a single comma-separated value (csv) file using a series of data-processing scripts written in Python. To allow for the comparison of measurements collected only within a specific window of flow exceedance, we conducted geospatial analyses to attribute each ADCP measurement by a discharge from the most relevant USGS gage location (with the most relevant gage location being the gage located between the same major tributaries as the measurement, even if it was not the closest spatially), and assigned each measurement a flow exceedance percentile based on the relevant gage's record between 2000 and 2016. We also conducted general quality control on the data, discarding any ADCP returns where the ADCP measured a depth-averaged velocity greater than 3 meters per second or a depth greater than 16 meters; these values were considered to be an approximate upper bounds for realistic values on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers. The presented csv file lists individual ADCP bins for all measurements that have been archived between 2000 and 2016 by CERC scientists along with their three-dimensional velocity components, depth-averaged velocity magnitude for a given ADCP return, average channel depth for a given ADCP

  11. Localization of small arms fire using acoustic measurements of muzzle blast and/or ballistic shock wave arrivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kam W; Ferguson, Brian G

    2012-11-01

    The accurate localization of small arms fire using fixed acoustic sensors is considered. First, the conventional wavefront-curvature passive ranging method, which requires only differential time-of-arrival (DTOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave to estimate the source position, is modified to account for sensor positions that are not strictly collinear (bowed array). Second, an existing single-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires both DTOA and differential angle-of-arrival (DAOA) measurements of the muzzle blast wave and ballistic shock wave, is improved by replacing the basic external ballistics model (which describes the bullet's deceleration along its trajectory) with a more rigorous model and replacing the look-up table ranging procedure with a nonlinear (or polynomial) equation-based ranging procedure. Third, a new multiple-sensor-node ballistic model-based localization method, which requires only DTOA measurements of the ballistic shock wave to localize the point of fire, is formulated. The first method is applicable to situations when only the muzzle blast wave is received, whereas the third method applies when only the ballistic shock wave is received. The effectiveness of each of these methods is verified using an extensive set of real data recorded during a 7 day field experiment.

  12. Using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and acoustic radiation force elasticity microscope to measure the spatial distribution of corneal elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Li, Xin; Fan, Zhongwei; Kurtz, Ron; Juhasz, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Corneal biomechanics plays an important role in determining the eye's structural integrity, optical power and the overall quality of vision. It also plays an increasingly recognized role in corneal transplant and refractive surgery, affecting the predictability, quality and stability of final visual outcome [1]. A critical limitation to increasing our understanding of how corneal biomechanics controls corneal stability and refraction is the lack of non-invasive technologies that microscopically measure local biomechanical properties, such as corneal elasticity within the 3D space. Bubble based acoustic radiation force elastic microscopy (ARFEM) introduce the opportunity to measure the inhomogeneous elastic properties of the cornea by the movement of a micron size cavitation bubble generated by a low energy femtosecond laser pulse [2, 3]. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) also known as laser induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) or laser spark spectrometry (LSS) is an atomic emission spectroscopy [4]. The LIBS principle of operation is quite simple, although the physical processes involved in the laser matter interaction are complex and still not completely understood. In one sentence for description, the laser pulses are focused down to a target so as to generate plasma that vaporizes a small amount of material which the emitted spectrum is measured to analysis the elements of the target.

  13. RADIATION ACOUSTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Lyamshev, L.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a new branch of acoustics. Its' fundamentals are lying in the research of acoustical effects due to the interaction of a radiation with matter. The sound excitation in liquids and solids by modulated or pulsed particle beams (electron, proton, ion beams, γ-radiation and single high-energy elementary particles) and some practical applications are discussed.

  14. Measurement of the absorption coefficient of acoustical materials using the sound intensity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Mahabir S.; Crocker, Malcolm J.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the possibility of using the two-microphone sound intensity technique to measure the normal incidence and the random incidence sound absorption coefficient was investigated. The normal incidence absorption coefficient was determined by measuring the intensity incidence on the sample and the intensity reflected by the sample placed in an anechoic chamber. The random incidence absorption coefficient was determined by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the intensity reflected by the sample placed in a reverberation chamber. Absorption coefficient results obtained by the sound intensity technique were compared with standard techniques, namely the reverberation chamber and the standing wave tube. The major advantages of using the sound intensity technique are that it permits 'in situ' measurements and the absorption coefficient for a large range of frequencies can be obtained from a single measurement.

  15. Measuring particle concentration in multiphase pipe flow using acoustic backscatter: generalization of the dual-frequency inversion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Hugh P; Fairweather, Michael; Hunter, Timothy N; Mahmoud, Bashar; Biggs, Simon; Peakall, Jeff

    2014-07-01

    A technique that is an extension of an earlier approach for marine sediments is presented for determining the acoustic attenuation and backscattering coefficients of suspensions of particles of arbitrary materials of general engineering interest. It is necessary to know these coefficients (published values of which exist for quartz sand only) in order to implement an ultrasonic dual-frequency inversion method, in which the backscattered signals received by transducers operating at two frequencies in the megahertz range are used to determine the concentration profile in suspensions of solid particles in a carrier fluid. To demonstrate the application of this dual-frequency method to engineering flows, particle concentration profiles are calculated in turbulent, horizontal pipe flow. The observed trends in the measured attenuation and backscatter coefficients, which are compared to estimates based on the available quartz sand data, and the resulting concentration profiles, demonstrate that this method has potential for measuring the settling and segregation behavior of real suspensions and slurries in a range of applications, such as the nuclear and minerals processing industries, and is able to distinguish between homogeneous, heterogeneous, and bed-forming flow regimes.

  16. Comparison between acoustic measurements of brass instruments and one-dimensional models with curved wavefronts and transformed axial coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduña-Bustamante, Felipe; Rendón, Pablo Luis; Martínez-Montejo, Erika

    2017-10-01

    A progressive spherical or spheroidal wavefront approximation has previously been found to be a necessary step for a more accurate application of Webster's wave equation to rapidly flaring horns. This leads to a necessary transformation of the horn area function, from the usual flat cross-sectional area in terms of the axial coordinate, into a curved cap-like wavefront area as a function of either the axial coordinate, the arc-length coordinate along the horn profile, the leading curved wavefront coordinate, or still other possible longitudinal coordinates. In this article, horn functions, and related frequency potential functions are calculated from the measured horn profiles of a trombone and a trumpet for several of the above parameterizations. From them, cutoff frequencies and effective lengths are determined. A comparison is drawn between theoretical results using different parameterizations, results calculated via transfer-matrix models, and experimental measurements of the acoustical input impedance and reflection function of both instruments. Results indicate that one-dimensional models accurately predict the effective lengths, and consequently the fundamental resonance frequency of the instruments within ±25 cents, but fail noticeably in predicting cutoff frequencies, leading to what is probably an inaccurate representation of perceived timbre.

  17. Thomson-Scattering Measurements of Ion-Acoustic Wave Amplitudes Driven by the Two-Plasmon-Decay Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, R. K.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Hu, S. X.; Yaakobi, B.; Froula, D. H.

    2012-10-01

    Thomson scattering was used to measure enhanced ion-acoustic waves (IAW's) driven by the two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability. The IAW amplitude scales with the 3/2φ emission (a TPD signature). Up to 20 beams with 860-μm-diam laser spots generated by 2-ns-long pulses of 3φ (0.351-μm) light with overlapped intensities up to 4 x 10^14 W/cm^2 were used to produce ˜300-μm density-scale lengths. The IAW amplitudes were measured using 4φ Thomson scattering near 3φ quarter-critical densities. Time-resolved 3/2φ spectroscopy was used to compare the amplitude of 3/2φ emission to the IAW amplitude. QZAKfootnotetext K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 932 (1999).^,footnotetext K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2824 (2000). modeling shows a similar onset threshold and wave amplitude as the experiments. The model suggests that the source of the IAW growth is from the beating of electron-plasma waves, which drive density perturbations through the ponderomotive force. This conclusion is supported by the experimental geometry. This process is shown to be a saturation mechanism for TPD from simulations.footnotetext R. Yan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 175002 (2009). This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  18. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  19. Shear wave velocity measurements using acoustic radiation force impulse in young children with normal kidneys versus hydronephrotic kidneys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, Beom Seok; Kim, Myung Joon; Han, Sang Won; Im, Young Jae; Lee, Mi Jung [Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To measure shear wave velocities (SWVs) by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound elastography in normal kidneys and in hydronephrotic kidneys in young children and to compare SWVs between the hydronephrosis grades. This study was approved by an institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from the parents of all the children included. Children under the age of 24 months were prospectively enrolled. Hydronephrosis grade was evaluated on ultrasonography, and three valid ARFI measurements were attempted using a high-frequency transducer for both kidneys. Hydronephrosis was graded from 0 to 4, and high-grade hydronephrosis was defined as grades 3 and 4. Fifty-one children underwent ARFI measurements, and three valid measurements for both kidneys were obtained in 96% (49/51) of the patients. Nineteen children (38.8%) had no hydronephrosis. Twenty-three children (46.9%) had unilateral hydronephrosis, and seven children (14.3%) had bilateral hydronephrosis. Seven children had ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Median SWVs in kidneys with high-grade hydronephrosis (2.02 m/sec) were higher than those in normal kidneys (1.75 m/sec; P=0.027). However, the presence of UPJO did not influence the median SWVs in hydronephrotic kidneys (P=0.362). Obtaining ARFI measurements of the kidney is feasible in young children with median SWVs of 1.75 m/sec in normal kidneys. Median SWVs increased in high-grade hydronephrotic kidneys but were not different between hydronephrotic kidneys with and without UPJO.

  20. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  1. High Performance Acousto-Optic Arrays based on Fiber Bragg Gratings for Measuring Launch Acoustics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes to prove the feasibility of innovations in acousto-optic sensor development for measurement of launch...

  2. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  3. Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night-Vision Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    insect noise. The second, level II, represented the quietest noise environment likely to be encountered, at least 16 km away from road traffic and...no insect noise. These background levels were taken from Environmental Protection Agency measurements (1971); the level II measurements were made at...recordings (24 bit, 96 kHz) were acquired using Adobe Audition 3.0. The KEMAR and 40-AF microphones were calibrated using a G.R.A.S. 42-AA calibrator

  4. Design of an Acoustic Probe to Measure Otoacoustic Emissions Below 0.5 kHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    of commercial probe systems allow for detailed studies of OAEs emitted between 0.5 and 6-8 kHz. Few studies report OAE measurements below 0.5 kHz. This paper is a preliminary report of an OAE probe aimed at making OAE measurements from 0.03 to 3 kHz. The range 0.5-3 kHz was included to study lower...

  5. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  6. Towards the prediction of cohesive sediments dynamics: developing acoustic and optical measurements via in situ particle visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Rob; Bass, Sarah; Manning, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Cohesive particles in marine and costal waters remain a significant challenge to sediment transport predictions. Given the relevance to water quality, pollution, benthic ecology and coastal engineering our ability to develop process-response models of cohesive sediments is poor. Suspended cohesive particles rarely exist in their primary state but form flocs which are aggregated, heterogeneous assemblages of mineral grains, biogenic debris, bacteria and organic material. Floc formation is thus a function of numerous variables whose inter-related processes are yet to be fully elucidated. This complexity is exacerbated by a lack of suitable data, notably in characterizing floc populations. A floc may constitute over 1 million individual particles and size can range over 4 orders of magnitude within one population. The effective densities are also highly variable, and the settling velocity can therefore span several orders of magnitude (Fennessey et al., 1994; Gibbs, 1985). The challenge is to develop data acquisition techniques that will allow accurate quantification of floc characteristics for the determination of SPM concentration and settling velocities for mass settling flux calculations. Particle size ranges and concentrations are not adequately measurable by physical sampling which break up fragile flocs. Remote methods offer the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of floc particle dynamics. However, the responses of light and sound to floc particles remain uncertain. Differences in derived mass concentrations of flocculated and non-cohesive suspensions occur because OBS measures projected area concentration not mass concentration. Laser interferometry (e.g. LISST) is only applicable in relatively low concentrations, can disturb fragile flocs and requires a smooth size distribution and near-spherical particles (e.g. Wren et al., 2000). Acoustic backscatter methods are limited by a lack of data from floc-dominated environments which has restricted the

  7. Quantifying acoustic doppler current profiler discharge uncertainty: A Monte Carlo based tool for moving-boat measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method using Monte Carlo simulations for assessing uncertainty of moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements using a software tool known as QUant, which was developed for this purpose. Analysis was performed on 10 data sets from four Water Survey of Canada gauging stations in order to evaluate the relative contribution of a range of error sources to the total estimated uncertainty. The factors that differed among data sets included the fraction of unmeasured discharge relative to the total discharge, flow nonuniformity, and operator decisions about instrument programming and measurement cross section. As anticipated, it was found that the estimated uncertainty is dominated by uncertainty of the discharge in the unmeasured areas, highlighting the importance of appropriate selection of the site, the instrument, and the user inputs required to estimate the unmeasured discharge. The main contributor to uncertainty was invalid data, but spatial inhomogeneity in water velocity and bottom-track velocity also contributed, as did variation in the edge velocity, uncertainty in the edge distances, edge coefficients, and the top and bottom extrapolation methods. To a lesser extent, spatial inhomogeneity in the bottom depth also contributed to the total uncertainty, as did uncertainty in the ADCP draft at shallow sites. The estimated uncertainties from QUant can be used to assess the adequacy of standard operating procedures. They also provide quantitative feedback to the ADCP operators about the quality of their measurements, indicating which parameters are contributing most to uncertainty, and perhaps even highlighting ways in which uncertainty can be reduced. Additionally, QUant can be used to account for self-dependent error sources such as heading errors, which are a function of heading. The results demonstrate the importance of a Monte Carlo method tool such as QUant for quantifying random and bias errors when

  8. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  9. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Mueller, David S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks.

  10. A KLM-circuit model of a multi-layer transducer for acoustic bladder volume measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merks, E J W; Borsboom, J M G; Bom, N; van der Steen, A F W; de Jong, N

    2006-12-22

    In a preceding study a new technique to non-invasively measure the bladder volume on the basis of non-linear wave propagation was validated. It was shown that the harmonic level generated at the posterior bladder wall increases for larger bladder volumes. A dedicated transducer is needed to further verify and implement this approach. This transducer must be capable of both transmission of high-pressure waves at fundamental frequency and reception of up to the third harmonic. For this purpose, a multi-layer transducer was constructed using a single element PZT transducer for transmission and a PVDF top-layer for reception. To determine feasibility of the multi-layer concept for bladder volume measurements, and to ensure optimal performance, an equivalent mathematical model on the basis of KLM-circuit modeling was generated. This model was obtained in two subsequent steps. Firstly, the PZT transducer was modeled without PVDF-layer attached by means of matching the model with the measured electrical input impedance. It was validated using pulse-echo measurements. Secondly, the model was extended with the PVDF-layer. The total model was validated by considering the PVDF-layer as a hydrophone on the PZT transducer surface and comparing the measured and simulated PVDF responses on a wave transmitted by the PZT transducer. The obtained results indicated that a valid model for the multi-layer transducer was constructed. The model showed feasibility of the multi-layer concept for bladder volume measurements. It also allowed for further optimization with respect to electrical matching and transmit waveform. Additionally, the model demonstrated the effect of mechanical loading of the PVDF-layer on the PZT transducer.

  11. Application of Acoustic Emission for Measuring of Contact Fatigue of Axial Bearing

    OpenAIRE

    Hort, Filip; Mazal, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some results of an experiment aimed at monitoring of contact fatigue during the axial bearings tests. The needful of AE set-up for measuring of signal and Axmat stand for testing is presented here. The measuring of some kind of bearings required the creation of new clamping elements (Segment and Bearing bush) to the existing key point of Axmat stand. The results in this paper show records in the time domain mainly for counts and events. These events are filtered by maxima...

  12. Statistical relations among architectural features and objective acoustical measurements of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G. W.; Chiang, W.

    1993-01-01

    as for entire rooms. Measurements data from all three teams were used in the models to assess the sensitivity of the models to expect variations in measurements. The results were compared to the previous work of Barron, Gade, and Hook among others. [Work supported by the National Science Foundation and Concert...... properties was developed. Architectural features of interest include both room average values and more-detailed subdivisions of surfaces including shape, volume, height, width, and sound absorption properties of materials. Regression modeling was performed for individual source–receiver paths as well...

  13. Acoustic remote sensing of ocean flows

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.

    Acoustic techniques have become powerful tools for measurement of ocean circulation mainly because of the ability of acoustic signals to travel long distances in water, and the inherently non-invasive nature of measurement. The satellite remote...

  14. The influence of profiled ceilings on sports hall acoustics : Ground effect predictions and scale model measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattez, Y.C.M.; Tenpierik, M.J.; Nijs, L.

    2018-01-01

    Over the last few years, reverberation times and sound pressure levels have been measured in many sports halls. Most of these halls, for instance those made from stony materials, perform as predicted. However, sports halls constructed with profiled perforated steel roof panels have an unexpected

  15. Comparisons between computer simulations of room acoustical parameters and those measured in concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Shiokawa, Hiroyoshi; Christensen, Claus Lynge

    1999-01-01

    is the reverberation time, and this is mainly used to adjust the absorption data of the surfaces in the computer model. But five additional parameters are calculated and compared with measured data as well. In order to determine the sensitivity of the computer model, comparisons are also made between the results...

  16. Measuring fast-temporal sediment fluxes with an analogue acoustic sensor: a wind tunnel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poortinga, A.; Minnen, van J.; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Goossens, D.; Seeger, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    In aeolian research, field measurements are important for studying complex wind-driven processes for land management evaluation and model validation. Consequently, there have been many devices developed, tested, and applied to investigate a range of aeolian-based phenomena. However, determining the

  17. A note on acoustic measurements of turbulence, suspended sediment, and bed forms in mobile bed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the challenges of hydraulic experimentation is designing experiments that are complex enough to capture relevant processes while retaining the simplicity necessary for useful, accurate measurements. The intricacy of the interactions between turbulent flows and mobile beds in rivers and stream...

  18. Study and development of an in situ acoustic absorption measurement method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijs, E.

    2013-01-01

    Sound absorbing materials are used in many applications to attenuate unwanted noise. However, existing measurement methods can only be used on a limited number of material packages and under restricted circumstances. Since PU probes are relatively new, the possibilities they offer for (absorption)

  19. Measurement of sewer sediments with acoustic technology : From laboratory to field experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lepot, M.J.; Pouzol, Tanguy; Aldea Borruel, Xavier; Suner, David; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean Luc

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring sewer sediments is necessary to better understand sedimentation and erosion processes. Sonar is one of the available techniques to proceed to sewer sediment measurements. Extraction of numerical data, implementation of a new algorithm to identify the water-sediment interface,

  20. The effect of interstellar absorption on measurements of the baryon acoustic peak in the Lyman α forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadai, Yishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Baron, Dalya; Nugent, Peter E.; Schlegel, David

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, the autocorrelation of the hydrogen Lyman α forest has been used to observe the baryon acoustic peak at redshift 2 stacking over a million spectra of galaxies and QSOs. We find that the systematics introduced are too small to affect the current accuracy of the baryon acoustic peak, but might be relevant to future surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We outline a method to account for this with future data sets.

  1. High Fidelity Measurement and Modeling of Interactions between Acoustics and Heat Release in Highly-Compact, High-Pressure Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    systematic and rigorous means for comparison. Introduction The issue of combustion instability is a common recurring problem for bi- propellant rocket...the combustion of propellants to the acoustic energy field is the primary mechanism that creates acoustically coupled combustion instability. Chamber...T. and Sattelmayer, T., “On the Use of OH Radiation as a Marker for the Heat Release Rate in High- Pressure Hydrogen-Oxygen Liquid Rocket Combustion

  2. Physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size using multi-frequency arrays of acoustic-doppler profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.; Griffiths, Ronald; Dean, David

    2014-01-01

    As the result of a 12-year program of sediment-transport research and field testing on the Colorado River (6 stations in UT and AZ), Yampa River (2 stations in CO), Little Snake River (1 station in CO), Green River (1 station in CO and 2 stations in UT), and Rio Grande (2 stations in TX), we have developed a physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size at 15-minute intervals using multifrequency arrays of acoustic-Doppler profilers. This multi-frequency method is able to achieve much higher accuracies than single-frequency acoustic methods because it allows removal of the influence of changes in grain size on acoustic backscatter. The method proceeds as follows. (1) Acoustic attenuation at each frequency is related to the concentration of silt and clay with a known grain-size distribution in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (2) The combination of acoustic backscatter and attenuation at each frequency is uniquely related to the concentration of sand (with a known reference grain-size distribution) and the concentration of silt and clay (with a known reference grain-size distribution) in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (3) Comparison of the suspended-sand concentrations measured at each frequency using this approach then allows theory-based calculation of the median grain size of the suspended sand and final correction of the suspended-sand concentration to compensate for the influence of changing grain size on backscatter. Although this method of measuring suspended-sediment concentration is somewhat less accurate than using conventional samplers in either the EDI or EWI methods, it is much more accurate than estimating suspended-sediment concentrations using calibrated pump measurements or single-frequency acoustics. Though the EDI and EWI methods provide the most accurate measurements of suspended-sediment concentration, these measurements are labor-intensive, expensive, and

  3. Spatial variation of deep diving odontocetes' occurrence around a canyon region in the Ligurian Sea as measured with acoustic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorli, Giacomo; Neuheimer, Anna; Au, Whitlow

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the distribution of animals is of paramount importance for management and conservation, especially for species that are impacted by anthropogenic threats. In the case of marine mammals there has been a growing concern about the impact of human-made noise, in particular for beaked whales and other deep diving odontocetes. Foraging (measured via echolocation clicks at depth) was studied for Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris), sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) and Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) using three passive acoustics recorders moored to the bottom of the ocean in a canyon area in the Ligurian Sea between July and December 2011. A Generalized Linear Model was used to test whether foraging was influenced by location and day of the year, including the possibility of interactions between predictors. Contrary to previous studies conducted by visual surveys in this area, all species were detected at all locations, suggesting habitat overlapping. However, significant differences were found in the occurrence of each species at different locations. Beaked and sperm whales foraged significantly more in the northern and western locations, while long-finned pilot whales and Risso's dolphins hunted more in the northern and eastern location.

  4. Effective Use of Molecular Recognition in Gas Sensing: Results from Acoustic Wave and In-Situ FTIR Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenhofer, K,; Gopel, W.; Hierlemann, A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-12-09

    To probe directly the analyte/film interactions that characterize molecular recognition in gas sensors, we recorded changes to the in-situ surface vibrational spectra of specifically fictionalized surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices concurrently with analyte exposure and SAW measurement of the extent of sorption. Fourier-lmnsform infrared external- reflectance spectra (FTIR-ERS) were collected from operating 97-MH2 SAW delay lines during exposure to a range of analytes as they interacted with thin-film coatings previously shown to be selective: cyclodextrins for chiral recognition, Ni-camphorates for Lewis bases such as pyridine and organophosphonates, and phthalocyanines for aromatic compounds. In most cases where specific chemical interactions-metal coordination, "cage" compound inclusion, or z stacking-were expected, analyte dosing caused distinctive changes in the IR spectr~ together with anomalously large SAW sensor responses. In contrast, control experiments involving the physisorption of the same analytes by conventional organic polymers did not cause similar changes in the IR spectra, and the SAW responses were smaller. For a given conventional polymer, the partition coefficients (or SAW sensor signals) roughly followed the analyte fraction of saturation vapor pressure. These SAW/FTIR results support earlier conclusions derived from thickness-shear mode resonator data.

  5. A comparison of acoustic cavitation detection thresholds measured with piezo-electric and fiber-optic hydrophone sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Victoria; Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Ter Haar, Gail

    2013-12-01

    A Fabry-Perot interferometer fiber-optic hydrophone (FOH) was investigated for use as an acoustic cavitation detector and compared with a piezo-ceramic passive cavitation detector (PCD). Both detectors were used to measure negative pressure thresholds for broadband emissions in 3% agar and ex vivo bovine liver simultaneously. FOH-detected half- and fourth-harmonic emissions were also studied. Three thresholds were defined and investigated: (i) onset of cavitation; (ii) 100% probability of cavitation; and (iii) a time-integrated threshold where broadband signals integrated over a 3-s exposure duration, averaged over 5-10 repeat exposures, become statistically significantly greater than noise. The statistical sensitiviy of FOH broadband detection was low compared with that of the PCD (0.43/0.31 in agar/liver). FOH-detected fourth-harmonic data agreed best with PCD broadband (sensitivity: 0.95/0.94, specificity: 0.89/0.76 in agar/liver). The FOH has potential as a cavitation detector, particularly in applications where space is limited or during magnetic resonance-guided studies. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acoustical Measurement and Biot Model for Coral Reef Detection and Quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Henry M. Manik

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs are coastal resources and very useful for marine ecosystems. Nowadays, the existence of coral reefs is seriously threatened due to the activities of blast fishing, coral mining, marine sedimentation, pollution, and global climate change. To determine the existence of coral reefs, it is necessary to study them comprehensively. One method to study a coral reef by using a propagation of sound waves is proposed. In this research, the measurement of reflection coefficient, transmission...

  7. High resolution acoustic measurement system and beam pattern reconstruction method for bat echolocation emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Jason E; Kloepper, Laura N; Warnecke, Michaela; Simmons, James A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the transmit beam patterns emitted by echolocating bats have previously been limited to cross-sectional planes or averaged over multiple signals using sparse microphone arrays. To date, no high-resolution measurements of individual bat transmit beams have been reported in the literature. Recent studies indicate that bats may change the time-frequency structure of their calls depending on the task, and suggest that their beam patterns are more dynamic than previously thought. To investigate beam pattern dynamics in a variety of bat species, a high-density reconfigurable microphone array was designed and constructed using low-cost ultrasonic microphones and custom electronic circuitry. The planar array is 1.83 m wide by 1.42 m tall with microphones positioned on a 2.54 cm square grid. The system can capture up to 228 channels simultaneously at a 500 kHz sampling rate. Beam patterns are reconstructed in azimuth, elevation, and frequency for visualization and further analysis. Validation of the array measurement system and post-processing functions is shown by reconstructing the beam pattern of a transducer with a fixed circular aperture and comparing the result with a theoretical model. To demonstrate the system in use, transmit beam patterns of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, are shown.

  8. Short-Term Behavioural Responses of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus Exposed to the Toxic Alga Alexandrium minutum Measured by Accelerometry and Passive Acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquereau, Laura; Jolivet, Aurélie; Hégaret, Hélène; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms produced by toxic dinoflagellates have increased worldwide, impacting human health, the environment, and fisheries. Due to their potential sensitivity (e.g., environmental changes), bivalves through their valve movements can be monitored to detect harmful algal blooms. Methods that measure valve activity require bivalve-attached sensors and usually connected cables to data transfers, leading to stress animals and limit the use to sessile species. As a non-intrusive and continuously deployable tool, passive acoustics could be an effective approach to detecting harmful algal blooms in real time based on animal sound production. This study aimed to detect reaction changes in the valve movements of adult Pecten maximus exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum using both accelerometry and passive acoustic methods. Scallops were experimentally exposed to three ecologically relevant concentrations of A. minutum for 2 hours. The number of each type of valve movement and their sound intensity, opening duration, and valve-opening amplitude were measured. Four behaviours were identified: closures, expulsion, displacement, and swimming. The response of P. maximus to A. minutum occurred rapidly at a high concentration. The valve activity of P. maximus was different when exposed to high concentrations (500 000 cells L-1) of A. minutum compared to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra; the number of valve movements increased, especially closure and expulsion, which were detected acoustically. Thus, this study demonstrates the potential for acoustics and sound production changes in the detection of harmful algal blooms. However, field trials and longer duration experiments are required to provide further evidence for the use of acoustics as a monitoring tool in the natural environment where several factors may interfere with valve behaviours.

  9. Short-Term Behavioural Responses of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus Exposed to the Toxic Alga Alexandrium minutum Measured by Accelerometry and Passive Acoustics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Coquereau

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms produced by toxic dinoflagellates have increased worldwide, impacting human health, the environment, and fisheries. Due to their potential sensitivity (e.g., environmental changes, bivalves through their valve movements can be monitored to detect harmful algal blooms. Methods that measure valve activity require bivalve-attached sensors and usually connected cables to data transfers, leading to stress animals and limit the use to sessile species. As a non-intrusive and continuously deployable tool, passive acoustics could be an effective approach to detecting harmful algal blooms in real time based on animal sound production. This study aimed to detect reaction changes in the valve movements of adult Pecten maximus exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum using both accelerometry and passive acoustic methods. Scallops were experimentally exposed to three ecologically relevant concentrations of A. minutum for 2 hours. The number of each type of valve movement and their sound intensity, opening duration, and valve-opening amplitude were measured. Four behaviours were identified: closures, expulsion, displacement, and swimming. The response of P. maximus to A. minutum occurred rapidly at a high concentration. The valve activity of P. maximus was different when exposed to high concentrations (500 000 cells L-1 of A. minutum compared to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra; the number of valve movements increased, especially closure and expulsion, which were detected acoustically. Thus, this study demonstrates the potential for acoustics and sound production changes in the detection of harmful algal blooms. However, field trials and longer duration experiments are required to provide further evidence for the use of acoustics as a monitoring tool in the natural environment where several factors may interfere with valve behaviours.

  10. In-Situ Acoustic Measurements of Temperature Profile in Extreme Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliar, Mikhail [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-03-31

    A gasifier’s temperature is the primary characteristic that must be monitored to ensure its performance and the longevity of its refractory. One of the key technological challenges impacting the reliability and economics of coal and biomass gasification is the lack of temperature sensors that are capable of providing accurate, reliable, and long-life performance in an extreme gasification environment. This research has proposed, demonstrated, and validated a novel approach that uses a noninvasive ultrasound method that provides real-time temperature distribution monitoring across the refractory, especially the hot face temperature of the refractory. The essential idea of the ultrasound measurements of segmental temperature distribution is to use an ultrasound propagation waveguide across a refractory that has been engineered to contain multiple internal partial reflectors at known locations. When an ultrasound excitation pulse is introduced on the cold side of the refractory, it will be partially reflected from each scatterer in the US propagation path in the refractory wall and returned to the receiver as a train of partial echoes. The temperature in the corresponding segment can be determined based on recorded ultrasonic waveform and experimentally defined relationship between the speed of sound and temperature. The ultrasound measurement method offers a powerful solution to provide continuous real time temperature monitoring for the occasions that conventional thermal, optical and other sensors are infeasible, such as the impossibility of insertion of temperature sensor, harsh environment, unavailable optical path, and more. Our developed ultrasound system consists of an ultrasound engineered waveguide, ultrasound transducer/receiver, and data acquisition, logging, interpretation, and online display system, which is simple to install on the existing units with minimal modification on the gasifier or use with new units. This system has been successfully tested

  11. Pavement type and wear condition classification from tire cavity acoustic measurements with artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masino, Johannes; Foitzik, Michael-Jan; Frey, Michael; Gauterin, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Tire road noise is the major contributor to traffic noise, which leads to general annoyance, speech interference, and sleep disturbances. Standardized methods to measure tire road noise are expensive, sophisticated to use, and they cannot be applied comprehensively. This paper presents a method to automatically classify different types of pavement and the wear condition to identify noisy road surfaces. The methods are based on spectra of time series data of the tire cavity sound, acquired under normal vehicle operation. The classifier, an artificial neural network, correctly predicts three pavement types, whereas there are few bidirectional mis-classifications for two pavements, which have similar physical characteristics. The performance measures of the classifier to predict a new or worn out condition are over 94.6%. One could create a digital map with the output of the presented method. On the basis of these digital maps, road segments with a strong impact on tire road noise could be automatically identified. Furthermore, the method can estimate the road macro-texture, which has an impact on the tire road friction especially on wet conditions. Overall, this digital map would have a great benefit for civil engineering departments, road infrastructure operators, and for advanced driver assistance systems.

  12. Distributed measurement of acoustic vibration location with frequency multiplexed phase-OTDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Daisuke; Toge, Kunihiro; Manabe, Tetsuya

    2017-07-01

    All-fiber distributed vibration sensing is attracting attention in relation to structural health monitoring because it is cost effective, offers high coverage of the monitored area and can detect various structural problems. And in particular the demand for high-speed vibration sensing operating at more than 10 kHz has increased because high frequency vibration indicates high energy and severe trouble in the monitored object. Optical fiber vibration sensing with phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (phase-OTDR) has long been studied because it can be used for distributed vibration sensing in optical fiber. However, pulse reflectometry such as OTDR cannot measure high-frequency vibration whose cycle is shorter than the repetition time of the OTDR. That is, the maximum detectable frequency depends on fiber length. In this paper, we describe a vibration sensing technique with frequency-multiplexed OTDR that can detect the entire distribution of a high-frequency vibration thus allowing us to locate a high-speed vibration point. We can measure the position, frequency and dynamic change of a high-frequency vibration whose cycle is shorter than the repetition time. Both frequency and position are visualized simultaneously for a 5-km fiber with an 80-kHz frequency response and a 20-m spatial resolution.

  13. Application of holography in jet acoustic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Source strength distribution on a jet boundary was obtained from measurements using the principle of acoustic holography. Measurements were conducted in an open field. Measurement of acoustic pressure on a cylindrical twodimensional contour located close to the vibrating jet boundary was used to obtain the acoustic ...

  14. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  15. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos, E-mail: triantafillos.koukoulas@npl.co.uk; Piper, Ben [Acoustics Group, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  16. Measurement of baryon acoustic oscillation correlations at z = 2.3 with SDSS DR12 Lyα-Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Julian E.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Guy, Julien; Rich, James; Blomqvist, Michael; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Pieri, Matthew M.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Bailey, Stephen; Delubac, Timothée; Kirkby, David; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Margala, Daniel; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinberg, David H.; Yèche, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    We have used flux-transmission correlations in Lyα forests to measure the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The study uses spectra of 157 783 quasars in the redshift range 2.1 ≤ z ≤ 3.5 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 12 (DR12). Besides the statistical improvements on our previous studies using SDSS DR9 and DR11, we have implemented numerous improvements in the analysis procedure, allowing us to construct a physical model of the correlation function and to investigate potential systematic errors in the determination of the BAO peak position. The Hubble distance, DH = c/H(z), relative to the sound horizon is DH(z = 2.33) /rd = 9.07 ± 0.31. The best-determined combination of comoving angular-diameter distance, DM, and the Hubble distance is found to be DH0.7DM0.3 /rd = 13.94 ± 0.35. This value is 1.028 ± 0.026 times the prediction of the flat-ΛCDM model consistent with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy spectrum. The errors include marginalization over the effects of unidentified high-density absorption systems and fluctuations in ultraviolet ionizing radiation. Independently of the CMB measurements, the combination of our results and other BAO observations determine the open-ΛCDM density parameters to be ΩM = 0.296 ± 0.029, ΩΛ = 0.699 ± 0.100 and Ωk = -0.002 ± 0.119.

  17. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  18. Report on acoustic and vibration measurements on 250 MVA transformer at St. Vital Station, Winnipeg, Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, K. [QuietPower Systems, Inc., New York, NE (United States); McLoughlin, M. [Noise Cancellation Technologies, Inc., Linthicum, MD (United States); Schott, R. [Western Canada Testing, Inc., Portage Laprairie, MB (Canada); Tennese, G. [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Daneryd, A. [SECRC ABB Corporate Research, Vasteras (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    Vibroacoustic behaviour of a power transformer was characterized prior to employing active noise control (ANC) to control transformer noise. The effect of changes in temperature and loading conditions on the vibration pattern of the transformer tank received particular attention. The transformer quieting technology has been developed and implemented by QuietPower Systems of New York and Noise Cancellation Technologies Inc., of Maryland. Results of the study will be used to ensure that actuator placement is appropriate for each of the seasons experienced throughout the year, as well as to build boundary element and finite element models of the tank vibration and the associated radiated noise. Boundary element results show that the first four harmonics are the primary contributors to radiated noise. The finite element model used to examine the modal response of the tank structure showed high modal densities, even around the lower order harmonics (120 Hz). This can be interpreted to mean that statistical techniques normally associated with high frequency noise problems may be applicable here because of the high modal density. Results of the completed summer and winter measurements permit an evaluation of the effects of loading conditions, temperature and other environmental factors on transformer noise. Appendix B contains the results of numerical simulations on a 250 MVA transformer. 3 refs., 72 figs., 2 appendices.

  19. Speech task effects on acoustic measure of fundamental frequency in Cantonese-speaking children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Estella P-M; Lam, Nina L-N

    2015-12-01

    Speaking fundamental frequency (F0) is a voice measure frequently used to document changes in vocal performance over time. Knowing the intra-subject variability of speaking F0 has implications on its clinical usefulness. The present study examined the speaking F0 elicited from three speech tasks in Cantonese-speaking children. The study also compared the variability of speaking F0 elicited from different speech tasks. Fifty-six vocally healthy Cantonese-speaking children (31 boys and 25 girls) aged between 7.0 and 10.11 years participated. For each child, speaking F0 was elicited using speech tasks at three linguistic levels (sustained vowel /a/ prolongation, reading aloud a sentence and passage). Two types of variability, within-session (trial-to-trial) and across-session (test-retest) variability, were compared across speech tasks. Significant differences in mean speaking F0 values were found between speech tasks. Mean speaking F0 value elicited from sustained vowel phonations was significantly higher than those elicited from the connected speech tasks. The variability of speaking F0 was higher in sustained vowel prolongation than that in connected speech. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acoustic field of an ultrasonic cavity resonator with two open ends: Experimental measurements and lattice Boltzmann method modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Feng; Tu, Juan; Cheng, Jianchun; Zhang, Dong; Li, Faqi; Wang, Zhibiao

    2017-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has become an attractive therapeutic tool for noninvasive tumor treatment. The key component of HIFU systems is the acoustic transducer, which generates a focal region of high-intensity focused ultrasonic energy. A key determinant of safety in HIFU treatment is the size of the focal region. To achieve subwavelength focusing, we previously investigated the feasibility of an ultrasonic spherical cavity resonator (USCR) with two open ends. To further investigate the properties of the USCR, experiments and simulations were performed to comprehensively characterize the acoustic field generated. The emphasis was on the field formation process, the pressure distribution, the frequency dependence, and the acoustic nonlinearity. As a novel simulation approach, an axisymmetric isothermal multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) model was used to numerically analyze the acoustic field. The reliability of this model was verified by comparing the results generated with those from experiments. The MRT-LBM model gave new insight into conventional acoustic numerical simulations and provided significant indications for USCR parameter optimization. The USCR demonstrated its feasibility for application in HIFU treatment or in other fields that demand high-precision focusing.

  1. Separation of Main and Tail Rotor Noise Sources from Ground-Based Acoustic Measurements Using Time-Domain De-Dopplerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of separating the contributions of helicopter main and tail rotor noise sources is presented, making use of ground-based acoustic measurements. The method employs time-domain de-Dopplerization to transform the acoustic pressure time-history data collected from an array of ground-based microphones to the equivalent time-history signals observed by an array of virtual inflight microphones traveling with the helicopter. The now-stationary signals observed by the virtual microphones are then periodically averaged with the main and tail rotor once per revolution triggers. The averaging process suppresses noise which is not periodic with the respective rotor, allowing for the separation of main and tail rotor pressure time-histories. The averaged measurements are then interpolated across the range of directivity angles captured by the microphone array in order to generate separate acoustic hemispheres for the main and tail rotor noise sources. The new method is successfully applied to ground-based microphone measurements of a Bell 206B3 helicopter and demonstrates the strong directivity characteristics of harmonic noise radiation from both the main and tail rotors of that helicopter.

  2. An Excised Canine Model of Anterior Glottic Web and Its Acoustic, Aerodynamic, and High-speed Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao; Pulvermacher, Allyson; Calawerts, William; Devine, Erin; Jiang, Jack

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to build an excised anterior glottic web (AGW) model and study the basic voice-related mechanisms of the AGW through investigating the acoustic, aerodynamic, and vibratory properties. Overall, four conditions were tested for each of the eight canine larynges used. At baseline, 10%, 20%, and 33% occlusion (as determined by the placement of the suture), acoustic, aerodynamic, and high-speed video data were collected while each larynx was phonated in a soundproof booth. The phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and the phonation threshold flow significantly increased as percent occlusion increased (P aerodynamic, acoustic, and high-speed video analysis in our study. We observed and investigated the glottic web movement, which may be a new explanation for the pathologic voice-related mechanism of AGW. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bayesian three-dimensional reconstruction of toothed whale trajectories: passive acoustics assisted with visual and tagging measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplanche, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The author describes and evaluates a Bayesian method to reconstruct three-dimensional toothed whale trajectories from a series of echolocation signals. Localization by using passive acoustic data (time of arrival of source signals at receptors) is assisted by using visual data (coordinates of the whale when diving and resurfacing) and tag information (movement statistics). The efficiency of the Bayesian method is compared to the standard minimum mean squared error statistical approach by comparing the reconstruction results of 48 simulated sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) trajectories. The use of the advanced Bayesian method reduces bias (standard deviation) with respect to the standard method up to a factor of 8.9 (13.6). The author provides open-source software which is functional with acoustic data which would be collected in the field from any three-dimensional receptor array design. This approach renews passive acoustics as a valuable tool to study the underwater behavior of toothed whales.

  4. Use of acoustic wave travel-time measurements to probe the near-surface layers of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, S. M.; Osaki, Y.; Shibahashi, H.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.; Pomerantz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The variation of solar p-mode travel times with cyclic frequency nu is shown to provide information on both the radial variation of the acoustic potential and the depth of the effective source of the oscillations. Observed travel-time data for waves with frequency lower than the acoustic cutoff frequency for the solar atmosphere (approximately equals 5.5 mHz) are inverted to yield the local acoustic cutoff frequency nu(sub c) as a function of depth in the outer convection zone and lower atmosphere of the Sun. The data for waves with nu greater than 5.5 mHz are used to show that the source of the p-mode oscillations lies approximately 100 km beneath the base of the photosphere. This depth is deeper than that determined using a standard mixing-length calculation.

  5. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  6. The Effects of Three Physical and Vocal Warm-Up Procedures on Acoustic and Perceptual Measures of Choral Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Cunningham, Sheri L; Grady, Melissa L

    2017-05-05

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of three warm-up procedures (vocal-only, physical-only, physical/vocal combination) on acoustic and perceptual measures of choir sound. The researchers tested three videotaped, 5-minute, choral warm-up procedures on three university choirs. After participating in a warm-up procedure, each choir was recorded singing a folk song for long-term average spectra and pitch analysis. Singer participants responded to a questionnaire about preferences after each warm-up procedure. Warm-up procedures and recording sessions occurred during each choir's regular rehearsal time and in each choir's regular rehearsal space during three consecutive rehearsals. Long-term average spectra results demonstrated more resonant singing after the physical/vocal warm-up for two of the three choirs. Pitch analysis results indicate that all three choirs sang "in-tune" or with the least pitch deviation after participating in the physical/vocal warm-up. Singer questionnaire responses showed general preference for the physical/vocal combination warm-up, and singer ranking of the three procedures indicated the physical/vocal warm-up as the most favored for readiness to sing. In the context of this study with these three university choir participants, it seems that a combination choral warm-up that includes physical and vocal aspects is preferred by singers, enables more resonant singing, and more in-tune singing. Findings from this study could provide teachers and choral directors with important information as they structure and experiment with their choral warm-up procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  8. Nonlinear Acoustic Characterization of Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    lack of advanced measurement equipment such as piezoelectric microphones and transducers, nonlinear ul- trasonic acoustics has mostly remained a...the poor coupling between solids and air, and could be more easily measured with equipment such as a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). Acoustic

  9. Musical Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  10. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... chapters represent review articles covering the most relevant areas of the field. They are written with the goal of providing students with comprehensive introductions. Further they offer a supply of numerous references to the relevant literature. Besides its usefulness as a textbook, this will make...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as...

  11. Misure in laboratorio di acustica edilizia a bassa frequenza: un approccio modale - Laboratory measurements of building acoustics at low frequency: a modal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Prato

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nei tipici ambienti ordinari e di laboratorio (40-80 m3 e a bassa frequenza (50-100 Hz, il campo acustico risulta non diffuso a causa della presenza dei modi. In tali condizioni, le misure classiche di acustica edilizia (isolamento acustico per via aerea e da impatto, tempi di riverbera-zione sono inadeguate per caratterizzare correttamente le proprietà acustiche di partizioni, si-stemi di pavimentazioni e spazi chiusi. L’approccio modale permette di valutare tali proprietà studiando il comportamento dei modi. Sulla base di ciò, appropriate procedure di misura e nuovi descrittori sono proposti e discussi in modo da fornire possibili soluzioni per tali problematiche. ------ In typical laboratory and ordinary rooms (40-80 m3 and at low frequencies (50-100 Hz, the acoustic field is non-diffuse due to the presence of room modes. Under such conditions, standard building acoustics measurements (airborne and impact sound insulation, reverberation time and descriptors are not adequate to correctly characterize the acoustic property of partitions, flooring systems and rooms. The modal approach allows to evaluate such properties by studying the behavior of modes. On the basis of this, proper measurement procedures and new descriptors are proposed and discussed in order to provide possible solutions for such issues.

  12. Noise reduction in acoustic measurements with a particle velocity sensor by means of a cross-correlation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Honschoten, J.W.; Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Kuipers, Hendrik; Raangs, R.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    In this paper a method is presented to reduce the noise level of a particle velocity sensor, a thermal two-wire sensor sensitive to acoustic particle velocities, which yields a reduction of the noise of 30 dB. The method is based on utilisation of cross- instead of auto-correlation spectra of two of

  13. Quantitative measurements of acoustical beats by means of the 'improper' use of sound card software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganci, S [Museo di Fisica e Meteo-sismologia ' G Sanguineti-G Leonardini' , Piazza N S dell' Orto, 8, 16043 Chiavari (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    Low-cost experiments on acoustical beats are carried out on a personal computer using standard software for a sound card in a non-canonical way, which provides a useful teaching method for a traditional classroom experiment. (letters and comments)

  14. Measuring Relative Motions Across a Fault Using Seafloor Transponders Installed at Close Range to each Other Based on Differential GPS/Acoustic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, M.; Ashi, J.; Tsuji, T.; Tomita, F.

    2016-12-01

    Seafloor geodesy based on acoustic ranging technique is getting popular means to reveal crustal deformation beneath the ocean. GPS/acoustic technique can be applied to monitoring regional deformation or absolute position, while direct-path acoustic ranging can be applied to detecting localized strain or relative motion in a short distance ( 1-10 km). However the latter observation sometimes fails to keep the clearance of an acoustic path between the seafloor transponders because of topographic obstacle or of downward bending nature of the path due to vertical gradient of sound speed in deep-ocean. Especially at steep fault scarp, it is almost impossible to keep direct path between the top and bottom of the fault scarp. Even in such a situation, acoustic path to the sea surface might be always clear. Then we propose a new approach to monitor the relative motion of across a fault scarp using "differential" GPS/acoustic measurement, which account only for traveltime differences among the transponders. The advantages of this method are that: (1) uncertainty in sound speed in shallow water is almost canceled; (2) possible GPS error is also canceled; (3) picking error in traveltime detection is almost canceled; (4) only a pair of transponders can fully describe relative 3-dimensional motion. On the other hand the disadvantages are that: (5) data is not continuous but only campaign; (6) most advantages are only effective only for very short baseline (< 100-300 m). Our target being applied this method is a steep fault scarp near the Japan trench, which is expected as a surface expression of back thrust, in where time scale of fault activity is still controversial especially after the Tohoku earthquake. We have carefully installed three transponders across this scarp using a NSS system, which can remotely navigate instrument near the seafloor from a mother vessel based on video camera image. Baseline lengths among the transponders are 200-300 m at 3500 m depth. Initial

  15. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  16. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  17. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  18. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  19. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in June 1969 at Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. Since then, more than 10,000 acoustic neuroma ... of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and a nursing staff. Specialists in neuroimaging join the team when ...

  20. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  1. Studying materials using acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfel, R. E.

    1988-03-01

    This final report summarizes the activity of the contractor in meeting the objectives of the contract. A comprehensive bibliography and list of participants on the contract work are included along with a discussion including: microcavitation, microparticle characterization, interfacial characterization using acoustic levitation, measurements of the acoustic nonlinear parameter for determining the composition of mixtures.

  2. Theory of acoustic measurement of internal wave strength as a function of depth, horizontal position, and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatté, Stanley M.; Stoughton, Roland B.

    1986-06-01

    High-frequency (≳ 1 cpd) variations in travel time of acoustic transmissions over ocean mesoscale distances are known to be dominated by the effects of internal wave displacements of the sound speed stratification (Flatté et al., 1979; Flatté, 1983a). Variations in the difference in travel time between transmissions in opposite directions along the same path (reciprocal transmissions) are dominated by internal wave currents [Munk et al., 1981]. We investigate the usefulness of a two-mooring acoustic system for determining the statistical variances of internal wave displacements and currents as a function of depth, geographical position, and time. We find that Statistical fluctuations in the internal wave field itself prevent recovery of range-dependent information between the two moorings. However, range-averaged information can be obtained about mean energy level and about vertical energy migration. We find that uncertainties in the buoyancy and sound speed profiles do not significantly affect the usefulness of the method.

  3. Bias in mean velocities and noise in variances and covariances measured using a multistatic acoustic profiler: the Nortek Vectrino Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. E.; Schindfessel, L.; McLelland, S. J.; Creëlle, S.; De Mulder, T.

    2017-07-01

    This paper compiles the technical characteristics and operating principles of the Nortek Vectrino Profiler and reviews previously reported user experiences. A series of experiments are then presented that investigate instrument behaviour and performance, with a particular focus on variations within the profile. First, controlled tests investigate the sensitivity of acoustic amplitude (and Signal-to-Noise Ratio, SNR) and pulse-to-pulse correlation coefficient, R 2, to seeding concentration and cell geometry. Second, a novel methodology that systematically shifts profiling cells through a single absolute vertical position investigates the sensitivity of mean velocities, SNR and noise to: (a) emitted sound intensity and the presence (or absence) of acoustic seeding; and (b) varying flow rates under ideal acoustic seeding conditions. A new solution is derived to quantify the noise affecting the two perpendicular tristatic systems of the Vectrino Profiler and its contribution to components of the Reynolds stress tensor. Results suggest that for the Vectrino Profiler: 1. optimum acoustic seeding concentrations are ~3000 to 6000 mg L-1 2. mean velocity magnitudes are biased by variable amounts in proximal cells but are consistently underestimated in distal cells; 3. noise varies parabolically with a minimum around the ‘sweet spot’, 50 mm below the transceiver; 4. the receiver beams only intersect at the sweet spot and diverge nearer to and further from the transceiver. This divergence significantly reduces the size of the sampled area away from the sweet spot, reducing data quality; 5. the most reliable velocity data will normally be collected in the region between approximately 43 and 61 mm below the transceiver.

  4. Location of an acoustic window in dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y

    1990-01-15

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to sound clicks from sources in different positions were recorded in dolphins Inia geoffrensis. The position of the acoustic window was determined by measurement of acoustic delays. The acoustic window was found to lie close to the auditory meatus and the bulla rather than on the lower jaw.

  5. Acoustical simulation based on head-tracked auralization and measured high-resolution head related transfer function (HRTF) and impulse responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Wolfgang; Feistel, Stefan; Moldrzyk, Christoph

    2004-10-01

    A very desirable feature of modern acoustical simulation programs is the easy, fast and reliable auralization of the prediction results. In this paper we consider a new auralization method, based on a head-tracked headphone system with high spatial resolution and real-time convolution. We discuss the way to measure the directional head-related transfer functions, the calculation of the directional binaural impulse responses and the realization as a real-time convolution software. Furthermore, high-resolution impulse responses have been measured to compare reality, measurement and prediction results of an example room. The measurements were performed with a newly developed software tool EASERA. We conclude that, using this new method, auralization results are obtained equivalent to the human perception in reality.

  6. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser

  8. [Acoustic characteristics of classrooms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszarny, Zbigniew; Chyla, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Quality and usefulness of school rooms for transmission of verbal information depends on the two basic parameters: form and quantity of the reverberation time, and profitable line measurements of school rooms from the acoustic point of view. An analysis of the above-mentioned parameters in 48 class rooms and two gymnasiums in schools, which were built in different periods, shows that the most important problem is connected with too long reverberation time and inappropriate acoustic proportions. In schools built in the 1970s, the length of reverberation time is mostly within a low frequency band, while in schools built contemporarily, the maximum length of disappearance time takes place in a quite wide band of 250-2000 Hz. This exceeds optimal values for that kind of rooms at least twice, and five times in the newly built school. A long reverberation time is connected with a low acoustic absorption of school rooms. Moreover, school rooms are characterised by inappropriate acoustic proportions. The classrooms, in their relation to the height, are too long and too wide. It is connected with deterioration of the transmission of verbal information. The data show that this transmission is unequal. Automatically, it leads to a speech disturbance and difficulties with understanding. There is the need for adaptation of school rooms through increase of an acoustic absorption.

  9. The Microflown, an acoustic particle velocity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bree, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    The Microflown is an acoustic sensor directly measuring particle velocity instead of sound pressure, which is usually measured by conventional microphones. Since its invention in 1994 it is mostly used for measurement purposes (broadband1D and 3D-sound intensity measurement and acoustic impedance).

  10. Acoustic microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    For many years 'Acoustic Microscopy' has been the definitive book on the subject. A key development since it was first published has been the development of ultrasonic force microscopy. This edition has a major new chapter on this technique and its applications.

  11. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements of steel and ice impacts on concrete for acoustic interrogation of delaminations in bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeo, Brian A.; Patil, Anjali N.; Klis, Jeffrey M.; Hurd, Randy C.; Truscott, Tadd T.; Guthrie, W. Spencer

    2014-02-01

    Delaminations in bridge decks typically result from corrosion of the top mat of reinforcing steel, which leads to a localized separation of the concrete cover from the underlying concrete. Because delaminations cannot be detected using visual inspection, rapid, large-area interrogation methods are desired to characterize bridge decks without disruption to traffic, without the subjectivity inherent in existing methods, and with increased inspector safety. To this end, disposable impactors such as water droplets or ice chips can be dropped using automatic dispensers onto concrete surfaces to excite mechanical vibrations while acoustic responses can be recorded using air-coupled microphones. In this work, numerical simulations are used to characterize the flexural response of a model concrete bridge deck subject to both steel and ice impactors, and the results are compared with similar experiments performed in the laboratory on a partially delaminated concrete bridge deck slab. The simulations offer greater understanding of the kinetics of impacts and the responses of materials.

  12. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  13. Application of holography in jet acoustic studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    MS received 4 February 2003; revised 30 April 2004. Abstract. Source strength distribution on a jet boundary was obtained from measurements using the principle of acoustic holography. Measurements were con- ducted in an open field. Measurement of acoustic pressure on a cylindrical two- dimensional contour located ...

  14. Acoustic energy propagation around railways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Petra

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with the issues of acoustic energy propagation around railways. The research subject was noise emission spreading into the surroundings during the passage of trains over a directly travelled steel bridge construction. Noise emissions were measured using direct measurements in the field. The measurements were performed in two measurement profiles. The noise exposures A LAE measured near the steel bridge construction were compared against the noise exposures A LAE captured on an open track. From the difference of these data, the noise level of the steel bridge structure was determined. Part of the research was to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction of the railway track superstructure on the acoustic situation in the given section of the railway track. The article describes the methodology of measurements, including the processing and evaluation of measured data. The article points out the noise levels of the steel bridge construction and assesses changes in the acoustic situation after the reconstruction.

  15. Profile measurements and data from the 2011 Optics, Acoustics, and Stress In Situ (OASIS) project at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Christopher R.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Martini, Marinna A.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2012-01-01

    This report documents data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Coastal Model Applications and Field Measurements project under the auspices of the U.S. Navy Office of Naval Research Optics, Acoustics, and Stress In Situ (OASIS) Project. The objective of the measurements was to relate optical and acoustic properties of suspended particles to changes in particle size, concentration, and vertical distribution in the bottom boundary layer near the seafloor caused by wave- and current-induced stresses. This information on the physics of particle resuspension and aggregation and light penetration and water clarity will help improve models of sediment transport, benthic primary productivity, and underwater visibility. There is well-established technology for acoustic profiling, but optical profiles are more difficult to obtain because of the rapid attenuation of light in water. A specially modified tripod with a moving arm was designed to solve this problem by moving instruments vertically in the bottom boundary layer, between the bottom and about 2 meters above the seafloor. The profiling arm was designed, built, and tested during spring and summer 2011 by a team of USGS scientists, engineers, and technicians. To accommodate power requirements and the large data files recorded by some of the optical instruments, the tripod was connected via underwater cable to the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory, operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). This afforded real-time Internet communication with the embedded computers aboard the tripod. Instruments were mounted on the profiling arm, and additional instruments were mounted elsewhere on the tripod and nearby on the seafloor. The tripod and a small mooring for a profiling current meter were deployed on September 17, 2011, at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory 12-meter-deep underwater node about 2 kilometers south of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. Divers assisted in the

  16. Medidas vocais acústicas na doença de Parkinson: estudo de casos Vocal acoustic measures in Parkinson disease: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Vargas Ferreira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: características vocais acústicas de indivíduos com Doença de Parkinson (DP. PROCEDIMENTOS: estudo de casos, estatística descritiva; cinco pares de parkinsonianos e controle, três masculinos e dois femininos, entre 36 e 63 anos. Avaliação otorrinolaringológica, fonoaudiológica, voz analisada pelo Multi-Dimensional Voice Program Advanced Model 5105 da Kay Pentax®. RESULTADOS: a f0 das mulheres adultas de meia-idade com DP ficou na faixa masculina e a f0 dos controles no limite inferior da faixa feminina. Nos demais sujeitos, que eram homens de diferentes idades, a f0 foi normal; houve aumento de todas as medidas acústicas principalmente nos sujeitos com DP de todas as faixas etárias estudadas. CONCLUSÃO: o processo de envelhecimento e suas consequências parecem atuar como fator interferente nas modificações acústicas da voz, mas, aparentemente, a DP e a idade precoce de seu aparecimento podem acentuar tais alterações, repercutindo de forma negativa na fonação.BACKGROUND: vocal acoustic measures in individuals with Parkinson Disease (PD. PROCEDURES: case studies, descriptive statistics; five pairs of Parkinson patients and control group, three male and two female subjects, between 36 and 63-year old. Evaluations on otorhinolaryngology, speech therapy, voice analyzed by the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program Advanced Model 5105 by Kay Pentax®. RESULTS: f0 in women adults of middle age with PD, was in full male and f0 of the controls on the bottom of the band of women. In other subjects, who were men of different ages, f0 was normal; there was an increase for all acoustic measures, mainly, in the subjects with PD of all studied age groups. CONCLUSION: aging process and its consequences seem to act as an interference factor in the changes of acoustic voice, but apparently, PD and the early age of its appearance may come to enhance these changes, reflecting a negative impact on phonation.

  17. Acoustic Territoriality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Under the heading of "Gang i København" a number of initiatives was presented by the Lord Mayer and the Technical and Environmental Mayer of Copenhagen in May 2006. The aim of the initiative, which roughly translates to Lively Copenhagen, was both to make Copenhagen a livelier city in terms of ci...... this article outline a few approaches to a theory of acoustic territoriality....

  18. Acoustic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U. [Drittes Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Hochschule Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Akhatov, I. [Department of Continuous Media Mechanics, Bashkir State University, Ufa 450074 (Russia)

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. PVT Degradation Studies: Acoustic Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dib, Gerges [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. This document reports on a study of acoustic techniques to determine whether they can provide a diagnostic for the fogging of PVT. Different ultrasound techniques were employed for detecting the level of internal fogging in PVT, including wave velocity measurements, attenuation, nonlinear acoustics, and acoustic microscopy. The results indicate that there are linear relations between the wave velocity and wave attenuation with the level of internal fogging. The effects of fogging on ultrasound wave attenuation is further verified by acoustic microscopy imaging, where regions with fog in the specimen demonstration higher levels of attenuation compared to clear regions. Results from the nonlinear ultrasound measurements were inconclusive due to high sensitivities to transducer coupling and fixture variabilities.

  20. Whistle characteristics and daytime dive behavior in pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) in Hawai'i measured using digital acoustic recording tags (DTAGs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tammy L; Mooney, T Aran; Sayigh, Laela S; Tyack, Peter L; Baird, Robin W; Oswald, Julie N

    2016-07-01

    This study characterizes daytime acoustic and dive behavior of pantropical spotted dolphins (Stenella attenuata) in Hawai'i using 14.58 h of data collected from five deployments of digital acoustic recording tags (DTAG3) in 2013. For each tagged animal, the number of whistles, foraging buzzes, dive profiles, and dive statistics were calculated. Start, end, minimum, and maximum frequencies, number of inflection points and duration were measured from 746 whistles. Whistles ranged in frequency from 9.7 ± 2.8 to 19.8 ± 4.2 kHz, had a mean duration of 0.7 ± 0.5 s and a mean of 1.2 ± 1.2 inflection points. Thirteen foraging buzzes were recorded across all tags. Mean dive depth and duration were 16 ± 9 m and 1.9 ± 1.0 min, respectively. Tagged animals spent the majority of time in the upper 10 m (76.9% ± 16.1%) of the water column. Both whistle frequency characteristics and dive statistics measured here were similar to previously reported values for spotted dolphins in Hawai'i. Shallow, short dive profiles combined with few foraging buzzes provide evidence that little spotted dolphin feeding behavior occurs during daytime hours. This work represents one of the first successful DTAG3 studies of small pelagic delphinids, providing rare insights into baseline bioacoustics and dive behavior.

  1. Real-time monitoring of methanol concentration using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor for direct methanol fuel cell without reference liquid measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kyosuke; Nozawa, Takuya; Kondoh, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing demand for sensors that continuously measure liquid concentrations and detect abnormalities in liquid environments. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied for the continuous monitoring of liquid concentrations. As the SH-SAW sensor functions using the relative measurement method, it normally needs a reference at each measurement. However, if the sensor is installed in a liquid flow cell, it is difficult to measure a reference liquid. Therefore, it is important to establish an estimation method for liquid concentrations using the SH-SAW sensor without requiring a reference measurement. In this study, the SH-SAW sensor is installed in a direct methanol fuel cell to monitor the methanol concentration. The estimated concentration is compared with a conventional density meter. Moreover, the effect of formic acid is examined. When the fuel temperature is higher than 70 °C, it is necessary to consider the influence of liquid conductivity. Here, an estimation method for these cases is also proposed.

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EVENTS DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing ... Brain Freeze ? READ MORE Read More What is acoustic neuroma? Identifying an AN Learn More Get Info ...

  3. Firmness prediction in Prunus persica 'Calrico' peaches by visible/short-wave near infrared spectroscopy and acoustic measurements using optimised linear and non-linear chemometric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Victoria; Herrera, Luis J; Pérez, María del Mar; Val, Jesús; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2015-08-15

    In this work, near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and an acoustic measure (AWETA) (two non-destructive methods) were applied in Prunus persica fruit 'Calrico' (n = 260) to predict Magness-Taylor (MT) firmness. Separate and combined use of these measures was evaluated and compared using partial least squares (PLS) and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) regression methods. Also, a mutual-information-based variable selection method, seeking to find the most significant variables to produce optimal accuracy of the regression models, was applied to a joint set of variables (NIR wavelengths and AWETA measure). The newly proposed combined NIR-AWETA model gave good values of the determination coefficient (R(2)) for PLS and LS-SVM methods (0.77 and 0.78, respectively), improving the reliability of MT firmness prediction in comparison with separate NIR and AWETA predictions. The three variables selected by the variable selection method (AWETA measure plus NIR wavelengths 675 and 697 nm) achieved R(2) values 0.76 and 0.77, PLS and LS-SVM. These results indicated that the proposed mutual-information-based variable selection algorithm was a powerful tool for the selection of the most relevant variables. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Ion Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Murphy and L. C. Aamodt , "Signal Enhancement in Photothermal Imaging Produced by Three Dimensional Heat Flow", Appl. Phys. Lett. 39, 519 (1981); L. C... Aamodt and J. C. Murphy, "Photothermal Measurements Using a Localized Excitation Source", J. Appl. Phys. 52, 4903 (1981) (9) R. L. Thomas, L. D. Favro...25 (23) J. C. Murphy, F. G. Satkiewicz and L. C. Aamodt , "Ion Acoustic Imaging of Buried Flaws in Aluminum", Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE

  5. The clustering of the SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR14 quasar sample: first measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations between redshift 0.8 and 2.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burtin, Etienne; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; Du, Wei; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grabowski, Katie; Guy, Julien; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; McEwen, Joseph E.; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pâris, Isabelle; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruggeri, Rossana; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas Magaña, Mariana; Vivek, M.; Wang, Yuting; Yèche, Christophe; Yu, Liang; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2018-02-01

    We present measurements of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale in redshift-space using the clustering of quasars. We consider a sample of 147 000 quasars from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) distributed over 2044 square degrees with redshifts 0.8 0 at 6.6σ significance when testing a ΛCDM model with free curvature.

  6. Fast wideband acoustical holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    Patch near-field acoustical holography methods like statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography and equivalent source method are limited to relatively low frequencies, where the average array-element spacing is less than half of the acoustic wavelength, while beamforming provides useful resolution only at medium-to-high frequencies. With adequate array design, both methods can be used with the same array. But for holography to provide good low-frequency resolution, a small measurement distance is needed, whereas beamforming requires a larger distance to limit sidelobe issues. The wideband holography method of the present paper was developed to overcome that practical conflict. Only a single measurement is needed at a relatively short distance and a single result is obtained covering the full frequency range. The method uses the principles of compressed sensing: A sparse sound field representation is assumed with a chosen set of basis functions, a measurement is taken with an irregular array, and the inverse problem is solved with a method that enforces sparsity in the coefficient vector. Instead of using regularization based on the 1-norm of the coefficient vector, an iterative solution procedure is used that promotes sparsity. The iterative method is shown to provide very similar results in most cases and to be computationally much more efficient.

  7. Acoustical evaluation of preschool classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wonyoung; Hodgson, Murray

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made of the acoustical environments in the Berwick Preschool, Vancouver, in response to complaints by the teachers. Reverberation times (RT), background noise levels (BNL), and in-class sound levels (Leq) were measured for acoustical evaluation in the classrooms. With respect to the measured RT and BNL, none of the classrooms in the preschool were acceptable according to the criteria relevant to this study. A questionnaire was administered to the teachers to assess their subjective responses to the acoustical and nonacoustical environments of the classrooms. Teachers agreed that the nonacoustical environments in the classrooms were fair, but that the acoustical environments had problems. Eight different classroom configurations were simulated to improve the acoustical environments, using the CATT room acoustical simulation program. When the surface absorption was increased, both the RT and speech levels decreased. RASTI was dependent on the volumes of the classrooms when the background noise levels were high; however, it depended on the total absorption of the classrooms when the background noise levels were low. Ceiling heights are critical as well. It is recommended that decreasing the volume of the classrooms is effective. Sound absorptive materials should be added to the walls or ceiling.

  8. Noise transmission loss of aircraft panels using acoustic intensity methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgary, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    The two-microphone, cross-spectral, acoustic intensity measurement technique was used to determine the acoustic transmission loss of three different aircraft panels. The study was conducted in the transmission loss apparatus in the Langley aircraft noise reduction laboratory.

  9. Simulation of Acoustics for Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Gabriel; Strutzenberg, Louise L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity acoustic measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in both held down and elevated configurations, as well as with and without water suppression have been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure.

  10. First measurement of the displacement rate of the Pacific Plate near the Japan Trench after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using GPS/acoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Fumiaki; Kido, Motoyuki; Osada, Yukihito; Hino, Ryota; Ohta, Yusaku; Iinuma, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    The subduction rate of an oceanic plate may accelerate after large earthquakes rupture the interplate coupling between the oceanic and overriding continental plates. To better understand postseismic deformation processes in an incoming oceanic plate, we directly measured the displacement rate of the Pacific Plate near the Japan Trench after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using a GPS/acoustic technique over a period of 2 years (September 2012 to September 2014). The displacement rate was measured to be 18.0 ± 4.5 cm yr-1 (N302.0°E) relative to the North American Plate, which is almost twice as fast as the predicted interseismic plate motion. Because the sum of steady plate motion and viscoelastic response to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake roughly accounts for the observed displacement rate, we conclude that viscoelastic relaxation is the primary mechanism responsible for postseismic deformation of the Pacific Plate and that significant subduction acceleration did not occur at least not during the observation period.

  11. Quantifying fluxes and characterizing compositional changes of dissolved organic matter in aquatic systems in situ using combined acoustic and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, B.D.; Boss, E.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Lionberger, M.A.; Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Fujii, R.

    2009-01-01

    Studying the dynamics and geochemical behavior of dissolved and particulate organic material is difficult because concentration and composition may rapidly change in response to aperiodic as well as periodic physical and biological forcing. Here we describe a method useful for quantifying fluxes and analyzing dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics. The method uses coupled optical and acoustic measurements that provide robust quantitative estimates of concentrations and constituent characteristics needed to investigate processes and calculate fluxes of DOM in tidal and other lotic environments. Data were collected several times per hour for 2 weeks or more, with the frequency and duration limited only by power consumption and data storage capacity. We assessed the capabilities and limitations of the method using data from a winter deployment in a natural tidal wetland of the San Francisco Bay estuary. We used statistical correlation of in situ optical data with traditional laboratory analyses of discrete water samples to calibrate optical properties suited as proxies for DOM concentrations and characterizations. Coupled with measurements of flow velocity, we calculated long-term residual horizontal fluxes of DOC into and out from a tidal wetland. Subsampling the dataset provides an estimate for the maximum sampling interval beyond which the error in flux estimate is significantly increased.?? 2009, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  12. Continued Investigation of the Acoustics of Marine Sediments Using Impedance Tube and Acoustic Resonator Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    additional measurements of the effective low frequency acoustic properties of three gulf-coast species, Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass ...Syringodium filiforme (manatee grass ), and Halodule wrightii (shoal grass ). These measurements are similar to those previously discussed [17] but have now been...9] R.D. Stoll and T.K. Kan , "Reflection of acoustic waves at a water–sediment interface," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 70, pp. 149–156 (1981). [10] K.L

  13. Experimental analysis of thermo-acoustic instabilities in a generic gas turbine combustor by phase-correlated PIV, chemiluminescence, and laser Raman scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Christoph M.; Severin, Michael; Dem, Claudiu; Stöhr, Michael; Steinberg, Adam M.; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    A gas turbine model combustor for partially premixed swirl flames was equipped with an optical combustion chamber and operated with CH4 and air at atmospheric pressure. The burner consisted of two concentric nozzles for separately controlled air flows and a ring of holes 12 mm upstream of the nozzle exits for fuel injection. The flame described here had a thermal power of 25 kW, a global equivalence ratio of 0.7, and exhibited thermo-acoustic instabilities at a frequency of approximately 400 Hz. The phase-dependent variations in the flame shape and relative heat release rate were determined by OH* chemiluminescence imaging; the flow velocities by stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV); and the major species concentrations, mixture fraction, and temperature by laser Raman scattering. The PIV measurements showed that the flow field performed a "pumping" mode with varying inflow velocities and extent of the inner recirculation zone, triggered by the pressure variations in the combustion chamber. The flow field oscillations were accompanied by variations in the mixture fraction in the inflow region and at the flame root, which in turn were mainly caused by the variations in the CH4 concentration. The mean phase-dependent changes in the fluxes of CH4 and N2 through cross-sectional planes of the combustion chamber at different heights above the nozzle were estimated by combining the PIV and Raman data. The results revealed a periodic variation in the CH4 flux by more than 150 % in relation to the mean value, due to the combined influence of the oscillating flow velocity, density variations, and CH4 concentration. Based on the experimental results, the feedback mechanism of the thermo-acoustic pulsations could be identified as a periodic fluctuation of the equivalence ratio and fuel mass flow together with a convective delay for the transport of fuel from the fuel injector to the flame zone. The combustor and the measured data are well suited for the validation of

  14. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  15. Hidden acoustic information revealed by intentional nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, David R.

    2017-11-01

    Acoustic waves are omnipresent in modern life and are well described by the linearized equations of fluid dynamics. Once generated, acoustic waves carry and collect information about their source and the environment through which they propagate, respectively, and this information may be retrieved by analyzing recordings of these waves. Because of this, acoustics is the primary means for observation, surveillance, reconnaissance, and remote sensing in otherwise opaque environments, such as the Earth's oceans and crust, and the interior of the human body. For such information-retrieval tasks, acoustic fields are nearly always interrogated within their recorded frequency range or bandwidth. However, this frequency-range restriction is not general; acoustic fields may also carry (hidden) information at frequencies outside their bandwidth. Although such a claim may seem counter intuitive, hidden acoustic-field information can be revealed by re-introducing a marquee trait of fluid dynamics: nonlinearity. In particular, an intentional quadratic nonlinearity - a form of intra-signal heterodyning - can be used to obtain acoustic field information at frequencies outside a recorded acoustic field's bandwidth. This quadratic nonlinearity enables a variety of acoustic remote sensing applications that were long thought to be impossible. In particular, it allows the detrimental effects of sparse recordings and random scattering to be suppressed when the original acoustic field has sufficient bandwidth. In this presentation, the topic is developed heuristically, with a just brief exposition of the relevant mathematics. Hidden acoustic field information is then revealed from simulated and measured acoustic fields in simple and complicated acoustic environments involving frequencies from a few Hertz to more than 100 kHz, and propagation distances from tens of centimeters to hundreds of kilometers. Sponsored by ONR, NAVSEA, and NSF.

  16. Acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  17. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  18. Spatiotemporally resolved granular acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic techniques provide a non-invasive method of characterizing granular material properties; however, there are many challenges in formulating accurate models of sound propagation due to the inherently heterogeneous nature of granular materials. In order to quantify acoustic responses in space and time, we perform experiments in a photoelastic granular material in which the internal stress pattern (in the form of force chains) is visible. We utilize two complementary methods, high-speed imaging and piezoelectric transduction, to provide particle-scale measurements of the amplitude of the acoustic wave. We observe that the average wave amplitude is largest within particles experiencing the largest forces. The force-dependence of this amplitude is in qualitative agreement with a simple Hertzian-like model for contact area. In addition, we investigate the power spectrum of the propagating signal using the piezoelectric sensors. For a Gaussian wave packet input, we observe a broad spectrum of transmitted frequencies below the driving frequency, and we quantify the characteristic frequencies and corresponding length scales of our material as the system pressure is varied.

  19. Evaluating the auralization of a small room in a virtual sound environment using objective room acoustic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrens, Axel; Marschall, Marton; Dau, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    of the room. The auralizations were generated using the loudspeaker-based room auralization toolbox (LoRA; Favrot and Buchholz, 2010) and reproduced in a 64-channel loudspeaker array, set up in an anechoic chamber. Differences between the objective measures evaluated in the real and the virtual room were...

  20. Shear wave velocity measurements using acoustic radiation force impulse in young children with normal kidneys versus hydronephrotic kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beomseok Sohn

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Obtaining ARFI measurements of the kidney is feasible in young children with median SWVs of 1.75 m/sec in normal kidneys. Median SWVs increased in high-grade hydronephrotic kidneys but were not different between hydronephrotic kidneys with and without UPJO.

  1. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude: 3, Theoretical Refinements. Research Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Kai

    This report offers some general principles which are helpful for designing and constructing a test for measuring musical aptitude of persons from various age groups. A discussion attempts to clarify the concepts used within the psychology of music. The basic structuralist principles favored by Gestalt psychologists and structuralists are also…

  2. Comparison of acoustic travel-time measurement of solar meridional circulation from SDO/HMI and SOHO/MDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Thomas L.; Liang, Zhi-Chao; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper

    2017-08-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is one of the primary tools for studying the solar meridional circulation. However, travel-time measurements of the subsurface meridional flow suffer from a variety of systematic errors, such as a center-to-limb variation and an offset due to the P-angle uncertainty of solar images. Here we apply the time-distance technique to contemporaneous medium-degree Dopplergrams produced by SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI to obtain the travel-time difference caused by meridional circulation throughout the solar convection zone. The P-angle offset in MDI images is measured by cross-correlating MDI and HMI images. The travel-time measurements in the south-north and east-west directions are averaged over the same observation period for the two data sets and then compared to examine the consistency of MDI and HMI travel times after correcting the systematic errors.The offsets in the south-north travel-time difference from MDI data induced by the P-angle error gradually diminish with increasing travel distance. However, these offsets become noisy for travel distances corresponding to waves that reach the base of the convection zone. This suggests that a careful treatment of the P-angle problem is required when studying a deep meridional flow. After correcting the P-angle and the removal of the center-to-limb effect, the travel-time measurements from MDI and HMI are consistent within the error bars for meridional circulation covering the entire convection zone. The fluctuations observed in both data sets are highly correlated and thus indicate their solar origin rather than an instrumental origin. Although our results demonstrate that the ad hoc correction is capable of reducing the wide discrepancy in the travel-time measurements from MDI and HMI, we cannot exclude the possibility that there exist other systematic effects acting on the two data sets in the same way.

  3. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  4. An acoustical model based monitoring network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the approach for an acoustical model based monitoring network is demonstrated. This network is capable of reconstructing a noise map, based on the combination of measured sound levels and an acoustic model of the area. By pre-calculating the sound attenuation within the network the

  5. Acoustic-Emission Weld-Penetration Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, J.; Collins, J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld penetration monitored by detection of high-frequency acoustic emissions produced by advancing weld pool as it melts and solidifies in workpiece. Acoustic emission from TIG butt weld measured with 300-kHz resonant transducer. Rise in emission level coincides with cessation of weld penetration due to sudden reduction in welding current. Such monitoring applied to control of automated and robotic welders.

  6. Acoustic sorting models for improved log segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Steve Verrill; Eini Lowell; Robert J. Ross; Vicki L. Herian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined three individual log measures (acoustic velocity, log diameter, and log vertical position in a tree) for their ability to predict average modulus of elasticity (MOE) and grade yield of structural lumber obtained from Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb. Franco]) logs. We found that log acoustic velocity only had a...

  7. Auditory modelling for assessing room acoustics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dorp Schuitman, J.

    2011-01-01

    The acoustics of a concert hall, or any other room, are generally assessed by measuring room impulse responses for one or multiple source and receiver location(s). From these responses, objective parameters can be determined that should be related to various perceptual attributes of room acoustics.

  8. Assessing the performance of the photo-acoustic infrared gas monitor for measuring CO(2), N(2)O, and CH(4) fluxes in two major cereal rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirol-Padre, Agnes; Rai, Munmun; Gathala, Mahesh; Sharma, Sheetal; Kumar, Virender; Sharma, Parbodh C; Sharma, Dinesh K; Wassmann, Reiner; Ladha, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Rapid, precise, and globally comparable methods for monitoring greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes are required for accurate GHG inventories from different cropping systems and management practices. Manual gas sampling followed by gas chromatography (GC) is widely used for measuring GHG fluxes in agricultural fields, but is laborious and time-consuming. The photo-acoustic infrared gas monitoring system (PAS) with on-line gas sampling is an attractive option, although it has not been evaluated for measuring GHG fluxes in cereals in general and rice in particular. We compared N2 O, CO2 , and CH4 fluxes measured by GC and PAS from agricultural fields under the rice-wheat and maize-wheat systems during the wheat (winter), and maize/rice (monsoon) seasons in Haryana, India. All the PAS readings were corrected for baseline drifts over time and PAS-CH4 (PCH4 ) readings in flooded rice were corrected for water vapor interferences. The PCH4 readings in ambient air increased by 2.3 ppm for every 1000 mg cm(-3) increase in water vapor. The daily CO2 , N2 O, and CH4 fluxes measured by GC and PAS from the same chamber were not different in 93-98% of all the measurements made but the PAS exhibited greater precision for estimates of CO2 and N2 O fluxes in wheat and maize, and lower precision for CH4 flux in rice, than GC. The seasonal GC- and PAS-N2 O (PN2 O) fluxes in wheat and maize were not different but the PAS-CO2 (PCO2 ) flux in wheat was 14-39% higher than that of GC. In flooded rice, the seasonal PCH4 and PN2 O fluxes across N levels were higher than those of GC-CH4 and GC-N2 O fluxes by about 2- and 4fold, respectively. The PAS (i) proved to be a suitable alternative to GC for N2 O and CO2 flux measurements in wheat, and (ii) showed potential for obtaining accurate measurements of CH4 fluxes in flooded rice after making correction for changes in humidity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  10. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  11. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  12. Electromagnetically generated acoustic determination of delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaino, W.

    1991-04-01

    Previous work has demonstrated a technique for acoustically detecting localized delamination of metallized patterns on insulating substrates [W. Imaino, L. Crawforth, A. C. Munce, and A. Julaiana, in Proceedings of the IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, edited by B. R. McAvoy (IEEE, New York, 1986), p. 1065]. Employing a high-spatial-resolution permeable electromagnetic acoustic transducer to preferentially excite the metallization, the acoustic coupling between the metal foil and substrate may be probed. Scanning, then, provides a map of delaminations. To extend and generalize these results, the detailed generation mechanism and acoustic response of the substrate has been studied. A computer program developed previously [W. Imaino, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 80, S7 (1986)] was used to model the acoustic source. In this investigation, a finite-element calculation is used to provide a more detailed description of the acoustic behavior of the delaminated plate. The effects of source size relative to defect dimensions and acoustic properties of the substrate have been studied. The determination of the localized coupling is complicated by structural resonances of the substrate, which make single frequency measurements unfavorable. However, the analysis shows that the spectral acoustic behavior provides an indication of metallization to substrate coupling. A signal-processing algorithm based on this analysis has been formulated and will be described.

  13. Inverting Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) touchdown signals to measure the elastic modulus of comet material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W.; Faber, C.; Knapmeyer, M.; Witte, L.; Schröder, S.; Tune, J.; Möhlmann, D.; Roll, R.; Chares, B.; Fischer, H.; Seidensticker, K.

    2014-07-01

    The landing of Philae on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is scheduled for November 11, 2014. Each of the three landing feet of Philae house a triaxial acceleration sensor of CASSE, which will thus be the first sensors to be in mechanical contact with the cometary surface. CASSE will be in listening mode to record the deceleration of the lander, when it impacts with the comet at a velocity of approx. 0.5 m/s. The analysis of this data yields information on the reduced elastic modulus and the yield stress of the comet's surface material. We describe a series of controlled landings of a lander model. The tests were conducted in the Landing & Mobility Test Facility (LAMA) of the DLR Institute of Space Systems in Bremen, Germany, where an industrial robot can be programmed to move landers or rovers along predefined paths, allowing to adapt landing procedures with predefined velocities. The qualification model of the Philae landing gear was used in the tests. It consists of three legs manufactured of carbon fiber and metal joints. A dead mass of the size and mass of the lander housing is attached via a damper above the landing gear to represent the lander structure as a whole. Attached to each leg is a foot with two soles and a mechanically driven fixation screw (''ice screw'') to secure the lander on the comet. The right soles, if viewed from the outside towards the lander body, house a Brüel & Kjaer DeltaTron 4506 triaxial piezoelectric accelerometer as used on the spacecraft. Orientation of the three axes was such that one of the axes, here the X-axis of the accelerometer, points downwards, while the Y- and Z-axes are horizontal. Data were recorded at a sampling rate of 8.2 kHz within a time gate of 2 s. In parallel, a video sequence was taken, in order to monitor the touchdown on the sand and the movement of the ice screws. Touchdown measurements were conducted on three types of ground with landing velocities between 0.1 to 1.1 m/s. Landings with low velocities were

  14. Measurement of the ultrasonic properties of human coronary arteries in vitro with a 50-MHz acoustic microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic attenuation coefficient, wave propagation speed and integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC of human coronary arteries were measured in vitro over the -6 dB frequency bandwidth (36 to 67 MHz of a focused ultrasound transducer (50 MHz, focal distance 5.7 mm, f/number 1.7. Corrections were made for diffraction effects. Normal and diseased coronary artery sub-samples (N = 38 were obtained from 10 individuals at autopsy. The measured mean ± SD of the wave speed (average over the entire vessel wall thickness was 1581.04 ± 53.88 m/s. At 50 MHz, the average attenuation coefficient was 4.99 ± 1.33 dB/mm with a frequency dependence term of 1.55 ± 0.18 determined over the 36- to 67-MHz frequency range. The IBC values were: 17.42 ± 13.02 (sr.m-1 for thickened intima, 11.35 ± 6.54 (sr.m-1 for fibrotic intima, 39.93 ± 50.95 (sr.m-1 for plaque, 4.26 ± 2.34 (sr.m-1 for foam cells, 5.12 ± 5.85 (sr.m-1 for media and 21.26 ± 31.77 (sr.m-1 for adventitia layers. The IBC results indicate the possibility for ultrasound characterization of human coronary artery wall tissue layer, including the situations of diseased arteries with the presence of thickened intima, fibrotic intima and plaque. The mean IBC normalized with respect to the mean IBC of the media layer seems promising for use as a parameter to differentiate a plaque or a thickened intima from a fibrotic intima.

  15. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  16. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  17. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time-distance helioseismology pipeline has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time-distance helioseismology: a Gabor wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, 2004). Using Doppler velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference travel-time perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (1997) and Gizon and Birch (2002). We investigated the relationships among these three travel-time definitions, their sensitivities to fitting parameters, and estimated the random errors they produce

  18. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Solar Dynamics Observatory-Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler-velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time - distance helioseismology pipeline (Zhao et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2010) has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross-covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time - distance helioseismology: a Gabor-wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004). Using Doppler-velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument onboard SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference traveltime perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet-Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997) and Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002). We investigated the relationships among

  19. Acoustic Model Testing Chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesman, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Scale models have been used for decades to replicate liftoff environments and in particular acoustics for launch vehicles. It is assumed, and analyses supports, that the key characteristics of noise generation, propagation, and measurement can be scaled. Over time significant insight was gained not just towards understanding the effects of thruster details, pad geometry, and sound mitigation but also to the physical processes involved. An overview of a selected set of scale model tests are compiled here to illustrate the variety of configurations that have been tested and the fundamental knowledge gained. The selected scale model tests are presented chronologically.

  20. Acoustic Properties of Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria

    2017-08-01

    Cellulose is the oldest material for thermal insulation in construction field. Thomas Jefferson was the first architect that used the cellulose in his project of the Monticello house (1800). But only after 1945 that the cellulose from newsprint was used across America and northern Europe. In the 70s with the energy crisis it Austria, Czech Republic, Switzerland and Germany began the production of cellulose derived from paper newspapers. It used for both winter and summer thermal insulation, while respecting the environment. In this paper are reported acoustic measurements carried out with the tube of Kundt, with the cellulose melted and with glue with different thicknesses.

  1. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) Inspection Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph; Winfree, William P.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of plus or minus 6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  2. PT-Symmetric Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefeng Zhu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce here the concept of acoustic parity-time (PT symmetry and demonstrate the extraordinary scattering characteristics of the acoustic PT medium. On the basis of exact calculations, we show how an acoustic PT-symmetric medium can become unidirectionally transparent at given frequencies. Combining such a PT-symmetric medium with transformation acoustics, we design two-dimensional symmetric acoustic cloaks that are unidirectionally invisible in a prescribed direction. Our results open new possibilities for designing functional acoustic devices with directional responses.

  3. Acoustic design method of ship's cabin based on geometrical acoustics

    OpenAIRE

    FENG Aijing; WEI Qiang; ZHANG Dahai

    2017-01-01

    In light of the question of how to select the best noise control position and measures in the large noise transmission path of the cabins of a ship, based on the acoustic ray-tracing method in the theory of geometrical acoustics, and by considering the effect of the sound transmission of the bulkhead, this paper proposes the sound line search method. It is used to calculate the sound pressure of a ship's cabin, allowing the sound field distribution of multiple compartments to be simulated. Th...

  4. Time-Lapse Acoustic, Transport, and NMR Measurements to Monitor Induced Microstructural Changes of Carbonate Rocks During Injection of CO2-Rich Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grombacher, D.; Vanorio, T.; Ebert, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Geophysical monitoring during CO2 injection is necessary to ensure that 1) injected CO2 fills the reservoir as predicted, and that 2) injected CO2 does not migrate towards regions where it may escape. Injection of CO2 results in an altered equilibrium between the pore fluid and the host rock causing chemo-mechanical processes to occur which may impact rock frame properties. In order to improve monitoring techniques, further characterization of injection-induced microstructural changes due to chemo-mechanical processes is needed. We attempt to answer the following questions: How does injection alter the pore network, and how do injection-induced microstructural changes impact seismic properties? An experiment consisting of a suite of six concurrent and independent time-lapse measurements including permeability, porosity, acoustic, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) T2 relaxation, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and CT-scan images were conducted on two types of carbonate rocks (micritic limestones, and chalky, micritic carbonates). Measurements were taken as a function of the total injected volume of CO2-rich water (which mimics CO2 injection). Injections took place both under bench top conditions and under conditions of constant confining and pore pressures of 15MPa and 12MPa, respectively. Each measurement type is independent and sensitive to different pore properties, allowing us to determine how the microstructure is altered by considering the data from all measurement types simultaneously. Additionally, time-lapse measurements allow us to quantify induced pore structure changes. With increased injection of CO2-rich water, micritic limestones exhibit increased sensitivity of velocity to confining pressure, large permeability increases (~200%), and much variation in their T2 distribution. We hypothesize that injection alters the pore network by increasing pore connectivity and promoting the formation of more elongated pores. In contrast, chalkly, micritic

  5. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  6. Acoustic vocal measures in women without voice complaints and with normal larynxes Medidas vocais acústicas de mulheres sem queixas de voz e com laringe normal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Susana Finger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is important to establish normal voice standards in order to help guide voice professionals. AIM: to describe acoustic voice measures of adult young women with normal larynxes and without voice complaints. METHOD: 56 women underwent ENT evaluation and speech screening. The "A" vowel utterance was digitally recorded and analyzed by means of the Praat (Version 4.6.10 software. The data was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and by the Shapiro-Wilk test with a 5% significance level. The study was cross-section and exploratory. RESULTS: normal distribution measures were: fundamental frequency; Jitter (local; Jitter (local, absolute; Jitter (ppq5; Jitter (ddp. The Jitter (rap, all the Shimmer, the noise/harmonic ratio (NHR and the harmonic/noise ratio (HNR values did not follow a normal distribution. CONCLUSION: It seems that the measures which followed the normal distribution can be used as base-normal values for the interpretation of acoustic voice analysis of those women with and without laryngeal disorders. All the values with and without normal distribution showed results similar to the ones present in the national and international literature.O estabelecimento de padrões de base da normalidade é importante para guiar os profissionais na área da voz. OBJETIVO: Descrever as medidas acústicas de vozes de mulheres adultas jovens, com laringe normal e sem queixas de voz. MÉTODO: 56 mulheres realizaram avaliação otorrinolaringológica e triagem fonoaudiológica. A emissão da vogal /a/ foi gravada digitalmente e analisada por meio do software Praat (versão 4.6.10. Os dados foram analisados por meio da estatística descritiva, e pelo teste Shapiro-Wilk, em nível de significância de 5%. O estudo foi transversal e exploratório. RESULTADOS: Medidas com distribuição normal foram: Frequência fundamental; Jitter (local; Jitter (local, absoluto; Jitter (ppq5; Jitter (ddp. As medidas de Jitter (rap; todas as de Shimmer; a Propor

  7. Objective and subjective evaluation of the acoustic comfort in classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta; Marcon, Carolina Reich

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic comfort of classrooms in a Brazilian public school has been evaluated through interviews with 62 teachers and 464 pupils, measurements of background noise, reverberation time, and sound insulation. Acoustic measurements have revealed the poor acoustic quality of the classrooms. Results have shown that teachers and pupils consider the noise generated and the voice of the teacher in neighboring classrooms as the main sources of annoyance inside the classroom. Acoustic simulations resulted in the suggestion of placement of perforated plywood on the ceiling, for reduction in reverberation time and increase in the acoustic comfort of the classrooms.

  8. Subscale Acoustic Testing: Comparison of ALAT and ASMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Janice D.; Counter, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option. This paper compares the acoustic measurements of two different subscale tests: the 2% Ares Liftoff Acoustic Test conducted at Stennis Space Center and the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. Acoustical Modifications for the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandell, Carl C.; Smaldino, Joseph J.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews procedures for evaluating, measuring, and modifying noise and reverberation levels in the classroom environment. Recommendations include: relocating children away from high noise sources, such as fans, air conditioners, heating ducts, and faulty lighting fixtures, using sound-absorbing materials, using acoustical ceiling tile…

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic ... Stories Keywords Shop ANA Discussion Forum About Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values ...

  11. Tethys Acoustic Metadata Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Tethys database houses the metadata associated with the acoustic data collection efforts by the Passive Acoustic Group. These metadata include dates, locations...

  12. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare provider Request a ... What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation Radiation ...

  13. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare provider ... Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation ...

  14. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resource Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN ... sponsors Become a Sponsor Acoustic Neuroma Association Latest News Join / Renew Login Contact Us Become a Sponsor ...

  15. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN ... a Sponsor Patient Events Acoustic Neuroma Association Latest News Join / Renew Login Contact Us Become a Sponsor ...

  17. Density-near-zero using the acoustically induced transparency of a Fano acoustic resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Elayouch, A.

    2017-01-05

    We report experimental results of near-zero mass density involving an acoustic metamaterial supporting Fano resonance. For this, we designed and fabricated an acoustic resonator with two closely coupled modes and measured its transmission properties. Our study reveals that the phenomenon of acoustically induced transparency is accompanied by an effect of near-zero density. Indeed, the dynamic effective parameters obtained from experimental data show the presence of a frequency band where the effective mass density is close to zero, with high transmission levels reaching 0.7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such effective parameters lead to wave guiding in a 90-degrees-bent channel. This kind of acoustic metamaterial can, therefore, give rise to acoustic functions like controlling the wavefront, which may lead to very promising applications in acoustic cloacking or imaging.

  18. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  19. Ionic association and solvation of the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride in molecular solvents revealed by vapor pressure osmometry, conductometry, volumetry, and acoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Ebrahimi, Nosaibah

    2011-11-17

    A systematic study of osmotic coefficient, conductivity, volumetric and acoustic properties of solutions of ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C(6)mim][Cl]) in various molecular solvents has been made at different temperatures in order to study of ionic association and solvation behavior of [C(6)mim][Cl] in different solutions. Precise measurements on electrical conductances of solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and acetonitrile at 293.15, 298.15, and 303.15 K are reported and analyzed with Barthel's low-concentration chemical model (lcCM) to obtain the limiting molar conductivities and association constants of this ionic liquid in the investigated solvents. Strong ion pairing was found for the ionic liquid in 2-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-propanol, whereas ion association in acetonitrile, methanol and ethanol is rather weak and in water the ionic liquid is fully dissociated. In the second part of this work, the apparent molar volumes and isentropic compressibilities of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-butanol are obtained at the 288.15-313.15 K temperature range at 5 K intervals at atmospheric pressure from the precise measurements of density and sound velocity. The infinite dilution apparent molar volume and isentropic compressibility values of the free ions and ion pairs of [C(6)mim][Cl] in the investigated solvents as well as the excess molar volume of the investigated solutions are determined and their variations with temperature and type of solvents are also studied. Finally, the experimental measurements of osmotic coefficient at 318.15 K for binary solutions of [C(6)mim][Cl] in water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetonitrile are taken using the vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) method and from which the values of the solvent activity, vapor pressure, activity coefficients, and Gibbs free energies are calculated. The results are

  20. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).