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Sample records for acoustic imaging applied

  1. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  2. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  3. Acoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    An acoustic imaging system for displaying an object viewed by a moving array of transducers as the array is pivoted about a fixed point within a given plane. A plurality of transducers are fixedly positioned and equally spaced within a laterally extending array and operatively directed to transmit and receive acoustic signals along substantially parallel transmission paths. The transducers are sequentially activated along the array to transmit and receive acoustic signals according to a preestablished sequence. Means are provided for generating output voltages for each reception of an acoustic signal, corresponding to the coordinate position of the object viewed as the array is pivoted. Receptions from each of the transducers are presented on the same display at coordinates corresponding to the actual position of the object viewed to form a plane view of the object scanned.

  4. Student design projects in applied acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bös, Joachim; Moritz, Karsten; Skowronek, Adam; Thyes, Christian; Tschesche, Johannes; Hanselka, Holger

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a series of student projects which are intended to complement theoretical education in acoustics and engineering noise control with practical experience. The projects are also intended to enhance the students' ability to work in a team, to manage a project, and to present their results. The projects are carried out in close cooperation with industrial partners so that the students can get a taste of the professional life of noise control engineers. The organization of such a project, its execution, and some of the results from the most recent student project are presented as a demonstrative example. This latest project involved the creation of noise maps of a production hall, the acoustic analysis of a packaging machine, and the acoustic analysis of a spiral vibratory conveyor. Upon completion of the analysis, students then designed, applied, and verified some simple preliminary noise reduction measures to demonstrate the potential of these techniques. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  5. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  6. 30th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Joie; Lee, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2009 the 30th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Monterey, CA, USA, March 1-4. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 30 in the Series contains an excellent collection of forty three papers presented in five major categories: Biomedical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation Systems Analysis Signal Analysis and Image Processing Audience Researchers in medical imaging and biomedical instrumentation experts.

  7. Comparison of two acoustic analogies applied to experimental PIV data for cavity sound emission estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koschatzky, V.; Westerweel, J.; Boersma, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare two different acoustic analogies applied to time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) data for the prediction of the acoustic far-field generated by the flow over a rectangular cavity. Recent developments in laser and camera technology allow the

  8. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hume, W.R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Douglass, G.D. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  9. First images of thunder: Acoustic imaging of triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Evans, N. D.; Fuselier, S. A.; Trevino, J.; Ramaekers, J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R.; Rassoul, H. K.; Kotovsky, D. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    An acoustic camera comprising a linear microphone array is used to image the thunder signature of triggered lightning. Measurements were taken at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in Camp Blanding, FL, during the summer of 2014. The array was positioned in an end-fire orientation thus enabling the peak acoustic reception pattern to be steered vertically with a frequency-dependent spatial resolution. On 14 July 2014, a lightning event with nine return strokes was successfully triggered. We present the first acoustic images of individual return strokes at high frequencies (>1 kHz) and compare the acoustically inferred profile with optical images. We find (i) a strong correlation between the return stroke peak current and the radiated acoustic pressure and (ii) an acoustic signature from an M component current pulse with an unusual fast rise time. These results show that acoustic imaging enables clear identification and quantification of thunder sources as a function of lightning channel altitude.

  10. Acoustic Imaging of Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K. N.; Seshan, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Elliposidal acoustic mirror used to measure sound emitted at discrete points in burning turbulent jets. Mirror deemphasizes sources close to target source and excludes sources far from target. At acoustic frequency of 20 kHz, mirror resolves sound from region 1.25 cm wide. Currently used by NASA for research on jet flames. Produces clearly identifiable and measurable variation of acoustic spectral intensities along length of flame. Utilized in variety of monitoring or control systems involving flames or other reacting flows.

  11. Synthetic modelling of acoustical propagation applied to seismic oceanography experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormann, Jean; Cobo, Pedro; Biescas, Berta; Sallarés, Valentí; Papenberg, Cord; Recuero, Manuel; Carbonell, Ramón

    2010-03-01

    Recent work shows that multichannel seismic (MCS) systems provide detailed information on the oceans' finestructure. The aim of this paper is to analyze if high order numerical algorithms are suitable to accurately model the extremely weak wavefield scattered by the oceans' finestructures. For this purpose, we generate synthetic shot records along a coincident seismic and oceanographic profile acquired across a Mediterranean salt lens in the Gulf of Cadiz. We apply a 2D finite-difference time-domain propagation model, together with second-order Complex Frequency Shifted Perfectly Matched Layers at the numerical boundaries, using as reference a realistic sound speed map with the lateral resolution of the seismic data. We show that our numerical propagator creates an acoustical image of the ocean finestructures including the salt lens that reproduces with outstanding detail the real acquired one.

  12. Systematic Error of Acoustic Particle Image Velocimetry and Its Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickiewicz Witold

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry is getting more and more often the method of choice not only for visualization of turbulent mass flows in fluid mechanics, but also in linear and non-linear acoustics for non-intrusive visualization of acoustic particle velocity. Particle Image Velocimetry with low sampling rate (about 15Hz can be applied to visualize the acoustic field using the acquisition synchronized to the excitation signal. Such phase-locked PIV technique is described and used in experiments presented in the paper. The main goal of research was to propose a model of PIV systematic error due to non-zero time interval between acquisitions of two images of the examined sound field seeded with tracer particles, what affects the measurement of complex acoustic signals. Usefulness of the presented model is confirmed experimentally. The correction procedure, based on the proposed model, applied to measurement data increases the accuracy of acoustic particle velocity field visualization and creates new possibilities in observation of sound fields excited with multi-tonal or band-limited noise signals.

  13. Acoustical bubble trapper applied to hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanchon, P; Birmelé, B; Tranquart, F

    2008-04-01

    Gaseous microemboli can arise in extracorporeal lines and devices such as dialysis machines. They are associated with severe pulmonary side effects in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis sessions. The goal of this study was to develop a gaseous emboli trapper using ultrasound waves to remove any air bubble from the tubing system before they reach the patient. A homemade bubble trapper, developed in the laboratory, consists of a Perspex block containing a main channel connected to the tubing of a hemodialysis machine and a second subchannel positioned perpendicularly to the main one, used to trap the air microemboli. The microemboli flowing in the main channel were insonified through an acoustic window with an ultrasound wave, at a frequency of 500 kHz and with a maximal acoustic pressure of 500 kPa, generated by a single-element transducer positioned 3 cm away from the main flow. The radiation force induced by the ultrasound beam acts directly on the flowing air emboli, by pushing them into the subchannel. Two Doppler probes operating both at 2 MHz, connected to a DWL Doppler machine were placed before and after the bubble trapper to count sequentially the number of embolic events. The flow of the machine was varied between 200 mL/min and 500 mL/min. Depending on the flow velocity, the number of microembolic signals (MES) detected by the Doppler probes before and after the trapping system was identical and ranged from 5 to 150 MES/min in absence of the ultrasound irradiation. When the air bubble trapper was activated, a reduction of the number of MES, up to 70%, was achieved. Doppler recordings suggest that the circulating bubbles were either fragmented into smaller bubble fragments or directly got pushed into the second subchannel where they were collected. This simple approach using an ultrasound-based trapping system was shown to operate adequately with the current settings and can be used to filter air microemboli.

  14. Homotopy Based Reconstruction from Acoustic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ojaswa

    are reconstruction from an organised set of linear cross sections and reconstruction from an arbitrary set of linear cross sections. The first problem is looked upon in the context of acoustic signals wherein the cross sections show a definite geometric arrangement. A reconstruction in this case can take advantage...... GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) based methods are suggested for a streaming computation on large volumes of data. Validation of results for acoustic images is not straightforward due to unavailability of ground truth. Accuracy figures for the suggested methods are provided using phantom object...

  15. Topology optimization applied to room acoustic problems and surface acoustic wave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Sigmund, Ole; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    of the project is concerned with simulation and optimization of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices [4]. SAWs are for instance used in filters and resonators in mobile phones and to modulate light waves [5], and it is here essential to obtain waves with a high intensity, to direct the waves or to optimize...... of engineering fields such as mechanism design, fluid problems and photonic and phononic band-gap materials and structures [1,2]. In this project topology optimization is first applied to control acoustic properties in a room [3]. It is shown how the squared sound pressure amplitude in a certain part of a room...

  16. 28th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    André, Michael P; Andre, Michael; Arnold, Walter; Bamber, Jeff; Burov, Valentin; Chubachi, Noriyoshi; Erikson, Kenneth; Ermert, Helmut; Fink, Mathias; Gan, Woon S; Granz, Bernd; Greenleaf, James; Hu, Jiankai; Jones, Joie P; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Laugier, Pascal; Lee, Hua; Lees, Sidney; Levin, Vadim M; Maev, Roman; Masotti, Leonardo; Nowicki, Andrzej; O’Brien, William; Prasad, Manika; Rafter, Patrick; Rouseff, Daniel; Thijssen, Johan; Tittmann, Bernard; Tortoli, Piero; Steen, Anton; Waag, Robert; Wells, Peter; Acoustical Imaging

    2007-01-01

    The International Acoustical Imaging Symposium has been held continuously since 1968 as a unique forum for advanced research, promoting the sharing of technology, developments, methods and theory among all areas of acoustics. The interdisciplinary nature of the Symposium and the wide international participation are two of its main strengths. Scientists from around the world present their papers in an informal environment conducive to lively discussion and cross-fertilization. The fact that a loyal community of scientists has supported this Series since 1968 is evidence of its impact on the field. The Symposium Series continues to thrive in a busy calendar of scientific meetings without the infrastructure of a professional society. It does so because those who attend and those who rely on the Proceedings as a well-known reference work acknowledge its value. This Volume 28 of the Proceedings likewise contains an excellent collection of papers presented in six major categories, offering both a broad perspective ...

  17. Laser-induced acoustic imaging of underground objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; DiMarzio, Charles A.; McKnight, Stephen W.; Sauermann, Gerhard O.; Miller, Eric L.

    1999-02-01

    This paper introduces a new demining technique based on the photo-acoustic interaction, together with results from photo- acoustic experiments. We have buried different types of targets (metal, rubber and plastic) in different media (sand, soil and water) and imaged them by measuring reflection of acoustic waves generated by irradiation with a CO2 laser. Research has been focused on the signal acquisition and signal processing. A deconvolution method using Wiener filters is utilized in data processing. Using a uniform spatial distribution of laser pulses at the ground's surface, we obtained 3D images of buried objects. The images give us a clear representation of the shapes of the underground objects. The quality of the images depends on the mismatch of acoustic impedance of the buried objects, the bandwidth and center frequency of the acoustic sensors and the selection of filter functions.

  18. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms

    OpenAIRE

    Bulman, J. B.; Ganezer, K. S.; Halcrow, P. W.; Neeson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statisti...

  19. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Izquierdo Fuente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced.

  20. Demonstration of acoustic source localization in air using single pixel compressive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jeffrey S.; Rohde, Charles A.; Guild, Matthew D.; Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic source localization often relies on large sensor arrays that can be electronically complex and have large data storage requirements to process element level data. Recently, the concept of a single-pixel-imager has garnered interest in the electromagnetics literature due to its ability to form high quality images with a single receiver paired with shaped aperture screens that allow for the collection of spatially orthogonal measurements. Here, we present a method for creating an acoustic analog to the single-pixel-imager found in electromagnetics for the purpose of source localization. Additionally, diffraction is considered to account for screen openings comparable to the acoustic wavelength. A diffraction model is presented and incorporated into the single pixel framework. In this paper, we explore the possibility of applying single pixel localization to acoustic measurements. The method is experimentally validated with laboratory measurements made in an air waveguide.

  1. CO2 leak detection through acoustic sensing and infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiwang; Yan, Yong; Ma, Lin; Ma, Yifan; Han, Xiaojuan

    2014-04-01

    When CO2 leakage occurs from a high pressure enclosure, the CO2 jet formed can produce fierce turbulent flow generating acoustic emission with possible phase change, depending on the pressure of the enclosure, and a significant temperature drop in the region close to the releasing point. Acoustic Emission (AE) and infrared imaging technologiesare promising methods for on-line monitoring of such accidental leakage. In this paper, leakage experiments were carried out with a CO2 container under well controlled conditions in a laboratory. Acoustic signals and temperature distribution at the leakage area were acquired using an acoustic sensor and an infraredthermalimaging camera. The acoustic signal was analyzed in both time and frequency domains. The characteristics of the signal frequencies areidentified, and their suitability for leakage detectionis investigated. The location of the leakage can be identified by seeking the lowest temperature area or point in the infrared image.

  2. Interpreting underwater acoustic images of the upper ocean boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, Marco J

    2007-01-01

    A challenging task in physical studies of the upper ocean using underwater sound is the interpretation of high-resolution acoustic images. This paper covers a number of basic concepts necessary for undergraduate and postgraduate students to identify the most distinctive features of the images, providing a link with the acoustic signatures of physical processes occurring simultaneously beneath the surface of the sea. Sonars are so sensitive that they detected a new acoustic signature at the breaking of surface gravity waves in deep water, which resembles oblique motion-like vortices

  3. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Ohara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA with a surface acoustic wave (SAW. SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs. The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  4. Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lee, James Edwin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The INL is developing Vibro-acoustic imaging technology to characterize microstructure in fuels and materials in spent fuel pools and within reactor vessels. A vibro-acoustic development laboratory has been established at the INL. The progress in developing the vibro-acoustic technology at the INL is the focus of this report. A successful technology demonstration was performed in a working TRIGA research reactor. Vibro-acoustic imaging was performed in the reactor pool of the Breazeale reactor in late September of 2015. A confocal transducer driven at a nominal 3 MHz was used to collect the 60 kHz differential beat frequency induced in a spent TRIGA fuel rod and empty gamma tube located in the main reactor water pool. Data was collected and analyzed with the INLDAS data acquisition software using a short time Fourier transform.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging using acoustic reflectors to enhance planar arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Robert; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul; Cox, Ben

    2014-12-01

    Planar sensor arrays have advantages when used for photoacoustic imaging: they do not require the imaging target to be enclosed, and they are easier to manufacture than curved arrays. However, planar arrays have a limited view of the acoustic field due to their finite size; therefore, not all of the acoustic waves emitted from a photoacoustic source can be recorded. This loss of data results in artifacts in the reconstructed photoacoustic image. A detection array configuration which combines a planar Fabry–Pérot sensor with perpendicular acoustic reflectors is described and experimentally implemented. This retains the detection advantages of the planar sensor while increasing the effective detection aperture in order to improve the reconstructed photoacoustic image.

  6. Acoustic rhinometry (AR): An Alternative Method to Image Nasal Airway Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straszek, Sune; Pedersen, O.F.

      ACOUSTIC RHINOMETRY (AR): AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD TO IMAGE NASAL AIRWAY GEOMETRY.  INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND:  In human studies the acoustic reflection technique was first applied to describe the area-distance relationship of the lower airways, but later the acoustic reflection technique appeared...... to be of more use in the description of nasal cavity geometry. Applied to human subjects AR has been applied to monitor the effect of corrective surgery and mucosal effects of pharmacological interventions. In recent years, however, AR has found use also in pharmacological studies in animals ranging in size...... from dogs to guinea pigs. It is possible to measure relative changes in nasal congestion even in small animals, but absolute volumes seem to be underestimated. There is a need for further development to obtain better results of AR in small laboratory animals.   METHOD: A sound pulse, generated...

  7. Performance Evaluation of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Villacorta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic electronic scanning array for acquiring images from a person using a biometric application is developed. Based on pulse-echo techniques, multifrequency acoustic images are obtained for a set of positions of a person (front, front with arms outstretched, back and side. Two Uniform Linear Arrays (ULA with 15 l/2-equispaced sensors have been employed, using different spatial apertures in order to reduce sidelobe levels. Working frequencies have been designed on the basis of the main lobe width, the grating lobe levels and the frequency responses of people and sensors. For a case-study with 10 people, the acoustic profiles, formed by all images acquired, are evaluated and compared in a mean square error sense. Finally, system performance, using False Match Rate (FMR/False Non-Match Rate (FNMR parameters and the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve, is evaluated. On the basis of the obtained results, this system could be used for biometric applications.

  8. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-01-01

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes

  9. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part...... allows for a dynamic control of the image source production, so that no fixed maximum reflection order is required. The model is optimized for energy impulse response predictions in arbitrary polyhedral rooms. The predictions are validated by comparison with published measured data for a real music...

  10. Acoustic Angiography: A New Imaging Modality for Assessing Microvasculature Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Gessner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide the biomedical imaging community with details of a new high resolution contrast imaging approach referred to as “acoustic angiography.” Through the use of dual-frequency ultrasound transducer technology, images acquired with this approach possess both high resolution and a high contrast-to-tissue ratio, which enables the visualization of microvascular architecture without significant contribution from background tissues. Additionally, volumetric vessel-tissue integration can be visualized by using b-mode overlays acquired with the same probe. We present a brief technical overview of how the images are acquired, followed by several examples of images of both healthy and diseased tissue volumes. 3D images from alternate modalities often used in preclinical imaging, contrast-enhanced micro-CT and photoacoustics, are also included to provide a perspective on how acoustic angiography has qualitatively similar capabilities to these other techniques. These preliminary images provide visually compelling evidence to suggest that acoustic angiography may serve as a powerful new tool in preclinical and future clinical imaging.

  11. Acoustic imaging of underground storage tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.

    1995-09-01

    Acoustics is a potential tool to determine the properties of high level wastes stored in Underground Storage Tanks. Some acoustic properties were successfully measured by a limited demonstration conducted in 114-TX. This accomplishment provides the basis for expanded efforts to qualify techniques which depend on the acoustic properties of tank wastes. This work is being sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Office of Science and Technology. In FY-1994, limited Tank Waste Remediation Systems EM-30 support was available at Hanford and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) were engaged for analysis support, and Elohi Geophysics, Inc. for seismic testing services. Westinghouse-Hanford Company provided the testing and training, supplied the special engineering and safety analysis equipment and procedures, and provided the trained operators for the actual tank operations. On 11/9/94, limited in-tank tests were successfully conducted in tank 114-TX. This stabilized Single Shell Tank was reported as containing 16.8 feet of waste, the lower 6.28 feet of which contained interstitial liquid. Testing was conducted over the lower 12 feet, between two Liquid Observation Wells thirty feet apart. The ''quick-look'' data was reviewed on-site by MIT and Elohi

  12. Near-field acoustic imaging based on Laplacian sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Daudet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    We present a sound source identification method for near-field acoustic imaging of extended sources. The methodology is based on a wave superposition method (or equivalent source method) that promotes solutions with sparse higher order spatial derivatives. Instead of promoting direct sparsity, as...

  13. Quantile Acoustic Vectors vs. MFCC Applied to Speaker Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorga-Ortiz Pedro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe speaker and command recognition related experiments, through quantile vectors and Gaussian Mixture Modelling (GMM. Over the past several years GMM and MFCC have become two of the dominant approaches for modelling speaker and speech recognition applications. However, memory and computational costs are important drawbacks, because autonomous systems suffer processing and power consumption constraints; thus, having a good trade-off between accuracy and computational requirements is mandatory. We decided to explore another approach (quantile vectors in several tasks and a comparison with MFCC was made. Quantile acoustic vectors are proposed for speaker verification and command recognition tasks and the results showed very good recognition efficiency. This method offered a good trade-off between computation times, characteristics vector complexity and overall achieved efficiency.

  14. Acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy imaging of single leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    An acoustic/photoacoustic microscope was used to create micrometer resolution images of stained cells from a blood smear. Pulse echo ultrasound images were made using a 1000 MHz transducer with 1 μm resolution. Photoacoustic images were made using a fiber coupled 532 nm laser, where energy losses through stimulated Raman scattering enabled output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm. The laser was focused onto the sample using a 20x objective, and the laser spot co-aligned with the 1000 MHz transducer opposite the laser. The blood smear was stained with Wright-Giemsa, a common metachromatic dye that differentially stains the cellular components for visual identification. A neutrophil, lymphocyte and a monocyte were imaged using acoustic and photoacoustic microscopy at two different wavelengths, 532 nm and 600 nm. Unique features in each imaging modality enabled identification of the different cell types. This imaging method provides a new way of imaging stained leukocytes, with applications towards identifying and differentiating cell types, and detecting disease at the single cell level.

  15. Accuracy of measurement of acoustic rhinometry applied to small experimental animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaise, Toshihiko; Ukai, Kotara; Pedersen, Ole Finn

    1999-01-01

    Nasal obstruction is one of the major symptoms of allergic rhinitis. In the study of the mechanism of nasal obstruction, experiments on animal are useful. In adult humans, acoustic rhinometry has been used to evaluate nasal obstruction by determining nasal cavity dimensions in terms of cross......-sectional areas as a function of the distance from the nostril. We modified the equipment used on humans to assess dimensions of nasal airway geometry of small experimental animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of the modified acoustic rhinometry applied to small...... experimental animals using nasal cavity models and guinea pigs. Measurement of the nasal cavity models (made of cylindrical silicone tubes) showed that the acoustic rhinometry estimated 85.5% of actual area and 79.0% of actual volume. In guinea pigs, nasal cavity volume determined by the acoustic rhinometry...

  16. Photo acoustic imaging: technology, systems and market trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, Marc; d'Humières, Benoît; Cochard, Jacques

    2017-03-01

    Although the Photo Acoustic effect was observed by Graham Bell in 1880, the first applications (gas analysis) occurred in 1970's using the required energetic light pulses from lasers. During mid 1990's medical imaging research begun to use Photo Acoustic effect and in vivo images were obtained in mid-2000. Since 2009, the number of patent related to Photo Acoustic Imaging (PAI) has dramatically increased. PAI machines for pre-clinical and small animal imaging have been being used in a routine way for several years. Based on its very interesting features (non-ionizing radiation, noninvasive, high depth resolution ratio, scalability, moderate price) and because it is able to deliver not only anatomical, but functional and molecular information, PAI is a very promising clinical imaging modality. It penetrates deeper into tissue than OCT (Optical Coherence Tomography) and provides a higher resolution than ultrasounds. The PAI is one of the most growing imaging modality and some innovative clinical systems are planned to be on market in 2017. Our study analyzes the different approaches such as photoacoustic computed tomography, 3D photoacoustic microscopy, multispectral photoacoustic tomography and endoscopy with the recent and tremendous technological progress over the past decade: advances in image reconstruction algorithms, laser technology, ultrasound detectors and miniaturization. We analyze which medical domains and applications are the most concerned and explain what should be the forthcoming medical system in the near future. We segment the market in four parts: Components and R&D, pre-clinical, analytics, clinical. We analyzed what should be, quantitatively and qualitatively, the PAI medical markets in each segment and its main trends. We point out the market accessibility (patents, regulations, clinical evaluations, clinical acceptance, funding). In conclusion, we explain the main market drivers and challenges to overcome and give a road map for medical

  17. Applied medical image processing a basic course

    CERN Document Server

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    A widely used, classroom-tested text, Applied Medical Image Processing: A Basic Course delivers an ideal introduction to image processing in medicine, emphasizing the clinical relevance and special requirements of the field. Avoiding excessive mathematical formalisms, the book presents key principles by implementing algorithms from scratch and using simple MATLAB®/Octave scripts with image data and illustrations on an accompanying CD-ROM or companion website. Organized as a complete textbook, it provides an overview of the physics of medical image processing and discusses image formats and data storage, intensity transforms, filtering of images and applications of the Fourier transform, three-dimensional spatial transforms, volume rendering, image registration, and tomographic reconstruction.

  18. Multi-crack imaging using nonclassical nonlinear acoustic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lue; Zhang Ying; Liu Xiao-Zhou; Gong Xiu-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Solid materials with cracks exhibit the nonclassical nonlinear acoustical behavior. The micro-defects in solid materials can be detected by nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) method with a time-reversal (TR) mirror. While defects lie in viscoelastic solid material with different distances from one another, the nonlinear and hysteretic stress—strain relation is established with Preisach—Mayergoyz (PM) model in crack zone. Pulse inversion (PI) and TR methods are used in numerical simulation and defect locations can be determined from images obtained by the maximum value. Since false-positive defects might appear and degrade the imaging when the defects are located quite closely, the maximum value imaging with a time window is introduced to analyze how defects affect each other and how the fake one occurs. Furthermore, NEWS-TR-NEWS method is put forward to improve NEWS-TR scheme, with another forward propagation (NEWS) added to the existing phases (NEWS and TR). In the added phase, scanner locations are determined by locations of all defects imaged in previous phases, so that whether an imaged defect is real can be deduced. NEWS-TR-NEWS method is proved to be effective to distinguish real defects from the false-positive ones. Moreover, it is also helpful to detect the crack that is weaker than others during imaging procedure. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  19. Imaging of acoustic attenuation and speed of sound maps using photoacoustic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Rene; Manohar, Srirang; Purwar, Y.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Slump, Cornelis H.; van Leeuwen, Ton; McAleavey, S.A.; D'Hooge, J.

    Photoacoustic imaging is an upcoming medical imaging modality with the potential of imaging both optical and acoustic properties of objects. We present a measurement system and outline reconstruction methods to image both speed of sound and acoustic attenuation distributions of an object using only

  20. Structural changes and imaging signatures of acoustically sensitive microcapsules under ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar-Keralapura, Mallika; Thirumalai, Shruthi; Mobed-Miremadi, Maryam

    2013-07-01

    The ultrasound drug delivery field is actively designing new agents that would obviate the problems of just using microbubbles for drug delivery. Microbubbles have very short circulation time (minutes), low payload and large size (2-10μm), all of these aspects are not ideal for systemic drug delivery. However, microbubble carriers provide excellent image contrast and their use for image guidance can be exploited. In this paper, we suggest an alternative approach by developing acoustically sensitive microcapsule reservoirs that have future applications for treating large ischemic tumors through intratumoral therapy. We call these agents Acoustically Sensitized Microcapsules (ASMs) and these are not planned for the circulation. ASMs are very simple in their formulation, robust and reproducible. They have been designed to offer high payload (because of their large size), be acoustically sensitive and reactive (because of the Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs) encapsulated) and mechanically robust for future injections/implantations within tumors. We describe three different aspects - (1) effect of therapeutic ultrasound; (2) mechanical properties and (3) imaging signatures of these agents. Under therapeutic ultrasound, the formation of a cavitational bubble was seen prior to rupture. The time to rupture was size dependent. Size dependency was also seen when measuring mechanical properties of these ASMs. % Alginate and permeability also affected the Young's modulus estimates. For study of imaging signatures of these agents, we show six schemes. For example, with harmonic imaging, tissue phantoms and controls did not generate higher harmonic components. Only ASM phantoms created a harmonic signal, whose sensitivity increased with applied acoustic pressure. Future work includes developing schemes combining both sonication and imaging to help detect ASMs before, during and after release of drug substance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  2. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for differentiation of thyroid nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Bojunga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI-Imaging is an ultrasound-based elastography method enabling quantitative measurement of tissue stiffness. The aim of the present study was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of ARFI-imaging for differentiation of thyroid nodules and to compare it to the well evaluated qualitative real-time elastography (RTE. METHODS: ARFI-imaging involves the mechanical excitation of tissue using acoustic pulses to generate localized displacements resulting in shear-wave propagation which is tracked using correlation-based methods and recorded in m/s. Inclusion criteria were: nodules ≥5 mm, and cytological/histological assessment. All patients received conventional ultrasound, real-time elastography (RTE and ARFI-imaging. RESULTS: One-hundred-fifty-eight nodules in 138 patients were available for analysis. One-hundred-thirty-seven nodules were benign on cytology/histology, and twenty-one nodules were malignant. The median velocity of ARFI-imaging in the healthy thyroid tissue, as well as in benign and malignant thyroid nodules was 1.76 m/s, 1.90 m/s, and 2.69 m/s, respectively. While no significant difference in median velocity was found between healthy thyroid tissue and benign thyroid nodules, a significant difference was found between malignant thyroid nodules on the one hand and healthy thyroid tissue (p = 0.0019 or benign thyroid nodules (p = 0.0039 on the other hand. No significant difference of diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of malignant thyroid nodules was found between RTE and ARFI-imaging (0.74 vs. 0.69, p = 0.54. The combination of RTE with ARFI did not improve diagnostic accuracy. CONCLUSIONS: ARFI can be used as an additional tool in the diagnostic work up of thyroid nodules with high negative predictive value and comparable results to RTE.

  3. Near-field acoustic imaging based on Laplacian sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Daudet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    , as in standard compressive sensing or basis pursuit approaches, solutions with a piecewise constant gradient or curvature are promoted, suitable for modeling extended sources that are subject to smooth spatial variations. The obtained results are compared to Least Squares and Compressive Sensing solutions......We present a sound source identification method for near-field acoustic imaging of extended sources. The methodology is based on a wave superposition method (or equivalent source method) that promotes solutions with sparse higher order spatial derivatives. Instead of promoting direct sparsity...

  4. A Dual Communication and Imaging Underwater Acoustic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tricia C.

    A dual communication and imaging underwater acoustic system is proposed and developed throughout this dissertation. Due to the wide variation in underwater channel characteristics, the research here focuses more on robustness to multipath in the shallow underwater acoustic environment, rather than high bit-rate applications and signaling schemes. Lower bit-rate (in the hundreds of bits per second (bps) to low kbps), applications such as the transfer of ecological telemetry data, e.g. conductivity or temperature data, are the primary focus of this dissertation. The parallels between direct sequence spread spectrum in digital communication and pulse-echo with pulse compression in imaging, and channel estimation in communication and range profile estimation in imaging are drawn, leading to a unified communications and imaging platform. A digital communication algorithm for channel order and channel coefficient estimation and symbol demodulation using Matching Pursuit (MP) with Generalized Multiple Hypothesis Testing (GMHT) is implemented in programmable DSP in real time with field experiment results in varying underwater environments for the single receiver (Rx), single transmitter (Tx) case. The custom and off-the-shelf hardware used in the single receiver, single transmitter set of experiments are detailed as well. This work is then extended to the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) case, and then to the full multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) case. The results of channel estimation are used for simple range profile imaging reconstructions. Successful simulated and experimental results for both transducer array configurations are presented and analyzed. Non-real-time symbol demodulation and channel estimation is performed using experimental data from a scaled testing environment. New hardware based on cost-effective fish-finder transducers for a 6 Rx--1 Tx and 6 Rx--4 Tx transducer array is detailed. Lastly, in an application that is neither communication nor

  5. Multi-crack imaging using nonclassical nonlinear acoustic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lue; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Solid materials with cracks exhibit the nonclassical nonlinear acoustical behavior. The micro-defects in solid materials can be detected by nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) method with a time-reversal (TR) mirror. While defects lie in viscoelastic solid material with different distances from one another, the nonlinear and hysteretic stress—strain relation is established with Preisach—Mayergoyz (PM) model in crack zone. Pulse inversion (PI) and TR methods are used in numerical simulation and defect locations can be determined from images obtained by the maximum value. Since false-positive defects might appear and degrade the imaging when the defects are located quite closely, the maximum value imaging with a time window is introduced to analyze how defects affect each other and how the fake one occurs. Furthermore, NEWS-TR-NEWS method is put forward to improve NEWS-TR scheme, with another forward propagation (NEWS) added to the existing phases (NEWS and TR). In the added phase, scanner locations are determined by locations of all defects imaged in previous phases, so that whether an imaged defect is real can be deduced. NEWS-TR-NEWS method is proved to be effective to distinguish real defects from the false-positive ones. Moreover, it is also helpful to detect the crack that is weaker than others during imaging procedure.

  6. Imaging and applied optics: introduction to the feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Arnison, Matthew R; Javidi, Bahram; Testorf, Markus

    2018-03-01

    This special issue of Applied Optics contains selected papers from OSA's Imaging Congress with particular emphasis on work from mathematics in imaging, computational optical sensing and imaging, imaging systems and applications, and 3D image acquisition and display.

  7. Applied acoustics concepts, absorbers, and silencers for acoustical comfort and noise control alternative solutions, innovative tools, practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Helmut V

    2013-01-01

    The author gives a comprehensive overview of materials and components for noise control and acoustical comfort. Sound absorbers must meet acoustical and architectural requirements, which fibrous or porous material alone can meet. Basics and applications are demonstrated, with representative examples for spatial acoustics, free-field test facilities and canal linings. Acoustic engineers and construction professionals will find some new basic concepts and tools for developments in order to improve acoustical comfort. Interference absorbers, active resonators and micro-perforated absorbers of different materials and designs complete the list of applications.

  8. Acoustic Imaging Frequency Dynamics of Ferroelectric Domains by Atomic Force Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun-Yu, Zhao; Hua-Rong, Zeng; Hong-Zhang, Song; Sen-Xing, Hui; Guo-Rong, Li; Qing-Rui, Yin; Shimamura, Kiyoshi; Kannan, Chinna Venkadasamy; Villora, Encarnacion Antonia Garcia; Takekawa, Shunji; Kitamura, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    We report the acoustic imaging frequency dynamics of ferroelectric domains by low-frequency acoustic probe microscopy based on the commercial atomic force microscopy It is found that ferroelectric domain could be firstly visualized at lower frequency down to 0.5 kHz by AFM-based acoustic microscopy The frequency-dependent acoustic signal revealed a strong acoustic response in the frequency range from 7kHz to 10kHz, and reached maximum at 8.1kHz. The acoustic contrast mechanism can be ascribed to the different elastic response of ferroelectric microstructures to local elastic stress fields, which is induced by the acoustic wave transmitting in the sample when the piezoelectric transducer is vibrating and exciting acoustic wave under ac electric fields due to normal piezoelectric effects. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Fast transforms for acoustic imaging--part II: applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Flávio P; Nascimento, Vítor H

    2011-08-01

    In Part I ["Fast Transforms for Acoustic Imaging-Part I: Theory," IEEE Transactions on Image Processing], we introduced the Kronecker array transform (KAT), a fast transform for imaging with separable arrays. Given a source distribution, the KAT produces the spectral matrix which would be measured by a separable sensor array. In Part II, we establish connections between the KAT, beamforming and 2-D convolutions, and show how these results can be used to accelerate classical and state of the art array imaging algorithms. We also propose using the KAT to accelerate general purpose regularized least-squares solvers. Using this approach, we avoid ill-conditioned deconvolution steps and obtain more accurate reconstructions than previously possible, while maintaining low computational costs. We also show how the KAT performs when imaging near-field source distributions, and illustrate the trade-off between accuracy and computational complexity. Finally, we show that separable designs can deliver accuracy competitive with multi-arm logarithmic spiral geometries, while having the computational advantages of the KAT.

  10. A review of acoustic dampers applied to combustion chambers in aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Li, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    In engine combustion systems such as rockets, aero-engines and gas turbines, pressure fluctuations are always present, even during normal operation. One of design prerequisites for the engine combustors is stable operation, since large-amplitude self-sustained pressure fluctuations (also known as combustion instability) have the potential to cause serious structural damage and catastrophic engine failure. To dampen pressure fluctuations and to reduce noise, acoustic dampers are widely applied as a passive control means to stabilize combustion/engine systems. However, they cannot respond to the dynamic changes of operating conditions and tend to be effective over certain narrow range of frequencies. To maintain their optimum damping performance over a broad frequency range, extensive researches have been conducted during the past four decades. The present work is to summarize the status, challenges and progress of implementing such acoustic dampers on engine systems. The damping effect and mechanism of various acoustic dampers, such as Helmholtz resonators, perforated liners, baffles, half- and quarter-wave tube are introduced first. A summary of numerical, experimental and theoretical studies are then presented to review the progress made so far. Finally, as an alternative means, ';tunable acoustic dampers' are discussed. Potential, challenges and issues associated with the dampers practical implementation are highlighted.

  11. Synchronized imaging and acoustic analysis of the upper airway in patients with sleep-disordered breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yi-Chung; Pham, Van-Truong; Wang, Yung-Hung; Lin, Chen; Lo, Men-Tzung; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Wang, Pa-Chun; Chen, Yunn-Jy; Jiang, Sun-Fen; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Tran, Thi-Thao; Tsao, Jenho

    2014-01-01

    Progressive narrowing of the upper airway increases airflow resistance and can produce snoring sounds and apnea/hypopnea events associated with sleep-disordered breathing due to airway collapse. Recent studies have shown that acoustic properties during snoring can be altered with anatomic changes at the site of obstruction. To evaluate the instantaneous association between acoustic features of snoring and the anatomic sites of obstruction, a novel method was developed and applied in nine patients to extract the snoring sounds during sleep while performing dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The degree of airway narrowing during the snoring events was then quantified by the collapse index (ratio of airway diameter preceding and during the events) and correlated with the synchronized acoustic features. A total of 201 snoring events (102 pure retropalatal and 99 combined retropalatal and retroglossal events) were recorded, and the collapse index as well as the soft tissue vibration time were significantly different between pure retropalatal (collapse index, 24  ±  11%; vibration time, 0.2  ±  0.3 s) and combined (retropalatal and retroglossal) snores (collapse index, 13  ±  7% [P ≤ 0.0001]; vibration time, 1.2  ±  0.7 s [P ≤ 0.0001]). The synchronized dynamic MRI and acoustic recordings successfully characterized the sites of obstruction and established the dynamic relationship between the anatomic site of obstruction and snoring acoustics. (paper)

  12. Spatial distribution of macroalgae along the shores of Kongsfjorden (West Spitsbergen using acoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruss Aleksandra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The identification of macroalgal beds is a crucial component for the description of fjord ecosystems. Direct, biological sampling is still the most popular investigation technique but acoustic methods are becoming increasingly recognized as a very efficient tool for the assessment of benthic communities. In 2007 we carried out the first acoustic survey of the littoral areas in Kongsfjorden. A 2.68 km2 area comprised within a 12.40 km2 euphotic zone was mapped along the fjord’s coast using single- and multi-beam echosounders. The singlebeam echosounder (SBES proved to be a very efficient and reliable tool for macroalgae detection in Arctic conditions. The multibeam echosounder (MBES was very useful in extending the SBES survey range, even though it’s ability in discriminating benthic communities was limited. The final result of our investigation is a map of the macroalgae distribution around the fjord, showing 39% macroalgae coverage (1.09 km2 of investigated area between isobaths -0.70 m and -30 m. Zonation analysis showed that most of the studied macroalgae areas occur up to 15 m depth (93%. These results were confirmed by biological sampling and observation in key areas. The potential of acoustic imaging of macrophytes, and a proposed methodology for the processing of acoustic data, are presented in this paper along with preliminary studies on the acoustic reflectivity of macroalgae, also highlighting differences among species. These results can be applied to future monitoring of the evolution of kelp beds in different areas of the Arctic, and in the rest of the world.

  13. From acoustic segmentation to language processing: evidence from optical imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellmuth Obrig

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During language acquisition in infancy and when learning a foreign language, the segmentation of the auditory stream into words and phrases is a complex process. Intuitively, learners use ‘anchors’ to segment the acoustic speech stream into meaningful units like words and phrases. Regularities on a segmental (e.g., phonological or suprasegmental (e.g., prosodic level can provide such anchors. Regarding the neuronal processing of these two kinds of linguistic cues a left hemispheric dominance for segmental and a right hemispheric bias for suprasegmental information has been reported in adults. Though lateralization is common in a number of higher cognitive functions, its prominence in language may also be a key to understanding the rapid emergence of the language network in infants and the ease at which we master our language in adulthood. One question here is whether the hemispheric lateralization is driven by linguistic input per se or whether non-linguistic, especially acoustic factors, ‘guide’ the lateralization process. Methodologically, fMRI provides unsurpassed anatomical detail for such an enquiry. However, instrumental noise, experimental constraints and interference with EEG assessment limit its applicability, pointedly in infants and also when investigating the link between auditory and linguistic processing. Optical methods have the potential to fill this gap. Here we review a number of recent studies using optical imaging to investigate hemispheric differences during segmentation and basic auditory feature analysis in language development.

  14. Acoustic resonances in microfluidic chips: full-image micro-PIV experiments and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagsäter, S M; Jensen, T Glasdam; Bruus, H; Kutter, J P

    2007-10-01

    We show that full-image micro-PIV analysis in combination with images of transient particle motion is a powerful tool for experimental studies of acoustic radiation forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic chambers under piezo-actuation in the MHz range. The measured steady-state motion of both large 5 microm and small 1 microm particles can be understood in terms of the acoustic eigenmodes or standing ultra-sound waves in the given experimental microsystems. This interpretation is supported by numerical solutions of the corresponding acoustic wave equation.

  15. Hyperspectral imaging applied to forensic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkoff, Donald B.; Oliver, William R.

    2000-03-01

    Remote sensing techniques now include the use of hyperspectral infrared imaging sensors covering the mid-and- long wave regions of the spectrum. They have found use in military surveillance applications due to their capability for detection and classification of a large variety of both naturally occurring and man-made substances. The images they produce reveal the spatial distributions of spectral patterns that reflect differences in material temperature, texture, and composition. A program is proposed for demonstrating proof-of-concept in using a portable sensor of this type for crime scene investigations. It is anticipated to be useful in discovering and documenting the affects of trauma and/or naturally occurring illnesses, as well as detecting blood spills, tire patterns, toxic chemicals, skin injection sites, blunt traumas to the body, fluid accumulations, congenital biochemical defects, and a host of other conditions and diseases. This approach can significantly enhance capabilities for determining the circumstances of death. Potential users include law enforcement organizations (police, FBI, CIA), medical examiners, hospitals/emergency rooms, and medical laboratories. Many of the image analysis algorithms already in place for hyperspectral remote sensing and crime scene investigations can be applied to the interpretation of data obtained in this program.

  16. Acoustic sources of opportunity in the marine environment - Applied to source localization and ocean sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Christopher M.

    Controlled acoustic sources have typically been used for imaging the ocean. These sources can either be used to locate objects or characterize the ocean environment. The processing involves signal extraction in the presence of ambient noise, with shipping being a major component of the latter. With the advent of the Automatic Identification System (AIS) which provides accurate locations of all large commercial vessels, these major noise sources can be converted from nuisance to beacons or sources of opportunity for the purpose of studying the ocean. The source localization method presented here is similar to traditional matched field processing, but differs in that libraries of data-derived measured replicas are used in place of modeled replicas. In order to account for differing source spectra between library and target vessels, cross-correlation functions are compared instead of comparing acoustic signals directly. The library of measured cross-correlation function replicas is extrapolated using waveguide invariant theory to fill gaps between ship tracks, fully populating the search grid with estimated replicas allowing for continuous tracking. In addition to source localization, two ocean sensing techniques are discussed in this dissertation. The feasibility of estimating ocean sound speed and temperature structure, using ship noise across a drifting volumetric array of hydrophones suspended beneath buoys, in a shallow water marine environment is investigated. Using the attenuation of acoustic energy along eigenray paths to invert for ocean properties such as temperature, salinity, and pH is also explored. In each of these cases, the theory is developed, tested using numerical simulations, and validated with data from acoustic field experiments.

  17. Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  18. Development of novel imaging probe for optical/acoustic radiation imaging (OARI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejofodomi, O'tega A; Zderic, Vesna; Zara, Jason M

    2013-11-01

    Optical/acoustic radiation imaging (OARI) is a novel imaging modality being developed to interrogate the optical and mechanical properties of soft tissues. OARI uses acoustic radiation force to generate displacement in soft tissue. Optical images before and after the application of the force are used to generate displacement maps that provide information about the mechanical properties of the tissue under interrogation. Since the images are optical images, they also represent the optical properties of the tissue as well. In this paper, the authors present the first imaging probe that uses acoustic radiation force in conjunction with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to provide information about the optical and mechanical properties of tissues to assist in the diagnosis and staging of epithelial cancers, and in particular bladder cancer. The OARI prototype probe consisted of an OCT probe encased in a plastic sheath, a miniaturized transducer glued to a plastic holder, both of which were encased in a 10 cm stainless steel tube with an inner diameter of 10 mm. The transducer delivered an acoustic intensity of 18 W/cm(2) and the OCT probe had a spatial resolution of approximately 10-20 μm. The tube was filled with deionized water for acoustic coupling and covered by a low density polyethylene cap. The OARI probe was characterized and tested on bladder wall phantoms. The phantoms possessed Young's moduli ranging from 10.2 to 12 kPa, mass density of 1.05 g/cm(3), acoustic attenuation coefficient of 0.66 dB/cm MHz, speed of sound of 1591 m/s, and optical scattering coefficient of 1.80 mm(-1). Finite element model (FEM) theoretical simulations were performed to assess the performance of the OARI probe. The authors obtained displacements of 9.4, 8.7, and 3.4 μm for the 3%, 4%, and 5% bladder wall phantoms, respectively. This shows that the probe is capable of generating optical images, and also has the ability to generate and track displacements in tissue. This will

  19. Detection of Breast Microcalcifications Under Ultrasound Using Power Doppler and Acoustic Resonance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weinstein, Susan

    2003-01-01

    .... Our goal with our current project was to utilize breast sonography coupled with the technique of acoustic resonance to image and evaluate the breast micorcalcifications in patients prior to biopsy...

  20. Detection of Breast Microcalcifications Under Ultrasound Using Power Doppler and Acoustic Resonance Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weinstein, Susan

    2002-01-01

    .... Our goal with our current project was to utilize breast sonography coupled with the technique of acoustic resonance to image and evaluate the breast microcalcifications in patients prior to biopsy...

  1. ACOUSTIC SCHWANNOMA - Two Case Reports and An Insight into Diagnostic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunali Khanna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual and interesting cases of acoustic (vestibular schwannoma are reported, The advances in diagnostic imaging and their importance in early detection of these tumours is also discussed.

  2. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr.; Younane Abousleiman

    2004-04-01

    The research during this project has concentrated on developing a correlation between rock deformation mechanisms and their acoustic velocity signature. This has included investigating: (1) the acoustic signature of drained and undrained unconsolidated sands, (2) the acoustic emission signature of deforming high porosity rocks (in comparison to their low porosity high strength counterparts), (3) the effects of deformation on anisotropic elastic and poroelastic moduli, and (4) the acoustic tomographic imaging of damage development in rocks. Each of these four areas involve triaxial experimental testing of weak porous rocks or unconsolidated sand and involves measuring acoustic properties. The research is directed at determining the seismic velocity signature of damaged rocks so that 3-D or 4-D seismic imaging can be utilized to image rock damage. These four areas of study are described in the report: (1) Triaxial compression experiments have been conducted on unconsolidated Oil Creek sand at high confining pressures. (2) Initial experiments on measuring the acoustic emission activity from deforming high porosity Danian chalk were accomplished and these indicate that the AE activity was of a very low amplitude. (3) A series of triaxial compression experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of induced stress on the anisotropy developed in dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters in rocks. (4) Tomographic acoustic imaging was utilized to image the internal damage in a deforming porous limestone sample. Results indicate that the deformation damage in rocks induced during laboratory experimentation can be imaged tomographically in the laboratory. By extension the results also indicate that 4-D seismic imaging of a reservoir may become a powerful tool for imaging reservoir deformation (including imaging compaction and subsidence) and for imaging zones where drilling operation may encounter hazardous shallow water flows.

  3. Terahertz imaging applied to cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, M.-A.; Formanek, F.; Yasuda, A.; Sekine, M.; Ando, N.; Eishii, Y.

    2010-08-01

    We report on terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy imaging of 10 µm thick histological sections. The sections are prepared according to standard pathological procedures and deposited on a quartz window for measurements in reflection geometry. Simultaneous acquisition of visible images enables registration of THz images and thus the use of digital pathology tools to investigate the links between the underlying cellular structure and specific THz information. An analytic model taking into account the polarization of the THz beam, its incidence angle, the beam shift between the reference and sample pulses as well as multiple reflections within the sample is employed to determine the frequency-dependent complex refractive index. Spectral images are produced through segmentation of the extracted refractive index data using clustering methods. Comparisons of visible and THz images demonstrate spectral differences not only between tumor and healthy tissues but also within tumors. Further visualization using principal component analysis suggests different mechanisms as to the origin of image contrast.

  4. A Bayesian approach for characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity in acoustic radiation force imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2016-04-01

    Biomechanical imaging techniques based on acoustic radiation force (ARF) have been developed to characterize the viscoelasticity of soft tissue by measuring the motion excited by ARF non-invasively. The unknown stress distribution in the region of excitation limits an accurate inverse characterization of soft tissue viscoelasticity, and single degree-of-freedom simplified models have been applied to solve the inverse problem approximately. In this study, the ARF-induced creep imaging is employed to estimate the time constant of a Voigt viscoelastic tissue model, and an inverse finite element (FE) characterization procedure based on a Bayesian formulation is presented. The Bayesian approach aims to estimate a reasonable quantification of the probability distributions of soft tissue mechanical properties in the presence of measurement noise and model parameter uncertainty. Gaussian process metamodeling is applied to provide a fast statistical approximation based on a small number of computationally expensive FE model runs. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the Bayesian approach provides an efficient and practical estimation of the probability distributions of time constant in the ARF-induced creep imaging. In a comparison study with the single degree of freedom models, the Bayesian approach with FE models improves the estimation results even in the presence of large uncertainty levels of the model parameters. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. OSA Imaging and Applied Optics Congress Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-16

    PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Giallorenzi , Thomas, Ph.D. Lesky, Marcia Se. TASK NUMBER Sf. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...invasive surgery, remote sensing, astronomical observations and imaging from nearby planets to outer space, digital cinematography capture and...and non-invasive surgery, remote sensing, astronomical observations and imaging from nearby planets to outer space, digital cinematography capture

  6. Electronic imaging applied to neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, D.A.; Bracher, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    A commercially - available image intensifier was used with a scan conversion memory and a mobile 252 Cf based neutron radiography system to obtain neutron radiographs on a television monitor in 0.5 minutes to 10.0 minutes

  7. APES Beamforming Applied to Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Ann E. A.; Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Austeng, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Recently, adaptive beamformers have been introduced to medical ultrasound imaging. The primary focus has been on the minimum variance (MV) (or Capon) beamformer. This work investigates an alternative but closely related beamformer, the Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES) beamformer. APES offers...... added robustness at the expense of a slightly lower resolution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the APES beamformer on medical imaging data, since correct amplitude estimation often is just as important as spatial resolution. In our simulations we have used a 3.5 MHz, 96...... element linear transducer array. When imaging two closely spaced point targets, APES displays nearly the same resolution as the MV, and at the same time improved amplitude control. When imaging cysts in speckle, APES offers speckle statistics similar to that of the DAS, without the need for temporal...

  8. Preliminary study of copper oxide nanoparticles acoustic and magnetic properties for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Or; Weitz, Iris S.; Azhari, Haim

    2015-03-01

    The implementation of multimodal imaging in medicine is highly beneficial as different physical properties may provide complementary information, augmented detection ability, and diagnosis verification. Nanoparticles have been recently used as contrast agents for various imaging modalities. Their significant advantage over conventional large-scale contrast agents is the ability of detection at early stages of the disease, being less prone to obstacles on their path to the target region, and possible conjunction to therapeutics. Copper ions play essential role in human health. They are used as a cofactor for multiple key enzymes involved in various fundamental biochemistry processes. Extremely small size copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) are readily soluble in water with high colloidal stability yielding high bioavailability. The goal of this study was to examine the magnetic and acoustic characteristics of CuO-NPs in order to evaluate their potential to serve as contrast imaging agent for both MRI and ultrasound. CuO-NPs 7nm in diameter were synthesized by hot solution method. The particles were scanned using a 9.4T MRI and demonstrated a concentration dependent T1 relaxation time shortening phenomenon. In addition, it was revealed that CuO-NPs can be detected using the ultrasonic B-scan imaging. Finally, speed of sound based ultrasonic computed tomography was applied and showed that CuO-NPs can be clearly imaged. In conclusion, the preliminary results obtained, positively indicate that CuO-NPs may be imaged by both MRI and ultrasound. The results motivate additional in-vivo studies, in which the clinical utility of fused images derived from both modalities for diagnosis improvement will be studied.

  9. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, J B; Ganezer, K S; Halcrow, P W; Neeson, Ian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statistical and systematic errors associated with the variability in the pressure applied by the clinician to the transmitting transducer that NCU might provide. The authors also undertook this study in order to find additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing the severity of third degree burns. A noncontact ultrasound imaging system using a pair of specially designed broadband, 1.5 MHz noncontact piezoelectric transducers and cortical bone phantoms, were used to determine bone mineral density (BMD), speed of sound (SOS), integrated response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps of greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were also used in the collection of data from phantoms of nominal mass densities that varied from 1.17 to 2.25 g/cm(3) and in bone mineral density from 0 to 1.7 g/cm(3). Good correlations between known BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained for all 17 phantoms, and methods for quantifying and minimizing sources of systematic errors were outlined. The BMD of the phantom sets extended through most of the in vivo range found in cortical bone. A total of 16-20 repeated measurements of the SOS, thickness, and IR for the phantom set that were conducted over a period of several months showed a small variation in the range of measurements of ±1%-2%. These NCU data were shown to be in agreement with similar results using contact ultrasound to be within 1%-2%. Transmittance

  10. [Computerized image analysis applied to urology research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia Avisrror, M

    1994-05-01

    Diagnosis with the aid of imaging techniques in urology had developed dramatically over the last few years as a result of using state-of-the-art technology that has added digital angiology to the last generation apparatus for ultrasound. Computerized axial tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance allow very high rates of diagnostic possibilities that only a decade ago were not extended to routine use. Each of these examination procedures has its own limits of sensitivity and specificity which vary as a function of the pathoanatomical characteristics depending on the condition to be explored, although none reaches yet absolute values. With ultrasound, CAT and NMR, identification of the various diseases rely on the analysis of densities although with a significant degree of the examiner's subjectivity in the diagnostic judgement. The logic evolution of these techniques is to eliminate such subjective component and translate the features which characterize each disease in quantifiable parameters, a challenge made feasible by computerized analysis. Thanks to technological advances in the field of microcomputers and the decreased cost of the equipment, currently it is possible for any clinical investigator with average resources to use the most sophisticated imaging analysis techniques for the post-processing of the images obtained, opening in the scope of practical investigation a pathway that just a few years ago was exclusive to only certain organizations due to the high cost involved.

  11. Automated Quality Assurance Applied to Mammographic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Davis

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality control in mammography is based upon subjective interpretation of the image quality of a test phantom. In order to suppress subjectivity due to the human observer, automated computer analysis of the Leeds TOR(MAM test phantom is investigated. Texture analysis via grey-level co-occurrence matrices is used to detect structures in the test object. Scoring of the substructures in the phantom is based on grey-level differences between regions and information from grey-level co-occurrence matrices. The results from scoring groups of particles within the phantom are presented.

  12. Overcoming the acoustic diffraction limit in photoacoustic imaging by the localization of flowing absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilov, Sergey; Arnal, Bastien; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    The resolution of photoacoustic imaging deep inside scattering media is limited by the acoustic diffraction limit. In this Letter, taking inspiration from super-resolution imaging techniques developed to beat the optical diffraction limit, we demonstrate that the localization of individual optical absorbers can provide super-resolution photoacoustic imaging well beyond the acoustic diffraction limit. As a proof-of-principle experiment, photoacoustic cross-sectional images of microfluidic channels were obtained with a 15 MHz linear capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer array, while absorbing beads were flown through the channels. The localization of individual absorbers allowed us to obtain a super-resolved cross-sectional image of the channels by reconstructing both the channel width and position with an accuracy better than λ/10. Given the discrete nature of endogenous absorbers such as red blood cells, or that of exogenous particular contrast agents, localization is a promising approach to push the current resolution limits of photoacoustic imaging.

  13. Acoustical cross-talk in row–column addressed 2-D transducer arrays for ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2015-01-01

    The acoustical cross-talk in row–column addressed 2-D transducer arrays for volumetric ultrasound imaging is investigated. Experimental results from a 2.7 MHz, λ/2-pitch capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with 62 rows and 62 columns are presented and analyzed in the frequ......The acoustical cross-talk in row–column addressed 2-D transducer arrays for volumetric ultrasound imaging is investigated. Experimental results from a 2.7 MHz, λ/2-pitch capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with 62 rows and 62 columns are presented and analyzed...

  14. Acoustic imaging of vapor bubbles through optically non-transparent media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolbe, W.F.; Turko, B.T.; Leskovar, B.

    1983-10-01

    A preliminary investigation of the feasibility of acoustic imaging of vapor bubbles through optically nontransparent media is described. Measurements are reported showing the echo signals produced by air filled glass spheres of various sizes positioned in an aqueous medium as well as signals produced by actual vapor bubbles within a water filled steel pipe. In addition, the influence of the metallic wall thickness and material on the amplitude of the echo signals is investigated. Finally several examples are given of the imaging of spherical bubbles within metallic pipes using a simulated array of acoustic transducers mounted circumferentially around the pipe. The measurement procedures and a description of the measuring system are also given

  15. Digital image processing applied Rock Art tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montero Ruiz, Ignacio

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Adequate graphic recording has been one of the main objectives of rock art research. Photography has increased its role as a documentary technique. Now, digital image and its treatment allows new ways to observe the details of the figures and to develop a recording procedure which is as, or more, accurate than direct tracing. This technique also avoid deterioration of the rock paintings. The mathematical basis of this method is also presented.

    La correcta documentación del arte rupestre ha sido una preocupación constante por parte de los investigadores. En el desarrollo de nuevas técnicas de registro, directas e indirectas, la fotografía ha ido adquiriendo mayor protagonismo. La imagen digital y su tratamiento permiten nuevas posibilidades de observación de las figuras representadas y, en consecuencia, una lectura mediante la realización de calcos indirectos de tanta o mayor fiabilidad que la observación directa. Este sistema evita los riesgos de deterioro que provocan los calcos directos. Se incluyen las bases matemáticas que sustentan el método.

  16. Imaging acoustic vibrations in an ear model using spectrally encoded interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechin, Sveta; Yelin, Dvir

    2018-01-01

    Imaging vibrational patterns of the tympanic membrane would allow an accurate measurement of its mechanical properties and provide early diagnosis of various hearing disorders. Various optical technologies have been suggested to address this challenge and demonstrated in vitro using point scanning and full-field interferometry. Spectrally encoded imaging has been previously demonstrated capable of imaging tissue acoustic vibrations with high spatial resolution, including two-dimensional phase and amplitude mapping. In this work, we demonstrate a compact optical apparatus for imaging acoustic vibrations that could be incorporated into a commercially available digital otoscope. By transmitting harmonic sound waves through the otoscope insufflation port and analyzing the spectral interferograms using custom-built software, we demonstrate high-resolution vibration imaging of a circular rubber membrane within an ear model.

  17. Photo-acoustic imaging of coronary arteries with polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Broadway, Christian; Lamela, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    is useful for detection of plaques for prevention of rupture of vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques in the arteries can be distinguished using photo-acoustic imaging based on lipid accumulation with different characteristics of optical absorption. The basic principle of this imaging technique...... relies on exposing lipids to a laser capable of inducing photo-acoustic effect and a sensor affected by the induced pressure. Polymer optical fibre Bragg grating and Fabry-Perot sensors will be developed for detection of photo-acoustic signal in collaboration of Optoelectronics and Laser technology group......, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid under the TRIPOD project. TRIPOD (http://www.tripod-itn.eu) is a Marie Curie Initial Training Network located in the field of optical fibre sensors - an area where Europe has developed internationally competitive research and commercial activity. The aim is to significantly...

  18. Imaging of human tooth using ultrasound based chirp-coded nonlinear time reversal acoustics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dos Santos, S.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2011), s. 667-674 ISSN 0041-624X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : TR-NEWS * chirp-coded excitation * echodentography * ultrasonic imaging Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0041624X11000229

  19. A line array based near field imaging technique for characterising acoustical properties of elongated targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, F.P.G.

    1995-01-01

    With near field imaging techniques the acoustical pressure waves at distances other than the recorded can be calculated. Normally, acquisition on a two dimensional plane is necessary and extrapolation is performed by a Rayleigh integral. A near field single line instead of two dimensional plane

  20. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison.

  1. Applying the digital-image-correlation technique to measure the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    digital-image-correlation) technique is used to measure the deformation of the retrofitted column. The result shows that the DIC technique can be successfully applied to measure the relative displacement of the column. Additionally, thismethod ...

  2. Acoustic imaging of underground storage tank wastes: A feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turpening, R.; Zhu, Z.; Caravana, C.; Matarese, J.

    1995-01-01

    The objectives for this underground storage tank (UST) imaging investigation are: (1) to assess the feasibility of using acoustic methods in UST wastes, if shown to be feasible, develop and assess imaging strategies; (2) to assess the validity of using chemical simulants for the development of acoustic methods and equipment. This investigation examined the velocity of surrogates, both salt cake and sludge surrogates. In addition collected seismic cross well data in a real tank (114-TX) on the Hanford Reservation. Lastly, drawing on the knowledge of the simulants and the estimates of the velocities of the waste in tank 114-TX the authors generated a hypothetical model of waste in a tank and showed that non-linear travel time tomographic imaging would faithfully image that stratigraphy

  3. Smart DNA Fabrication Using Sound Waves: Applying Acoustic Dispensing Technologies to Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanigowska, Paulina; Shen, Yue; Zheng, Yijing; Rosser, Susan; Cai, Yizhi

    2016-02-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) technology uses focused acoustic energy to transfer nanoliter-scale liquid droplets with high precision and accuracy. This noncontact, tipless, low-volume dispensing technology minimizes the possibility of cross-contamination and potentially reduces the costs of reagents and consumables. To date, acoustic dispensers have mainly been used in screening libraries of compounds. In this paper, we describe the first application of this powerful technology to the rapidly developing field of synthetic biology, for DNA synthesis and assembly at the nanoliter scale using a Labcyte Echo 550 acoustic dispenser. We were able to successfully downscale PCRs and the popular one-pot DNA assembly methods, Golden Gate and Gibson assemblies, from the microliter to the nanoliter scale with high assembly efficiency, which effectively cut the reagent cost by 20- to 100-fold. We envision that acoustic dispensing will become an instrumental technology in synthetic biology, in particular in the era of DNA foundries. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  4. Orthogonal matching pursuit applied to the deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padois, Thomas; Berry, Alain

    2015-12-01

    Microphone arrays and beamforming have become a standard method to localize aeroacoustic sources. Deconvolution techniques have been developed to improve spatial resolution of beamforming maps. The deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources (DAMAS) is a standard deconvolution technique, which has been enhanced via a sparsity approach called sparsity constrained deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources (SC-DAMAS). In this paper, the DAMAS inverse problem is solved using the orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) and compared with beamforming and SC-DAMAS. The resulting noise source maps show that OMP-DAMAS is an efficient source localization technique in the case of uncorrelated or correlated acoustic sources. Moreover, the computation time is clearly reduced as compared to SC-DAMAS.

  5. An Efficient Acoustic Density Estimation Method with Human Detectors Applied to Gibbons in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Kidney

    Full Text Available Some animal species are hard to see but easy to hear. Standard visual methods for estimating population density for such species are often ineffective or inefficient, but methods based on passive acoustics show more promise. We develop spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR methods for territorial vocalising species, in which humans act as an acoustic detector array. We use SECR and estimated bearing data from a single-occasion acoustic survey of a gibbon population in northeastern Cambodia to estimate the density of calling groups. The properties of the estimator are assessed using a simulation study, in which a variety of survey designs are also investigated. We then present a new form of the SECR likelihood for multi-occasion data which accounts for the stochastic availability of animals. In the context of gibbon surveys this allows model-based estimation of the proportion of groups that produce territorial vocalisations on a given day, thereby enabling the density of groups, instead of the density of calling groups, to be estimated. We illustrate the performance of this new estimator by simulation. We show that it is possible to estimate density reliably from human acoustic detections of visually cryptic species using SECR methods. For gibbon surveys we also show that incorporating observers' estimates of bearings to detected groups substantially improves estimator performance. Using the new form of the SECR likelihood we demonstrate that estimates of availability, in addition to population density and detection function parameters, can be obtained from multi-occasion data, and that the detection function parameters are not confounded with the availability parameter. This acoustic SECR method provides a means of obtaining reliable density estimates for territorial vocalising species. It is also efficient in terms of data requirements since since it only requires routine survey data. We anticipate that the low-tech field requirements will

  6. Application of acoustical holography for construction shadow images in ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Zimpfer, J.

    1977-01-01

    The full-scale, three-dimensional presentation of material defects by means of acoustical holography is limited on the one hand by an insufficient resolving power in depth of the procedure and, on the other hand, by the fact that the defects of the material to be examined often reflect mirror-like. Examined is the possible range of reducing these limitations by means of constructing shadow images of defects in ultrasonic testing without - as it is usually done - reconstructing the sonic field reflected by the flow but reconstructing the sonic field diffracted at the flow by means of acoustical holography. It has been shown that acoustical holography, during which the amplitude information is always analyzed as well as - on principle - the phase information, improves the efficiency of ultrasonic testing to a large extent. (orig.) [de

  7. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Brewster Angle Reflection Imaging of Acoustic Tiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Kilcullen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Brewster angle reflection imaging apparatus is demonstrated which is capable of detecting hidden water-filled voids in a rubber tile sample. This imaging application simulates a real-world hull inspection problem for Royal Canadian Navy Victoria-class submarines. The tile samples represent a challenging imaging application due to their large refractive index and absorption coefficient. With a rubber transmission window at approximately 80 GHz, terahertz (THz sensing methods have shown promise for probing these structures in the laboratory. Operating at Brewster’s angle allows for the typically strong front surface reflection to be minimized while also conveniently making the method insensitive to air-filled voids. Using a broadband THz time-domain waveform imaging system (THz-TDS, we demonstrate satisfactory imaging and detection of water-filled voids without complicated signal processing. Optical properties of the tile samples at low THz frequencies are also reported.

  8. Negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Liu Zhengyou; Qiu Chunyin

    2008-01-01

    By using of the multiple scattering methods, we study the negative refraction imaging effect of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystals composed of coated solid inclusions placed in solid matrix. We show that localized resonance mechanism brings on a group of flat single-mode bands in low-frequency region, which provides two equivalent frequency surfaces (EFS) close to circular. The two constant frequency surfaces correspond to two Bloch modes, a right-handed and a left-handed, whose leading mode are respectively transverse (T) and longitudinal (L) modes. The negative refraction behaviors of the two kinds of modes have been demonstrated by simulation of a Gaussian beam through a finite system. High-quality far-field imaging by a planar lens for transverse or longitudinal waves has been realized separately. This three-component phononic crystal may thus serve as a mode selector in negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves

  9. Temperature effects on an acoustic emission based SHM system - Applied to composite materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargalui, A.; Martinez, M.J.; Zarouchas, D.; Pant, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the effect of temperature variations and the position of the piezoelectric sensors with respect to fiber orientation angle, as it relates to acoustic emission wave velocity in composite structures. A hybrid panel consisting of Unidirectional Carbon Fiber (UDCF)

  10. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  11. Fast photoacoustic imaging with a line scanning optical-acoustical resolution photoacoustic microscope (LS-OAR-PAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuster, Robert; Paltauf, Guenther

    2015-07-01

    We present the concept, the setup and a preliminary experiment using optical ultrasound detection with a CCD camera combined with focused line excitation for photoacoustic microscopy. The line scanning optical-acoustical resolution photoacoustic microscope (LS-OAR-PAM) with optical ultrasound detection is capable of real-time B-scan imaging providing acoustical resolution within the individual B-scans and optical out of plane resolution up to a depth limited by optical diffusion. A 3D image is composed of reconstructed B-scan images recorded while scanning the excitation line along the sample surface. Proof of concept is shown by imaging a phantom containing black human hairs and carbon fibers. The obtained C-scan image clearly shows the different resolution in the two perpendicular directions, namely diffraction limited by optical focusing in scan direction and acoustically limited in direction parallel to line orientation by the properties of acoustic wave propagation.

  12. Three dimensional full-wave nonlinear acoustic simulations: Applications to ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinton, Gianmarco [Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina - North Carolina State University, 348 Taylor Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA gfp@unc.edu (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Characterization of acoustic waves that propagate nonlinearly in an inhomogeneous medium has significant applications to diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. The generation of an ultrasound image of human tissue is based on the complex physics of acoustic wave propagation: diffraction, reflection, scattering, frequency dependent attenuation, and nonlinearity. The nonlinearity of wave propagation is used to the advantage of diagnostic scanners that use the harmonic components of the ultrasonic signal to improve the resolution and penetration of clinical scanners. One approach to simulating ultrasound images is to make approximations that can reduce the physics to systems that have a low computational cost. Here a maximalist approach is taken and the full three dimensional wave physics is simulated with finite differences. This paper demonstrates how finite difference simulations for the nonlinear acoustic wave equation can be used to generate physically realistic two and three dimensional ultrasound images anywhere in the body. A specific intercostal liver imaging scenario for two cases: with the ribs in place, and with the ribs removed. This configuration provides an imaging scenario that cannot be performed in vivo but that can test the influence of the ribs on image quality. Several imaging properties are studied, in particular the beamplots, the spatial coherence at the transducer surface, the distributed phase aberration, and the lesion detectability for imaging at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies. The results indicate, counterintuitively, that at the fundamental frequency the beamplot improves due to the apodization effect of the ribs but at the same time there is more degradation from reverberation clutter. At the harmonic frequency there is significantly less improvement in the beamplot and also significantly less degradation from reverberation. It is shown that even though simulating the full propagation physics is computationally challenging it

  13. Anomalous diffusion process applied to magnetic resonance image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senra Filho, A. C. da S.; Garrido Salmon, C. E.; Murta Junior, L. O.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion process is widely applied to digital image enhancement both directly introducing diffusion equation as in anisotropic diffusion (AD) filter, and indirectly by convolution as in Gaussian filter. Anomalous diffusion process (ADP), given by a nonlinear relationship in diffusion equation and characterized by an anomalous parameters q, is supposed to be consistent with inhomogeneous media. Although classic diffusion process is widely studied and effective in various image settings, the effectiveness of ADP as an image enhancement is still unknown. In this paper we proposed the anomalous diffusion filters in both isotropic (IAD) and anisotropic (AAD) forms for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement. Filters based on discrete implementation of anomalous diffusion were applied to noisy MRI T2w images (brain, chest and abdominal) in order to quantify SNR gains estimating the performance for the proposed anomalous filter when realistic noise is added to those images. Results show that for images containing complex structures, e.g. brain structures, anomalous diffusion presents the highest enhancements when compared to classical diffusion approach. Furthermore, ADP presented a more effective enhancement for images containing Rayleigh and Gaussian noise. Anomalous filters showed an ability to preserve anatomic edges and a SNR improvement of 26% for brain images, compared to classical filter. In addition, AAD and IAD filters showed optimum results for noise distributions that appear on extreme situations on MRI, i.e. in low SNR images with approximate Rayleigh noise distribution, and for high SNR images with Gaussian or non central χ noise distributions. AAD and IAD filter showed the best results for the parametric range 1.2 MRI. This study indicates the proposed anomalous filters as promising approaches in qualitative and quantitative MRI enhancement.

  14. Synthetic Aperture Acoustic Imaging for Roadside Detection of Solid Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    correction algorithm was developed earlier in the program and implemented into the SAA imaging code, based on the use of two rotary encoders mounted...estimated in accordance with ASTM C70-13 using the burn-off method. The impedance tube sample holders were placed into a oven set to 110◦ C and cooked

  15. International symposium on pattern recognition and acoustical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 50 selections. Some of the titles are: Inverse scattering theory foundations of tomography with diffracting wavefields; Statistical physics of medical ultrasonic images; Pattern recognition in geophysical exploration; and Applications of cluster analysis and unsupervised learning to multivariate tissue characterization

  16. Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation applied to medical imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming (SASB) is applied to medical ultrasound imaging using a multi element convex array transducer. The main motivation for SASB is to apply synthetic aperture techniques without the need for storing RF-data for a number of elements and hereby devise a system...... with a reduced system complexity. Using a 192 element, 3.5 MHz, λ-pitch transducer, it is demonstrated using tissue-phantom and wire-phantom measurements, how the speckle size and the detail resolution is improved compared to conventional imaging....

  17. Demonstration of acoustic resonances in a cylindrical cavity applying the photoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, N. L.; Vallespi, A. S.; Zajarevich, N. M.; Peuriot, A. L.; Slezak, V. B.

    2017-09-01

    In this work we present some experiments which can be performed in college or on the first courses of university to acquire knowledge about resonant acoustical phenomena in closed cavities in a tangible way, through experiments based on the photoacoustic effect in gases. This phenomenon consists in the generation of acoustic waves after optical excitation of an absorbing gas and further local heating of the non-absorbing surrounding gas by energy exchange through collisions between molecules of both species. Simple experiments, performed with daily live elements, can be very useful for teachers and students to get in touch with the phenomenon of acoustic resonances with the addition of concepts about light-matter interaction. The setups consist of the resonant cavity, the illumination source and the signal detection-acquisition scheme. In this paper a closed glass test tube is used as the resonant cavity and is filled with a mixture of nitrogen dioxide and air. The illumination is performed by a pulsed power LED modulated at different resonant frequencies of the cavity. A microphone inside the tube is connected to an oscilloscope which displays the photoacoustic signal. The LED is moved along the tube showing how different resonant modes can be excited.

  18. High-resolution acoustic imaging at low frequencies using 3D-printed metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laureti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic metamaterial has been constructed using 3D printing. It contained an array of air-filled channels, whose size and shape could be varied within the design and manufacture process. In this paper we analyze both numerically and experimentally the properties of this polymer metamaterial structure, and demonstrate its use for the imaging of a sample with sub-wavelength dimensions in the audible frequency range.

  19. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichen Yan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Matched field processing (MFP is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method.

  20. Applying the digital-image-correlation technique to measure the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has been applied for analysing various structural problems. For exam- ple, French scholars Raffard et ... observe the crack development in masonry wall. One major advantage of DIC technique ... based on the characteristic gray-scale distributions in the image of the structural speckle on the specimen surface. As shown in ...

  1. Digital processing methodology applied to exploring of radiological images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cristiane de Queiroz

    2004-01-01

    In this work, digital image processing is applied as a automatic computational method, aimed for exploring of radiological images. It was developed an automatic routine, from the segmentation and post-processing techniques to the radiology images acquired from an arrangement, consisting of a X-ray tube, target and filter of molybdenum, of 0.4 mm and 0.03 mm, respectively, and CCD detector. The efficiency of the methodology developed is showed in this work, through a case study, where internal injuries in mangoes are automatically detected and monitored. This methodology is a possible tool to be introduced in the post-harvest process in packing houses. A dichotomic test was applied to evaluate a efficiency of the method. The results show a success of 87.7% to correct diagnosis and 12.3% to failures to correct diagnosis with a sensibility of 93% and specificity of 80%. (author)

  2. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Jithin; Jose, J.; Willemink, Rene; Willemink, Rene G.H.; Resink, Steffen; Piras, D.; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; van Hespen, J.C.G.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    We present a ‘hybrid’ imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  3. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jose, Jithin; Willemink, Rene G. H.; Resink, Steffen; Piras, Daniele; van Hespen, J. C. G.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-01

    We present a 'hybrid' imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of

  4. Evaluating the Benefit of Elevated Acoustic Output in Harmonic Motion Estimation in Ultrasonic Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yufeng; Palmeri, Mark L; Rouze, Ned C; Haystead, Clare M; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2018-02-01

    Harmonic imaging techniques have been applied in ultrasonic elasticity imaging to obtain higher-quality tissue motion tracking data. However, harmonic tracking can be signal-to-noise ratio and penetration depth limited during clinical imaging, resulting in decreased yield of successful shear wave speed measurements. A logical approach is to increase the source pressure, but the in situ pressures used in diagnostic ultrasound have been subject to a de facto upper limit based on the Food and Drug Administration guideline for the mechanical index (MI estimation yield by 27% at a focal depth of 5 cm, with larger yield increase in more difficult-to-image patients. High-MI tracking improved harmonic tracking data quality by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio and decreasing jitter in the tissue motion data. We conclude that there is clinical benefit to use of elevated acoustic output in shear wave tracking, particularly in difficult-to-image patients. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Polymer Optical Fibre Sensors for Endoscopic Opto-Acoustic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet

    2015-01-01

    is the physical size of the device, allowing compatibility with current technology, while governing flexibility of the distal end of the endoscope based on the needs of the sensor. Polymer optical fibre (POF) presents a novel approach for endoscopic applications and has been positively discussed and compared...... in existing publications. A great advantage can be obtained for endoscopy due to a small size and array potential to provide discrete imaging speed improvements. Optical fibre exhibits numerous advantages over conventional piezo-electric transducers, such as immunity from electromagnetic interference...... and a higher resolution at small sizes. Furthermore, micro structured polymer optical fibres offer over 12 times the sensitivity of silica fibre. We present a polymer fibre Bragg grating ultrasound detector with a core diameter of 125 microns. We discuss the ultrasonic signals received and draw conclusions...

  6. Perceptual thresholds for detecting modifications applied to the acoustical properties of a violin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Claudia; Cross, Ian; Moore, Brian C J; Woodhouse, Jim

    2007-12-01

    This study is the first step in the psychoacoustic exploration of perceptual differences between the sounds of different violins. A method was used which enabled the same performance to be replayed on different "virtual violins," so that the relationships between acoustical characteristics of violins and perceived qualities could be explored. Recordings of real performances were made using a bridge-mounted force transducer, giving an accurate representation of the signal from the violin string. These were then played through filters corresponding to the admittance curves of different violins. Initially, limits of listener performance in detecting changes in acoustical characteristics were characterized. These consisted of shifts in frequency or increases in amplitude of single modes or frequency bands that have been proposed previously to be significant in the perception of violin sound quality. Thresholds were significantly lower for musically trained than for nontrained subjects but were not significantly affected by the violin used as a baseline. Thresholds for the musicians typically ranged from 3 to 6 dB for amplitude changes and 1.5%-20% for frequency changes. Interpretation of the results using excitation patterns showed that thresholds for the best subjects were quite well predicted by a multichannel model based on optimal processing.

  7. Improved SIFT descriptor applied to stereo image matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Luan; Zhai, You; Xiong, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) has been proven to perform better on the distinctiveness and robustness than other features. But it cannot satisfy the needs of low contrast images matching and the matching results are sensitive to 3D viewpoint change of camera. In order to improve the performance of SIFT to low contrast images and images with large 3D viewpoint change, a new matching method based on improved SIFT is proposed. First, an adaptive contrast threshold is computed for each initial key point in low contrast image region, which uses pixels in its 9×9 local neighborhood, and then using it to eliminate initial key points in low contrast image region. Second, a new SIFT descriptor with 48 dimensions is computed for each key point. Third, a hierarchical matching method based on epipolar line and differences of key points' dominate orientation is presented. The experimental results prove that the method can greatly enhance the performance of SIFT to low contrast image matching. Besides, when applying it to stereo images matching with the hierarchical matching method, the correct matches and matching efficiency are greatly enhanced.

  8. Spectrographic Image Analysis Applied to Gabor and Wavelet Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    I present a new package for analysis of two-dimensional fields commonly produced by spectrum analysis of harmonic tremor and other seismic signals recorded during volcanic unrest. Exploding volcanoes often exhibit considerable variability in seismic signature - events can range considerably in amplitude, bandwidth and source time function. Harmonic behavior is common on numerous volcanoes and examples show the presence of frequency gliding interspersed with impulsive and emergent explosive signals. The intermittent behavior poses a serious challenge for signal processing and automated analysis for extracting important volcano seismo-acoustic parameters. Here we introduce image processing methods to estimate ridge continuity on spectrograms and to form the basis for pattern recognition on varying quasi-harmonic tremor. Standard routines such as pixel opening and closing, threshold estimation and edge detection will be illustrated. For example, distinguishing harmonic tremor from chugging may be an important element of a hazard reduction program at volcano observatories. Patterns revealed in spectrograms and wavelet transforms have been used in the past to extract physical parameters associated with ongoing eruptions. In this paper an additional level of abstraction is used for pattern recognition. Application of these automated methods for extracting the structure underlying seismic behavior may provide critical time sensitive information used for mitigation.

  9. Correlation-based nonlinear composite filters applied to image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Díaz, Saúl

    2010-08-01

    Correlation-based pattern recognition has been an area of extensive research in the past few decades. Recently, composite nonlinear correlation filters invariants to translation, rotation, and scale were proposed. The design of the filters is based on logical operations and nonlinear correlation. In this work nonlinear filters are designed and applied to non-homogeneously illuminated images acquired with an optical microscope. Images are embedded into cluttered background, non-homogeneously illuminated and corrupted by random noise, which makes difficult the recognition task. Performance of nonlinear composite filters is compared with performance of other composite correlation filters, in terms discrimination capability.

  10. Bond-selective photoacoustic imaging by converting molecular vibration into acoustic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Hui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The quantized vibration of chemical bonds provides a way of detecting specific molecules in a complex tissue environment. Unlike pure optical methods, for which imaging depth is limited to a few hundred micrometers by significant optical scattering, photoacoustic detection of vibrational absorption breaks through the optical diffusion limit by taking advantage of diffused photons and weak acoustic scattering. Key features of this method include both high scalability of imaging depth from a few millimeters to a few centimeters and chemical bond selectivity as a novel contrast mechanism for photoacoustic imaging. Its biomedical applications spans detection of white matter loss and regeneration, assessment of breast tumor margins, and diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. This review provides an overview of the recent advances made in vibration-based photoacoustic imaging and various biomedical applications enabled by this new technology.

  11. Acoustic Imaging of a Turbidity Current Flowing along a Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Hiroji, A.; Cahill, L.; Fedele, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    As part of a 3 month sequence of repetitive surveys and ADCP monitoring, more than 30 turbidity currents have been identified modifying a lobe channel in 130 to 190m of water on the Squamish prodelta. For a 6 day period, daily surveys at low tide tried to capture the change resulting from a single flow. On the 8thof June three flows occurred within a half hour. Along channel multibeam images of the seabed and water column were obtained from a moving vessel immediately before, during and after the passage of the third flow. In this manner the spatial extent of the in-channel and overbank flow could be constrained. By following the flow, the spatial pattern of scattering from the flow upper surface could be examined over a 2 km length of the channel. Along channel bands of high scattering appear related to enhanced release of gas along the channel flanks. Notably, no signature of the underlying across-channel bedform modulations were evident, suggesting that the upper surface of the flow does not feel the influence of the channel floor. Overbank spillage of the flow could be detected by perturbation of a plankton scattering layer just above the seabed. Additionally, evidence of enhanced overbank deposition due to flow stripping on the outer corner of a bend was identified from backscatter changes. The specific seabed alteration due to this flow could be identified and compared with the cumulative change over three months in the channel and adjacent channel-lobe transition zone. As the flow passed under the ADCP, it had a peak velocity of over 2 m/s, a thickness of 4-5m and duration of 35 minutes. Based on the timing of the flow head when in view of the surface vessel, it was decelerating as it exited the mouth of the channel.

  12. Data Quality Control Tools Applied to Seismo-Acoustic Arrays in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Hayward, C.; Stump, B. W.

    2017-12-01

    We assess data quality (data gap, seismometer orientation, timing error, noise level and coherence between co-located sensors) for seismic and infrasound data in South Korea using six seismo-acoustic arrays, BRDAR, CHNAR, KSGAR, KMPAR, TJIAR, and YPDAR, cooperatively operated by Southern Methodist University and Korea Institute for Geosciences and Mineral Resources. Timing errors associated with seismometers can be found based on estimated changes in instrument orientation calculated from RMS errors between the reference array and each array seismometer using waveforms filtered from 0.1 to 0.35 Hz. Noise levels of seismic and infrasound data are analyzed to investigate local environmental effects and seasonal noise variation. In order to examine the spectral properties of the noise, the waveform are analyzed using Welch's method (Welch, 1967) that produces a single power spectral estimate from an average of spectra taken at regular intervals over a specific time period. This analysis quantifies the range of noise conditions found at each of the arrays over the given time period. We take an advantage of the fact that infrasound sensors are co-located or closely located to one another, which allows for a direct comparison of sensors, following the method by Ringler et al. (2010). The power level differences between two sensors at the same array in the frequency band of interest are used to monitor temporal changes in data quality and instrument conditions. A data quality factor is assigned to stations based on the average values of temporal changes estimated in the frequency and time domains. These monitoring tools enable us to automatically assess technical issue related to the instruments and data quality at each seismo-acoustic array as well as to investigate local environmental effects and seasonal variations in both seismic and infrasound data.

  13. Acoustic Property Reconstruction of a Neonate Yangtze Finless Porpoise's (Neophocaena asiaeorientalis) Head Based on CT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chong; Wang, Zhitao; Song, Zhongchang; Wang, Kexiong; Wang, Ding; Au, Whitlow W. L.; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the acoustic properties of a neonate finless porpoise’s head was performed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). The head of the deceased neonate porpoise was also segmented across the body axis and cut into slices. The averaged sound velocity and density were measured, and the Hounsfield units (HU) of the corresponding slices were obtained from computed tomography scanning. A regression analysis was employed to show the linear relationships between the Hounsfield unit and both sound velocity and density of samples. Furthermore, the CT imaging data were used to compare the HU value, sound velocity, density and acoustic characteristic impedance of the main tissues in the porpoise’s head. The results showed that the linear relationships between HU and both sound velocity and density were qualitatively consistent with previous studies on Indo-pacific humpback dolphins and Cuvier’s beaked whales. However, there was no significant increase of the sound velocity and acoustic impedance from the inner core to the outer layer in this neonate finless porpoise’s melon. PMID:25856588

  14. Time domain localization technique with sparsity constraint for imaging acoustic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padois, Thomas; Doutres, Olivier; Sgard, Franck; Berry, Alain

    2017-09-01

    This paper addresses source localization technique in time domain for broadband acoustic sources. The objective is to accurately and quickly detect the position and amplitude of noise sources in workplaces in order to propose adequate noise control options and prevent workers hearing loss or safety risk. First, the generalized cross correlation associated with a spherical microphone array is used to generate an initial noise source map. Then a linear inverse problem is defined to improve this initial map. Commonly, the linear inverse problem is solved with an l2 -regularization. In this study, two sparsity constraints are used to solve the inverse problem, the orthogonal matching pursuit and the truncated Newton interior-point method. Synthetic data are used to highlight the performances of the technique. High resolution imaging is achieved for various acoustic sources configurations. Moreover, the amplitudes of the acoustic sources are correctly estimated. A comparison of computation times shows that the technique is compatible with quasi real-time generation of noise source maps. Finally, the technique is tested with real data.

  15. Sensing the delivery and endocytosis of nanoparticles using magneto-photo-acoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Qu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Many biomedical applications necessitate a targeted intracellular delivery of the nanomaterial to specific cells. Therefore, a non-invasive and reliable imaging tool is required to detect both the delivery and cellular endocytosis of the nanoparticles. Herein, we demonstrate that magneto-photo-acoustic (MPA imaging can be used to monitor the delivery and to identify endocytosis of magnetic and optically absorbing nanoparticles. The relationship between photoacoustic (PA and magneto-motive ultrasound (MMUS signals from the in vitro samples were analyzed to identify the delivery and endocytosis of nanoparticles. The results indicated that during the delivery of nanoparticles to the vicinity of the cells, both PA and MMUS signals are almost linearly proportional. However, accumulation of nanoparticles within the cells leads to nonlinear MMUS-PA relationship, due to non-linear MMUS signal amplification. Therefore, through longitudinal MPA imaging, it is possible to monitor the delivery of nanoparticles and identify the endocytosis of the nanoparticles by living cells.

  16. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers Applied to High Temperature Plates for Potential Use in the Solar Thermal Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kogia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Concentrated Solar Plants (CSPs are used in solar thermal industry for collecting and converting sunlight into electricity. Parabolic trough CSPs are the most widely used type of CSP and an absorber tube is an essential part of them. The hostile operating environment of the absorber tubes, such as high temperatures (400–550 °C, contraction/expansion, and vibrations, may lead them to suffer from creep, thermo-mechanical fatigue, and hot corrosion. Hence, their condition monitoring is of crucial importance and a very challenging task as well. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs are a promising, non-contact technology of transducers that has the potential to be used for the inspection of large structures at high temperatures by exciting Guided Waves. In this paper, a study regarding the potential use of EMATs in this application and their performance at high temperature is presented. A Periodic Permanent Magnet (PPM EMAT with a racetrack coil, designed to excite Shear Horizontal waves (SH0, has been theoretically and experimentally evaluated at both room and high temperatures.

  17. Acoustic Emission and Echo Signal Compensation Techniques Applied to an Ultrasonic Logging-While-Drilling Caliper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yongchao; Ju, Xiaodong; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong

    2017-06-10

    A logging-while-drilling (LWD) caliper is a tool used for the real-time measurement of a borehole diameter in oil drilling engineering. This study introduces the mechanical structure and working principle of a new LWD caliper based on ultrasonic distance measurement (UDM). The detection range is a major performance index of a UDM system. This index is determined by the blind zone length and remote reflecting interface detection capability of the system. To reduce the blind zone length and detect near the reflecting interface, a full bridge acoustic emission technique based on bootstrap gate driver (BGD) and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) is designed by analyzing the working principle and impedance characteristics of a given piezoelectric transducer. To detect the remote reflecting interface and reduce the dynamic range of the received echo signals, the relationships between the echo amplitude and propagation distance of ultrasonic waves are determined. A signal compensation technique based on time-varying amplification theory, which can automatically change the gain according to the echo arrival time is designed. Lastly, the aforementioned techniques and corresponding circuits are experimentally verified. Results show that the blind zone length in the UDM system of the LWD caliper is significantly reduced and the capability to detect the remote reflecting interface is considerably improved.

  18. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  19. Reconstruction of an acoustic pressure field in a resonance tube by particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuu, K; Hasegawa, S

    2015-11-01

    A technique for estimating an acoustic field in a resonance tube is suggested. The estimation of an acoustic field in a resonance tube is important for the development of the thermoacoustic engine, and can be conducted employing two sensors to measure pressure. While this measurement technique is known as the two-sensor method, care needs to be taken with the location of pressure sensors when conducting pressure measurements. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is employed instead of a pressure measurement by a sensor, and two-dimensional velocity vector images are extracted as sequential data from only a one- time recording made by a video camera of PIV. The spatial velocity amplitude is obtained from those images, and a pressure distribution is calculated from velocity amplitudes at two points by extending the equations derived for the two-sensor method. By means of this method, problems relating to the locations and calibrations of multiple pressure sensors are avoided. Furthermore, to verify the accuracy of the present method, the experiments are conducted employing the conventional two-sensor method and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Then, results by the proposed method are compared with those obtained with the two-sensor method and LDV.

  20. Iterative electromagnetic Born inversion applied to earth conductivity imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alumbaugh, David Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This thesis investigates the use of a fast imaging technique to deduce the spatial conductivity distribution in the earth from low frequency (< 1 MHz), cross well electromagnetic (EM) measurements. The theory embodied in this work is the extension of previous strategies and is based on the Born series approximation to solve both the forward and inverse problem. Nonlinear integral equations are employed to derive the series expansion which accounts for the scattered magnetic fields that are generated by inhomogeneities embedded in either a homogenous or a layered earth. A sinusoidally oscillating, vertically oriented magnetic dipole is employed as a source, and it is assumed that the scattering bodies are azimuthally symmetric about the source dipole axis. The use of this model geometry reduces the 3-D vector problem to a more manageable 2-D scalar form. The validity of the cross well EM method is tested by applying the imaging scheme to two sets of field data. Images of the data collected at the Devine, Texas test site show excellent correlation with the well logs. Unfortunately there is a drift error present in the data that limits the accuracy of the results. A more complete set of data collected at the Richmond field station in Richmond, California demonstrates that cross well EM can be successfully employed to monitor the position of an injected mass of salt water. Both the data and the resulting images clearly indicate the plume migrates toward the north-northwest. The plausibility of these conclusions is verified by applying the imaging code to synthetic data generated by a 3-D sheet model.

  1. Sparsity-based acoustic inversion in cross-sectional multiscale optoacoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yiyong; Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Rosenthal, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: With recent advancement in hardware of optoacoustic imaging systems, highly detailed cross-sectional images may be acquired at a single laser shot, thus eliminating motion artifacts. Nonetheless, other sources of artifacts remain due to signal distortion or out-of-plane signals. The purpose of image reconstruction algorithms is to obtain the most accurate images from noisy, distorted projection data. Methods: In this paper, the authors use the model-based approach for acoustic inversion, combined with a sparsity-based inversion procedure. Specifically, a cost function is used that includes the L1 norm of the image in sparse representation and a total variation (TV) term. The optimization problem is solved by a numerically efficient implementation of a nonlinear gradient descent algorithm. TV–L1 model-based inversion is tested in the cross section geometry for numerically generated data as well as for in vivo experimental data from an adult mouse. Results: In all cases, model-based TV–L1 inversion showed a better performance over the conventional Tikhonov regularization, TV inversion, and L1 inversion. In the numerical examples, the images reconstructed with TV–L1 inversion were quantitatively more similar to the originating images. In the experimental examples, TV–L1 inversion yielded sharper images and weaker streak artifact. Conclusions: The results herein show that TV–L1 inversion is capable of improving the quality of highly detailed, multiscale optoacoustic images obtained in vivo using cross-sectional imaging systems. As a result of its high fidelity, model-based TV–L1 inversion may be considered as the new standard for image reconstruction in cross-sectional imaging

  2. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  3. Wiener-filter-based compensation of a transmitter’s radiation pattern using synthetic transmit aperture acoustic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laokulrat, Natsuda; Sugimoto, Masanori; Maeda, Yasushige; Hashizume, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    Airborne acoustic imaging has the capability of obtaining distance information of an object in a scene, the capability of distinguishing objects from the background or a texture and it can also estimate the velocity of objects. However, the nonideal radiation pattern of a transmitter used for insonifying an imaging space can degrade imaging results. In this work, radiation patterns have been investigated, and a new approach to decrease the effect of a transmitter’s radiation pattern in acoustic imaging is proposed. The novelty of our proposed method is that we used the measurement-based transmitter’s radiation compensation. The compensation can be accomplished without knowing anything about the model and characteristics of the transmitter, the receiver and the medium. We compensated for the transmitter’s radiation pattern and reconstructed acoustic images using the synthetic transmit aperture imaging technique. The compensation was based on the radiation pattern obtained from real measurements using a Wiener filter. The Wiener filter was used to compensate for the nonideal radiation pattern of the ultrasonic transmitter for both the phase and amplitude aspects simultaneously. To verify the proposed method, an indoor airborne acoustic imaging experiment was conducted using a two-dimensional (2D) receiver array and a 2D transmitter array. The results show an obvious improvement in the vertical angular resolution of the reconstructed three-dimensional images as well as a satisfactory horizontal angular resolution. (paper)

  4. Super-resolution imaging applied to moving object tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swalaganata, Galandaru; Ratna Sulistyaningrum, Dwi; Setiyono, Budi

    2017-10-01

    Moving object tracking in a video is a method used to detect and analyze changes that occur in an object that being observed. Visual quality and the precision of the tracked target are highly wished in modern tracking system. The fact that the tracked object does not always seem clear causes the tracking result less precise. The reasons are low quality video, system noise, small object, and other factors. In order to improve the precision of the tracked object especially for small object, we propose a two step solution that integrates a super-resolution technique into tracking approach. First step is super-resolution imaging applied into frame sequences. This step was done by cropping the frame in several frame or all of frame. Second step is tracking the result of super-resolution images. Super-resolution image is a technique to obtain high-resolution images from low-resolution images. In this research single frame super-resolution technique is proposed for tracking approach. Single frame super-resolution was a kind of super-resolution that it has the advantage of fast computation time. The method used for tracking is Camshift. The advantages of Camshift was simple calculation based on HSV color that use its histogram for some condition and color of the object varies. The computational complexity and large memory requirements required for the implementation of super-resolution and tracking were reduced and the precision of the tracked target was good. Experiment showed that integrate a super-resolution imaging into tracking technique can track the object precisely with various background, shape changes of the object, and in a good light conditions.

  5. Study of consolidating materials applied on wood by hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, G.; Serranti, S.; Capobianco, G.; Agresti, G.; Calienno, L.; Picchio, R.; Lo Monaco, A.; Santamaria, U.; Pelosi, C.

    2016-05-01

    The focus of this study was addressed to investigate the potentiality of HyperSpectral Imaging (HSI) in the monitoring of commercial consolidant products applied on wood samples. Poplar (Populus Sp.) and walnut (Juglans Regia L.) were chosen for the consolidant application. Both traditional and innovative products were selected, based on acrylic, epoxy and aliphatic compounds. Wood samples were stresses by freeze/thaw cycles in order to cause material degradation. Then the consolidants were applied under vacuum. The samples were finally artificially aged for 168 hours in a solar box chamber. The samples were acquired in the SWIR (1000-2500 nm) range by SISUChema XL™ device (Specim, Finland) after 168 hours of irradiation. As comparison, color measurement was also used as economic, simple and noninvasive technique to evaluate the deterioration and consolidation effects on wood. All data were then processed adopting a chemometric approach finalized to define correlation models, HSI based, between consolidating materials, wood species and short time ageing effects.

  6. Direct imaging of delayed magneto-dynamic modes induced by surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Michael; Macià, Ferran; Statuto, Nahuel; Finizio, Simone; Hernández-Mínguez, Alberto; Lendínez, Sergi; Santos, Paulo V; Fontcuberta, Josep; Hernàndez, Joan Manel; Kläui, Mathias; Aballe, Lucia

    2017-09-01

    The magnetoelastic effect-the change of magnetic properties caused by the elastic deformation of a magnetic material-has been proposed as an alternative approach to magnetic fields for the low-power control of magnetization states of nanoelements since it avoids charge currents, which entail ohmic losses. Here, we have studied the effect of dynamic strain accompanying a surface acoustic wave on magnetic nanostructures in thermal equilibrium. We have developed an experimental technique based on stroboscopic X-ray microscopy that provides a pathway to the quantitative study of strain waves and magnetization at the nanoscale. We have simultaneously imaged the evolution of both strain and magnetization dynamics of nanostructures at the picosecond time scale and found that magnetization modes have a delayed response to the strain modes, adjustable by the magnetic domain configuration. Our results provide fundamental insight into magnetoelastic coupling in nanostructures and have implications for the design of strain-controlled magnetostrictive nano-devices.Understanding the effects of local dynamic strain on magnetization may help the development of magnetic devices. Foerster et al. demonstrate stroboscopic imaging that allows the observation of both strain and magnetization dynamics in nickel when surface acoustic waves are driven in the substrate.

  7. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  8. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics Theory and Expected Experimental Errors when Applied to a Scramjet Isolator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert Jeffrey; Baurle, Robert A.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2011-01-01

    A scramjet isolator model test apparatus is being assembled in the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The test apparatus is designed to support multiple measurement techniques for investigating the flow field in a scramjet isolator model. The test section is 1-inch high by 2-inch wide by 24-inch long and simulates a scramjet isolator with an aspect ratio of two. Unheated, dry air at a constant stagnation pressure and temperature is delivered to the isolator test section through a Mach 2.5 planar nozzle. The isolator test section is mechanically back-pressured to contain the resulting shock train within the 24-inch isolator length and supports temperature, static pressure, and high frequency pressure measurements at the wall. Additionally, nonintrusive methods including laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), spontaneous Raman scattering, particle image velocimetry, and schlieren imaging are being incorporated to measure off-wall fluid dynamic, thermodynamic, and transport properties of the flow field. Interchangeable glass and metallic sidewalls and optical access appendages permit making multiple measurements simultaneously. The measurements will be used to calibrate computational fluid dynamics turbulence models and characterize the back-pressured flow of a scramjet isolator. This paper describes the test apparatus, including the optical access appendages; the physics of the LITA method; and estimates of LITA measurement uncertainty for measurements of the speed of sound and temperature.

  9. A novel imaging technique based on the spatial coherence of backscattered waves: demonstration in the presence of acoustical clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jeremy J.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Lediju, Muyinatu; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-03-01

    In the last 20 years, the number of suboptimal and inadequate ultrasound exams has increased. This trend has been linked to the increasing population of overweight and obese individuals. The primary causes of image degradation in these individuals are often attributed to phase aberration and clutter. Phase aberration degrades image quality by distorting the transmitted and received pressure waves, while clutter degrades image quality by introducing incoherent acoustical interference into the received pressure wavefront. Although significant research efforts have pursued the correction of image degradation due to phase aberration, few efforts have characterized or corrected image degradation due to clutter. We have developed a novel imaging technique that is capable of differentiating ultrasonic signals corrupted by acoustical interference. The technique, named short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) imaging, is based on the spatial coherence of the received ultrasonic wavefront at small spatial distances across the transducer aperture. We demonstrate comparative B-mode and SLSC images using full-wave simulations that include the effects of clutter and show that SLSC imaging generates contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) that are significantly better than B-mode imaging under noise-free conditions. In the presence of noise, SLSC imaging significantly outperforms conventional B-mode imaging in all image quality metrics. We demonstrate the use of SLSC imaging in vivo and compare B-mode and SLSC images of human thyroid and liver.

  10. Wavelet Domain Radiofrequency Pulse Design Applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettner, Andrew M.; Mickevicius, Nikolai J.; Ersoz, Ali; Koch, Kevin M.; Muftuler, L. Tugan; Nencka, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for designing radiofrequency (RF) pulses with numerical optimization in the wavelet domain is presented. Numerical optimization may yield solutions that might otherwise have not been discovered with analytic techniques alone. Further, processing in the wavelet domain reduces the number of unknowns through compression properties inherent in wavelet transforms, providing a more tractable optimization problem. This algorithm is demonstrated with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spin echo refocusing pulses because reduced peak RF power is necessary for SMS diffusion imaging with high acceleration factors. An iterative, nonlinear, constrained numerical minimization algorithm was developed to generate an optimized RF pulse waveform. Wavelet domain coefficients were modulated while iteratively running a Bloch equation simulator to generate the intermediate slice profile of the net magnetization. The algorithm minimizes the L2-norm of the slice profile with additional terms to penalize rejection band ripple and maximize the net transverse magnetization across each slice. Simulations and human brain imaging were used to demonstrate a new RF pulse design that yields an optimized slice profile and reduced peak energy deposition when applied to a multiband single-shot echo planar diffusion acquisition. This method may be used to optimize factors such as magnitude and phase spectral profiles and peak RF pulse power for multiband simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) acquisitions. Wavelet-based RF pulse optimization provides a useful design method to achieve a pulse waveform with beneficial amplitude reduction while preserving appropriate magnetization response for magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517262

  11. Passive element enriched photoacoustic computed tomography (PER PACT) for simultaneous imaging of acoustic propagation properties and light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jithin; Willemink, Rene G H; Resink, Steffen; Piras, Daniele; van Hespen, J C G; Slump, Cornelis H; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-01-31

    We present a 'hybrid' imaging approach which can image both light absorption properties and acoustic transmission properties of an object in a two-dimensional slice using a computed tomography (CT) photoacoustic imager. The ultrasound transmission measurement method uses a strong optical absorber of small cross-section placed in the path of the light illuminating the sample. This absorber, which we call a passive element acts as a source of ultrasound. The interaction of ultrasound with the sample can be measured in transmission, using the same ultrasound detector used for photoacoustics. Such measurements are made at various angles around the sample in a CT approach. Images of the ultrasound propagation parameters, attenuation and speed of sound, can be reconstructed by inversion of a measurement model. We validate the method on specially designed phantoms and biological specimens. The obtained images are quantitative in terms of the shape, size, location, and acoustic properties of the examined heterogeneities.

  12. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Kaneko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  13. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Shogo; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  14. Applied Fourier analysis from signal processing to medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Tim

    2017-01-01

    The first of its kind, this focused textbook serves as a self-contained resource for teaching from scratch the fundamental mathematics of Fourier analysis and illustrating some of its most current, interesting applications, including medical imaging and radar processing. Developed by the author from extensive classroom teaching experience, it provides a breadth of theory that allows students to appreciate the utility of the subject, but at as accessible a depth as possible. With myriad applications included, this book can be adapted to a one or two semester course in Fourier Analysis or serve as the basis for independent study. Applied Fourier Analysis assumes no prior knowledge of analysis from its readers, and begins by making the transition from linear algebra to functional analysis. It goes on to cover basic Fourier series and Fourier transforms before delving into applications in sampling and interpolation theory, digital communications, radar processing, medical i maging, and heat and wave equations. Fo...

  15. A cross-correlation objective function for least-squares migration and visco-acoustic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Dutta, Gaurav

    2014-08-05

    Conventional acoustic least-squares migration inverts for a reflectivity image that best matches the amplitudes of the observed data. However, for field data applications, it is not easy to match the recorded amplitudes because of the visco-elastic nature of the earth and inaccuracies in the estimation of source signature and strength at different shot locations. To relax the requirement for strong amplitude matching of least-squares migration, we use a normalized cross-correlation objective function that is only sensitive to the similarity between the predicted and the observed data. Such a normalized cross-correlation objective function is also equivalent to a time-domain phase inversion method where the main emphasis is only on matching the phase of the data rather than the amplitude. Numerical tests on synthetic and field data show that such an objective function can be used as an alternative to visco-acoustic least-squares reverse time migration (Qp-LSRTM) when there is strong attenuation in the subsurface and the estimation of the attenuation parameter Qp is insufficiently accurate.

  16. Acoustic radiation- and streaming-induced microparticle velocities determined by microparticle image velocimetry in an ultrasound symmetry plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present microparticle image velocimetry measurements of suspended microparticles of diameters from 0.6 to 10μm undergoing acoustophoresis in an ultrasound symmetry plane in a microchannel. The motion of the smallest particles is dominated by the Stokes drag from the induced acoustic streaming ...

  17. Enhanced delivery of gold nanoparticles by acoustic cavitation for photoacoustic imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsin; Liao, Ai-Ho; Lin, Jia-Yu; Lee, Cheng-Ru; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Min; Wang, Churng-Ren; Li, Pai-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Gold-nanorods incorporated with microbubbles (AuMBs) were introduced as a photoacoustic/ultrasound dual- modality contrast agent in our previous study. The application can be extended to theragnosis purpose. With the unique physical characteristics of AuMBs, we propose an enhanced delivery method for the encapsulated particles. For example, laser thermotherapy mediated by plasmonic nanoparticles can be made more effective by using microbubbles as a targeted carrier and acoustic cavitation for enhanced sonoporation. The hypothesis was experimentally tested. Firts, these AuMBs first act as molecular probes with binding to specific ligands. The improved targeting efficacy was macroscopically observed by an ultrasound system. The extended retention of targeted AuMB was observed and recorded for 30 minutes in a CT-26 tumor bearing mouse. Secondly, cavitation induced by time-varying acoustic field was also applied to disrupt the microbubbles and cause increased transient cellular permeability (a.k.a., sonoporation). Multimodal optical microscope based on a Cr:forsterite laser was used to directly observe these effects. The microscope can acquired third-harmonic generation (THG) and two-photon fluorescent (2PF) signals produced by the AuMBs. In vitro examination shows approximately a 60% improvement in terms of fluorescence signals from the cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles after sonoporation treatment. Therefore, we conclude that the controlled release is feasible and can further improve the therapeutic effects of the nanoparticles.

  18. Positioning and Imaging Detection of Corona Discharge in Air with Double Helix Acoustic Sensors Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Corona discharge could be a serious hazard to the outdoor insulation of a high-voltage (HV system and also is an important detection issue for insulation status diagnosis. In this study, a double-helix-ultrasonic-array (DHUA sensor was developed for corona positioning, which showed a good sensitivity to the ultrasonic signal originating from corona discharge and a satisfied directional response in static beam patterns. Based on the matting-based image fusion method, the acoustic intensity matrix was fused to a visual scene in real-time. This ultrasonic visualization technology was then evaluated with a simulation test and performed in a real air insulated substation (AIS, and showed a satisfied performance in terms of sensitivity and spatial location resolution.

  19. High-resolution acoustic-radiation-force-impulse imaging for assessing corneal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Huang, Chih-Chung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-07-01

    In ophthalmology, detecting the biomechanical properties of the cornea can provide valuable information about various corneal pathologies, including keratoconus and the phototoxic effects of ultraviolet radiation on the cornea. Also, the mechanical properties of the cornea can be used to evaluate the recovery from corneal refractive surgeries. Therefore, noninvasive and high-resolution estimation of the stiffness distribution in the cornea is important in ophthalmic diagnosis. The present study established a method for high-resolution acoustic-radiation-force-impulse (ARFI) imaging based on a dual-frequency confocal transducer in order to obtain a relative stiffness map, which was used to assess corneal sclerosis. An 11-MHz pushing element was used to induce localized displacements of tissue, which were monitored by a 48-MHz imaging element. Since the tissue displacements are directly correlated with the tissue elastic properties, the stiffness distribution in a tiny region of the cornea can be found by a mechanical B/D scan. The experimental system was verified using tissue-mimicking phantoms that included different geometric structures. Ex vivo cornea experiments were carried out using fresh porcine eyeballs. Corneas with localized sclerosis were created artificially by the injection of a formalin solution. The phantom experiments showed that the distributions of stiffness within different phantoms can be recognized clearly using ARFI imaging, and the measured lateral and axial resolutions of this imaging system were 177 and 153 μ m, respectively. The ex vivo experimental results from ARFI imaging showed that a tiny region of localized sclerosis in the cornea could be distinguished. All of the obtained results demonstrate that high-resolution ARFI imaging has considerable potential for the clinical diagnosis of corneal sclerosis.

  20. A spinal cord window chamber model for in vivo longitudinal multimodal optical and acoustic imaging in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Figley

    Full Text Available In vivo and direct imaging of the murine spinal cord and its vasculature using multimodal (optical and acoustic imaging techniques could significantly advance preclinical studies of the spinal cord. Such intrinsically high resolution and complementary imaging technologies could provide a powerful means of quantitatively monitoring changes in anatomy, structure, physiology and function of the living cord over time after traumatic injury, onset of disease, or therapeutic intervention. However, longitudinal in vivo imaging of the intact spinal cord in rodent models has been challenging, requiring repeated surgeries to expose the cord for imaging or sacrifice of animals at various time points for ex vivo tissue analysis. To address these limitations, we have developed an implantable spinal cord window chamber (SCWC device and procedures in mice for repeated multimodal intravital microscopic imaging of the cord and its vasculature in situ. We present methodology for using our SCWC to achieve spatially co-registered optical-acoustic imaging performed serially for up to four weeks, without damaging the cord or induction of locomotor deficits in implanted animals. To demonstrate the feasibility, we used the SCWC model to study the response of the normal spinal cord vasculature to ionizing radiation over time using white light and fluorescence microscopy combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT in vivo. In vivo power Doppler ultrasound and photoacoustics were used to directly visualize the cord and vascular structures and to measure hemoglobin oxygen saturation through the complete spinal cord, respectively. The model was also used for intravital imaging of spinal micrometastases resulting from primary brain tumor using fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging. Our SCWC model overcomes previous in vivo imaging challenges, and our data provide evidence of the broader utility of hybridized optical-acoustic imaging methods for obtaining

  1. Seabed Detection Using Application Of Image Side Scan Sonar Instrument (Acoustic Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zainuddin Lubis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of knowing the method for seabed detection using side-scan sonar images with sonar instrument is a much-needed requirement right now. This kind of threat also requires frequent sonar surveys in such areas. These survey operations need specific procedures and special equipment to ensure survey correctness. In this paper describes the method of observation and retrieval of marine imagery data using an acoustic signal method, to determine a target based on the sea. Side scan sonar is an instrument consisting of single beam transducer on both sides. Side scan sonar (SSS is a sonar development that is able to show in two-dimensional images of the seabed surface with seawater conditions and target targets simultaneously. The side scan sonar data processing is performed through geometric correction to establish the actual position of the image pixel, which consists of bottom tracking, slant-range correction, layback correction and radiometric correction performed for the backscatter intensity of the digital number assigned to each pixel including the Beam Angle Correction (BAC, Automatic Gain Control (AGC, Time Varied Gain (TVG, and Empirical Gain Normalization (EGN.

  2. Hyperspectral imaging based techniques applied to polluted clay characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Serranti, Silvia

    2006-10-01

    Polluted soils analysis and characterization is one of the basic step to perform in order to collect all the information to design and set-up correct soil reclamation strategies. Soil analysis is usually performed through "in-situ" sampling and laboratory analysis. Such an approach is usually quite expensive and does not allow to reach a direct and detailed knowledge of large areas for the intrinsic limits (high costs) linked to direct sampling and polluting elements detection. As a consequence numerical strategies are applied to extrapolate, starting from a discrete set of data, that is those related to collected samples, information about the contamination level of areas not directly interested by physical sampling. These models are usually very difficult to handle both for the intrinsic variability characterizing the media (soils) and for the high level of interactions between polluting agents, soil characteristics (organic matter content, size class distribution of the inorganic fraction, composition, etc.) and environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, presence of vegetation, human activities, etc.). Aim of this study, starting from previous researches addressed to evaluate the potentialities of hyperspectral imaging approach in polluting soil characterization, was to evaluate the results obtainable in the investigation of an "ad hoc" polluted benthonic clay, usually utilized in rubbish dump, in order to define fast and reliable control strategies addressed to monitor the status of such a material in terms of insulation.

  3. A study on applying image dictionary to inner organ registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, Takamichi; Asai, Takeshi; Iwata, Takuya; Hontani, Hidekata

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we report on selecting image features that are useful for registering organ surface in medical image based on image dictionary constructed for the organ. Here, the image dictionary denotes a basis set, which is non-orthogonal and over-complete one and is designed to represent images of the target organ. We propose a method that refers to a combination of the basis obtained for reconstructing a given image in order to estimate the location of the target organ. (author)

  4. Acoustical imaging using capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays: Devices, circuits, and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oralkan, Omer

    Integrated circuit technologies have had a great impact on the development of medical devices. Diagnostic imaging systems have benefited tremendously from the improvements in integrated circuits. One of the recent examples of this interaction between the two disciplines occurred in the area of ultrasonic imaging. The ability to build structures with dimensions in the submicron range enabled the realization of an almost a century old idea: Capacitive ultrasonic transducers. The major advantages of this transducer technology are ease of fabrication, potential for integration with supporting electronic circuits and improved bandwidth and sensitivity. This dissertation analyzes the viability of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) for practical imaging applications. This analysis is conducted by a detailed characterization effort, and by demonstrating both 2-D and 3-D images. Acoustical performance of 1-D and 2-D CMUT arrays fabricated using silicon integrated circuit technology has been experimentally characterized for transmit and receive modes, and the results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical expectations. Both 2-D and 3-D images have been demonstrated. The distinctive features of CMUTs manifest themselves in the results of the characterization experiments and also in the resulting images. This dissertation also describes a general approach to design integrated front-end circuits for ultrasonic imaging and demonstrates basic circuit blocks for use in integrated systems along with CMUT arrays. The integration of the ultrasonic transducer arrays with supporting electronics not only reduces the cost and complexity of the system but also provides several advantages such as reduced parasitics, improved sensitivity, and a compact design with a reduced number of external interconnects. In this study, a custom integrated circuit comprising a pulse driver, a transmit/receive (T/R) switch and a wideband preamplifier has been fabricated

  5. A Compressive Multi-Frequency Linear Sampling Method for Underwater Acoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadah, Hatim F

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the use of a qualitative inverse scattering method known as the linear sampling method (LSM) for imaging underwater scenes using limited aperture receiver configurations. The LSM is based on solving a set of unstable integral equations known as the far-field equations and whose stability breaks down even further for under-sampled observation aperture data. Based on the results of a recent study concerning multi-frequency LSM imaging, we propose an iterative inversion method that is founded upon a compressive sensing framework. In particular, we leverage multi-frequency diversity in the data by imposing a partial frequency variation prior on the solution which we show is justified when the frequency bandwidth is sampled finely enough. We formulate an alternating direction method of multiplier approach to minimize the proposed cost function. Proof of concept is established through numerically generated data as well as experimental acoustic measurements taken in a shallow pool facility at the U.S Naval Research Laboratory.

  6. Imaging the Chicxulub central crater zone from large scale seismic acoustic wave propagation and gravity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Martin, R.

    2017-12-01

    Large complex craters are characterized by central uplifts that represent large-scale differential movement of deep basement from the transient cavity. Here we investigate the central sector of the large multiring Chicxulub crater, which has been surveyed by an array of marine, aerial and land-borne geophysical methods. Despite high contrasts in physical properties,contrasting results for the central uplift have been obtained, with seismic reflection surveys showing lack of resolution in the central zone. We develop an integrated seismic and gravity model for the main structural elements, imaging the central basement uplift and melt and breccia units. The 3-D velocity model built from interpolation of seismic data is validated using perfectly matched layer seismic acoustic wave propagation modeling, optimized at grazing incidence using shift in the frequency domain. Modeling shows significant lack of illumination in the central sector, masking presence of the central uplift. Seismic energy remains trapped in an upper low velocity zone corresponding to the sedimentary infill, melt/breccias and surrounding faulted blocks. After conversion of seismic velocities into a volume of density values, we use massive parallel forward gravity modeling to constrain the size and shape of the central uplift that lies at 4.5 km depth, providing a high-resolution image of crater structure.The Bouguer anomaly and gravity response of modeled units show asymmetries, corresponding to the crater structure and distribution of post-impact carbonates, breccias, melt and target sediments

  7. Acoustic attenuation imaging of tissue bulk properties with a priori information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Kripfgans, Oliver; Carson, Paul L

    2016-09-01

    Attenuation of ultrasound waves traversing a medium is not only a result of absorption and scattering within a given tissue, but also of coherent scattering, including diffraction, refraction, and reflection of the acoustic wave at tissue boundaries. This leads to edge enhancement and other artifacts in most reconstruction algorithms, other than 3D wave migration with currently impractical, implementations. The presented approach accounts for energy loss at tissue boundaries by normalizing data based on variable sound speed, and potential density, of the medium using a k-space wave solver. Coupled with a priori knowledge of major sound speed distributions, physical attenuation values within broad ranges, and the assumption of homogeneity within segmented regions, an attenuation image representative of region bulk properties is constructed by solving a penalized weighted least squares optimization problem. This is in contradistinction to absorption or to conventional attenuation coefficient based on overall insertion loss with strong dependence on sound speed and impedance mismatches at tissue boundaries. This imaged property will be referred to as the bulk attenuation coefficient. The algorithm is demonstrated on an opposed array setup, with mean-squared-error improvements from 0.6269 to 0.0424 (dB/cm/MHz) 2 for a cylindrical phantom, and 0.1622 to 0.0256 (dB/cm/MHz) 2 for a windowed phantom.

  8. Assessment of liver steatosis in chicken by using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Aroca, Florentina; Serrano, Laura; Berna-Serna, Juan D.; Reus, Manuel; Ayala, Ignacio; Castell, Maria T.; Garcia-Perez, Bartolome

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging as a non-invasive tool for quantification of the grades of liver steatosis in chickens. We used two different diets: a standard diet (SD group) and a hyperlipidaemic diet (HD group). The ARFI technique was performed in all the animals in the right hepatic lobe and shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured and expressed in metres per second (m/s). Plasma lipid levels were analysed. Steatosis was quantified by using semiquantitative analysis. Statistical analysis was used and Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated. Mean SWV was 0.94 ± 0.16 m/s (range 0.8-1.3 m/s) in the SD group and 1.91 ± 0.25 m/s (range 1.3-2.2 m/s) in the HD group (p < 0.001). The lowest SWVs (≤1.3 m/s) corresponded to the chickens in the SD group, with 100% of the animals returning a score of 0, whereas the range of SWV in the HD group chickens was between 1.6 and 2.2 m/s. A substantial correlation was observed between SWVs with histological semiquantitative analysis of steatosis (r = 0.85, p < 0.001). ARFI imaging is a non-invasive diagnostic tool that allows discrimination between the grades of liver steatosis in chickens. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of liver steatosis in chicken by using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman Aroca, Florentina; Serrano, Laura; Berna-Serna, Juan D.; Reus, Manuel [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Radiology, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Ayala, Ignacio [University of Murcia, Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Murcia (Spain); Castell, Maria T. [University of Murcia, Department of Cell Biology, Murcia (Spain); Garcia-Perez, Bartolome [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Internal Medicine Service, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    To evaluate acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging as a non-invasive tool for quantification of the grades of liver steatosis in chickens. We used two different diets: a standard diet (SD group) and a hyperlipidaemic diet (HD group). The ARFI technique was performed in all the animals in the right hepatic lobe and shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured and expressed in metres per second (m/s). Plasma lipid levels were analysed. Steatosis was quantified by using semiquantitative analysis. Statistical analysis was used and Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated. Mean SWV was 0.94 {+-} 0.16 m/s (range 0.8-1.3 m/s) in the SD group and 1.91 {+-} 0.25 m/s (range 1.3-2.2 m/s) in the HD group (p < 0.001). The lowest SWVs ({<=}1.3 m/s) corresponded to the chickens in the SD group, with 100% of the animals returning a score of 0, whereas the range of SWV in the HD group chickens was between 1.6 and 2.2 m/s. A substantial correlation was observed between SWVs with histological semiquantitative analysis of steatosis (r = 0.85, p < 0.001). ARFI imaging is a non-invasive diagnostic tool that allows discrimination between the grades of liver steatosis in chickens. (orig.)

  10. Inferences of Particle Size and Composition From Video-like Images Based on Acoustic Data: Grotto Plume, Main Endeavor Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.; Santilli, K.; Dastur, J.; Silver, D.

    2004-12-01

    Optical and acoustic scattering from particles in a seafloor hydrothermal plume can be related if the particle properties and scattering mechanisms are known. We assume Rayleigh backscattering of sound and Mie forward scattering of light. We then use the particle concentrations implicit in the observed acoustic backscatter intensity to recreate the optical image a camera would see given a particular lighting level. The motivation for this study is to discover what information on particle size and composition in the buoyant plume can be inferred from a comparison of the calculated optical images (based on acoustic data) with actual video images from the acoustic acquisition cruise and the IMAX film "Volcanoes of the Deep Sea" (Stephen Low Productions, Inc.). Because the geologists, biologists and oceanographers involved in the study of seafloor hydrothermal plumes all "see" plumes in different ways, an additional motivation is to create more realistic plume images from the acoustic data. By using visualization techniques, with realistic lighting models, we can convert the plume image from mechanical waves (sound) to electromagnetic waves (light). The resulting image depends on assumptions about the particle size distribution and composition. Conversion of the volume scattering coefficients from Rayleigh to Mie scattering is accomplished by an extinction scale factor that depends on the wavelengths of light and sound and on the average particle size. We also make an adjustment to the scattered light based on the particles reflectivity (albedo) and color. We present a series of images of acoustic data for Grotto Plume, Main Endeavour Field (within the Endeavour ISS Site) using both realistic lighting models and traditional visualization techniques to investigate the dependence of the images on assumptions about particle composition and size. Sensitivity analysis suggests that the visibility of the buoyant plume increases as the intensity of supplied light increases

  11. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging in Benign and Malignant Breast Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Jayapriya; Kannan, Kanakaraj; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2017-01-01

    Background Elastography is a promising way to assess tissue differences regarding stiffness or elasticity, which has been historically assessed manually by palpation. Combined with conventional imaging modalities, shear wave elastography can potentially evaluate the stiffness of a breast lesion and consequently help detect malignant breast tumor from benign ones. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of shear wave elastography in breast lesions in the Indian population. Material and methods Fifty patients presenting with breast lesions were included in the study. All the patients were subjected to B-mode ultrasound and elastography using shear wave with Virtual Touch Imaging (VTITM) (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., PA, USA) and Virtual Touch Quantification (VTQTM) (Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., PA, USA) and the obtained data was analyzed using an appropriate statistical test (independent samples t-test). Results In our study group of 50 patients, 34 were benign and 16 were malignant. VTITM showed a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 93% with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 97% for benign lesions. VTITM showed a sensitivity of 87.5 % and a specificity of 100% with a PPV of 100% for malignant lesions. VTQTM showed a sensitivity of 71.4% and a specificity of 100% with a PPV of 100% for benign lesions. VTQTM showed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% with a PPV of 76.6% for malignant lesions. Conclusions VTITM was more reliable as a diagnostic tool compared to VTQTM in benign lesions and both are equally reliable in identifying malignant lesions. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) plays a significant role as an adjuvant diagnostic tool to B-mode imaging for assessing breast lesions. PMID:28690935

  12. Differential diagnosis of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis and breast cancer using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teke, Memik; Teke, Fatma; Alan, Bircan; Türkoğlu, Ahmet; Hamidi, Cihad; Göya, Cemil; Hattapoğlu, Salih; Gumus, Metehan

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) from carcinoma with routine imaging methods, such as ultrasonography (US) and mammography, is difficult. Therefore, we evaluated the value of a newly developed noninvasive technique called acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in differentiating IGM versus malignant lesions in the breast. Four hundred and eighty-six patients, who were referred to us with a presumptive diagnosis of a mass, underwent Virtual Touch tissue imaging (VTI; Siemens) and Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTQ; Siemens) after conventional gray-scale US. US-guided percutaneous needle biopsy was then performed on 276 lesions with clinically and radiologically suspicious features. Malignant lesions (n = 122) and IGM (n = 48) were included in the final study group. There was a statistically significant difference in shear wave velocity marginal and internal values between the IGM and malignant lesions. The median marginal velocity for IGM and malignant lesions was 3.19 m/s (minimum-maximum 2.49-5.82) and 5.05 m/s (minimum-maximum 2.09-8.46), respectively (p < 0.001). The median internal velocity for IGM and malignant lesions was 2.76 m/s (minimum-maximum 1.14-4.12) and 4.79 m/s (minimum-maximum 2.12-8.02), respectively (p < 0.001). The combination of VTI and VTQ as a complement to conventional US provides viscoelastic properties of tissues, and thus has the potential to increase the specificity of US.

  13. A Kalman filter technique applied for medical image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goliaei, S.; Ghorshi, S.; Manzuri, M. T.; Mortazavi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical images contain information about vital organic tissues inside of human body and are widely used for diagnoses of disease or for surgical purposes. Image reconstruction is essential for medical images for some applications such as suppression of noise or de-blurring the image in order to provide images with better quality and contrast. Due to vital rule of image reconstruction in medical sciences the corresponding algorithms with better efficiency and higher speed is desirable. Most algorithms in image reconstruction are operated on frequency domain such as the most popular one known as filtered back projection. In this paper we introduce a Kalman filter technique which is operated in time domain for medical image reconstruction. Results indicated that as the number of projection increases in both normal collected ray sum and the collected ray sum corrupted by noise the quality of reconstructed image becomes better in terms of contract and transparency. It is also seen that as the number of projection increases the error index decreases.

  14. Technical Note: Compact three-tesla magnetic resonance imager with high-performance gradients passes ACR image quality and acoustic noise tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weavers, Paul T; Shu, Yunhong; Tao, Shengzhen; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Graziani, Dominic; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Trzasko, Joshua D; Foo, Thomas K-F; Bernstein, Matt A

    2016-03-01

    A compact, three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed. It features a 37 cm patient aperture, allowing the use of commercial receiver coils. Its design allows simultaneously for gradient amplitudes of 85 millitesla per meter (mT/m) sustained and 700 tesla per meter per second (T/m/s) slew rates. The size of the gradient system allows for these simultaneous performance targets to be achieved with little or no peripheral nerve stimulation, but also raises a concern about the geometric distortion as much of the imaging will be done near the system's maximum 26 cm field-of-view. Additionally, the fast switching capability raises acoustic noise concerns. This work evaluates the system for both the American College of Radiology's (ACR) MRI image quality protocol and the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) nonsignificant risk (NSR) acoustic noise limits for MR. Passing these two tests is critical for clinical acceptance. In this work, the gradient system was operated at the maximum amplitude and slew rate of 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s, respectively. The geometric distortion correction was accomplished by iteratively determining up to the tenth order spherical harmonic coefficients using a fiducial phantom and position-tracking software, with seventh order correction utilized in the ACR test. Acoustic noise was measured with several standard clinical pulse sequences. The system passes all the ACR image quality tests. The acoustic noise as measured when the gradient coil was inserted into a whole-body MRI system conforms to the FDA NSR limits. The compact system simultaneously allows for high gradient amplitude and high slew rate. Geometric distortion concerns have been mitigated by extending the spherical harmonic correction to higher orders. Acoustic noise is within the FDA limits.

  15. Unsupervised Neural Techniques Applied to MR Brain Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ortiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of brain image segmentation is to partition a given brain image into different regions representing anatomical structures. Magnetic resonance image (MRI segmentation is especially interesting, since accurate segmentation in white matter, grey matter and cerebrospinal fluid provides a way to identify many brain disorders such as dementia, schizophrenia or Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Then, image segmentation results in a very interesting tool for neuroanatomical analyses. In this paper we show three alternatives to MR brain image segmentation algorithms, with the Self-Organizing Map (SOM as the core of the algorithms. The procedures devised do not use any a priori knowledge about voxel class assignment, and results in fully-unsupervised methods for MRI segmentation, making it possible to automatically discover different tissue classes. Our algorithm has been tested using the images from the Internet Brain Image Repository (IBSR outperforming existing methods, providing values for the average overlap metric of 0.7 for the white and grey matter and 0.45 for the cerebrospinal fluid. Furthermore, it also provides good results for high-resolution MR images provided by the Nuclear Medicine Service of the “Virgen de las Nieves” Hospital (Granada, Spain.

  16. Quality assessment of butter cookies applying multispectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby Andresen, Mette; Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Løje, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    in a forced convection electrically heated oven. In addition to the browning score, a model for predicting the average water content based on the same images is presented. This shows how multispectral images of butter cookies may be used for the assessment of different quality parameters. Statistical analysis...

  17. Improved Bat Algorithm Applied to Multilevel Image Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adis Alihodzic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilevel image thresholding is a very important image processing technique that is used as a basis for image segmentation and further higher level processing. However, the required computational time for exhaustive search grows exponentially with the number of desired thresholds. Swarm intelligence metaheuristics are well known as successful and efficient optimization methods for intractable problems. In this paper, we adjusted one of the latest swarm intelligence algorithms, the bat algorithm, for the multilevel image thresholding problem. The results of testing on standard benchmark images show that the bat algorithm is comparable with other state-of-the-art algorithms. We improved standard bat algorithm, where our modifications add some elements from the differential evolution and from the artificial bee colony algorithm. Our new proposed improved bat algorithm proved to be better than five other state-of-the-art algorithms, improving quality of results in all cases and significantly improving convergence speed.

  18. Wavelet compression algorithm applied to abdominal ultrasound images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Hsun; Pan, Su-Feng; LU, Chin-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Che

    2006-01-01

    We sought to investigate acceptable compression ratios of lossy wavelet compression on 640 x 480 x 8 abdominal ultrasound (US) images. We acquired 100 abdominal US images with normal and abnormal findings from the view station of a 932-bed teaching hospital. The US images were then compressed at quality factors (QFs) of 3, 10, 30, and 50 followed outcomes of a pilot study. This was equal to the average compression ratios of 4.3:1, 8.5:1, 20:1 and 36.6:1, respectively. Four objective measurements were carried out to examine and compare the image degradation between original and compressed images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was also introduced for subjective assessment. Five experienced and qualified radiologists as reviewers blinded to corresponding pathological findings, analysed paired 400 randomly ordered images with two 17-inch thin film transistor/liquid crystal display (TFT/LCD) monitors. At ROC analysis, the average area under curve (Az) for US abdominal image was 0.874 at the ratio of 36.6:1. The compressed image size was only 2.7% for US original at this ratio. The objective parameters showed the higher the mean squared error (MSE) or root mean squared error (RMSE) values, the poorer the image quality. The higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) values indicated better image quality. The average RMSE, PSNR at 36.6:1 for US were 4.84 ± 0.14, 35.45 dB, respectively. This finding suggests that, on the basis of the patient sample, wavelet compression of abdominal US to a ratio of 36.6:1 did not adversely affect diagnostic performance or evaluation error for radiologists' interpretation so as to risk affecting diagnosis

  19. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G6 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [−35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  20. Non-intrusive, high-resolution, real-time, two-dimensional imaging of multiphase materials using acoustic array sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiède, M.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Two parallel multi-element ultrasonic acoustic arrays combined with sets of focal laws for acoustic signal generation and a classical tomographic inversion algorithm are used to generate real-time two-dimensional micro seismic acoustic images of multiphase materials. Proof of concept and calibration measurements were performed for single phase and two phase liquids, uniform polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plates, and aluminum cylinders imbedded in PVC plates. Measurement artefacts, arising from the limited range of viewing angles, and the compromise between data acquisition rate and image quality are discussed. The angle range of scanning and the image resolution were varied, and the effects on the quality of the reproduction of the speed of sound profiles of model solids and liquids with known geometries and compositions were analysed in detail. The best image quality results were obtained for a scanning angle range of [-35°, 35°] at a step size of 2.5° post processed to generate images on a 40 μm square grid. The data acquisition time for high quality images with a 30 mm × 40 mm view field is 10 min. Representation of two-phase solids with large differences in speed of sound between phases and where one phase is dispersed in the form of macroscopic objects (greater than 1 mm in diameter) proved to be the most difficult to image accurately. Liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor phase boundaries, in micro porous solids by contrast, were more readily defined. Displacement of air by water and water by heptane in natural porous limestone provides illustrative kinetic examples. Measurement results with these realistic cases demonstrate the feasibility of the technique to monitor in real time and on the micrometer length scale local composition and flow of organic liquids in inorganic porous media, one of many envisioned engineering applications. Improvement of data acquisition rate is an area for future collaborative study.

  1. Particle and speckle imaging velocimetry applied to a monostatic LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsson, Thorsteinn; Langmeier, Andreas; Prücklmeier, Andreas; Banakh, Viktor; Falits, Andrey

    2006-11-01

    A novel backscatter-lidar imaging method of visualization of air movement in the atmosphere is discussed in the paper. The method is based on the particle image velocimetry (PIV) principle, namely: pairs of image of laser illuminated thin atmospheric layers are recorded by CCD camera and then are cross correlated to obtain velocity information from these records. Both the way of computer simulation of atmospheric version of PIV technique and the first concept proof experiments are described in the paper. It is proposed that the method can find an application for visualization of wake vortices arising behind large aircrafts.

  2. Detecting crack profile in concrete using digital image correlation and acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loukili A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Failure process in concrete structures is usually accompanied by cracking of concrete. Understanding the cracking pattern is very important while studying the failure governing criteria of concrete. The cracking phenomenon in concrete structures is usually complex and involves many microscopic mechanisms caused by material heterogeneity. Since last many years, fracture or damage analysis by experimental examinations of the cement based composites has shown importance to evaluate the cracking and damage behavior of those heterogeneous materials with damage accumulation due to microcracks development ahead of the propagating crack tip; and energy dissipation resulted during the evolution of damage in the structure. The techniques used in those experiments may be the holographic interferometry, the dye penetration, the scanning electron microscopy, the acoustic emission etc. Those methods offer either the images of the material surface to observe micro-features of the concrete with qualitative analysis, or the black-white fringe patterns of the deformation on the specimen surface, from which it is difficult to observe profiles of the damaged materials.

  3. Testicular microlithiasis and preliminary experience of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Malene Roland; Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Elastography of the testis can be used as a part of multiparametric examination of the scrotum. To determine the testicular stiffness using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) technique in men with testicular microlithiasis (TML). In 2013, 12 patients with diagnosed testicular microlithiasis in 2008 (mean age, 51 years; age range, 25–76 years) underwent a 5-year follow-up B-mode ultrasonography with three ARFI elastography measurements of each testis. We used a Siemens Acuson S3000 machine. No malignancy was found at the 5-year follow-up B-mode and elastography in 2013. However, we found an increase in TML; in the previous ultrasonography in 2008, eight men had bilateral TML, whereas in 2013, 10 men were diagnosed with bilateral TML. The mean elasticity of testicles with TML was 0.82 m/s (interquartile range [IQR], 0.72–0.88 m/s; range, 65–1.08 m/s). Elastography velocity of testis with TML seems to be in the same velocity range as in men with normal testis tissue

  4. Upconversion applied for mid-IR hyperspectral image acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Kehlet, Louis Martinus; Sanders, Nicolai Højer

    2015-01-01

    Different schemes for upconversion mid-IR hyperspectral imaging is implemented and compared in terms of spectral coverage, spectral resolution, speed and noise. Phasematch scanning and scanning of the object within the field of view is considered....

  5. The problem of applying information theory to efficient image transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakrison, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The main ideas of Shannon's (1948, 1960) theory of source encoding with a fidelity constraint, more commonly known as rate distortion theory, are summarized. The theory was specifically intended to provide a theoretical basis for efficient transmission of information such as images. What the theory has to contribute to the problem is demonstrated. Difficulties that impeded application of the theory to image transmission, and current efforts to solve these difficulties are discussed.

  6. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Allison, E-mail: apayne@ucair.med.utah.edu [Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Bever, Josh de [Department of Computer Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Farrer, Alexis [Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Coats, Brittany [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Parker, Dennis L. [Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 (United States); Christensen, Douglas A. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  7. Imaging Reservoir Siltation and Quaternary Stratigraphy Beneath the Mactaquac Headpond by Acoustic and Ground Penetrating Radar Sub-bottom Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, M.; Butler, K. E.; Peter, S.; Yamazaki, G.; Haralampides, K.

    2016-12-01

    The Mactaquac Hydroelectric Generating Station, located on the Saint John River in New Brunswick, Canada, is approaching the end of its life due to deterioration of the concrete structures. As part of an aquatic ecosystem study, designed to support a decision on the future of the dam, sediment in the headpond, extending 80 km upriver, is being examined. The focus of this sub-study lies in (i) mapping the thickness of sediments that have accumulated since inundation in 1968, and (ii) imaging the deeper glacial and post-glacial stratigraphy. Acoustic sub-bottom profiling surveys were completed during 2014 and 2015. An initial 3.5 kHz chirp sonar survey proved ineffective, lacking in both resolution and depth of the penetration. A follow-up survey employing a boomer-based "Seistec" sediment profiler provided better results, resolving sediment layers as thin as 12 cm, and yielding coherent reflections from the deeper Quaternary sediments. Post-inundation sediments in the lowermost 25 km of the headpond, between the dam and Bear Island, are interpreted to average 26 cm in thickness with the thickest deposits (up to 65 cm) in deep water areas overlying the pre-inundation riverbed west of Snowshoe Island, and south and east of Bear Island. A recent coring program confirmed the presence of silty sediment and showed good correlation with the Seistec thickness estimates. In the 15 km stretch upriver of Bear Island to Nackawic, the presence of gas in the uppermost sediments severely limits sub-bottom penetration and our ability to interpret sediment thicknesses. Profiles acquired in the uppermost 40 km reach of the headpond, extending to Woodstock, show a strong, positive water bottom reflection and little to no sub-bottom penetration, indicating the absence of soft post-inundation sediment. Deeper reflections observed within 5 km of the dam reveal a buried channel cut into glacial till, extending up to 20 m below the water bottom. Channel fill includes a finely laminated

  8. Image remapping strategies applied as protheses for the visually impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Curtis D.

    1993-01-01

    Maculopathy and retinitis pigmentosa (rp) are two vision defects which render the afflicted person with impaired ability to read and recognize visual patterns. For some time there has been interest and work on the use of image remapping techniques to provide a visual aid for individuals with these impairments. The basic concept is to remap an image according to some mathematical transformation such that the image is warped around a maculopathic defect (scotoma) or within the rp foveal region of retinal sensitivity. NASA/JSC has been pursuing this research using angle invariant transformations with testing of the resulting remapping using subjects and facilities of the University of Houston, College of Optometry. Testing is facilitated by use of a hardware device, the Programmable Remapper, to provide the remapping of video images. This report presents the results of studies of alternative remapping transformations with the objective of improving subject reading rates and pattern recognition. In particular a form of conformal transformation was developed which provides for a smooth warping of an image around a scotoma. In such a case it is shown that distortion of characters and lines of characters is minimized which should lead to enhanced character recognition. In addition studies were made of alternative transformations which, although not conformal, provide for similar low character distortion remapping. A second, non-conformal transformation was studied for remapping of images to aid rp impairments. In this case a transformation was investigated which allows remapping of a vision field into a circular area representing the foveal retina region. The size and spatial representation of the image are selectable. It is shown that parametric adjustments allow for a wide variation of how a visual field is presented to the sensitive retina. This study also presents some preliminary considerations of how a prosthetic device could be implemented in a practical sense, vis

  9. Single- and Multiple- Track Location Shear Wave and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging: Matched Comparison of Contrast, CNR, and Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Peter J.; Rosenzweig, Stephen J.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) use the dynamic response of tissue to impulsive mechanical stimulus to characterize local elasticity. A variant of conventional, multiple track location SWEI (MTL-SWEI), denoted single track location SWEI (STL-SWEI) offers the promise of creating speckle-free shear wave images. This work compares the three imaging modalities using a high push and track beam density combined acquisition sequence to image inclusions of different sizes and contrasts. STL-SWEI is shown to have significantly higher CNR than MTL-SWEI, allowing for operation at higher resolution. ARFI and STL-SWEI perform similarly in the larger inclusions, with STL-SWEI providing better visualization of small targets ≤2.5 mm in diameter. The processing of each modality introduces different trade-offs between smoothness and resolution of edges and structures; these are discussed in detail. PMID:25701531

  10. Quality assessment of butter cookies applying multispectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Mette S; Dissing, Bjørn S; Løje, Hanne

    2013-07-01

    A method for characterization of butter cookie quality by assessing the surface browning and water content using multispectral images is presented. Based on evaluations of the browning of butter cookies, cookies were manually divided into groups. From this categorization, reference values were calculated for a statistical prediction model correlating multispectral images with a browning score. The browning score is calculated as a function of oven temperature and baking time. It is presented as a quadratic response surface. The investigated process window was the intervals 4-16 min and 160-200°C in a forced convection electrically heated oven. In addition to the browning score, a model for predicting the average water content based on the same images is presented. This shows how multispectral images of butter cookies may be used for the assessment of different quality parameters. Statistical analysis showed that the most significant wavelengths for browning predictions were in the interval 400-700 nm and the wavelengths significant for water prediction were primarily located in the near-infrared spectrum. The water prediction model was found to correctly estimate the average water content with an absolute error of 0.22%. From the images it was also possible to follow the browning and drying propagation from the cookie edge toward the center.

  11. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  12. Acoustics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Kuttruff, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    This definitive textbook provides students with a comprehensive introduction to acoustics. Beginning with the basic physical ideas, Acoustics balances the fundamentals with engineering aspects, applications and electroacoustics, also covering music, speech and the properties of human hearing. The concepts of acoustics are exposed and applied in:room acousticssound insulation in buildingsnoise controlunderwater sound and ultrasoundScientifically thorough, but with mathematics kept to a minimum, Acoustics is the perfect introduction to acoustics for students at any level of mechanical, electrical or civil engineering courses and an accessible resource for architects, musicians or sound engineers requiring a technical understanding of acoustics and their applications.

  13. Applying BAT Evolutionary Optimization to Image-Based Visual Servoing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Perez-Cisneros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a predictive control strategy for an image-based visual servoing scheme that employs evolutionary optimization. The visual control task is approached as a nonlinear optimization problem that naturally handles relevant visual servoing constraints such as workspace limitations and visibility restrictions. As the predictive scheme requires a reliable model, this paper uses a local model that is based on the visual interaction matrix and a global model that employs 3D trajectory data extracted from a quaternion-based interpolator. The work assumes a free-flying camera with 6-DOF simulation whose results support the discussion on the constraint handling and the image prediction scheme.

  14. Decision theory applied to image quality control in radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Lessa, Patrícia S; Caous, Cristofer A; Arantes, Paula R; Amaro, Edson; de Souza, Fernando M Campello

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The present work aims at the application of the decision theory to radiological image quality control (QC) in diagnostic routine. The main problem addressed in the framework of decision theory is to accept or reject a film lot of a radiology service. The probability of each decision of a determined set of variables was obtained from the selected films. Methods ...

  15. Applying the digital-image-correlation technique to measure the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4.2 Image analysis. The DIC technique is used to analyse the column deformation. After the position of every mark is traced, two parallel observation lines on the surface of column (as shown in figure 8) are cho- sen. There are 181 equal spaced points on each line. The positions of these points are calculated using B-Spline ...

  16. Seeing Sound - Image Analysis of the Lift-off Acoustic Field, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A launch vehicle and its launch facilities are subjected to intense acoustic loads generated by the vehicle's propulsion system. The vehicle, its payload, and...

  17. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.

    2013-02-21

    We introduce a modified tomographic PIV technique using four high-speed video cameras and a scanning pulsed laser-volume. By rapidly illuminating adjacent subvolumes onto separate video frames, we can resolve a larger total volume of velocity vectors, while retaining good spatial resolution. We demonstrate this technique by performing time-resolved measurements of the turbulent structure of a round jet, using up to 9 adjacent volume slices. In essence this technique resolves more velocity planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise image planes, showing time-resolved evolution of the large-scale vortical structures for a turbulent jet of Re up to 10 000.

  18. An analysis and retrofit of the acoustics at Image Creators Health and Beauty Salon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Donna

    2002-11-01

    This paper discusses the analysis and retrofit of the acoustics in a high-volume beauty salon in Severna Park, MD. The major issues in what was designed to be a serene environment are reverberation times of 1-1.68 s in the mid- to upper-frequency range. Employee and customer complaints include heightened stress, vocal strain, headaches, and poor intelligibility. Existing analysis and acoustical retrofit solutions will be demonstrated.

  19. Applying Quantitative CT Image Feature Analysis to Predict Response of Ovarian Cancer Patients to Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danala, Gopichandh; Thai, Theresa; Gunderson, Camille C; Moxley, Katherine M; Moore, Kathleen; Mannel, Robert S; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin; Qiu, Yuchen

    2017-10-01

    The study aimed to investigate the role of applying quantitative image features computed from computed tomography (CT) images for early prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy in the clinical trials for treating ovarian cancer patients. A dataset involving 91 patients was retrospectively assembled. Each patient had two sets of pre- and post-therapy CT images. A computer-aided detection scheme was applied to segment metastatic tumors previously tracked by radiologists on CT images and computed image features. Two initial feature pools were built using image features computed from pre-therapy CT images only and image feature difference computed from both pre- and post-therapy images. A feature selection method was applied to select optimal features, and an equal-weighted fusion method was used to generate a new quantitative imaging marker from each pool to predict 6-month progression-free survival. The prediction accuracy between quantitative imaging markers and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria was also compared. The highest areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve are 0.684 ± 0.056 and 0.771 ± 0.050 when using a single image feature computed from pre-therapy CT images and feature difference computed from pre- and post-therapy CT images, respectively. Using two corresponding fusion-based image markers, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve significantly increased to 0.810 ± 0.045 and 0.829 ± 0.043 (P quantitative imaging markers computed from pre-therapy CT images. However, using image feature difference computed between pre- and post-therapy CT images yielded higher prediction accuracy. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Apparatus for real-time acoustic imaging of Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Kerry, K.

    2008-10-28

    We have successfully designed, built and tested an experimental apparatus which is capable of providing the first real-time ultrasound images of Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection in optically opaque fluids confined to large aspect ratio experimental cells. The apparatus employs a modified version of a commercially available ultrasound camera to capture images (30 frames per second) of flow patterns in a fluid undergoing Rayleigh Bénard convection. The apparatus was validated by observing convection rolls in 5cSt polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer fluid. Our first objective, after having built the apparatus, was to use it to study the sequence of transitions from diffusive to time--dependent heat transport in liquid mercury. The aim was to provide important information on pattern formation in the largely unexplored regime of very low Prandtl number fluids. Based on the theoretical stability diagram for liquid mercury, we anticipated that straight rolls should be stable over a range of Rayleigh numbers, between 1708 and approximately 1900. Though some of our power spectral densities were suggestive of the existence of weak convection, we have been unable to unambiguously visualize stable convection rolls above the theoretical onset of convection in liquid mercury. Currently, we are seeking ways to increase the sensitivity of our apparatus, such as (i) improving the acoustic impedance matching between our materials in the ultrasound path and (ii) reducing the noise level in our acoustic images due to turbulence and cavitation in the cooling fluids circulating above and below our experimental cell. If we are able to convincingly improve the sensitivity of our apparatus, and we still do not observe stable convection rolls in liquid mercury, then it may be the case that the theoretical stability diagram requires revision. In that case, either (i) straight rolls are not stable in a large aspect ratio cell at the Prandtl numbers associated with liquid mercury, or (ii

  1. A full vectorial contrast source inversion scheme for three-dimensional acoustic imaging of both compressibility and density profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Koen W A; Wright, William M D

    2007-03-01

    Imaging the two acoustic medium parameters density and compressibility requires the use of both the acoustic pressure and velocity wave fields, described via integral equations. Imaging is based on solving for the unknown medium parameters using known measured scattered wave fields, and it is difficult to solve this ill-posed inverse problem directly using a conjugate gradient inversion scheme. Here, a contrast source inversion method is used in which the contrast sources, defined via the product of changes in compressibility and density with the pressure and velocity wave fields, respectively, are computed iteratively. After each update of the contrast sources, an update of the medium parameters is obtained. Total variation as multiplicative regularization is used to minimize blurring in the reconstructed contrasts. The method successfully reconstructed three-dimensional contrast profiles based on changes in both density and compressibility, using synthetic data both with and without 50% white noise. The results were compared with imaging based only on the pressure wave field, where speed of sound profiles were solely based on changes in compressibility. It was found that the results improved significantly by using the full vectorial method when changes in speed of sound depended on changes in both compressibility and density.

  2. ACOUSTICAL IMAGING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SOFT ROCK AND MARINE SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman E. Scott, Jr., Ph.D.; Younane Abousleiman, Ph.D.; Musharraf Zaman, Ph.D., P.E.

    2001-07-01

    Mechanically weak formations, such as chalks, high porosity sandstones, and marine sediments, pose significant problems for oil and gas operators. Problems such as compaction, subsidence, and loss of permeability can affect reservoir production operations. For example, the unexpected subsidence of the Ekofisk chalk in the North Sea required over one billion dollars to re-engineer production facilities to account for losses created during that compaction (Sulak 1991). Another problem in weak formations is that of shallow water flows (SWF). Deep water drilling operations sometimes encounter cases where the marine sediments, at shallow depths just below the seafloor, begin to uncontrollably flow up and around the drill pipe. SWF problems created a loss of $150 million for the Ursa development project in the U.S. Gulf Coast SWF (Furlow 1998a,b; 1999a,b). The goal of this project is to provide a database on both the rock mechanical properties and the geophysical properties of weak rocks and sediments. These could be used by oil and gas companies to detect, evaluate, and alleviate potential production and drilling problems. The results will be useful in, for example, pre-drill detection of events such as SWF's by allowing a correlation of seismic data (such as hazard surveys) to rock mechanical properties. The data sets could also be useful for 4-D monitoring of the compaction and subsidence of an existing reservoir and imaging the zones of damage. During the second quarter of the project the research team has: (1) completed acoustic sensor construction, (2) conducted reconnaissance tests to map the deformational behaviors of the various rocks, (3) developed a sample assembly for the measurement of dynamic elastic and poroelastic parameters during triaxial testing, and (4) conducted a detailed review of the scientific literature and compiled a bibliography of that review. During the first quarter of the project the research team acquired several rock types for

  3. Monitoring of pipeline hydrostatic testing with artificial flaws applying acoustic emission and ultra-sonic techniques; Monitoracao de teste hidrostatico de tubos com descontinuidades artificiais empregando as tecnicas de emissao acustica e ultra-som

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Sergio Damasceno [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2003-07-01

    Charts and parameters used to perform and analyzing the acoustic emission data collected during the hydrostatic test in pipe samples build in API XL 60 with 20 inches of diameter and 14 millimeters of thickness are shown. These pipes had internal and external artificial flaws done by electro-erosion process with aspect ratio 1 x 20. A relationship between acoustic emission results, ultrasound and J-Integral were established using the applied pressurization sequence. Characteristics values of acoustic emission signals were shown as a criteria of field tests. (author)

  4. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. NDE of friction stir welds, nonlinear acoustics, ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Lingvall, Fredrik; Wennerstroem, Erik; Ping Wu

    2004-01-01

    This report contains results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2002/2003. After a short introduction a review of the NDE techniques that have been applied to the assessment of friction stir welds (FSW) is presented. The review is based on the results reported by the specialists from the USA, mostly from the aerospace industry. A separate chapter is devoted to the extended experimental and theoretical research concerning potential of nonlinear waves in NDE applications. Further studies concerning nonlinear propagation of acoustic and elastic waves (classical nonlinearity) are reported. Also a preliminary investigation of the nonlinear ultrasonic detection of contacts and interfaces (non-classical nonlinearity) is included. Report on the continuation of previous work concerning computer simulation of nonlinear propagations of ultrasonic beams in water and in immersed solids is also presented. Finally, results of an investigation concerning a new method of synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) and its comparison to the traditional phased array (PA) imaging and to the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are presented. A new spatial-temporal filtering method is presented that is a generalization of the previously proposed filter. Spatial resolution of the proposed method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of classical SAFT and PA imaging. Performance of the proposed method for flat targets is also investigated

  5. Acoustic imaging in application to reconstruction of rough rigid surface with airborne ultrasound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krynkin, A.; Dolcetti, G.; Hunting, S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate reconstruction of the surface roughness is of high importance to various areas of science and engineering. One important application of this technology is for remote monitoring of open channel flows through observing its dynamic surface roughness. In this paper a novel airborne acoustic method of roughness reconstruction is proposed and tested with a static rigid rough surface. This method is based on the acoustic holography principle and Kirchhoff approximation which make use of acoustic pressure data collected at multiple receiver points spread along an arch. The Tikhonov regularisation and generalised cross validation technique are used to solve the underdetermined system of equations for the acoustic pressures. The experimental data are collected above a roughness created with a 3D printer. For the given surface, it is shown that the proposed method works well with the various number of receiver positions. In this paper, the tested ratios between the number of surface points at which the surface elevation can be reconstructed and number of receiver positions are 2.5, 5, and 7.5. It is shown that, in a region comparable with the projected size of the main directivity lobe, the method is able to reconstruct the spatial spectrum density of the actual surface elevation with the accuracy of 20%.

  6. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  7. MR-acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to visualize calcifications in ex vivo swine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Rachel R; Pauly, Kim R Butts

    2014-05-01

    To present the use of MR-acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to visualize calcifications in ex vivo brain tissue as a planning indicator for MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS). Calcifications were implanted in ex vivo swine brain and imaged using SWI, MR-ARFI, and computed tomography (CT). SWI-filtered phase images used 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) images with a Fourier-based unwrapping algorithm. The MR-ARFI pulse sequence used a 2DFT spin-echo with repeated bipolar encoding gradients in the direction of the longitudinal ultrasound beam. MR-ARFI interrogations scanned a subregion (14 × 10 × 12 mm) of the brain surrounding the calcification. They were combined into a single displacement weighted map, using the sum of squares method. Calcification size estimates were based on image profiles plotted along the ±x and ±z direction, at the full-width half-maximum. Both MR-ARFI and SWI were able to visualize the calcifications. The contrast ratio was 150 for CT, 12 for SWI, and 12 for MR-ARFI. Profile measures were 1.35 × 1.28 mm on CT, 1.24 × 1.73 mm on SWI, and 2.45 × 3.02 mm on MR-ARFI. MR-ARFI displacement showed a linear increase with acoustic power (20-80 W), and also increased with calcification size. The use of SWI-filtered phase and MR-ARFI have the potential to provide a clinical indicator of calcification relevance in the planning of a transcranial MRgFUS treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The 2D Spectral Intrinsic Decomposition Method Applied to Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samba Sidibe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for autoadaptive image decomposition and recomposition based on the two-dimensional version of the Spectral Intrinsic Decomposition (SID. We introduce a faster diffusivity function for the computation of the mean envelope operator which provides the components of the SID algorithm for any signal. The 2D version of SID algorithm is implemented and applied to some very known images test. We extracted relevant components and obtained promising results in images analysis applications.

  9. Pattern matching and adaptive image segmentation applied to plant reproduction by tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico

    1999-03-01

    This paper shows the results obtained in a system vision applied to plant reproduction by tissue culture using adaptive image segmentation and pattern matching algorithms, this analysis improves the number of tissue obtained and minimize errors, the image features of tissue are considered join to statistical analysis to determine the best match and results. Tests make on potato plants are used to present comparative results with original images processed with adaptive segmentation algorithm and non adaptive algorithms and pattern matching.

  10. Status of thermal imaging technology as applied to conservation-update 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, F.J.; Wood, J.T.; Barthle, R.C.

    1980-07-01

    This document updates the 1978 report on the status of thermal imaging technology as applied to energy conservation in buildings. Thermal imaging technology is discussed in terms of airborne surveys, ground survey programs, and application needs such as standards development and lower cost equipment. Information on the various thermal imaging devices was obtained from manufacturer's standard product literature. Listings are provided of infrared projects of the DOE building diagnostics program, of aerial thermographic firms, and of aerial survey programs. (LCL)

  11. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging of the Transplant Kidney: Correlation Between Cortical Stiffness and Arterial Resistance in Early Post-transplant Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-K; Lai, Y-C; Lin, Y-H; Chiou, H-J; Chou, Y-H

    2017-06-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a noninvasive imaging modality for quantitative assessment of tissue stiffness. This study utilized ARFI imaging to assess the stiffness of a transplant renal cortex within the first month after renal transplantation and to explore the correlation between the cortical stiffness and arterial resistance of the transplant kidney. Forty renal transplant recipients (male/female = 26/14; mean age: 45.3 years; deceased donor/living related donor = 27/13) were included in this study. ARFI imaging with virtual touch tissue imaging quantification was applied to assess the stiffness of the transplant renal cortex by using a linear ultrasound transducer. Arterial resistance was acquired by spectral Doppler examination of the main artery and intrarenal arteries of the transplant kidney using a curvilinear ultrasound transducer. The stiffness of transplant renal cortex was expressed as shear wave velocity (m/s). The mean value of cortical stiffness was 3.19 ± 1.01 m/s (range: 1.55-5.54). The stiffness of transplant renal cortex was positively correlated with the resistance index of the main renal artery (r = 0.55, P = .001), segmental artery (r = 0.43, P = .005), and interlobar artery (r = 0.42, P = .006). The stiffness of a transplant renal cortex is positively correlated with the arterial resistance of the renal transplant in the early post-transplant period. This result indicates that, in addition to renal fibrosis, the stiffness of the transplant renal cortex is also influenced by the hemodynamics of the transplant kidney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence from acoustic imaging for submarine volcanic activity in 2012 off the west coast of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Somoza, Luis; Hernández, Pedro A.; de Vallejo, Luis González; León, Ricardo; Sagiya, Takeshi; Biain, Ander; González, Francisco J.; Medialdea, Teresa; Barrancos, José; Ibáñez, Jesús; Sumino, Hirochika; Nogami, Kenji; Romero, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    We report precursory geophysical, geodetic, and geochemical signatures of a new submarine volcanic activity observed off the western coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands. Submarine manifestation of this activity has been revealed through acoustic imaging of submarine plumes detected on the 20-kHz chirp parasound subbottom profiler (TOPAS PS18) mounted aboard the Spanish RV Hespérides on June 28, 2012. Five distinct "filament-shaped" acoustic plumes emanating from the flanks of mounds have been recognized at water depth between 64 and 88 m on a submarine platform located NW El Hierro. These plumes were well imaged on TOPAS profiles as "flares" of high acoustic contrast of impedance within the water column. Moreover, visible plumes composed of white rafts floating on the sea surface and sourcing from the location of the submarine plumes were reported by aerial photographs on July 3, 2012, 5 days after acoustic plumes were recorded. In addition, several geophysical and geochemical data support the fact that these submarine vents were preceded by several precursory signatures: (i) a sharp increase of the seismic energy release and the number of daily earthquakes of magnitude ≥2.5 on June 25, 2012, (ii) significant vertical and horizontal displacements observed at the Canary Islands GPS network (Nagoya University-ITER-GRAFCAN) with uplifts up to 3 cm from June 25 to 26, 2012, (iii) an anomalous increase of the soil gas radon activity, from the end of April until the beginning of June reaching peak values of 2.7 kBq/m3 on June 3, 2012, and (iv) observed positive peak in the air-corrected value of 3He/4He ratio monitored in ground waters (8.5 atmospheric 3He/4He ratio ( R A)) at the northwestern El Hierro on June 16, 2012. Combining these submarine and subaerial information, we suggest these plumes are the consequence of submarine vents exhaling volcanic gas mixed with fine ash as consequence of an event of rapid rise of volatile-rich magma beneath the NW submarine ridge

  13. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Nonlinear acoustics, synthetic aperture imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingvall, Fredrik; Ping Wu; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2003-03-01

    This report contains results concerning inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in year 2001/2002. The first chapter presents results of an investigation of a new method for synthetic aperture imaging. The new method presented here takes the form of a 2D filter based on minimum mean squared error (MMSE) criteria. The filter, which varies with the target position in two dimensions includes information about spatial impulse response (SIR) of the imaging system. Spatial resolution of the MMSE method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of the classical SAFT and phased array imaging. It is shown that the resolution of the MMSE algorithm, evaluated for imaging immersed copper specimen is superior to that observed for the two above-mentioned methods. Extended experimental and theoretical research concerning the potential of nonlinear waves and material harmonic imaging is presented in the second chapter. An experimental work is presented that was conducted using the RITEC RAM-5000 ultrasonic system capable of providing a high power tone-burst output. A new method for simulation of nonlinear acoustic waves that is a combination of the angular spectrum approach and the Burger's equation is also presented. This method was used for simulating nonlinear elastic waves radiated by the annular transducer that was used in the experiments

  14. Towards factor analysis exploration applied to positron emission tomography functional imaging for breast cancer characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, W.; Ketata, I.; Sellami, L.; Ben slima, M.; Ben Hamida, A.; Chtourou, K.; Ruan, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the factor analysis when applied to a dynamic sequence of medical images obtained using nuclear imaging modality, Positron Emission Tomography (PET). This latter modality allows obtaining information on physiological phenomena, through the examination of radiotracer evolution during time. Factor analysis of dynamic medical images sequence (FADMIS) estimates the underlying fundamental spatial distributions by factor images and the associated so-called fundamental functions (describing the signal variations) by factors. This method is based on an orthogonal analysis followed by an oblique analysis. The results of the FADMIS are physiological curves showing the evolution during time of radiotracer within homogeneous tissues distributions. This functional analysis of dynamic nuclear medical images is considered to be very efficient for cancer diagnostics. In fact, it could be applied for cancer characterization, vascularization as well as possible evaluation of response to therapy.

  15. Photo-Acoustic Ultrasound Imaging to Distinguish Benign from Malignant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    University Page 2 of 13 1. INTRODUCTION: Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves at frequencies above the human hearing range to image organs within the body ... Imaging of phantom in a rotating water tank which revolves the sample around the probe body . (D) Deconstructed ultrasound image of the phantom...other disciplines ? This work will have a substantial impact on multiple disciplines including medical imaging , focal therapies, and medical

  16. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  17. Detecting the Activation of a Self-Healing Mechanism in Concrete by Acoustic Emission and Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tsangouri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous crack healing in concrete is obtained when encapsulated healing agent is embedded into the material. Cracking damage in concrete elements ruptures the capsules and activates the healing process by healing agent release. Previously, the strength and stiffness recovery as well as the sealing efficiency after autonomous crack repair was well established. However, the mechanisms that trigger capsule breakage remain unknown. In parallel, the conditions under which the crack interacts with embedded capsules stay black-box. In this research, an experimental approach implementing an advanced optical and acoustic method sets up scopes to monitor and justify the crack formation and capsule breakage of concrete samples tested under three-point bending. Digital Image Correlation was used to visualize the crack opening. The optical information was the basis for an extensive and analytical study of the damage by Acoustic Emission analysis. The influence of embedding capsules on the concrete fracture process, the location of capsule damage, and the differentiation between emissions due to capsule rupture and crack formation are presented in this research. A profound observation of the capsules performance provides a clear view of the healing activation process.

  18. Investigation of the acoustic field in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator using time-resolved particule image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Benon, Ph.; Poignand, G.; Jondeau, E.

    2012-09-01

    In thermoacoustic devices, the full understanding of the heat transfer between the stack and the heat exchangers is a key issue to improve the global efficiency of these devices. The goal of this paper is to investigate the vortex structures, which appear at the stack plates extremities and may impact the heat transfer. Here, the aerodynamic field between a stack and a heat exchanger is characterised with a time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR- PIV) set-up. Measurements are performed in a standing wave thermoacoustic refrigerator operating at a frequency of 200 Hz. The employed TR-PIV set-up offers the possibility to acquire 3000 instantaneous velocity fields at a frequency of 3125 Hz (15 instantaneous velocity fields per acoustic period). Measurements show that vortex shedding can occur at high pressure level, when a nonlinear acoustic regime preveals, leading to an additional heating generated by viscous dissipation in the gap between the stack and the heat exchangers and a loss of efficiency.

  19. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging of pancreatic cystic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Onofrio, M., E-mail: mirko.donofrio@univr.it [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Gallotti, A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Salvia, R. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Capelli, P. [Department of Pathology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy); Mucelli, R. Pozzi [Department of Radiology, University Hospital G.B. Rossi, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 10, University of Verona, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ARFI ultrasound imaging with Virtual Touch tissue quantification in studying pancreatic cystic lesions, compared with phantom fluid models. Materials and methods: Different phantom fluids at different viscosity or density (water, iodinate contrast agent, and oil) were evaluated by two independent operators. From September to December 2008, 23 pancreatic cystic lesions were prospectively studied. All lesions were pathologically confirmed. Results: Non-numerical values on water and numerical values on other phantoms were obtained. Inter-observer evaluation revealed a perfect correlation (rs = 1.00; p < 0.0001) between all measurements achieved by both operators per each balloon and fluid. Among the pancreatic cystic lesions, 14 mucinous cystadenomas, 4 pseudocysts, 3 intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms and 2 serous cystadenomas were studied. The values obtained ranged from XXXX/0-4,85 m/s in mucinous cystadenomas, from XXXX/0-3,11 m/s in pseudocysts, from XXXX/0-4,57 m/s in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasms. In serous cystadenomas all values measured were XXXX/0 m/s. Diagnostic accuracy in benign and non-benign differentiation of pancreatic cystic lesions was 78%. Conclusions: Virtual Touch tissue quantification can be applied in the analysis of fluids and is potentially able to differentiate more complex (mucinous) from simple (serous) content in studying pancreatic cystic lesions.

  20. Super-resolution image reconstruction applied to an active millimeter wave imaging system based on compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkuş, Ümit; Şengün Ermeydan, Esra; Şahin, Asaf Behzat; ćankaya, Ä.°lyas; Altan, Hakan

    2017-10-01

    The development of passive and active millimeter wave imaging systems is progressing rapidly fueled by the need for many applications in the area of security and defense. Imaging schemes that may either utilize array detectors or single detectors in scan architectures offer suffer from poor resolution due to the longer wavelengths used and the limits of the optical system in terms of lens and mirror dimensions. In order to overcome this limit, super-resolution techniques can be employed to enhance the resolution of the imaging system. Here, a form of this technique based on oversampling is applied to reconstruct the image of a target which is acquired using compressive sensing based on scanning the image plane using randomly patterned masks with fixed pixel sizes. The mm-wave stand-off imaging system uses a 93 GHz center frequency source and heterodyne sub-harmonic receiver place in a bi-static configuration to image a target in reflection mode. The image of the target is projected onto a mechanically scanned spatial light modulator (SLM), which is a patterned two-dimensional mask that is translated along one axis. In order to improve the resolution of the image, the masks are shifted by half the pixel size (2.5mm). To enhance the resolution of the image, the patterns are shifted by smaller steps, thereby each pixel is oversampled and the resulting new pattern and detected intensity is fed into the CS algorithm to reconstruct the image of the target. After the image reconstruction process, sharper edges are observed for a circular object of 12mm diameter compared to the image acquired by whole pixel step scanning.

  1. Spatial regularization applied to factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frouin, F.; Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic image sequences allow physiological mechanisms to be monitored after the injection of a tracer. Factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS) hence creates a synthesis of the information in one image sequence. It estimates a limited number of structures (factor images) assuming that the tracer kinetics (factors) are similar at each point inside the structure. A spatial regularization method for computing factor images (REG-FAMIS) is proposed to remove irregularities due to noise in the original data while preserving discontinuities between structures. REG-FAMIS has been applied to two sets of simulations: (a) dynamic data with Gaussian noise and (b) dynamic studies in emission tomography (PET or SPECT), which respect real tomographic acquisition parameters and noise characteristics. Optimal regularization parameters are estimated in order to minimize the distance between reference images and regularized factor images. Compared with conventional factor images, the root mean square error between regularized images and reference factor images is improved by 3 for the first set of simulations, and by about 1.5 for the second set of simulations. In all cases, regularized factor images are qualitatively and quantitatively improved. (author)

  2. The Precision Exploration of Image Super-Resolution Applied into Motion Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ye; Hou, Wenhui; Feng, Wei; Jin, Yi; Zhu, Chang’an

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a new evaluation parameter of image super-resolution reconstruction quality, which is used to determine the influence of super-resolution reconstruction on motion measuring precision. Based on this new evaluation parameter, we respectively employ different algorithms of super-resolution reconstruction with different reconstruction scales, then calculate the motion measuring precision using the corresponding super-resolution image, analyze the impact of image super-resolution technology on the precision of image motion measuring. The experimental results show that only part of the super-resolution algorithms can improve the measuring precision slightly, and prove that under the background of image motion measurement, image super-resolution reconstruction method has the potential to apply to the actual measurement.

  3. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  4. Image Enhancer: A Graphic Editor to Apply Numerous Effects in Digital Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhisek Hazra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Image Enhancer is an open source, portable graphic editor developed for Windows platform. It is equipped with an enriched set of digital imaging filters with advanced computer vision techniques embedded within, like Interest Point Detection (Susan Corner Detector, Linear Edge Detection (Simple, Sobel, Canny, Histogram Equalization, Dithering (Bayer, Burkes, Sierra, Jarvis Judis Ninke, Transforming to Polar images and vice versa etc.  Image Enhancer was released under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL and the software was made available from the Microsoft’s open source project hosting repository Codeplex (http://imageenhancer.codeplex.com. Image Enhancer was tested and hosted by several popular software archives like SoftPedia, CNET, Freeware Files, ZDNet, Soft Tango and others. A stable Release Candidate (RC version has been made available in which some major modifications were done which were not present in the earlier Beta version. The download link for the Image Enhancer (both Release Candidate & Beta Version from CodePlex repository is (http://imageenhancer.codeplex.com/releases.

  5. Experimental demonstration of passive acoustic imaging in the human skull cavity using CT-based aberration corrections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Ryan M., E-mail: rmjones@sri.utoronto.ca [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); O’Reilly, Meaghan A. [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences Platform, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Experimentally verify a previously described technique for performing passive acoustic imaging through an intact human skull using noninvasive, computed tomography (CT)-based aberration corrections Jones et al. [Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 4981–5005 (2013)]. Methods: A sparse hemispherical receiver array (30 cm diameter) consisting of 128 piezoceramic discs (2.5 mm diameter, 612 kHz center frequency) was used to passively listen through ex vivo human skullcaps (n = 4) to acoustic emissions from a narrow-band fixed source (1 mm diameter, 516 kHz center frequency) and from ultrasound-stimulated (5 cycle bursts, 1 Hz pulse repetition frequency, estimated in situ peak negative pressure 0.11–0.33 MPa, 306 kHz driving frequency) Definity™ microbubbles flowing through a thin-walled tube phantom. Initial in vivo feasibility testing of the method was performed. The performance of the method was assessed through comparisons to images generated without skull corrections, with invasive source-based corrections, and with water-path control images. Results: For source locations at least 25 mm from the inner skull surface, the modified reconstruction algorithm successfully restored a single focus within the skull cavity at a location within 1.25 mm from the true position of the narrow-band source. The results obtained from imaging single bubbles are in good agreement with numerical simulations of point source emitters and the authors’ previous experimental measurements using source-based skull corrections O’Reilly et al. [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 61, 1285–1294 (2014)]. In a rat model, microbubble activity was mapped through an intact human skull at pressure levels below and above the threshold for focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening. During bursts that led to coherent bubble activity, the location of maximum intensity in images generated with CT-based skull corrections was found to deviate by less than 1 mm, on average, from the position

  6. Assessing hepatic fibrosis: comparing the intravoxel incoherent motion in MRI with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chih-Horng; Liang, Po-Chin; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Ho, Ming-Chih; Hu, Rey-Heng; Lai, Hong-Shiee [National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Jeng, Yung-Ming [National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Taipei (China)

    2015-12-15

    This study compared the diagnostic performance of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) in ultrasound (US) for liver fibrosis (LF) evaluation. A total of 49 patients scheduled for liver surgery were recruited. LF in the non-tumorous liver parenchyma at the right lobe was estimated using a slow diffusion coefficient, fast diffusion coefficient (D{sub fast}), perfusion fraction (f) of the IVIM parameters, the total apparent diffusion coefficient of conventional diffusion-weighted imaging and the shear wave velocity (Vs) of ARFI. LF was graded using the Metavir scoring system on histological examination. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient for correlation and analysis of variance was used for determining difference. The diagnostic performance was compared using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. LF exhibited significant correlation with the three parameters D{sub fast}, f, and Vs (r = -0.528, -0.337, and 0.481, respectively, P < 0.05). The D{sub fast} values in the F4 group were significantly lower than those in the F0, F1 and F2 groups. D{sub fast} exhibited a non-inferior performance for diagnosing all fibrosis grades compared with that of Vs. Both IVIM and ARFI provide reliable estimations for the noninvasive assessment of LF. (orig.)

  7. Early Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer Using Ultrasonic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    region, with high resolution and realtime data processing . 2) To integrate ARFI & B-mode data in real-time with 3D Slicer and the Image -Guided Surgical...Generation and 3D Slicer Display (Months 4-16) Working with Siemens engineers, we have integrated real-time ARFI image processing tools that directly...excitation. These processing tools have been written in C# to run in a multithreaded CPU infrastructure on the ultrasound scanner, rendering image data in

  8. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  9. IMAGE information monitoring and applied graphics software environment. Volume 2. Software description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallam, J.W.; Ng, K.B.; Upham, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The EPRI Information Monitoring and Applied Graphics Environment (IMAGE) system is designed for 'fast proto-typing' of advanced concepts for computer-aided plant operations tools. It is a flexible software system which can be used for rapidly creating, dynamically driving and evaluating advanced operator aid displays. The software is written to be both host computer and graphic device independent

  10. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Olofsson, Tomas; Wennerstroem, Erik [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Technical Sciences (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2006-12-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the {omega}-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization.

  11. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Olofsson, Tomas; Wennerstroem, Erik

    2006-12-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the ω-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization

  12. Remote Sensing Image Classification Applied to the First National Geographical Information Census of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Wen, Zongyong; Zhu, Zhaorong; Xia, Qiang; Shun, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Image classification will still be a long way in the future, although it has gone almost half a century. In fact, researchers have gained many fruits in the image classification domain, but there is still a long distance between theory and practice. However, some new methods in the artificial intelligence domain will be absorbed into the image classification domain and draw on the strength of each to offset the weakness of the other, which will open up a new prospect. Usually, networks play the role of a high-level language, as is seen in Artificial Intelligence and statistics, because networks are used to build complex model from simple components. These years, Bayesian Networks, one of probabilistic networks, are a powerful data mining technique for handling uncertainty in complex domains. In this paper, we apply Tree Augmented Naive Bayesian Networks (TAN) to texture classification of High-resolution remote sensing images and put up a new method to construct the network topology structure in terms of training accuracy based on the training samples. Since 2013, China government has started the first national geographical information census project, which mainly interprets geographical information based on high-resolution remote sensing images. Therefore, this paper tries to apply Bayesian network to remote sensing image classification, in order to improve image interpretation in the first national geographical information census project. In the experiment, we choose some remote sensing images in Beijing. Experimental results demonstrate TAN outperform than Naive Bayesian Classifier (NBC) and Maximum Likelihood Classification Method (MLC) in the overall classification accuracy. In addition, the proposed method can reduce the workload of field workers and improve the work efficiency. Although it is time consuming, it will be an attractive and effective method for assisting office operation of image interpretation.

  13. Image processing applied to automatic detection of defects during ultrasonic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moysan, J.

    1992-10-01

    This work is a study about image processing applied to ultrasonic BSCAN images which are obtained in the field of non destructive testing of weld. The goal is to define what image processing techniques can bring to ameliorate the exploitation of the data collected and, more precisely, what image processing can do to extract the meaningful echoes which enable to characterize and to size the defects. The report presents non destructive testing by ultrasounds in the nuclear field and it indicates specificities of the propagation of ultrasonic waves in austenitic weld. It gives a state of the art of the data processing applied to ultrasonic images in nondestructive evaluation. A new image analysis is then developed. It is based on a powerful tool, the co-occurrence matrix. This matrix enables to represent, in a whole representation, relations between amplitudes of couples of pixels. From the matrix analysis, a new complete and automatic method has been set down in order to define a threshold which separates echoes from noise. An automatic interpretation of the ultrasonic echoes is then possible. Complete validation has been done with standard pieces

  14. Experimental Investigation on the Fracture Behavior of Black Shale by Acoustic Emission Monitoring and CT Image Analysis during Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, C. H.; Hu, Y. Z.

    2018-01-01

    Plenty of mechanical experiments have been done to investigate the deformation and failure characteristics of shale; however, the anisotropic failure mechanism has not been well studied. Here, laboratory Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) tests on cylindrical shale samples obtained by drilling at different inclinations to bedding plane were performed. The failure behaviors of the shale samples were studied by real-time acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and post-test X-ray computer tomography (CT) analysis. The experimental results suggest that the pronounced bedding planes of shale have a great influence on the mechanical properties and AE patterns. The AE counts and AE cumulative energy release curves clearly demonstrate different morphology, and the `U' shaped curve relationship between the AE counts, AE cumulative energy release and bedding inclination was first documented. The post-test CT image analysis shows the crack patterns via 2D image reconstructions, an index of stimulated fracture density is defined to represent the anisotropic failure mode of shale. What is more, the most striking finding is that the AE monitoring results are in good agreement with the CT analysis. The structural difference in the shale sample is the controlling factor resulting in the anisotropy of AE patterns. The pronounced bedding structure in the shale formation results in an anisotropy of elasticity, strength, and AE information from which the changes in strength dominate the entire failure pattern of the shale samples.

  15. Experimental investigation on the fracture behaviour of black shale by acoustic emission monitoring and CT image analysis during uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, C. H.; Hu, Y. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Plenty of mechanical experiments have been done to investigate the deformation and failure characteristics of shale; however, the anisotropic failure mechanism has not been well studied. Here, laboratory Uniaxial Compressive Strength tests on cylindrical shale samples obtained by drilling at different inclinations to bedding plane were performed. The failure behaviours of the shale samples were studied by real-time acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and post-test X-ray computer tomography (CT) analysis. The experimental results suggest that the pronounced bedding planes of shale have a great influence on the mechanical properties and AE patterns. The AE counts and AE cumulative energy release curves clearly demonstrate different morphology, and the `U'-shaped curve relationship between the AE counts, AE cumulative energy release and bedding inclination was first documented. The post-test CT image analysis shows the crack patterns via 2-D image reconstructions, an index of stimulated fracture density is defined to represent the anisotropic failure mode of shale. What is more, the most striking finding is that the AE monitoring results are in good agreement with the CT analysis. The structural difference in the shale sample is the controlling factor resulting in the anisotropy of AE patterns. The pronounced bedding structure in the shale formation results in an anisotropy of elasticity, strength and AE information from which the changes in strength dominate the entire failure pattern of the shale samples.

  16. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diebold, Gerald J

    2005-01-01

    .... Interfacial features of objects are highlighted as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations...

  17. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diebold, Gerald J

    2006-01-01

    .... Interfacial features of objects are highlighted as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations...

  18. Resonant Mie scattering (RMieS) correction applied to FTIR images of biological tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambery, Keith R; Wood, Bayden R; McNaughton, Don

    2012-01-07

    Recently a resonant Mie scattering (RMieS) correction approach has been developed and demonstrated to be effective for removing the baseline distortions that compromise the raw data in individual spectra. In this paper RMieS correction is extended to FTIR images of a tissue section from biopsy of the human cervical transformation zone and a coronal tissue section of a Wistar rat brain and compared to the uncorrected images. It is shown that applying RMieS correction to FTIR images a) removes baseline distortions from the image spectra and thus reveals previously hidden information on spatial variation of chemical contents within the tissue and b) can lead to improved automatic tissue feature classification through multivariate cluster analysis. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  19. Active filtering applied to radiographic images unfolded by the Richardson-Lucy algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Silvani, Maria Ines; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of images caused by systematic uncertainties can be reduced when one knows the features of the spoiling agent. Typical uncertainties of this kind arise in radiographic images due to the non - zero resolution of the detector used to acquire them, and from the non-punctual character of the source employed in the acquisition, or from the beam divergence when extended sources are used. Both features blur the image, which, instead of a single point exhibits a spot with a vanishing edge, reproducing hence the point spread function - PSF of the system. Once this spoiling function is known, an inverse problem approach, involving inversion of matrices, can then be used to retrieve the original image. As these matrices are generally ill-conditioned, due to statistical fluctuation and truncation errors, iterative procedures should be applied, such as the Richardson-Lucy algorithm. This algorithm has been applied in this work to unfold radiographic images acquired by transmission of thermal neutrons and gamma-rays. After this procedure, the resulting images undergo an active filtering which fairly improves their final quality at a negligible cost in terms of processing time. The filter ruling the process is based on the matrix of the correction factors for the last iteration of the deconvolution procedure. Synthetic images degraded with a known PSF, and undergone to the same treatment, have been used as benchmark to evaluate the soundness of the developed active filtering procedure. The deconvolution and filtering algorithms have been incorporated to a Fortran program, written to deal with real images, generate the synthetic ones and display both. (author)

  20. Applying Deep Learning in Medical Images: The Case of Bone Age Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang Hyung; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2018-01-01

    A diagnostic need often arises to estimate bone age from X-ray images of the hand of a subject during the growth period. Together with measured physical height, such information may be used as indicators for the height growth prognosis of the subject. We present a way to apply the deep learning technique to medical image analysis using hand bone age estimation as an example. Age estimation was formulated as a regression problem with hand X-ray images as input and estimated age as output. A set of hand X-ray images was used to form a training set with which a regression model was trained. An image preprocessing procedure is described which reduces image variations across data instances that are unrelated to age-wise variation. The use of Caffe, a deep learning tool is demonstrated. A rather simple deep learning network was adopted and trained for tutorial purpose. A test set distinct from the training set was formed to assess the validity of the approach. The measured mean absolute difference value was 18.9 months, and the concordance correlation coefficient was 0.78. It is shown that the proposed deep learning-based neural network can be used to estimate a subject's age from hand X-ray images, which eliminates the need for tedious atlas look-ups in clinical environments and should improve the time and cost efficiency of the estimation process.

  1. Effect of liposomal local therapy on salivary glands in acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofauer, Benedikt; Mansour, Naglaa; Heiser, Clemens; Straßen, Ulrich; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging as a monitoring tool for the effect of a liposomal local therapy in patients with dry mouth symptoms due to primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Fifty patients with pSS, diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) criteria, were included. Clinical data were collected, and sonographic examination including ARFI imaging of the parotid and submandibular glands was performed. Subjective symptoms were evaluated via visual analogue scales (VAS), and the unstimulated whole salivary flow was measured. After a two-month period of liposomal local therapy, sonographic examination was repeated and both subjective and objective symptoms were re-evaluated. Before local treatment, the mean ARFI value of parotid glands was 2.96 m/s (SD 0.97). Mean ARFI value of the submandibular glands was 2.09 m/s (SD 0.71). After the two-month treatment period, a significant decline of ARFI values in the parotid glands to a value of 2.34 m/s (SD 0.70, p dry mouth symptoms could be observed (p = 0.0001). With the application of ARFI imaging, a decline in parotid gland stiffness could be observed in patients with primary Sjögren's Syndrome accompanied by a significant improvement of the subjective sensation of dry mouth symptoms. The seromucous submandibular glands did not show any changes compared to the serous parotid glands.

  2. Diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for assessing superficial lymph nodes: A diagnostic accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Zhao, Xinming; Ji, Xiaohui; Han, Ruoling; Li, Ping; Du, Min

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for differentiating superficial lymph nodes.Virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI) grade and shear wave velocity (SWV) were analyzed and compared in 97 patients (65 women, 32 men; mean age, 49 y; range, 23-72 y) with 97 lymph nodes [23 chronic nonspecific reactive lymph nodes (CLNs), 38 metastatic lymph nodes (MLNs), and 36 blood and lymphatic system diseases lymph nodes (BLLNs)]. The elastography characteristics in patients with CLNs, MLNs, and BLLNs were compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables and categorical variables. The diagnostic performance of VTI grade and SWV were evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC).The median of SWV of MLNs was significantly higher (2.90 m/s) than those of CLNs (2.15 m/s) and BLLNs (2.52 m/s). The VTI grade of MLNs was significantly higher than those of CLNs (P accuracy, and AUC were 81.58%, 95.65%, 86.89%, and 0.904, respectively, at a cutoff level of grade IV for VTI grade in differentiating MLNs from CLNs, whereas those of SWV were 57.89%, 86.96%, 68.85%, and 0.752, respectively, at a cutoff level of 2.76 m/s.The diagnostic performance of VTI grade was significantly higher than that of SWV in differentiating MLNs from CLNs. The diagnostic performance of VTI grade and SWV were lower intermediate in differentiating MLNs from BLLNs and in differentiating BLLNs from CLNs, and there was no significant difference between VTI grade and SWV. ARFI imaging may be a feasible method for differentiating MLNs from CLNs.

  3. Event Centroiding Applied to Energy-Resolved Neutron Imaging at LANSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P. Borges

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The energy-dependence of the neutron cross section provides vastly different contrast mechanisms than polychromatic neutron radiography if neutron energies can be selected for imaging applications. In recent years, energy-resolved neutron imaging (ERNI with epi-thermal neutrons, utilizing neutron absorption resonances for contrast as well as for quantitative density measurements, was pioneered at the Flight Path 5 beam line at LANSCE and continues to be refined. Here we present event centroiding, i.e., the determination of the center-of-gravity of a detection event on an imaging detector to allow sub-pixel spatial resolution and apply it to the many frames collected for energy-resolved neutron imaging at a pulsed neutron source. While event centroiding was demonstrated at thermal neutron sources, it has not been applied to energy-resolved neutron imaging, where the energy resolution requires to be preserved, and we present a quantification of the possible resolution as a function of neutron energy. For the 55 μm pixel size of the detector used for this study, we found a resolution improvement from ~80 μm to ~22 μm using pixel centroiding while fully preserving the energy resolution.

  4. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Fan, Ren-Hao; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu; Jiangnan University Collaboration

    In this talk, we present our studies on broadband properties of acoustic waves through metal gratings. We have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing and new acoustic devices. References: [1] Dong-Xiang Qi, Yu-Qiang Deng, Di-Hu Xu, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Ze-Guo Chen, Ming-Hui Lu, X. R. Huang and Mu Wang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 011906 (2015); [2] Dong-Xiang Qi, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Xian-Rong Huang, Ming-Hui Lu, Xu Ni, Qing Hu, and Mu Wang, Applied Physics Letters 101, 061912 (2012).

  5. Imaging and pattern recognition techniques applied to particulate solids material characterization in mineral processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifazi, G.; La Marca, F.; Massacci, P.

    1999-01-01

    The characterization of particulate solids can be carried out by chemical and mineralogical analysis, or, in some cases, following a new approach based on the combined use of: i) imaging techniques to detect the surface features of the particles, and ii) pattern recognition procedures, to identify and classify the mineralogical composition on the bases of the previously detected 'pictorial' features. The aim of this methodology is to establish a correlation between image parameters (texture and color) and physical chemical parameters characterizing the set of particles to be evaluated. The technique was applied to characterize the raw-ore coming from a deposit of mineral sands of three different lithotypes. An appropriate number of samples for each lithotype has been collected. A vector of attributes (pattern vector), by either texture and color parameters, has been associated to each sample. Image analysis demonstrated as the selected parameters are quite sensitive to the conditions of image acquisition: in fact optical properties may be strongly influenced by physical condition, in terms of moisture content and optics set-up and lighting conditions. Standard conditions for acquisition have been selected according to the in situ conditions during sampling. To verify the reliability of the proposed methodology, images have been acquired under different conditions of humidity, focusing and illumination. In order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on image pictorial properties, textural analysis procedures have been applied to the image acquired from different samples. Data resulting from the processing have been used for remote controlling of the material fed to the mineral processing plant. (author)

  6. Photo-acoustic imaging of blue nanoparticle targeted brain tumor for intra-operative glioma delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Wang, Xueding; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Hah, HoeJin; Kim, Gwangseong; Chen, Thomas; Orrienger, Daniel; Sagher, Oren; Kopelman, Raoul

    2011-07-01

    Distinguishing the tumor from the background neo-plastic tissue is challenging for cancer surgery such as surgical resection of glioma. Attempts have been made to use visible or fluorescent markers to delineate the tumors during surgery. However, the systemic injection of the dyes requires high dose, resulting in negative side effects. A novel method to delineate rat brain tumors intra-operatively, as well as post-operatively, using a highly sensitive photoacoustic imaging technique enhanced by tumor targeting blue nanoparticle as contrast agent is demonstrated. The nanoparticles are made of polyacrylamide (PAA) matrix with covalently linked Coomassie-Blue dye. They contain 7.0% dye and the average size is 80nm. Their surface was conjugated with F3 peptide for active tumor targeting. These nanoparticles are nontoxic, chemically inert and have long plasma circulation lifetime, making them suitable as nanodevices for imaging using photoacoustics. Experiments on phantoms and rat brains tumors ex-vivo demonstrate the high sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging in delineating the tumor, containing contrast agent at concentrations too low to be visualized by eye. The control tumors without nanoparticles did not show any enhanced signal. This study shows that photoacoustic imaging facilitated with the nanoparticle contrast agent could contribute to future surgical procedures for glioma.

  7. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansouri, Hani [Purdue University; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bouman, Charlie [Purdue University; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well's health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  8. Development of Acoustic Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Technique for Thick-Concrete Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansouri, Hani [Purdue University; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bouman, Charlie [Purdue University; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound signals have been used extensively for non-destructive evaluation (NDE). However, typical reconstruction techniques, such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), are limited to quasi-homogenous thin media. New ultrasonic systems and reconstruction algorithms are in need for one-sided NDE of non-homogenous thick objects. An application example space is imaging of reinforced concrete structures for commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). These structures provide important foundation, support, shielding, and containment functions. Identification and management of aging and degradation of concrete structures is fundamental to the proposed long-term operation of NPPs. Another example is geothermal and oil/gas production wells. These multi-layered structures are composed of steel, cement, and several types of soil and rocks. Ultrasound systems with greater penetration range and image quality will allow for better monitoring of the well s health and prediction of high-pressure hydraulic fracturing of the rock. These application challenges need to be addressed with an integrated imaging approach, where the application, hardware, and reconstruction software are highly integrated and optimized. Therefore, we are developing an ultrasonic system with Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR) as the image reconstruction backbone. As the first implementation of MBIR for ultrasonic signals, this paper document the first implementation of the algorithm and show reconstruction results for synthetically generated data.

  9. An explorative chemometric approach applied to hyperspectral images for the study of illuminated manuscripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelli, Emilio; Randeberg, Lise Lyngsnes; Alsberg, Bjørn Kåre; Gebremariam, Kidane Fanta; Bracci, Silvano

    2017-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a fast non-invasive imaging technology recently applied in the field of art conservation. With the help of chemometrics, important information about the spectral properties and spatial distribution of pigments can be extracted from HSI data. With the intent of expanding the applications of chemometrics to the interpretation of hyperspectral images of historical documents, and, at the same time, to study the colorants and their spatial distribution on ancient illuminated manuscripts, an explorative chemometric approach is here presented. The method makes use of chemometric tools for spectral de-noising (minimum noise fraction (MNF)) and image analysis (multivariate image analysis (MIA) and iterative key set factor analysis (IKSFA)/spectral angle mapper (SAM)) which have given an efficient separation, classification and mapping of colorants from visible-near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral images of an ancient illuminated fragment. The identification of colorants was achieved by extracting and interpreting the VNIR spectra as well as by using a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer.

  10. Applied noncentral Chi-squared distribution in CFAR detection of hyperspectral projected images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Chen, Dong; Shi, Gongtao; Yang, Guopeng; Wang, Gang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the noncentral chi-squared distribution is applied in the Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detection of hyperspectral projected images to distinguish the anomaly points from background. Usually, the process of the hyperspectral anomaly detectors can be considered as a linear projection. These operators are linear transforms and their results are quadratic form which comes from the transform of spectral vector. In general, chi-squared distribution could be the proper choice to describe the statistical characteristic of this projected image. However, because of the strong correlation among the bands, the standard central chi-squared distribution often cannot fit the stochastic characteristic of the projected images precisely. In this paper, we use a noncentral chi-squared distribution to approximate the projected image of subspace based anomaly detectors. Firstly, the statistical modal of the projected multivariate data is analysed, and a noncentral chi-squared distribution is deduced. Then, the approach of the parameters calculation is introduced. At last, the aerial hyperspectral images are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in tightly modeling the projected image statistic distribution.

  11. Applying Enhancement Filters in the Pre-processing of Images of Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Sérgio Henrique; Do Nascimento, Marcelo Zanchetta; Neves, Leandro Alves; Batista, Valério Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is a type of cancer that affects the immune system, and is classified as Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin. It is one of the ten types of cancer that are the most common on earth. Among all malignant neoplasms diagnosed in the world, lymphoma ranges from three to four percent of them. Our work presents a study of some filters devoted to enhancing images of lymphoma at the pre-processing step. Here the enhancement is useful for removing noise from the digital images. We have analysed the noise caused by different sources like room vibration, scraps and defocusing, and in the following classes of lymphoma: follicular, mantle cell and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The filters Gaussian, Median and Mean-Shift were applied to different colour models (RGB, Lab and HSV). Afterwards, we performed a quantitative analysis of the images by means of the Structural Similarity Index. This was done in order to evaluate the similarity between the images. In all cases we have obtained a certainty of at least 75%, which rises to 99% if one considers only HSV. Namely, we have concluded that HSV is an important choice of colour model at pre-processing histological images of lymphoma, because in this case the resulting image will get the best enhancement

  12. Applying GA for Optimizing the User Query in Image and Video Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    In an information retrieval system, the query can be made by user sketch. The new method presented here, optimizes the user sketch and applies the optimized query to retrieval the information. This optimization may be used in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) and Content-Based Video Retrieval (CBVR) which is based on trajectory extraction. To optimize the retrieval process, one stage of retrieval is performed by the user sketch. The retrieval criterion is based on the proposed distance met...

  13. Virtual touch tissue quantification of acoustic radiation force impulse: a new ultrasound elastic imaging in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Feng Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI is a new quantitative technique to measure tissue stiffness. The study was aimed to assess the usefulness of VTQ in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. METHODS: 173 pathologically proven thyroid nodules in 142 patients were included and all were examined by conventional ultrasound (US, conventional elasticity imaging (EI and VTQ of ARFI. The tissue stiffness for VTQ was expressed as shear wave velocity (SWV (m/s. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC analyses were performed to assess the diagnostic performance. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of VTQ measurement was assessed. RESULTS: The SWVs of benign and malignant thyroid nodules were 2.34±1.17 m/s (range: 0.61-9.00 m/s and 4.82±2.53 m/s (range: 2.32-9.00 m/s respectively (P20 mm and lowest for those ≤10 mm. The correlation coefficients were 0.904 for intraobserver measurement and 0.864 for interobserver measurement. CONCLUSIONS: VTQ of ARFI provides quantitative and reproducible information about the tissue stiffness, which is useful for the differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. The diagnostic performance of VTQ is higher than that of conventional EI.

  14. Efficient super-resolution image reconstruction applied to surveillance video captured by small unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Schultz, Richard R.; Chu, Chee-Hung Henry

    2008-04-01

    The concept surrounding super-resolution image reconstruction is to recover a highly-resolved image from a series of low-resolution images via between-frame subpixel image registration. In this paper, we propose a novel and efficient super-resolution algorithm, and then apply it to the reconstruction of real video data captured by a small Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS). Small UAS aircraft generally have a wingspan of less than four meters, so that these vehicles and their payloads can be buffeted by even light winds, resulting in potentially unstable video. This algorithm is based on a coarse-to-fine strategy, in which a coarsely super-resolved image sequence is first built from the original video data by image registration and bi-cubic interpolation between a fixed reference frame and every additional frame. It is well known that the median filter is robust to outliers. If we calculate pixel-wise medians in the coarsely super-resolved image sequence, we can restore a refined super-resolved image. The primary advantage is that this is a noniterative algorithm, unlike traditional approaches based on highly-computational iterative algorithms. Experimental results show that our coarse-to-fine super-resolution algorithm is not only robust, but also very efficient. In comparison with five well-known super-resolution algorithms, namely the robust super-resolution algorithm, bi-cubic interpolation, projection onto convex sets (POCS), the Papoulis-Gerchberg algorithm, and the iterated back projection algorithm, our proposed algorithm gives both strong efficiency and robustness, as well as good visual performance. This is particularly useful for the application of super-resolution to UAS surveillance video, where real-time processing is highly desired.

  15. The creation of inter-ethnic images for studies in applied psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanezis, Maria; Vanezis, Peter; Minnis, Helen; McMillan, Alison; Gillies, Marjorie; Smith, Shubulade

    2003-10-01

    The facial transformation programme, is an integral part of the computerised three-dimensional facial reconstruction system, employed at the University of Glasgow for forensic and historical cases. It was applied to the creation of inter-ethnic images for use in studies to assess the response of various groups to facial appearance in the assessment of racial stereotyping. We initially acquired a three-dimensional facial image from a young black (Negroid) male volunteer, using our optical laser scanning system. This image was then used as a template over a Caucasian skull to produce a reconstruction using facial criteria applicable to white (Caucasian) males. The other image used was that of the facial template of the black male. A commercially available electronic identikit system, E-FIT was then used to add appropriate hair styles and open eyes to both images. In addition, on the 'Caucasian reconstruction' we were able to reduce the contrast and lighting on the face. This was relatively straightforward as we were using greyscale images rather than colour. The shape of the nose and lips on the white male were also altered to be more in keeping with Caucasoid average measurements. The resulting images were shown to a group of second-year clinical psychology students and their responses are discussed. Similar images may also be used in studies of racial stereotyping in different categories of professionals such as police, prison personnel, probation officers, social workers, potential employers, doctors, and others, in order to assess the response to individuals by facial appearance.

  16. Influence of applied corneal endothelium image segmentation techniques on the clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowski, Adam; Nurzynska, Karolina; Gronkowska-Serafin, Jolanta; Selig, Bettina; Boldak, Cezary; Reska, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The corneal endothelium state is verified on the basis of an in vivo specular microscope image from which the shape and density of cells are exploited for data description. Due to the relatively low image quality resulting from a high magnification of the living, non-stained tissue, both manual and automatic analysis of the data is a challenging task. Although, many automatic or semi-automatic solutions have already been introduced, all of them are prone to inaccuracy. This work presents a comparison of four methods (fully-automated or semi-automated) for endothelial cell segmentation, all of which represent a different approach to cell segmentation; fast robust stochastic watershed (FRSW), KH method, active contours solution (SNAKE), and TOPCON ImageNET. Moreover, an improvement framework is introduced which aims to unify precise cell border location in images pre-processed with differing techniques. Finally, the influence of the selected methods on clinical parameters is examined, both with and without the improvement framework application. The experiments revealed that although the image segmentation approaches differ, the measures calculated for clinical parameters are in high accordance when CV (coefficient of variation), and CVSL (coefficient of variation of cell sides length) are considered. Higher variation was noticed for the H (hexagonality) metric. Utilisation of the improvement framework assured better repeatability of precise endothelial cell border location between the methods while diminishing the dispersion of clinical parameter values calculated for such images. Finally, it was proven statistically that the image processing method applied for endothelial cell analysis does not influence the ability to differentiate between the images using medical parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pattern recognition applied to infrared images for early alerts in fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Vincent; Marchetti, Mario; Dumoulin, Jean; Cord, Aurélien

    2014-09-01

    Fog conditions are the cause of severe car accidents in western countries because of the poor induced visibility. Its forecast and intensity are still very difficult to predict by weather services. Infrared cameras allow to detect and to identify objects in fog while visibility is too low for eye detection. Over the past years, the implementation of cost effective infrared cameras on some vehicles has enabled such detection. On the other hand pattern recognition algorithms based on Canny filters and Hough transformation are a common tool applied to images. Based on these facts, a joint research program between IFSTTAR and Cerema has been developed to study the benefit of infrared images obtained in a fog tunnel during its natural dissipation. Pattern recognition algorithms have been applied, specifically on road signs which shape is usually associated to a specific meaning (circular for a speed limit, triangle for an alert, …). It has been shown that road signs were detected early enough in images, with respect to images in the visible spectrum, to trigger useful alerts for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems.

  18. Versatile quantitative phase imaging system applied to high-speed, low noise and multimodal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Antoine; Aknoun, Sherazade; Savatier, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2017-02-01

    Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) is a well-established quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique based on the analysis of interference patterns of four diffraction orders by an optical grating set in front of an array detector [1]. As a QPI modality, this is a non-invasive imaging technique which allow to measure the optical path difference (OPD) of semi-transparent samples. We present a system enabling QWLSI with high-performance sCMOS cameras [2] and apply it to perform high-speed imaging, low noise as well as multimodal imaging. This modified QWLSI system contains a versatile optomechanical device which images the optical grating near the detector plane. Such a device is coupled with any kind of camera by varying its magnification. In this paper, we study the use of a sCMOS Zyla5.5 camera from Andor along with our modified QWLSI system. We will present high-speed live cell imaging, up to 200Hz frame rate, in order to follow intracellular fast motions while measuring the quantitative phase information. The structural and density information extracted from the OPD signal is complementary to the specific and localized fluorescence signal [2]. In addition, QPI detects cells even when the fluorophore is not expressed. This is very useful to follow a protein expression with time. The 10 µm spatial pixel resolution of our modified QWLSI associated to the high sensitivity of the Zyla5.5 enabling to perform high quality fluorescence imaging, we have carried out multimodal imaging revealing fine structures cells, like actin filaments, merged with the morphological information of the phase. References [1]. P. Bon, G. Maucort, B. Wattellier, and S. Monneret, "Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry for quantitative phase microscopy of living cells," Opt. Express, vol. 17, pp. 13080-13094, 2009. [2] P. Bon, S. Lécart, E. Fort and S. Lévêque-Fort, "Fast label-free cytoskeletal network imaging in living mammalian cells," Biophysical journal, 106

  19. Single- and multiple-track-location shear wave and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging: matched comparison of contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollender, Peter J; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Nightingale, Kathryn R; Trahey, Gregg E

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) use the dynamic response of tissue to impulsive mechanical stimulus to characterize local elasticity. A variant of conventional, multiple-track-location SWEI, denoted single-track-location SWEI, offers the promise of creating speckle-free shear wave images. This work compares the three imaging modalities using a high push and track beam density combined acquisition sequence to image inclusions of different sizes and contrasts. Single-track-location SWEI is found to have a significantly higher contrast-to-noise ratio than multiple-track-location SWEI, allowing for operation at higher resolution. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging and single-track-location SWEI perform similarly in the larger inclusions, with single-track-location SWEI providing better visualization of small targets ≤ 2.5 mm in diameter. The processing of each modality introduces different trade-offs between smoothness and resolution of edges and structures; these are discussed in detail. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  1. Statement of capabilities: Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology applied to mine detection and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gavel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-03-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in demining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower Impulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes LLNL`s unique capabilities and technologies that can be applied to the demining problem.

  2. Unfolding and smoothing applied to the quality enhancement of neutron tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Silvani, Maria I.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2008-01-01

    Resolution and contrast are the major parameters defining the quality of a computer-aided tomographic image. These parameters depend upon several features of the image acquisition system, such as detector resolution, geometrical arrangement of the source-object-detector, beam divergence, source strength, detector efficiency and counting time. Roughly, the detector finite resolution is the main source of systematic errors affecting the separation power of the image acquisition system, while the electronic noise and statistical fluctuation are responsible for the data dispersion, which spoils the contrast. An algorithm has been developed in this work aiming at the improvement of the image quality through the minimization of both types of errors. The systematic ones are reduced by a mathematical unfolding of the position spectra - used as projections to reconstruct the 2D-images - using the Line Spread Function - LSF of the neutron tomographic system. The principle behind this technique is that every single channel contains information about all channels of the spectrum, but it is concealed due to the automatic integration carried out by the detector. Therefore, knowing the shape of this curve, it is possible to retrieve the original spectra. These spectra are unfortunately corrupted by the unavoidable statistical fluctuation, and by oscillations arising from the unfolding process, which strongly affects the quality of the final unfolded image. In order to reduce this impact, the spectra have been filtered by a Fourier transform technique or smoothed with a least square fitting procedure. The algorithm has been applied to spectra of some test-bodies generated by an earlier developed tomographic simulator, which reproduces the spectra furnished by a thermal neutron tomographic system employing a position sensitive detector. The obtained results have shown that the unfolded spectra produce final images capable to resolve features otherwise not achievable with the

  3. Nonlinear time reversal signal processing techniques applied to acousto-mechanical imaging of complex materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dos Santos, S.; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Caliez, M.; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 3 (2015) ISSN 0001-4966 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acousto-mechanical characterization of skin aging * nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) * PM-space statistical approach Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  4. Semi-supervised learning of hyperspectral image segmentation applied to vine tomatoes and table grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen van Roy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, quality inspection of fruit and vegetables is typically accomplished through visual inspection. Automation of this inspection is desirable to make it more objective. For this, hyperspectral imaging has been identified as a promising technique. When the field of view includes multiple objects, hypercubes should be segmented to assign individual pixels to different objects. Unsupervised and supervised methods have been proposed. While the latter are labour intensive as they require masking of the training images, the former are too computationally intensive for in-line use and may provide different results for different hypercubes. Therefore, a semi-supervised method is proposed to train a computationally efficient segmentation algorithm with minimal human interaction. As a first step, an unsupervised classification model is used to cluster spectra in similar groups. In the second step, a pixel selection algorithm applied to the output of the unsupervised classification is used to build a supervised model which is fast enough for in-line use. To evaluate this approach, it is applied to hypercubes of vine tomatoes and table grapes. After first derivative spectral preprocessing to remove intensity variation due to curvature and gloss effects, the unsupervised models segmented 86.11% of the vine tomato images correctly. Considering overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and time needed to segment one hypercube, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA was found to be the best choice for in-line use, when using one training image. By adding a second image, the segmentation results improved considerably, yielding an overall accuracy of 96.95% for segmentation of vine tomatoes and 98.52% for segmentation of table grapes, demonstrating the added value of the learning phase in the algorithm.

  5. Least Square NUFFT Methods Applied to 2D and 3D Radially Encoded MR Image Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiayu; Liu, Qing H.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Cofer, Gary; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-01-01

    Radially encoded MR imaging (MRI) has gained increasing attention in applications such as hyperpolarized gas imaging, contrast-enhanced MR angiography, and dynamic imaging, due to its motion insensitivity and improved artifact properties. However, since the technique collects k-space samples nonuniformly, multidimensional (especially 3D) radially sampled MRI image reconstruction is challenging. The balance between reconstruction accuracy and speed becomes critical when a large data set is processed. Kaiser-Bessel gridding reconstruction has been widely used for non-Cartesian reconstruction. The objective of this work is to provide an alternative reconstruction option in high dimensions with on-the-fly kernels calculation. The work develops general multi-dimensional least square nonuniform fast Fourier transform (LS-NUFFT) algorithms and incorporates them into a k-space simulation and image reconstruction framework. The method is then applied to reconstruct the radially encoded k-space, although the method addresses general nonuniformity and is applicable to any non-Cartesian patterns. Performance assessments are made by comparing the LS-NUFFT based method with the conventional Kaiser-Bessel gridding method for 2D and 3D radially encoded computer simulated phantoms and physically scanned phantoms. The results show that the LS-NUFFT reconstruction method has better accuracy-speed efficiency than the Kaiser-Bessel gridding method when the kernel weights are calculated on the fly. The accuracy of the LS-NUFFT method depends on the choice of scaling factor, and it is found that for a particular conventional kernel function, using its corresponding deapodization function as scaling factor and utilizing it into the LS-NUFFT framework has the potential to improve accuracy. When a cosine scaling factor is used, in particular, the LS-NUFFT method is faster than Kaiser-Bessel gridding method because of a quasi closed-form solution. The method is successfully applied to 2D and

  6. Acoustic telemetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To determine movements of green turtles in the nearshore foraging areas, we deployed acoustic tags and determined their movements through active and passive acoustic...

  7. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  8. Stroke prognosis by applying double thresholds on CT-perfusion-brain images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokchaitam, Somchart; Santipromwong, Nittaya; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat

    2013-03-01

    The CT-perfusion image shows information of brain abnormalities such as its size and location. Generally, neurologist diagnoses stroke disease using CT-perfusion images such as Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV). In our previous report, we applied threshold technique to divide amount of CBV and CBF into low and high level. Then, their levels are applied to identify normal tissue areas, dead tissue areas (infract core) and blood-cot tissue areas (infract penumbra). However, it's not totally correct, if the same threshold is applied to the whole area (it must depend on size of blood vessel in that area. In this report, we propose double thresholds to divided CBV and CBF into 3 levels: very low, medium and very high levels. Very low and very high levels are definitely implied to bad areas and good areas, respectively. The proposed double thresholds makes stroke prognosis more accurate. The simulation results confirm that our proposed results closed to results defined from neurologist comparing to the conventional results.

  9. Model simulations of line-of-sight effects in airglow imaging of acoustic and fast gravity waves from ground and space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Guerrero, J.; Snively, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Acoustic waves (AWs) have been predicted to be detectable by imaging systems for the OH airglow layer [Snively, GRL, 40, 2013], and have been identified in spectrometer data [Pilger et al., JASP, 104, 2013]. AWs are weak in the mesopause region, but can attain large amplitudes in the F region [Garcia et al., GRL, 40, 2013] and have local impacts on the thermosphere and ionosphere. Similarly, fast GWs, with phase speeds over 100 m/s, may propagate to the thermosphere and impart significant local body forcing [Vadas and Fritts, JASTP, 66, 2004]. Both have been clearly identified in ionospheric total electron content (TEC), such as following the 2013 Moore, OK, EF5 tornado [Nishioka et al., GRL, 40, 2013] and following the 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunami [e.g., Galvan et al., RS, 47, 2012, and references therein], but AWs have yet to be unambiguously imaged in MLT data and fast GWs have low amplitudes near the threshold of detection; nevertheless, recent imaging systems have sufficient spatial and temporal resolution and sensitivity to detect both AWs and fast GWs with short periods [e.g., Pautet et al., AO, 53, 2014]. The associated detectability challenges are related to the transient nature of their signatures and to systematic challenges due to line-of-sight (LOS) effects such as enhancements and cancelations due to integration along aligned or oblique wavefronts and geometric intensity enhancements. We employ a simulated airglow imager framework that incorporates 2D and 3D emission rate data and performs the necessary LOS integrations for synthetic imaging from ground- and space-based platforms to assess relative intensity and temperature perturbations. We simulate acoustic and fast gravity wave perturbations to the hydroxyl layer from a nonlinear, compressible model [e.g., Snively, 2013] for different idealized and realistic test cases. The results show clear signal enhancements when acoustic waves are imaged off-zenith or off-nadir and the temporal evolution of these

  10. Forward-backward generalized sidelobe canceler beamforming applied to medical ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiake Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For adaptive ultrasound imaging, accurate estimation of the covariance matrix is of great importance, and it has a fundamental influence on the performance of the adaptive beamformer. In this paper, a new forward-backward generalized sidelobe canceler (FBGSC approach is proposed for medical ultrasound imaging, which uses forward and backward subaperture averaging to accurate estimate the covariance matrix. And resulted from accurate estimating of covariance matrix, FBGSC can achieve better lateral resolution and contrast without preprocessing algorithms. Field II is applied to obtain the simulated echo data of scattering points and a circular cyst. Beamforming responses of scattering points show that FBGSC can improve the lateral resolution by 55.7% and 66.6% compared with synthetic aperture (SA and delay-and-sum (DS, respectively. Similarly, the simulated results of circular cyst show that FBGSC can obtain better beamforming responses than traditional adaptive beamformers. Finally, an experiment is conducted based on the real echo data of a medical ultrasound system. Results demonstrate that the FBGSC can improve the imaging quality of medical ultrasound imaging system, with lower computational demand and higher reliability.

  11. Age-related changes in liver, kidney, and spleen stiffness in healthy children measured with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi-Jung, E-mail: mjl1213@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung-Joon, E-mail: mjkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyung Hwa, E-mail: khhan@yuhs.ac [Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon Sik, E-mail: yooncs58@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, 211 Unjoo-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and age-related changes of shear wave velocity (SWV) in normal livers, kidneys, and spleens of children using acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. Materials and methods: Healthy pediatric volunteers prospectively underwent abdominal ultrasonography and ARFI. The subjects were divided into three groups according to age: group 1: <5 years old; group 2: 5–10 years old; and group 3: >10 years old. The SWV was measured using a 4–9 MHz linear probe for group 1 and a 1–4 MHz convex probe for groups 2 and 3. Three valid SWV measurements were acquired for each organ. Results: Two hundred and two children (92 male, 110 female) with an average age of 8.1 years (±4.7) were included in this study and had a successful measurement rate of 97% (196/202). The mean SWVs were 1.12 m/s for the liver, 2.19 m/s for the right kidney, 2.33 m/s for the left kidney, and 2.25 m/s for the spleen. The SWVs for the right and left kidneys, and the spleen showed age-related changes in all children (p < 0.001). And the SWVs for the kidneys increased with age in group 1, and those for the liver changed with age in group 3. Conclusions: ARFI measurements are feasible for solid abdominal organs in children using high or low frequency probes. The mean ARFI SWV for the kidneys increased according to age in children less than 5 years of age and in the liver, it changed with age in children over 10.

  12. Exploration on practice teaching reform of Photoelectric Image Processing course under applied transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Binfang; Li, Xiaoqin; Liu, Changqing; Li, Jianqi

    2017-08-01

    With the further applied transformation of local colleges, teachers are urgently needed to make corresponding changes in the teaching content and methods from different courses. The article discusses practice teaching reform of the Photoelectric Image Processing course in the Optoelectronic Information Science and Engineering major. The Digital Signal Processing (DSP) platform is introduced to the experimental teaching. It will mobilize and inspire students and also enhance their learning motivation and innovation through specific examples. The course via teaching practice process has become the most popular course among students, which will further drive students' enthusiasm and confidence to participate in all kinds of electronic competitions.

  13. Overdrive and Edge as Refiners of "Belting"?: An Empirical Study Qualifying and Categorizing "Belting" Based on Audio Perception, Laryngostroboscopic Imaging, Acoustics, LTAS, and EGG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlashan, Julian; Thuesen, Mathias Aaen; Sadolin, Cathrine

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to study the categorizations "Overdrive" and "Edge" from the pedagogical method Complete Vocal Technique as refiners of the often ill-defined concept of "belting" by means of audio perception, laryngostroboscopic imaging, acoustics, long-term average spectrum (LTAS), and electroglottography (EGG). This is a case-control study. Twenty singers were recorded singing sustained vowels in a "belting" quality refined by audio perception as "Overdrive" and "Edge." Two studies were performed: (1) a laryngostroboscopic examination using a videonasoendoscopic camera system (Olympus) and the Laryngostrobe program (Laryngograph); (2) a simultaneous recording of the EGG and acoustic signals using Speech Studio (Laryngograph). The images were analyzed based on consensus agreement. Statistical analysis of the acoustic, LTAS, and EGG parameters was undertaken using the Student paired t test. The two modes of singing determined by audio perception have visibly different laryngeal gestures: Edge has a more constricted setting than that of Overdrive, where the ventricular folds seem to cover more of the vocal folds, the aryepiglottic folds show a sharper edge in Edge, and the cuneiform cartilages are rolled in anteromedially. LTAS analysis shows a statistical difference, particularly after the ninth harmonic, with a coinciding first formant. The combined group showed statistical differences in shimmer, harmonics-to-noise ratio, normalized noise energy, and mean sound pressure level (P ≤ 0.05). "Belting" sounds can be categorized using audio perception into two modes of singing: "Overdrive" and "Edge." This study demonstrates consistent visibly different laryngeal gestures between these modes and with some correspondingly significant differences in LTAS, EGG, and acoustic measures. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of SPECT calibration for quantification of images applied to dosimetry with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Samira Marques de

    2018-01-01

    SPECT systems calibration plays an essential role in the accuracy of the quantification of images. In this work, in its first stage, an optimized SPECT calibration method was proposed for 131 I studies, considering the partial volume effect (PVE) and the position of the calibration source. In the second stage, the study aimed to investigate the impact of count density and reconstruction parameters on the determination of the calibration factor and the quantification of the image in dosimetry studies, considering the reality of clinical practice in Brazil. In the final step, the study aimed evaluating the influence of several factors in the calibration for absorbed dose calculation using Monte Carlo simulations (MC) GATE code. Calibration was performed by determining a calibration curve (sensitivity versus volume) obtained by applying different thresholds. Then, the calibration factors were determined with an exponential function adjustment. Images were performed with high and low counts densities for several source positions within the simulator. To validate the calibration method, the calibration factors were used for absolute quantification of the total reference activities. The images were reconstructed adopting two approaches of different parameters, usually used in patient images. The methodology developed for the calibration of the tomographic system was easier and faster to implement than other procedures suggested to improve the accuracy of the results. The study also revealed the influence of the location of the calibration source, demonstrating better precision in the absolute quantification considering the location of the target region during the calibration of the system. The study applied in the Brazilian thyroid protocol suggests the revision of the calibration of the SPECT system, including different positions for the reference source, besides acquisitions considering the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the images. Finally, the doses obtained with the

  15. The use of broadband acoustic transducers and pulse-compression techniques for air-coupled ultrasonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, T H; Hutchins, D A; Billson, D R; Schindel, D W

    2001-04-01

    A pulse-compression technique has been applied to air-coupled testing of solid materials. Capacitance transducers were used to generate wide bandwidth swept-frequency (chirp) signals in air, which were then used to measure and image solid samples in through transmission. The results demonstrate that such signal processing techniques lead to an improvement in the signal to noise ratio and timing accuracy for air-coupled testing. Measurements of thickness and spectroscopic experiments are presented. Images of defects in a wide range of materials, including metals and carbon-fibre composites have also been obtained. This combination of capacitive transducers with pulse-compression techniques is shown to be a powerful tool for non-contact air-coupled ultrasonic measurements.

  16. Harmonic Wave Generated by Contact Acoustic Nonlinearity in Obliquely Incident Ultrasonic Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Dong Seok; Choi, Sung Ho; Kim, Chung Seok; Jhang, Kyung Young [Hangyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    The objective of this study is to image the harmonic wave generated by contact acoustic nonlinearity in obliquely incident ultrasonic wave for early detection of closed cracks. A closed crack has been simulated by contacting two aluminum block specimens producing solid-solid contact interfaces and then acoustic nonlinearity has been imaged with contact pressure. Sampling phased array(SPA) and synthetic aperture focusing technique(SAFT) are used for imaging techniques. The amplitude of the fundamental frequency decreased with applying pressure. But, the amplitude of second harmonic increased with pressure and was a maximum amplitude at the simulation point of closed crack. Then, the amplitude of second harmonic decreased. As a result, harmonic imaging of contact acoustic nonlinearity is possible and it is expected to be apply for early detection of initial cracks.

  17. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans.

  18. Evaluating the Feasibility of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging of the Uterine Cervix With an Intracavity Array: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltovich, Helen; Homyk, Andrew D.; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The uterine cervix softens, shortens, and dilates throughout pregnancy in response to progressive disorganization of its layered collagen microstructure. This process is an essential part of normal pregnancy, but premature changes are associated with preterm birth. Clinically, there are no reliable noninvasive methods to objectively measure cervical softening or assess cervical microstructure. The goal of these preliminary studies was to evaluate the feasibility of using an intracavity ultrasound array to generate acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) excitations in the uterine cervix through simulation, and to optimize the acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation for shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) of the tissue stiffness. The cervix is a unique soft tissue target for SWEI because it has significantly greater acoustic attenuation (α = 1.3 to 2.0 dB·cm−1·MHz−1) than other soft tissues, and the pathology being studied tends to lead to an increase in tissue compliance, with healthy cervix being relatively stiff compared with other soft tissues (E ≈ 25 kPa). Additionally, the cervix can only be accessed in vivo using a transvaginal or catheter-based array, which places additional constraints on the excitation focal characteristics that can be used during SWEI. Finite element method (FEM) models of SWEI show that larger-aperture, catheter-based arrays can utilize excitation frequencies up to 7 MHz to generate adequate focal gain up to focal depths 10 to 15 mm deep, with higher frequencies suffering from excessive amounts of near-field acoustic attenuation. Using full-aperture excitations can yield ~40% increases in ARFI-induced displacements, but also restricts the depth of field of the excitation to ~0.5 mm, compared with 2 to 6 mm, which limits the range that can be used for shear wave characterization of the tissue. The center-frequency content of the shear wave particle velocity profiles ranges from 1.5 to 2.5 kHz, depending on the focal

  19. Experiments for possible hydroacoustic discrimination of free-swimming juvenile gadoid fish by analysis of broadband pulse spectra as well as 3D fish position form video images and split beam acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bo; Nielsen, J. Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    Measurements were made of the broad-bandwidth (80–220 kHz) acoustic backscattering from free-swimming juvenile gadoids at various orientations and positions in an acoustic beam, under controlled conditions. The experimental apparatus consisted of a stereo-video camera system, a broad-bandwidth ec......Measurements were made of the broad-bandwidth (80–220 kHz) acoustic backscattering from free-swimming juvenile gadoids at various orientations and positions in an acoustic beam, under controlled conditions. The experimental apparatus consisted of a stereo-video camera system, a broad...... were estimated from stereo-images captured synchronously when broad-bandwidth echoes were received from passing fish. Fish positions were also estimated from data collected with a synchronized split-beam echosounder. Software was developed for image analysis and modelling, including calibration...

  20. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Huanyang [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215006 (China); Chan, C T, E-mail: kenyon@ust.h, E-mail: phchan@ust.h [Department of Physics and the William Mong Institute of NanoScience and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-24

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  1. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  2. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  3. Evaluation of multichannel Wiener filters applied to fine resolution passive microwave images of first-year sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Full, William E.; Eppler, Duane T.

    1993-01-01

    The effectivity of multichannel Wiener filters to improve images obtained with passive microwave systems was investigated by applying Wiener filters to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice. Four major parameters which define the filter were varied: the lag or pixel offset between the original and the desired scenes, filter length, the number of lines in the filter, and the weight applied to the empirical correlation functions. The effect of each variable on the image quality was assessed by visually comparing the results. It was found that the application of multichannel Wiener theory to passive microwave images of first-year sea ice resulted in visually sharper images with enhanced textural features and less high-frequency noise. However, Wiener filters induced a slight blocky grain to the image and could produce a type of ringing along scan lines traversing sharp intensity contrasts.

  4. Phase incremented echo train acquisition applied to magnetic resonance pore imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, S. A.; Galvosas, P.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient phase cycling schemes remain a challenge for NMR techniques if the pulse sequences involve a large number of rf-pulses. Especially complex is the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence where the number of rf-pulses can range from hundreds to several thousands. Our recent implementation of Magnetic Resonance Pore Imaging (MRPI) is based on a CPMG rf-pulse sequence in order to refocus the effect of internal gradients inherent in porous media. While the spin dynamics for spin- 1 / 2 systems in CPMG like experiments are well understood it is still not straight forward to separate the desired pathway from the spectrum of unwanted coherence pathways. In this contribution we apply Phase Incremented Echo Train Acquisition (PIETA) to MRPI. We show how PIETA offers a convenient way to implement a working phase cycling scheme and how it allows one to gain deeper insights into the amplitudes of undesired pathways.

  5. Added clinical value of applying myocardial deformation imaging to assess right ventricular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalskis, Vladislavs; Peluso, Diletta; Jagodzinski, Annika; Sinning, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Right heart dysfunction has been found to be a strong prognostic factor predicting adverse outcome in various cardiopulmonary diseases. Conventional echocardiographic measurements can be limited by geometrical assumptions and impaired reproducibility. Speckle tracking-derived strain provides a robust quantification of right ventricular function. It explicitly evaluates myocardial deformation, as opposed to tissue Doppler-derived strain, which is computed from tissue velocity gradients. Right ventricular longitudinal strain provides a sensitive tool for detecting right ventricular dysfunction, even at subclinical levels. Moreover, the longitudinal strain can be applied for prognostic stratification of patients with pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary embolism, and congestive heart failure. Speckle tracking-derived right atrial strain, right ventricular longitudinal strain-derived mechanical dyssynchrony, and three-dimensional echocardiography-derived strain are emerging imaging parameters and methods. Their application in research is paving the way for their clinical use. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Accuracy Investigation of Creating Orthophotomaps Based on Images Obtained by Applying Trimble-UX5 UAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hlotov Volodymyr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to confirm the possibility of making largescale orthophotomaps applying unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV Trimble- UX5. A planned altitude reference of the studying territory was carried out before to the aerial surveying. The studying territory has been marked with distinctive checkpoints in the form of triangles (0.5 × 0.5 × 0.2 m. The checkpoints used to precise the accuracy of orthophotomap have been marked with similar triangles. To determine marked reference point coordinates and check-points method of GNSS in real-time kinematics (RTK measuring has been applied. Projecting of aerial surveying has been done with the help of installed Trimble Access Aerial Imaging, having been used to run out the UX5. Aerial survey out of the Trimble UX5 UAV has been done with the help of the digital camera SONY NEX-5R from 200m and 300 m altitude. These aerial surveying data have been calculated applying special photogrammetric software Pix 4D. The orthophotomap of the surveying objects has been made with its help. To determine the precise accuracy of the got results of aerial surveying the checkpoint coordinates according to the orthophotomap have been set. The average square error has been calculated according to the set coordinates applying GNSS measurements. A-priori accuracy estimation of spatial coordinates of the studying territory using the aerial surveying data have been calculated: mx=0.11 m, my=0.15 m, mz=0.23 m in the village of Remeniv and mx=0.26 m, my=0.38 m, mz=0.43 m in the town of Vynnyky. The accuracy of determining checkpoint coordinates has been investigated using images obtained out of UAV and the average square error of the reference points. Based on comparative analysis of the got results of the accuracy estimation of the made orthophotomap it can be concluded that the value the average square error does not exceed a-priori accuracy estimation. The possibility of applying Trimble UX5 UAV for making

  7. In vivo precision of bootstrap algorithms applied to diffusion tensor imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorburger, Robert S; Reischauer, Carolin; Dikaiou, Katerina; Boesiger, Peter

    2012-10-01

    To determine the precision for in vivo applications of model and non-model-based bootstrap algorithms for estimating the measurement uncertainty of diffusion parameters derived from diffusion tensor imaging data. Four different bootstrap methods were applied to diffusion datasets acquired during 10 repeated imaging sessions. Measurement uncertainty was derived in eight manually selected regions of interest and in the entire brain white matter and gray matter. The precision of the bootstrap methods was analyzed using coefficients of variation and intra-class correlation coefficients. Comprehensive simulations were performed to validate the results. All bootstrap algorithms showed similar precision which slightly varied in dependence of the selected region of interest. The averaged coefficient of variation in the selected regions of interest was 13.81%, 12.35%, and 17.93% with respect to the apparent diffusion coefficient, the fractional anisotropy value, and the cone of uncertainty, respectively. The repeated measurements showed a very high similarity with intraclass-correlation coefficients larger than 0.96. The simulations confirmed most of the in vivo findings. All investigated bootstrap methods perform with a similar, high precision in deriving the measurement uncertainty of diffusion parameters. Thus, the time-efficient model-based bootstrap approaches should be the method of choice in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Automated image classification applied to reconstituted human corneal epithelium for the early detection of toxic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Urani, Chiara; De Servi, Barbara; Meloni, Marisa

    2010-02-01

    For a long time acute eye irritation has been assessed by means of the DRAIZE rabbit test, the limitations of which are known. Alternative tests based on in vitro models have been proposed. This work focuses on the "reconstituted human corneal epithelium" (R-HCE), which resembles the corneal epithelium of the human eye by thickness, morphology and marker expression. Testing a substance on R-HCE involves a variety of methods. Herewith quantitative morphological analysis is applied to optical microscope images of R-HCE cross sections resulting from exposure to benzalkonium chloride (BAK). The short term objectives and the first results are the analysis and classification of said images. Automated analysis relies on feature extraction by the spectrum-enhancement algorithm, which is made sensitive to anisotropic morphology, and classification based on principal components analysis. The winning strategy has been the separate analysis of the apical and basal layers, which carry morphological information of different types. R-HCE specimens have been ranked by gross damage. The onset of early damage has been detected and an R-HCE specimen exposed to a low BAK dose has been singled out from the negative and positive control. These results provide a proof of principle for the automated classification of the specimens of interest on a purely morphological basis by means of the spectrum enhancement algorithm.

  9. Applying vertebral boundary semantics to CBIR of digitized spine x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing research interest in reliable content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques specialized for biomedical image retrieval. Applicable feature representation and similarity algorithms have to balance conflicting goals of efficient and effective retrieval while allowing queries on important and often subtle biomedical features. In a collection of digitized X-rays of the spine, such as that from the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) maintained by the National Library of Medicine, a typical user may be interested in only a small region of the vertebral boundary pertinent to the pathology: for this experiment, the Anterior Osteophyte (AO). A previous experiment in pathology-based retrieval using partial shape matching (PSM) on a subset from the above collection; about 89% normal vertebrae were correctly retrieved. In contrast only 45% of moderate and severe cases were correctly retrieved, and on the average only 46% of the pathology classes were correctly determined. Further analysis revealed that mere shape matching is insufficient for semantically correct retrieval of pathological cases. This paper describes an automatic 9 point localization algorithm that incorporates reasoning about boundary semantics equivalent to that applied by the content-expert as a step in our enhancements to PSM, and results from initial experiments.

  10. Tunable coupled surface acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M. M.; Santos, P. V.; Kosevich, Yu. A.; Cantarero, A.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate the electric tuning of the acoustic field in acoustic microcavities (MCs) defined by a periodic arrangement of metal stripes within a surface acoustic delay line on LiNbO3 substrate. Interferometric measurements show the enhancement of the acoustic field distribution within a single MC, the presence of a "bonding" and "anti-bonding" modes for two strongly coupled MCs, as well as the positive dispersion of the "mini-bands" formed by five coupled MCs. The frequency and amplitude of the resonances can be controlled by the potential applied to the metal stripes.

  11. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  12. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  13. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: design/operation/preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J L; Marston, T M; Lee, K; Lopes, J L; Lim, R

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  14. Acoustic agglomeration methods and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Methods are described for using acoustic energy to agglomerate fine particles on the order of one micron diameter that are suspended in gas, to provide agglomerates large enough for efficient removal by other techniques. The gas with suspended particles, is passed through the length of a chamber while acoustic energy at a resonant chamber mode is applied to set up one or more acoustic standing wave patterns that vibrate the suspended particles to bring them together so they agglomerate. Several widely different frequencies can be applied to efficiently vibrate particles of widely differing sizes. The standing wave pattern can be applied along directions transversed to the flow of the gas. The particles can be made to move in circles by applying acoustic energy in perpendicular directions with the energy in both directions being of the same wavelength but 90 deg out of phase.

  15. Observer Evaluation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Applied to Head and Neck Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpics, Mark; Surucu, Murat; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Alite, Fiori; Block, Alec M.; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Solanki, Abhishek A.; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose and Objectives: To quantify, through an observer study, the reduction in metal artifacts on cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images using a projection-interpolation algorithm, on images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants in patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods and Materials: An interpolation-substitution algorithm was applied to H&N CBCT images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants. Image quality with respect to metal artifacts was evaluated subjectively and objectively. First, 6 independent radiation oncologists were asked to rank randomly sorted blinded images (before and after metal artifact reduction) using a 5-point rating scale (1 = severe artifacts; 5 = no artifacts). Second, the standard deviation of different regions of interest (ROI) within each image was calculated and compared with the mean rating scores. Results: The interpolation-substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in 70% of the cases. From a total of 60 images from 15 H&N cancer patients undergoing image guided radiation therapy, the mean rating score on the uncorrected images was 2.3 ± 1.1, versus 3.3 ± 1.0 for the corrected images. The mean difference in ranking score between uncorrected and corrected images was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.2, P<.05). The standard deviation of each ROI significantly decreased after artifact reduction (P<.01). Moreover, a negative correlation between the mean rating score for each image and the standard deviation of the oral cavity and bilateral cheeks was observed. Conclusion: The interpolation-substitution algorithm is efficient and effective for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings and implants on CBCT images, as demonstrated by the statistically significant increase in observer image quality ranking and by the decrease in ROI standard deviation between uncorrected and corrected images.

  16. Discrimination and identification of RDX/PETN explosives by chemometrics applied to terahertz time-domain spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Sleiman, J.; Perraud, J.-B.; Bousquet, B.; Guillet, J.-P.; Palka, N.; Mounaix, P.

    2015-10-01

    Detection of explosives has always been a priority for homeland security. Jointly, terahertz spectroscopy and imaging are emerging and promising candidates as contactless and safe systems. In this work, we treated data resulting from hyperspectral imaging obtained by THz-time domain spectroscopy, with chemometric tools. We found efficient identification and sorting of targeted explosives in the case of pure and mixture samples. In this aim, we applied to images Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to discriminate between RDX, PETN and mixtures of the two materials, using the absorbance as the key-parameter. Then we applied Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) to each pixel of the hyperspectral images to sort the explosives into different classes. The results clearly show successful identification and categorization of the explosives under study.

  17. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  18. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a team composed of neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and a nursing staff. Specialists in neuroimaging join ... Even though most acoustic neuromas arise from the balance nerve (and not from the adjacent hearing nerve), ...

  19. Acoustic neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Professional Call your provider if you have: Hearing loss that is sudden or getting worse Ringing in one ear Dizziness (vertigo) Alternative Names Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; ... Patient Instructions Brain surgery - discharge ...

  20. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  1. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  2. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  3. Acoustic Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Hann

    One of the subtle problems that make noise control difficult for engineers is the invisibility of noise or sound. A visual image of noise often helps to determine an appropriate means for noise control. There have been many attempts to fulfill this rather challenging objective. Theoretical (or numerical) means for visualizing the sound field have been attempted, and as a result, a great deal of progress has been made. However, most of these numerical methods are not quite ready for practical applications to noise control problems. In the meantime, rapid progress with instrumentation has made it possible to use multiple microphones and fast signal-processing systems. Although these systems are not perfect, they are useful. A state-of-the-art system has recently become available, but it still has many problematic issues; for example, how can one implement the visualized noise field. The constructed noise or sound picture always consists of bias and random errors, and consequently, it is often difficult to determine the origin of the noise and the spatial distribution of the noise field. Section 26.2 of this chapter introduces a brief history, which is associated with sound visualization, acoustic source identification methods and what has been accomplished with a line or surface array. Section 26.2.3 introduces difficulties and recent studies, including de-Dopplerization and de-re verberation methods, both essential for visualizing a moving noise source, such as occurs for cars or trains. This section also addresses what produces ambiguity in realizing real sound sources in a room or closed space. Another major issue associated with sound/noise visualization is whether or not we can distinguish between mutual dependencies of noise in space (Sect. 26.2.4); for example, we are asked to answer the question, Can we see two birds singing or one bird with two beaks?

  4. Nonlinear acoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monk, P.

    1993-01-01

    The use of acoustic waves as probes to determine otherwise inaccessible properties of a medium is extremely widespread. Applications include sonar, medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Despite the importance of the applications, there is as yet no acceptable method for solving the full non-linear problem at resonance frequencies (frequencies at which the size of the features under investigations are approximately the wavelength of the incident acoustic field). The medical imaging problem, which consists in trying to determine the sound speed, density and absorption properties of a bounded inhomogeneous medium from scattered acoustic waves is the motivaiton for the investigation described in this paper. We shall present a solution technique for a standard model inverse acoustic scattering problem which consists of reconstructing the refractive index of an inhomogeneity from given far field data (far field data is essentially the measured scattered field at considerable distance from the inhomogeneity). This model inverse problem simplifies the inhomogeneity by neglecting density and absorption but includes two important features of the real problem: nonlinearity and illposedness. Furthermore the method we present can easily by extended to more general problems

  5. Supersonic acoustic intensity with statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    to the information provided by the near-field acoustic holography technique. This study proposes a version of the supersonic acoustic intensity applied to statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography (SONAH). The theory, numerical results and an experimental study are presented. The possibility of using...

  6. Optimization of input parameters of acoustic-transfection for the intracellular delivery of macromolecules using FRET-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic-transfection technique has been developed for the first time. We have developed acoustic-transfection by integrating a high frequency ultrasonic transducer and a fluorescence microscope. High frequency ultrasound with the center frequency over 150 MHz can focus acoustic sound field into a confined area with the diameter of 10 μm or less. This focusing capability was used to perturb lipid bilayer of cell membrane to induce intracellular delivery of macromolecules. Single cell level imaging was performed to investigate the behavior of a targeted single-cell after acoustic-transfection. FRET-based Ca2+ biosensor was used to monitor intracellular concentration of Ca2+ after acoustic-transfection and the fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide (PI) was used to observe influx of PI molecules. We changed peak-to-peak voltages and pulse duration to optimize the input parameters of an acoustic pulse. Input parameters that can induce strong perturbations on cell membrane were found and size dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules was explored. To increase the amount of delivered molecules by acoustic-transfection, we applied several acoustic pulses and the intensity of PI fluorescence increased step wise. Finally, optimized input parameters of acoustic-transfection system were used to deliver pMax-E2F1 plasmid and GFP expression 24 hours after the intracellular delivery was confirmed using HeLa cells.

  7. Digital image correlation, acoustic emission and ultrasonic pulse velocity for the detection of cracks in the concrete buffer of the Belgian nuclear supercontainer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliopoulos, Sokratis; Tsangouri, Eleni; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Pyl, Lincy; Areias, Lou; Vrije Univ., Brussels

    2014-01-01

    The long term management of high-level and heat emitting radioactive waste is a worldwide concern, as it directly influences the environment and future generations. To address this issue, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials has come up with the conceptual design of a massive concrete structure called Supercontainer. The feasibility to construct these structures is being evaluated through a number of scaled models that are tested using classical as well as state of the art measurement techniques. In the current paper, the results obtained from the simultaneous application of the Digital Image Correlation (DIC), the Acoustic Emission (AE) and the Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) nondestructive testing techniques on the second scaled model for the detection and monitoring of cracks will be presented.

  8. Wastewater treatment with acoustic separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambayashi, Takuya; Saeki, Tomonori; Buchanan, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic separation is a filter-free wastewater treatment method based on the forces generated in ultrasonic standing waves. In this report, a batch-system separator based on acoustic separation was demonstrated using a small-scale prototype acoustic separator to remove suspended solids from oil sand process-affected water (OSPW). By applying an acoustic separator to the batch use OSPW treatment, the required settling time, which was the time that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased to the environmental criterion (<200 mg/L), could be shortened from 10 to 1 min. Moreover, for a 10 min settling time, the acoustic separator could reduce the FeCl3 dose as coagulant in OSPW treatment from 500 to 160 mg/L.

  9. 3D Coda Attenuation Tomography of Acoustic Emission Data from Laboratory Samples as a tool for imaging pre-failure deformation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinciguerra, S.; King, T. I.; Benson, P. M.; De Siena, L.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, 3D and 4D seismic tomography have unraveled medium changes during the seismic cycle or before eruptive events. As our resolving power increases, however, complex structures increasingly affect images. Being able to interpret and understand these features requires a multi-discipline approach combining different methods, each sensitive to particular properties of the sub-surface. Rock deformation laboratory experiments can relate seismic properties to the evolving medium quantitatively. Here, an array of 1 MHz Piezo-Electric Transducers has recorded high-quality low-noise acoustic emission (AE) data during triaxial compressional experiments. Samples of Carrara Marble, Darley Dale Sandstone and Westerly Granite were deformed in saturated conditions representative of a depth of about 1 km until brittle failure. Using a time window around sample failure, AE data were filtered between 5 and 75 KHz and processed using a 3D P-coda attenuation-tomography method. Ratios of P-direct to P-coda energies calculated for each source-receiver path were inverted using the coda normalisation method for values of Q (P-wave quality factor). The results show Q-variation with respect to an average Q. Q is a combination of the effects of scattering attenuation (Qs) and intrinsic attenuation Q (Qi), which can be correlated to the sample structure. Qs primary controls energy dissipation in the presence at acoustic impedance (AI) surfaces and at fracture tips, independently of rock type, while pore fluid effects dissipate energy (Qi). Damaged zones appear as high-Q and low-Q anomalies in unsaturated and saturated samples, respectively. We have attributed frequency-dependent high-Q to resonance in the presence of AI surfaces. Low Q areas appear behind AI surfaces and are interpreted as energy shadows. These shadows can affect attenuation tomography imaging at field scale.

  10. Probabilistic Multiple-Bias Modeling Applied to the Canadian Data From the Interphone Study of Mobile Phone Use and Risk of Glioma, Meningioma, Acoustic Neuroma, and Parotid Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momoli, F; Siemiatycki, J; McBride, M L; Parent, M-É; Richardson, L; Bedard, D; Platt, R; Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Krewski, D

    2017-10-01

    We undertook a re-analysis of the Canadian data from the 13-country case-control Interphone Study (2001-2004), in which researchers evaluated the associations of mobile phone use with the risks of brain, acoustic neuroma, and parotid gland tumors. In the main publication of the multinational Interphone Study, investigators concluded that biases and errors prevented a causal interpretation. We applied a probabilistic multiple-bias model to address possible biases simultaneously, using validation data from billing records and nonparticipant questionnaires as information on recall error and selective participation. In our modeling, we sought to adjust for these sources of uncertainty and to facilitate interpretation. For glioma, when comparing those in the highest quartile of use (>558 lifetime hours) to those who were not regular users, the odds ratio was 2.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 3.4). After adjustment for selection and recall biases, the odds ratio was 2.2 (95% limits: 1.3, 4.1). There was little evidence of an increase in the risk of meningioma, acoustic neuroma, or parotid gland tumors in relation to mobile phone use. Adjustments for selection and recall biases did not materially affect interpretation in our results from Canadian data. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Phase Transition Mapping by Means of Neutron Imaging in SOFC Anode Supports During Reduction Under Applied Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, Malgorzata; Strobl, M.; Lauridsen, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    is crucial for optimization of the SOC performance. In this work the measurements with energy resolved neutron imaging of the phase transition during the NiOYSZ reduction performed at different temperatures with and without applied load, are presented. The results indicate a link between reduction rate...

  12. Digital processing methodology applied to exploring of radiological images; Metodologia de processamento digital aplicada a exploracao de imagens radiologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cristiane de Queiroz

    2004-07-01

    In this work, digital image processing is applied as a automatic computational method, aimed for exploring of radiological images. It was developed an automatic routine, from the segmentation and post-processing techniques to the radiology images acquired from an arrangement, consisting of a X-ray tube, target and filter of molybdenum, of 0.4 mm and 0.03 mm, respectively, and CCD detector. The efficiency of the methodology developed is showed in this work, through a case study, where internal injuries in mangoes are automatically detected and monitored. This methodology is a possible tool to be introduced in the post-harvest process in packing houses. A dichotomic test was applied to evaluate a efficiency of the method. The results show a success of 87.7% to correct diagnosis and 12.3% to failures to correct diagnosis with a sensibility of 93% and specificity of 80%. (author)

  13. Nanoparticles Formed by Acoustic Destruction of Microbubbles and Their Utilization for Imaging and Effects on Therapy by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Nicholas T; Yildirim, Adem; Chattaraj, Rajarshi; Goodwin, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    This work reports that when PEG-lipid-shelled microbubbles with fluorocarbon interior (C 4 F 10 , C 5 F 12 , or C 6 F 14 ) are subjected to ultrasound pulses, they produce metastable, fluid-filled nanoparticles that can be re-imaged upon administration of HIFU. The nanoparticles produced by destruction of the microbubbles (MBNPs) are of 150 nm average diameter and can be re-imaged for up to an hour after creation for C 4 F 10 , and for at least one day for C 5 F 12 . The active species were found to be fluid (gas or liquid) filled nanoparticles rather than lipid debris. The acoustic droplet vaporization threshold of the nanoparticles was found to vary with the vapor pressure of the encapsulated fluorocarbon, and integrated image brightness was found to increase dramatically when the temperature was raised above the normal boiling point of the fluorocarbon. Finally, the vaporization threshold decreases in serum as compared to buffer, and administration of HIFU to the nanoparticles caused breast cancer cells to completely detach from their culture substrate. This work demonstrates a new functionality of microbubbles that could serve as a platform technology for ultrasound-based theranostics.

  14. System and method to create three-dimensional images of non-linear acoustic properties in a region remote from a borehole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  15. Applying machine learning and image feature extraction techniques to the problem of cerebral aneurysm rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steren Chabert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral aneurysm is a cerebrovascular disorder characterized by a bulging in a weak area in the wall of an artery that supplies blood to the brain. It is relevant to understand the mechanisms leading to the apparition of aneurysms, their growth and, more important, leading to their rupture. The purpose of this study is to study the impact on aneurysm rupture of the combination of different parameters, instead of focusing on only one factor at a time as is frequently found in the literature, using machine learning and feature extraction techniques. This discussion takes relevance in the context of the complex decision that the physicians have to take to decide which therapy to apply, as each intervention bares its own risks, and implies to use a complex ensemble of resources (human resources, OR, etc. in hospitals always under very high work load. This project has been raised in our actual working team, composed of interventional neuroradiologist, radiologic technologist, informatics engineers and biomedical engineers, from Valparaiso public Hospital, Hospital Carlos van Buren, and from Universidad de Valparaíso – Facultad de Ingeniería and Facultad de Medicina. This team has been working together in the last few years, and is now participating in the implementation of an “interdisciplinary platform for innovation in health”, as part of a bigger project leaded by Universidad de Valparaiso (PMI UVA1402. It is relevant to emphasize that this project is made feasible by the existence of this network between physicians and engineers, and by the existence of data already registered in an orderly manner, structured and recorded in digital format. The present proposal arises from the description in nowadays literature that the actual indicators, whether based on morphological description of the aneurysm, or based on characterization of biomechanical factor or others, these indicators were shown not to provide sufficient information in order

  16. On the Acoustic Properties of Vaporized Submicron Perfluorocarbon Droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reznik, Nikita; Lajoinie, Guillaume Pierre Rene; Shpak, O.; Gelderblom, E.C.; Williams, Ross; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Burns, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    The acoustic characteristics of microbubbles created from vaporized submicron perfluorocarbon droplets with fluorosurfactant coating are examined. Utilizing ultra-high-speed optical imaging, the acoustic response of individual microbubbles to low-intensity diagnostic ultrasound was observed on

  17. Acoustic Emission Technology and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Y. S.; Lim, S. H.; Eom, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Jung, H. K.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic emission is the elastic wave that is generated by the rapid release of energy from the localized sources within a material. After the observation of acoustic emission phenomenon in 1950, the research and further investigation had been performed. Acoustic emission examination becomes a rapidly matured nondestructive testing method with demonstrated capabilities for characterizing material behavior and for detecting the defect. It is of interest as a possible passive monitoring technique for detecting, locating and characterizing the defects in component and structure. Acoustic emission technology has recently strengthened the on-line monitoring application for the detection of incipient failures and the assurance of structural integrity. The field of acoustic emission testing is still growing vigorously and presents many challenges. Especially, acoustic emission has been successfully applied in the leak detection of primary pressure boundary of nuclear power plants. In this state-of-art report, the principle, measurement and field applications of acoustic emission technique is reviewed and summarized. Acoustic emission technology will contribute to the assurance of nuclear safety as the on-line monitoring technique of structural integrity of NSSS components and structures

  18. Applying a computer-aided scheme to detect a new radiographic image marker for prediction of chemotherapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Qiu, Yuchen; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of automated segmentation of visceral and subcutaneous fat areas from computed tomography (CT) images of ovarian cancer patients and applying the computed adiposity-related image features to predict chemotherapy outcome. A computerized image processing scheme was developed to segment visceral and subcutaneous fat areas, and compute adiposity-related image features. Then, logistic regression models were applied to analyze association between the scheme-generated assessment scores and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients using a leave-one-case-out cross-validation method and a dataset involving 32 patients. The correlation coefficients between automated and radiologist’s manual segmentation of visceral and subcutaneous fat areas were 0.76 and 0.89, respectively. The scheme-generated prediction scores using adiposity-related radiographic image features significantly associated with patients’ PFS (p < 0.01). Using a computerized scheme enables to more efficiently and robustly segment visceral and subcutaneous fat areas. The computed adiposity-related image features also have potential to improve accuracy in predicting chemotherapy outcome

  19. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    acoustic design process and to set up a strategy to develop future programmes. The emphasis is put on the first three out of four phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference...... to the design of Bagsvaerd Church by Jørn Utzon. The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the programme in each phase compared to the works of architects not using acoustic simulation programmes. The conclusion of the paper points towards the need to apply the acoustic simulation programmes...

  20. Synthetic Aperture Focusing Applied to Imaging Using a Rotating Single Element Transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2007-01-01

    the concave element of radius 2.5 mm along a circle of radius 10 mm. Elements with different concave curvatures are used to obtain geometrical focusing depths at 10 rum, 15 rum, and 20 mm. Point targets in the range from 5 mm to 65 mm. are used as image objects. The high resolution images (HRI) are shown...

  1. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence imaging applied to the study of embryo development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokosin, David L.; White, John G.

    1998-07-01

    The use of fluorescent probes is a powerful technique for the study of living specimens. Unfortunately, living tissues are vulnerable to photodamage from the excitation illumination and they make poor optical specimens due to their light-scattering nature. Multiphoton (two or more photon) excitation imaging offers significant advantages compared to laser-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy for fluorescence microscopy of live specimens: considerable reduction in total sample fluorophore excitation and hence less photodamage, increased depth penetration due to increased tolerance for scattering, and increased detection sensitivity as more signal photons can be used for imaging. These advantages become more significant if 3D or 4D (multifocal plane, time-lapse) imaging is undertaken. In addition, multiphoton excitation imaging allows UV excited probes such as DAPI or INDO I or endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H and serotonin to be imaged without UV excitation. We, and others, have been evaluating the potential of multi-photon excitation imaging for biological microscopy and have found all of the aforementioned advantages particularly significant for laser-scanning fluorescence imaging of developing embryos; a summary of currently pursued developmental biology applications will be presented. The current status of all-solid-state ultrafast lasers as excitation sources will also be reviewed since these lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, 'turnkey' multiphoton imaging systems. The combination of demonstrated applications, simple ultrafast laser sources, and affordable commercial systems may promote a revolution in the study of embryogenesis with the light microscope.

  2. VisualRank: applying PageRank to large-scale image search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yushi; Baluja, Shumeet

    2008-11-01

    Because of the relative ease in understanding and processing text, commercial image-search systems often rely on techniques that are largely indistinguishable from text-search. Recently, academic studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of employing image-based features to provide alternative or additional signals. However, it remains uncertain whether such techniques will generalize to a large number of popular web queries, and whether the potential improvement to search quality warrants the additional computational cost. In this work, we cast the image-ranking problem into the task of identifying "authority" nodes on an inferred visual similarity graph and propose VisualRank to analyze the visual link structures among images. The images found to be "authorities" are chosen as those that answer the image-queries well. To understand the performance of such an approach in a real system, we conducted a series of large-scale experiments based on the task of retrieving images for 2000 of the most popular products queries. Our experimental results show significant improvement, in terms of user satisfaction and relevancy, in comparison to the most recent Google Image Search results. Maintaining modest computational cost is vital to ensuring that this procedure can be used in practice; we describe the techniques required to make this system practical for large scale deployment in commercial search engines.

  3. Parameters and definitions in applied technique quality test for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging system (NMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Zhikai; Zhao Lancai

    1999-08-01

    During the past two decades, medical diagnostic imaging technique has achieved dramatic development such as CT, MRI, PET, DSA and so on. The most striking examples of them are the application of X ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging in the field of medical diagnosis. It can be predicted that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will definitely have more widespread prospects of applications and play more and more important role in clinical diagnosis looking forward to the development of image diagnostic technique for 21 st century. The authors also present the measuring methods for some parameters. The parameters described can be used for reference by clinical diagnosticians, operators on MRI and medical physicists who engages in image quality assurance (QA) and control (QC) in performing MRI acceptance test and routine test

  4. Applying Support Vector Machine in classifying satellite images for the assessment of urban sprawl

    Science.gov (United States)

    murgante, Beniamino; Nolè, Gabriele; Lasaponara, Rosa; Lanorte, Antonio; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    In last decades the spreading of new buildings, road infrastructures and a scattered proliferation of houses in zones outside urban areas, produced a countryside urbanization with no rules, consuming soils and impoverishing the landscape. Such a phenomenon generated a huge environmental impact, diseconomies and a decrease in life quality. This study analyzes processes concerning land use change, paying particular attention to urban sprawl phenomenon. The application is based on the integration of Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing adopting open source technologies. The objective is to understand size distribution and dynamic expansion of urban areas in order to define a methodology useful to both identify and monitor the phenomenon. In order to classify "urban" pixels, over time monitoring of settlements spread, understanding trends of artificial territories, classifications of satellite images at different dates have been realized. In order to obtain these classifications, supervised classification algorithms have been adopted. More particularly, Support Vector Machine (SVM) learning algorithm has been applied to multispectral remote data. One of the more interesting features in SVM is the possibility to obtain good results also adopting few classification pixels of training areas. SVM has several interesting features, such as the capacity to obtain good results also adopting few classification pixels of training areas, a high possibility of configuration parameters and the ability to discriminate pixels with similar spectral responses. Multi-temporal ASTER satellite data at medium resolution have been adopted because are very suitable in evaluating such phenomena. The application is based on the integration of Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing technologies by means of open source software. Tools adopted in managing and processing data are GRASS GIS, Quantum GIS and R statistical project. The area of interest is located south of Bari

  5. Automated striatal uptake analysis of 18F-FDOPA PET images applied to Parkinson's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Icheng; Lue Kunhan; Hsieh Hungjen; Liu Shuhsin; Kao, Chinhao K.

    2011-01-01

    6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) is a radiopharmaceutical valuable for assessing the presynaptic dopaminergic function when used with positron emission tomography (PET). More specifically, the striatal-to-occipital ratio (SOR) of FDOPA uptake images has been extensively used as a quantitative parameter in these PET studies. Our aim was to develop an easy, automated method capable of performing objective analysis of SOR in FDOPA PET images of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Brain images from FDOPA PET studies of 21 patients with PD and 6 healthy subjects were included in our automated striatal analyses. Images of each individual were spatially normalized into an FDOPA template. Subsequently, the image slice with the highest level of basal ganglia activity was chosen among the series of normalized images. Also, the immediate preceding and following slices of the chosen image were then selected. Finally, the summation of these three images was used to quantify and calculate the SOR values. The results obtained by automated analysis were compared with manual analysis by a trained and experienced image processing technologist. The SOR values obtained from the automated analysis had a good agreement and high correlation with manual analysis. The differences in caudate, putamen, and striatum were -0.023, -0.029, and -0.025, respectively; correlation coefficients 0.961, 0.957, and 0.972, respectively. We have successfully developed a method for automated striatal uptake analysis of FDOPA PET images. There was no significant difference between the SOR values obtained from this method and using manual analysis. Yet it is an unbiased time-saving and cost-effective program and easy to implement on a personal computer. (author)

  6. Image restoration techniques as applied to Landsat MSS and TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, David

    1987-01-01

    Two factors are primarily responsible for the loss of image sharpness in processing digital Landsat images. The first factor is inherent in the data because the sensor's optics and electronics, along with other sensor elements, blur and smear the data. Digital image restoration can be used to reduce this degradation. The second factor, which further degrades by blurring or aliasing, is the resampling performed during geometric correction. An image restoration procedure, when used in place of typical resampled techniques, reduces sensor degradation without introducing the artifacts associated with resampling. The EROS Data Center (EDC) has implemented the restoration proceed for Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) and thematic mapper (TM) data. This capability, developed at the University of Arizona by Dr. Robert Schowengerdt and Lynette Wood, combines restoration and resampling in a single step to produce geometrically corrected MSS and TM imagery. As with resampling, restoration demands a tradeoff be made between aliasing, which occurs when attempting to extract maximum sharpness from an image, and blurring, which reduces the aliasing problem but sacrifices image sharpness. The restoration procedure used at EDC minimizes these artifacts by being adaptive, tailoring the tradeoff to be optimal for individual images.

  7. A study on the acoustical holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, S.H.; Lee, J.H.; Jang, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of acoustical holograms, and the optical reconstruction of their images are described. Acoustical holograms are constructed through the use of sound waves of 14 KHz-16 KHz frequency range. The virtual images and conjugate images are reconstructed using He-Ne gas laser(Wavelength 6,328A) light. The effect on the reconstructed images of the wavelength of the sound waves and of the scanning plane are discussed. Furthermore, the three dimensional information memory in acoustical holograms is discussed. (author)

  8. Applying Data-driven Imaging Biomarker in Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening: Preliminary Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hyo-Eun; Han, Kyunghwa; Kang, Bong Joo; Sohn, Yu-Mee; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Chan Wha

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of a data-driven imaging biomarker based on weakly supervised learning (DIB; an imaging biomarker derived from large-scale medical image data with deep learning technology) in mammography (DIB-MG). A total of 29,107 digital mammograms from five institutions (4,339 cancer cases and 24,768 normal cases) were included. After matching patients’ age, breast density, and equipment, 1,238 and 1,238 cases were chosen as validation and test sets, respectively, and the remai...

  9. Extending and applying active appearance models for automated, high precision segmentation in different image modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Fisker, Rune; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2001-01-01

    , an initialization scheme is designed thus making the usage of AAMs fully automated. Using these extensions it is demonstrated that AAMs can segment bone structures in radiographs, pork chops in perspective images and the left ventricle in cardiovascular magnetic resonance images in a robust, fast and accurate...... object class description, which can be employed to rapidly search images for new object instances. The proposed extensions concern enhanced shape representation, handling of homogeneous and heterogeneous textures, refinement optimization using Simulated Annealing and robust statistics. Finally...

  10. Crack Detection Method Applied to 3D Computed Tomography Images of Baked Carbon Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Picard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon anodes used in the aluminium industry were imaged through destructive and non-destructive testing (NDT methods. For the latter case, computed tomography (CT, which has previously been used to map the 3D apparent density distribution, was extended to crack detection. Previous work has shown how to overcome technical hurdles related to crack detection by using percolation-based algorithms operating on low-resolution images of full-scale baked carbon anodes. The previous application to 2D images was extended here to the 3D case. The crack detection algorithm has been performed on anode slices containing several independent macro cracks with different morphologies.

  11. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  12. Optimized lighting method of applying shaped-function signal for increasing the dynamic range of LED-multispectral imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Hu, Yajia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposes an optimized lighting method of applying a shaped-function signal for increasing the dynamic range of light emitting diode (LED)-multispectral imaging system. The optimized lighting method is based on the linear response zone of the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) and the spectral response of the camera. The auxiliary light at a higher sensitivity-camera area is introduced to increase the A/D quantization levels that are within the linear response zone of ADC and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The active light is modulated by the shaped-function signal to improve the gray-scale resolution of the image. And the auxiliary light is modulated by the constant intensity signal, which is easy to acquire the images under the active light irradiation. The least square method is employed to precisely extract the desired images. One wavelength in multispectral imaging based on LED illumination was taken as an example. It has been proven by experiments that the gray-scale resolution and the accuracy of information of the images acquired by the proposed method were both significantly improved. The optimum method opens up avenues for the hyperspectral imaging of biological tissue.

  13. Genetic algorithms applied to reconstructing coded imaging of neutrons and analysis of residual watermark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiankui; Hu, Huasi; Jia, Qinggang; Zhang, Fengna; Chen, Da; Li, Zhenghong; Wu, Yuelei; Liu, Zhihua; Hu, Guang; Guo, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Monte-Carlo simulation of neutron coded imaging based on encoding aperture for Z-pinch of large field-of-view with 5 mm radius has been investigated, and then the coded image has been obtained. Reconstruction method of source image based on genetic algorithms (GA) has been established. "Residual watermark," which emerges unavoidably in reconstructed image, while the peak normalization is employed in GA fitness calculation because of its statistical fluctuation amplification, has been discovered and studied. Residual watermark is primarily related to the shape and other parameters of the encoding aperture cross section. The properties and essential causes of the residual watermark were analyzed, while the identification on equivalent radius of aperture was provided. By using the equivalent radius, the reconstruction can also be accomplished without knowing the point spread function (PSF) of actual aperture. The reconstruction result is close to that by using PSF of the actual aperture.

  14. Criteria for applying imaging diagnosis and initial management for pediatric head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, Naoto; Okada, Michiko; Echigo, Tadashi; Oka, Hideki; Hino, Akihiko

    2010-01-01

    It may be difficult to perform CT for pediatric head trauma because of body movement and radiation exposure. Imaging application criteria were established, in which patients diagnosed as less likely to have an intracranial lesion meeting the criteria were not indicated for imaging and subjected to course observation at home, and this policy was explained to the parents. When consent was obtained, patients were followed up at home, and we checked on the condition by making a phone call 4-8 hours after injury. The patients were 103 infants aged 15 years or younger brought to the emergency medical care center of our hospital between May and August 2008. Imaging was basically indicated for cases of traffic accidents, falls from a high level, those brought in by ambulance, referred cases, and cases with disturbance of consciousness, neurologically abnormal findings, vomiting on examination, and trauma requiring X-ray examination in addition to that for the head. However, apart from these cases, imaging was not required. Imaging was not necessary for 94% of infant cases. The parents were convinced by the explanation and selected course observation at home in 94% of cases for which imaging was judged as unnecessary. None of the patients required re-examination based on the conditions reported in phone calls to homes. Imaging diagnosis for pediatric head trauma is not always necessary, and its application should be decided on after consultation. When no imaging is performed, this should be fully explained at the initial treatment before selecting course observation at home. Checking on the child's condition by making a phone call several hours after injury is useful for both patients and physicians. (author)

  15. An optimisation strategy in a digital environment applied to neonatal chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansson, J.; Baath, M.; Haakansson, M.; Grundin, H.; Bjurklint, E.; Orvestad, P.; Kjellstroem, A.; Bostroem, H.; Joensson, M.; Jonsson, K.; Maansson, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find the optimum tube voltage for neonatal chest imaging in computed radiography. The study was designed to take full advantage of the benefits of digital imaging, for example, by comparing the tube voltages at constant effective dose. A phantom study using a living rabbit was first conducted. Images were collected at tube voltages ranging from 40 to 90 kVp. The reproduction of four structures (central vessels, peripheral vessels, carina and thoracic vertebrae) was rated by 10 radiologist. The reproduction of both central and peripheral vessels was relatively independent of tube voltage. The carina was better reproduced at higher tube voltages whereas the opposite was true for the thoracic vertebrae. Based on the higher importance of the reproduction of the carina it was decided that 90 kVp was the optimal tube voltage. To validate the result from the phantom study, a follow-up study was conducted in which images of neonates collected at the tube voltage regularly used at Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital (70 kVp) were compared with images collected at the tube voltage proposed by the phantom study. The follow-up study confirmed the results from the phantom study that the reproduction of the carina was better at 90 than at 70 kVp. In conclusion, for neonatal chest imaging - given the same effective dose - 90 kVp gives better reproduction of important structures than the regularly used 70 kVp. (authors)

  16. Fast and accurate denoising method applied to very high resolution optical remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Antoine; Lefèvre, Sébastien; Binet, Renaud; Artigues, Stéphanie; Lassalle, Pierre; Blanchet, Gwendoline; Baillarin, Simon

    2017-10-01

    Restoration of Very High Resolution (VHR) optical Remote Sensing Image (RSI) is critical and leads to the problem of removing instrumental noise while keeping integrity of relevant information. Improving denoising in an image processing chain implies increasing image quality and improving performance of all following tasks operated by experts (photo-interpretation, cartography, etc.) or by algorithms (land cover mapping, change detection, 3D reconstruction, etc.). In a context of large industrial VHR image production, the selected denoising method should optimized accuracy and robustness with relevant information and saliency conservation, and rapidity due to the huge amount of data acquired and/or archived. Very recent research in image processing leads to a fast and accurate algorithm called Non Local Bayes (NLB) that we propose to adapt and optimize for VHR RSIs. This method is well suited for mass production thanks to its best trade-off between accuracy and computational complexity compared to other state-of-the-art methods. NLB is based on a simple principle: similar structures in an image have similar noise distribution and thus can be denoised with the same noise estimation. In this paper, we describe in details algorithm operations and performances, and analyze parameter sensibilities on various typical real areas observed in VHR RSIs.

  17. Image Fusion Applied to Satellite Imagery for the Improved Mapping and Monitoring of Coral Reefs: a Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholoum, M.; Bruce, D.; Hazeam, S. Al

    2012-07-01

    A coral reef ecosystem, one of the most complex marine environmental systems on the planet, is defined as biologically diverse and immense. It plays an important role in maintaining a vast biological diversity for future generations and functions as an essential spawning, nursery, breeding and feeding ground for many kinds of marine species. In addition, coral reef ecosystems provide valuable benefits such as fisheries, ecological goods and services and recreational activities to many communities. However, this valuable resource is highly threatened by a number of environmental changes and anthropogenic impacts that can lead to reduced coral growth and production, mass coral mortality and loss of coral diversity. With the growth of these threats on coral reef ecosystems, there is a strong management need for mapping and monitoring of coral reef ecosystems. Remote sensing technology can be a valuable tool for mapping and monitoring of these ecosystems. However, the diversity and complexity of coral reef ecosystems, the resolution capabilities of satellite sensors and the low reflectivity of shallow water increases the difficulties to identify and classify its features. This paper reviews the methods used in mapping and monitoring coral reef ecosystems. In addition, this paper proposes improved methods for mapping and monitoring coral reef ecosystems based on image fusion techniques. This image fusion techniques will be applied to satellite images exhibiting high spatial and low to medium spectral resolution with images exhibiting low spatial and high spectral resolution. Furthermore, a new method will be developed to fuse hyperspectral imagery with multispectral imagery. The fused image will have a large number of spectral bands and it will have all pairs of corresponding spatial objects. This will potentially help to accurately classify the image data. Accuracy assessment use ground truth will be performed for the selected methods to determine the quality of the

  18. Treatment verification with megavoltage electronic portal imaging applied to the tomotherapy concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, B.-M.; Spies, L.; Groh, B.; Doll, J.; Haering, P.; Hoever, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A new treatment strategy called Tomotherapy, introduced by T. R. Mackie et al. in 1993, was designed to perform a dynamic conformal treatment technique in precision radiotherapy. This technique delivers sliced intensity-modulated radiation fields to achieve best tumor control while sparing neighbouring sensitive normal tissue and organs at risk. The beam continuously revolves around the patient similarly to a spiral-CT while the patient is moved through the bore of the gantry. As a first step towards the realization of such a concept with a linear accelerator (Siemens Mevatron Experimental) used in clinical routine, we focused on treatment setup and dose verification. In tomotherapy, an actual CT data set is needed for patient positioning and for the verification of the absorbed dose, also, the dose transmitted through the patient must be known. This makes possible both routine tomographic treatment setup verification and tomographic dose reconstruction of the actual delivered dose. Materials and Methods: All measurements were performed with a megavoltage electronic portal imaging device of Wellhoefer TM (BIS-710). The BIS-710 detector is based on a scintillation foil and contains a camera for 10-bit digital data output. The dimension of the detector plane is 512 x 512 pixels with a pixel size of 0.6 mm in each direction. The BIS-710 was developed especially for quantitative dose measuring, whereas most of the existing Portal Imaging Systems are used for image display only. To examine the properties of the BIS-710 concerning tomographical reconstruction with a therapeutic 6 MV X-ray beam, a tissue-equivalent Alderson head phantom was rotated stepwise across a stationary beam between the collimator and the detector plane. The influence of scattering can be estimated by comparing measurements which were taken with a homogeneous phantom which is invariant under rotation with a calculated exit dose distribution using a simple exponential law for the

  19. Acoustic emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Universidade do Minho, Department Engineering Mecânica, Azurém,. 4800058 Guimar˜aes, Portugal e-mail: mathew@dem.uminho.pt. Abstract. Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring man- ufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the ...

  20. A Multimodal Biomicroscopic System based on High-frequency Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse and Multispectral Imaging Techniques for Tumor Characterization Ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihun; Seo, Anna; Kim, Jun-Young; Choi, Sung Hyouk; Yoon, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Eunjoo; Hwang, Jae Youn

    2017-12-13

    We report a multimodal biomicroscopic system which offers high-frequency ultrasound B-mode, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI), and multispectral imaging for qualitative tumor characterization ex vivo. Examinations of resected tissues from diseased regions such as tumors are crucial procedures during surgical operations to treat cancer. Particularly, if tiny tumors remain at surgical sites after tumor resection, such tumors can result in unwanted outcomes, such as cancer recurrence or metastasis to other organs. To avoid this, accurate characterizations of tumors resected during surgery are necessary. To this end, we devised a multimodal biomicroscopic system including high-frequency ultrasound B-mode, ARFI, and multispectral imaging modalities to examine resected tumors with high levels of accuracy. This system was evaluated with tissue-mimicking phantoms with different mechanical properties. In addition, colorectal tumors excised from cancer patients were examined. The proposed system offers highly resolved anatomical, mechanical, chemical information pertaining to tumors, thus allowing the detection of tumor regions from the surface to deep inside tissues. These results therefore suggest that the multimodal biomicroscopic system has the potential to undertake qualitative characterizations of excised tumors ex vivo.

  1. A pilot study of the characterization of hepatic tissue strain in children with cystic-fibrosis-associated liver disease (CFLD) by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Christopher B.; Langholz, Juliane H.; Eiler, Jessika; Jenewein, Raphael; Fuchs, Konstantin; Alzen, Gerhard F.P.; Naehrlich, Lutz; Harth, Sebastian; Krombach, Gabriele A.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive fibrotic alterations of liver tissue represent a major complication in children with cystic fibrosis. Correct assessment of cystic-fibrosis-associated liver disease (CFLD) in clinical routine is a challenging issue. Sonographic elastography based on acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) is a new noninvasive approach for quantitatively assessing in vivo elasticity of biological tissues in many organs. To characterize ARFI elastography as a diagnostic tool to assess alteration of liver tissue elasticity related to cystic fibrosis in children. ARFI elastography and B-mode US imaging were performed in 36 children with cystic fibrosis. The children's clinical history and laboratory parameters were documented. According to the findings on conventional US, children were assigned to distinct groups indicating severity of hepatic tissue alterations. The relationship between US findings and respective elastography values was assessed. Additionally, differences between ARFI elastography values of each US group were statistically tested. Children with sonomorphologic characteristics of fibrotic tissue remodeling presented significantly increased values for tissue elasticity. Children with normal B-mode US or discrete signs of hepatic tissue alterations showed a tendency toward increased tissue stiffness indicating early tissue remodeling. Assessment of children with CFLD by means of ARFI elastography yields adequate results when compared to conventional US. For detection of early stages of liver disease with mild fibrotic reactions of hepatic tissue, ARFI elastography might offer diagnostic advantages over conventional US. Thus, liver stiffness measured by means of elastography might represent a valuable biological parameter for evaluation and follow-up of CFLD. (orig.)

  2. A pilot study of the characterization of hepatic tissue strain in children with cystic-fibrosis-associated liver disease (CFLD) by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Christopher B.; Langholz, Juliane H.; Eiler, Jessika; Jenewein, Raphael; Fuchs, Konstantin; Alzen, Gerhard F.P. [University Hospital Giessen, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Giessen (Germany); Naehrlich, Lutz [University Hospital Giessen, Department of Pediatrics, Giessen (Germany); Harth, Sebastian; Krombach, Gabriele A. [University Hospital Giessen, Department of Radiology, Giessen (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Progressive fibrotic alterations of liver tissue represent a major complication in children with cystic fibrosis. Correct assessment of cystic-fibrosis-associated liver disease (CFLD) in clinical routine is a challenging issue. Sonographic elastography based on acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) is a new noninvasive approach for quantitatively assessing in vivo elasticity of biological tissues in many organs. To characterize ARFI elastography as a diagnostic tool to assess alteration of liver tissue elasticity related to cystic fibrosis in children. ARFI elastography and B-mode US imaging were performed in 36 children with cystic fibrosis. The children's clinical history and laboratory parameters were documented. According to the findings on conventional US, children were assigned to distinct groups indicating severity of hepatic tissue alterations. The relationship between US findings and respective elastography values was assessed. Additionally, differences between ARFI elastography values of each US group were statistically tested. Children with sonomorphologic characteristics of fibrotic tissue remodeling presented significantly increased values for tissue elasticity. Children with normal B-mode US or discrete signs of hepatic tissue alterations showed a tendency toward increased tissue stiffness indicating early tissue remodeling. Assessment of children with CFLD by means of ARFI elastography yields adequate results when compared to conventional US. For detection of early stages of liver disease with mild fibrotic reactions of hepatic tissue, ARFI elastography might offer diagnostic advantages over conventional US. Thus, liver stiffness measured by means of elastography might represent a valuable biological parameter for evaluation and follow-up of CFLD. (orig.)

  3. Applying Data-driven Imaging Biomarker in Mammography for Breast Cancer Screening: Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hyo-Eun; Han, Kyunghwa; Kang, Bong Joo; Sohn, Yu-Mee; Woo, Ok Hee; Lee, Chan Wha

    2018-02-09

    We assessed the feasibility of a data-driven imaging biomarker based on weakly supervised learning (DIB; an imaging biomarker derived from large-scale medical image data with deep learning technology) in mammography (DIB-MG). A total of 29,107 digital mammograms from five institutions (4,339 cancer cases and 24,768 normal cases) were included. After matching patients' age, breast density, and equipment, 1,238 and 1,238 cases were chosen as validation and test sets, respectively, and the remainder were used for training. The core algorithm of DIB-MG is a deep convolutional neural network; a deep learning algorithm specialized for images. Each sample (case) is an exam composed of 4-view images (RCC, RMLO, LCC, and LMLO). For each case in a training set, the cancer probability inferred from DIB-MG is compared with the per-case ground-truth label. Then the model parameters in DIB-MG are updated based on the error between the prediction and the ground-truth. At the operating point (threshold) of 0.5, sensitivity was 75.6% and 76.1% when specificity was 90.2% and 88.5%, and AUC was 0.903 and 0.906 for the validation and test sets, respectively. This research showed the potential of DIB-MG as a screening tool for breast cancer.

  4. Development of the hyperspectral cellular imaging system to apply to regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Masato; Matsumura, Kouji; Mochida, Joji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Regenerative medicine by the transplantation of differentiated cells or tissue stem cells has been clinically performed, particularly in the form of cell sheets. To ensure the safety and effectiveness of cell therapy, the efficient selection of desired cells with high quality is a critical issue, which requires the development of a new evaluation method to discriminate cells non-invasively with high throughput. There were many ways to characterize cells and their components, among which the optical spectral analysis has a powerful potential for this purpose. We developed a cellular hyperspectral imaging system, which captured both spatial and spectral information in a single pixel. Hyperspectral data are composed of continual spectral bands, whereas multispectral data are usually composed of about 5 to 10 discrete bands of large bandwidths. The hyperspectral imaging system which we developed was set up by a commonly-used inverted light microscope for cell culture experiments, and the time-lapse imaging system with automatic focus correction. Spectral line imaging device with EMCCD was employed for spectral imaging. The system finally enabled to acquire 5 dimensional (x, y, z, time, wavelength) data sets and cell-by-cell evaluation. In this study, we optimized the protocol for the creation of cellular spectral database under biological understanding. We enabled to confirm spectrum of autofluorescence of collagen, absorption of specific molecules in the cultural sample and increase of scattering signal due to cell components although detail spectral analyses have not been performed.

  5. Digital image processing applied to analysis of geophysical and geochemical data for southern Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Leff, C. E.; Edwards, M. H.; Bindschadler, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Digital image-processing techniques have been used to analyze a variety of geophysical and geochemical map data covering southern Missouri, a region with important basement and strata-bound mineral deposits. Gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns, which have been reformatted to image displays, indicate a deep crustal structure cutting northwest-southeast through southern Missouri. In addition, geologic map data, topography, and Landsat multispectral scanner images have been used as base maps for the digital overlay of aerial gamma-ray and stream sediment chemical data for the 1 x 2-deg Rolla quadrangle. Results indicate enrichment of a variety of elements within the clay-rich alluvium covering many of the interfluvial plains, as well as a complicated pattern of enrichment for the sedimentary units close to the Precambrian rhyolites and granites of the St. Francois Mountains.

  6. Double-Stage Delay Multiply and Sum Beamforming Algorithm Applied to Ultrasound Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Sadeghi, Masume; Mahloojifar, Ali; Orooji, Mahdi

    2018-03-01

    In ultrasound (US) imaging, delay and sum (DAS) is the most common beamformer, but it leads to low-quality images. Delay multiply and sum (DMAS) was introduced to address this problem. However, the reconstructed images using DMAS still suffer from the level of side lobes and low noise suppression. Here, a novel beamforming algorithm is introduced based on expansion of the DMAS formula. We found that there is a DAS algebra inside the expansion, and we proposed use of the DMAS instead of the DAS algebra. The introduced method, namely double-stage DMAS (DS-DMAS), is evaluated numerically and experimentally. The quantitative results indicate that DS-DMAS results in an approximately 25% lower level of side lobes compared with DMAS. Moreover, the introduced method leads to 23%, 22% and 43% improvement in signal-to-noise ratio, full width at half-maximum and contrast ratio, respectively, compared with the DMAS beamformer. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Personal computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processsed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes commputation.

  8. A quantitative performance evaluation of the EM algorithm applied to radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailean, J.C.; Sullivan, B.J.; Giger, M.L.; Chen, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the authors quantitatively evaluate the performance of the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm as a restoration technique for radiographic images. The perceived signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), of simple radiographic patterns processed by the EM algorithm are calculated on the basis of a statistical decision theory model that includes both the observer's visual response function and a noise component internal to the eye-brain system. The relative SNR (ratio of the processed SNR to the original SNR) is calculated and used as a metric to quantitatively compare the effects of the EM algorithm to two popular image enhancement techniques: contrast enhancement (windowing) and unsharp mask filtering

  9. Clinical advances of SPECT rCBF and interventional imaging applied in the diagnosis of dementias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kaijun

    2002-01-01

    Brain perfusion SPECT is a functional and noninvasive neuroimaging technique that allow the investigation of physiological and physiopathologic events in the human brain, including cerebral perfusion and function. Interventional rCBF imaging can also evaluate cerebrovascular reserve. In clinically, rCBF imaging play an important role in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementias, especially vascular and Alzheimer's dementia. If etiology of some types of dementias is determined so that it can be early diagnosed, treated and taken prevention; the partial patients with dementia can get recovery or remission

  10. A new automated assessment method for contrast–detail images by applying support vector machine and its robustness to nonlinear image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takei, Takaaki; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Imai, Kumiharu; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Kato, Katsuhiko; Isoda, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    The automated contrast–detail (C–D) analysis methods developed so-far cannot be expected to work well on images processed with nonlinear methods, such as noise reduction methods. Therefore, we have devised a new automated C–D analysis method by applying support vector machine (SVM), and tested for its robustness to nonlinear image processing. We acquired the CDRAD (a commercially available C–D test object) images at a tube voltage of 120 kV and a milliampere-second product (mAs) of 0.5–5.0. A partial diffusion equation based technique was used as noise reduction method. Three radiologists and three university students participated in the observer performance study. The training data for our SVM method was the classification data scored by the one radiologist for the CDRAD images acquired at 1.6 and 3.2 mAs and their noise-reduced images. We also compared the performance of our SVM method with the CDRAD Analyser algorithm. The mean C–D diagrams (that is a plot of the mean of the smallest visible hole diameter vs. hole depth) obtained from our devised SVM method agreed well with the ones averaged across the six human observers for both original and noise-reduced CDRAD images, whereas the mean C–D diagrams from the CDRAD Analyser algorithm disagreed with the ones from the human observers for both original and noise-reduced CDRAD images. In conclusion, our proposed SVM method for C–D analysis will work well for the images processed with the non-linear noise reduction method as well as for the original radiographic images.

  11. A sampler of useful computational tools for applied geometry, computer graphics, and image processing foundations for computer graphics, vision, and image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Or, Daniel; Ju, Tao; Mitra, Niloy J; Shamir, Ariel; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Zhang, Hao (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    A Sampler of Useful Computational Tools for Applied Geometry, Computer Graphics, and Image Processing shows how to use a collection of mathematical techniques to solve important problems in applied mathematics and computer science areas. The book discusses fundamental tools in analytical geometry and linear algebra. It covers a wide range of topics, from matrix decomposition to curvature analysis and principal component analysis to dimensionality reduction.Written by a team of highly respected professors, the book can be used in a one-semester, intermediate-level course in computer science. It

  12. PVT Degradation Studies: Acoustic Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dib, Gerges [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Under certain environmental conditions, polyvinyl toluene (PVT) plastic scintillator has been observed to undergo internal fogging. This document reports on a study of acoustic techniques to determine whether they can provide a diagnostic for the fogging of PVT. Different ultrasound techniques were employed for detecting the level of internal fogging in PVT, including wave velocity measurements, attenuation, nonlinear acoustics, and acoustic microscopy. The results indicate that there are linear relations between the wave velocity and wave attenuation with the level of internal fogging. The effects of fogging on ultrasound wave attenuation is further verified by acoustic microscopy imaging, where regions with fog in the specimen demonstration higher levels of attenuation compared to clear regions. Results from the nonlinear ultrasound measurements were inconclusive due to high sensitivities to transducer coupling and fixture variabilities.

  13. Lessons from Coronagraphic Imaging with HST that may apply to JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; McElwain, Michael W.

    2017-06-01

    One of the major capabilities offered by JWST is coronagraphic imaging from space, covering the near through mid-IR and optimized for study of planet formation and the evolution of planetary systems. Planning for JWST has resulted in expectations for instrument performance, observation strategies and data reduction approaches. HST with 20 years of coronagraphic imaging offers some experience which may be useful to those planning for JWST. 1) Real astronomical sources do not necessarily conform to expectations. Debris disks may be accompanied by more distant material, and some systems may be conspicuous in scattered light when offering only modest IR excesses. Proto-planetary disks are not constantly illuminated, and thus a single epoch observation of the source may not be sufficient to reveal everything about it. 2) The early expectation with NICMOS was that shallow, 2-roll observations would reveal a wealth of debris disks imaged in scattered light, and that only a limited set of PSF observations would be required. Instead, building up a library of spatially resolved disks in scattered light has proven to require alternate observing strategies, is still on-going, and has taken far longer than expected. 3) A wealth of coronagraphic options with an instrument may not be scientifically informative, unless there is a similar time investment in acquisition of calibration data in support of the science observations. 4) Finally, no one anticipated what can be gleaned from coronagraphic imaging. We should expect similar, unexpected, and ultimately revolutionary discoveries with JWST.

  14. An Adaptive Spectrally Weighted Structure Tensor Applied to Tensor Anisotropic Nonlinear Diffusion for Hyperspectral Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin Quintero, Maider J.

    2013-01-01

    The structure tensor for vector valued images is most often defined as the average of the scalar structure tensors in each band. The problem with this definition is the assumption that all bands provide the same amount of edge information giving them the same weights. As a result non-edge pixels can be reinforced and edges can be weakened…

  15. Robustness as an image of sustainability: applied conceptualisations and their contribution to sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, de D.M.; Gremmen, B.; Blom, M.

    2012-01-01

    Sustainability is a catch-all term in need of more tangible, yet qualitatively measureable operationalisations. This paper discusses the relevance of robustness as an image of sustainability. We argue that robustness has conceptual advantages against sustainability because it is embedded in system

  16. Light calibration and quality assessment methods for Reflectance Transformation Imaging applied to artworks' analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachetti, A.; Daffara, C.; Reghelin, C.; Gobbetti, E.; Pintus, R.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we analyze some problems related to the acquisition of multiple illumination images for Polynomial Texture Maps (PTM) or generic Reflectance Transform Imaging (RTI). We show that intensity and directionality nonuniformity can be a relevant issue when acquiring manual sets of images with the standard highlight-based setup both using a flash lamp and a LED light. To maintain a cheap and flexible acquisition setup that can be used on field and by non-experienced users we propose to use a dynamic calibration and correction of the lights based on multiple intensity and direction estimation around the imaged object during the acquisition. Preliminary tests on the results obtained have been performed by acquiring a specifically designed 3D printed pattern in order to see the accuracy of the acquisition obtained both for spatial discrimination of small structures and normal estimation, and on samples of different types of paper in order to evaluate material discrimination. We plan to design and build from our analysis and from the tools developed and under development a set of novel procedures and guidelines that can be used to turn the cheap and common RTI acquisition setup from a simple way to enrich object visualization into a powerful method for extracting quantitative characterization both of surface geometry and of reflective properties of different materials. These results could have relevant applications in the Cultural Heritage domain, in order to recognize different materials used in paintings or investigate the ageing status of artifacts' surface.

  17. Target-oriented imaging of hydraulic fractures by applying the staining algorithm for downhole microseismic migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Zhang, Haijiang; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2018-03-01

    For microseismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing, microseismic migration can be used to image the fracture network with scattered microseismic waves. Compared with conventional microseismic location-based fracture characterization methods, microseismic migration can better constrain the stimulated reservoir volume regardless of the completeness of detected and located microseismic sources. However, the imaging results from microseismic migration may suffer from the contamination of other structures and thus the target fracture zones may not be illuminated properly. To solve this issue, in this study we propose a target-oriented staining algorithm for microseismic reverse-time migration. In the staining algorithm, the target area is first stained by constructing an imaginary velocity field and then a synchronized source wavefield only concerning the target structure is produced. As a result, a synchronized image from imaging with the synchronized source wavefield mainly contains the target structures. Synthetic tests based on a downhole microseismic monitoring system show that the target-oriented microseismic reverse-time migration method improves the illumination of target areas.

  18. Applying of the array transducers' technology for surface acoustic waves materials characterization in the transient regime; Application de la technologie multi-elements a la caracterisation des materiaux par ondes acoustiques de surface en regime impulsionnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenet, D

    2000-07-01

    In this document we present a theoretical and experimental study which has been led to design a surface acoustic wave device for local characterisation (relatively to the wavelength) of isotropic or anisotropic materials. The device is based on a phased-array transducer of conical shape we have specifically designed for this purpose. It operates in the impulsive mode, in the frequency range of 1-5 MHz. In order to deduce mechanical properties of the material, it is possible to measure the surface wave characteristics (velocity, attenuation,...). Different methods for measuring the wave velocity have been developed taking advantage of from the phased-array technology. The originality of theses methods relies on the fact that the measures are performed without moving the transducer. Consequently, the device requires no additional mechanical system and it is quite compact. In addition, this shortens the characterisation process duration comparatively to the usually available methods (e. g. the V(z) technique). In the theoretical section of this study, a versatile model allowing to simulate in the time harmonic regime as well as in the transient regime, the transmitted field, the field reflected on isotropic or anisotropic planar samples and the output voltage for transducers of arbitrary shapes has been developed. The model has been applied to the phased-array conical transducer as well as to more classical transducers such as planar (rectangular) or focusing (spherically or cylindrically shaped) transducers. It predicts not only the geometrical contributions of the reflected field and signal but also the leaky contributions related to the surface acoustic waves. (author)

  19. Influence of Images on the Evaluation of Jams Using Conjoint Analysis Combined with Check-All-That-Apply (CATA) Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraballes, Marcelo; Gámbaro, Adriana

    2018-01-01

    A study of the influence of the use of images in a conjoint analysis combined with check-all-that apply (CATA) questions on jams was carried out. The relative importance of flavor and the information presented in the label in the willingness to purchase and the perception of how healthy the product is has been evaluated. Sixty consumers evaluated the stimuli presented only in text format (session 1), and another group of 60 consumers did so by receiving the stimuli in text format along with an image of the product (session 2). In addition, for each stimulus, consumers answered a CATA question consisting of 20 terms related to their involvement with the product. The perception of healthy increased when the texts were accompanied with images and also increased when the text included information. Willingness to purchase was only influenced by the flavor of the jams. The presence of images did not influence the CATA question's choice of terms, which were influenced by the information presented in the text. The use of a check-all-that-apply question in concepts provided an interesting possibility when they were combined with the results from the conjoint analysis, improving the comprehension of consumers' perception. Using CATA questions as an alternative way of evaluating consumer involvement seems to be beneficial and should be evaluated much further. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. Using Anatomic Magnetic Resonance Image Information to Enhance Visualization and Interpretation of Functional Images: A Comparison of Methods Applied to Clinical Arterial Spin Labeling Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Dai, Weiying; Soman, Salil; Hackney, David B; Wong, Eric T; Robson, Philip M; Alsop, David C

    2017-02-01

    Functional imaging provides hemodynamic and metabolic information and is increasingly being incorporated into clinical diagnostic and research studies. Typically functional images have reduced signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution compared to other non-functional cross sectional images obtained as part of a routine clinical protocol. We hypothesized that enhancing visualization and interpretation of functional images with anatomic information could provide preferable quality and superior diagnostic value. In this work, we implemented five methods (frequency addition, frequency multiplication, wavelet transform, nonsubsampled contourlet transform and intensity-hue-saturation) and a newly proposed ShArpening by Local Similarity with Anatomic images (SALSA) method to enhance the visualization of functional images, while preserving the original functional contrast and quantitative signal intensity characteristics over larger spatial scales. Arterial spin labeling blood flow MR images of the brain were visualization enhanced using anatomic images with multiple contrasts. The algorithms were validated on a numerical phantom and their performance on images of brain tumor patients were assessed by quantitative metrics and neuroradiologist subjective ratings. The frequency multiplication method had the lowest residual error for preserving the original functional image contrast at larger spatial scales (55%-98% of the other methods with simulated data and 64%-86% with experimental data). It was also significantly more highly graded by the radiologists (p<0.005 for clear brain anatomy around the tumor). Compared to other methods, the SALSA provided 11%-133% higher similarity with ground truth images in the simulation and showed just slightly lower neuroradiologist grading score. Most of these monochrome methods do not require any prior knowledge about the functional and anatomic image characteristics, except the acquired resolution. Hence, automatic implementation on

  1. Image processing technology applied in quality inspecting of the motor carling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongsheng; Lei, Jun; Fu, Yongzhi

    2010-07-01

    After a deep analysis on how to use an image processing system to detect the missing holes on the motor carling, we design the whole system combined with the actual production conditions of the motor carling. Afterwards we explain the whole system's hardware and software in detail. We introduce the general functions for the system's hardware and software. Analyzed these general functions, we discuss the modules of the system's hardware and software and the theory to design these modules in detail. The measurement to confirm the area to image processing, edge detection, randomized Hough transform to circle detecting is explained in detail. Finally, the system result tested in the laboratory and in the factory is given out.

  2. Shanoir: Applying the Software as a Service Distribution Model to Manage Brain Imaging Research Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Barillot

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Two of the major concerns of researchers and clinicians performing neuroimaging experiments are managing the huge quantity and diversity of data and the ability to compare their experiments and the programs they develop with those of their peers. In this context, we introduce Shanoir, which uses a type of cloud computing known as software as a service (SaaS to manage neuroimaging data used in the clinical neurosciences. Thanks to a formal model of medical imaging data (an ontology, Shanoir provides an open source neuroinformatics environment designed to structure, manage, archive, visualize and share neuroimaging data with an emphasis on managing multi-institutional, collaborative research projects. This article covers how images are accessed through the Shanoir Data Management System and describes the data repositories that are hosted and managed by the Shanoir environment in different contexts.

  3. Multispectral mapper - Imaging spectroscopy as applied to the mapping of earth resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    An instrument concept that uses solid-state array imaging has been developed for a future land observing system. The design concept is responsive to a variety of use needs and provides improved capabilities over the planned Landsat Thematic Mapper. A comparison of the differing approaches to the instrument design was made, resulting in the selection of a concept which uses a spectrograph coupled to a line-array imager to provide simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution. The design provides an inherent solution to the problem of achieving precise registration among the spectral bands. Data processing on the focal plane is used to select the spectral bands and their band widths. Onboard capabilities include radiometric correction, selection of instantaneous field-of-view and swath width, and data compression.

  4. Infrared microscopy imaging applied to obtain the index finger pad's thermoregulation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viafora, Laura A.; Torres, Sergio N.; Ramírez, Wagner; Gutiérrez, Pablo A.; Machuca, Guillermo; Jara, Anselmo

    2017-03-01

    In this work, mid wavelength infrared microscopy imaging videos of several index finger pads, from voluntary people, are recorded to obtain their thermoregulation curves. The proposed non-invasive technique is able to capture spatial and temporal thermal information emitted from blood vessels under-skin, and the irrigation finger pad system, making possible to capture features that a visual-spectrum microscopy cannot detect. Using an infrared laboratory prepared method several voluntary patients exposed theirs fingers to thermal stress while the infrared data is recorded. Using standard infrared imaging and signal processing techniques the thermoregulation curves are estimated. The Cold/Hot Stress experiments have shown infrared data with exponential trend curves, with different recovering slopes for each voluntary person, and sometimes with two steps increasing slope in one person thermoregulation curve response.

  5. Image processing techniques applied to the detection of optic disk: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Vijaya V.; Narayanan, Suriya N.

    2010-02-01

    In retinal image analysis, the detection of optic disk is of paramount importance. It facilitates the tracking of various anatomical features and also in the extraction of exudates, drusens etc., present in the retina of human eye. The health of retina crumbles with age in some people during the presence of exudates causing Diabetic Retinopathy. The existence of exudates increases the risk for age related macular Degeneration (AMRD) and it is the leading cause for blindness in people above the age of 50.A prompt diagnosis when the disease is at the early stage can help to prevent irreversible damages to the diabetic eye. Screening to detect diabetic retinopathy helps to prevent the visual loss. The optic disk detection is the rudimentary requirement for the screening. In this paper few methods for optic disk detection were compared which uses both the properties of optic disk and model based approaches. They are uniquely used to give accurate results in the retinal images.

  6. An automatic image-based modelling method applied to forensic infography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zancajo-Blazquez

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method based on 3D reconstruction from images that demonstrates the utility and integration of close-range photogrammetry and computer vision as an efficient alternative to modelling complex objects and scenarios of forensic infography. The results obtained confirm the validity of the method compared to other existing alternatives as it guarantees the following: (i flexibility, permitting work with any type of camera (calibrated and non-calibrated, smartphone or tablet and image (visible, infrared, thermal, etc.; (ii automation, allowing the reconstruction of three-dimensional scenarios in the absence of manual intervention, and (iii high quality results, sometimes providing higher resolution than modern laser scanning systems. As a result, each ocular inspection of a crime scene with any camera performed by the scientific police can be transformed into a scaled 3d model.

  7. Error analysis by means of acoustic holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, J.; Wuestenberg, H.

    1976-01-01

    The possilbilities to use the acoustical holography in nondestructive testing are discussed. Although compared to optical holography the image quality of acoustical holography is reduced this technique can give important informations about the shape of defects. Especially in nondestructive testing of thick walled components no alternative exists until now. (orig.) [de

  8. Medical Image Processing Server applied to Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, C.; Graffigna, J. P.; Marino, E.; Omati, S.; Holleywell, P.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is framed within the area of medical image processing and aims to present the process of installation, configuration and implementation of a processing server of medical images (MIPS) in the Fundación Escuela de Medicina Nuclear located in Mendoza, Argentina (FUESMEN). It has been developed in the Gabinete de Tecnologia Médica (GA.TE.ME), Facultad de Ingeniería-Universidad Nacional de San Juan. MIPS is a software that using the DICOM standard, can receive medical imaging studies of different modalities or viewing stations, then it executes algorithms and finally returns the results to other devices. To achieve the objectives previously mentioned, preliminary tests were conducted in the laboratory. More over, tools were remotely installed in clinical enviroment. The appropiate protocols for setting up and using them in different services were established once defined those suitable algorithms. Finally, it’s important to focus on the implementation and training that is provided in FUESMEN, using nuclear medicine quality control processes. Results on implementation are exposed in this work.

  9. Medical Image Processing Server applied to Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergara, C.; Graffigna, J.P.; Holleywell, P.; Marino, E.; Omati, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is framed within the area of medical image processing and aims to present the process of installation, configuration and implementation of a processing server of medical images (MIPS) in the Fundación Escuela de Medicina Nuclear located in Mendoza, Argentina (FUESMEN). It has been developed in the Gabinete de Tecnologia Médica (GA.TE.ME), Facultad de Ingeniería-Universidad Nacional de San Juan. MIPS is a software that using the DICOM standard, can receive medical imaging studies of different modalities or viewing stations, then it executes algorithms and finally returns the results to other devices. To achieve the objectives previously mentioned, preliminary tests were conducted in the laboratory. More over, tools were remotely installed in clinical enviroment. The appropiate protocols for setting up and using them in different services were established once defined those suitable algorithms. Finally, it’s important to focus on the implementation and training that is provided in FUESMEN, using nuclear medicine quality control processes. Results on implementation are exposed in this work. (paper)

  10. Applying x-ray digital imaging to the verification of cadmium in fuel-storage components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbs, R.D.; Cook, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor utilizes large underwater fuel-storage arrays to stage irradiated fuel before it is shipped from the facility. Cadmium is required as a thermal neutron absorber in these fuel-storage arrays to produce an acceptable margin of nuclear subcriticality during both normal and off-normal operating conditions. Due to incomplete documentation from the time of their fabrication, the presence of cadmium within two stainless-steel parts of fuel-storage arrays must be experimentally verified before they are reused in new fuel-storage arrays. A cadmium-verification program has been developed in association with the Waste Examination and Assay Facility located at the Oak Ridge national Laboratory to nondestructively examine these older shroud assemblies. The program includes the following elements (1) x-ray analog imaging, (2) x-ray digital imaging, (3) prompt-gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements, and (4) neutron-transmission measurements. X-ray digital imaging utilizes an analog-to-digital convertor to record attenuated x-ray intensities observed on a fluorescent detector by a video camera. These x-ray intensities are utilized in expressions for cadmium thickness based upon x-ray attenuation theory

  11. Applying protein-based amide proton transfer MR imaging to distinguish solitary brain metastases from glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hao; Zou, Tianyu; Wang, Xianlong; Du, Yongxing; Jiang, Chunxiu; Ma, Ling; Zhu, Jianbin; He, Wen; Rui, Qihong; Wen, Zhibo [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lou, Huiling [The First People' Hospital of Guangzhou, Department of Geriatrics, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Jiang, Shanshan [Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huang, Zhongqing [Shantou University Medical College, Department of Medical Image Center, Yuebei People' s Hospital, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Zhou, Jianyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To determine the utility of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MR imaging in distinguishing solitary brain metastases (SBMs) from glioblastomas (GBMs). Forty-five patients with SBMs and 43 patients with GBMs underwent conventional and APT-weighted sequences before clinical intervention. The APTw parameters and relative APTw (rAPTw) parameters in the tumour core and the peritumoral brain zone (PBZ) were obtained and compared between SBMs and GBMs. The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to assess the best parameter for distinguishing between the two groups. The APTw{sub max}, APTw{sub min}, APTw{sub mean}, rAPTw{sub max}, rAPTw{sub min} or rAPTw{sub mean} values in the tumour core were not significantly different between the SBM and GBM groups (P = 0.141, 0.361, 0.221, 0.305, 0.578 and 0.448, respectively). However, the APTw{sub max}, APTw{sub min}, APTw{sub mean}, rAPTw{sub max}, rAPTw{sub min} or rAPTw{sub mean} values in the PBZ were significantly lower in the SBM group than in the GBM group (P < 0.001). The APTw{sub min} values had the highest area under the ROC curve 0.905 and accuracy 85.2% in discriminating between the two neoplasms. As a noninvasive imaging method, APT-weighted MR imaging can be used to distinguish SBMs from GBMs. (orig.)

  12. Automatic selection of localized region-based active contour models using image content analysis applied to brain tumor segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Cepeda-Negrete, Jonathan; Ibarra-Manzano, Mario Alberto; Chalopin, Claire

    2017-12-01

    Brain tumor segmentation is a routine process in a clinical setting and provides useful information for diagnosis and treatment planning. Manual segmentation, performed by physicians or radiologists, is a time-consuming task due to the large quantity of medical data generated presently. Hence, automatic segmentation methods are needed, and several approaches have been introduced in recent years including the Localized Region-based Active Contour Model (LRACM). There are many popular LRACM, but each of them presents strong and weak points. In this paper, the automatic selection of LRACM based on image content and its application on brain tumor segmentation is presented. Thereby, a framework to select one of three LRACM, i.e., Local Gaussian Distribution Fitting (LGDF), localized Chan-Vese (C-V) and Localized Active Contour Model with Background Intensity Compensation (LACM-BIC), is proposed. Twelve visual features are extracted to properly select the method that may process a given input image. The system is based on a supervised approach. Applied specifically to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images, the experiments showed that the proposed system is able to correctly select the suitable LRACM to handle a specific image. Consequently, the selection framework achieves better accuracy performance than the three LRACM separately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acoustic detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccobene, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    The proposal of acoustic neutrino detection is living a renaissance: the interest in ultra high energy neutrino detection, the fast improvements of deep sea technology and the availability of large deep sea research infrastructures are the three main ingredients to explain the new interest in this technique. The status of simulation work, medium studies, sensor developments and first results from test experimental setups are presented.

  14. Acoustic Territoriality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Under the heading of "Gang i København" a number of initiatives was presented by the Lord Mayer and the Technical and Environmental Mayer of Copenhagen in May 2006. The aim of the initiative, which roughly translates to Lively Copenhagen, was both to make Copenhagen a livelier city in terms of ci...... this article outline a few approaches to a theory of acoustic territoriality....

  15. Acoustic lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittmer, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  16. New system applying image processor to automatically separate cation exchange resin and anion exchange resin for condensate demineralizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tsuneyasu; Nagao, Nobuaki; Yoshimori, Yasuhide; Inoue, Takashi; Yoda, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    In PWR plant, condensate demineralizer is equipped to remove corrosive ion in condensate water. Mixed bed packing cation exchange resin (CER) and anion exchange resin (AER) is generally applied, and these are regenerated after separation to each layer periodically. Since the AER particle is slightly lighter than the CER particle, the AER layer is brought up onto the CER layer by feeding water upward from the bottom of column (backwashing). The separation performance is affected by flow rate and temperature of water for backwashing, so normally operators set the proper condition parameters regarding separation manually every time for regeneration. The authors have developed the new separation system applying CCD camera and image processor. The system is comprised of CCD camera, LED lamp, image processor, controller, flow control valves and background color panel. Blue color of the panel, which is corresponding to the complementary color against both ivory color of AER and brown color of CER, is key to secure the system precision. At first the color image of the CER via the CCD camera is digitized and memorized by the image processor. The color of CER in the field of vision of the camera is scanned by the image processor, and the position where the maximum difference of digitized color index is indicated is judged as the interface. The detected interface is able to make the accordance with the set point by adjusting the flow rate of backwashing. By adopting the blue background panel, it is also possible to draw the AER out of the column since detecting the interface of the CER clearly. The system has provided the reduction of instability factor concerning separation of resin during regeneration process. The system has been adopted in two PWR plants in Japan, it has been demonstrating its stable and precise performance. (author)

  17. Sensitivity study of a semiautomatic supervised classifier applied to minerals from x-ray mapping images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Flesche, Harald

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of assessing the robustness with respect to change in parameters of an integrated training and classification routine for minerals commonly encountered in siliciclastic or carbonate rocks. Twelve chemical elements are mapped from thin sections by energy dispersive...... spectroscopy (EDS) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Extensions to traditional multivariate statistical methods are applied to perform the classification. Training sets are grown from one or a few seed points by a method that ensures spatial and spectral closeness of observations. Spectral closeness...... training, a standard quadratic classifier is applied. The performance for each parameter setting is measured by the overall misclassification rate on an independently generated validation set. The classification method is presently used as a routine petrographical analysis method at Norsk Hydro Research...

  18. Sensitivity study of a semiautomatic supervised classifier applied to minerals from x-ray mapping images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Flesche, Harald

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of assessing the robustness with respect to change in parameters of an integrated training and classification routine for minerals commonly encountered in siliciclastic or carbonate rocks. Twelve chemical elements are mapped from thin sections by energy dispersive...... spectroscopy (EDS) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Extensions to traditional multivariate statistical methods are applied to perform the classification. Training sets are grown from one or a few seed points by a method that ensures spatial and spectral closeness of observations. Spectral closeness...... training, a standard quadratic classifier is applied. The performance for each parameter setting is measured by the overall misclassification rate on an independently generated validation set. The classification method is presently used as a routine petrographical analysis method at Norsk Hydro Research...

  19. Comparison of Several Fusion Paradigms Applied to Pixel-Based Image Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Data Fusion in Robotics and Machine Intelligence, Abidi and Gonzalez eds., Academic Press, 481-505, 1992 [3] L. Gacôgne, Éléments de logique ...811-823, 1994. [5] D. Dubois and H. Prade, La fusion d’informations imprécises, Traitement du Signal, 11(6):447-458, 1994. [6] A.P. Dempster, A...Fusion d’informations multisources pour la classification d’images satellite, Ph.D. thesis, Université Paul Sabatier, France, 1997. [15] F. Leduc

  20. Linear, Transfinite and Weighted Method for Interpolation from Grid Lines Applied to OCT Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Anne-Sofie Wessel; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen

    2018-01-01

    When performing a line scan using optical coherence tomography (OCT), the distance between the successive scan lines is often large compared to the resolution along each scan line. If two sets of such line scans are acquired orthogonal to each other, intensity values are known along the lines...... of a square grid, but are unknown inside each square. To view these values as an image, intensities need to be interpolated at regularly spaced pixel positions. In this paper we evaluate three methods for interpolation from grid lines: linear, transfinite and weighted. The linear method does not preserve...... scans, acquired such that the lines of the second scan are orthogonal to the first....

  1. Applying of Electrical Imaging Survey (EIS) to Evaluate Leachate Pollution in Underground Area of Informal Landfill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Song; Wang, Di; Mou, Zishen

    2014-01-01

    An informal landfill is an open dump that pollutes the underground environment because it lacks an impervious liner. The leakage of such a landfill is unidirectional and thus difficult to directly test. This study uses electrical imaging survey to evaluate the pollution of the underground...... environment of an informal landfill for municipal solid waste in Beijing. We hypothesize that every location has a specific resistivity resulting from the leachate. We use the membership function of fuzzy mathematics to quantitatively represent the pollution of the underground environment in the sanitary...... landfill. The results are consistent with borehole data....

  2. Suppression through acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kevin D.; Short, Kenneth R.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reviews research conducted by our laboratory exploring the possible use of acoustical stimuli as a tool for influencing behavior. Over the course of several programs, different types of acoustic stimuli have been evaluated for their effectiveness in disrupting targeting, balance, and high-order cognitive processes in both humans and animals. Escape responses are of particular use in this regard. An escape response serves not only as an objective measure of aversion, but as a potential substitute for ongoing behavior. We have also assessed whether the level of performance changes if the individual does not perform an escape response. In general these studies have both suggested certain types of sounds are more aversive or distracting than others. Although the laboratory development of additional stimuli needs to continue, we are taking the next step by testing some of the more effective stimuli in more applied experimental scenarios including those involving group dynamics.

  3. Online monitoring of the two-dimensional temperature field in a boiler furnace based on acoustic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shiping; Shen, Guoqing; An, Liansuo; Niu, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Online monitoring of the temperature field is crucial to optimally adjust combustion within a boiler. In this paper, acoustic computed tomography (CT) technology was used to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. The physical principles behind acoustic CT, acoustic signals and time delay estimation were studied. Then, the technique was applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. Acoustic CT technology was used to monitor the temperature field of the cross-section in the boiler furnace, and the temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. The linear sweeping frequency signal was adopted as the sound source signal, whose sweeping frequency ranged from 500 to 3000 Hz with a sweeping cycle of 0.1 s. The generalized cross-correlation techniques with PHAT and ML were used as the time delay estimation method when the boiler was in different states. Its actual operation indicated that the monitored images accurately represented the combustion state of the boiler, and the acoustic CT system was determined to be accurate and reliable. - Highlights: • An online monitoring approach to monitor temperature field in a boiler furnace. • The paper provides acoustic CT technology to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. • The temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. • The technique is applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. • The monitored images accurately represent the combustion state of the boiler

  4. Skin Parameter Map Retrieval from a Dedicated Multispectral Imaging System Applied to Dermatology/Cosmetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In vivo quantitative assessment of skin lesions is an important step in the evaluation of skin condition. An objective measurement device can help as a valuable tool for skin analysis. We propose an explorative new multispectral camera specifically developed for dermatology/cosmetology applications. The multispectral imaging system provides images of skin reflectance at different wavebands covering visible and near-infrared domain. It is coupled with a neural network-based algorithm for the reconstruction of reflectance cube of cutaneous data. This cube contains only skin optical reflectance spectrum in each pixel of the bidimensional spatial information. The reflectance cube is analyzed by an algorithm based on a Kubelka-Munk model combined with evolutionary algorithm. The technique allows quantitative measure of cutaneous tissue and retrieves five skin parameter maps: melanin concentration, epidermis/dermis thickness, haemoglobin concentration, and the oxygenated hemoglobin. The results retrieved on healthy participants by the algorithm are in good accordance with the data from the literature. The usefulness of the developed technique was proved during two experiments: a clinical study based on vitiligo and melasma skin lesions and a skin oxygenation experiment (induced ischemia) with healthy participant where normal tissues are recorded at normal state and when temporary ischemia is induced. PMID:24159326

  5. Skin parameter map retrieval from a dedicated multispectral imaging system applied to dermatology/cosmetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivot, Romuald; Benezeth, Yannick; Marzani, Franck

    2013-01-01

    In vivo quantitative assessment of skin lesions is an important step in the evaluation of skin condition. An objective measurement device can help as a valuable tool for skin analysis. We propose an explorative new multispectral camera specifically developed for dermatology/cosmetology applications. The multispectral imaging system provides images of skin reflectance at different wavebands covering visible and near-infrared domain. It is coupled with a neural network-based algorithm for the reconstruction of reflectance cube of cutaneous data. This cube contains only skin optical reflectance spectrum in each pixel of the bidimensional spatial information. The reflectance cube is analyzed by an algorithm based on a Kubelka-Munk model combined with evolutionary algorithm. The technique allows quantitative measure of cutaneous tissue and retrieves five skin parameter maps: melanin concentration, epidermis/dermis thickness, haemoglobin concentration, and the oxygenated hemoglobin. The results retrieved on healthy participants by the algorithm are in good accordance with the data from the literature. The usefulness of the developed technique was proved during two experiments: a clinical study based on vitiligo and melasma skin lesions and a skin oxygenation experiment (induced ischemia) with healthy participant where normal tissues are recorded at normal state and when temporary ischemia is induced.

  6. Numerical images applied to the spatial technics: the discovery of the Halley's comet nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abergel, A.

    1988-01-01

    For the first time, the solide nucleus of a comet was observed by the 2 soviet spacecraft VEGA on 6 and 9 March 1986. They were followed by the european spacecraft GIOTTO on 14 march. The numerical images transmitted by the 3 spacecraft have been corrected from instrumental degradations and allowed a unique description of the shape and the movement of Halley's comet nucleus. Thus the contours become clearly apparent. Its volume can be described by an ellipsoid which principal axis are equal to 16, 8.2 and 7.5 km: it has an oblate rugby balloon shape. Its rational movement is complicated, but we are able to analyse it with the identification of details seen on the surface at three different moments. The nucleus is greater than expected in the past. It is made of a mixture of water ice and dust, and is covered by a dust dark mantle: it is one of the darkest objects in the solar system. This mantle is not uniform, as shown by the images sent by the 3 spacecraft. They display a spectacular distribution of dust jets emitted by very active regions on the nucleus surface [fr

  7. [Imaging of cancer activity and range of tumor involvement--applying to breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Koji; Uno, Kimiichi; Wu, Jin; Ko, Weijey

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, PET using mainly fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has played a very large role in the management of breast cancer. Systemic, functional images can be obtained by whole body PET and can provide information that is not obtained by anatomical imaging modalities such as conventional X-ray computed tomography, X-ray mammography, or ultrasonography. The utility of FDG-PET for breast cancer patients has been established in every phase of the management of breast cancer, such as the differential diagnosis of breast cancer primary lesion, cancer staging, and posttreatment monitoring. For whole body FDG-PET that can assess the spread of systemic disease in a single examination, postoperative monitoring is one of the most useful applications in particular. In addition, the usefulness of PET for prediction of prognosis and assessment of treatment response has been reported along with the medical economical effect of FDG-PET for breast cancer patients. Moreover, it is expected that a new tracer other than FDG, such as fluorine-18 ion and [18F]-fluoro-17beta; estradiol (FES), and the new instruments such as PET-CT and positron emission mammography (PEM) can further contribute to the management of breast cancer. In this report, we will outline the benefits, limitations, and future prospects of PET for breast cancer.

  8. Digital Image Correlation Techniques Applied to Large Scale Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Rocket engine hot-fire ground testing is necessary to understand component performance, reliability and engine system interactions during development. The J-2X upper stage engine completed a series of developmental hot-fire tests that derived performance of the engine and components, validated analytical models and provided the necessary data to identify where design changes, process improvements and technology development were needed. The J-2X development engines were heavily instrumented to provide the data necessary to support these activities which enabled the team to investigate any anomalies experienced during the test program. This paper describes the development of an optical digital image correlation technique to augment the data provided by traditional strain gauges which are prone to debonding at elevated temperatures and limited to localized measurements. The feasibility of this optical measurement system was demonstrated during full scale hot-fire testing of J-2X, during which a digital image correlation system, incorporating a pair of high speed cameras to measure three-dimensional, real-time displacements and strains was installed and operated under the extreme environments present on the test stand. The camera and facility setup, pre-test calibrations, data collection, hot-fire test data collection and post-test analysis and results are presented in this paper.

  9. Time integration and statistical regulation applied to mobile objects detection in a sequence of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letang, Jean-Michel

    1993-01-01

    This PhD thesis deals with the detection of moving objects in monocular image sequences. The first section presents the inherent problems of motion analysis in real applications. We propose a method robust to perturbations frequently encountered during acquisition of outdoor scenes. It appears three main directions for investigations, all of them pointing out the importance of the temporal axis, which is a specific dimension for motion analysis. In the first part, the image sequence is considered as a set of temporal signals. The temporal multi-scale decomposition enables the characterization of various dynamical behaviors of the objects being in the scene at a given instant. A second module integrates motion information. This elementary trajectography of moving objects provides a temporal prediction map, giving a confidence level of motion presence. Interactions between both sets of data are expressed within a statistical regularization. Markov random field models supply a formal framework to convey a priori knowledge of the primitives to be evaluated. A calibration method with qualitative boxes is presented to estimate model parameters. Our approach requires only simple computations and leads to a rather fast algorithm, that we evaluate in the last section over various typical sequences. (author) [fr

  10. GPR image analysis to locate water leaks from buried pipes by applying variance filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Levario, Silvia J.; Carreño-Alvarado, Elizabeth P.; Ayala-Cabrera, David; Izquierdo, Joaquín

    2018-05-01

    Nowadays, there is growing interest in controlling and reducing the amount of water lost through leakage in water supply systems (WSSs). Leakage is, in fact, one of the biggest problems faced by the managers of these utilities. This work addresses the problem of leakage in WSSs by using GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) as a non-destructive method. The main objective is to identify and extract features from GPR images such as leaks and components in a controlled laboratory condition by a methodology based on second order statistical parameters and, using the obtained features, to create 3D models that allows quick visualization of components and leaks in WSSs from GPR image analysis and subsequent interpretation. This methodology has been used before in other fields and provided promising results. The results obtained with the proposed methodology are presented, analyzed, interpreted and compared with the results obtained by using a well-established multi-agent based methodology. These results show that the variance filter is capable of highlighting the characteristics of components and anomalies, in an intuitive manner, which can be identified by non-highly qualified personnel, using the 3D models we develop. This research intends to pave the way towards future intelligent detection systems that enable the automatic detection of leaks in WSSs.

  11. Detection of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery: preliminary evaluation with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Aroca, F.; Reus, M.; Dios Berna-Serna, Juan de; Frutos-Bernal, M.D.; Lujan-Mompean, J.A.; Parrilla, P.; Bas, A.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, with the determination of shear wave velocity (SWV), to differentiate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery. Thirty-two patients with morbid obesity were evaluated with ARFI and conventional ultrasound before bariatric surgery. The ARFI and ultrasound results were compared with liver biopsy findings, which is the reference standard. The patients were classed according to their histological findings into three groups: group A, simple steatosis; group B, inflammation; and group C, fibrosis. The median SWV was 1.57 ± 0.79 m/s. Hepatic alterations were observed in the histopathological findings for all the patients in the study (100 %), with the results of the laboratory tests proving normal. Differences in SWV were also observed between groups A, B and C: 1.34 ± 0.90 m/s, 1.55 ± 0.79 m/s and 1.86 ± 0.75 m/s (P < 0.001), respectively. The Az for differentiating NAFLD from NASH or fibrosis was 0.899 (optimal cut-off value 1.3 m/s; sensitivity 85 %; specificity 83.3 %). The ARFI technique is a useful diagnostic tool for differentiating NAFLD from NASH in asymptomatic patients with morbid obesity. (orig.)

  12. Detection of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery: preliminary evaluation with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Aroca, F.; Reus, M.; Dios Berna-Serna, Juan de [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of of Radiology, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Frutos-Bernal, M.D.; Lujan-Mompean, J.A.; Parrilla, P. [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Surgery, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Bas, A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Pathology, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, with the determination of shear wave velocity (SWV), to differentiate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery. Thirty-two patients with morbid obesity were evaluated with ARFI and conventional ultrasound before bariatric surgery. The ARFI and ultrasound results were compared with liver biopsy findings, which is the reference standard. The patients were classed according to their histological findings into three groups: group A, simple steatosis; group B, inflammation; and group C, fibrosis. The median SWV was 1.57 {+-} 0.79 m/s. Hepatic alterations were observed in the histopathological findings for all the patients in the study (100 %), with the results of the laboratory tests proving normal. Differences in SWV were also observed between groups A, B and C: 1.34 {+-} 0.90 m/s, 1.55 {+-} 0.79 m/s and 1.86 {+-} 0.75 m/s (P < 0.001), respectively. The Az for differentiating NAFLD from NASH or fibrosis was 0.899 (optimal cut-off value 1.3 m/s; sensitivity 85 %; specificity 83.3 %). The ARFI technique is a useful diagnostic tool for differentiating NAFLD from NASH in asymptomatic patients with morbid obesity. (orig.)

  13. Acoustic wave science realized by metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwoo; Nguyen, Duc Minh; Rho, Junsuk

    2017-01-01

    Artificially structured materials with unit cells at sub-wavelength scale, known as metamaterials, have been widely used to precisely control and manipulate waves thanks to their unconventional properties which cannot be found in nature. In fact, the field of acoustic metamaterials has been much developed over the past 15 years and still keeps developing. Here, we present a topical review of metamaterials in acoustic wave science. Particular attention is given to fundamental principles of acoustic metamaterials for realizing the extraordinary acoustic properties such as negative, near-zero and approaching-infinity parameters. Realization of acoustic cloaking phenomenon which is invisible from incident sound waves is also introduced by various approaches. Finally, acoustic lenses are discussed not only for sub-diffraction imaging but also for applications based on gradient index (GRIN) lens.

  14. Visualization of Protease Activity In Vivo Using an Activatable Photo-Acoustic Imaging Probe Based on CuS Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Nie, Liming; Sun, Xiaolian; Cheng, Liang; Wu, Chenxi; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we for the first time report a novel activatable photoacoustic (PA) imaging nano-probe for in vivo detection of cancer-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). A black hole quencher 3 (BHQ3) which absorbs red light is conjugated to near-infrared (NIR)-absorbing copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles via a MMP-cleavable peptide linker. The obtained CuS-peptide-BHQ3 (CPQ) nano-probe exhibits two distinctive absorption peaks at 630 nm and 930 nm. Inside the tumor microenviorment where MMPs present, the MMP-sensitive peptide would be cleaved, releasing BHQ3 from the CuS nanoparticles, the former of which as a small molecule is then rapidly cleared out from the tumor, whereas the latter of which as large nanoparticles would retain inside the tumor for a much longer period of time. As the result, the PA signal at 680 nm which is contributed by BHQ3 would be quickly diminished while that at 930 nm would be largely retained. The PA signal ratio of 680 nm / 930 nm could thus serve as an in vivo indicator of MMPs activity inside the tumor. Our work presents a novel strategy of in vivo sensing of MMPs based on PA imaging, which should offer remarkably improved detection depth compared with traditional optical imaging techniques. PMID:24465271

  15. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Phased arrays, ultrasonic imaging and nonlinear acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Ping Wu; Wennerstroem, Erik

    2004-09-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2003/2004. After a short introduction a review of beam forming fundamentals required for proper understanding phased array operation is included. The factors that determine lateral resolution during ultrasonic imaging of flaws in solids are analyzed and results of simulations modelling contact inspection of copper are presented. In the second chapter an improved synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) technique is introduced. The proposed SAI technique is characterized by an enhanced lateral resolution compared with the previously proposed extended synthetic aperture focusing technique (ESAFT). The enhancement of imaging performance is achieved due to more realistic assumption concerning the probability density function of scatterers in the region of interest. The proposed technique takes the form of a two-step algorithm using the result obtained in the first step as a prior for the second step. Final chapter contains summary of our recent experimental and theoretical research on nonlinear ultrasonics of unbounded interfaces. A new theoretical model for rough interfaces is developed, and the experimental results from the copper specimens that mimic contact cracks of different types are presented. Derivation of the theory and selected measurement results are given in appendix

  16. Sinusoidal echo-planar imaging with parallel acquisition technique for reduced acoustic noise in auditory fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Jascha; Schmitter, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2012-09-01

    To extend the parameter restrictions of a silent echo-planar imaging (sEPI) sequence using sinusoidal readout (RO) gradients, in particular with increased spatial resolution. The sound pressure level (SPL) of the most feasible configurations is compared to conventional EPI having trapezoidal RO gradients. We enhanced the sEPI sequence by integrating a parallel acquisition technique (PAT) on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. The SPL was measured for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, without and with PAT (R = 2). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was examined for both sinusoidal and trapezoidal RO gradients. Compared to EPI PAT, the SPL could be reduced by up to 11.1 dB and 5.1 dB for matrix sizes of 64 × 64 and 128 × 128 pixels, respectively. The SNR of sinusoidal RO gradients is lower by a factor of 0.96 on average compared to trapezoidal RO gradients. The sEPI PAT sequence allows for 1) increased resolution, 2) expanded RO frequency range toward lower frequencies, which is in general beneficial for SPL, or 3) shortened TE, TR, and RO train length. At the same time, it generates lower SPL compared to conventional EPI for a wide range of RO frequencies while having the same imaging parameters. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Application of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Elastography in Imaging of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS): A Comparative Analysis With 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotfiel, Thilo; Kellermann, Marion; Swoboda, Bernd; Wildner, Dane; Golditz, Tobias; Grim, Casper; Raithel, Martin; Uder, Michael; Heiss, Rafael

    2017-05-17

    DOMS is one of the most common reasons for impaired muscle performance in sports and is associated with reduced muscle strength and frequently observed both in professional and recreational athletes. To emphasize the diagnostic value of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) in imaging of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness by comparing findings to high-resolution 3T MRI T2 weighted sequences. Case series. Laboratory environment. Fifteen healthy students (7 female, 8 male, age 24 ± 4 years, height 178 ± 10 cm, body weight 67 ± 12 kg). ARFI values, represented as shear wave velocities (SWV) of the gastrocnemius muscle (GM) and soleus muscle (SM), as well as conventional ultrasound, high-resolution 3T MRI, creatine kinase activity, extension range of the ankle joint, calf circumference and muscle soreness were assessed before (baseline) and 60 hours after (post-intervention, PI) a standardized eccentric exercise. ARFI SWV values of the GM revealed a statistically significant decrease of 19.1% between baseline (2.2 ± 0.26 m/s) and PI (1.78 ± 0.24 m/s); p = 0.008. At follow-up, the MRI investigations showed intramuscular oedema for the GM in all participants corresponding to a significant raise in T2 signal intensity (p = 0.001) and in T2-time values (p = 0.004). ARFI elastography seems to be an additional sensitive diagnostic modality in the diagnostic work up of DOMS. Intramuscular SWV could represent an additional imaging marker for the assessment and monitoring of ultrastructural muscle injuries and therefore be helpful for individual training composition in elite sports.

  18. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging for the Differentiation of Benign and Malignant Lymph Nodes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peige Zhang

    Full Text Available To evaluate the overall performance of acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI in differentiating between benign and malignant lymph nodes (LNs by conducting a meta-analysis.PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were comprehensively searched for potential studies through August 13th, 2016. Studies that investigated the diagnostic power of ARFI for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant LNs by using virtual touch tissue quantification (VTQ or virtual touch tissue imaging quantification (VTIQ were collected. The included articles were published in English or Chinese. Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2 was used to evaluate the methodological quality. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC curve (AUC were calculated by means of a bivariate mixed-effects regression model. Meta-regression analysis was performed to identify the potential sources of between study heterogeneity. Fagan plot analysis was used to explore the clinical utilities. Publication bias was assessed using Deek's funnel plot.Nine studies involving 1084 LNs from 929 patients were identified to analyze in the meta-analysis. The summary sensitivity and specificity of ARFI in detecting malignant LNs were 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83-0.91 and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.82-0.92, respectively. The AUC was 0.93 (95% CI, 0.90-0.95. The pooled DOR was 49.59 (95% CI, 26.11-94.15. Deek's funnel plot revealed no significant publication bias.ARFI is a promising tool for the differentiation of benign and malignant LNs with high sensitivity and specificity.

  19. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Solar Dynamics Observatory-Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler-velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time - distance helioseismology pipeline (Zhao et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2010) has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross-covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time - distance helioseismology: a Gabor-wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004). Using Doppler-velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument onboard SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference traveltime perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet-Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 614, 472, 2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (SCORE'96: Solar Convection and Oscillations and Their Relationship, ASSL, Dordrecht, 241, 1997) and Gizon and Birch (Astrophys. J. 571, 966, 2002). We investigated the relationships among

  20. Implementation and Comparison of Acoustic Travel-Time Measurement Procedures for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager Time-Distance Helioseismology Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, S.; Zhao, J.; Birch, A. C.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Parchevsky, K.; Scherrer, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite is designed to produce high-resolution Doppler velocity maps of oscillations at the solar surface with high temporal cadence. To take advantage of these high-quality oscillation data, a time-distance helioseismology pipeline has been implemented at the Joint Science Operations Center (JSOC) at Stanford University. The aim of this pipeline is to generate maps of acoustic travel times from oscillations on the solar surface, and to infer subsurface 3D flow velocities and sound-speed perturbations. The wave travel times are measured from cross covariances of the observed solar oscillation signals. For implementation into the pipeline we have investigated three different travel-time definitions developed in time-distance helioseismology: a Gabor wavelet fitting (Kosovichev and Duvall, 1997), a minimization relative to a reference cross-covariance function (Gizon and Birch, 2002), and a linearized version of the minimization method (Gizon and Birch, 2004). Using Doppler velocity data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instrument on board SOHO, we tested and compared these definitions for the mean and difference travel-time perturbations measured from reciprocal signals. Although all three procedures return similar travel times in a quiet Sun region, the method of Gizon and Birch (2004) gives travel times that are significantly different from the others in a magnetic (active) region. Thus, for the pipeline implementation we chose the procedures of Kosovichev and Duvall (1997) and Gizon and Birch (2002). We investigated the relationships among these three travel-time definitions, their sensitivities to fitting parameters, and estimated the random errors they produce

  1. The use of lidar images in Costa Rica : case studies applied in geology, engineering, and archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Paulo; Garro, Jose F.; Soto, Gerardo J.

    2014-01-01

    A historical review is made about evolution of technology Lidar (Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging). The improvements of this technology and additions from other technologies are annotated in the last 15 years. The information of the aerial and terrestrial lidar operation, technical parameters for data acquisition and resolutions are presented. The results from four studies are presented in Costa Rica: 1) The discovery of pre-Columbian trails in the area of Volcan Arenal, 2) A case of geological mapping and discovery of new volcanic structures in the North area of the Volcan Poas, 3) The characterization of a landslide near Palmares that represents a hazard for the road network, 4) A detail survey of a pre-Columbian sphere. The results from new Lidar will become more frequent in the following years because its cost will be more affordable. The transference of data between institutions will generate new applications in different fields. (author) [es

  2. Progress and Potential of Imaging Mass Spectrometry Applied to Biomarker Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien; Wisztorski, Maxence; Salzet, Michel; Fournier, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Mapping provides a direct means to assess the impact of protein biomarkers and puts into context their relevance in the type of cancer being examined. To this end, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was developed to provide the needed spatial information which is missing in traditional liquid-based mass spectrometric proteomics approaches. Aptly described as a "molecular histology" technique, MSI gives an additional dimension in characterizing tumor biopsies, allowing for mapping of hundreds of molecules in a single analysis. A decade of developments focused on improving and standardizing MSI so that the technique can be translated into the clinical setting. This review describes the progress made in addressing the technological development that allows to bridge local protein detection by MSI to its identification and to illustrate its potential in studying various aspects of cancer biomarker discovery.

  3. Multi-image screening technique applied to a general orientation training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, B.K.; Campbell, T.O.; Evans, A.D.; Hickey, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A general orientation and training program is a prerequisite for personnel to have unescorted access to various site locations at a nuclear power plant. A new general orientation and training program is being developed for the Toledo Edison Company to be used at the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station. The program is presented in a multi-image and stereo sound format that has the unique capability to present the magnitude and scale of the plant, to arouse and maintain the interest of the viewer, and to instill in him a feeling of importance and pride about his job. Satisfactory completion of the program by individuals is assessed and certified by a machine scored test that is administered as an integral part of the presentation

  4. Improved total variation-based CT image reconstruction applied to clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Bergner, Frank; Kachelriess, Marc; Fleischmann, Christof

    2011-01-01

    In computed tomography there are different situations where reconstruction has to be performed with limited raw data. In the past few years it has been shown that algorithms which are based on compressed sensing theory are able to handle incomplete datasets quite well. As a cost function these algorithms use the l 1 -norm of the image after it has been transformed by a sparsifying transformation. This yields to an inequality-constrained convex optimization problem. Due to the large size of the optimization problem some heuristic optimization algorithms have been proposed in the past few years. The most popular way is optimizing the raw data and sparsity cost functions separately in an alternating manner. In this paper we will follow this strategy and present a new method to adapt these optimization steps. Compared to existing methods which perform similarly, the proposed method needs no a priori knowledge about the raw data consistency. It is ensured that the algorithm converges to the lowest possible value of the raw data cost function, while holding the sparsity constraint at a low value. This is achieved by transferring the step-size determination of both optimization procedures into the raw data domain, where they are adapted to each other. To evaluate the algorithm, we process measured clinical datasets. To cover a wide field of possible applications, we focus on the problems of angular undersampling, data lost due to metal implants, limited view angle tomography and interior tomography. In all cases the presented method reaches convergence within less than 25 iteration steps, while using a constant set of algorithm control parameters. The image artifacts caused by incomplete raw data are mostly removed without introducing new effects like staircasing. All scenarios are compared to an existing implementation of the ASD-POCS algorithm, which realizes the step-size adaption in a different way. Additional prior information as proposed by the PICCS algorithm can

  5. Image intelligence online consulting: A flexible and remote access to strategic information applied to verification of declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassy, A.F. de; Denizot, L.

    2001-01-01

    Commercial satellite imagery is giving International Institutions specialized Information Departments access to a great source of valuable intelligence. High resolution and multiple sensors have also led to a growing complexity of interpretation that calls for a greater need of consulting, verification and training in the field in order to make it eligible as an operational source of verification. Responding to this need, Fleximage is extending its Image intelligence (IMINT) training program to include a fully operational and flexible online consulting and training program. Image Intelligence (IMINT) Online Program, a new approach to acquiring IMINT expertise, supported by Internet technologies, and managed by a professional team of experts and technical staff. Fleximage has developed a virtual learning environment on the Internet for acquiring IMINT expertise. Called the IMINT Online Program, this dynamic learning environment provides complete flexibility and personalization of the process for acquiring expertise. The IMINT online program includes two services: Online Consulting and Online Training. The Online Consulting service is designed for the technical staff of an organization who are already operational in the field of image intelligence. Online Consulting enables these staff members to acquire pertinent expertise online that can be directly applied to their professional activity, such as IAEA verification tasks. The Online Training service is designed for the technical staff of an organization who are relatively new to the field of image intelligence. These staff members need to build expertise within a formal training program. Online Training is a flexible and structured program for acquiring IMINT expertise online

  6. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords ... patient kit Treatment Options Overview Observation Radiation Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question ...

  7. Marine Acoustic Sensor Assembly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruffa, Anthony A

    2007-01-01

    A marine acoustic sensor assembly includes an acoustic panel having a forward surface and an after surface, a laser scanner oriented so as to project a laser beam onto the acoustic panel after surface...

  8. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustic Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-06

    great success. Our acoustics research groups, the Ocean Acoustics and Signals Laboratory and the Acoustic Communications Group, in the Applied Ocean...field efforts in shallow-water acoustics and underwater acoustic communications. We have plans to upgrade our existing hydrophone arrays and sound...Hydrophone Receiver Unit) arrays. The immedate objective was to improve our fieldwork capibility and to enhance the quality of our underwater acoustic

  9. Uniaxial experimental study of the acoustic emission and deformation behavior of composite rock based on 3D digital image correlation (DIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-Long; Yang, Sheng-Qi; Chen, Kui; Ma, Dan; Li, Feng-Yuan; Wang, Li-Ming

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, uniaxial compression tests were carried out on a series of composite rock specimens with different dip angles, which were made from two types of rock-like material with different strength. The acoustic emission technique was used to monitor the acoustic signal characteristics of composite rock specimens during the entire loading process. At the same time, an optical non-contact 3D digital image correlation technique was used to study the evolution of axial strain field and the maximal strain field before and after the peak strength at different stress levels during the loading process. The effect of bedding plane inclination on the deformation and strength during uniaxial loading was analyzed. The methods of solving the elastic constants of hard and weak rock were described. The damage evolution process, deformation and failure mechanism, and failure mode during uniaxial loading were fully determined. The experimental results show that the θ = 0{°}-45{°} specimens had obvious plastic deformation during loading, and the brittleness of the θ = 60{°}-90{°} specimens gradually increased during the loading process. When the anisotropic angle θ increased from 0{°} to 90{°}, the peak strength, peak strain, and apparent elastic modulus all decreased initially and then increased. The failure mode of the composite rock specimen during uniaxial loading can be divided into three categories: tensile fracture across the discontinuities (θ = 0{°}-30{°}), sliding failure along the discontinuities (θ = 45{°}-75{°}), and tensile-split along the discontinuities (θ = 90{°}). The axial strain of the weak and hard rock layers in the composite rock specimen during the loading process was significantly different from that of the θ = 0{°}-45{°} specimens and was almost the same as that of the θ = 60{°}-90{°} specimens. As for the strain localization highlighted in the maximum principal strain field, the θ = 0{°}-30{°} specimens appeared in the rock

  10. Design of a front-end integrated circuit for 3D acoustic imaging using 2D CMUT arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Çiçek, İhsan; Cicek, Ihsan; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Karaman, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Integration of front-end electronics with 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays has been a challenging issue due to the small element size and large channel count. We present design and verification of a front-end drive-readout integrated circuit for 3D ultrasonic imaging using 2D CMUT arrays. The circuit cell dedicated to a single CMUT array element consists of a high-voltage pulser and a low-noise readout amplifier. To analyze the circuit cell together with the CMU...

  11. Islets of Meningioma in an Acoustic Schwannoma in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis-2: Pathology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelal, F.; Rezanko, T.; Uyaroglu, M.A.; Tunakan, M.; Bezircioglu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Mixed tumors of the cerebellopontine angle, composed of meningioma and schwannoma components, are extremely rare; so far, only 12 cases have been reported in the literature. They are thought to be exclusively associated with neurofibromatosis-2. We present a mixed tumor of schwannoma and meningioma in a patient with neurofibromatosis-2 and discuss the pathology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in relation to the literature. Review of the literature shows that a typical MRI pattern has not been established for mixed tumors and it seems unlikely that a meningioma component can be differentiated within a schwannoma preoperatively

  12. Applying Chemical Imaging Analysis to Improve Our Understanding of Cold Cloud Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, A.; Knopf, D. A.; Wang, B.; Alpert, P. A.; Roedel, T.; Gilles, M. K.; Moffet, R.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    The impact that atmospheric ice nucleation has on the global radiation budget is one of the least understood problems in atmospheric sciences. This is in part due to the incomplete understanding of various ice nucleation pathways that lead to ice crystal formation from pre-existing aerosol particles. Studies investigating the ice nucleation propensity of laboratory generated particles indicate that individual particle types are highly selective in their ice nucleating efficiency. This description of heterogeneous ice nucleation would present a challenge when applying to the atmosphere which contains a complex mixture of particles. Here, we employ a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical methods to relate particle physical and chemical properties with observed water uptake and ice nucleation. Field-collected particles from urban environments impacted by anthropogenic and marine emissions and aging processes are investigated. Single particle characterization is provided by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). A particle-on-substrate approach coupled to a vapor controlled cooling-stage and a microscope system is applied to determine the onsets of water uptake and ice nucleation including immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. We observe for urban aerosol particles that for T > 230 K the oxidation level affects initial water uptake and that subsequent immersion freezing depends on particle mixing state, e.g. by the presence of insoluble particles. For T cloud formation. Initial results applying single particle IN analysis using CCSEM/EDX and STXM/NEXAFS reveal that a significant amount of IN are coated by organics and, thus, are similar to the

  13. Imaging sciences workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. MR of acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide

    1989-01-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T 1 -weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author)

  15. Comparison of vessel enhancement algorithms applied to time-of-flight MRA images for cerebrovascular segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phellan, Renzo; Forkert, Nils D

    2017-11-01

    Vessel enhancement algorithms are often used as a preprocessing step for vessel segmentation in medical images to improve the overall segmentation accuracy. Each algorithm uses different characteristics to enhance vessels, such that the most suitable algorithm may vary for different applications. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the accuracy gains in vessel segmentation generated by the use of nine vessel enhancement algorithms: Multiscale vesselness using the formulas described by Erdt (MSE), Frangi (MSF), and Sato (MSS), optimally oriented flux (OOF), ranking orientations responses path operator (RORPO), the regularized Perona-Malik approach (RPM), vessel enhanced diffusion (VED), hybrid diffusion with continuous switch (HDCS), and the white top hat algorithm (WTH). The filters were evaluated and compared based on time-of-flight MRA datasets and corresponding manual segmentations from 5 healthy subjects and 10 patients with an arteriovenous malformation. Additionally, five synthetic angiographic datasets with corresponding ground truth segmentation were generated with three different noise levels (low, medium, and high) and also used for comparison. The parameters for each algorithm and subsequent segmentation were optimized using leave-one-out cross evaluation. The Dice coefficient, Matthews correlation coefficient, area under the ROC curve, number of connected components, and true positives were used for comparison. The results of this study suggest that vessel enhancement algorithms do not always lead to more accurate segmentation results compared to segmenting nonenhanced images directly. Multiscale vesselness algorithms, such as MSE, MSF, and MSS proved to be robust to noise, while diffusion-based filters, such as RPM, VED, and HDCS ranked in the top of the list in scenarios with medium or no noise. Filters that assume tubular-shapes, such as MSE, MSF, MSS, OOF, RORPO, and VED show a decrease in accuracy when considering patients with an AVM

  16. Lumbopelvic dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence: a case report applying rehabilitative ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Elizabeth E; Ogle, Melissa D; Teyhen, Deydre S

    2007-08-01

    Case report. It has been suggested that altered neuromuscular control of the transversus abdominis and pelvic floor muscles may contribute to sacroiliac joint (SIJ) region pain and stress urinary incontinence. There are limited examples describing the evaluation and management of individuals with both SIJ region pain and stress urinary incontinence in the literature. This case report describes a patient with both conditions and details the integration of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) during physical therapy evaluation. 6 A 35-year-old female soldier presented with a 6-week history of left buttock pain and 4-year history of stress urinary incontinence during activities that involved running, jumping, and fast walking. RUSI was used to supplement the physical assessment process, revealing altered motor control strategies of the transversus abdominis and pelvic floor muscles, and as a form of biofeedback during the rehabilitation process. After completing a rehabilitation program that incorporated principles of lumbar stabilization and pelvic floor muscle re-education, this patient was able to complete all physical activities in basic combat training without SIJ region pain or urinary leakage. This case demonstrates the importance of considering pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and training in a patient with primary complaints of SIJ region pain. It also highlights the potential role of RUSI as both an evaluation and biofeedback tool for the deep abdominal and pelvic floor muscles.

  17. Energy-sensitive imaging detector applied to the dissociative recombination of D2H+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhr, H.; Schwalm, D.; Mendes, M. B.; Novotny, O.; Berg, M. H.; Bing, D.; Krantz, C.; Orlov, D. A.; Sorg, T.; Stuetzel, J.; Varju, J.; Wolf, A.; Heber, O.; Rappaport, M. L.; Zajfman, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an energy-sensitive imaging detector for studying the fragmentation of polyatomic molecules in the dissociative recombination of fast molecular ions with electrons. The system is based on a large area (10x10 cm 2 ) position-sensitive, double-sided Si-strip detector with 128 horizontal and 128 vertical strips, whose pulse height information is read out individually. The setup allows us to uniquely identify fragment masses and is thus capable of measuring branching ratios between different fragmentation channels, kinetic energy releases, and breakup geometries as a function of the relative ion-electron energy. The properties of the detection system, which has been installed at the Test Storage Ring (TSR) facility of the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, is illustrated by an investigation of the dissociative recombination of the deuterated triatomic hydrogen cation D 2 H + . A huge isotope effect is observed when comparing the relative branching ratio between the D 2 + H and the HD + D channel; the ratio 2B(D 2 + H)/B(HD + D), which is measured to be 1.27±0.05 at relative electron-ion energies around 0 eV, is found to increase to 3.7±0.5 at ∼5 eV.

  18. Energy-sensitive imaging detector applied to the dissociative recombination of D2H+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, H.; Mendes, M. B.; Novotný, O.; Schwalm, D.; Berg, M. H.; Bing, D.; Heber, O.; Krantz, C.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Sorg, T.; Stützel, J.; Varju, J.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2010-06-01

    We report on an energy-sensitive imaging detector for studying the fragmentation of polyatomic molecules in the dissociative recombination of fast molecular ions with electrons. The system is based on a large area (10×10 cm2) position-sensitive, double-sided Si-strip detector with 128 horizontal and 128 vertical strips, whose pulse height information is read out individually. The setup allows us to uniquely identify fragment masses and is thus capable of measuring branching ratios between different fragmentation channels, kinetic energy releases, and breakup geometries as a function of the relative ion-electron energy. The properties of the detection system, which has been installed at the Test Storage Ring (TSR) facility of the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, is illustrated by an investigation of the dissociative recombination of the deuterated triatomic hydrogen cation D2H+. A huge isotope effect is observed when comparing the relative branching ratio between the D2 + H and the HD + D channel; the ratio 2B(D2 + H)/B(HD + D), which is measured to be 1.27±0.05 at relative electron-ion energies around 0 eV, is found to increase to 3.7±0.5 at ~5 eV.

  19. Cerebral cortex classification by conditional random fields applied to intraoperative thermal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Nico

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative thermal neuroimaging is a novel intraoperative imaging technique for the characterization of perfusion disorders, neural activity and other pathological changes of the brain. It bases on the correlation of (sub-cortical metabolism and perfusion with the emitted heat of the cortical surface. In order to minimize required computational resources and prevent unwanted artefacts in subsequent data analysis workflows foreground detection is a important preprocessing technique to differentiate pixels representing the cerebral cortex from background objects. We propose an efficient classification framework that integrates characteristic dynamic thermal behaviour into this classification task to include additional discriminative features. The first stage of our framework consists of learning this representation of characteristic thermal time-frequency behaviour. This representation models latent interconnections in the time-frequency domain that cover specific, yet a priori unknown, thermal properties of the cortex. In a second stage these features are then used to classify each pixel’s state with conditional random fields. We quantitatively evaluate several approaches to learning high-level features and their impact to the overall prediction accuracy. The introduction of high-level features leads to a significant accuracy improvement compared to a baseline classifier.

  20. OPTICAL FLOW APPLIED TO TIME-LAPSE IMAGE SERIES TO ESTIMATE GLACIER MOTION IN THE SOUTHERN PATAGONIA ICE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lannutti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we assessed the feasibility of using optical flow to obtain the motion estimation of a glacier. In general, former investigations used to detect glacier changes involve solutions that require repeated observations which are many times based on extensive field work. Taking into account glaciers are usually located in geographically complex and hard to access areas, deploying time-lapse imaging sensors, optical flow may provide an efficient solution at good spatial and temporal resolution to describe mass motion. Several studies in computer vision and image processing community have used this method to detect large displacements. Therefore, we carried out a test of the proposed Large Displacement Optical Flow method at the Viedma Glacier, located at South Patagonia Icefield, Argentina. We collected monoscopic terrestrial time-lapse imagery, acquired by a calibrated camera at every 24 hour from April 2014 until April 2015. A filter based on temporal correlation and RGB color discretization between the images was applied to minimize errors related to changes in lighting, shadows, clouds and snow. This selection allowed discarding images that do not follow a sequence of similarity. Our results show a flow field in the direction of the glacier movement with acceleration in the terminus. We analyzed the errors between image pairs, and the matching generally appears to be adequate, although some areas show random gross errors related to the presence of changes in lighting. The proposed technique allowed the determination of glacier motion during one year, providing accurate and reliable motion data for subsequent analysis.

  1. Low back and hip pain in a postpartum runner: applying ultrasound imaging and running analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill M; Thompson, Elizabeth F; Chumanov, Elizabeth S; Heiderscheit, Bryan C

    2012-07-01

    Case report. Postpartum low back and hip dysfunction may be caused by an incomplete recovery of abdominal musculature and impaired neuromuscular control. The purpose of this report is to describe the management of a postpartum runner with hip and low back pain through exercise training via ultrasound imaging (USI) biofeedback combined with running-form modification. A postpartum runner with hip and low back pain underwent dynamic lumbar stabilization training with USI biofeedback and running-form modification to reduce mechanical loading. Muscle thickness of transversus abdominis and internal oblique was measured with USI preintervention and 7 weeks after completion of the intervention. Additionally, 3-dimensional lower extremity joint motions, moments, and powers were calculated during treadmill running. The patient's pain with running decreased from a constant 9/10 (0, no pain; 10, worst pain) to an occasional 3/10 posttreatment. Transversus abdominis muscle thickness increased 6.3% during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and 27.0% during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver with straight leg raise. Changes were also noted in the internal oblique. These findings corresponded to improved lumbopelvic control: pelvic list and axial rotation during running decreased 38% and 36%, respectively. The patient's running volume returned to preinjury levels (8.1-9.7 km, 3 days per week) with no hip pain and minimal low back pain, and she successfully completed her goal of running a half-marathon. The successful outcomes of this case support the consideration of dynamic lumbar stabilization exercises, USI biofeedback, and running-form modification in postpartum runners with lumbopelvic dysfunction. Therapy, level 4.

  2. High-Energy X-Ray Imaging Applied to Nondestructive Characterization of Large Nuclear Waste Drums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estre, Nicolas; Eck, Daniel; Pettier, Jean-Luc; Payan, Emmanuel; Roure, Christophe; Simon, Eric

    2015-12-01

    As part of its R&D programs on non-destructive testing of nuclear waste drums, CEA is commissioning an irradiation cell named CINPHONIE, at Cadarache. This cell allows high-energy imaging (radiography and tomography) on large volumes (up to 5 m3) and heavy weights (up to 5 tons). A demonstrator has been finalized, based on existing components. The X-ray source is a 9 MeV LINAC which produces Bremsstrahlung X-rays (up to 23 Gy/min at 1 meter in the beam axis). The mechanical bench is digitally controlled on three axes (translation, rotation, elevation) and can handle objects up to 2 t. This bench performs trajectories necessary for acquisition of projections (sinograms) according to different geometries: Translation-Rotation, Fan-Beam and Cone-Beam. Two detection systems both developed by CEA-Leti are available. The first one is a large GADOX scintillating screen ( 800 ×600 mm2) coupled to a low-noise pixelated camera. The second one is a multi-CdTe semiconductor detector, offering measurements up to 5 decades of attenuation (equivalent to 25 cm of lead or 180 cm of standard concrete). At the end of the acquisition, a Filtered Back Projection-based algorithm is performed. Then, a density slice (fan-beam tomography) or a density volume (cone-beam tomography or helical tomography) is produced and used to examine the waste. Characterization of LINAC, associated detectors as well as the full acquisition chain, are presented. Experimental performances on phantoms and real drum are discussed and expected limits on defect detectability are evaluated by simulation. The final system, designed to handle objects up to 5 tons is then presented.

  3. Noninvasive measurement of burn wound depth applying infrared thermal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E.; Maltha, Ilse M.; Klaessens, John H.; Vet, Henrica C.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Zuijlen, Paul P.

    2016-02-01

    In burn wounds early discrimination between the different depths plays an important role in the treatment strategy. The remaining vasculature in the wound determines its healing potential. Non-invasive measurement tools that can identify the vascularization are therefore considered to be of high diagnostic importance. Thermography is a non-invasive technique that can accurately measure the temperature distribution over a large skin or tissue area, the temperature is a measure of the perfusion of that area. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinimetric properties (i.e. reliability and validity) of thermography for measuring burn wound depth. In a cross-sectional study with 50 burn wounds of 35 patients, the inter-observer reliability and the validity between thermography and Laser Doppler Imaging were studied. With ROC curve analyses the ΔT cut-off point for different burn wound depths were determined. The inter-observer reliability, expressed by an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.99, was found to be excellent. In terms of validity, a ΔT cut-off point of 0.96°C (sensitivity 71%; specificity 79%) differentiates between a superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burn. A ΔT cut-off point of -0.80°C (sensitivity 70%; specificity 74%) could differentiate between a deep partial-thickness and a full-thickness burn wound. This study demonstrates that thermography is a reliable method in the assessment of burn wound depths. In addition, thermography was reasonably able to discriminate among different burn wound depths, indicating its potential use as a diagnostic tool in clinical burn practice.

  4. Quantifying the visual appearance of sunscreens applied to the skin using indirect computer image colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Vincent; Kharazmi, Pegah; Lee, Tim K; Kalia, Sunil; Lui, Harvey

    2017-10-28

    There is no accepted method to objectively assess the visual appearance of sunscreens on the skin. We present a method for sunscreen application, digital photography, and computer analysis to quantify the appearance of the skin after sunscreen application. Four sunscreen lotions were applied randomly at densities of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mg/cm 2 to areas of the back of 29 subjects. Each application site had a matched contralateral control area. High-resolution standardized photographs including a color card were taken after sunscreen application. After color balance correction, CIE L*a*b* color values were extracted from paired sites. Differences in skin appearance attributed to sunscreen were represented by ΔE, which in turn was calculated from the linear Euclidean distance within the L*a*b* color space between the paired sites. Sunscreen visibility as measured by median ΔE varied across different products and application densities and ranged between 1.2 and 12.1. The visibility of sunscreens varied according to product SPF, composition (organic vs inorganic), presence of tint, and baseline b* of skin (P < .05 for all). Standardized sunscreen application followed by digital photography and indirect computer-based colorimetry represents a potential method to objectively quantify visibility of sunscreen on the skin. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Differentiating malignant from benign breast tumors on acoustic radiation force impulse imaging using fuzzy-based neural networks with principle component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiao-Chuan; Chou, Yi-Hong; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Hsieh, Chi-Wen; Liu, Brent; Shung, K. Kirk

    2017-03-01

    Many modalities have been developed as screening tools for breast cancer. A new screening method called acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging was created for distinguishing breast lesions based on localized tissue displacement. This displacement was quantitated by virtual touch tissue imaging (VTI). However, VTIs sometimes express reverse results to intensity information in clinical observation. In the study, a fuzzy-based neural network with principle component analysis (PCA) was proposed to differentiate texture patterns of malignant breast from benign tumors. Eighty VTIs were randomly retrospected. Thirty four patients were determined as BI-RADS category 2 or 3, and the rest of them were determined as BI-RADS category 4 or 5 by two leading radiologists. Morphological method and Boolean algebra were performed as the image preprocessing to acquire region of interests (ROIs) on VTIs. Twenty four quantitative parameters deriving from first-order statistics (FOS), fractal dimension and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were utilized to analyze the texture pattern of breast tumors on VTIs. PCA was employed to reduce the dimension of features. Fuzzy-based neural network as a classifier to differentiate malignant from benign breast tumors. Independent samples test was used to examine the significance of the difference between benign and malignant breast tumors. The area Az under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated to evaluate the performance of the system. Most all of texture parameters present significant difference between malignant and benign tumors with p-value of less than 0.05 except the average of fractal dimension. For all features classified by fuzzy-based neural network, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az were 95.7%, 97.1%, 95% and 0.964, respectively. However, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az can be increased to 100%, 97.1%, 98.8% and 0.985, respectively

  6. Least-square NUFFT methods applied to 2-D and 3-D radially encoded MR image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiayu; Liu, Yanhui; Gewalt, Sally L; Cofer, Gary; Johnson, G Allan; Liu, Qing Huo

    2009-04-01

    Radially encoded MRI has gained increasing attention due to its motion insensitivity and reduced artifacts. However, because its samples are collected nonuniformly in the k-space, multidimensional (especially 3-D) radially sampled MRI image reconstruction is challenging. The objective of this paper is to develop a reconstruction technique in high dimensions with on-the-fly kernel calculation. It implements general multidimensional nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) algorithms and incorporates them into a k-space image reconstruction framework. The method is then applied to reconstruct from the radially encoded k-space data, although the method is applicable to any non-Cartesian patterns. Performance comparisons are made against the conventional Kaiser-Bessel (KB) gridding method for 2-D and 3-D radially encoded computer-simulated phantoms and physically scanned phantoms. The results show that the NUFFT reconstruction method has better accuracy-efficiency tradeoff than the KB gridding method when the kernel weights are calculated on the fly. It is found that for a particular conventional kernel function, using its corresponding deapodization function as a scaling factor in the NUFFT framework has the potential to improve accuracy. In particular, when a cosine scaling factor is used, the NUFFT method is faster than KB gridding method since a closed-form solution is available and is less computationally expensive than the KB kernel (KB griding requires computation of Bessel functions). The NUFFT method has been successfully applied to 2-D and 3-D in vivo studies on small animals.

  7. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Senescence and Stress using Derivative Spectroscopy Applied to Hyperspectral Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipar, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that senescence and stress affect the shape of the optical reflectance spectrum of vegetation. A prime example is the shift of the red edge inflection point (REIP) to lower wavelength as senescence or stress increases. The red edge refers to the sharp rise in vegetation reflectance between the chlorophyll well in the red (670-680 nm) and the near infrared plateau (~790-1350 nm). The REIP wavelength shift, however, can be subtle and not easily detected with hyperspectral imagers. I explore the use of derivative spectroscopy to enhance the features in the reflectance spectrum. Conventional analysis focuses on the wavelength position of the REIP as a measure of stress. In this paper, I examine the shape of the entire derivative spectrum to characterize the transition from healthy to senescent deciduous vegetation over the summer to autumn transition. While this transition occurs naturally, it causes changes in the reflectance spectrum similar to those changes due to stress such as drought or soil contamination. The experiment (carried out in southern New England) consisted of clipping leaves from maple and oak trees every two to three days from early September through late November and measuring the optical reflectance in the laboratory using an Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) Field Spectrometer. Reflectance spectra were measured for stacks of leaves using different numbers of leaves in the stack and different backgrounds. The primary data set was measured using four-leaf stacks on a flat black background. The time series of derivative spectra clearly show the shift in the red edge inflection point as a function of date, as expected. In addition, the overall shape of the derivative spectra changes significantly as leaf senescence proceeds. The utility of derivative spectroscopy lay in whether it can be used with remote sensing data recorded by hyperspectral sensors such the NASA-JPL AVIRIS instrument. The lower spectral sampling of current

  8. The acoustics of snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  9. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  10. Design of a front-end integrated circuit for 3D acoustic imaging using 2D CMUT arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciçek, Ihsan; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Karaman, Mustafa

    2005-12-01

    Integration of front-end electronics with 2D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays has been a challenging issue due to the small element size and large channel count. We present design and verification of a front-end drive-readout integrated circuit for 3D ultrasonic imaging using 2D CMUT arrays. The circuit cell dedicated to a single CMUT array element consists of a high-voltage pulser and a low-noise readout amplifier. To analyze the circuit cell together with the CMUT element, we developed an electrical CMUT model with parameters derived through finite element analysis, and performed both the pre- and postlayout verification. An experimental chip consisting of 4 X 4 array of the designed circuit cells, each cell occupying a 200 X 200 microm2 area, was formed for the initial test studies and scheduled for fabrication in 0.8 microm, 50 V CMOS technology. The designed circuit is suitable for integration with CMUT arrays through flip-chip bonding and the CMUT-on-CMOS process.

  11. Acoustic Imaging of Selected Areas of Gdansk Bay with the Aid of Parametric Echosounder and Side-Scan Sonar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grelowska Grażyna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents and analyses the data recorded during sounding of the Gdansk Bay seabed with the aid of a parametric echosounder and a side-scan sonar. The accuracy of seabed structure examination, as a condition for obtaining valuable results, requires correct configuration of echolocation devices and proper calibration of peripheral devices, such as the survey unit geographical position sensor - GPS, the navigation unit, the MRU-Z sensor of pitch, roll and heave, and the sound velocity meter, which deliver the data to the bathymetric measurement system. Parametric seabed profilers deliver two types of data: the envelope, and the detailed echo signal without processing. The envelope is used for data visualisation in the form of online echograms, while the echo signal is stored for further analyses, to be performed using dedicated software or, after relevant conversion, in arbitrary programming environment1. The presented data analysis is illustrated by selected sample images recorded by the parametric echosounder and the side-scan sonar during Gdansk Bay sounding.

  12. Single-sensor multispeaker listening with acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Brady, David J; Cummer, Steven A

    2015-08-25

    Designing a "cocktail party listener" that functionally mimics the selective perception of a human auditory system has been pursued over the past decades. By exploiting acoustic metamaterials and compressive sensing, we present here a single-sensor listening device that separates simultaneous overlapping sounds from different sources. The device with a compact array of resonant metamaterials is demonstrated to distinguish three overlapping and independent sources with 96.67% correct audio recognition. Segregation of the audio signals is achieved using physical layer encoding without relying on source characteristics. This hardware approach to multichannel source separation can be applied to robust speech recognition and hearing aids and may be extended to other acoustic imaging and sensing applications.

  13. Acoustic Resonance in School Hallways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucki, Elliot; Nagle, Matthew; Smith, Pearson; Taylor, Ken

    2010-03-01

    This paper takes the theory of acoustic standing waves for air columns and applies it to school hallways. By utilizing an audio generator and power amplifier/speaker the authors set up an experiment in a school hallway and studied the resonant patterns created for a range of driving frequencies. Data describing the various mode structures are presented.

  14. Applying 2-D resistivity imaging and ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods to identify infiltration of water in the ground surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Azim Hilmy Mohamad; Azman, Muhamad Iqbal Mubarak Faharul; Ismail, Nur Azwin; Ismail, Noer El Hidayah

    2017-07-01

    Infiltration of water into the soil mostly happens in area near to the ocean or area where rain occurred frequently. This paper explains about the water infiltration process that occurred vertically and horizontally at the subsurface layer. Infiltration act as an indicator of the soil's ability to allow water movement into and through the soil profile. This research takes place at Teluk Kumbar, Pulau Pinang, area that located near to the sea. Thus, infiltration process occurs actively. The study area consists of unconsolidated marine clay, sand and gravel deposits. Furthermore, the methods used for this research is 2-D Resistivity Imaging by using Wenner-Schlumberger array with 2.5 m minimum electrode spacing, and the second method is Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) with antenna frequency of 250MHz. 2-D Resistivity Imaging is used to investigate the subsurface layer of the soil. Other than that, this method can also be used to investigate the water infiltration that happens horizontally. GPR is used to investigate shallow subsurface layer and to investigate the water infiltration from above. The results of inversion model of 2-D Resistivity Imaging shows that the subsurface layer at distance of 0 m to 20 m are suspected to be salt water intrusion zone due to the resistivity value of 0 Ω.m to 1 Ω.m. As for the radargram results from the GPR, the anomaly seems to be blurry and unclear, and EM waves signal can only penetrate up to 1.5 m depth. This feature shows that the subsurface layer is saturated with salt water. Applying 2-D resistivity imaging and GPR method were implemented to each other in identifying infiltration of water in the ground surface.

  15. Applying quantitative benefit-risk analysis to aid regulatory decision making in diagnostic imaging: methods, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapova, Maria; Devine, Emily Beth; Bresnahan, Brian W; Higashi, Mitchell K; Garrison, Louis P

    2014-09-01

    Health agencies making regulatory marketing-authorization decisions use qualitative and quantitative approaches to assess expected benefits and expected risks associated with medical interventions. There is, however, no universal standard approach that regulatory agencies consistently use to conduct benefit-risk assessment (BRA) for pharmaceuticals or medical devices, including for imaging technologies. Economics, health services research, and health outcomes research use quantitative approaches to elicit preferences of stakeholders, identify priorities, and model health conditions and health intervention effects. Challenges to BRA in medical devices are outlined, highlighting additional barriers in radiology. Three quantitative methods--multi-criteria decision analysis, health outcomes modeling and stated-choice survey--are assessed using criteria that are important in balancing benefits and risks of medical devices and imaging technologies. To be useful in regulatory BRA, quantitative methods need to: aggregate multiple benefits and risks, incorporate qualitative considerations, account for uncertainty, and make clear whose preferences/priorities are being used. Each quantitative method performs differently across these criteria and little is known about how BRA estimates and conclusions vary by approach. While no specific quantitative method is likely to be the strongest in all of the important areas, quantitative methods may have a place in BRA of medical devices and radiology. Quantitative BRA approaches have been more widely applied in medicines, with fewer BRAs in devices. Despite substantial differences in characteristics of pharmaceuticals and devices, BRA methods may be as applicable to medical devices and imaging technologies as they are to pharmaceuticals. Further research to guide the development and selection of quantitative BRA methods for medical devices and imaging technologies is needed. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Parametric Room Acoustic Workflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, Dario; Svidt, Kjeld; Molin, Erik

    2017-01-01

    and interoperability with Grasshopper 3d. The focus will be placed to the benchmarking of three different acoustic analysis tools based on raytracing. To compare the accuracy and speed of the acoustic evaluation across different tools, a homogeneous set of acoustic parameters is chosen. The room acoustics parameters...

  17. Acoustic Environment Simulation Study; Acoustic Intrusion Sensor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    generation of transients. 10,000. 13. Software for stastistical record keeping. 7,500. Note that no allowance is made here for additional racks or backplanes...sAcoustic Instrusion Sensor Performance Date Jan 83 I 0.1. TERMINOLOGY ATSA APPLIED TIME SERIES ANALYSIS, R. K. Otnes and L. Enochson, Wiley Interscience...verif- ication of the procedures. The terminology used in this report is essentially the same as that in APPLIED TIME SERIES ANALYSIS, VOLUME I, by Robert

  18. Acoustics and Hearing

    CERN Document Server

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  19. Quantitative evaluation of automated skull-stripping methods applied to contemporary and legacy images: effects of diagnosis, bias correction, and slice location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Ozyurt, I Burak; Clark, Camellia P

    2006-01-01

    Performance of automated methods to isolate brain from nonbrain tissues in magnetic resonance (MR) structural images may be influenced by MR signal inhomogeneities, type of MR image set, regional anatomy, and age and diagnosis of subjects studied. The present study compared the performance of four...... Extractor (BSE, Sandor and Leahy [1997] IEEE Trans Med Imag 16:41-54; Shattuck et al. [2001] Neuroimage 13:856-876) to manually stripped images. The methods were applied to uncorrected and bias-corrected datasets; Legacy and Contemporary T1-weighted image sets; and four diagnostic groups (depressed...

  20. Density-near-zero using the acoustically induced transparency of a Fano acoustic resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Elayouch, A.

    2017-01-05

    We report experimental results of near-zero mass density involving an acoustic metamaterial supporting Fano resonance. For this, we designed and fabricated an acoustic resonator with two closely coupled modes and measured its transmission properties. Our study reveals that the phenomenon of acoustically induced transparency is accompanied by an effect of near-zero density. Indeed, the dynamic effective parameters obtained from experimental data show the presence of a frequency band where the effective mass density is close to zero, with high transmission levels reaching 0.7. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such effective parameters lead to wave guiding in a 90-degrees-bent channel. This kind of acoustic metamaterial can, therefore, give rise to acoustic functions like controlling the wavefront, which may lead to very promising applications in acoustic cloacking or imaging.

  1. Imaging techniques applied to quality control of civil manufactured goods obtained starting from ready-to-use mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Federica

    2003-05-01

    Concrete materials obtained from the utilization of pre-mixed and ready to use products (central mix-concrete) are more and more used. They represent a big portion of the civil construction market. Such products are used at different scale, ranging from small scale works, as those commonly realized inside and house, an apartment, etc. or at big civil or industrial scale works. In both cases the problem to control the mixtures and the final work is usually realized through the analysis of properly collected samples. Through appropriate sampling it can be derived objective parameters, as size class distribution and composition of the constituting particulate matter, or mechanical characteristics of the sample itself. An important parameter not considered by the previous mentioned approach is "segregation", that is the possibility that some particulate materials migrate preferentially in some zones of the mixtures and/or of the final product. Such a behavior dramatically influences the quality of the product and of the final manufactured good. Actually this behavior is only studied adopting a human based visual approach. Not repeatable analytical procedures or quantitative data processing exist. In this paper a procedure fully based on image processing techniques is described and applied. Results are presented and analyzed with reference to industrial products. A comparison is also made between the new proposed digital imaging based techniques and the analyses usually carried out at industrial laboratory scale for standard quality control.

  2. Software-based acoustical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Miyara, Federico

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a detailed introduction to the use of software in combination with simple and economical hardware (a sound level meter with calibrated AC output and a digital recording system) to obtain sophisticated measurements usually requiring expensive equipment. It emphasizes the use of free, open source, and multiplatform software. Many commercial acoustical measurement systems use software algorithms as an integral component; however the methods are not disclosed. This book enables the reader to develop useful algorithms and provides insight into the use of digital audio editing tools to document features in the signal. Topics covered include acoustical measurement principles, in-depth critical study of uncertainty applied to acoustical measurements, digital signal processing from the basics, and metrologically-oriented spectral and statistical analysis of signals. The student will gain a deep understanding of the use of software for measurement purposes; the ability to implement software-based...

  3. Transmission and signal loss in mask designs for a dual neutron and gamma imager applied to mobile standoff detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Hayward, Jason P.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Blackston, Matthew A.; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    In order to design a next-generation, dual neutron and gamma imager for mobile standoff detection which uses coded aperture imaging as its primary detection modality, the following design parameters have been investigated for gamma and neutron radiation incident upon a hybrid, coded mask: (1) transmission through mask elements for various mask materials and thicknesses; and (2) signal attenuation in the mask versus angle of incidence. Each of these parameters directly affects detection significance, as quantified by the signal-to-noise ratio. The hybrid mask consists of two or three layers: organic material for fast neutron attenuation and scattering, Cd for slow neutron absorption (if applied), and one of three of the following photon or photon and slow neutron attenuating materials—Linotype alloy, CLYC, or CZT. In the MCNP model, a line source of gamma rays (100–2500 keV), fast neutrons (1000–10,000 keV) or thermal neutrons was positioned above the hybrid mask. The radiation penetrating the mask was simply tallied at the surface of an ideal detector, which was located below the surface of the last mask layer. The transmission was calculated as the ratio of the particles transmitted through the fixed aperture to the particles passing through the closed mask. In order to determine the performance of the mask considering relative motion between the source and detector, simulations were used to calculate the signal attenuation for incident radiation angles of 0–50°. The results showed that a hybrid mask can be designed to sufficiently reduce both transmission through the mask and signal loss at large angles of incidence, considering both gamma ray and fast neutron radiations. With properly selected material thicknesses, the signal loss of a hybrid mask, which is necessarily thicker than the mask required for either single mode imaging, is not a setback to the system's detection significance

  4. Considerations in applying compressed sensing to in vivo phosphorus MR spectroscopic imaging of human brain at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatay, Gokce Hale; Yildirim, Muhammed; Ozturk-Isik, Esin

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply compressed sensing method for accelerated phosphorus MR spectroscopic imaging ( 31 P-MRSI) of human brain in vivo at 3T. Fast 31 P-MRSI data of five volunteers were acquired on a 3T clinical MR scanner using pulse-acquire sequence with a pseudorandom undersampling pattern for a data reduction factor of 5.33 and were reconstructed using compressed sensing. Additionally, simulated 31 P-MRSI human brain tumor datasets were created to analyze the effects of k-space sampling pattern, data matrix size, regularization parameters of the reconstruction, and noise on the compressed sensing accelerated 31 P-MRSI data. The 31 P metabolite peak ratios of the full and compressed sensing accelerated datasets of healthy volunteers in vivo were similar according to the results of a Bland-Altman test. The estimated effective spatial resolution increased with reduction factor and sampling more at the k-space center. A lower regularization parameter for both total variation and L1-norm penalties resulted in a better compressed sensing reconstruction of 31 P-MRSI. Although the root-mean-square error increased with noise levels, the compressed sensing reconstruction was robust for up to a reduction factor of 10 for the simulated data that had sharply defined tumor borders. As a result, compressed sensing was successfully applied to accelerate 31 P-MRSI of human brain in vivo at 3T.

  5. Testing the Feasibility of Using PERM to Apply Scattering-Angle Filtering in the Image-Domain for FWI Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hani Ataiq

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT Testing the Feasibility of Using PERM to Apply Scattering-Angle Filtering in the Image-Domain for FWI Applications Hani Ataiq Alzahrani Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is a non-linear optimization problem aimed to estimating subsurface parameters by minimizing the mis t between modeled and recorded seismic data using gradient descent methods, which are the only practical choice because of the size of the problem. Due to the high non-linearity of the problem, gradient methods will converge to a local minimum if the starting model is not close to the true one. The accuracy of the long-wavelength components of the initial model controls the level of non-linearity of the inversion. In order for FWI to converge to the global minimum, we have to obtain the long wavelength components of the model before inverting for the short wavelengths. Ultra-low temporal frequencies are sensitive to the smooth (long wavelength) part of the model, and can be utilized by waveform inversion to resolve that part. Un- fortunately, frequencies in this range are normally missing in eld data due to data- acquisition limitations. The lack of low frequencies can be compensated for by uti- lizing wide-aperture data, as they include arrivals that are especially sensitive to the long wavelength components of the model. The higher the scattering angle of a 5 recorded event, the higher the model wavelength it can resolve. Based on this prop- erty, a scattering-angle ltering algorithm is proposed to start the inversion process with events corresponding to the highest scattering angle available in the data, and then include lower scattering angles progressively. The large scattering angles will resolve the smooth part of the model and reduce the non-linearity of the problem, then the lower ones will enhance the resolution of the model. Recorded data is rst migrated using Pre-stack Exploding Re ector Migration (PERM), then the resulting pre-stack image is transformed into angle gathers to which

  6. Geomatics techniques applied to time series of aerial images for multitemporal geomorphological analysis of the Miage Glacier (Mont Blanc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Luigi; Carletti, Roberto; Giardino, Marco; Mortara, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Miage glacier is the major one in the Italian side of the Mont Blanc Massif, the third by area and the first by longitudinal extent among Italian glaciers. It is a typical debris covered glacier, since the end of the L.I.A. The debris coverage reduces ablation, allowing a relative stability of the glacier terminus, which is characterized by a wide and articulated moraine apparatus. For its conservative landforms, the Miage Glacier has a great importance for the analysis of the geomorphological response to recent climatic changes. Thanks to an organized existing archive of multitemporal aerial images (1935 to present) a photogrammetric approach has been applied to detect recent geomorphological changes in the Miage glacial basin. The research team provided: a) to digitize all the available images (still in analogic form) through photogrammetric scanners (very low image distortions devices) taking care of correctly defining the resolution of the acquisition compared to the scale mapping images are suitable for; b) to import digitized images into an appropriate digital photogrammetry software environment; c) to manage images in order, where possible, to carried out the stereo models orientation necessary for 3D navigation and plotting of critical geometric features of the glacier. Recognized geometric feature, referring to different periods, can be transferred to vector layers and imported in a GIS for further comparisons and investigations; d) to produce multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models for glacier volume changes; e) to perform orthoprojection of such images to obtain multitemporal orthoimages useful for areal an planar terrain evaluation and thematic analysis; f) to evaluate both planimetric positioning and height determination accuracies reachable through the photogrammetric process. Users have to known reliability of the measures they can do over such products. This can drive them to define the applicable field of this approach and this can help them to

  7. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  8. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  9. International Conference on Acoustics and Vibration

    CERN Document Server

    Chaari, Fakher; Walha, Lasaad; Abdennadher, Moez; Abbes, Mohamed; Haddar, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The book provides readers with a snapshot of recent research and industrial trends in field of industrial acoustics and vibration. Each chapter, accepted after a rigorous peer-review process, reports on a selected, original piece of work presented and discussed at International Conference on Acoustics and Vibration (ICAV2016), which was organized by the Tunisian Association of Industrial Acoustics and Vibration (ATAVI) and held March 21-23, in Hammamet, Tunisia. The contributions, mainly written by north African authors, covers advances in both theory and practice in a variety of subfields, such as: smart materials and structures; fluid-structure interaction; structural acoustics as well as computational vibro-acoustics and numerical methods. Further topics include: engines control, noise identification, robust design, flow-induced vibration and many others.This book provides a valuable resource for both academics and professionals dealing with diverse issues in applied mechanics. By combining advanced theori...

  10. Phonemes as images : An experimental inquiry into shape-sound symbolism applied to the distinctive features of French

    OpenAIRE

    Nobile , Luca

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This paper attempts to improve the understanding of shape-sound symbolism by isolating the phonological features of the pseudo-words used in the experiments and the graphic features of the figures matched with them. In a first section, it analyses the classic maluma-takete effect from both an articulatory and acoustical point of view, showing that it is determined by several phonological features operating simultaneously. In a second section, two new experiments are pr...

  11. Underwater Inspection of Navigation Structures with an Acoustic Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    38  Figure 4-11. Masonry wall comparison of visible image and acoustical image, downtown landing, Mississippi River, Vicksburg...early automated mosaic software efforts. ERDC/ITL TR-13-3 39 Figure 4-11. Masonry wall comparison of visible image and acoustical image...areas not accessible by conventional side- scan or multi-beam deployments. Figure 4-19 shows a profile and surface view of various sheet pilings

  12. Influence of different frequencies and insertion depths on the diagnostic accuracy of liver elastography by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potthoff, Andrej, E-mail: potthoff.andrej@mh-hannover.de [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Attia, Dina; Pischke, Sven; Kirschner, Janina; Mederacke, Ingmar; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Manns, Michael P.; Gebel, Michael J.; Rifai, Kinan [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Background: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) is an innovative elastography for staging of liver fibrosis. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of different probes to perform ARFI at different insertion depths. Methods: In a prospective study, 89 chronic HCV infected patients underwent ARFI elastography using both available probes (c-ARFI: C4-1-MHz; l-ARFI: L9-4 MHz) in comparison to Fibroscan{sup ®}. Variability of ARFI elastography at different insertion depths was systematically evaluated in 39 patients (44%). According to Fibroscan{sup ®} elastography, 32 patients (36%) presented with liver cirrhosis, 23 patients (26%) had significant fibrosis and 34 patients (38%) had no significant fibrosis. Results: Mean propagation velocity with c-ARFI was 1.70 ± 0.67 m/s and 1.91 ± 0.87 m/s with l-ARFI. Results of both probes were correlated to each other (p < 0.001; r = 0.70) and to Fibroscan{sup ®} (p < 0.001, r = 0.82 and 0.84, respectively). In patients with significant fibrosis or with cirrhosis, mean values by l-ARFI were significantly higher than by c-ARFI (p < 0.001). For detection of liver cirrhosis, AUROC was 0.97 for c-ARFI (cut-off level 1.72 m/s) and 0.90 for l-ARFI (cut-off 2.04 m/s). Correlation coefficients of c-ARFI with Fibroscan{sup ®} were highest at an insertion depth of 5–6 cm (r = 0.882 and 0.864, respectively, p < 0.001) and at 3–4 cm for l-ARFI (r = 0.850 and 0.838, respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions: ARFI elastography with the linear and with the convex probes showed comparable validity and accuracy in the estimation of liver stiffness. The linear probe gave higher ARFI values. The most accurate insertion depth was 5–6 cm for c-ARFI and 3–4 cm for l-ARFI indicating that measurements should not be performed close to the liver capsule.

  13. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  14. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  15. Propose for systematization of data applied to bioclimatic architecture: acoustic, high ling and thermal; Propuesta para la sistematizacion de ecotecnicas y datos de vegetacion aplicables a la arquitectura bioclimatica desde un enfoque energetico global. Luminico. Acustico y Termico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo, G. R.

    2004-07-01

    In Environmental Design or Solar Architecture, vegetation may be used to modify the micro climate surrounding a building. However, books on this subject only state the way vegetation may be used to control thermal conditions within buildings, considering thermal energy the only one present. In buildings, there is always a simultaneous presence of three kinds of energy: thermal energy, acoustics and illumination. Therefore, this paper will propose: (1) a holistic approach to the use of vegetation in Environmental Design, using all parameters of thermal, acoustic and luminal comfort, and (2) a holistic approach to Environmental Design guidelines that use vegetation. (Author)

  16. Acoustic emission monitoring during welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Weld repair is a major cost item, particularly in the fabrication of heavy section weldments such as pressure vessels. A heavy section repair can frequently leave the weld with worse problems than the original flaw. These problems may include damage to weld microstructure as well as added residual stress. The removal of flaws through in-process repair can minimize these problems and certainly, the removal of one or two passes and their replacement with automatic welding procedure is considerably cheaper than a heavy section post weld repair. The major barrier to application of in-process repair is the lack of an effective in-process inspection procedure. In-process monitoring of Acoustic Emission shows great promise for providing this much needed tool. The successful application of acoustic emission to in-process weld monitoring requires that advanced signal processing and pattern recognition techniques be applied if the flaw related acoustic emission is to be separated from the overwhelming amount of background noise present in welding. GARD, INC. has studied the problem of applying in-process acoustic emission monitoring to weld inspection for over 9 years and has empirically developed AE signal processing techniques which allow typical weld flaws to be detected, located, and characterized. This paper discusses these techniques and describes a recent successful field test of a microcomputer based AE weld monitor in a nuclear fabrication plant. (author)

  17. Acoustic grating fringe projector for high-speed and high-precision three-dimensional shape measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xuebing; Zhao Huijie; Zeng Junyu; Qu Yufu

    2007-01-01

    A new acoustic grating fringe projector (AGFP) was developed for high-speed and high-precision 3D measurement. A new acoustic grating fringe projection theory is also proposed to describe the optical system. The AGFP instrument can adjust the spatial phase and period of fringes with unprecedented speed and accuracy. Using rf power proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and CCD synchronous control, we obtain fringes with fine sinusoidal characteristics and realize high-speed acquisition of image data. Using the device, we obtained a precise phase map for a 3D profile. In addition, the AGFP can work in running fringe mode, which could be applied in other measurement fields

  18. Pattern recognition methods for acoustic emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, P.G.; Harrington, T.P.; Hutton, P.H.

    1979-07-01

    Models have been developed that relate the rate of acoustic emissions to structural integrity. The implementation of these techniques in the field has been hindered by the noisy environment in which the data must be taken. Acoustic emissions from noncritical sources are recorded in addition to those produced by critical sources, such as flaws. A technique is discussed for prescreening acoustic events and filtering out those that are produced by noncritical sources. The methodology that was investigated is pattern recognition. Three different pattern recognition techniques were applied to a data set that consisted of acoustic emissions caused by crack growth and acoustic signals caused by extraneous noise sources. Examination of the acoustic emission data presented has uncovered several features of the data that can provide a reasonable filter. Two of the most valuable features are the frequency of maximum response and the autocorrelation coefficient at Lag 13. When these two features and several others were combined with a least squares decision algorithm, 90% of the acoustic emissions in the data set were correctly classified. It appears possible to design filters that eliminate extraneous noise sources from flaw-growth acoustic emissions using pattern recognition techniques

  19. Pattern recognition methods for acoustic emission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, P.G.; Harrington, T.P.; Hutton, P.H.

    1979-07-01

    Models have been developed that relate the rate of acoustic emissions to structural integrity. The implementation of these techniques in the field has been hindered by the noisy environment in which the data must be taken. Acoustic emissions from noncritical sources are recorded in addition to those produced by critical sources, such as flaws. A technique is discussed for prescreening acoustic events and filtering out those that are produced by noncritical sources. The methodology that was investigated is pattern recognition. Three different pattern recognition techniques were applied to a data set that consisted of acoustic emissions caused by crack growth and acoustic signals caused by extraneous noise sources. Examination of the acoustic emission data presented has uncovered several features of the data that can provide a reasonable filter. Two of the most valuable features are the frequency of maximum response and the autocorrelation coefficient at Lag 13. When these two features and several others were combined with a least squares decision algorithm, 90% of the acoustic emissions in the data set were correctly classified. It appears possible to design filters that eliminate extraneous noise sources from flaw-growth acoustic emissions using pattern recognition techniques.

  20. Aging adult skull vaults by applying the concept of fractal geometry to high-resolution computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Martin; Seyfried, Maren; Schumacher, Falk; Krombach, Gabriele A; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2014-09-01

    Aging human remains is a critical issue in anthropology and forensic medicine, and the search for accurate, new age-estimation methods is ongoing. In our study, we, therefore, explored a new approach to investigate a possible correlation between age-at-death (aad) and geometric irregularities in the bone structure of human skull caps. We applied the concept of fractal geometry and fractal dimension D analysis to describe heterogeneity within the bone structure. A high-resolution flat-panel computed tomography scanner (eXplore Locus Ultra) was used to obtain 229,500 images from 221 male and 120 female (total 341) European human skulls. Automated image analysis software was developed to evaluate the fractal dimension D, using the mass radius method. The frontal and the occipital portions of the skull caps of adult females and males were investigated separately. The age dependence of the fractal dimension D was studied by correlation analysis, and the prediction accuracy of age-at-death (aad) estimates for individual observations was calculated. D values for human skull caps scatter strongly as a function of age. We found sex-dependent correlation coefficients (CC) between D and age for adults (females CC=-0.67; males CC=-0.05). Prediction errors for aad estimates for individual observations were in the range of ±18 years at a 75% confidence interval. The detailed quantitative description of age-dependent irregularities in the bone microarchitecture of skull vaults through fractal dimension analysis does not, as we had hoped, enable a new aging method. Severe scattering of the data leads to an estimation error that is too great for this method to be of practical relevance in aad estimates. Thus, we disclosed an interesting sex difference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the emission linear pulse holography which produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. A thirty two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The concept behind the AE linear pulse holography is illustrated, and a block diagram of a data acquisition system to implement the concept is given. Array element spacing, synthetic frequency criteria, and lateral depth resolution are specified. A reference timing transducer positioned between the array and the inspection zone and which inititates the time-of-flight measurements is described. The results graphically illustrate the technique using a one-dimensional FFT computer algorithm (ie. linear backward wave) for an AE image reconstruction

  2. Case-study magnetic resonance imaging and acoustic investigation of the effects of vocal warm-up on two voice professionals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laukkanen, A. M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Havlík, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2012), s. 75-82 ISSN 1401-5439 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : speaker’s formant cluster * singer’s formant cluster * speech and singing training Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.571, year: 2012

  3. Ex vivo and in vitro synchrotron-based micro-imaging of biocompatible materials applied in dental surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, A.; Stiller, M.; Nelson, K.; Knabe, C.; Rack, T.; Zabler, S.; Dalügge, O.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.; Goebbels, J.

    2010-09-01

    Biocompatible materials such as porous bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics or titanium are regularly applied in dental surgery: ceramics are used to support the local bone regeneration in a given defect, afterwards titanium implants replace lost teeth. The current gold standard for bone reconstruction in implant dentistry is the use of autogenous bone grafts. But the concept of guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a predictable and well documented surgical approach using biomaterials (bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics) which qualify as bone substitutes for this kind of application as well. We applied high resolution synchrotron microtomography and subsequent 3d image analysis in order to investigate bone formation and degradation of the bone substitute material in a three-dimensional manner, extending the knowledge beyond the limits of classical histology. Following the bone regeneration, titanium-based implants to replace lost teeth call for high mechanical precision, especially when two-piece concepts are used in order to guaranty leak tightness. Here, synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in these kind of highly attenuating objects. Therefore, we could study micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the specimen under different mechanical load. We could prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the micromechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential issue of failure, i. e. bacterial leakage which can induce an inflammatory process.

  4. Micromachined silicon acoustic delay line with improved structural stability and acoustic directivity for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young; Kumar, Akhil; Xu, Song; Zou, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that micromachined silicon acoustic delay lines can provide a promising solution to achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography without the need for complex transducer arrays and data acquisition electronics. However, as its length increases to provide longer delay time, the delay line becomes more vulnerable to structural instability due to reduced mechanical stiffness. In addition, the small cross-section area of the delay line results in a large acoustic acceptance angle and therefore poor directivity. To address these two issues, this paper reports the design, fabrication, and testing of a new silicon acoustic delay line enhanced with 3D printed polymer micro linker structures. First, mechanical deformation of the silicon acoustic delay line (with and without linker structures) under gravity was simulated by using finite element method. Second, the acoustic crosstalk and acoustic attenuation caused by the polymer micro linker structures were evaluated with both numerical simulation and ultrasound transmission testing. The result shows that the use of the polymer micro linker structures significantly improves the structural stability of the silicon acoustic delay lines without creating additional acoustic attenuation and crosstalk. In addition, a new tapered design for the input terminal of the delay line was also investigate to improve its acoustic directivity by reducing the acoustic acceptance angle. These two improvements are expected to provide an effective solution to eliminate current limitations on the achievable acoustic delay time and out-of-plane imaging resolution of micromachined silicon acoustic delay line arrays.

  5. Tipping point analysis of ocean acoustic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livina, Valerie N.; Brouwer, Albert; Harris, Peter; Wang, Lian; Sotirakopoulos, Kostas; Robinson, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    We apply tipping point analysis to a large record of ocean acoustic data to identify the main components of the acoustic dynamical system and study possible bifurcations and transitions of the system. The analysis is based on a statistical physics framework with stochastic modelling, where we represent the observed data as a composition of deterministic and stochastic components estimated from the data using time-series techniques. We analyse long-term and seasonal trends, system states and acoustic fluctuations to reconstruct a one-dimensional stochastic equation to approximate the acoustic dynamical system. We apply potential analysis to acoustic fluctuations and detect several changes in the system states in the past 14 years. These are most likely caused by climatic phenomena. We analyse trends in sound pressure level within different frequency bands and hypothesize a possible anthropogenic impact on the acoustic environment. The tipping point analysis framework provides insight into the structure of the acoustic data and helps identify its dynamic phenomena, correctly reproducing the probability distribution and scaling properties (power-law correlations) of the time series.

  6. Tipping point analysis of ocean acoustic noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Livina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We apply tipping point analysis to a large record of ocean acoustic data to identify the main components of the acoustic dynamical system and study possible bifurcations and transitions of the system. The analysis is based on a statistical physics framework with stochastic modelling, where we represent the observed data as a composition of deterministic and stochastic components estimated from the data using time-series techniques. We analyse long-term and seasonal trends, system states and acoustic fluctuations to reconstruct a one-dimensional stochastic equation to approximate the acoustic dynamical system. We apply potential analysis to acoustic fluctuations and detect several changes in the system states in the past 14 years. These are most likely caused by climatic phenomena. We analyse trends in sound pressure level within different frequency bands and hypothesize a possible anthropogenic impact on the acoustic environment. The tipping point analysis framework provides insight into the structure of the acoustic data and helps identify its dynamic phenomena, correctly reproducing the probability distribution and scaling properties (power-law correlations of the time series.

  7. Acoustic signal analysis in the creeping discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamiya, T; Sonoda, Y; Tsuda, R; Ebihara, K; Ikegami, T

    2008-01-01

    We have previously succeeded in measuring the acoustic signal due to the dielectric barrier discharge and discriminating the dominant frequency components of the acoustic signal. The dominant frequency components appear over 20kHz of acoustic signal by the dielectric barrier discharge. Recently surface discharge control technology has been focused from practical applications such as ozonizer, NO X reactors, light source or display. The fundamental experiments are carried to examine the creeping discharge using the acoustic signal. When the high voltage (6kV, f = 10kHz) is applied to the electrode, the discharge current flows and the acoustic sound is generated. The current, voltage waveforms of creeping discharge and the sound signal detected by the condenser microphone are stored in the digital memory scope. In this scheme, Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) is applied to discriminate the acoustic sound of the micro discharge and the dominant frequency components are studied. CWT results of sound signal show the frequency spectrum of wideband up to 100kHz. In addition, the energy distributions of acoustic signal are examined by CWT

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing Symptoms Side Effects Keywords Questions to ask Choosing a healthcare provider ... Surgery What is acoustic neuroma Diagnosing Symptoms Side effects Question To Ask Treatment Options Back Overview Observation ...

  9. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic ... Stories Keywords Shop ANA Discussion Forum About Back Learn more about ANA About ANA Mission, Vision & Values ...

  10. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more Click to learn more... LOGIN CALENDAR DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN ... a Sponsor Patient Events Acoustic Neuroma Association Latest News Join / Renew Login Contact Us Become a Sponsor ...

  12. In Situ Acoustic Monitoring of Thermal Spray Process Using High-Frequency Impulse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Walther, Frank; Luo, Weifeng; Haack, Matthias; Nellesen, Jens; Knyazeva, Marina

    2018-01-01

    In order to guarantee their protective function, thermal spray coatings must be free from cracks, which expose the substrate surface to, e.g., corrosive media. Cracks in thermal spray coatings are usually formed because of tensile residual stresses. Most commonly, the crack occurrence is determined after the thermal spraying process by examination of metallographic cross sections of the coating. Recent efforts focus on in situ monitoring of crack formation by means of acoustic emission analysis. However, the acoustic signals related to crack propagation can be absorbed by the noise of the thermal spraying process. In this work, a high-frequency impulse measurement technique was applied to separate different acoustic sources by visualizing the characteristic signal of crack formation via quasi-real-time Fourier analysis. The investigations were carried out on a twin wire arc spraying process, utilizing FeCrBSi as a coating material. The impact of the process parameters on the acoustic emission spectrum was studied. Acoustic emission analysis enables to obtain global and integral information on the formed cracks. The coating morphology and coating defects were inspected using light microscopy on metallographic cross sections. Additionally, the resulting crack patterns were imaged in 3D by means of x-ray microtomography.

  13. An Adjoint Sensitivity Method Applied to Time Reverse Imaging of Tsunami Source for the 2009 Samoa Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Gusman, Aditya; Satake, Kenji; Cummins, Phil R.

    2018-01-01

    We have previously developed a tsunami source inversion method based on "Time Reverse Imaging" and demonstrated that it is computationally very efficient and has the ability to reproduce the tsunami source model with good accuracy using tsunami data of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami. In this paper, we implemented this approach in the 2009 Samoa earthquake tsunami triggered by a doublet earthquake consisting of both normal and thrust faulting. Our result showed that the method is quite capable of recovering the source model associated with normal and thrust faulting. We found that the inversion result is highly sensitive to some stations that must be removed from the inversion. We applied an adjoint sensitivity method to find the optimal set of stations in order to estimate a realistic source model. We found that the inversion result is improved significantly once the optimal set of stations is used. In addition, from the reconstructed source model we estimated the slip distribution of the fault from which we successfully determined the dipping orientation of the fault plane for the normal fault earthquake. Our result suggests that the fault plane dip toward the northeast.

  14. Multiple Δt strategy for particle image velocimetry (PIV) error correction, applied to a hot propulsive jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, J; Lecuona, A; Nauri, S; Legrand, M; Rodríguez, P A

    2009-01-01

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) is a measurement technique with growing application to the study of complex flows with relevance to industry. This work is focused on the assessment of some significant PIV measurement errors. In particular, procedures are proposed for estimating, and sometimes correcting, errors coming from the sensor geometry and performance, namely peak-locking and contemporary CCD camera read-out errors. Although the procedures are of general application to PIV, they are applied to a particular real case, giving an example of the methodology steps and the improvement in results that can be obtained. This real case corresponds to an ensemble of hot high-speed coaxial jets, representative of the civil transport aircraft propulsion system using turbofan engines. Errors of ∼0.1 pixels displacements have been assessed. This means 10% of the measured magnitude at many points. These results allow the uncertainty interval associated with the measurement to be provided and, under some circumstances, the correction of some of the bias components of the errors. The detection of conditions where the peak-locking error has a period of 2 pixels instead of the classical 1 pixel has been made possible using these procedures. In addition to the increased worth of the measurement, the uncertainty assessment is of interest for the validation of CFD codes

  15. Multiple Δt strategy for particle image velocimetry (PIV) error correction, applied to a hot propulsive jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, J.; Lecuona, A.; Nauri, S.; Legrand, M.; Rodríguez, P. A.

    2009-07-01

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) is a measurement technique with growing application to the study of complex flows with relevance to industry. This work is focused on the assessment of some significant PIV measurement errors. In particular, procedures are proposed for estimating, and sometimes correcting, errors coming from the sensor geometry and performance, namely peak-locking and contemporary CCD camera read-out errors. Although the procedures are of general application to PIV, they are applied to a particular real case, giving an example of the methodology steps and the improvement in results that can be obtained. This real case corresponds to an ensemble of hot high-speed coaxial jets, representative of the civil transport aircraft propulsion system using turbofan engines. Errors of ~0.1 pixels displacements have been assessed. This means 10% of the measured magnitude at many points. These results allow the uncertainty interval associated with the measurement to be provided and, under some circumstances, the correction of some of the bias components of the errors. The detection of conditions where the peak-locking error has a period of 2 pixels instead of the classical 1 pixel has been made possible using these procedures. In addition to the increased worth of the measurement, the uncertainty assessment is of interest for the validation of CFD codes.

  16. Distortion correction of echo planar images applying the concept of finite rate of innovation to point spread function mapping (FRIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rita G; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2018-01-03

    Point spread function (PSF) mapping enables estimating the displacement fields required for distortion correction of echo planar images. Recently, a highly accelerated approach was introduced for estimating displacements from the phase slope of under-sampled PSF mapping data. Sampling schemes with varying spacing were proposed requiring stepwise phase unwrapping. To avoid unwrapping errors, an alternative approach applying the concept of finite rate of innovation to PSF mapping (FRIP) is introduced, using a pattern search strategy to locate the PSF peak, and the two methods are compared. Fully sampled PSF data was acquired in six subjects at 3.0 T, and distortion maps were estimated after retrospective under-sampling. The two methods were compared for both previously published and newly optimized sampling patterns. Prospectively under-sampled data were also acquired. Shift maps were estimated and deviations relative to the fully sampled reference map were calculated. The best performance was achieved when using FRIP with a previously proposed sampling scheme. The two methods were comparable for the remaining schemes. The displacement field errors tended to be lower as the number of samples or their spacing increased. A robust method for estimating the position of the PSF peak has been introduced.

  17. Electroencephalographic evaluation of acoustic therapies for the treatment of chronic and refractory tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz María; Ibarra-Zarate, David I; Tavira-Sánchez, Francisco J; Ramírez-Mendoza, Ricardo A; Recuero, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    To date, a large number of acoustic therapies have been applied to treat tinnitus. The effect that produces those auditory stimuli is, however, not well understood yet. Furthermore, the conventional clinical protocol is based on a trial-error procedure, and there is not a formal and adequate treatment follow-up. At present, the only way to evaluate acoustic therapies is by means of subjective methods such as analog visual scale and ad-hoc questionnaires. This protocol seeks to establish an objective methodology to treat tinnitus with acoustic therapies based on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity evaluation. On the hypothesis that acoustic therapies should produce perceptual and cognitive changes at a cortical level, it is proposed to examine neural electrical activity of patients suffering from refractory and chronic tinnitus in four different stages: at the beginning of the experiment, at one week of treatment, at five weeks of treatment, and at eight weeks of treatment. Four of the most efficient acoustic therapies found at the moment are considered: retraining, auditory discrimination, enriched acoustic environment, and binaural. EEG has become a standard brain imaging tool to quantify and qualify neural oscillations, which are basically spatial, temporal, and spectral patterns associated with particular perceptual, cognitive, motor and emotional processes. Neural oscillations have been traditionally studied on the basis of event-related experiments, where time-locked and phase-locked responses (i.e., event-related potentials) along with time-locked but not necessary phase-locked responses (i.e., event-related (de) synchronization) have been essentially estimated. Both potentials and levels of synchronization related to auditory stimuli are herein proposed to assess the effect of acoustic therapies. Registration Number: ISRCTN14553550. ISRCTN Registry: BioMed Central. Date of Registration: October 31st, 2017.

  18. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  19. Acoustic Location of Lightning Using Interferometric Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erives, H.; Arechiga, R. O.; Stock, M.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.; Stringer, A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic arrays have been used to accurately locate thunder sources in lightning flashes. The acoustic arrays located around the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico produce locations which compare quite well with source locations provided by the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array. These arrays utilize 3 outer microphones surrounding a 4th microphone located at the center, The location is computed by band-passing the signal to remove noise, and then computing the cross correlating the outer 3 microphones with respect the center reference microphone. While this method works very well, it works best on signals with high signal to noise ratios; weaker signals are not as well located. Therefore, methods are being explored to improve the location accuracy and detection efficiency of the acoustic location systems. The signal received by acoustic arrays is strikingly similar to th signal received by radio frequency interferometers. Both acoustic location systems and radio frequency interferometers make coherent measurements of a signal arriving at a number of closely spaced antennas. And both acoustic and interferometric systems then correlate these signals between pairs of receivers to determine the direction to the source of the received signal. The primary difference between the two systems is the velocity of propagation of the emission, which is much slower for sound. Therefore, the same frequency based techniques that have been used quite successfully with radio interferometers should be applicable to acoustic based measurements as well. The results presented here are comparisons between the location results obtained with current cross correlation method and techniques developed for radio frequency interferometers applied to acoustic signals. The data were obtained during the summer 2013 storm season using multiple arrays sensitive to both infrasonic frequency and audio frequency acoustic emissions from lightning. Preliminary results show that

  20. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November

  1. Broadband acoustic focusing by Airy-like beams based on acoustic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di-Chao; Zhu, Xing-Feng; Wei, Qi; Wu, Da-Jian; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2018-01-01

    An acoustic metasurface (AM) composed of space-coiling subunits is proposed to generate acoustic Airy-like beams (ALBs) by manipulating the transmitted acoustic phase. The self-accelerating, self-healing, and non-diffracting features of ALBs are demonstrated using finite element simulations. We further employ two symmetrical AMs to realize two symmetrical ALBs, resulting in highly efficient acoustic focusing. At the working frequency, the focal intensity can reach roughly 20 times that of the incident wave. It is found that the highly efficient acoustic focusing can circumvent obstacles in the propagating path and can be maintained in a broad frequency bandwidth. In addition, simply changing the separation between the two AMs can modulate the focal length of the proposed AM lens. ALBs generated by AMs and the corresponding AM lens may benefit applications in medical ultrasound imaging, biomedical therapy, and particle trapping and manipulation.

  2. Application of acoustic microscopy to assessment of cardiovascular biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Hidehiko; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Tanaka, Motonao; Joergensen, Claus S.; Falk, Erling

    2002-11-01

    Acoustic microscopy provides information on physical and mechanical properties of biological tissues, while optical microscopy with various staining techniques provides chemical properties. The biomechanics of tissues is especially important in cardiovascular system because its pathophysiology is closely related with mechanical stresses such as blood pressure or blood flow. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) system with tone-burst ultrasound in the frequency range of 100-200 MHz has been developed, and attenuation and sound speed of tissues have been measured. In human coronary arteries, attenuation and sound speed were high in calcification and collagen, while both values were low in smooth muscle and lipid. Another SAM system with 800-MHz-1.3-GHz ultrasound was applied for aortas of Apo-E deficient mouse, which is known to develop atherosclerosis. Attenuation of ultrasound was significantly higher in type 1 collagen compared to type 3 collagen. Recently, a new type FFT-SAM using a single-pulse, broadband frequency range ultrasound (20-150 MHz) has been developed. Cardiac allograft was observed by FFT-SAM and the acoustic properties were able to grade allograft rejection. SAM provides very useful information for assessing cardiovascular biomechanics and for understanding normal and abnormal images of clinical ultrasound.

  3. A sound future for acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummer, Steven

    2017-05-01

    The field of acoustic metamaterials borrowed ideas from electromagnetics and optics to create engineered structures that exhibit desired fluid or fluid-like properties for the propagation of sound. These metamaterials offer the possibility of manipulating and controlling sound waves in ways that are challenging or impossible with conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. And active acoustic metamaterials use external control and power to create effective material properties that are fundamentally not possible with passive structures. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and, critically, converting exciting laboratory experiments into practically useful devices. In this presentation, I will outline the recent history of the field, describe some of the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters, discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound, and finally, provide a personal perspective on future directions in the field.

  4. High interstitial fluid pressure is associated with low tumour penetration of diagnostic monoclonal antibodies applied for molecular imaging purposes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Heine

    Full Text Available The human epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM is highly expressed in a variety of clinical tumour entities. Although an antibody against EpCAM has successfully been used as an adjuvant therapy in colon cancer, this therapy has never gained wide-spread use. We have therefore investigated the possibilities and limitations for EpCAM as possible molecular imaging target using a panel of preclinical cancer models. Twelve human cancer cell lines representing six tumour entities were tested for their EpCAM expression by qPCR, flow cytometry analysis and immunocytochemistry. In addition, EpCAM expression was analyzed in vivo in xenograft models for tumours derived from these cells. Except for melanoma, all cell lines expressed EpCAM mRNA and protein when grown in vitro. Although they exhibited different mRNA levels, all cell lines showed similar EpCAM protein levels upon detection with monoclonal antibodies. When grown in vivo, the EpCAM expression was unaffected compared to in vitro except for the pancreatic carcinoma cell line 5072 which lost its EpCAM expression in vivo. Intravenously applied radio-labelled anti EpCAM MOC31 antibody was enriched in HT29 primary tumour xenografts indicating that EpCAM binding sites are accessible in vivo. However, bound antibody could only be immunohistochemically detected in the vicinity of perfused blood vessels. Investigation of the fine structure of the HT29 tumour blood vessels showed that they were immature and prone for higher fluid flux into the interstitial space. Consistent with this hypothesis, a higher interstitial fluid pressure of about 12 mbar was measured in the HT29 primary tumour via "wick-in-needle" technique which could explain the limited diffusion of the antibody into the tumour observed by immunohistochemistry.

  5. Edge detection applied to Cassini images reveals no measurable displacement of Ontario Lacus' margin between 2005 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Thomas; Bourgeois, Olivier; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Sotin, Christophe; Barnes, Jason W.; Brown, Robert H.; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger N.; Nicholson, Phillip D.

    2012-07-01

    Ontario Lacus is thus far the largest flat-floored topographic depression of Titan's southern hemisphere interpreted as a permanent or ephemeral lake. From 2005 to 2010, it was imaged several times and at various wavelengths by ISS, VIMS and RADAR instruments onboard Cassini's spacecraft. We analyze the position and uncertainty of Ontario Lacus' margin in all these images using an edge detection method based on image derivation. We find that, given the range of uncertainties in contour locations derived from images, no measurable displacement of Ontario Lacus' margin can be detected between 2005 and 2010 at the actual image spatial resolutions. The discrepancy between this result and previous ones is attributable to differences in (1) the basics behind the methods used, (2) the actual spatial resolutions and contrasts of the available images due to differential atmospheric scattering effects at different wavelengths, and (3) the geomorphological interpretation of contours derived from images acquired at different wavelengths. This lack of measurable displacement in the images suggests that the imaged contour corresponds either (1) to the border of a surface liquid body, provided that potential changes in its extent over five terrestrial years were not sufficiently large to be measured, or (2) to the stationary topographic border between Ontario Lacus' depression and the surrounding alluvial plain. Potential displacements of Ontario Lacus' margin between 2005 and 2010 are thus below the actual resolution of currently available images or have to be sought for within the extent of the topographic depression rather than along its borders.

  6. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  7. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Han, Xiaole; Xia, Dong; Liu, Taolin; Lang, Hao

    2018-01-13

    Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  8. Preface to Special Topic: Acoustic Metamaterials and Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouar, Badreddine

    2018-03-01

    The advent of acoustic metamaterials in the beginning of 2000s and very recently of acoustic metasurfaces has created tremendous excitement and efforts in the field of materials science and physics by introducing and building real transformative research and dealing with unprecedented physics and applications. The acoustic/elastic metamaterials and metasurfaces, which can simply be described as designed artificial materials with unusual physical properties, form the core of the present Special Topic published by the Journal of Applied Physics.

  9. Acoustic reciprocity: An extension to spherical harmonics domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinghe, Prasanga; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Kellermann, Walter

    2017-10-01

    Acoustic reciprocity is a fundamental property of acoustic wavefields that is commonly used to simplify the measurement process of many practical applications. Traditionally, the reciprocity theorem is defined between a monopole point source and a point receiver. Intuitively, it must apply to more complex transducers than monopoles. In this paper, the authors formulate the acoustic reciprocity theory in the spherical harmonics domain for directional sources and directional receivers with higher order directivity patterns.

  10. Contrast enhancement of ultrasonic imaging of internal stresses in materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Michal; Plesek, Jirí

    2002-05-01

    The ultrasonic methods, which detect applied or residual stress in materials, are based on nonlinear interaction of a small dynamic disturbance (acoustic waves) with the pre-deformed state of the solid. This weak phenomenon (acoustoelasticity) leads to a dependence of acoustic wave velocities on the initial stress, and a stress-induced anisotropy in the acoustical properties of the material. In anisotropic media, the transversal wave velocity depends on its polarization. The amplitude of the conical polarized shear wave, propagating through a plate specimen, is sensitive to pre-stress due to acoustoelastic birefringence. The resulting scan image is created by variations of the amplitude. The previous description is a basic principle of the approach used for stress mapping in Al-alloys by time-resolved acoustic microscopy. Disk specimens with central stress concentrators are loaded step by step. The acoustic scans are created during each loading step. Thermal stress detection is also shown on specimens with an Invar core. The original image processing procedure has been developed to improve edge detection of obtained stress maps. The acoustic images are compared with theoretically predicted isocline contours. The inherent material anisotropy and the structural inhomogeneities influence significantly the acoustoelastic measurements. Advantages and limitations of the nondestructive technique are summarized on the basis of presented experimental results.

  11. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-04-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish

  12. Digital Holography and 3D Imaging: introduction to the joint feature issue in Applied Optics and Journal of the Optical Society of America A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hoonjong; Lee, Byoungho; Kozacki, Tomasz; Picart, Pascal; Situ, Guohai

    2018-01-01

    The OSA Topical Meeting on Digital Holography and 3D Imaging (DH) was held 29 May to 1 June 2017 on Jeju Island, South Korea. Feature issues based on the DH meeting series have been released by Applied Optics (AO) since 2007. This year, AO and the Journal of the Optical Society of America A (JOSA A) jointly decided to have one such feature issue in each journal. This feature issue includes 33 papers in AO and 9 in JOSA A and covers a large range of topics, reflecting the rapidly expanding techniques and applications of digital holography and 3D imaging. The upcoming DH meeting (DH 2018) will be held 25-28 June 2018 in Orlando, Florida, as part of the OSA Imaging and Applied Optics Congress.

  13. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  14. Acoustic energy harvesting based on multilateral metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuibao; Assouar, Badreddine

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically and numerically report on an innovative acoustic energy harvester based on acoustic multilateral metasurfaces and a piezoelectric bimorph. The coiling-up-space concept realized by labyrinthine units is applied to achieve the desired phase profiles for the acoustic focusing and energy confinement. The acoustic energy confined by the metasurfaces from a point source is converted into electrical energy by a structured piezoelectric bimorph. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis evidenced that the output voltage and power drastically increase with the sides of the multilateral metasurface energy harvesting system. Maximum output voltage and power 52 and 407 times higher than those under the case without metasurfaces are achieved with enclosed multilateral metasurface design.

  15. Modern methods in analytical acoustics lecture notes

    CERN Document Server

    Crighton, D G; Williams, J E Ffowcs; Heckl, M; Leppington, F G

    1992-01-01

    Modern Methods in Analytical Acoustics considers topics fundamental to the understanding of noise, vibration and fluid mechanisms. The series of lectures on which this material is based began by some twenty five years ago and has been developed and expanded ever since. Acknowledged experts in the field have given this course many times in Europe and the USA. Although the scope of the course has widened considerably, the primary aim of teaching analytical techniques of acoustics alongside specific areas of wave motion and unsteady fluid mechanisms remains. The distinguished authors of this volume are drawn from Departments of Acoustics, Engineering of Applied Mathematics in Berlin, Cambridge and London. Their intention is to reach a wider audience of all those concerned with acoustic analysis than has been able to attend the course.

  16. Acoustic Power Transmission Through a Ducted Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envia, Ed

    2016-01-01

    For high-speed ducted fans, when the rotor flowfield is shock-free, the main contribution to the inlet radiated acoustic power comes from the portion of the rotor stator interaction sound field that is transmitted upstream through the rotor. As such, inclusion of the acoustic transmission is an essential ingredient in the prediction of the fan inlet noise when the fan tip relative speed is subsonic. This paper describes a linearized Euler based approach to computing the acoustic transmission of fan tones through the rotor. The approach is embodied in a code called LINFLUX was applied to a candidate subsonic fan called the Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP). The results from this study suggest that it is possible to make such prediction with sufficient fidelity to provide an indication of the acoustic transmission trends with the fan tip speed.

  17. Applying ethical and legal principles to new technology: the University of Auckland Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences' policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Monique; Malpas, Phillipa; Kersey, Kate; Merry, Alan; Bagg, Warwick

    2017-01-27

    To develop a policy governing the taking and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. The Rules of the Health Information Privacy Code 1994 and the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers' Rights were applied to the taking, storing and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. Stakeholders, including clinicians, medical students, lawyers at district health boards in the Auckland region, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and the Health and Disability Commissioner were consulted and their recommendations incorporated. The policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients' sets expectations of students in relation to: photographs taken for the purpose of providing care; photographs taken for educational or professional practice purposes and photographic or radiological images used for educational or professional practice purposes. In addition, it prohibits students from uploading images of patients onto image-sharing apps such as Figure 1. The policy has since been extended to apply to all students at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. Technology-driven evolutions in practice necessitate regular review to ensure compliance with existing legal regulations and ethical frameworks. This policy offers a starting point for healthcare providers to review their own policies and practice, with a view to ensuring that patients' trust in the treatment that their health information receives is upheld.

  18. Image processing applied to automatic detection of defects during ultrasonic examination; Imagerie numerique ultrasonore pour la detection automatique de defauts en controle non destructif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moysan, J.

    1992-10-01

    This work is a study about image processing applied to ultrasonic BSCAN images which are obtained in the field of non destructive testing of weld. The goal is to define what image processing techniques can bring to ameliorate the exploitation of the data collected and, more precisely, what image processing can do to extract the meaningful echoes which enable to characterize and to size the defects. The report presents non destructive testing by ultrasounds in the nuclear field and it indicates specificities of the propagation of ultrasonic waves in austenitic weld. It gives a state of the art of the data processing applied to ultrasonic images in nondestructive evaluation. A new image analysis is then developed. It is based on a powerful tool, the co-occurrence matrix. This matrix enables to represent, in a whole representation, relations between amplitudes of couples of pixels. From the matrix analysis, a new complete and automatic method has been set down in order to define a threshold which separates echoes from noise. An automatic interpretation of the ultrasonic echoes is then possible. Complete validation has been done with standard pieces.

  19. Acoustic telemetry and fisheries management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossin, Glenn T.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Holbrook, Christopher; Hussey, Nigel E.; Lowerre-Barbieri, Susan K; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Raby, Graham D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of acoustic telemetry as a tool for addressing issues in fisheries management, and serves as the lead to the special Feature Issue of Ecological Applications titled “Acoustic Telemetry and Fisheries Management”. Specifically, we provide an overview of the ways in which acoustic telemetry can be used to inform issues central to the ecology, conservation, and management of exploited and/or imperiled fish species. Despite great strides in this area in recent years, there are comparatively few examples where data have been applied directly to influence fisheries management and policy. We review the literature on this issue, identify the strengths and weaknesses of work done to date, and highlight knowledge gaps and difficulties in applying empirical fish telemetry studies to fisheries policy and practice. We then highlight the key areas of management and policy addressed, as well as the challenges that needed to be overcome to do this. We conclude with a set of recommendations about how researchers can, in consultation with stock assessment scientists and managers, formulate testable scientific questions to address and design future studies to generate data that can be used in a meaningful way by fisheries management and conservation practitioners. We also urge the involvement of relevant stakeholders (managers, fishers, conservation societies, etc.) early on in the process (i.e. in the co-creation of research projects), so that all priority questions and issues can be addressed effectively.

  20. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    This thesis presents studies of boundary-driven acoustic streaming in microfluidic channels, which is a steady flow of the fluid initiated by the interactions of an oscillating acoustic standing wave and the rigid walls of the microchannel. The studies present analysis of the acoustic resonance......, the acoustic streaming flow, and the forces on suspended microparticles. The work is motivated by the application of particle focusing by acoustic radiation forces in medical, environmental and food sciences. Here acoustic streaming is most often unwanted, because it limits the focusability of particles...... oscillating plates. Furthermore, under general thermodynamic conditions, we derive the time-dependent first- and second-order equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The coupling from fluid equations to particle motion is achieved through the expressions for the streaming-induced drag...

  1. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  2. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  3. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise i...... in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.......A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise...

  4. Surface acoustic wave electric field effect on acoustic streaming: Numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darinskii, A. N.; Weihnacht, M.; Schmidt, H.

    2018-01-01

    The paper numerically studies the contribution of the electric field accompanying the surface acoustic wave to the actuation of the acoustic streaming in microchannels. The finite element method is used. The results obtained as applied to the surface waves on 128° and 64°-rotated Y cuts of LiNbO3 demonstrate that the force created by the electric field is capable of accelerating appreciably the acoustic streaming. In particular, examples are given for the situations where the electric field increases the streaming velocity by a factor of about 2-3 and significantly changes the flow pattern as compared to predictions of computations ignoring the electric field.

  5. Agorá Acoustics - Effects of arcades on the acoustics of public squares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paini, Dario; Gade, Anders Christian; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    and the receivers were positioned in the open square as well as in the arcades (making four different combinations).The results show that, when adding arcades to an open square, an increase in reverberation time is observed: a criterion is studied to predict in which cases arcades have this effect. Arcades can also......This paper is part of a PhD work, dealing with the acoustics of the public squares (‘Agorá Acoustics’), especially when music (amplified or not) is played. Consequently, our approach will be to evaluate public squares using the same set of acoustics concepts for subjective evaluation and objective...... measurements as applied for concert halls and theatres. In this paper the acoustical effects of arcades will be studied, in terms of reverberation (EDT and T30), clarity (C80), intelligibility (STI) and other acoustical parameters. For this purpose, also the theory of coupled rooms is applied and compared...

  6. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    analysis was conducted on the North Pacific Acoustics Laboratory Philippine Sea tests 2009 and 2010, both of which Dr. Heaney participated as a co-chief...obtained from the ambient noise field. In underwater acoustics , this travel time strongly depends on the depth and temperature and to a lesser extent...et al. 2012) and underwater volcanoes (Green at al. 2013). Guided wave propagation contributes to the limited acoustical attenuation by the SOFAR

  7. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  8. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...

  9. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  10. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  11. Laboratory for Structural Acoustics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where acoustic radiation, scattering, and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures are...

  12. Comment on paper entitled, "An inversion of Freedman's 'image pulse' model in air". Acoust. Soc. Am. 119(2), 965-975 (2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickling, Robert; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C

    2006-08-01

    Echolocation (i.e., perceiving objects using acoustic echoes) is well-known in underwater detection and to a lesser extent in robot guidance and machine perception. The paper by Tsakiris and McKerrow is concerned with machine perception in air using Freedman's asymptotic model, which was originally developed to predict the backscattering multiple-echo effect observed in sonar detection. This effect was subsequently shown to be due to the elastic response of underwater targets. Freedman's model can be used in air because the acoustic target is assumed to be rigid. Also, the model's prediction of multiple echoes can be used to obtain information about the shape of the target. This is the so-called inversion of the Freedman model by Tsakiris and McKerrow. In their paper, various simple bodies are tested in air using ultrasound and it is shown that the model provides relatively poor information about body shape. Several explanations are given. However, one explanation is not considered, namely that the model itself is not satisfactory. First, there is poor agreement with exact backscattering theory. Second, deriving information about target shape from the multiple echoes predicted by the model is a highly questionable procedure. Both these aspects are examined here.

  13. Correlation peak analysis applied to a sequence of images using two different filters for eye tracking model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrón, Verónica A.; Álvarez Borrego, Josué; Coronel Beltrán, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    Eye tracking has many useful applications that range from biometrics to face recognition and human-computer interaction. The analysis of the characteristics of the eyes has become one of the methods to accomplish the location of the eyes and the tracking of the point of gaze. Characteristics such as the contrast between the iris and the sclera, the shape, and distribution of colors and dark/light zones in the area are the starting point for these analyses. In this work, the focus will be on the contrast between the iris and the sclera, performing a correlation in the frequency domain. The images are acquired with an ordinary camera, which with were taken images of thirty-one volunteers. The reference image is an image of the subjects looking to a point in front of them at 0° angle. Then sequences of images are taken with the subject looking at different angles. These images are processed in MATLAB, obtaining the maximum correlation peak for each image, using two different filters. Each filter were analyzed and then one was selected, which is the filter that gives the best performance in terms of the utility of the data, which is displayed in graphs that shows the decay of the correlation peak as the eye moves progressively at different angle. This data will be used to obtain a mathematical model or function that establishes a relationship between the angle of vision (AOV) and the maximum correlation peak (MCP). This model will be tested using different input images from other subject not contained in the initial database, being able to predict angle of vision using the maximum correlation peak data.

  14. High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-18

    can be tested against theory, practicality of computational methods can be determined, and studies of underwater acoustics phenomena can be...Administrative Grants Officer Vbefense Techllical Information Office Naval Research Laboratory Grant and Contract Services (WHOI) AOPE Department Office...distribution is unlimited. ONR DURIP Grant Final Report High Performance Computing Assets for Ocean Acoustics Research Timothy F. Dud a Applied Ocean

  15. Acoustic Tweezing and Patterning of Concentration Fields in Microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    that weakly perturb the fluid density and speed of sound is presented and applied to study manipulation of concentration fields in rectangular-channel acoustic eigenmodes and in Bessel-function acoustic vortices. In the first example, methods to obtain horizontal and vertical multilayer stratification...

  16. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy for the advanced undergraduate laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Villafañe, J. A.; Flores-Olmedo, E.; Báez, G.; Gandarilla-Carrillo, O.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2012-11-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the principles and applications of spectroscopy. The technique, known as acoustic resonance spectroscopy, is applied to study a vibrating rod. The setup includes electromagnetic-acoustic transducers, an audio amplifier and a vector network analyzer. Typical results of compressional, torsional and bending waves are analyzed and compared with analytical results.

  17. Acoustic shadows help gleaning bats find prey, but may be defeated by prey acoustic camouflage on rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Elizabeth L; Holderied, Marc W

    2015-09-01

    Perceptual abilities of animals, like echolocating bats, are difficult to study because they challenge our understanding of non-visual senses. We used novel acoustic tomography to convert echoes into visual representations and compare these cues to traditional echo measurements. We provide a new hypothesis for the echo-acoustic basis of prey detection on surfaces. We propose that bats perceive a change in depth profile and an 'acoustic shadow' cast by prey. The shadow is more salient than prey echoes and particularly strong on smooth surfaces. This may explain why bats look for prey on flat surfaces like leaves using scanning behaviour. We propose that rather than forming search images for prey, whose characteristics are unpredictable, predators may look for disruptions to the resting surface (acoustic shadows). The fact that the acoustic shadow is much fainter on rougher resting surfaces provides the first empirical evidence for 'acoustic camouflage' as an anti-predator defence mechanism.

  18. Principles and effects of acoustic cavitation - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina GÂMBUŢEANU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, food industry has shown a real interest in ultrasound use because of its effect on physical, biochemical and microbial properties of food systems. In order to better understand how the acoustic cavity effects could be best applied in food industry, a review on acoustic cavitation and its effects was done. The present paper describes in detail the basic principles underlying the effects of ultrasounds on food processing applications. It also provides theoretical background on acoustic cavitation and ultrasound production method. Moreover, harnessing mechanic, optic, chemical and biological effects of acoustic cavitation in food industry were briefly highlighted.

  19. Dynamics of acoustic-convective drying of sunflower cake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The dynamics of drying sunflower cake by a new acoustic-convective method has been studied. Unlike the conventional (thermal-convective) method, the proposed method allows moisture to be extracted from porous materials without applying heat to the sample to be dried. Kinetic curves of drying by the thermal-convective and acoustic-convective methods were obtained and analyzed. The advantages of the acoustic-convective extraction of moisture over the thermal-convective method are discussed. The relaxation times of drying were determined for both drying methods. An intermittent drying mode which improves the efficiency of acoustic-convective extraction of moisture is considered.

  20. High dynamic range ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Perrin, Douglas P; Howe, Robert D

    2018-03-16

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is a popular computational photography technique that has found its way into every modern smartphone and camera. In HDR imaging, images acquired at different exposures are combined to increase the luminance range of the final image, thereby extending the limited dynamic range of the camera. Ultrasound imaging suffers from limited dynamic range as well; at higher power levels, the hyperechogenic tissue is overexposed, whereas at lower power levels, hypoechogenic tissue details are not visible. In this work, we apply HDR techniques to ultrasound imaging, where we combine ultrasound images acquired at different power levels to improve the level of detail visible in the final image. Ultrasound images of ex vivo and in vivo tissue are acquired at different acoustic power levels and then combined to generate HDR ultrasound (HDR-US) images. The performance of five tone mapping operators is quantitatively evaluated using a similarity metric to determine the most suitable mapping for HDR-US imaging. The ex vivo and in vivo results demonstrated that HDR-US imaging enables visualizing both hyper- and hypoechogenic tissue at once in a single image. The Durand tone mapping operator preserved the most amount of detail across the dynamic range. Our results strongly suggest that HDR-US imaging can improve the utility of ultrasound in image-based diagnosis and procedure guidance.