WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic field produced

  1. Customization of the acoustic field produced by a piezoelectric array through interelement delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Barbone, Paul E.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2008-01-01

    A method for producing a prescribed acoustic pressure field from a piezoelectric array was investigated. The array consisted of 170 elements placed on the inner surface of a 15 cm radius spherical cap. Each element was independently driven by using individual pulsers each capable of generating 1.2 kV. Acoustic field customization was achieved by independently controlling the time when each element was excited. The set of time delays necessary to produce a particular acoustic field was determined by using an optimization scheme. The acoustic field at the focal plane was simulated by using the angular spectrum method, and the optimization searched for the time delays that minimized the least squared difference between the magnitudes of the simulated and desired pressure fields. The acoustic field was shaped in two different ways: the −6 dB focal width was increased to different desired widths and the ring-shaped pressure distributions of various prescribed diameters were produced. For both cases, the set of delays resulting from the respective optimization schemes were confirmed to yield the desired pressure distributions by using simulations and measurements. The simulations, however, predicted peak positive pressures roughly half those obtained from the measurements, which was attributed to the exclusion of nonlinearity in the simulations. PMID:18537369

  2. Room Acoustical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mechel, Fridolin

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the theory of room acoustical fields and revises the Mirror Source Methods for practical computational use, emphasizing the wave character of acoustical fields.  The presented higher methods include the concepts of “Mirror Point Sources” and “Corner sources which allow for an excellent approximation of complex room geometries and even equipped rooms. In contrast to classical description, this book extends the theory of sound fields describing them by their complex sound pressure and the particle velocity. This approach enables accurate descriptions of interference and absorption phenomena.

  3. Comparison of acoustic fields produced by the original and upgraded HM-3 lithotripter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Zhu, Songlin; Dreyer, Thomas; Liebler, Marko; Zhong, Pei

    2003-10-01

    To reduce tissue injury in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) while maintaining satisfactory stone comminution, an original HM-3 lithotripter was upgraded by a reflector insert to suppress large intraluminal bubble expansion, which is a primary mechanism of vascular injury in SWL. The pressure waveforms produced by the original and upgraded HM-3 lithotripter were measured by using a fiber optical probe hydrophone (FOPH), which was scanned both along and transverse to the lithotripter axis at 1-mm step using a computer-controlled 3-D positioning system. At F2, the pressure waveform produced by the upgraded HM-3 lithotripter at 22 kV has a distinct dual-pulse structure, with a leading shock wave of ~45 MPa from the reflector insert and a 4-μs delayed second pulse of ~15 MPa reflected from the uncovered bottom surface of the original HM-3 reflector. The beam sizes of the original and upgraded HM-3 lithotripter are comparable in both axial and lateral directions. The pressure waveforms measured at the reflector aperture will be used as input to the KZK equation to predict the lithotripter shock wave at F2. Furthermore, bubble dynamics predicted by the Gilmore model will be compared with experimental observation by high-speed imaging. [Work supported by NIH.

  4. Acoustic field modulation in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J. Y.; Wang, W.; Luo, E. C.; Chen, Y. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The regenerator is a key component that transfers energy between heat and work. The conversion efficiency is significantly influenced by the acoustic field in the regenerator. Much effort has been spent to quantitatively determine this influence, but few comprehensive experimental verifications have been performed because of difficulties in modulating and measuring the acoustic field. In this paper, a method requiring two compressors is introduced and theoretically investigated that achieves acoustic field modulation in the regenerator. One compressor outputs the acoustic power for the regenerator; the other acts as a phase shifter. A RC load dissipates the acoustic power out of both the regenerator and the latter compressor. The acoustic field can be modulated by adjusting the current in the two compressors and opening the RC load. The acoustic field is measured with pressure sensors instead of flow-field imaging equipment, thereby greatly simplifying the experiment.

  5. Use of acoustic field in gas cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaud, D.; Madelaine, G.; Malherbe, C.

    1985-01-01

    The use of acoustic field in gas cleaning can be done in two ways: the first is the conditioning of an aerosol by acoustic agglomeration before filtration by conventional methods (cyclones, granular beds, etc.), the second is the collection efficiency improvement of granular bed filters exposed to an acoustic field. In a first part, experimental results are given on the acoustic agglomeration of a polydisperse aerosol of mass concentration between 0.5 and 1 g/m 3 . An important effect of wall precipitation of particles is described and deposition velocity due to the presence of an acoustic field are measured as a function of particle diameter, sound pressure level and acoustic frequency. A dimensionless relationship between the deposition velocity and particle relaxation time is established for these results. At the end of this part energetic criteria for the use of acoustic agglomeration in a gas cleaning train is given. In a second part, experimental results are given to the influence of acoustic field on the collection efficiency of monodispersed aerosols ranging from 0.1 to 1 μm. For these both uses of acoustic field in industrial gas cleaning the different alternatives for the acoustic field generation are discussed

  6. Aerosol behaviour in an acoustic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, C.

    1985-01-01

    The average size of an aerosol submitted to acoustic waves is increased. This results from coagulation of the finest particles on the largest ones. The mechanisms responsible for acoustic agglomeration are mentioned. An experimental apparatus was developed in order to control the evolution of aerosol distribution in an acoustic field. Important deposition on the walls of the agglomeration chamber was observed as a consequence of the acoustically induced turbulent flow. Finally, a dimensionless relationship was established between deposition rates and particle diameters as a function of experimental parameters (aeraulic and acoustic conditions, etc...) [fr

  7. Optical measurement of acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation through transparent object

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Satoshi; Furusawa, Toshiaki; Sasao, Yasuhiro; Katsura, Kogure; Naoki, Kondo

    2013-01-01

    It is known that macroscopic objects can be levitated for few to several hundred micrometers by near-field acoustic field and this phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). Although there are various experiments conducted to measure integrated acoustic pressure on the object surface, up to now there was no direct method to measure pressure distribution. In this study we measured the acoustic radiation pressure of the near-field acoustic levitation via pressure-sensitive paint.

  8. Vapor Bubbles in Flow and Acoustic Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosperetti, Andrea; Hao, Yue; Sadhal, S.S

    2002-01-01

    A review of several aspects of the interaction of bubbles with acoustic and flow fields is presented. The focus of the paper is on bubbles in hot liquids, in which the bubble contains mostly vapor, with little or no permanent gas. The topics covered include the effect of translation on condensation

  9. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  10. Supersonic acoustic intensity with statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    The concept of supersonic acoustic intensity was introduced some years ago for estimating the fraction of the flow of energy radiated by a source that propagates to the far field. It differs from the usual (active) intensity by excluding the near-field energy resulting from evanescent waves...... to the information provided by the near-field acoustic holography technique. This study proposes a version of the supersonic acoustic intensity applied to statistically optimized near-field acoustic holography (SONAH). The theory, numerical results and an experimental study are presented. The possibility of using...

  11. Introducing passive matched field acoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, O.; Camporeale, C.; Crise, A.

    1997-01-01

    In acoustic tomography sea-basin environmental parameters such as temperature profiles and current-velocities are derived, when ray propagation models are adopted, by the travel time estimates relative to the identifiable ray paths. The transmitted signals are either single frequency, or impulsive, or intermittent and deterministic. When the wavelength is comparable with the scale lengths present in the propagation scenario, Matched Field Tomography (MFT) is used, entailing the consideration of waveguide modes instead of rays. A new concept in tomography is introduced in the paper, that employs passively the noise emitted by ships of opportunity (cargoes, ferries) as source signals. The passive technique is acoustic-pollution-free, and if a basin is selected in which a regular ship traffic occurs data can be received on a regular schedule, with no transmission cost. A novel array pre-processor for passive tomography is introduced, such that the signal structure at the pre-processor output in nearly the same as that obtainable in the case of single-frequency source signals

  12. Dynamics of levitated objects in acoustic vortex fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Yin, J F; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wang, W L; Zhang, J; Drinkwater, Bruce W

    2017-08-02

    Acoustic levitation in gaseous media provides a tool to process solid and liquid materials without the presence of surfaces such as container walls and hence has been used widely in chemical analysis, high-temperature processing, drop dynamics and bioreactors. To date high-density objects can only be acoustically levitated in simple standing-wave fields. Here we demonstrate the ability of a small number of peripherally placed sources to generate acoustic vortex fields and stably levitate a wide range of liquid and solid objects. The forces exerted by these acoustic vortex fields on a levitated water droplet are observed to cause a controllable deformation of the droplet and/or oscillation along the vortex axis. Orbital angular momentum transfer is also shown to rotate a levitated object rapidly and the rate of rotation can be controlled by the source amplitude. We expect this research can increase the diversity of acoustic levitation and expand the application of acoustic vortices.

  13. Study of aerosol behaviour in an acoustic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, C.

    1988-01-01

    The average size of an aerosol submitted to acoustic waves is increased. This results from coagulation of the finer particles on the larger ones. An experimental apparatus was developed in order to control the evolution of aerosol distribution in an acoustic field. Important deposition on the walls of the agglomeration chamber was observed as a consequence of the acoustically induced turbulent flow. Consequently, we experimentally evaluated the turbulent properties of the system. A granular bed submitted to an acoustic field and set downstream an agglomerator constitutes an almost absolute filter for an usually penetrating aerosol [fr

  14. Diving with microparticles in acoustic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Sound can move particles. A good example of this phenomenon is the Chladni plate, in which an acoustic wave is induced in a metallic plate and particles migrate to the nodes of the acoustic wave. For several years, acoustophoresis has been used to manipulate microparticles in microscopic scales...

  15. Diversity of acoustic streaming in a rectangular acoustofluidic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiang; Hu, Junhui

    2015-04-01

    Diversity of acoustic streaming field in a 2D rectangular chamber with a traveling wave and using water as the acoustic medium is numerically investigated by the finite element method. It is found that the working frequency, the vibration excitation source length, and the distance and phase difference between two separated symmetric vibration excitation sources can cause the diversity in the acoustic streaming pattern. It is also found that a small object in the acoustic field results in an additional eddy, and affects the eddy size in the acoustic streaming field. In addition, the computation results show that with an increase of the acoustic medium's temperature, the speed of the main acoustic streaming decreases first and then increases, and the angular velocity of the corner eddies increases monotonously, which can be clearly explained by the change of the acoustic dissipation factor and shearing viscosity of the acoustic medium with temperature. Commercialized FEM software COMSOL Multiphysics is used to implement the computation tasks, which makes our method very easy to use. And the computation method is partially verified by an established analytical solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Patch near-field acoustic holography: The influence of acoustic contributions from outside the source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Zhang, Yong-Bin

    2009-01-01

    It is a requirement of conventional Near-field Acoustic Holography that the measurement area covers the entire surface of the source. In the case of Patch Near-field Acoustic Holography (patch NAH), the measurement area can be reduced to cover only a specific area of the source which...... is of particular interest (known as the “patch” or “source patch”). The area of the source beyond this patch is not of interest in the analysis. However, its acoustic output may nevertheless contribute to the total sound field in the measurement plane, and influence the reconstruction of the field close...... to the patch. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the acoustic radiation from outside the patch area influences the reconstruction of the sound field close to the source. The reconstruction is based on simulated measurements of sound pressure and particle velocity. The methods used in this paper...

  17. Acoustic Tweezing and Patterning of Concentration Fields in Microfluidics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Bruus, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    that weakly perturb the fluid density and speed of sound is presented and applied to study manipulation of concentration fields in rectangular-channel acoustic eigenmodes and in Bessel-function acoustic vortices. In the first example, methods to obtain horizontal and vertical multilayer stratification...

  18. Acoustic Characterization of a Stationary Field Synchronous Motor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woodward, E

    2001-01-01

    .... We investigate the gross acoustic signature of a notional stationary field synchronous motor utilized as a marine propulsion motor in a naval combatant using the following methodology: (1) model the forces...

  19. Non-contact transportation using near-field acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueha; Hashimoto; Koike

    2000-03-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation, where planar objects 10 kg in weight can levitate stably near the vibrating plate, is successfully applied both to non-contact transportation of objects and to a non-contact ultrasonic motor. Transporting apparatuses and an ultrasonic motor have been fabricated and their characteristics measured. The theory of near-field acoustic levitation both for a piston-like sound source and a flexural vibration source is also briefly described.

  20. Dynamics of indirect exciton transport by moving acoustic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violante, A; Lazić, S; Hey, R; Santos, P V; Cohen, K; Rapaport, R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the modulation of indirect excitons (IXs) as well as their transport by moving periodic potentials produced by surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The potential modulation induced by the SAW strain modifies both the band gap and the electrostatic field in the quantum wells confining the IXs, leading to changes in their energy. In addition, this potential captures and transports IXs over several hundreds of μm. While the IX packets keep to a great extent their spatial shape during transport by the moving potential, the effective transport velocity is lower than the SAW group velocity and increases with the SAW amplitude. This behavior is attributed to the capture of IXs by traps along the transport path, thereby increasing the IX transit time. The experimental results are well-reproduced by an analytical model for the interaction between trapping centers and IXs during transport. (paper)

  1. Acoustic Force Density Acting on Inhomogeneous Fluids in Acoustic Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Augustsson, Per; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    , the theory predicts a relocation of the inhomogeneities into stable field-dependent configurations, which are qualitatively different from the horizontally layered configurations due to gravity. Experimental validation is obtained by confocal imaging of aqueous solutions in a glass-silicon microchip....

  2. Characterization of the acoustic field generated by a horn shaped ultrasonic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B.; Lerch, J. E.; Chavan, A. H.; Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Suthar, K. J.; DiChiara, A. D.

    2017-09-01

    A horn shaped Langevin ultrasonic transducer used in a single axis levitator was characterized to better understand the role of the acoustic profile in establishing stable traps. The method of characterization included acoustic beam profiling performed by raster scanning an ultrasonic microphone as well as finite element analysis of the horn and its interface with the surrounding air volume. The results of the model are in good agreement with measurements and demonstrate the validity of the approach for both near and far field analyses. Our results show that this style of transducer produces a strong acoustic beam with a total divergence angle of 10°, a near-field point close to the transducer surface and a virtual sound source. These are desirable characteristics for a sound source used for acoustic trapping experiments.

  3. Characterization of the acoustic field generated by a horn shaped ultrasonic transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, B.; Lerch, J. E.; Chavan, A. H.; Weber, J. K. R.; Tamalonis, A.; Suthar, K. J.; DiChiara, A. D.

    2017-09-04

    A horn shaped Langevin ultrasonic transducer used in a single axis levitator was characterized to better understand the role of the acoustic profile in establishing stable traps. The method of characterization included acoustic beam profiling performed by raster scanning an ultrasonic microphone as well as finite element analysis of the horn and its interface with the surrounding air volume. The results of the model are in good agreement with measurements and demonstrate the validity of the approach for both near and far field analyses. Our results show that this style of transducer produces a strong acoustic beam with a total divergence angle of 10 degree, a near-field point close to the transducer surface and a virtual sound source. These are desirable characteristics for a sound source used for acoustic trapping experiments

  4. NEAR- AND FAR-FIELD RESPONSE TO COMPACT ACOUSTIC SOURCES IN STRATIFIED CONVECTION ZONES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cally, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the acoustic continuum associated with compact sources in the Sun's interior wave field is explored for a simple polytropic model. The continuum produces a near-field acoustic structure—the so-called acoustic jacket—that cannot be represented by a superposition of discrete normal modes. Particular attention is paid to monochromatic point sources of various frequency and depth, and to the surface velocity power that results, both in the discrete f- and p-mode spectrum and in the continuum. It is shown that a major effect of the continuum is to heal the surface wave field produced by compact sources, and therefore to hide them from view. It is found that the continuous spectrum is not a significant contributor to observable inter-ridge seismic power.

  5. NEAR- AND FAR-FIELD RESPONSE TO COMPACT ACOUSTIC SOURCES IN STRATIFIED CONVECTION ZONES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cally, Paul S., E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu [Monash Centre for Astrophysics and School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    The role of the acoustic continuum associated with compact sources in the Sun's interior wave field is explored for a simple polytropic model. The continuum produces a near-field acoustic structure-the so-called acoustic jacket-that cannot be represented by a superposition of discrete normal modes. Particular attention is paid to monochromatic point sources of various frequency and depth, and to the surface velocity power that results, both in the discrete f- and p-mode spectrum and in the continuum. It is shown that a major effect of the continuum is to heal the surface wave field produced by compact sources, and therefore to hide them from view. It is found that the continuous spectrum is not a significant contributor to observable inter-ridge seismic power.

  6. Determination of the viscous acoustic field for liquid drop positioning/forcing in an acoustic levitation chamber in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Margaret J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of acoustic levitation systems has provided a technology with which to undertake droplet studies as well as do containerless processing experiments in a microgravity environment. Acoustic levitation chambers utilize radiation pressure forces to position/manipulate the drop. Oscillations can be induced via frequency modulation of the acoustic wave, with the modulated acoustic radiation vector acting as the driving force. To account for tangential as well as radial forcing, it is necessary that the viscous effects be included in the acoustic field. The method of composite expansions is employed in the determination of the acoustic field with viscous effects.

  7. Near-field acoustic imaging based on Laplacian sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Daudet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    We present a sound source identification method for near-field acoustic imaging of extended sources. The methodology is based on a wave superposition method (or equivalent source method) that promotes solutions with sparse higher order spatial derivatives. Instead of promoting direct sparsity......, and the validity of the wave extrapolation used for the reconstruction is examined. It is shown that this methodology can overcome conventional limits of spatial sampling, and is therefore valid for wide-band acoustic imaging of extended sources....

  8. Modified electron acoustic field and energy applied to observation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahed, H. G., E-mail: hgomaa-eg@yahoo.com, E-mail: hgomaa-eg@mans.edu.eg [College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Physics Department, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul Aziz University, Alkharj 11942 (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt); El-Shewy, E. K. [Theoretical Physics Research Group, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516 (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Improved electrostatic acoustic field and energy have been debated in vortex trapped hot electrons and fluid of cold electrons with pressure term plasmas. The perturbed higher-order modified-Korteweg-de Vries equation (PhomKdV) has been worked out. The effect of trapping and electron temperatures on the electro-field and energy properties in auroral plasmas has been inspected.

  9. New developments in near-field acoustic holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, N.B.; Geerlings, A.C.; Verhaar, B.T.; Vliegenthart, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the field of noise-control engineering, information about the individual strength, andlocation, of the most dominant sources is of vital importance. This information allows theacoustic engineer to take effective measures in his effort to reduce the emitted acoustic noiselevels. Near-field

  10. Near field acoustic holography with microphones on a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Moreno-Pescador, Guillermo; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2011-01-01

    Spherical near field acoustic holography (spherical NAH) is a technique that makes it possible to reconstruct the sound field inside and just outside a spherical surface on which the sound pressure is measured with an array of microphones. This is potentially very useful for source identification...

  11. Induced clustering of Escherichia coli by acoustic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Ramos, Salomé; Hoyos, Mauricio; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2018-03-16

    Brownian or self-propelled particles in aqueous suspensions can be trapped by acoustic fields generated by piezoelectric transducers usually at frequencies in the megahertz. The obtained confinement allows the study of rich collective behaviours like clustering or spreading dynamics in microgravity-like conditions. The acoustic field induces the levitation of self-propelled particles and provides secondary lateral forces to capture them at nodal planes. Here, we give a step forward in the field of confined active matter, reporting levitation experiments of bacterial suspensions of Escherichia coli. Clustering of living bacteria is monitored as a function of time, where different behaviours are clearly distinguished. Upon the removal of the acoustic signal, bacteria rapidly spread, impelled by their own swimming. Nevertheless, long periods of confinement result in irreversible bacteria entanglements that could act as seeds for levitating bacterial aggregates.

  12. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  13. Investigation into the Effect of Acoustic Radiation Force and Acoustic Streaming on Particle Patterning in Acoustic Standing Wave Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilei Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic standing waves have been widely used in trapping, patterning, and manipulating particles, whereas one barrier remains: the lack of understanding of force conditions on particles which mainly include acoustic radiation force (ARF and acoustic streaming (AS. In this paper, force conditions on micrometer size polystyrene microspheres in acoustic standing wave fields were investigated. The COMSOL® Mutiphysics particle tracing module was used to numerically simulate force conditions on various particles as a function of time. The velocity of particle movement was experimentally measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV. Through experimental and numerical simulation, the functions of ARF and AS in trapping and patterning were analyzed. It is shown that ARF is dominant in trapping and patterning large particles while the impact of AS increases rapidly with decreasing particle size. The combination of using both ARF and AS for medium size particles can obtain different patterns with only using ARF. Findings of the present study will aid the design of acoustic-driven microfluidic devices to increase the diversity of particle patterning.

  14. Investigation into the Effect of Acoustic Radiation Force and Acoustic Streaming on Particle Patterning in Acoustic Standing Wave Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanye; Ni, Zhengyang; Guo, Xiasheng; Luo, Linjiao; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic standing waves have been widely used in trapping, patterning, and manipulating particles, whereas one barrier remains: the lack of understanding of force conditions on particles which mainly include acoustic radiation force (ARF) and acoustic streaming (AS). In this paper, force conditions on micrometer size polystyrene microspheres in acoustic standing wave fields were investigated. The COMSOL® Mutiphysics particle tracing module was used to numerically simulate force conditions on various particles as a function of time. The velocity of particle movement was experimentally measured using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Through experimental and numerical simulation, the functions of ARF and AS in trapping and patterning were analyzed. It is shown that ARF is dominant in trapping and patterning large particles while the impact of AS increases rapidly with decreasing particle size. The combination of using both ARF and AS for medium size particles can obtain different patterns with only using ARF. Findings of the present study will aid the design of acoustic-driven microfluidic devices to increase the diversity of particle patterning. PMID:28753955

  15. Measurement of incident sound power using near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    ; and it has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using ‘statistically optimised near field acoustic holography’ (SONAH...

  16. Schlieren imaging of the standing wave field in an ultrasonic acoustic levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Pablo Luis; Boullosa, Ricardo R.; Echeverria, Carlos; Porta, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model of a single axis acoustic levitator consisting of two cylinders immersed in air and directed along the same axis. The first cylinder has a flat termination and functions as a sound emitter, and the second cylinder, which is simply a refector, has the side facing the first cylinder cut out by a spherical surface. By making the first cylinder vibrate at ultrasonic frequencies a standing wave is produced in the air between the cylinders which makes it possible, by means of the acoustic radiation pressure, to levitate one or several small objects of different shapes, such as spheres or disks. We use schlieren imaging to observe the acoustic field resulting from the levitation of one or several objects, and compare these results to previous numerical approximations of the field obtained using a finite element method. The authors acknowledge financial support from DGAPA-UNAM through project PAPIIT IN109214.

  17. Theory of the Auger effect in an intense acoustic noise field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan Nhat Quang.

    1995-10-01

    A study is given of the effect on Auger processes produced by an intense acoustic noise flux affecting charge carriers via deformation-potential interaction. The calculation of Auger coefficients is carried out within a semiclassical approach to the acoustic noise field and non-degenerate carrier statistics. Simple analytic expressions are then obtained, which expose an exponential dependence of the Auger coefficients on flux intensity. The Auger recombination is found, in analogy with the case of piezoelectric noise field, to be strongly enhanced as compared to that in no-noise conditions by up to several orders of magnitude at high flux intensity, short acoustic wavelength, small carrier concentration and low temperature. (author). 29 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  18. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense.

  19. Real-time temperature field measurement based on acoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Yong; Jia, Jiabin; Polydorides, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic tomography can be used to measure the temperature field from the time-of-flight (TOF). In order to capture real-time temperature field changes and accurately yield quantitative temperature images, two improvements to the conventional acoustic tomography system are studied: simultaneous acoustic transmission and TOF collection along multiple ray paths, and an offline iteration reconstruction algorithm. During system operation, all the acoustic transceivers send modulated and filtered wideband Kasami sequences simultaneously to facilitate fast and accurate TOF measurements using cross-correlation detection. For image reconstruction, the iteration process is separated and executed offline beforehand to shorten computation time for online temperature field reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of the developed methods are validated in the simulation study. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the processing time per frame from 160 ms to 20 ms, while the reconstruction error remains less than 5%. Hence, the proposed method has great potential in the measurement of rapid temperature change with good temporal and spatial resolution. (paper)

  20. Sound field simulation and acoustic animation in urban squares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Meng, Yan

    2005-04-01

    Urban squares are important components of cities, and the acoustic environment is important for their usability. While models and formulae for predicting the sound field in urban squares are important for their soundscape design and improvement, acoustic animation tools would be of great importance for designers as well as for public participation process, given that below a certain sound level, the soundscape evaluation depends mainly on the type of sounds rather than the loudness. This paper first briefly introduces acoustic simulation models developed for urban squares, as well as empirical formulae derived from a series of simulation. It then presents an acoustic animation tool currently being developed. In urban squares there are multiple dynamic sound sources, so that the computation time becomes a main concern. Nevertheless, the requirements for acoustic animation in urban squares are relatively low compared to auditoria. As a result, it is important to simplify the simulation process and algorithms. Based on a series of subjective tests in a virtual reality environment with various simulation parameters, a fast simulation method with acceptable accuracy has been explored. [Work supported by the European Commission.

  1. Theory and numerical calculation of the acoustic field exerted by eddy-current forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    The equations for calculating the acoustic field produced within a nonmagnetic metal by interaction of eddy currents with a static magnetic field were obtained on the assumptions (1) an ultrasonic wave is generated by the electromagentic force through classical and macroscopic phenomena; (2) the electric, magnetic, and elastic properties of the metal are linear, isotropic, and homogeneous throughout the metal, which occupies semi-infinite space; (3) the whole system is axially symmetric; and (4) eddy currents and elastic waves show a steady-state sinusoidal variation. The acoustic field produced by a specific electromagnetic ultrasonic transducer with axial symmetry was calculated numerically, and the results showed a well-defined ultrasonic wave beam, which was narrower than had been expected from the size of the transducer. (auth)

  2. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  3. Acoustic radiosity for computation of sound fields in diffuse environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Beamer, C. Walter

    2002-05-01

    The use of image and ray tracing methods (and variations thereof) for the computation of sound fields in rooms is relatively well developed. In their regime of validity, both methods work well for prediction in rooms with small amounts of diffraction and mostly specular reflection at the walls. While extensions to the method to include diffuse reflections and diffraction have been made, they are limited at best. In the fields of illumination and computer graphics the ray tracing and image methods are joined by another method called luminous radiative transfer or radiosity. In radiosity, an energy balance between surfaces is computed assuming diffuse reflection at the reflective surfaces. Because the interaction between surfaces is constant, much of the computation required for sound field prediction with multiple or moving source and receiver positions can be reduced. In acoustics the radiosity method has had little attention because of the problems of diffraction and specular reflection. The utility of radiosity in acoustics and an approach to a useful development of the method for acoustics will be presented. The method looks especially useful for sound level prediction in industrial and office environments. [Work supported by NSF.

  4. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  5. Field of infrasound wave on the earth from blast wave, produced by supersonic flight of a rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobzheva, Ya.V.; Krasnov, V.M.

    2006-01-01

    It was developed a physical model, which allowed calculating a field of infrasound wave on the earth from blast wave, produced by supersonic flight of a rocket. For space launching site Baikonur it is shown that the nearest horizontal distance from launching site of rocket up to which arrive infrasound waves, produced by supersonic flight of a rocket, is 56 km. Amplitude of acoustic impulse decreases in 5 times on distance of 600 km. Duration of acoustic impulse increases from 1.5 to 3 s on the same distance. Values of acoustic field parameters on the earth surface, practically, do not depend from season of launching of rocket. (author)

  6. Patch near field acoustic holography based on particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yong-Bin; Jacobsen, Finn; Bi, Chuan-Xing

    2009-01-01

    Patch near field acoustic holography (PNAH) based on sound pressure measurements makes it possible to reconstruct the source field near a source by measuring the sound pressure at positions on a surface. that is comparable in size to the source region of concern. Particle velocity is an alternative...... examines the use of particle velocity as the input of PNAH. Because the particle velocity decays faster toward the edges of the measurement aperture than the pressure does and because the wave number ratio that enters into the inverse propagator from pressure to velocity amplifies high spatial frequencies...

  7. The application of standard definitions of sound to the fields of underwater acoustics and acoustical oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, William M.

    2004-05-01

    Recent societal concerns have focused attention on the use of sound as a probe to investigate the oceans and its use in naval sonar applications. The concern is the impact the use of sound may have on marine mammals and fishes. The focus has changed the fields of acoustical oceanography (AO) and underwater acoustics (UW) because of the requirement to communicate between disciplines. Multiple National Research Council publications, Dept. of Navy reports, and several monographs have been written on this subject, and each reveals the importance as well as the misapplication of ASA standards. The ANSI-ASA standards are comprehensive, however not widely applied. The clear definition of standards and recommendations of their use is needed for both scientists and government agencies. Traditionally the U.S. Navy has been responsible for UW standards and calibration; the ANSI-ASA standards have been essential. However, recent changes in the Navy and its laboratory structure may necessitate a more formal recognition of ANSI-ASA standards and perhaps incorporation of UW-AO in the Bureau of Standards. A separate standard for acoustical terminology, reference levels, and notation used in the UW-AO is required. Since the problem is global, a standard should be compatible and cross referenced with the International Standard (CEI/IEC 27-3).

  8. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B.

    2014-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope

  9. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Lü, P.; Geng, D. L.; Zhai, W.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  10. The near-field acoustic levitation of high-mass rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z Y; Lü, P; Geng, D L; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-10-01

    Here we demonstrate that spherical rotors with 40 mm diameter and 0-1 kg mass can be suspended more than tens of micrometers away from an ultrasonically vibrating concave surface by near-field acoustic radiation force. Their rotating speeds exceed 3000 rpm. An acoustic model has been developed to evaluate the near-field acoustic radiation force and the resonant frequencies of levitation system. This technique has potential application in developing acoustic gyroscope.

  11. Sound field reproduction as an equivalent acoustical scattering problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Filippo Maria; Nelson, Philip A

    2013-11-01

    Given a continuous distribution of acoustic sources, the determination of the source strength that ensures the synthesis of a desired sound field is shown to be identical to the solution of an equivalent acoustic scattering problem. The paper begins with the presentation of the general theory that underpins sound field reproduction with secondary sources continuously arranged on the boundary of the reproduction region. The process of reproduction by a continuous source distribution is modeled by means of an integral operator (the single layer potential). It is then shown how the solution of the sound reproduction problem corresponds to that of an equivalent scattering problem. Analytical solutions are computed for two specific instances of this problem, involving, respectively, the use of a secondary source distribution in spherical and planar geometries. The results are shown to be the same as those obtained with analyses based on High Order Ambisonics and Wave Field Synthesis, respectively, thus bringing to light a fundamental analogy between these two methods of sound reproduction. Finally, it is shown how the physical optics (Kirchhoff) approximation enables the derivation of a high-frequency simplification for the problem under consideration, this in turn being related to the secondary source selection criterion reported in the literature on Wave Field Synthesis.

  12. Interior near-field acoustical holography in flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E G; Houston, B H; Herdic, P C; Raveendra, S T; Gardner, B

    2000-10-01

    In this paper boundary element methods (BEM) are mated with near-field acoustical holography (NAH) in order to determine the normal velocity over a large area of a fuselage of a turboprop airplane from a measurement of the pressure (hologram) on a concentric surface in the interior of the aircraft. This work represents the first time NAH has been applied in situ, in-flight. The normal fuselage velocity was successfully reconstructed at the blade passage frequency (BPF) of the propeller and its first two harmonics. This reconstructed velocity reveals structure-borne and airborne sound-transmission paths from the engine to the interior space.

  13. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-01-01

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained

  14. Effect of non-uniform mean flow field on acoustic propagation problems in computational aeroacoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Si, Haiqing; Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in the presence of a non-uniform mean flow is studied numerically by using two different acoustic propagating models, which solve linearized Euler equations (LEE) and acoustic perturbation equations (APE). As noise induced by turbulent flows often propagates from near field t...

  15. A Comparison of Acoustic Field Measurement by a Microphone and by an Optical Interferometric Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bálek

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to show that our optical method for measuring acoustic pressure is in some way superior to measurement using a microphone. Measurement of the integral acoustic pressure in the air by a laser interferometric probe is compared with measurement using a microphone. We determined the particular harmonic components in the acoustic field in the case of relatively high acoustic power in the ultrasonic frequency range.

  16. Acoustic heating produced in the thermoviscous flow of a Bingham plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelomova, Anna

    2011-02-01

    This study is devoted to the instantaneous acoustic heating of a Bingham plastic. The model of the Bingham plastic's viscous stress tensor includes the yield stress along with the shear viscosity, which differentiates a Bingham plastic from a viscous Newtonian fluid. A special linear combination of the conservation equations in differential form makes it possible to reduce all acoustic terms in the linear part of of the final equation governing acoustic heating, and to retain those belonging to the thermal mode. The nonlinear terms of the final equation are a result of interaction between sounds and the thermal mode. In the field of intense sound, the resulting nonlinear acoustic terms form a driving force for the heating. The final governing dynamic equation of the thermal mode is valid in a weakly nonlinear flow. It is instantaneous, and does not imply that sounds be periodic. The equations governing the dynamics of both sounds and the thermal mode depend on sign of the shear rate. An example of the propagation of a bipolar initially acoustic pulse and the evolution of the heating induced by it is illustrated and discussed.

  17. Nonstationary random acoustic and electromagnetic fields as wave diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaut, L R

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the effects of relatively rapid variations of the boundaries of an overmoded cavity on the stochastic properties of its interior acoustic or electromagnetic field. For quasi-static variations, this field can be represented as an ideal incoherent and statistically homogeneous isotropic random scalar or vector field, respectively. A physical model is constructed showing that the field dynamics can be characterized as a generalized diffusion process. The Langevin-It o-hat and Fokker-Planck equations are derived and their associated statistics and distributions for the complex analytic field, its magnitude and energy density are computed. The energy diffusion parameter is found to be proportional to the square of the ratio of the standard deviation of the source field to the characteristic time constant of the dynamic process, but is independent of the initial energy density, to first order. The energy drift vanishes in the asymptotic limit. The time-energy probability distribution is in general not separable, as a result of nonstationarity. A general solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is obtained in integral form, together with explicit closed-form solutions for several asymptotic cases. The findings extend known results on statistics and distributions of quasi-stationary ideal random fields (pure diffusions), which are retrieved as special cases

  18. Acoustic properties of naturally produced clear speech at normal speaking rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jean C.; Braida, Louis D.

    2004-01-01

    Sentences spoken ``clearly'' are significantly more intelligible than those spoken ``conversationally'' for hearing-impaired listeners in a variety of backgrounds [Picheny et al., J. Speech Hear. Res. 28, 96-103 (1985); Uchanski et al., ibid. 39, 494-509 (1996); Payton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 95, 1581-1592 (1994)]. While producing clear speech, however, talkers often reduce their speaking rate significantly [Picheny et al., J. Speech Hear. Res. 29, 434-446 (1986); Uchanski et al., ibid. 39, 494-509 (1996)]. Yet speaking slowly is not solely responsible for the intelligibility benefit of clear speech (over conversational speech), since a recent study [Krause and Braida, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 2165-2172 (2002)] showed that talkers can produce clear speech at normal rates with training. This finding suggests that clear speech has inherent acoustic properties, independent of rate, that contribute to improved intelligibility. Identifying these acoustic properties could lead to improved signal processing schemes for hearing aids. To gain insight into these acoustical properties, conversational and clear speech produced at normal speaking rates were analyzed at three levels of detail (global, phonological, and phonetic). Although results suggest that talkers may have employed different strategies to achieve clear speech at normal rates, two global-level properties were identified that appear likely to be linked to the improvements in intelligibility provided by clear/normal speech: increased energy in the 1000-3000-Hz range of long-term spectra and increased modulation depth of low frequency modulations of the intensity envelope. Other phonological and phonetic differences associated with clear/normal speech include changes in (1) frequency of stop burst releases, (2) VOT of word-initial voiceless stop consonants, and (3) short-term vowel spectra.

  19. Acoustic streaming produced by a cylindrical bubble undergoing volume and translational oscillations in a microfluidic channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Combriat, Thomas; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed for acoustic streaming generated by a cylindrical bubble confined in a fluid channel between two planar elastic walls. The bubble is assumed to undergo volume and translational oscillations. The volume oscillation is caused by an imposed acoustic pressure field and generates the bulk scattered wave in the fluid gap and Lamb-type surface waves propagating along the fluid-wall interfaces. The translational oscillation is induced by the velocity field of an external sound source such as another bubble or an oscillatory fluid flow. The acoustic streaming is assumed to result from the interaction of the volume and the translational modes of the bubble oscillations. The general solutions for the linear equations of fluid motion and the equations of acoustic streaming are calculated with no restrictions on the ratio between the viscous penetration depth and the bubble size. Approximate solutions for the limit of low viscosity are provided as well. Simulations of streamline patterns show that the geometry of the streaming resembles flows generated by a source dipole, while the vortex orientation is governed by the driving frequency, bubble size, and the distance of the bubble from the source of translational excitation. Experimental verification of the developed theory is performed using data for streaming generated by bubble pairs.

  20. Acoustic field generated by flight of rocket at the Earth surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobzheva, Ya.V.; Krasnov, V.M.; Maslov, A.N.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a model, which describes the propagation of acoustic impulses produced by explosion of carrier rocket at the active part of trajectory, down through the atmosphere. Calculations of acoustic field parameters on the earth surface were made for altitudes of rocket flight from 2.8 to 92.3 km and yield of explosions from 0.001 to 0.5 t tnt. It was shown the infrasound accompaniment of rocket flight with the goal to register the explosion it is possible only for an altitude about 70 km. For this case, test set should be situated at the distance not exceeding 120 km from the starting place. (author)

  1. Some far-field acoustics characteristics of the XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Robert A.; Conner, David A.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Rutledge, C. Kendall; Smith, Rita A.

    1990-01-01

    Far-field acoustics tests have been conducted on an instrumented XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft. The purpose of these acoustic measurements was to create an encompassing, high confidence (90 percent), and accurate (-1.4/ +1/8 dB theoretical confidence interval) far-field acoustics data base to validate ROTONET and other current rotorcraft noise prediction computer codes. This paper describes the flight techniques used, with emphasis on the care taken to obtain high-quality far-field acoustic data. The quality and extensiveness of the data base collected are shown by presentation of ground acoustic contours for level flyovers for the airplane flight mode and for several forward velocities and nacelle tilts for the transition mode and helicopter flight mode. Acoustic pressure time-histories and fully analyzed ensemble averaged far-field data results (spectra) are shown for each of the ground contour cases.

  2. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  3. An acoustical study of English word stress produced by Americans and Koreans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byunggon

    2002-05-01

    Acoustical correlates of stress can be divided into duration, intensity, and fundamental frequency. This study examined the acoustical difference in the first two syllables of stressed English words produced by ten American and Korean speakers. The Korean subjects scored very high in TOEFL. They read, at a normal speed, a fable from which the acoustical parameters of eight words were analyzed. In order to make the data comparison meaningful, each parameter was collected at 100 dynamic time points proportional to the total duration of the two syllables. Then, the ratio of the parameter sum of the first rime to that of the second rime was calculated to determine the relative prominence of the syllables. Results showed that the durations of the first two syllables were almost comparable between the Americans and Koreans. However, statistically significant differences showed up in the diphthong pronunciations and in the words with the second syllable stressed. Also, remarkably high r-squared values were found between pairs of the three acoustical parameters, which suggests that either one or a combination of two or more parameters may account for the prominence of a syllable within a word. [Work supported by Korea Science Foundation R01-1999-00229.

  4. Horizontal-Longitudinal Correlations of Acoustic Field in Deep Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jun; Li Zheng-Lin; Ren Yun; Li Wen; Zhang Ren-He

    2015-01-01

    The horizontal-longitudinal correlations of the acoustic field in deep water are investigated based on the experimental data obtained in the South China Sea. It is shown that the horizontal-longitudinal correlation coefficients in the convergence zone are high, and the correlation length is consistent with the convergence zone width, which depends on the receiver depth and range. The horizontal-longitudinal correlation coefficients in the convergence zone also have a division structure for the deeper receiver. The signals from the second part of the convergence zone are still correlated with the reference signal in the first part. The horizontal-longitudinal correlation coefficients in the shadow zone are lower than that in the convergence zone, and the correlation length in the shadow zone is also much shorter than that in the convergence zone. The numerical simulation results by using the normal modes theory are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results. (paper)

  5. Research on the Influence of an Acoustic Field on Particle Cohesion in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramūnas Vilkišius

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron is one of the most common natural elements. When iron concentration in water is more than 0,3 mg/l, it causes the formation of rust drain tag or changes the colour of the fabric during washing. Thus, the use of the acoustic field to improve water quality is a very relevant topic. Acoustic oscillations are currently widely used in various industrial sectors, including water treatment, metallurgy, chemical and food industry, equipment manufacturing and medicine. When materials are affected by acoustic fields, physical-chemical processes begin. Acoustic fields cause material dispersion, emulsification, coagulation and degassing (gas removal as well as influence the crystallization and melting processes. Acoustic vibrations may also cause various chemical transformations such as oxidation, polymerization processes and depolymerisation. The utilization of acoustics to enhance water oxidation and precipitation of coarse impurities further extends the scope of the use of this physical method.Article in Lithuanian

  6. Research on the Influence of an Acoustic Field on Particle Cohesion in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramūnas Vilkišius

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is one of the most common natural elements. When iron concentration in water is more than 0,3 mg/l, it causes the formation of rust drain tag or changes the colour of the fabric during washing. Thus, the use of the acoustic field to improve water quality is a very relevant topic. Acoustic oscillations are currently widely used in various industrial sectors, including water treatment, metallurgy, chemical and food industry, equipment manufacturing and medicine. When materials are affected by acoustic fields, physical-chemical processes begin. Acoustic fields cause material dispersion, emulsification, coagulation and degassing (gas removal as well as influence the crystallization and melting processes. Acoustic vibrations may also cause various chemical transformations such as oxidation, polymerization processes and depolymerisation. The utilization of acoustics to enhance water oxidation and precipitation of coarse impurities further extends the scope of the use of this physical method.Article in Lithuanian

  7. An acoustic analysis of laughter produced by congenitally deaf and normally hearing college students1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makagon, Maja M.; Funayama, E. Sumie; Owren, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Relatively few empirical data are available concerning the role of auditory experience in nonverbal human vocal behavior, such as laughter production. This study compared the acoustic properties of laughter in 19 congenitally, bilaterally, and profoundly deaf college students and in 23 normally hearing control participants. Analyses focused on degree of voicing, mouth position, air-flow direction, temporal features, relative amplitude, fundamental frequency, and formant frequencies. Results showed that laughter produced by the deaf participants was fundamentally similar to that produced by the normally hearing individuals, which in turn was consistent with previously reported findings. Finding comparable acoustic properties in the sounds produced by deaf and hearing vocalizers confirms the presumption that laughter is importantly grounded in human biology, and that auditory experience with this vocalization is not necessary for it to emerge in species-typical form. Some differences were found between the laughter of deaf and hearing groups; the most important being that the deaf participants produced lower-amplitude and longer-duration laughs. These discrepancies are likely due to a combination of the physiological and social factors that routinely affect profoundly deaf individuals, including low overall rates of vocal fold use and pressure from the hearing world to suppress spontaneous vocalizations. PMID:18646991

  8. Field reversal produced by a plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Condit, W.; Granneman, E.H.A.; Prono, D.; Smith, A.C. Jr.; Taska, J.; Turner, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental results are presented of the production of Field-Reversed Plasma with a high energy coaxial plasma gun. The gun is magnetized with solenoids inside the center electrode and outside the outer electrode so that plasma emerging from the gun entrains the radial fringer field at the muzzle. The plasma flow extends field lines propagating a high electrical conductivity, the flux inside the center electrode should be preserved. However, for low flux, the trapped flux exceeds by 2 or more the initial flux, possibly because of helical deformation of the current channel extending from the center electrode

  9. Phase change events of volatile liquid perfluorocarbon contrast agents produce unique acoustic signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheeran, Paul S; Dayton, Paul A; Matsunaga, Terry O

    2014-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) provide a dynamic platform to approach problems in medical ultrasound (US). Upon US-mediated activation, the liquid core vaporizes and expands to produce a gas bubble ideal for US imaging and therapy. In this study, we demonstrate through high-speed video microscopy and US interrogation that PCCAs composed of highly volatile perfluorocarbons (PFCs) exhibit unique acoustic behavior that can be detected and differentiated from standard microbubble contrast agents. Experimental results show that when activated with short pulses PCCAs will over-expand and undergo unforced radial oscillation while settling to a final bubble diameter. The size-dependent oscillation phenomenon generates a unique acoustic signal that can be passively detected in both time and frequency domain using confocal piston transducers with an ‘activate high’ (8 MHz, 2 cycles), ‘listen low’ (1 MHz) scheme. Results show that the magnitude of the acoustic ‘signature’ increases as PFC boiling point decreases. By using a band-limited spectral processing technique, the droplet signals can be isolated from controls and used to build experimental relationships between concentration and vaporization pressure. The techniques shown here may be useful for physical studies as well as development of droplet-specific imaging techniques. (paper)

  10. Stimulated Brillouin scattering phase-locking using a transient acoustic standing wave excited through an optical interference field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrej Slezak; Milan Kalal; Hon Jin Kong

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Analytical description of an experimentally verified scheme leading to a phase-locked stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), used in a laser beam combination systems, is presented. The essential condition for the phase-locking effect for SBS is the fixation of the starting position and time of the acoustic Brillouin wave. It is shown that the starting position fixation of this acoustic wave may have its origin in a transient acoustic standing wave initiated by an arising optical interference field produced by the back-seeding concave mirror. This interference field leads to a stationary density modulation of the medium. However, the way to the formation of this density modulation leads via the acoustic standing wave. An appropriate solution, in the form of the standing wave, was obtained from solving the acoustic wave-equation using the electrostriction as a driving force. As a consequence of the damping term included in this equation the acoustic standing wave becomes gradually attenuated and contrary to the undamped solution published earlier, thus constitutes a truly transient phenomenon. Using a mathematical formalism similar to that which is used for the SBS description in the case of a random phase, the coupled equations describing the phase-locked SBS were derived. Contrary to the case without the back-seeding mirror, where the wave chosen from the thermal noise background subsequently plays the role of a trigger of the stimulated process, in this case it is replaced by the transient standing wave produced as a consequence of the presence of an optical interference field arisen in the focal region of the back-seeding concave mirror.

  11. Effect of temperature on Acoustic Evaluation of standing trees and logs: Part 2: Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan Gao; Xiping Wang; Lihai Wang; R. Bruce Allison

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of seasonal temperature changes on acoustic velocity measured on standing trees and green logs and to develop models for compensating temperature differences because acoustic measurements are performed in different climates and seasons. Field testing was conducted on 20 red pine (Pinus resinosa...

  12. Studying the field induced breakup of acoustically levitated drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warschat, C.; Riedel, J.

    2017-10-01

    Coulomb fission of charged droplets (The terms drop and droplet are often used synonymous. Throughout this manuscript, to avoid confusion, the terms drop and droplet will be used for liquid spheres with radii in the millimeter range and the micrometer range, respectively. In our experiments, the first correspond to the parent drop while the latter describes the ejected progeny droplets.) is a well-studied natural phenomenon. Controlled droplet fission is already successfully employed in several technological applications. Still, since the occurring surface rupture relies on the exact understanding and description of the liquid gas boundary, some details are still under debate. Most empirical systematic studies observe falling micrometer droplets passing through the electric field inside a plate capacitor. This approach, although easily applicable and reliable, limits the experimental degrees of freedom regarding the observable time and the maximum size of the drops and can only be performed in consecutive individual observations of different subsequent drops. Here we present a novel setup to study the field induced breakup of acoustically levitated drops. The design does not bear any restrictions towards the temporal window of observation, and allows handling of drops of a tunable radius ranging from 10 μm to several millimeters and a real-time monitoring of one single drop. Our comprehensive study includes a time resolved visual inspection, laser shadowgraphy, laser induced fluorescence imaging, and ambient mass spectrometric interrogation of the nascent Taylor cone. The results shown for a millimeter sized drop, previously inaccessible for Coulomb fission experiments, are mostly comparable with previous results for smaller drops. The major difference is the time scale and the threshold potential of the drop rupture. Both values, however, resemble theoretically extrapolations to the larger radius. The technique allows for a systematic study of breakup behavior of

  13. Investigation of air-assisted sprays submitted to high frequency transverse acoustic fields: Droplet clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficuciello, A.; Blaisot, J. B.; Richard, C.; Baillot, F.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of a high amplitude transverse acoustic field on coaxial jets is presented in this paper. Water and air are used as working fluids at ambient pressure. The coaxial injectors are placed on the top of a semi-open resonant cavity where the acoustic pressure fluctuations of the standing wave can reach a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 12 kPa at the forcing frequency of 1 kHz. Several test conditions are considered in order to quantify the influence of injection conditions, acoustic field amplitude, and injector position with respect to the standing wave acoustic field. A high speed back-light visualization technique is used to characterize the jet response. Image processing is used to obtain valuable information about the jet behavior. It is shown that the acoustic field drastically affects the atomization process for all atomization regimes. The position of the injector in the acoustic field determines the jet response, and a droplet-clustering phenomenon is highlighted in multi-point injection conditions and quantified by determining discrete droplet location distributions. A theoretical model based on nonlinear acoustics related to the spatial distribution of the radiation pressure exerted on an object explains the behavior observed.

  14. Controlled Acoustic Bass System (CABS) A Method to Achieve Uniform Sound Field Distribution at Low Frequencies in Rectangular Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    The sound field produced by loudspeakers at low frequencies in small- and medium-size rectangular listening rooms is highly nonuniform due to the multiple reflections and diffractions of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A new method, called controlled acoustic bass system (CA......-frequency range. CABS has been simulated and measured in two different standard listening rooms with satisfactory results....

  15. Purification of produced waters in oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niyazov, R S; Baikov, U M

    1970-01-01

    Experience has shown that a single step water-conditioning process cannot be used to prepare Bashkirian produced waters for underground injection. In the single-step process, the water is passed through horizontal or vertical settling basins to remove solids. This system does not work when suspended solids increase above 200 to 500 mg/liter. The required quality of injection water can be obtained by filtering the water through sand at flow velocities of 5 to 10 m/hr. The filter has a sand layer 0.6 to 1 m thick, composed of 0.35 to 1.0 mm sand. Water entering the filters should not contain more than 100 to 150 mg/liter of oil products. The filters are backwashed at velocity of 10 to 15 m/hr and rates of 12 to 16 liters/sec sq m for 10 to 15 min. Clean water is used in backwashing. When surfactant is added to the backwash water, the filter cycle lasts longer.

  16. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams in lossy media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Borges, José L; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    2014-08-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have raised significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction -self-healing- property (after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's); while the FWs, a sub-class of LWs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the longitudinal field intensity pattern inside a prefixed interval, for instance 0⩽z⩽L, of the wave propagation axis. More specifically, the FWs are localized fields "at rest", that is, with a static envelope (within which only the carrier wave propagates), and can be endowed moreover with a high transverse localization. In this paper we investigate, by simulated experiments, various cases of generation of ultrasonic FW fields, with the frequency of f0=1 MHz in a water-like medium, taking account of the effects of attenuation. We present results of FWs for distances up to L=80 mm, in attenuating media with absorption coefficient α in the range 70⩽α⩽170 dB/m. Such simulated FW fields are constructed by using a procedure developed by us, via appropriate finite superpositions of monochromatic ultrasonic Bessel beams. We pay due attention to the selection of the FW parameters, constrained by the rather tight restrictions imposed by experimental Acoustics, as well as to some practical implications of the transducer design. The energy localization properties of the Frozen Waves can find application even in many medical apparatus, such as bistouries or acoustic tweezers, as well as for treatment of diseased tissues (in particular, for the destruction of tumor cells, without affecting the surrounding tissues; also for kidney stone shuttering, etc.). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Adaptive acoustic energy delivery to near and far fields using foldable, tessellated star transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chengzhe; Harne, Ryan L.

    2017-05-01

    Methods of guiding acoustic energy arbitrarily through space have long relied on digital controls to meet performance needs. Yet, more recent attention to adaptive structures with unique spatial configurations has motivated mechanical signal processing (MSP) concepts that may not be subjected to the same functional and performance limitations as digital acoustic beamforming counterparts. The periodicity of repeatable structural reconfiguration enabled by origami-inspired tessellated architectures turns attention to foldable platforms as frameworks for MSP development. This research harnesses principles of MSP to study a tessellated, star-shaped acoustic transducer constituent that provides on-demand control of acoustic energy guiding via folding-induced shape reconfiguration. An analytical framework is established to probe the roles of mechanical and acoustic geometry on the far field directivity and near field focusing of sound energy. Following validation by experiments and verification by simulations, parametric studies are undertaken to uncover relations between constituent topology and acoustic energy delivery to arbitrary points in the free field. The adaptations enabled by folding of the star-shaped transducer reveal capability for restricting sound energy to angular regions in the far field while also introducing means to modulate sound energy by three orders-of-magnitude to locations near to the transducer surface. In addition, the modeling philosophy devised here provides a valuable approach to solve general sound radiation problems for foldable, tessellated acoustic transducer constituents of arbitrary geometry.

  18. Investigation of acoustic field near to elastic thin plate using integral method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В.І. Токарев

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  Investigation of acoustic field near to elastic thin plate using  integral method The influence of boundary conditions on sound wave propagation, radiation and transmission through thin elastic plate is investigated. Necessary for that numerical model was found using the Helmholtz equation and equation of oscilated plate by means of integral formulation of the solution for acoustic fields near to elastic thin plate and for bending waves of small amplitudes.

  19. Acoustic excitation of mechatronic systems by diffuse acoustic sound fields; Numerical predictions and measurements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, N.B.

    2006-01-01

    With the accuracy of metrology frame applications entering the nanometer-range, the necessity arises totackle all types of disturbances. In the process of estimating the relative importance of the different types of disturbances on the machine accuracy, also called dynamic error budgeting, acoustic

  20. Acoustics forces on a solid sphere in focused sound fields and their use for acoustical traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller; Kristensen, Søren H.

    2009-01-01

    in the cases of hazardous substances, processing of materials under pure conditions, handling of fragile or sticky objects, for instance. Several theoretical investigations on the use of focused Gaussian and Bessel acoustic beams have been reported in literature. In those papers, water has been assumed...

  1. The near-field acoustic levitation for spheres by transducer with concave spherical radiating surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian Fang; Sun, Xu Guang; Jiao, Xiao Yang; Chen, Hong Xia; Hua, Shun Ming; Zhang, Hong Chun

    2013-01-01

    To levitate ICF target spheres in the near-field acoustic levitation, a transducer with concave spherical radiating surface and a nearfield acoustic levitation system is established. The concave spherical radiating surface of the transducer is designed by the finite element parametric method. Then the levitation height and levitation perturbation of spheres with different mass and diameters in the near-field acoustic levitation system are tested and discussed in the driving voltage at 400V, 500V and 600V, respectively, when the levitation system is under the resonant frequency. Finally, based on the experimental results, the height formula of the near-field acoustic levitation for spheres is deduced by introducing a coupling coefficient.

  2. The near-field acoustic levitation for spheres by transducer with concave spherical radiating surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian Fang; Sun, Xu Guang; Jiao, Xiao Yang; Chen, Hong Xia [Jilin University, Changchun (China); Hua, Shun Ming [Zhejiang University, Ningbo (China); Zhang, Hong Chun [Aviation University of AirForce, Changchun (China)

    2013-02-15

    To levitate ICF target spheres in the near-field acoustic levitation, a transducer with concave spherical radiating surface and a nearfield acoustic levitation system is established. The concave spherical radiating surface of the transducer is designed by the finite element parametric method. Then the levitation height and levitation perturbation of spheres with different mass and diameters in the near-field acoustic levitation system are tested and discussed in the driving voltage at 400V, 500V and 600V, respectively, when the levitation system is under the resonant frequency. Finally, based on the experimental results, the height formula of the near-field acoustic levitation for spheres is deduced by introducing a coupling coefficient.

  3. Synthetical optimization of hydraulic radius and acoustic field for thermoacoustic cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Huifang; Li Qing; Zhou Gang

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the acoustic field and the hydraulic radius of the regenerator play key roles in thermoacoustic processes. The optimization of hydraulic radius strongly depends on the acoustic field in the regenerator. This paper investigates the synthetical optimization of hydraulic radius and acoustic field which is characterized by the ratio of the traveling wave component to the standing wave component. In this paper, we discussed the heat flux, cooling power, temperature gradient and coefficient of performance of thermoacoustic cooler with different combinations of hydraulic radiuses and acoustic fields. The calculation results show that, in the cooler's regenerator, due to the acoustic wave, the heat is transferred towards the pressure antinodes in the pure standing wave, while the heat is transferred in the opposite direction of the wave propagation in the pure traveling wave. The better working condition for the regenerator appears in the traveling wave phase region of the like-standing wave, where the directions of the heat transfer by traveling wave component and standing wave component are the same. Otherwise, the small hydraulic radius is not a good choice for acoustic field with excessively high ratio of traveling wave, and the small hydraulic radius is only needed by the traveling wave phase region of like-standing wave.

  4. Modeling and experimental study on near-field acoustic levitation by flexural mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pinkuan; Li, Jin; Ding, Han; Cao, Wenwu

    2009-12-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) has been used in noncontact handling and transportation of small objects to avoid contamination. We have performed a theoretical analysis based on nonuniform vibrating surface to quantify the levitation force produced by the air film and also conducted experimental tests to verify our model. Modal analysis was performed using ANSYS on the flexural plate radiator to obtain its natural frequency of desired mode, which is used to design the measurement system. Then, the levitation force was calculated as a function of levitation distance based on squeeze gas film theory using measured amplitude and phase distributions on the vibrator surface. Compared with previous fluid-structural analyses using a uniform piston motion, our model based on the nonuniform radiating surface of the vibrator is more realistic and fits better with experimentally measured levitation force.

  5. Interaction between laser-produced plasma and guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Transportation properties of laser-produced plasma through a guiding magnetic field were examined. A drifting dense plasma produced by a KrF laser was injected into an axisymmetric magnetic field induced by permanent ring magnets. The plasma ion flux in the guiding magnetic field was measured by a Faraday cup at various distances from the laser target. Numerical analyses based on a collective focusing model were performed to simulate plasma particle trajectories and then compared with the experimental results. (author)

  6. The magnetized electron-acoustic instability driven by a warm, field-aligned electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sooklal, A.; Mace, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    The electron-acoustic instability in a magnetized plasma having three electron components, one of which is a field-aligned beam of intermediate temperature, is investigated. When the plasma frequency of the cool electrons exceeds the electron gyrofrequency, the electron-acoustic instability 'bifurcates' at sufficiently large propagation angles with respect to the magnetic field to yield an obliquely propagating, low-frequency electron-acoustic instability and a higher frequency cyclotron-sound instability. Each of these instabilities retains certain wave features of its progenitor, the quasiparallel electron-acoustic instability, but displays also new magnetic qualities through its dependence on the electron gyrofrequency. The obliquely propagating electron-acoustic instability requires a lower threshold beam speed for its excitation than does the cyclotron-sound instability, and for low to intermediate beam speeds has the higher maximum growth rate. When the plasma is sufficiently strongly magnetized that the plasma frequency of the cool electrons is less than the electron gyrofrequency, the only instability in the electron-acoustic frequency range is the strongly magnetized electron-acoustic instability. Its growth rate and real frequency exhibit a monotonic decrease with wave propagation angle and it grows at small to intermediate wave numbers where its parallel phase speed is approximately constant. The relevance of the results to the interpretation of cusp auroral hiss and auroral broadband electrostatic noise is briefly discussed

  7. Near-field multiple traps of paraxial acoustic vortices with strengthened gradient force generated by sector transducer array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingdong; Li, Yuzhi; Ma, Qingyu; Guo, Gepu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2018-01-01

    In order to improve the capability of particle trapping close to the source plane, theoretical and experimental studies on near-field multiple traps of paraxial acoustic vortices (AVs) with a strengthened acoustic gradient force (AGF) generated by a sector transducer array were conducted. By applying the integration of point source radiation, numerical simulations for the acoustic fields generated by the sector transducer array were conducted and compared with those produced by the circular transducer array. It was proved that strengthened AGFs of near-field multiple AVs with higher peak pressures and smaller vortex radii could be produced by the sector transducer array with a small topological charge. The axial distributions of the equivalent potential gradient indicated that the AGFs of paraxial AVs in the near field were much higher than those in the far field, and the distances at the near-field vortex antinodes were also proved to be the ideal trapping positions with relatively higher AGFs. With the established 8-channel AV generation system, theoretical studies were also verified by the experimental measurements of pressure and phase for AVs with various topological charges. The formation of near-field multiple paraxial AVs was verified by the cross-sectional circular pressure distributions with perfect phase spirals around central pressure nulls, and was also proved by the vortex nodes and antinodes along the center axis. The favorable results demonstrated the feasibility of generating near-field multiple traps of paraxial AVs with strengthened AGF using the sector transducer array, and suggested the potential applications of close-range particle trapping in biomedical engineering.

  8. Aftershock Sequences and Seismic-Like Organization of Acoustic Events Produced by a Single Propagating Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizee, D.; Bonamy, D.

    2017-12-01

    In inhomogeneous brittle solids like rocks, concrete or ceramics, one usually distinguish nominally brittle fracture, driven by the propagation of a single crack from quasibrittle one, resulting from the accumulation of many microcracks. The latter goes along with intermittent sharp noise, as e.g. revealed by the acoustic emission observed in lab scale compressive fracture experiments or at geophysical scale in the seismic activity. In both cases, statistical analyses have revealed a complex time-energy organization into aftershock sequences obeying a range of robust empirical scaling laws (the Omori-Utsu, productivity and Bath's law) that help carry out seismic hazard analysis and damage mitigation. These laws are usually conjectured to emerge from the collective dynamics of microcrack nucleation. In the experiments presented at AGU, we will show that such a statistical organization is not specific to the quasi-brittle multicracking situations, but also rules the acoustic events produced by a single crack slowly driven in an artificial rock made of sintered polymer beads. This simpler situation has advantageous properties (statistical stationarity in particular) permitting us to uncover the origins of these seismic laws: Both productivity law and Bath's law result from the scale free statistics for event energy and Omori-Utsu law results from the scale-free statistics of inter-event time. This yields predictions on how the associated parameters are related, which were analytically derived. Surprisingly, the so-obtained relations are also compatible with observations on lab scale compressive fracture experiments, suggesting that, in these complex multicracking situations also, the organization into aftershock sequences and associated seismic laws are also ruled by the propagation of individual microcrack fronts, and not by the collective, stress-mediated, microcrack nucleation. Conversely, the relations are not fulfilled in seismology signals, suggesting that

  9. Polymer coating of glass microballoons levitated in a focused acoustic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.T.; Lee, M.C.; Feng, I.A.; Elleman, D.D.; Wang, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) glass microballoons (GMBs) levitated in a focusing radiator acoustic device can be coated with liquid materials by deploying the liquid into the levitation field with a stepped-horn atomizer. The GMB can be forced to the center of the coating liquid with a strong acoustically generated centering force. Water solutions of organic polymers, uv-curable liquid organic monomers, and paraffin waxes have been used to prepare solid coatings on the surface of GMBs using this technique

  10. Near field acoustic holography with microphones mounted on a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Moreno, Guillermo; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2008-01-01

    Spherical near field acoustic holography (spherical NAH) is a technique that makes it pos-sible to reconstruct the sound field inside and just outside an acoustically transparent spherical surface on which the sound pressure is measured with an array of microphones with negligible scattering...... is only valid if it can be assumed that the sphere has a negligible in-fluence on the incident sound field, and this is not necessarily a good assumption when the sphere is very close to a radiating surface. This paper describes the modified spherical NAH theory and examines the matter through simulations...

  11. Spherical near field acoustic holography with microphones on a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Hald, Jørgen; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2008-01-01

    Spherical near field acoustic holography (SNAH) is a recently developed technique that makes it possible to reconstruct the sound field inside and just outside an acoustically transparent spherical surface on which the sound pressure is measured with an array of microphones with negligible...... with an array of microphones flush-mounted on a rigid sphere. However, this approach is only valid if it can be assumed that the sphere has a negligible influence on the incident sound field, in other words if multiple scattering can be ignored, and this is not necessarily a good assumption when the sphere...

  12. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses.

  13. A line array based near field imaging technique for characterising acoustical properties of elongated targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, F.P.G.

    1995-01-01

    With near field imaging techniques the acoustical pressure waves at distances other than the recorded can be calculated. Normally, acquisition on a two dimensional plane is necessary and extrapolation is performed by a Rayleigh integral. A near field single line instead of two dimensional plane

  14. Calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydock, David [Unilever R and D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedford MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-15

    We present a new calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field. We use the formula to calculate the force on a cylinder which is free to move in the field and one which is fixed in space.

  15. Calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David

    2005-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the radiation force on a cylinder in a standing wave acoustic field. We use the formula to calculate the force on a cylinder which is free to move in the field and one which is fixed in space

  16. Suppression of sound radiation to far field of near-field acoustic communication system using evanescent sound field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ayaka; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Mizutani, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A method of suppressing sound radiation to the far field of a near-field acoustic communication system using an evanescent sound field is proposed. The amplitude of the evanescent sound field generated from an infinite vibrating plate attenuates exponentially with increasing a distance from the surface of the vibrating plate. However, a discontinuity of the sound field exists at the edge of the finite vibrating plate in practice, which broadens the wavenumber spectrum. A sound wave radiates over the evanescent sound field because of broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. Therefore, we calculated the optimum distribution of the particle velocity on the vibrating plate to reduce the broadening of the wavenumber spectrum. We focused on a window function that is utilized in the field of signal analysis for reducing the broadening of the frequency spectrum. The optimization calculation is necessary for the design of window function suitable for suppressing sound radiation and securing a spatial area for data communication. In addition, a wide frequency bandwidth is required to increase the data transmission speed. Therefore, we investigated a suitable method for calculating the sound pressure level at the far field to confirm the variation of the distribution of sound pressure level determined on the basis of the window shape and frequency. The distribution of the sound pressure level at a finite distance was in good agreement with that obtained at an infinite far field under the condition generating the evanescent sound field. Consequently, the window function was optimized by the method used to calculate the distribution of the sound pressure level at an infinite far field using the wavenumber spectrum on the vibrating plate. According to the result of comparing the distributions of the sound pressure level in the cases with and without the window function, it was confirmed that the area whose sound pressure level was reduced from the maximum level to -50 dB was

  17. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K; Ju, X D; Lu, J Q; Men, B Y

    2014-01-01

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes. (paper)

  18. Design of acoustic logging signal source of imitation based on field programmable gate array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.; Ju, X. D.; Lu, J. Q.; Men, B. Y.

    2014-08-01

    An acoustic logging signal source of imitation is designed and realized, based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), to improve the efficiency of examining and repairing acoustic logging tools during research and field application, and to inspect and verify acoustic receiving circuits and corresponding algorithms. The design of this signal source contains hardware design and software design,and the hardware design uses an FPGA as the control core. Four signals are made first by reading the Random Access Memory (RAM) data which are inside the FPGA, then dealing with the data by digital to analog conversion, amplification, smoothing and so on. Software design uses VHDL, a kind of hardware description language, to program the FPGA. Experiments illustrate that the ratio of signal to noise for the signal source is high, the waveforms are stable, and also its functions of amplitude adjustment, frequency adjustment and delay adjustment are in accord with the characteristics of real acoustic logging waveforms. These adjustments can be used to imitate influences on sonic logging received waveforms caused by many kinds of factors such as spacing and span of acoustic tools, sonic speeds of different layers and fluids, and acoustic attenuations of different cementation planes.

  19. Effect of inhomogeneous temperature fields on acoustic streaming structures in resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Milan; Bednařík, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Acoustic streaming in 2D rectangular resonant channels filled with a fluid with a spatial temperature distribution is studied within this work. An inertial force is assumed for driving the acoustic field; the temperature inhomogeneity is introduced by resonator walls with prescribed temperature distribution. The method of successive approximations is employed to derive linear equations for calculation of primary acoustic and time-averaged secondary fields including the streaming velocity. The model equations have a standard form which allows their numerical integration using a universal solver; in this case, COMSOL Multiphysics was employed. The numerical results show that fluid temperature variations in the direction perpendicular to the resonator axis influence strongly the streaming field if the ratio of the channel width and the viscous boundary layer thickness is big enough; the streaming in the Rayleigh vortices can be supported as well as opposed, which can ultimately lead to the appearance of additional vortices.

  20. Modeling of Acoustic Field for a Parametric Focusing Source Using the Spheroidal Beam Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model of acoustic field for a parametric focusing source on concave spherical surface is proposed. In this model, the source boundary conditions of the Spheroidal Beam Equation (SBE for difference frequency wave excitation were studied. Propagation curves and beam patterns for difference frequency component of the acoustic field are compared with those obtained for Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK model. The results demonstrate that the focused parametric model of SBE is good valid for a large aperture angle in the strongly focused acoustic field. It is also investigated that high directivity and good focal ability with the decreasing of downshift ratio and the increasing of half-aperture angle for the focused parametric model of SBE.

  1. Convergent acoustic field of view in echolocating bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Ratcliffe, John M; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    Most echolocating bats exhibit a strong correlation between body size and the frequency of maximum energy in their echolocation calls (peak frequency), with smaller species using signals of higher frequency than larger ones. Size-signal allometry or acoustic detection constraints imposed on wavel......Most echolocating bats exhibit a strong correlation between body size and the frequency of maximum energy in their echolocation calls (peak frequency), with smaller species using signals of higher frequency than larger ones. Size-signal allometry or acoustic detection constraints imposed...... on wavelength by preferred prey size have been used to explain this relationship. Here we propose the hypothesis that smaller bats emit higher frequencies to achieve directional sonar beams, and that variable beam width is critical for bats. Shorter wavelengths relative to the size of the emitter translate...... into more directional sound beams. Therefore, bats that emit their calls through their mouths should show a relationship between mouth size and wavelength, driving smaller bats to signals of higher frequency. We found that in a flight room mimicking a closed habitat, six aerial hawking vespertilionid...

  2. Flow Field and Acoustic Predictions for Three-Stream Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Shaun Patrick; Henderson, Brenda S.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was used to analyze a three-stream nozzle parametric design space. The study varied bypass-to-core area ratio, tertiary-to-core area ratio and jet operating conditions. The flowfield solutions from the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code Overflow 2.2e were used to pre-screen experimental models for a future test in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Flowfield solutions were considered in conjunction with the jet-noise-prediction code JeNo to screen the design concepts. A two-stream versus three-stream computation based on equal mass flow rates showed a reduction in peak turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) for the three-stream jet relative to that for the two-stream jet which resulted in reduced acoustic emission. Additional three-stream solutions were analyzed for salient flowfield features expected to impact farfield noise. As tertiary power settings were increased there was a corresponding near nozzle increase in shear rate that resulted in an increase in high frequency noise and a reduction in peak TKE. As tertiary-to-core area ratio was increased the tertiary potential core elongated and the peak TKE was reduced. The most noticeable change occurred as secondary-to-core area ratio was increased thickening the secondary potential core, elongating the primary potential core and reducing peak TKE. As forward flight Mach number was increased the jet plume region decreased and reduced peak TKE.

  3. Cross-field dust acoustic instability in a dusty negative ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M

    2010-01-01

    A cross-field dust acoustic instability in a dusty negative ion plasma in a magnetic field is studied using kinetic theory. The instability is driven by the ExB drifts of the ions. It is assumed that the negative ions are much heavier than the positive ions, and that the dust is negatively charged. The case where the positive ions and electrons are magnetized, the negative ions are marginally unmagnetized, and the dust is unmagnetized is considered. The focus is on a situation where Doppler resonances near harmonics of the positive ion gyrofrequency can affect the spectrum of unstable dust acoustic waves. Application to possible laboratory experimental parameters is discussed.

  4. The Influence of Acoustic Field Induced by HRT on Oscillation Behavior of a Single Droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ruan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study on the effects of an acoustic field induced by Hartmann Resonance Tube (HRT on droplet deformation behavior. The characteristics of the acoustic field generated by HRT are investigated. Results show that the acoustic frequency decreases with the increase of the resonator length, the sound pressure level (SPL increases with the increase of nozzle pressure ratio (NPR, and it is also noted that increasing resonator length can cause SPL to decrease, which has rarely been reported in published literature. Further theoretical analysis reveals that the resonance frequency of a droplet has several modes, and when the acoustic frequency equals the droplet’s frequency, heightened droplet responses are observed with the maximum amplitude of the shape oscillation. The experimental results for different resonator cavity lengths, nozzle pressure ratios and droplet diameters confirm the non-linear nature of this problem, and this conclusion is in good agreement with theoretical analysis. Measurements by high speed camera have shown that the introduction of an acoustic field can greatly enhance droplet oscillation, which means with the use of an ultrasonic atomizer based on HRT, the quality of atomization and combustion can be highly improved.

  5. Active field control (AFC) -electro-acoustic enhancement system using acoustical feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hideo; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kishinaga, Shinji; Kawakami, Fukushi

    2003-10-01

    AFC is an electro-acoustic enhancement system using FIR filters to optimize auditory impressions, such as liveness, loudness, and spaciousness. This system has been under development at Yamaha Corporation for more than 15 years and has been installed in approximately 50 venues in Japan to date. AFC utilizes feedback control techniques for recreation of reverberation from the physical reverberation of the room. In order to prevent coloration problems caused by a closed loop condition, two types of time-varying control techniques are implemented in the AFC system to ensure smooth loop gain and a sufficient margin in frequency characteristics to prevent instability. Those are: (a) EMR (electric microphone rotator) -smoothing frequency responses between microphones and speakers by changing the combinations of inputs and outputs periodically; (b) fluctuating-FIR -smoothing frequency responses of FIR filters and preventing coloration problems caused by fixed FIR filters, by moving each FIR tap periodically on time axis with a different phase and time period. In this paper, these techniques are summarized. A block diagram of AFC using new equipment named AFC1, which has been developed at Yamaha Corporation and released recently in the US, is also presented.

  6. Recovering an elastic obstacle containing embedded objects by the acoustic far-field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fenglong; Yang, Jiaqing; Zhang, Bo

    2018-01-01

    Consider the inverse scattering problem of time-harmonic acoustic waves by a 3D bounded elastic obstacle which may contain embedded impenetrable obstacles inside. We propose a novel and simple technique to show that the elastic obstacle can be uniquely recovered by the acoustic far-field pattern at a fixed frequency, disregarding its contents. Our method is based on constructing a well-posed modified interior transmission problem on a small domain and makes use of an a priori estimate for both the acoustic and elastic wave fields in the usual H 1-norm. In the case when there is no obstacle embedded inside the elastic body, our method gives a much simpler proof for the uniqueness result obtained previously in the literature (Natroshvili et al 2000 Rend. Mat. Serie VII 20 57-92 Monk and Selgas 2009 Inverse Problems Imaging 3 173-98).

  7. Dynamics of a spherical particle in an acoustic field: A multiscale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Jin-Han; Vanneste, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    A rigid spherical particle in an acoustic wave field oscillates at the wave period but has also a mean motion on a longer time scale. The dynamics of this mean motion is crucial for numerous applications of acoustic microfluidics, including particle manipulation and flow visualisation. It is controlled by four physical effects: acoustic (radiation) pressure, streaming, inertia, and viscous drag. In this paper, we carry out a systematic multiscale analysis of the problem in order to assess the relative importance of these effects depending on the parameters of the system that include wave amplitude, wavelength, sound speed, sphere radius, and viscosity. We identify two distinguished regimes characterised by a balance among three of the four effects, and we derive the equations that govern the mean particle motion in each regime. This recovers and organises classical results by King [“On the acoustic radiation pressure on spheres,” Proc. R. Soc. A 147, 212–240 (1934)], Gor'kov [“On the forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in an ideal fluid,” Sov. Phys. 6, 773–775 (1962)], and Doinikov [“Acoustic radiation pressure on a rigid sphere in a viscous fluid,” Proc. R. Soc. London A 447, 447–466 (1994)], clarifies the range of validity of these results, and reveals a new nonlinear dynamical regime. In this regime, the mean motion of the particle remains intimately coupled to that of the surrounding fluid, and while viscosity affects the fluid motion, it plays no part in the acoustic pressure. Simplified equations, valid when only two physical effects control the particle motion, are also derived. They are used to obtain sufficient conditions for the particle to behave as a passive tracer of the Lagrangian-mean fluid motion

  8. Temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental shelf with random internal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Chen, Tianrun; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2013-11-01

    An analytical model derived from normal mode theory for the accumulated effects of range-dependent multiple forward scattering is applied to estimate the temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental-shelf waveguide containing random three-dimensional internal waves. The modeled coherence time scale of narrow band low-frequency acoustic field fluctuations after propagating through a continental-shelf waveguide is shown to decay with a power-law of range to the -1/2 beyond roughly 1 km, decrease with increasing internal wave energy, to be consistent with measured acoustic coherence time scales. The model should provide a useful prediction of the acoustic coherence time scale as a function of internal wave energy in continental-shelf environments. The acoustic coherence time scale is an important parameter in remote sensing applications because it determines (i) the time window within which standard coherent processing such as matched filtering may be conducted, and (ii) the number of statistically independent fluctuations in a given measurement period that determines the variance reduction possible by stationary averaging.

  9. Calculation of acoustic field based on laser-measured vibration velocities on ultrasonic transducer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Zhao, Nannan; Gao, Zhijian; Mao, Kai; Chen, Wenyu; Fu, Xin

    2018-05-01

    Determination of the distribution of a generated acoustic field is valuable for studying ultrasonic transducers, including providing the guidance for transducer design and the basis for analyzing their performance, etc. A method calculating the acoustic field based on laser-measured vibration velocities on the ultrasonic transducer surface is proposed in this paper. Without knowing the inner structure of the transducer, the acoustic field outside it can be calculated by solving the governing partial differential equation (PDE) of the field based on the specified boundary conditions (BCs). In our study, the BC on the transducer surface, i.e. the distribution of the vibration velocity on the surface, is accurately determined by laser scanning measurement of discrete points and follows a data fitting computation. In addition, to ensure the calculation accuracy for the whole field even in an inhomogeneous medium, a finite element method is used to solve the governing PDE based on the mixed BCs, including the discretely measured velocity data and other specified BCs. The method is firstly validated on numerical piezoelectric transducer models. The acoustic pressure distributions generated by a transducer operating in an homogeneous and inhomogeneous medium, respectively, are both calculated by the proposed method and compared with the results from other existing methods. Then, the method is further experimentally validated with two actual ultrasonic transducers used for flow measurement in our lab. The amplitude change of the output voltage signal from the receiver transducer due to changing the relative position of the two transducers is calculated by the proposed method and compared with the experimental data. This method can also provide the basis for complex multi-physical coupling computations where the effect of the acoustic field should be taken into account.

  10. Near field acoustic holography based on the equivalent source method and pressure-velocity transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.-B.; Chen, X.-Z.; Jacobsen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of using the normal component of the particle velocity rather than the sound pressure in the hologram plane as the input of conventional spatial Fourier transform based near field acoustic holography (NAH) and also as the input of the statistically optimized variant of NAH has recen...... generated by sources on the two sides of the hologram plane is also examined....

  11. A modeling approach to predict acoustic nonlinear field generated by a transmitter with an aluminum lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingbo; Liu, Zhenbo; Chen, Tao; Li, Faqi; Zhang, Dong

    2011-09-01

    In this work, the authors propose a modeling approach to compute the nonlinear acoustic field generated by a flat piston transmitter with an attached aluminum lens. In this approach, the geometrical parameters (radius and focal length) of a virtual source are initially determined by Snell's refraction law and then adjusted based on the Rayleigh integral result in the linear case. Then, this virtual source is used with the nonlinear spheroidal beam equation (SBE) model to predict the nonlinear acoustic field in the focal region. To examine the validity of this approach, the calculated nonlinear result is compared with those from the Westervelt and (Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov) KZK equations for a focal intensity of 7 kW/cm(2). Results indicate that this approach could accurately describe the nonlinear acoustic field in the focal region with less computation time. The proposed modeling approach is shown to accurately describe the nonlinear acoustic field in the focal region. Compared with the Westervelt equation, the computation time of this approach is significantly reduced. It might also be applicable for the widely used concave focused transmitter with a large aperture angle.

  12. A new theoretical basis for numerical simulations of nonlinear acoustic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Janusz

    2000-07-01

    Nonlinear acoustic equations can be considerably simplified. The presented model retains the accuracy of a more complex description of nonlinearity and a uniform description of near and far fields (in contrast to the KZK equation). A method has been presented for obtaining solutions of Kuznetsov's equation from the solutions of the model under consideration. Results of numerical calculations, including comparative ones, are presented.

  13. Assessment of ELF magnetic fields produced by independent power lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucca, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of assessing the ELF (extremely low-frequency) magnetic fields produced, in a certain area characterised by the presence of more than one independent power line, is faced. The use of the incoherent summation of the single contributions, as an advantageous estimator of the total magnetic field, is proposed and justified by means of a heuristic procedure. This kind of approach can be seen as a useful and practical tool to be employed in environmental impact analysis and in assessing long-term human exposure to ELF magnetic fields. (authors)

  14. Use of near field acoustic levitation sliding contact

    OpenAIRE

    Stolarski, TA; Woolliscroft, CI

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into producing self-levitation effect using piezo-electric actuators (PZT). Self-levitation has been demonstrated and results are presented and discussed. A relationship between the levitation distance and weight of the levitating sample has been found. In addition the orientation and position of the PZTs has been found to affect the levitation distance. Modal shapes of the vibration plates used have been produced through modelling annd found to accurately...

  15. Adaptive plasticity in wild field cricket's acoustic signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Bertram

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive when phenotypes are closely matched to changes in the environment. In crickets, rhythmic fluctuations in the biotic and abiotic environment regularly result in diel rhythms in density of sexually active individuals. Given that density strongly influences the intensity of sexual selection, we asked whether crickets exhibit plasticity in signaling behavior that aligns with these rhythmic fluctuations in the socio-sexual environment. We quantified the acoustic mate signaling behavior of wild-caught males of two cricket species, Gryllus veletis and G. pennsylvanicus. Crickets exhibited phenotypically plastic mate signaling behavior, with most males signaling more often and more attractively during the times of day when mating activity is highest in the wild. Most male G. pennsylvanicus chirped more often and louder, with shorter interpulse durations, pulse periods, chirp durations, and interchirp durations, and at slightly higher carrier frequencies during the time of the day that mating activity is highest in the wild. Similarly, most male G. veletis chirped more often, with more pulses per chirp, longer interpulse durations, pulse periods, and chirp durations, shorter interchirp durations, and at lower carrier frequencies during the time of peak mating activity in the wild. Among-male variation in signaling plasticity was high, with some males signaling in an apparently maladaptive manner. Body size explained some of the among-male variation in G. pennsylvanicus plasticity but not G. veletis plasticity. Overall, our findings suggest that crickets exhibit phenotypically plastic mate attraction signals that closely match the fluctuating socio-sexual context they experience.

  16. Ion acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma obliquely propagating to an external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Cheong Rim; Ryu, Chang-Mo; Lee, Nam C.; Lee, D.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear ion acoustic solitary wave in a magnetized dusty plasma, obliquely propagating to the embedding external magnetic field, is revisited. It is found that when the charge density of dust particles is high, the Sagdeev potential needs to be expanded up to δn 4 near n=1. In this case, it is shown that there could exist rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves as well as the kink-type double layer solutions, in addition to the conventional hump-type ones found in the δn 3 expansion. The amplitude variations of ion acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty plasma are also examined with respect to the change of the dust charge density and the wave directional angle

  17. The Chemical Percolation Devolatilization Model Applied to the Devolatilization of Coal in High Intensity Acoustic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veras Carlos A. G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical percolation devolatilization model (CPD was extended for the prediction of drying and devolatilization of coal particles in high intensity acoustic fields found in Rijke tube reactors. The acoustic oscillations enhance the heat and mass transfer processes in the fuel bed as well as in the freeboard, above the grate. The results from simulations in a Rijke tube combustor have shown an increase in the rate of water evaporation and thermal degradation of the particles. The devolatilization model, based on chemical percolation, applied in pulsating regime allowed the dynamic prediction on the yields of CO, CO2, CH4, H2O, other light gases as well as tar which are important on ignition and stabilization of flames. The model predicted the quantity and form of nitrogen containing species generated during devolatilization, for which knowledge is strategically indispensable for reducing pollutant emissions (NOx in flames under acoustic excitation .

  18. Acoustic emission in a superconductor (Nb-Ti) during magnetic field and current sweep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Harehiko

    1980-01-01

    Though superconducting magnets are indispensable in the fields of nuclear fusion, MHD power generation, high energy technology, and the trains using magnetic levitation, the safety of the magnets used for those fields is required to be fully investigated because their accumulating energy reaches up to several GJ. For this purpose, the improvement of monitoring techniques is extremely important to grasp exactly the magnetization of such large energy magnets. Although the detection of the terminal voltage of the magnets has been mainly used so far, the purpose has not yet been fulfilled because various phenomena appear in the form of noises in the terminal voltage. The authors have found the monitoring method using acoustic emission in a system completely independent from voltage observation. From this viewpoint, the experiments have been performed aiming at the generation of acoustic emission in conjunction with magnetization out of the fine structure of super-conductors, taking notice of the emitted sound frequency ranging over several hundred kHz. The results and investigation revealed that the superconductor itself emitted ultrasonic sound. It was found that the observation of this acoustic power intensity was able to monitor not only the magnetization of superconductors but also its current sweep. Since the motion of the magnetic flux is converted into the signal of acoustic field, this measuring method is less affected by noise disturbance from electromagnetic systems, and is expected to be useful for the researches on analyzing superconductor characteristics. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. Effect of aberration on the acoustic field in tissue harmonic imaging (THI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuan; Cleveland, Robin

    2003-10-01

    A numerical simulation was used to study the impact of an aberrating layer on the generation of the fundamental and second-harmonic (SH) field in a tissue harmonic imaging scenario. The simulation used a three-dimensional time-domain code for solving the KZK equation and accounted for arbitrary spatial variations in all acoustic properties. The aberration effect was modeled by assuming that the tissue consisted of two layers where the interface has a spatial variation C that acted like an effective phase screen. Initial experiments were carried out with sinusoidal-shaped interfaces. The sinusoidal interface produced grating lobes which were at least 6 dB larger for the fundamental signal than the SH. The energy outside of the main lobe was found to increase linearly as the amplitude of the interface variation increased. The location of the grating lobes was affected by the spatial period on the interface variation. The inhomogeneous nature of tissue was modeled with an interface with a random spatial variation. With the random interface the average sidelobe level for the fundamental was -30 dB whereas the SH had an average sidelobe level of -36 dB. [Work supported by the NSF through the Center for Subsurface Sensing and Imaging Systems.

  20. Quantum processes in a strong electromagnetic field producing pairs. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D.M.; Gavrilov, S.P.

    1977-01-01

    The Furry picture in quantum electrodynamics with an external field producing real pairs has been generalized. For the required generalization to be achieved all operators of a spinor field are expressed through functions of production and annihilation operators and formulated are the rules for reduction to a generalized normal form, i.e., to such a form in which all the production operators in each term are on the left from all the annihilation operators. The diagram technique for matrix elements of random processes has been considered

  1. Determination of the Accommodation Coefficient Using Vapor/gas Bubble Dynamics in an Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumerov, Nail A.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Allen, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonequilibrium liquid/vapor phase transformations can occur in superheated or subcooled liquids in fast processes such as in evaporation in a vacuum. The rate at which such a phase transformation occurs depends on the "condensation" or "accommodation" coefficient, Beta, which is a property of the interface. Existing measurement techniques for Beta are complex and expensive. The development of a relatively inexpensive and reliable technique for measurement of Beta for a wide range of substances and temperatures is of great practical importance. The dynamics of a bubble in an acoustic field strongly depends on the value of Beta. It is known that near the saturation temperature, small vapor bubbles grow under the action of an acoustic field due to "rectified heat transfer." This finding can be used as the basis for an effective measurement technique of Beta. We developed a theory of vapor bubble behavior in an isotropic acoustic wave and in a plane standing acoustic wave. A numerical code was developed which enables simulation of a variety of experimental situations and accurately takes into account slowly evolving temperature. A parametric study showed that the measurement of Beta can be made over a broad range of frequencies and bubble sizes. We found several interesting regimes and conditions which can be efficiently used for measurements of Beta. Measurements of Beta can be performed in both reduced and normal gravity environments.

  2. A model of the enhancement of coal combustion using high intensity acoustic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuzkurt, S.; Ha, M.Y.; Koopmann, G.H.; Scaroni, A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper a model for the enhancement of coal combustion in the presence of high intensity acoustics is developed. A high intensity acoustic field induces an oscillating velocity over pulverized coal particles otherwise entrained in the main gas stream, resulting in increased heat and mass transfer. The augmented heat and mass transfer coefficients, expressed as space- and time-averaged Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for the oscillating flow, were implemented in an existing computer code (PCGC-2) capable of predicting various aspects of pulverized coal combustion and gasification. Increases in the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers of about 45, 60 and 82.5% at sound pressure levels of 160, 165, and 170 dB for 100 μm coal particles were obtained due to increases in the acoustic slop velocity associated with the increased sound pressure levels. The main effect of the acoustic field was observed during the char combustion phase in a diffusionally controlled situation. A decrease in the char burnout length (time) of 15.7% at 160 dB and 30.2% at 170 dB was obtained compared to the case with no sound for the 100 μm coal particles

  3. Environmental contaminants in oil field produced waters discharged into wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, P. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The 866-acre Loch Katrine wetland complex in Park County, Wyoming provides habitat for many species of aquatic birds. The complex is sustained primarily by oil field produced waters. This study was designed to determine if constituents in oil field produced waters discharged into Custer Lake and to Loch Katrine pose a risk to aquatic birds inhabiting the wetlands. Trace elements, hydrocarbons and radium-226 concentrations were analyzed in water, sediment and biota collected from the complex during 1992. Arsenic, boron, radium-226 and zinc were elevated in some matrices. The presence of radium-226 in aquatic vegetation suggests that this radionuclide is available to aquatic birds. Oil and grease concentrations in water from the produced water discharge exceeded the maximum 10 mg/l permitted by the WDEQ (1990). Total aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments were highest at the produced water discharge, 6.376 μg/g, followed by Custer Lake, 1.104 μg/g. The higher levels of hydrocarbons found at Custer Lake, compared to Loch Katrine, may be explained by Custer Lake's closer proximity to the discharge. Benzo(a)pyrene was not detected in bile from gadwalls collected at Loch Katrine but was detected in bile from northern shovelers collected at Custer Lake. Benzo(a)pyrene concentrations in northern shoveler bile ranged from 500 to 960 ng/g (ppb) wet weight. The presence of benzo(a)pyrene in the shovelers indicates exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons

  4. Underwater Acoustic Matched Field Imaging Based on Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichen Yan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Matched field processing (MFP is an effective method for underwater target imaging and localizing, but its performance is not guaranteed due to the nonuniqueness and instability problems caused by the underdetermined essence of MFP. By exploiting the sparsity of the targets in an imaging area, this paper proposes a compressive sensing MFP (CS-MFP model from wave propagation theory by using randomly deployed sensors. In addition, the model’s recovery performance is investigated by exploring the lower bounds of the coherence parameter of the CS dictionary. Furthermore, this paper analyzes the robustness of CS-MFP with respect to the displacement of the sensors. Subsequently, a coherence-excluding coherence optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (CCOOMP algorithm is proposed to overcome the high coherent dictionary problem in special cases. Finally, some numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed CS-MFP method.

  5. A comparison of inverse boundary element method and near-field acoustical holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuhmacher, Andreas; Hald, Jørgen; Saemann, E.-U.

    1999-01-01

    An inverse boundary element method (IBEM) is used to estimate the surface velocity of a rolling tyre from measurements of the near-field pressure. Subsequently, the sound pressure is calculated over a finite plane surface next to the tyre from the reconstructed velocity field on the tyre surface........ In order to verify the reconstruction process, part of the measurement data is used together with Near-Field Acoustical Holography (NAH). Estimated distributions of sound pressure and particle velocity over a plane surface obtained from the two methods are compared....

  6. Distributed acoustic sensing technique and its field trial in SAGD well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; He, Xiangge; Pan, Yong; Liu, Fei; Yi, Duo; Hu, Chengjun; Zhang, Min; Gu, Lijuan

    2017-10-01

    Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is a very promising way for the development of heavy oil, extra heavy oil and tight oil reservoirs. Proper monitoring of the SAGD operations is essential to avoid operational issues and improve efficiency. Among all the monitoring techniques, micro-seismic monitoring and related interpretation method can give useful information about the steam chamber development and has been extensively studied. Distributed acoustic sensor (DAS) based on Rayleigh backscattering is a newly developed technique that can measure acoustic signal at all points along the sensing fiber. In this paper, we demonstrate a DAS system based on dual-pulse heterodyne demodulation technique and did field trial in SAGD well located in Xinjiang Oilfield, China. The field trail results validated the performance of the DAS system and indicated its applicability in steam-chamber monitoring and hydraulic monitoring.

  7. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  8. Site Study Plan for Acoustics, Deaf Smith County Site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    The Acoustics site study plan describes a field program which characterizes existing sound levels, determines the area's sound propagation characteristics, and monitors the project-related sound emissions. The plan describes for each study: the need for the study, study design, data management and use, schedule, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Requirements Document. 37 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Visualizing flow fields using acoustic Doppler current profilers and the Velocity Mapping Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey is using acoustic Doppler current profilers for much more than routine discharge measurements. These instruments are capable of mapping complex three-dimensional flow fields within rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox to process the ADCP data allows detailed visualization of the data, providing valuable information for a range of studies and applications.

  10. On the slow dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects under High excitation frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilssar, Dotan; Bucher, Izhak

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a simplified analytical model describing the governing dynamics of near-field acoustically levitated objects. The simplification converts the equation of motion coupled with the partial differential equation of a compressible fluid, into a compact, second order ordinary differential equation, where the local stiffness and damping are transparent. The simplified model allows one to more easily analyse and design near-field acoustic levitation based systems, and it also helps to devise closed-loop controller algorithms for such systems. Near-field acoustic levitation employs fast ultrasonic vibrations of a driving surface and exploits the viscosity and the compressibility of a gaseous medium to achieve average, load carrying pressure. It is demonstrated that the slow dynamics dominates the transient behaviour, while the time-scale associated with the fast, ultrasonic excitation has a small presence in the oscillations of the levitated object. Indeed, the present paper formulates the slow dynamics under an ultrasonic excitation without the need to explicitly consider the latter. The simplified model is compared with a numerical scheme based on Reynolds equation and with experiments, both showing reasonably good results.

  11. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-21

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  12. Coupled acoustic-gravity field for dynamic evaluation of ion exchange with a single resin bead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Takahiro; Hirawa, Shungo; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2010-06-01

    A coupled acoustic-gravity field is efficient for entrapping a particle at the position determined by its acoustic properties rather than its size. This field has been applied to the dynamic observation of ion-exchange reactions occurring in a single resin bead. The replacement of counterions in an ion-exchange resin induces changes in its acoustic properties, such as density and compressibility. Therefore, we can visually trace the advancement of an ion-exchange reaction as a time change in the levitation position of a resin bead entrapped in the field. Cation-exchange reactions occurring in resin beads with diameters of 40-120 microm are typically completed within 100-200 s. Ion-exchange equilibrium or kinetics is often evaluated with off-line chemical analyses, which require a batch amount of ion exchangers. Measurements with a single resin particle allow us to evaluate ion-exchange dynamics and kinetics of ions including those that are difficult to measure by usual off-line analyses. The diffusion properties of ions in resins have been successfully evaluated from the time change in the levitation positions of resin beads.

  13. PIV for the characterization of focused field induced acoustic streaming: seeding particle choice evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haj Slama, Rafika; Gilles, Bruno; Ben Chiekh, Maher; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2017-04-01

    This research evaluates the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique for characterizing acoustic streaming flow generated by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). PIV qualification tests, focusing on the seeding particle size (diameter of 5, 20 and 50μm) were carried out in degassed water subjected to a focused field of 550kHz-frequency with an acoustic pressure amplitude of 5.2, 10.5 and 15.7bar at the focus. This study shows that the ultrasonic field, especially the radiation force, can strongly affect seeding particle behavior. Large particles (50μm-diameter) are repelled from the focal zone and gathered at radiation pressure convergence lines on either side of the focus. The calculation of the acoustic radiation pressure applied on these particles explains the observed phenomenon. PIV measurements do not, therefore, properly characterize the streaming flow in this case. On the contrary, small particles (5μm-diameter) velocity measurements were in good agreement with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the water velocity field. A simple criterion approximating the diameter threshold below which seeding particles are qualified for PIV in presence of focused ultrasound is then proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  15. Near-field/far-field array manifold of an acoustic vector-sensor near a reflecting boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue Ivan; Lau, Siu-Kit; Wong, Kainam Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic vector-sensor (a.k.a. the vector hydrophone) is a practical and versatile sound-measurement device, with applications in-room, open-air, or underwater. It consists of three identical uni-axial velocity-sensors in orthogonal orientations, plus a pressure-sensor-all in spatial collocation. Its far-field array manifold [Nehorai and Paldi (1994). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 42, 2481-2491; Hawkes and Nehorai (2000). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 48, 2981-2993] has been introduced into the technical field of signal processing about 2 decades ago, and many direction-finding algorithms have since been developed for this acoustic vector-sensor. The above array manifold is subsequently generalized for outside the far field in Wu, Wong, and Lau [(2010). IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 58, 3946-3951], but only if no reflection-boundary is to lie near the acoustic vector-sensor. As for the near-boundary array manifold for the general case of an emitter in the geometric near field, the far field, or anywhere in between-this paper derives and presents that array manifold in terms of signal-processing mathematics. Also derived here is the corresponding Cramér-Rao bound for azimuth-elevation-distance localization of an incident emitter, with the reflected wave shown to play a critical role on account of its constructive or destructive summation with the line-of-sight wave. The implications on source localization are explored, especially with respect to measurement model mismatch in maximum-likelihood direction finding and with regard to the spatial resolution between coexisting emitters.

  16. Influence of electrical boundary conditions on profiles of acoustic field and electric potential of shear-horizontal acoustic waves in potassium niobate plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, I E; Nedospasov, I A; Kolesov, V V; Qian, Z; Wang, B; Zhu, F

    2018-05-01

    The profiles of an acoustic field and electric potential of the forward and backward shear-horizontal (SH) acoustic waves of a higher order propagating in X-Y potassium niobate plate have been theoretically investigated. It has been shown that by changing electrical boundary conditions on a surface of piezoelectric plates, it is possible to change the distributions of an acoustic field and electric potential of the forward and backward acoustic waves. The dependencies of the distribution of a mechanical displacement and electrical potential over the plate thickness for electrically open and electrically shorted plates have been plotted. The influence of a layer with arbitrary conductivity placed on a one or on the both plate surfaces on the profiles under study, phase and group velocities of the forward and backward acoustic waves in X-Y potassium niobate has been also investigated. The obtained results can be useful for development of the method for control of a particle or electrical charge movement inside the piezoelectric plates, as well a sensor for definition of the thin film conductivity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reciprocity relationships in vector acoustics and their application to vector field calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Thomas J; Smith, Kevin B

    2017-08-01

    The reciprocity equation commonly stated in underwater acoustics relates pressure fields and monopole sources. It is often used to predict the pressure measured by a hydrophone for multiple source locations by placing a source at the hydrophone location and calculating the field everywhere for that source. A similar equation that governs the orthogonal components of the particle velocity field is needed to enable this computational method to be used for acoustic vector sensors. This paper derives a general reciprocity equation that accounts for both monopole and dipole sources. This vector-scalar reciprocity equation can be used to calculate individual components of the received vector field by altering the source type used in the propagation calculation. This enables a propagation model to calculate the received vector field components for an arbitrary number of source locations with a single model run for each vector field component instead of requiring one model run for each source location. Application of the vector-scalar reciprocity principle is demonstrated with analytic solutions for a range-independent environment and with numerical solutions for a range-dependent environment using a parabolic equation model.

  18. PHYSICAL FIELDS OF CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL PIEZOCERAMIC RECEIVER IN PRESENCE OF A FLAT ACOUSTIC SOFT SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Derepa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available System in the form of a circular cylindrical piezoceramic transducer near a flat acoustic screen was analyzed. The aim of the work was to solve the problem of receiving plane sound waves by «cylindrical piezoceramic transducer – flat acoustically soft screen» system.Considered system was characterized by a violation of the radial symmetry of the radiation load of the transducer while maintaining the radial symmetry of the electric load. At the same time, the energy perceived by the system under consideration is distributed between all modes of oscillation of the transducer, while the conversion of mechanical energy into electric is realized only at zero mole of oscillations.Special attention was paid to the method of coupled fields in multiply connected domains using the imaging method. The design model of the «transducer–creen» system was formulated taking into account the interaction of acoustic, mechanical and electric fields in the process of energy conversion, the interaction of a cylindrical transducer with a flat screen and the interaction of a converter with elastic media outside and inside it. The physical fields of the system under consideration were determined by following solutions: the wave equation; equations of motion of thin piezoceramic cylindrical shells in displacements; equations of stimulated electrostatics for piezoceramics for given boundary conditions, conditions for coupling fields at interfaces and electrical conditions.A general conclusion was made concerning solving of an infinite system of linear algebraic equations with respect to the unknown coefficients of the expansion of the fields. As an example of the application of the obtained relations, a calculation was made and an analysis of the dependences of the electric fields of the system under consideration for various parameters of its construction on the direction of arrival on the plane wave system was conducted.

  19. The flame structure in round and plane propane microjet combustion in a transverse acoustic field at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. V.; Grek, G. R.; Katasonov, M. M.; Korobeinichev, O. P.; Litvinenko, Yu. A.; Shmakov, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The results of experimental studies of the structure and features of flame evolution under propane combustion in round and plane microjet flows at low Reynolds numbers in a transverse acoustic field are discussed in this paper. The specific features of flame evolution under these conditions are shown. Based on the new information obtained on free microjet evolution, new phenomena in flame evolution in a transverse acoustic field with round and plane propane microjet combustion are discovered and explained.

  20. Evaluation of a Loudspeaker-Based Virtual Acoustic Environment for Investigating sound-field auditory steady-state responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata-Rodriguez, Valentina; Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Measuring sound-field auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) is a promising new objective clinical procedure for hearing aid fitting validation, particularly for infants who cannot respond to behavioral tests. In practice, room acoustics of non-anechoic test rooms can heavily influence the audito...... tool PARISM (Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method) and validated through measurements. This study discusses the limitations of the system and the potential improvements needed for a more realistic sound-field ASSR simulation....

  1. Measurements of the acoustic field on austenitic welds: a way to higher reliability in ultrasonic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemnitz, P.; Richter, U.; Klueber, H.

    1997-01-01

    In nuclear power plants many of the welds in austenitic tubes have to be inspected by means of ultrasonic techniques. If component-identical test pieces are available, they are used to qualify the ultrasonic test technology. Acoustic field measurements on such test blocks give information whether the beam of the ultrasonic transducer reaches all critical parts of the weld region and which transducer type is best suited. Acoustic fields have been measured at a bimetallic, a V-shaped and a narrow gap weld in test pieces of wall thickness 33, 25 and 17 mm, respectively. Compression wave transducers 45, 60 and 70 and 45 shear wave transducers have been included in the investigation. The results are presented: (1) as acoustic C-scans for one definite probe position, (2) as series of C-scans for the probe moving on a track perpendicular to the weld, (3) as scan along the weld and (4) as effective beam profile. The influence of the scanning electrodynamic probe is also discussed. (orig.)

  2. Classification of underwater targets from autonomous underwater vehicle sampled bistatic acoustic scattered fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischell, Erin M; Schmidt, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    One of the long term goals of autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) minehunting is to have multiple inexpensive AUVs in a harbor autonomously classify hazards. Existing acoustic methods for target classification using AUV-based sensing, such as sidescan and synthetic aperture sonar, require an expensive payload on each outfitted vehicle and post-processing and/or image interpretation. A vehicle payload and machine learning classification methodology using bistatic angle dependence of target scattering amplitudes between a fixed acoustic source and target has been developed for onboard, fully autonomous classification with lower cost-per-vehicle. To achieve the high-quality, densely sampled three-dimensional (3D) bistatic scattering data required by this research, vehicle sampling behaviors and an acoustic payload for precision timed data acquisition with a 16 element nose array were demonstrated. 3D bistatic scattered field data were collected by an AUV around spherical and cylindrical targets insonified by a 7-9 kHz fixed source. The collected data were compared to simulated scattering models. Classification and confidence estimation were shown for the sphere versus cylinder case on the resulting real and simulated bistatic amplitude data. The final models were used for classification of simulated targets in real time in the LAMSS MOOS-IvP simulation package [M. Benjamin, H. Schmidt, P. Newman, and J. Leonard, J. Field Rob. 27, 834-875 (2010)].

  3. Multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann modeling of the acoustic field generated by focused transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Feng; Guo, Xiasheng; Tu, Juan; Cheng, Jianchun; Zhang, Dong

    The high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has become an attractive therapeutic tool for the noninvasive tumor treatment. The ultrasonic transducer is the key component in HIFU treatment to generate the HIFU energy. The dimension of focal region generated by the transducer is closely relevant to the safety of HIFU treatment. Therefore, it is essential to numerically investigate the focal region of the transducer. Although the conventional acoustic wave equations have been used successfully to describe the acoustic field, there still exist some inherent drawbacks. In this work, we presented an axisymmetric isothermal multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) model with the Bouzidi-Firdaouss-Lallemand (BFL) boundary condition in cylindrical coordinate system. With this model, some preliminary simulations were firstly conducted to determine a reasonable value of the relaxation parameter. Then, the validity of the model was examined by comparing the results obtained with the LBM results with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation and the Spheroidal beam equation (SBE) for the focused transducers with different aperture angles, respectively. In addition, the influences of the aperture angle on the focal region were investigated. The proposed model in this work will provide significant references for the parameter optimization of the focused transducer for applications in the HIFU treatment or other fields, and provide new insights into the conventional acoustic numerical simulations.

  4. Angular Spectrum Method for the Focused Acoustic Field of a Linear Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgroune, D.; de Belleval, J. F.; Djelouah, H.

    Applications involving non-destructive testing or acoustical imaging are more and more sophisticated. In this context, a model based on the angular spectrum approach is tackled in view to calculate the focused impulse field radiated by a linear transducer through a plane fluid-solid interface. It is well known that electronic focusing, based on a cylindrical delay law, like for the classical cases (lenses, curved transducer), leads to an inaccurate focusing in the solid due to geometric aberrations errors affecting refraction. Generally, there is a significant difference between the acoustic focal distance and the geometrical focal due to refraction. In our work, an optimized delay law, based on the Fermat's principle is established, particularly at an oblique incidence where the geometrical considerations, relatively simple in normal incidence, become quickly laborious. Numerical simulations of impulse field are judiciously carried out. Subsequently, the input parameters are optimally selected in order to achieve good computation accuracy and a high focusing. The overall results, involving compression and shear waves, have highlighted the focusing improvement in the solid when compared to the currently available approaches. Indeed, the acoustic focal distance is very close to geometrical focal distance and then, allows better control of the refracted angular beam profile (refraction angle, focusing depth and focal size).

  5. Inferring Pre-shock Acoustic Field From Post-shock Pitot Pressure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Xiao, Heng; Virginia Tech Team; Missouri Univ of Sci; Tech Team

    2017-11-01

    Linear interaction analysis (LIA) and iterative ensemble Kalman method are used to convert post-shock Pitot pressure fluctuations to static pressure fluctuations in front of the shock. The LIA is used as the forward model for the transfer function associated with a homogeneous field of acoustic waves passing through a nominally normal shock wave. The iterative ensemble Kalman method is then employed to infer the spectrum of upstream acoustic waves based on the post-shock Pitot pressure measured at a single point. Several test cases with synthetic and real measurement data are used to demonstrate the merits of the proposed inference scheme. The study provides the basis for measuring tunnel freestream noise with intrusive probes in noisy supersonic wind tunnels.

  6. Acoustic field characteristics and performance analysis of a looped travelling-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, T.; Yang, R.; Wang, Y.; Feng, Y.; Tang, K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Key issues for a highly efficient thermoacoustic conversion are analyzed. • A looped thermoacoustic refrigerator with one engine stage and one refrigerator stage is proposed. • Effective refrigeration powered by heat sources below 250 °C is demonstrated in the simulation. • Impact of cooling/heating temperatures on system performance is analyzed in view of acoustic field. - Abstract: This paper focuses on a looped travelling-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator powered by thermal energy. Based on a simplified model for the regenerator, key issues for a highly efficient thermoacoustic conversion, including both thermal-to-acoustic and heat-pumping processes, are summarized. A looped travelling-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator with one engine stage and one refrigerator stage is proposed, with emphasis on high normalized acoustic impedance, sufficient volumetric velocity and appropriate phase relation close to travelling wave in the regenerators of both engine and refrigerator. Simulation results indicate that for the ambient temperature of 30 °C, the looped travelling-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator can be powered by the heat at 210–250 °C to achieve the refrigeration at −3 °C with the overall coefficient of performance above 0.4 and the relative Carnot coefficient of performance over 13%. The characteristics of the acoustic field inside the loop configuration are analyzed in detail to reveal the operation mechanism of the looped travelling-wave thermoacoustic refrigerator. Additional analyses are conducted on the impact of the cooling and the heating temperatures, which are of great concern to the refrigeration applications and the utilization of low-grade thermal energy.

  7. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  8. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael W.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2017-08-15

    Disclosed herein is a acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow that includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  9. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, S.S.; Hassan, S.M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2015), s. 175-182 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * optical emission spectroscopy * plasma-B field interaction * plasma temperature and density * tin plasma Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  10. Sensitivity of simulated transcranial ultrasound fields to acoustic medium property maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James; Martin, Eleanor; Cox, Ben; Treeby, Bradley E.

    2017-04-01

    High intensity transcranial focused ultrasound is an FDA approved treatment for essential tremor, while low-intensity applications such as neurostimulation and opening the blood brain barrier are under active research. Simulations of transcranial ultrasound propagation are used both for focusing through the skull, and predicting intracranial fields. Maps of the skull acoustic properties are necessary for accurate simulations, and can be derived from medical images using a variety of methods. The skull maps range from segmented, homogeneous models, to fully heterogeneous models derived from medical image intensity. In the present work, the impact of uncertainties in the skull properties is examined using a model of transcranial propagation from a single element focused transducer. The impact of changes in bone layer geometry and the sound speed, density, and acoustic absorption values is quantified through a numerical sensitivity analysis. Sound speed is shown to be the most influential acoustic property, and must be defined with less than 4% error to obtain acceptable accuracy in simulated focus pressure, position, and volume. Changes in the skull thickness of as little as 0.1 mm can cause an error in peak intracranial pressure of greater than 5%, while smoothing with a 1 \\text{m}{{\\text{m}}3} kernel to imitate the effect of obtaining skull maps from low resolution images causes an increase of over 50% in peak pressure. The numerical results are confirmed experimentally through comparison with sonications made through 3D printed and resin cast skull bone phantoms.

  11. Pulsed TV holography measurement and digital reconstruction of compression acoustic wave fields: application to nondestructive testing of thick metallic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo, C; Doval, A F; Deán-Ben, X L; López-Vázquez, J C; Fernández, J L; Hernández-Montes, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique that numerically reconstructs the complex acoustic amplitude (i.e. the acoustic amplitude and phase) of a compression acoustic wave in the interior volume of a specimen from a set of full-field optical measurements of the instantaneous displacement of the surface. The volume of a thick specimen is probed in transmission mode by short bursts of narrowband compression acoustic waves generated at one of its faces. The temporal evolution of the displacement field induced by the bursts emerging at the opposite surface is measured by pulsed digital holographic interferometry (pulsed TV holography). A spatio-temporal 3D Fourier transform processing of the measured data yields the complex acoustic amplitude at the plane of the surface as a sequence of 2D complex-valued maps. Finally, a numerical implementation of the Rayleigh–Sommerfeld diffraction formula is employed to reconstruct the complex acoustic amplitude at other planes in the interior volume of the specimen. The whole procedure can be regarded as a combination of optical digital holography and acoustical holography methods. The technique was successfully tested on aluminium specimens with and without an internal artificial defect and sample results are presented. In particular, information about the shape and position of the defect was retrieved in the experiment performed on the flawed specimen, which indicates the potential applicability of the technique for the nondestructive testing of materials

  12. Preliminary study of the effect of the turbulent flow field around complex surfaces on their acoustic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, W. A.; Boldman, D.

    1978-01-01

    Fairly extensive measurements have been conducted of the turbulent flow around various surfaces as a basis for a study of the acoustic characteristics involved. In the experiments the flow from a nozzle was directed upon various two-dimensional surface configurations such as the three-flap model. A turbulent flow field description is given and an estimate of the acoustic characteristics is provided. The developed equations are based upon fundamental theories for simple configurations having simple flows. Qualitative estimates are obtained regarding the radiation pattern and the velocity power law. The effect of geometry and turbulent flow distribution on the acoustic emission from simple configurations are discussed.

  13. Analysis of Field Data to Describe the Effect of Context (Acoustic and Non-Acoustic Factors on Urban Soundscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmele Herranz-Pascual

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The need to improve acoustic environments in our cities has led to increased interest in correcting or minimising noise pollution in urban environments, something that has been associated with the resurgence of the soundscape approach. This line of research highlights the importance of context in the perception of acoustic environments. Despite this, few studies consider together a wide number of variables relating to the context, and analyse the relative importance of each. The purpose of this paper is therefore to identify the acoustic and non-acoustic characteristics of a place (context that influence an individual’s perception of the sound environment and the relative importance of these factors in soundscape. The aim is to continue advancing in the definition of an acoustic comfort indicator for urban places. The data used here were collected in various soundscape campaigns carried out by Tecnalia in Bilbao (Spain between 2011 and 2014. These studies involved 534 evaluations of 10 different places. The results indicate that many diverse contextual factors determine soundscape, the most important being the congruence between soundscape and landscape. The limitations of the findings and suggestions for further research are also discussed.

  14. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong; Morsy, Ahmed Mohamed Aly; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  15. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. Magnetic field induced random pulse trains of magnetic and acoustic noises in martensitic single-crystal Ni2MnGa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daróczi, Lajos; Piros, Eszter; Tóth, László Z.; Beke, Dezső L.

    2017-07-01

    Jerky magnetic and acoustic noises were evoked in a single variant martensitic Ni2MnGa single crystal (produced by uniaxial compression) by application of an external magnetic field along the hard magnetization direction. It is shown that after reaching the detwinning threshold, spontaneous reorientation of martensite variants (twins) leads not only to acoustic emission but magnetic two-directional noises as well. At small magnetic fields, below the above threshold, unidirectional magnetic emission is also observed and attributed to a Barkhausen-type noise due to magnetic domain wall motions during magnetization along the hard direction. After the above first run, in cycles of decreasing and increasing magnetic field, at low-field values, weak, unidirectional Barkhausen noise is detected and attributed to the discontinuous motion of domain walls during magnetization along the easy magnetization direction. The magnetic noise is also measured by constraining the sample in the same initial variant state along the hard direction and, after the unidirectional noise (as obtained also in the first run), a two-directional noise package is developed and it is attributed to domain rotations. From the statistical analysis of the above noises, the critical exponents, characterizing the power-law behavior, are calculated and compared with each other and with the literature data. Time correlations within the magnetic as well as acoustic signals lead to a common scaled power function (with β =-1.25 exponent) for both types of signals.

  17. Does Attention Play a Role in Dynamic Receptive Field Adaptation to Changing Acoustic Salience in A1?

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Jonathan; Elhilali, Mounya; David, Stephen; Shamma, Shihab

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic filter properties of A1 neurons can dynamically adapt to stimulus statistics, classical conditioning, instrumental learning and the changing auditory attentional focus. We have recently developed an experimental paradigm that allows us to view cortical receptive field plasticity on-line as the animal meets different behavioral challenges by attending to salient acoustic cues and changing its cortical filters to enhance performance. We propose that attention is the key trigger that in...

  18. Imaging of microwave-induced acoustic fields in LiNbO{sub 3} by high-performance Brillouin microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, B [Lab. Europeen de Recherche Univ.: Saarland-Lorraine, Univ. des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises et Applications, CNRS-UMR 7040, Univ. H. Poincare, Nancy I, F-54506 (France); Krueger, J K [Lab. Europeen de Recherche Univ.: Saarland-Lorraine, Univ. des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Fachrichtung 7.2, Experimentalphysik, Univ. des Saarlandes, Bau 38, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Elmazria, O [Laboratoire Europeen de Recherche Universitaire: Saarland-Lorraine, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises et Applications, CNRS-UMR 7040, Universite H. Poincare, Nancy I, F-54506 (France); Bouvot, L [Laboratoire Europeen de Recherche Universitaire: Saarland-Lorraine, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises et Applications, CNRS-UMR 7040, Universite H. Poincare, Nancy I, F-54506 (France); Mainka, J [Laboratoire Europeen de Recherche Universitaire: Saarland-Lorraine, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Fachrichtung 7.2, Experimentalphysik, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Bau 38, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Sanctuary, R [Laboratoire Europeen de Recherche Universitaire: Saarland-Lorraine, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Campus Luxembourg-Limpertsberg, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Rouxel, D [Lab. Europeen de Recherche Univ.: Saarland-Lorraine, Univ. des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises et Applications, CNRS-UMR 7040, Univ. H. Poincare, Nancy I, F-54506 (France); Alnot, P [Lab. Europeen de Recherche Univ.: Saarland-Lorraine, Univ. des Saarlandes, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)]|[Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises et Applications, CNRS-UMR 7040, Univ. H. Poincare, Nancy I, F-54506 (France)

    2005-06-21

    High performance Brillouin microscopy (BM) has been used to characterize the spatial distribution of piezoelectrically induced acoustic fields excited at microwave frequencies in a LiNbO{sub 3} single crystal. It is demonstrated that under suitable conditions BM is able to detect microwave-induced bulk as well as surface acoustic waves. Brillouin spectroscopy is able to probe sound wave intensities of induced phonons, which are as small as those of thermal phonons.

  19. Online monitoring of the two-dimensional temperature field in a boiler furnace based on acoustic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shiping; Shen, Guoqing; An, Liansuo; Niu, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Online monitoring of the temperature field is crucial to optimally adjust combustion within a boiler. In this paper, acoustic computed tomography (CT) technology was used to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. The physical principles behind acoustic CT, acoustic signals and time delay estimation were studied. Then, the technique was applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. Acoustic CT technology was used to monitor the temperature field of the cross-section in the boiler furnace, and the temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. The linear sweeping frequency signal was adopted as the sound source signal, whose sweeping frequency ranged from 500 to 3000 Hz with a sweeping cycle of 0.1 s. The generalized cross-correlation techniques with PHAT and ML were used as the time delay estimation method when the boiler was in different states. Its actual operation indicated that the monitored images accurately represented the combustion state of the boiler, and the acoustic CT system was determined to be accurate and reliable. - Highlights: • An online monitoring approach to monitor temperature field in a boiler furnace. • The paper provides acoustic CT technology to obtain the temperature profile of a furnace cross-section. • The temperature profile was reconstructed through ART iteration. • The technique is applied to a domestic 600-MW coal-fired boiler. • The monitored images accurately represent the combustion state of the boiler

  20. Evaluation of SHM system produced by additive manufacturing via acoustic emission and other NDT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strantza, Maria; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; de Baere, Dieter; Guillaume, Patrick; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-10-21

    During the last decades, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are used in order to detect damage in structures. We have developed a novel structural health monitoring approach, the so-called "effective structural health monitoring" (eSHM) system. The current SHM system is incorporated into a metallic structure by means of additive manufacturing (AM) and has the possibility to advance life safety and reduce direct operative costs. It operates based on a network of capillaries that are integrated into an AM structure. The internal pressure of the capillaries is continuously monitored by a pressure sensor. When a crack nucleates and reaches the capillary, the internal pressure changes signifying the existence of the flaw. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the crack detection capacity of the eSHM system and crack location accuracy by means of various non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques. During this study, detailed acoustic emission (AE) analysis was applied in AM materials for the first time in order to investigate if phenomena like the Kaiser effect and waveform parameters used in conventional metals can offer valuable insight into the damage accumulation of the AM structure as well. Liquid penetrant inspection, eddy current and radiography were also used in order to confirm the fatigue damage and indicate the damage location on un-notched four-point bending AM metallic specimens with an integrated eSHM system. It is shown that the eSHM system in combination with NDT can provide correct information on the damage condition of additive manufactured metals.

  1. Acoustic pressure waves induced in human heads by RF pulses from high-field MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2010-04-01

    The current evolution toward greater image resolution from magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanners has prompted the exploration of higher strength magnetic fields and use of higher levels of radio frequencies (RFs). Auditory perception of RF pulses by humans has been reported during MRI with head coils. It has shown that the mechanism of interaction for the auditory effect is caused by an RF pulse-induced thermoelastic pressure wave inside the head. We report a computational study of the intensity and frequency of thermoelastic pressure waves generated by RF pulses in the human head inside high-field MRI and clinical scanners. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) guides limit the local specific absorption rate (SAR) in the body-including the head-to 8 W kg(-1). We present results as functions of SAR and show that for a given SAR the peak acoustic pressures generated in the anatomic head model were essentially the same at 64, 300, and 400 MHz (1.5, 7.0, and 9.4 T). Pressures generated in the anatomic head are comparable to the threshold pressure of 20 mPa for sound perception by humans at the cochlea for 4 W kg(-1). Moreover, results indicate that the peak acoustic pressure in the brain is only 2 to 3 times the auditory threshold at the U.S. FDA guideline of 8 W kg(-1). Even at a high SAR of 20 W kg(-1), where the acoustic pressure in the brain could be more than 7 times the auditory threshold, the sound pressure levels would not be more than 17 db above threshold of perception at the cochlea.

  2. Modeling of Focused Acoustic Field of a Concave Multi-annular Phased Array Using Spheroidal Beam Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Li; Shou, Wen-De; Hui, Chun

    2012-02-01

    A theoretical model of focused acoustic field for a multi-annular phased array on concave spherical surface is proposed. In this model, the source boundary conditions of the spheroidal beam equation (SBE) for multi-annular phased elements are studied. Acoustic field calculated by the dynamic focusing model of SBE is compared with numerical results of the O'Neil and Khokhlov—Zabolotskaya—Kuznetsov (KZK) model, respectively. Axial dynamic focusing and the harmonic effects are presented. The results demonstrate that the dynamic focusing model of SBE is good valid for a concave multi-annular phased array with a large aperture angle in the linear or nonlinear field.

  3. Numerical Calculation and Measurement of Nonlinear Acoustic Fields in Ultrasound Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagishi, Tetsuya; Saito, Shigemi; Mine, Yoshitaka

    2002-05-01

    In order to develop a tool for designing on the ultrasonic probe and its peripheral devices for tissue-harmonic-imaging systems, a study is carried out to compare the calculation and observation results of nonlinear acoustic fields for a diagnostic ultrasound system. The pulsed ultrasound with a center frequency of 2.5 MHz is emanated from a weakly focusing sector probe with a 6.5 mm aperture radius and a 50 mm focal length into an agar phantom with an attenuation coefficient of about 0.6 dB/cm/MHz or 1.2 dB/cm/MHz. The nonlinear acoustic field is measured using a needle-type hydrophone. The calculation is based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov(KZK) equation which is modified so that the frequency dependence of the attenuation coefficient is the same as that in biological tissue. This equation is numerically solved with the implicit backward method employing the iterative method. The measured and calculated amplitude spectra show good agreement with each other.

  4. Reconstruction of an acoustic pressure field in a resonance tube by particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuu, K; Hasegawa, S

    2015-11-01

    A technique for estimating an acoustic field in a resonance tube is suggested. The estimation of an acoustic field in a resonance tube is important for the development of the thermoacoustic engine, and can be conducted employing two sensors to measure pressure. While this measurement technique is known as the two-sensor method, care needs to be taken with the location of pressure sensors when conducting pressure measurements. In the present study, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is employed instead of a pressure measurement by a sensor, and two-dimensional velocity vector images are extracted as sequential data from only a one- time recording made by a video camera of PIV. The spatial velocity amplitude is obtained from those images, and a pressure distribution is calculated from velocity amplitudes at two points by extending the equations derived for the two-sensor method. By means of this method, problems relating to the locations and calibrations of multiple pressure sensors are avoided. Furthermore, to verify the accuracy of the present method, the experiments are conducted employing the conventional two-sensor method and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Then, results by the proposed method are compared with those obtained with the two-sensor method and LDV.

  5. An acoustic analysis of English vowels produced by speakers of seven different native-language backgrounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuven, van V.J.J.P.; Gooskens, C.

    2017-01-01

    We measured F1, F2 and duration of ten English monophthongs produced by American native speakers and by Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian and Chinese L2 speakers. We hypothesized that (i) L2 speakers would approximate the English vowels more closely as the phonological distance between

  6. Low frequency sound field control for loudspeakers in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Rectangular rooms are the most common shape for sound reproduction, but at low frequencies the reflections from the boundaries of the room cause large spatial variations in the sound pressure level.  Variations up to 30 dB are normal, not only at the room modes, but basically at all frequencies....... As sound propagates in time, it seems natural that the problems can best be analyzed and solved in the time domain. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System) has been developed for sound reproduction in rectangular listening rooms. It can control the sound...... sound field in the whole room, and short impulse response.  In a standard listening room (180 m3) only 4 loudspeakers are needed, 2 more than a traditional stereo setup. CABS is controlled by a developed DSP system. The time based approached might help with the understanding of sound field control...

  7. Influences of non-uniform pressure field outside bubbles on the propagation of acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuning; Du, Xiaoze

    2015-09-01

    Predictions of the propagation of the acoustic waves in bubbly liquids is of great importance for bubble dynamics and related applications (e.g. sonochemistry, sonochemical reactor design, biomedical engineering). In the present paper, an approach for modeling the propagation of the acoustic waves in dilute bubbly liquids is proposed through considering the non-uniform pressure field outside the bubbles. This approach is validated through comparing with available experimental data in the literature. Comparing with the previous models, our approach mainly improves the predictions of the attenuation of acoustic waves in the regions with large kR0 (k is the wave number and R0 is the equilibrium bubble radius). Stability of the oscillating bubbles under acoustic excitation are also quantitatively discussed based on the analytical solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental verification of transient nonlinear acoustical holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yun; Cannata, Jonathan; Wang, Tianren

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on nonlinear transient acoustical holography. The validity and effectiveness of a recently proposed nonlinear transient acoustical holography algorithm is evaluated in the presence of noise. The acoustic field measured on a post-focal plane of a high-intensity focused transducer is backward projected to reconstruct the pressure distributions on the focal and a pre-focal plane, which are shown to be in good agreement with the measurement. In contrast, the conventional linear holography produces erroneous results in this case where the nonlinearity involved is strong. Forward acoustic field projection was also carried out to further verify the algorithm.

  9. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  10. Acoustic lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittmer, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    Acoustic lenses focus ultrasound to produce pencil-like beams with reduced near fields. When fitted to conventional (flat-faced) transducers, such lenses greatly improve the ability to detect and size defects. This paper describes a program developed to design acoustic lenses for use in immersion or contact inspection, using normal or angle beam mode with flat or curved targets. Lens surfaces are circular in geometry to facilitate machining. For normal beam inspection of flat plate, spherical or cylindrical lenses are used. For angle beam or curved surface inspections, a compound lens is required to correct for the extra induced aberration. Such a lens is aspherical with one radius of curvature in the plane of incidence, and a different radius of curvature in the plane perpendicular to the incident plane. The resultant beam profile (i.e., location of the acoustic focus, beam diameter, 6 dB working range) depends on the degree of focusing and the transducer used. The operating frequency and bandwidth can be affected by the instrumentation used. Theoretical and measured beam profiles are in good agreement. Various applications, from zone focusing used for defect sizing in thick plate, to line focusing for pipe weld inspection, are discussed

  11. Modeling of Focused Acoustic Field of a Concave Multi-annular Phased Array Using Spheroidal Beam Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lili; Shou Wende; Hui Chun

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical model of focused acoustic field for a multi-annular phased array on concave spherical surface is proposed. In this model, the source boundary conditions of the spheroidal beam equation (SBE) for multi-annular phased elements are studied. Acoustic field calculated by the dynamic focusing model of SBE is compared with numerical results of the O'Neil and Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) model, respectively. Axial dynamic focusing and the harmonic effects are presented. The results demonstrate that the dynamic focusing model of SBE is good valid for a concave multi-annular phased array with a large aperture angle in the linear or nonlinear field. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Producing acoustic 'Frozen Waves': Simulated experiments with diffraction/attenuation resistant beams, in lossy media

    OpenAIRE

    Prego-Borges, Jose' L.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Recami, Erasmo; Tavares-Costa, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The so-called Localized Waves (LW), and the "Frozen Waves" (FW), have arisen significant attention in the areas of Optics and Ultrasound, because of their surprising energy localization properties. The LWs resist the effects of diffraction for large distances, and possess an interesting self-reconstruction (self-healing) property, after obstacles with size smaller than the antenna's; while the FWs, a sub-class of theirs, offer the possibility of arbitrarily modeling the field longitudinal int...

  13. The influence of acoustical and non-acoustical factors on short-term annoyance due to aircraft noise in the field - The COSMA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Susanne; Márki, Ferenc; Müller, Uwe

    2015-12-15

    Air traffic has increased for the past decades and is forecasted to continue to grow. Noise due to current airport operations can impair the physical and psychological well-being of airport residents. The field study investigated aircraft noise-induced short-term (i.e., within hourly intervals) annoyance in local residents near a busy airport. We aimed at examining the contribution of acoustical and non-acoustical factors to the annoyance rating. Across four days from getting up till going to bed, 55 residents near Cologne/Bonn Airport (M=46years, SD=14years, 34 female) rated their annoyance due to aircraft noise at hourly intervals. For each participant and each hour, 26 noise metrics from outdoor measurements and further 6 individualized metrics that took into account the sound attenuation due to each person's whereabouts in and around their homes were obtained. Non-acoustical variables were differentiated into situational factors (time of day, performed activity during past hour, day of the week) and personal factors (e.g., sensitivity to noise, attitudes, domestic noise insulation). Generalized Estimation Equations were applied for the development of a prediction model for annoyance. Acoustical factors explained only a small proportion (13.7%) of the variance in the annoyance ratings. The number of fly-overs predicted annoyance better than did equivalent and maximum sound pressure levels. The proportion of explained variance in annoyance rose considerably (to 27.6%) when individualized noise metrics as well as situational and personal variables were included in the prediction model. Consideration of noise metrics related to the number of fly-overs and individual adjustment of noise metrics can improve the prediction of short-term annoyance compared to models using equivalent outdoor levels only. Non-acoustical factors have remarkable impact not only on long-term annoyance as shown before but also on short-term annoyance judged in the home environment. Copyright

  14. Analytical research of vibration and far-field acoustic radiation of cylindrical shell immersed at finite depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO Wenjie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the current lack of analytical research concerning the cylindrical shell-flow field coupling vibration and sound radiation system under the influence of a free surface, this paper proposes an analytical method which solves the vibration response and far-field acoustic radiation of a finite cylindrical shell immersed at a finite depth. Based on the image method and Graf addition theorem, the analytical expression of the fluid velocity potential can be obtained, then combined with the energy functional of the variation method to deduce the shell-liquid coupling vibration equation, which can in turn solve the forced vibration response. The research shows that, compared with an infinite fluid, a free surface can increase at the same order of resonance frequency; but as the depth of immersion gradually increases, the mean square vibration velocity tends to become the same as that in an infinite fluid. Compared with numerical results from Nastran software, this shows that the present method is accurate and reliable, and has such advantages as a simple method and a small amount of calculation. The far-field radiated pressure can be obtained by the vibration response using the Fourier transformation and stationary phase method. The results indicate that the directivity and volatility of the far-field acoustic pressure of a cylindrical shell is similar to that of an acoustical dipole due to the free surface. However, the far-field acoustic pressure is very different from the vibration characteristics, and will not tend to an infinite fluid as the submerging depth increases. Compared with the numerical method, the method in this paper is simpler and has a higher computational efficiency. It enables the far-field acoustic radiation of an underwater cylindrical shell to be predicted quickly under the influence of external incentives and the free surface, providing guiding significance for acoustic research into the half space structure vibration

  15. A comparison of SONAH and IBEM for near-field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller

    2008-01-01

    Among the popular techniques for acoustic source identification in complex environments are the Statistically Optimal Near Acoustic Holography (SONAH) and the Inverse Boundary Element Method (IBEM). These two methods are quite different regarding the underlying assumptions and the practical...

  16. Near-field acoustic microbead trapping as remote anchor for single particle manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae Youn [Department of Information and Communication Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Dong Young; Shin, Hyunjune; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Jungwoo, E-mail: jwlee@kw.ac.kr [Department of Electronic Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-04

    We recently proposed an analytical model of a two-dimensional acoustic trapping of polystyrene beads in the ray acoustics regime, where a bead diameter is larger than the wavelength used. As its experimental validation, this paper demonstrates the transverse (or lateral) trapping of individual polystyrene beads in the near field of focused ultrasound. A 100 μm bead is immobilized on the central beam axis by a focused sound beam from a 30 MHz single element lithium niobate transducer, after being laterally displaced through hundreds of micrometers. Maximum displacement, a longest lateral distance at which a trapped bead can be directed towards the central axis, is thus measured over a discrete frequency range from 24 MHz to 36 MHz. The displacement data are found to be between 323.7 μm and 470.2 μm, depending on the transducer's driving frequency and input voltage amplitude. The experimental results are compared with their corresponding model values, and their relative errors lie between 0.9% and 3.9%. The results suggest that this remote maneuvering technique may be employed to manipulate individual cells through solid microbeads, provoking certain cellular reactions to localized mechanical disturbance without direct contact.

  17. Frequency and magnetic field mapping of magnetoelastic spin pumping in high overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Polzikova

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first observation of microvolt-scale inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE dc voltage driven by an acoustic spin pumping (ASP in a bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonator formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-YIG(1-GGG-YIG(2-Pt structure. When 2 mW power is applied to an Al-ZnO-Al transducer, the voltage VISHE ∼ 4 μV in the Pt film is observed as a result of resonant ASP from YIG(2 to Pt in the area ∼ 170 μm. The results of frequency and magnetic field mapping of VISHE(f,H together with reflectivity of the resonator show an obvious agreement between the positions of the voltage maxima and BAW resonance frequencies fn(H on the (f, H plane. At the same time a significant asymmetry of the VISHE(fn(H value in reference to the magnetoelastic resonance (MER line fMER(H position is revealed, which is explained by asymmetry of the magnetoelastic waves dispersion law.

  18. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Bing; Chen Chao; Zhao Chunsheng

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to several velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) form are numerically solved by using streamline upwind petrov galerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed algebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  19. Frequency and magnetic field mapping of magnetoelastic spin pumping in high overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Luzanov, V. A.; Raevskiy, A. O.; Kotov, V. A.

    2018-05-01

    We report on the first observation of microvolt-scale inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) dc voltage driven by an acoustic spin pumping (ASP) in a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-YIG(1)-GGG-YIG(2)-Pt structure. When 2 mW power is applied to an Al-ZnO-Al transducer, the voltage VISHE ˜ 4 μV in the Pt film is observed as a result of resonant ASP from YIG(2) to Pt in the area ˜ 170 μm. The results of frequency and magnetic field mapping of VISHE(f,H) together with reflectivity of the resonator show an obvious agreement between the positions of the voltage maxima and BAW resonance frequencies fn(H) on the (f, H) plane. At the same time a significant asymmetry of the VISHE(fn(H)) value in reference to the magnetoelastic resonance (MER) line fMER(H) position is revealed, which is explained by asymmetry of the magnetoelastic waves dispersion law.

  20. Near-field acoustic microbead trapping as remote anchor for single particle manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Cheon, Dong Young; Shin, Hyunjune; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Jungwoo

    2015-05-01

    We recently proposed an analytical model of a two-dimensional acoustic trapping of polystyrene beads in the ray acoustics regime, where a bead diameter is larger than the wavelength used. As its experimental validation, this paper demonstrates the transverse (or lateral) trapping of individual polystyrene beads in the near field of focused ultrasound. A 100 μm bead is immobilized on the central beam axis by a focused sound beam from a 30 MHz single element lithium niobate transducer, after being laterally displaced through hundreds of micrometers. Maximum displacement, a longest lateral distance at which a trapped bead can be directed towards the central axis, is thus measured over a discrete frequency range from 24 MHz to 36 MHz. The displacement data are found to be between 323.7 μm and 470.2 μm, depending on the transducer's driving frequency and input voltage amplitude. The experimental results are compared with their corresponding model values, and their relative errors lie between 0.9% and 3.9%. The results suggest that this remote maneuvering technique may be employed to manipulate individual cells through solid microbeads, provoking certain cellular reactions to localized mechanical disturbance without direct contact.

  1. Interfacial Dynamics of Condensing Vapor Bubbles in an Ultrasonic Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boziuk, Thomas; Smith, Marc; Glezer, Ari

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of vapor condensation in quiescent subcooled liquid using ultrasonic actuation is investigated experimentally. The vapor bubbles are formed by direct injection from a pressurized steam reservoir through nozzles of varying characteristic diameters, and are advected within an acoustic field of programmable intensity. While kHz-range acoustic actuation typically couples to capillary instability of the vapor-liquid interface, ultrasonic (MHz-range) actuation leads to the formation of a liquid spout that penetrates into the vapor bubble and significantly increases its surface area and therefore condensation rate. Focusing of the ultrasonic beam along the spout leads to ejection of small-scale droplets from that are propelled towards the vapor liquid interface and result in localized acceleration of the condensation. High-speed video of Schlieren images is used to investigate the effects of the ultrasonic actuation on the thermal boundary layer on the liquid side of the vapor-liquid interface and its effect on the condensation rate, and the liquid motion during condensation is investigated using high-magnification PIV measurements. High-speed image processing is used to assess the effect of the actuation on the dynamics and temporal variation in characteristic scale (and condensation rate) of the vapor bubbles.

  2. Lazer-produced plasma in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaitmazov, S.D.; Shklovskij, E.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations on interaction of laser plasma with the magnetic field in the range of 100-300 kOe are surveyed. Problems associated with the effect of the field on the optical breakdown threshold in gases, the geometry (kinetics) of laser plasma and its radiation are mainly considered. It is noted that the magnetic field may reduce the o tical breakdown threshold in gases, promote the spreading of plasma predominantly in the direction of tice magnetic field, and also affect (increase in the visible range) the radiation intensity of the laser plasma. The effect of the magnetic field on the temperature of the laser plasma is not completely understood yet, but the very fact of existence of this dependence is important; it enables one to search for conditions under which the magnetic field would promote the increase at the temperature of laser plasma

  3. Morphology of magnetic fields generated in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.J.M.; Cooke, D.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic fields in the megagauss range have been measured in experiments on plasmas generated by irradiating targets with high power lasers. A study of the morphology of these self-generated fields is important not only for its intrinsic interest but for possible implications in laser--target physics. In this paper work on the numerical modeling of large magnetic fields generated in target experiments is reported. The results show generally satisfactory agreement with the fields measured experimentally both in terms of the magnitude of the peak fields and their morphology. In the numerical model the contribution from the Hall term in describing the evolution of the magnetic field is shown to be important especially in short pulse (≅100 psec) experiments

  4. Effects of optical attenuation, heat diffusion, and acoustic coherence in photoacoustic signals produced by nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Rosales, J. E.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Escamilla-Herrera, L. F.; Reyes-Ramírez, B.; Polo-Parada, L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2018-04-01

    The behavior of the photoacoustic signal produced by nanoparticles as a function of their concentration was studied in detail. As the concentration of nanoparticles is increased in a sample, the peak-to-peak photoacoustic amplitude increases linearly up to a certain value, after which an asymptotic saturated behavior is observed. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for these observations, we evaluate the effects of nanoparticles concentration, the optical attenuation, and the effects of heat propagation from nano-sources to their surroundings. We found that the saturation effect of the photoacoustic signal as a function of the concentration of nanoparticles is explained by a combination of two different mechanisms. As has been suggested previously, but not modeled correctly, the most important mechanism is attributed to optical attenuation. The second mechanism is due to an interference destructive process attributed to the superimposition of the photoacoustic amplitudes generated for each nanoparticle, and this explanation is reinforced through our experimental and simulations results; based on this, it is found that the linear behavior of the photoacoustic amplitude could be restricted to optical densities ≤0.5.

  5. A surface acoustic wave passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature, and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong; Yassine, Omar; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an integrated single-chip surface acoustic wave sensor with the capability of measuring magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The sensor is fabricated using a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate, a humidity sensitive hydrogel coating, and a magnetic field sensitive impedance load. The sensor response to individually and simultaneously changing magnetic field, temperature and humidity is characterized by connecting a network analyzer directly to the sensor. Analytical models for each measurand are derived and used to compensate noise due to cross sensitivities. The results show that all three measurands can be monitored in parallel with sensitivities of 75 ppm/°C, 0.13 dB/%R.H. (at 50%R.H.), 0.18 dB/Oe and resolutions of 0.1 °C, 0.4%R.H., 1 Oe for temperature, humidity and magnetic field, respectively. A passive wireless measurement is also conducted on a current line using, which shows the sensors capability to measure both temperature and current signals simultaneously.

  6. A surface acoustic wave electric field strength meter for environmental studies of HV transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandolfo, M.; Ranghiasci, C.; Verona, E.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in concern over the health and safety aspects of high voltage transmission lines (HVTL). The majority of research has focused on effects directly or indirectly involved with the central nervous system, including physiological, ultrastructural, and biochemical alterations, changes in blood composition, behaviour, reproduction, and development. Several recent epidemiological reports have presented preliminary data suggesting an increase in the incidence of cancer among children and adults exposed to magnetic fields through living close to various types of electrical power lines or devices. With the increase in environmental concerns there has been a concomitant consideration of biological effects and health implications related to presently existing HVTL and those planned in the future. It was concluded that the electric and magnetic field strengths and the electrical discharges are the most important electrophysical factors. Thus, it has been deemed necessary to develop measuring means to determine the field strengths in areas surrounding electric installations, in particular at ground level. In the present paper an electric field meter, based on the use of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line, is presented and the experimental results obtained are discussed

  7. On the horizontal wobbling of an object levitated by near-field acoustic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2007-11-01

    A circular planar object can be levitated with several hundreds of microns by ultrasonic near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL). However, when both the sound source and the levitated object are circularly shaped and the center of the levitated object does not coincide with the source center, instability problem often occurs. When this happens, it becomes difficult to pick up or transport the object for the next process. In this study, when the center of the levitated object was offset from the source center, the moving direction of the levitated object was predicted by using the time averaged potential around the levitated object. The wobbling frequency of the levitated object was calculated by analyzing the nonlinear wobbling motion of the object. It was shown that the predicted wobbling frequencies agreed with measured ones well. Finally, a safe zone was suggested to avoid the unstable movement of an object.

  8. Acoustofluidics 4: Piezoelectricity and application in the excitation of acoustic fields for ultrasonic particle manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dual, Jurg; Möller, Dirk

    2012-02-07

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used in the excitation of MHz frequency vibrations in devices for ultrasonic manipulation. An applied electrical voltage is transformed into mechanical stress, strain and displacement. Piezoelectric elements can be used in either a resonant or non-resonant manner. Depending on the desired motion the piezoelectric longitudinal, transverse or shear effects are exploited. Because of the coupling between electrical and mechanical quantities in the constitutive law the modelling of devices turns out to be quite complex. In this paper, the general equations that need to be used are delineated. For a one-dimensional actuator the underlying physics is described, including the consequences resulting for the characterization of devices. For a practical setup used in ultrasonic manipulation, finite element models are used to model the complete system, including piezoelectric excitation, solid motion and acoustic field. It is shown, how proper tailoring of transducer and electrodes allows selective excitation of desired modes.

  9. A New Uncertain Analysis Method for the Prediction of Acoustic Field with Random and Interval Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the frequency response analysis of acoustic field with random and interval parameters, a nonintrusive uncertain analysis method named Polynomial Chaos Response Surface (PCRS method is proposed. In the proposed method, the polynomial chaos expansion method is employed to deal with the random parameters, and the response surface method is used to handle the interval parameters. The PCRS method does not require efforts to modify model equations due to its nonintrusive characteristic. By means of the PCRS combined with the existing interval analysis method, the lower and upper bounds of expectation, variance, and probability density function of the frequency response can be efficiently evaluated. Two numerical examples are conducted to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the approach. The results show that the PCRS method is more efficient compared to the direct Monte Carlo simulation (MCS method based on the original numerical model without causing significant loss of accuracy.

  10. The acoustic field of a point source in a uniform boundary layer over an impedance plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorumski, W. E.; Willshire, W. L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The acoustic field of a point source in a boundary layer above an impedance plane is investigated anatytically using Obukhov quasi-potential functions, extending the normal-mode theory of Chunchuzov (1984) to account for the effects of finite ground-plane impedance and source height. The solution is found to be asymptotic to the surface-wave term studies by Wenzel (1974) in the limit of vanishing wind speed, suggesting that normal-mode theory can be used to model the effects of an atmospheric boundary layer on infrasonic sound radiation. Model predictions are derived for noise-generation data obtained by Willshire (1985) at the Medicine Bow wind-turbine facility. Long-range downwind propagation is found to behave as a cylindrical wave, with attention proportional to the wind speed, the boundary-layer displacement thickness, the real part of the ground admittance, and the square of the frequency.

  11. Panel acoustic contribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Natarajan, Logesh Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Formulations are derived to analyze the relative panel acoustic contributions of a vibrating structure. The essence of this analysis is to correlate the acoustic power flow from each panel to the radiated acoustic pressure at any field point. The acoustic power is obtained by integrating the normal component of the surface acoustic intensity, which is the product of the surface acoustic pressure and normal surface velocity reconstructed by using the Helmholtz equation least squares based nearfield acoustical holography, over each panel. The significance of this methodology is that it enables one to analyze and rank relative acoustic contributions of individual panels of a complex vibrating structure to acoustic radiation anywhere in the field based on a single set of the acoustic pressures measured in the near field. Moreover, this approach is valid for both interior and exterior regions. Examples of using this method to analyze and rank the relative acoustic contributions of a scaled vehicle cabin are demonstrated.

  12. Synthesis of magnetic systems producing field with maximal scalar characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevets, Nickolay I.

    2005-01-01

    A method of synthesis of the magnetic systems (MSs) consisting of uniformly magnetized blocks is proposed. This method allows to synthesize MSs providing maximum value of any magnetic field scalar characteristic. In particular, it is possible to synthesize the MSs providing the maximum of a field projection on a given vector, a gradient of a field modulus and a gradient of a field energy on a given directing vector, a field magnitude, a magnetic flux through a given surface, a scalar product of a field or a force by a directing function given in some area of space, etc. The synthesized MSs provide maximal efficiency of permanent magnets utilization. The usage of the proposed method of MSs synthesis allows to change a procedure of projecting in principal, namely, to execute it according to the following scheme: (a) to choose the sizes, a form and a number of blocks of a system proceeding from technological (economical) reasons; (b) using the proposed synthesis method, to find an orientation of site magnetization providing maximum possible effect of magnet utilization in a system obtained in (a). Such approach considerably reduces a time of MSs projecting and guarantees maximal possible efficiency of magnets utilization. Besides it provides absolute assurance in 'ideality' of a MS design and allows to obtain an exact estimate of the limit parameters of a field in a working area of a projected MS. The method is applicable to a system containing the components from soft magnetic material with linear magnetic properties

  13. Proton radiography of magnetic field in laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, S.; Patel, P.; Chen, S.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A.

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields generated by the interaction with plasmas of long-pulse laser beams relevant to inertial confinement fusion have been measure. A proton beam generated by the interaction of an ultra intense laser with a thin metallic foil is used to probe the B-fields. The proton beam then generated is temporally short (of the order of a ps), highly laminar and hence equivalent to a virtual point which makes it an ideal source for radiography. We have investigated, using face-on radiography, B fields at intensity around 10 14 W/cm 2 due to the non co-linearity of temperature and density gradients. (authors)

  14. Measurement of the sound power incident on the walls of a reverberation room with near field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Tiana Roig, Elisabet

    2010-01-01

    area; and it has always been regarded as impossible to measure the sound power that is incident on a wall directly. This paper examines a new method of determining this quantity from sound pressure measurements at positions on the wall using 'statistically optimised near field acoustic holography...

  15. Electrostatic fields and charged particle acceleration in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hora, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some new aspects pioneered recently by Alfven in the theory of cosmic plasmas, indicate the possibility of a new treatment of the action of electrostatic double layers in the periphery of an expanding laser produced plasma. The thermally produced electrostatic double layer which has been re-derived for a homogeneous plasma shows that a strong upshift of ion energies is possible, in agreement with experiments. The number of accelerated ions is many orders of magnitude smaller than observed at keV and MeV energies. The nonlinear force acceleration could explain the number and energy of the observed fast ions. It is shown, however, that electrostatic double layers can be generated which should produce super-fast ions. A derivation of the spread double layers in the case of inhomogeneous plasmas is presented. It is concluded that the hydrodynamically expected multi GeV heavy ions for 10 TW laser pulses should produce super-fast ions up to the TeV range. Further conclusions are drawn from the electrostatically measured upshifted (by 300 keV) DT fusion alphas from laser compressed plasma. An analysis of alpha spectra attempts to distinguish between different models of the stopping power in the plasmas. The analysis preliminarily arrives at a preference for the collective model. (author)

  16. Detecting chameleons: The astronomical polarization produced by chameleonlike scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrage, Clare; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    We show that a coupling between chameleonlike scalar fields and photons induces linear and circular polarization in the light from astrophysical sources. In this context chameleonlike scalar fields include those of the Olive-Pospelov (OP) model, which describes a varying fine structure constant. We determine the form of this polarization numerically and give analytic expressions in two useful limits. By comparing the predicted signal with current observations we are able to improve the constraints on the chameleon-photon coupling and the coupling in the OP model by over 2 orders of magnitude. It is argued that, if observed, the distinctive form of the chameleon induced circular polarization would represent a smoking gun for the presence of a chameleon. We also report a tentative statistical detection of a chameleonlike scalar field from observations of starlight polarization in our galaxy.

  17. Miniature coils for producing pulsed inplane magnetic fields for nanospintronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawliszak, Łukasz; Zgirski, Maciej [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al.Lotnikow 32/46, PL 02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Tekielak, Maria [Faculty of Physics, University of Białystok, ul.Lipowa 41, PL 15-424 Białystok (Poland)

    2015-03-15

    Nanospintronic and related research often requires the application of quickly rising magnetic field pulses in the plane of the studied planar structure. We have designed and fabricated sub-millimeter-sized coils capable of delivering pulses of the magnetic field up to ∼500 Oe in the plane of the sample with the rise time of the order of 10 ns. The placement of the sample above the coil allows for easy access to its surface with manipulators or light beams for, e.g., Kerr microscopy. We use the fabricated coil to drive magnetic domain walls in 1 μm wide permalloy wires and measure magnetic domain wall velocity as a function of the applied magnetic field.

  18. Electron acceleration by laser produced wake field: Pulse shape effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Sandeep; Nishida, Yasushi

    2007-12-01

    Analytical expressions are obtained for the longitudinal field (wake field: Ex), density perturbations ( ne') and the potential ( ϕ) behind a laser pulse propagating in a plasma with the pulse duration of the electron plasma period. A feasibility study on the wake field is carried out with Gaussian-like (GL) pulse, rectangular-triangular (RT) pulse and rectangular-Gaussian (RG) pulse considering one-dimensional weakly nonlinear theory ( ne'/n0≪1), and the maximum energy gain acquired by an electron is calculated for all these three types of the laser pulse shapes. A comparative study infers that the RT pulse yields the best results: In its case maximum electron energy gain is 33.5 MeV for a 30 fs pulse duration whereas in case of GL (RG) pulse of the same duration the gain is 28.6 (28.8)MeV at the laser frequency of 1.6 PHz and the intensity of 3.0 × 10 18 W/m 2. The field of the wake and hence the energy gain get enhanced for the higher laser frequency, larger pulse duration and higher laser intensity for all types of the pulses.

  19. Ponderomotive force, magnetic fields and hydrodynamics of laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobin, J.-L.; Wee Woo; Degroot, J.-S.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear effects deeply change the structure of a laser driven plasma flow. For high intensities, the radiation pressure should be taken into account. It acts through a ponderomotive force proportional to the electron density and to the gradient of the mean electric field energy density of the incident wave. Static magnetic fields originate from a term in the ponderomotive force which includes radiation absorption and whose curl is non zero. The basic properties of the structure are determined analytically in the absence of thermal conductivity and magnetic fields: steep density gradient close to the cut-off density, shelf at lower densities. The conditions of a steady state regime are set up. The isothermal case is specially investigated. It is shown that the cavities which are created in a motionless plasma may disappear due to the onset of a flow. Regions in which electromagnetic forces arising from the static field compensate the ponderomotive force are determined. The subsequent effects on the flow itself are studied [fr

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of attenuation-driven acoustic streaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydock, David; Yeomans, J M

    2003-01-01

    We show that lattice Boltzmann simulations can be used to model the attenuation-driven acoustic streaming produced by a travelling wave. Comparisons are made to analytical results and to the streaming pattern produced by an imposed body force approximating the Reynolds stresses. We predict the streaming patterns around a porous material in an attenuating acoustic field

  1. Violin f-hole contribution to far-field radiation via patch near-field acoustical holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George; Williams, Earl G; Valdivia, Nicolas

    2007-06-01

    The violin radiates either from dual ports (f-holes) or via surface motion of the corpus (top+ribs+back), with no clear delineation between these sources. Combining "patch" near-field acoustical holography over just the f-hole region of a violin with far-field radiativity measurements over a sphere, it was possible to separate f-hole from surface motion contributions to the total radiation of the corpus below 2.6 kHz. A0, the Helmholtz-like lowest cavity resonance, radiated essentially entirely through the f-holes as expected while A1, the first longitudinal cavity mode with a node at the f-holes, had no significant f-hole radiation. The observed A1 radiation comes from an indirect radiation mechanism, induced corpus motion approximately mirroring the cavity pressure profile seen for violinlike bowed string instruments across a wide range of sizes. The first estimates of the fraction of radiation from the f-holes F(f) indicate that some low frequency corpus modes thought to radiate only via surface motion (notably the first corpus bending modes) had significant radiation through the f-holes, in agreement with net volume changes estimated from experimental modal analysis. F(f) generally trended lower with increasing frequency, following corpus mobility decreases. The f-hole directivity (top/back radiativity ratio) was generally higher than whole-violin directivity.

  2. Systems and methods for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D.

    2018-03-06

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  3. Improved algorithms and methods for room sound-field prediction by acoustical radiosity in arbitrary polyhedral rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie; Hodgson, Murray; Ashdown, Ian

    2004-08-01

    This paper explores acoustical (or time-dependent) radiosity-a geometrical-acoustics sound-field prediction method that assumes diffuse surface reflection. The literature of acoustical radiosity is briefly reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed. A discrete form of the integral equation that results from meshing the enclosure boundaries into patches is presented and used in a discrete-time algorithm. Furthermore, an averaging technique is used to reduce computational requirements. To generalize to nonrectangular rooms, a spherical-triangle method is proposed as a means of evaluating the integrals over solid angles that appear in the discrete form of the integral equation. The evaluation of form factors, which also appear in the numerical solution, is discussed for rectangular and nonrectangular rooms. This algorithm and associated methods are validated by comparison of the steady-state predictions for a spherical enclosure to analytical solutions.

  4. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors. PMID:26428789

  5. Near-field acoustic holography using sparse regularization and compressive sampling principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon, Gilles; Daudet, Laurent; Peillot, Antoine; Ollivier, François; Bertin, Nancy; Gribonval, Rémi

    2012-09-01

    Regularization of the inverse problem is a complex issue when using near-field acoustic holography (NAH) techniques to identify the vibrating sources. This paper shows that, for convex homogeneous plates with arbitrary boundary conditions, alternative regularization schemes can be developed based on the sparsity of the normal velocity of the plate in a well-designed basis, i.e., the possibility to approximate it as a weighted sum of few elementary basis functions. In particular, these techniques can handle discontinuities of the velocity field at the boundaries, which can be problematic with standard techniques. This comes at the cost of a higher computational complexity to solve the associated optimization problem, though it remains easily tractable with out-of-the-box software. Furthermore, this sparsity framework allows us to take advantage of the concept of compressive sampling; under some conditions on the sampling process (here, the design of a random array, which can be numerically and experimentally validated), it is possible to reconstruct the sparse signals with significantly less measurements (i.e., microphones) than classically required. After introducing the different concepts, this paper presents numerical and experimental results of NAH with two plate geometries, and compares the advantages and limitations of these sparsity-based techniques over standard Tikhonov regularization.

  6. Acoustic holography as a metrological tool for characterizing medical ultrasound sources and fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Tsysar, Sergey A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Kreider, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic holography is a powerful technique for characterizing ultrasound sources and the fields they radiate, with the ability to quantify source vibrations and reduce the number of required measurements. These capabilities are increasingly appealing for meeting measurement standards in medical ultrasound; however, associated uncertainties have not been investigated systematically. Here errors associated with holographic representations of a linear, continuous-wave ultrasound field are studied. To facilitate the analysis, error metrics are defined explicitly, and a detailed description of a holography formulation based on the Rayleigh integral is provided. Errors are evaluated both for simulations of a typical therapeutic ultrasound source and for physical experiments with three different ultrasound sources. Simulated experiments explore sampling errors introduced by the use of a finite number of measurements, geometric uncertainties in the actual positions of acquired measurements, and uncertainties in the properties of the propagation medium. Results demonstrate the theoretical feasibility of keeping errors less than about 1%. Typical errors in physical experiments were somewhat larger, on the order of a few percent; comparison with simulations provides specific guidelines for improving the experimental implementation to reduce these errors. Overall, results suggest that holography can be implemented successfully as a metrological tool with small, quantifiable errors.

  7. Identifying fecal matter contamination in produce fields using multispectral reflectance imaging under ambient solar illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    An imaging device to detect fecal contamination in fresh produce fields could allow the producer to avoid harvesting fecal-contaminated produce. E.coli O157:H7 outbreaks have been associated with fecal-contaminated leafy greens. In this study, in-field spectral profiles of bovine fecal matter, soil,...

  8. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gélat, P; Ter Haar, G; Saffari, N

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  9. Towards the optimisation of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the non-invasive treatment of cancer has been demonstrated for a range of different cancers including those of the liver, kidney, prostate and breast. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over other techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection, in terms of its non-invasiveness and low risk of harmful side effects. There is, however, a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to induce tissue necrosis at the required foci whilst minimising the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. As such, a common side effect of focusing ultrasound in regions located behind the rib cage is the overheating of bone and surrounding tissue, which can lead to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy are deposited. This is likely to rely on a treatment planning procedure in which optimal source velocity distributions are obtained so as to maximise a dose quantity at the treatment sites, whilst ensuring that this quantity does not exceed a specified threshold at other field locations, particularly on the surface of the ribs. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalised Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data [1]. This work describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimisation problem with non-linear constraints. The methodology was subsequently tested at an excitation frequency of 100 kHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence

  10. Fundamentals of Acoustic Measurements on Trees and Logs and Their Implication to Field Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic technologies have been well established as material evaluation tools in the past several decades, and their use has become widely accepted in the forest products industry for on-line quality control and products grading. Recent research developments on acoustic sensing technology offer further opportunities to evaluate standing trees and logs for general wood...

  11. The effect of an acoustic field on the filtration efficiency of aerosols by a granular bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavossi, H.

    1985-06-01

    A theoretical and an experimental study were developed in order to evaluate the parameters controlling the aerosol collection efficiency of a granular bed, i.e. all the chief collection mechanisms and the effect of acoustic waves on this efficiency. The action of acoustic waves of appropriate intensity and frequency increased the efficiency of the granular bed significantly for all aerosol sizes including those corresponding to the minimum efficiency. The theoretical prediction was verified by an experimental apparatus using a granular bed of glass of 2 mm diameter. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated the existence of a threshold in the acoustic intensity above which the collection efficiency of the granular bed increased rapidly. We also demonstrated a semi-empirical law relating acoustic capture efficiency of a spherical collector to frequency and acoustic intensity [fr

  12. Numerical investigation of symmetry breaking and critical behavior of the acoustic streaming field in high-intensity discharge lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, Bernd; Schwieger, Joerg; Wolff, Marcus; Manders, Freddy; Suijker, Jos

    2015-01-01

    For energy efficiency and material cost reduction it is preferred to drive high-intensity discharge lamps at frequencies of approximately 300 kHz. However, operating lamps at these high frequencies bears the risk of stimulating acoustic resonances inside the arc tube, which can result in low frequency light flicker and even lamp destruction. The acoustic streaming effect has been identified as the link between high frequency resonances and low frequency flicker. A highly coupled three-dimensional multiphysics model has been set up to calculate the acoustic streaming velocity field inside the arc tube of high-intensity discharge lamps. It has been found that the velocity field suffers a phase transition to an asymmetrical state at a critical acoustic streaming force. In certain respects the system behaves similar to a ferromagnet near the Curie point. It is discussed how the model allows to investigate the light flicker phenomenon. Concerning computer resources the procedure is considerably less demanding than a direct approach with a transient model. (paper)

  13. Axial magnetic field produced by axially and radially magnetized permanent rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Q.L.; McMurry, S.M.; Coey, J.M.D.

    2004-01-01

    Axial magnetic fields produced by axially and radially magnetized permanent magnet rings were studied. First, the axial magnetic field produced by a current loop is introduced, from which the axial field generated by an infinitely thin solenoid and by an infinitely thin current disk can be derived. Then the axial fields produced by axially and by radially magnetized permanent magnet rings can be obtained. An analytic formula for the axial fields produced by two axially magnetized rings is given. A permanent magnet with a high axial gradient field is fabricated, the measured results agree with the theoretical calculation very well. As an example, the axial periodic field produced by an arrangement of alternating axially and radially magnetized rings has been discussed

  14. Acoustic Levitation With Less Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Certain chamber shapes require fewer than three acoustic drivers. Levitation at center of spherical chamber attained using only one acoustic driver. Exitation of lowest spherical mode produces asymmetric acoustic potential well.

  15. Ionization and acoustical instability of a low temperature magnetized plasma in a combined (direct and alternating) electrical field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andropov, V.G.; Sinkevich, O.A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the ionization front which moves through a gas along a magnetic field in a combined electrical field, which lies in the plane of the front, may be unstable, as a result of the development of an ionization instability in the plasma behind the front. The criterion of instability of the ionization front does not greatly differ from the criterion of instability of an infinite plasma. The ionization front in the magnetic field is stable only in an electrical field of circular polarization or in a combined field in which the direct and alternating electrical fields are orthogonal and the Joule heat liberation from them is equal. The generation of sound is possible in a magnetized plasma in an alternating electrical field orthogonal to a magnetic due to the parametric acoustical instability at the frequency of the external electrical field. 8 refs

  16. Study on Transient Properties of Levitated Object in Near-Field Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bing; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Chun-Sheng

    2011-12-01

    A new approach to the study on the transient properties of the levitated object in near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) is presented. In this article, the transient response characteristics, including the levitated height of an object with radius of 24 mm and thickness of 5 mm, the radial velocity and pressure difference of gas at the boundary of clearance between the levitated object and radiating surface (squeeze film), is calculated according to several velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. First, the basic equations in fluid areas on Arbitrary Lagrange—Euler (ALE) form are numerically solved by using streamline upwind petrov galerkin (SUPG) finite elements method. Second, the formed algebraic equations and solid control equations are solved by using synchronous alternating method to gain the transient messages of the levitated object and gas in the squeeze film. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, it is found that there is a oscillation time in the transient process and that the response time does not simply increase with the increasing of velocity amplitudes of radiating surface. More investigations in this paper are helpful for the understanding of the transient properties of levitated object in NFAL, which are in favor of enhancing stabilities and responsiveness of levitated object.

  17. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  18. Damping of acoustic flexural phonons in silicene: influence on high-field electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Mokhtar Hamham, El; Martín, María J.

    2018-06-01

    Silicene is a two-dimensional buckled material with broken horizontal mirror symmetry and Dirac-like dispersion. Under such conditions, flexural acoustic (ZA) phonons play a dominant role. Consequently, it is necessary to consider some suppression mechanism for electron–phonon interactions with long wavelengths in order to reach mobilities useful for electronic applications. In this work, we analyze, by means of an ensemble Monte Carlo simulator, the influence of several possibilities for the description of the effect of ZA phonon damping on electronic transport in silicene. The results show that a hard cutoff situation (total suppression for phonons with a wavelength longer than a critical one), as it has been proposed in the literature, does not yield a realistic picture regarding the electronic distribution function, and it artificially induces a negative differential resistance at moderate and high fields. Sub-parabolic dispersions, on the other hand, may provide a more realistic description in terms of the behavior of the electron distribution in the momentum space, but need extremely short cutoff wavelengths to reach functional mobility and drift velocity values.

  19. The influence of acoustic field and frequency on Hydrodynamics of Group B particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R L Sonolikar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound Assisted Fluidized Bed (SAFB of group B particles (180μm glass bead has been studied in a 46mm I.D. column with aspect ratios of 1.4 and 2.9. A loudspeaker mounted on the top of the bed was supplied by a function generator with square wave to generate the sound as the source of vibration of the fluidized bed. The sound pressure level (referred to 20μpa was varied from 102 to 140dB and frequencies from 70Hz to 170Hz were applied. The effects of sound pressure level, sound frequency and particle loading on the properties of SAFB were investigated. The experimental result showed that the minimum fluidization velocity decreased with the increase in sound pressure level, also minimum fluidization velocity was varied with variation of frequencies. At resonance frequency minimum fluidization velocity was found to be minimum. The bed height did not show an appreciable increase in presence of high acoustic field and at resonant frequency. Minimum fluidization velocity verses frequency curve in presence of sound intensity varied with variation of bed weight.

  20. Acoustic field of focusing phased array probe and the scanning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, J.; Miura, S.; Ida, T.; Shiraiwa, T.; Miya, T.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic field of a point focusing cylindrical linear array probe, in which focusing in the axial direction of cylinder is done by the phased linear array and focusing in the orthogonal direction is done geometrically, was studied by numerical calculation and an optimum design of phased array probe for focusing has been obtained. In generally speaking, the beam width at focus point decreases with decrease of width of each transducer element and with increase of synthetic aperture made by total elements. If the number of total array elements excited as one pulse is limited, the above conditions are contradicted. Thus, an optimum element width exists for the best focusing. On the above consideration, we can get focusing ability of phased array nearly as same as geometrical focusing. A developed transducer is a linear array of polymer piezoelectric material of cylindrical shape, of which radius is from 50 mm to 75 mm. The frequency is 10 Mhz and the beam width of 0.5 mm (depending on aperture) in the orthogonal direction to the cylinder axis and 0.7 mm width in the cylinder axis (phased array focusing) have been obtained. A delay circuit for exciting the transducer was newly designed to give maximum performance to the array regarding to accuracy, stability, easy control and etc. A c-scan ultrasonic testing system equipped with this transducer has sixteen times inspection speed compared to the single probe instrument.

  1. Study on the radial vibration and acoustic field of an isotropic circular ring radiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuyu; Xu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exact analytical theory, the radial vibration of an isotropic circular ring is studied and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. By means of the equivalent circuit model, the resonance frequency equation is derived; the relationship between the radial resonance frequency, the radial displacement amplitude magnification and the geometrical dimensions, the material property is analyzed. For comparison, numerical method is used to simulate the radial vibration of isotropic circular rings. The resonance frequency and the radial vibrational displacement distribution are obtained, and the radial radiation acoustic field of the circular ring in radial vibration is simulated. It is illustrated that the radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method and the numerical method are in good agreement when the height is much less than the radius. When the height becomes large relative to the radius, the frequency deviation from the two methods becomes large. The reason is that the exact analytical theory is limited to thin circular ring whose height must be much less than its radius. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A New Method for Determining Optimal Regularization Parameter in Near-Field Acoustic Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Xiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tikhonov regularization method is effective in stabilizing reconstruction process of the near-field acoustic holography (NAH based on the equivalent source method (ESM, and the selection of the optimal regularization parameter is a key problem that determines the regularization effect. In this work, a new method for determining the optimal regularization parameter is proposed. The transfer matrix relating the source strengths of the equivalent sources to the measured pressures on the hologram surface is augmented by adding a fictitious point source with zero strength. The minimization of the norm of this fictitious point source strength is as the criterion for choosing the optimal regularization parameter since the reconstructed value should tend to zero. The original inverse problem in calculating the source strengths is converted into a univariate optimization problem which is solved by a one-dimensional search technique. Two numerical simulations with a point driven simply supported plate and a pulsating sphere are investigated to validate the performance of the proposed method by comparison with the L-curve method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can determine the regularization parameter correctly and effectively for the reconstruction in NAH.

  3. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2012-12-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  4. Active control of acoustic field-of-view in a biosonar system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Yovel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Active-sensing systems abound in nature, but little is known about systematic strategies that are used by these systems to scan the environment. Here, we addressed this question by studying echolocating bats, animals that have the ability to point their biosonar beam to a confined region of space. We trained Egyptian fruit bats to land on a target, under conditions of varying levels of environmental complexity, and measured their echolocation and flight behavior. The bats modulated the intensity of their biosonar emissions, and the spatial region they sampled, in a task-dependant manner. We report here that Egyptian fruit bats selectively change the emission intensity and the angle between the beam axes of sequentially emitted clicks, according to the distance to the target, and depending on the level of environmental complexity. In so doing, they effectively adjusted the spatial sector sampled by a pair of clicks-the "field-of-view." We suggest that the exact point within the beam that is directed towards an object (e.g., the beam's peak, maximal slope, etc. is influenced by three competing task demands: detection, localization, and angular scanning-where the third factor is modulated by field-of-view. Our results suggest that lingual echolocation (based on tongue clicks is in fact much more sophisticated than previously believed. They also reveal a new parameter under active control in animal sonar-the angle between consecutive beams. Our findings suggest that acoustic scanning of space by mammals is highly flexible and modulated much more selectively than previously recognized.

  5. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  6. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  7. Determination of acoustic fields in acidic suspensions of peanut shell during pretreatment with high-intensity ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Carregari Polachini

    Full Text Available Abstract The benefits of high-intensity ultrasound in diverse processes have stimulated many studies based on biomass pretreatment. In order to improve processes involving ultrasound, a calorimetric method has been widely used to measure the real power absorbed by the material as well as the cavitation effects. Peanut shells, a byproduct of peanut processing, were immersed in acidified aqueous solutions and submitted to an ultrasonic field. Acoustic power absorbed, acoustic intensity and power yield were obtained through specific heat determination and experimental data were modeled in different conditions. Specific heat values ranged from 3537.0 to 4190.6 J·kg-1·K-1, with lower values encountered for more concentrated biomass suspensions. The acoustic power transmitted and acoustic intensity varied linearly with the applied power and quadratically with solids concentration, reaching maximum values at higher applied nominal power and for less concentrated suspensions. A power yield of 82.7% was reached for dilute suspensions at 320 W, while 6.4% efficiency was observed for a concentrated suspension at low input energy (80 W.

  8. Noise disturbance in open-plan study environments: a field study on noise sources, student tasks and room acoustic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braat-Eggen, P Ella; van Heijst, Anne; Hornikx, Maarten; Kohlrausch, Armin

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments and to reveal correlations between noise disturbance experienced by students and the noise sources they perceive, the tasks they perform and the acoustic parameters of the open-plan study environment they work in. Data were collected in five open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. A questionnaire was used to investigate student tasks, perceived sound sources and their perceived disturbance, and sound measurements were performed to determine the room acoustic parameters. This study shows that 38% of the surveyed students are disturbed by background noise in an open-plan study environment. Students are mostly disturbed by speech when performing complex cognitive tasks like studying for an exam, reading and writing. Significant but weak correlations were found between the room acoustic parameters and noise disturbance of students. Practitioner Summary: A field study was conducted to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments at universities in the Netherlands. More than one third of the students was disturbed by noise. An interaction effect was found for task type, source type and room acoustic parameters.

  9. Seeing Sound - Image Analysis of the Lift-off Acoustic Field, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A launch vehicle and its launch facilities are subjected to intense acoustic loads generated by the vehicle's propulsion system. The vehicle, its payload, and...

  10. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small spherical particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Within the perturbation assumptions, our analysis places no rest...... as to handling of nanoparticles in lab-on-a-chip systems.......We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small spherical particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Within the perturbation assumptions, our analysis places...... of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to acoustic separation of microparticles in gases, as well...

  11. Spatial Processing of Urban Acoustic Wave Fields from High-Performance Computations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ketcham, Stephen A; Wilson, D. K; Cudney, Harley H; Parker, Michael W

    2007-01-01

    .... The objective of this work is to develop spatial processing techniques for acoustic wave propagation data from three-dimensional high-performance computations to quantify scattering due to urban...

  12. A Patch Density Recommendation based on Convergence Studies for Vehicle Panel Vibration Response resulting from Excitation by a Diffuse Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Jones, Douglas; Towner, Robert; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Producing fluid structural interaction estimates of panel vibration from an applied pressure field excitation are quite dependent on the spatial correlation of the pressure field. There is a danger of either over estimating a low frequency response or under predicting broad band panel response in the more modally dense bands if the pressure field spatial correlation is not accounted for adequately. It is a useful practice to simulate the spatial correlation of the applied pressure field over a 2d surface using a matrix of small patch area regions on a finite element model (FEM). Use of a fitted function for the spatial correlation between patch centers can result in an error if the choice of patch density is not fine enough to represent the more continuous spatial correlation function throughout the intended frequency range of interest. Several patch density assumptions to approximate the fitted spatial correlation function are first evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative illustrations. The actual response of a typical vehicle panel system FEM is then examined in a convergence study where the patch density assumptions are varied over the same model. The convergence study results illustrate the impacts possible from a poor choice of patch density on the analytical response estimate. The fitted correlation function used in this study represents a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation of the panel to produce vibration response.

  13. Laughter Differs in Children with Autism: An Acoustic Analysis of Laughs Produced by Children with and without the Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudenko, William J.; Stone, Wendy; Bachorowski, Jo-Anne

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have examined vocal expressions of emotion in children with autism. We tested the hypothesis that during social interactions, children diagnosed with autism would exhibit less extreme laugh acoustics than their nonautistic peers. Laughter was recorded during a series of playful interactions with an examiner. Results showed that…

  14. Acoustic radiation force on a multilayered sphere in a Gaussian standing field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibin; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gao, Sha; Cui, Jun; Liu, Jiehui; He, Aijun; Zhang, Gutian

    2018-03-01

    We develop a model for calculating the radiation force on spherically symmetric multilayered particles based on the acoustic scattering approach. An expression is derived for the radiation force on a multilayered sphere centered on the axis of a Gaussian standing wave propagating in an ideal fluid. The effects of the sound absorption of the materials and sound wave on acoustic radiation force of a multilayered sphere immersed in water are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the shell thickness of every layer, and the width of the Gaussian beam. The results reveal that the existence of particle trapping behavior depends on the choice of the non-dimensional frequency ka, as well as the shell thickness of each layer. This study provides a theoretical basis for the development of acoustical tweezers in a Gaussian standing wave, which may benefit the improvement and development of acoustic control technology, such as trapping, sorting, and assembling a cell, and drug delivery applications. Project supported by National Key R&D Program (Grant No. 2016YFF0203000), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11774167 and 61571222), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. 020414380001), the Key Laboratory of Underwater Acoustic Environment, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SSHJ-KFKT-1701), and the AQSIQ Technology R&D Program of China (Grant No. 2017QK125).

  15. Circuit-field coupled finite element analysis method for an electromagnetic acoustic transducer under pulsed voltage excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Kuan-Sheng; Huang Song-Ling; Zhao Wei; Wang Shen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) under voltage excitation and considers the non-uniform distribution of the biased magnetic field. A complete model of EMATs including the non-uniform biased magnetic field, a pulsed eddy current field and the acoustic field is built up. The pulsed voltage excitation is transformed to the frequency domain by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). In terms of the time harmonic field equations of the EMAT system, the impedances of the coils under different frequencies are calculated according to the circuit-field coupling method and Poynting's theorem. Then the currents under different frequencies are calculated according to Ohm's law and the pulsed current excitation is obtained by inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT). Lastly, the sequentially coupled finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the Lorentz force in the EMATs under the current excitation. An actual EMAT with a two-layer two-bundle printed circuit board (PCB) coil, a rectangular permanent magnet and an aluminium specimen is analysed. The coil impedances and the pulsed current are calculated and compared with the experimental results. Their agreement verified the validity of the proposed method. Furthermore, the influences of lift-off distances and the non-uniform static magnetic field on the Lorentz force under pulsed voltage excitation are studied. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  16. Forces acting on a small particle in an acoustical field in a thermoviscous fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Jonas T; Bruus, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the acoustic radiation force on a single small spherical particle, either a thermoviscous fluid droplet or a thermoelastic solid particle, suspended in a viscous and heat-conducting fluid medium. Within the perturbation assumptions, our analysis places no restrictions on the length scales of the viscous and thermal boundary-layer thicknesses δ(s) and δ(t) relative to the particle radius a, but it assumes the particle to be small in comparison to the acoustic wavelength λ. This is the limit relevant to scattering of ultrasound waves from nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. For particles of size comparable to or smaller than the boundary layers, the thermoviscous theory leads to profound consequences for the acoustic radiation force. Not only do we predict forces orders of magnitude larger than expected from ideal-fluid theory, but for certain relevant choices of materials, we also find a sign change in the acoustic radiation force on different-sized but otherwise identical particles. These findings lead to the concept of a particle-size-dependent acoustophoretic contrast factor, highly relevant to acoustic separation of microparticles in gases, as well as to handling of nanoparticles in lab-on-a-chip systems.

  17. Self-running and self-floating two-dimensional actuator using near-field acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keyu; Gao, Shiming; Pan, Yayue; Guo, Ping

    2016-09-01

    Non-contact actuators are promising technologies in metrology, machine-tools, and hovercars, but have been suffering from low energy efficiency, complex design, and low controllability. Here we report a new design of a self-running and self-floating actuator capable of two-dimensional motion with an unlimited travel range. The proposed design exploits near-field acoustic levitation for heavy object lifting, and coupled resonant vibration for generation of acoustic streaming for non-contact motion in designated directions. The device utilizes resonant vibration of the structure for high energy efficiency, and adopts a single piezo element to achieve both levitation and non-contact motion for a compact and simple design. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed actuator can reach a 1.65 cm/s or faster moving speed and is capable of transporting a total weight of 80 g under 1.2 W power consumption.

  18. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  19. Acoustical measurements of sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit inside an historical opera house

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin-Ichi; Prodi, Nicola; Sakai, Hiroyuki

    2004-05-01

    To clarify the relationship of the sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit, we conducted acoustical measurements in a typical historical opera house, the Teatro Comunale of Ferrara, Italy. Orthogonal factors based on the theory of subjective preference and other related factors were analyzed. First, the sound fields for a singer on the stage in relation to the musicians in the pit were analyzed. And then, the sound fields for performers in the pit in relation to the singers on the stage were considered. Because physical factors vary depending on the location of the sound source, performers can move on the stage or in the pit to find the preferred sound field.

  20. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results from field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1984-09-01

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program is to develop use of the AE method on a continuous basis (during operation and during hydrotest) to detect and analyze flaw growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. AE has the unique capability for continuous monitoring, high sensitivity, and remote flaw location

  1. The acoustic field in the ionosphere caused by an underground nuclear explosion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasnov, Valerij Michailovič; Drobzheva, Yana Viktorovna

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 67, - (2005), s. 913-920 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/04/2110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Underground explosion * Acoustic wave * Atmosphere * Ionosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.309, year: 2005

  2. Pattern recognition methods for acoustic emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, P.G.; Harrington, T.P.; Hutton, P.H.

    1979-07-01

    Models have been developed that relate the rate of acoustic emissions to structural integrity. The implementation of these techniques in the field has been hindered by the noisy environment in which the data must be taken. Acoustic emissions from noncritical sources are recorded in addition to those produced by critical sources, such as flaws. A technique is discussed for prescreening acoustic events and filtering out those that are produced by noncritical sources. The methodology that was investigated is pattern recognition. Three different pattern recognition techniques were applied to a data set that consisted of acoustic emissions caused by crack growth and acoustic signals caused by extraneous noise sources. Examination of the acoustic emission data presented has uncovered several features of the data that can provide a reasonable filter. Two of the most valuable features are the frequency of maximum response and the autocorrelation coefficient at Lag 13. When these two features and several others were combined with a least squares decision algorithm, 90% of the acoustic emissions in the data set were correctly classified. It appears possible to design filters that eliminate extraneous noise sources from flaw-growth acoustic emissions using pattern recognition techniques

  3. Torque density measurements on vortex fluids produced by symmetry-breaking rational magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Kyle J; Martin, James E

    2014-09-07

    We have recently reported on the discovery that an infinite class of triaxial magnetic fields is capable of producing rotational flows in magnetic particle suspensions. These triaxial fields are created by applying a dc field orthogonally to a rational biaxial field, comprised of orthogonal components whose frequencies form a rational ratio. The vorticity axis can be parallel to any of the three field components and can be predicted by a careful consideration of the symmetry of the dynamic field. In this paper we not only test the field-symmetry predictions, but also quantify fluid vorticity as a function of the field parameters (strength, frequency ratio, phase angle and relative dc field strength) and particle shape. These measurements validate the symmetry predictions and demonstrate that rational fields are as effective as vortex fields for producing strong fluid mixing, yet have the advantage that small changes in the frequency of one of the field components can change the vorticity axis. This approach extends the possibilities for noncontact control of fluid flows and should be useful in areas such as microfluidics, and the manipulation and mixing of microdroplets.

  4. Technical procedures for implementation of acoustics site studies, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The purpose and scope of the technical procedure for processing data from the tethered meteorological system are covered. Definitions, interfaces, and concurrent data needs are also addressed. This technical procedure describes how to control, organize, verify, and archive tethered meteorological system data. These data will be received at the processing location from the field measurement location and are part of the characterization of the Deaf Smith County Site, Texas for the salt repository program. These measurements will be made in support of the sound propagation study and are a result of environmental data requirements for acoustics. 6 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Evidence for a devil's staircase in holmium produced by an applied magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, R.A.; Jehan, D.A.; McMorrow, D.F.; McIntyre, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic structure of holmium has been studied using neutron diffraction when a magnetic field is applied along the c axis. The field has the effect of suppressing the onset of the commensurate cone phase found at low temperatures in zero field, and instead produces a series of spin-slip structures. In contrast to the zero-field diffraction experiments, where a continuous variation of the magnetic wave vector q was observed, we find that below ∼15 K the wave vector q is always commensurate and forms a devil's staircase with increasing field

  6. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering and magnetic field generation in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawa'aneh, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with aspects of laser-plasma interactions related to fusion reactions; in particular thermoelectric magnetic field generation around a hole dug in plasma by intense laser beams, and stimulated Brillouin back scattering (SBBS) from plasmas containing hot spots. A hole, of the size of the laser focal spot, is dug in the plasma when illuminated by intense laser if the laser pressure exceeds the plasma thermal pressure. This hole is found to have steep, radial density gradients. My first concern arose from the prediction that magnetic fields might be generated around the hole-plasma interface in places where the steep density gradients overlap with the non-aligned temperature gradients. When a high-power laser beam is focused on a solid pellet, plasma is formed at the surface. In order to create conditions for thermonuclear reactions in the interior of the pellet, an effective deposition of the laser energy to thermal energy of the pellet via laser-plasma coupling is necessary. When light irradiates a plasma collective processes occur, which can either enhance or reduce the light absorption. For a better understanding of the fusion problem a knowledge of the nature of these collective processes and of the fraction of light reflected from the plasma modes is required. Local hot spots seen experimentally lead to higher gain levels of scattered light. These local temperature inhomogeneities could lead to non-equilibrium distributions, which result in a free energy leading to some interesting phenomena in plasma. In the second part of the thesis stimulated Brillouin back scattering from an ion acoustic mode in a hot spot is studied. Temperature inhomogeneities lead to an ion acoustic instability, and to higher levels of SBBS gain, which leads to lower thresholds for the same electron to ion temperature ratios. This could be the answer for the observed high levels of scattering from hot spots. (author)

  7. Acoustic transfer function of cavity and its application to rapid evaluation of sound field at low frequency band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Gang; CHEN Hualing; HU Xuanli; HUANG Xieqing

    2001-01-01

    A new method to obtain numerical solution of Acoustic Transfer Function (ATF) by BEM is presented. For a simply supported panel backed by a rectangular cavity at low frequency band (0-200 Hz), the frequency property of ATF is analyzed. The relation between the accuracy of the rapid evaluation of sound field and the discretization schemes of the vibrational panel is discussed. The result shows that the method to obtain ATF and the rapid evaluation of sound field using the ATF is suitable to low frequency band. If an appropriate discretization scheme is choosed based on the frequency involved and the effort to obtain ATF, the accuracy of the rapid evaluation of sound field is acceptable.

  8. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treweek, Benjamin C., E-mail: btreweek@utexas.edu; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F. [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, TX 78713-8029 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  9. Solid waves and acoustic emission first phase: Problems direct and inverse and equations elasto dynamics fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2002-07-01

    The present work is the first of a series of three memoirs briefs, destinadas to revise the classic theoretical foundations that allow to understand the generation,la diffusion and the detection of the elastic waves in those been accustomed to from the point of view of the mechanics of the means continuos. The study is faced in the mark of the non destructive rehearsals, emphasizing aspects related with the rehearsals based on the acoustic emission of the material defects

  10. Propagation-invariant waves in acoustic, optical, and radio-wave fields

    OpenAIRE

    Salo, Janne

    2003-01-01

    The physical phenomena considered in this thesis are associated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves that propagate in free space or in homogeneous media without diffraction. The concept of rotationally periodic wave propagation is introduced in the first journal article included in the thesis and it is subsequently used to analyse waves that avoid diffractive deterioration by repeatedly returning to their initial shape, possibly rotated around the optical axis. Such waves constitute an es...

  11. Relativistic derivation of the ponderomotive force produced by two intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroscio, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The ponderomotive force plays a fundamental role in the absorption of laser light on self-consistent plasma density profiles, in multiple-photon ionization, and in intense field electrodynamics. The relativistic corrections to the ponderomotive force of a transversely polarized electromagnetic wave lead to an approximately 20-percent reduction in the single particle ponderomotive force produced by a 10-γm 10 16 -W/cm 2 laser field. Recent experimental investigations are based on using two intense laser fields to produce desired lasermatter interactions. This paper presents the first derivation of the nonlinear relativistic ponderomotive force produced by two intense laser fields. The results demonstrate that relativistic ponderomotive forces are not additive

  12. Biological treatment process for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil field produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellez, G.; Khandan, N.

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of removing petroleum hydrocarbons from oil fields produced waters using biological treatment was evaluated under laboratory and field conditions. Based on previous laboratory studies, a field-scale prototype system was designed and operated over a period of four months. Two different sources of produced waters were tested in this field study under various continuous flow rates ranging from 375 1/D to 1,800 1/D. One source of produced water was an open storage pit; the other, a closed storage tank. The TDS concentrations of these sources exceeded 50,000 mg/l; total n-alkanes exceeded 100 mg/l; total petroleum hydrocarbons exceeded 125 mg/l; and total BTEX exceeded 3 mg/l. Removals of total n-alkanes, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and BTEX remained consistently high over 99%. During these tests, the energy costs averaged $0.20/bbl at 12 bbl/D.

  13. Calibration of acoustic emission transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leschek, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for calibrating an acoustic emission transducer to be used in a pre-set frequency range. The absolute reception sensitivity of a reference transducer is determined at frequencies selected within the frequency range. The reference transducer and the acoustic emission transducer are put into acoustic communication with the surface of a limited acoustic medium representing an equivalent acoustic load appreciably identical to that of the medium in which the use of the acoustic emission transducer is intended. A blank random acoustic noise is emitted in the acoustic medium in order to establish a diffuse and reverberating sound field, after which the output responses of the reference transducer and of the acoustic emission transducer are obtained with respect to the diffuse and reverberating field, for selected frequencies. The output response of the acoustic emission transducer is compared with that of the reference transducer for the selected frequencies, so as to determine the reception sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducer [fr

  14. Holograms for acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-22

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  15. How females of chirping and trilling field crickets integrate the 'what' and 'where' of male acoustic signals during decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Eileen; Gray, David A; Matthias Hennig, R

    2016-11-01

    In crickets acoustic communication serves mate selection. Female crickets have to perceive and integrate male cues relevant for mate choice while confronted with several different signals in an acoustically diverse background. Overall female decisions are based on the attractiveness of the temporal pattern (informative about the 'what') and on signal intensity (informative about the 'where') of male calling songs. Here, we investigated how the relevant cues for mate choice are integrated during the decision process by females of five different species of chirping and trilling field crickets. Using a behavioral design, female preferences in no-choice and choice situations for male calling songs differing in pulse rate, modulation depth, intensities, chirp/trill arrangements and temporal shifts were examined. Sensory processing underlying decisions in female field crickets is rather similar as combined evidence suggested that incoming song patterns were analyzed separately by bilaterally paired networks for pattern attractiveness and pattern intensity. A downstream gain control mechanism leads to a weighting of the intensity cue by pattern attractiveness. While remarkable differences between species were observed with respect to specific processing steps, closely related species exhibited more similar preferences than did more distantly related species.

  16. Experimental observation of pulsating instability under acoustic field in downward-propagating flames at large Lewis number

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Sung Hwan

    2017-10-12

    According to previous theory, pulsating propagation in a premixed flame only appears when the reduced Lewis number, β(Le-1), is larger than a critical value (Sivashinsky criterion: 4(1 +3) ≈ 11), where β represents the Zel\\'dovich number (for general premixed flames, β ≈ 10), which requires Lewis number Le > 2.1. However, few experimental observation have been reported because the critical reduced Lewis number for the onset of pulsating instability is beyond what can be reached in experiments. Furthermore, the coupling with the unavoidable hydrodynamic instability limits the observation of pure pulsating instabilities in flames. Here, we describe a novel method to observe the pulsating instability. We utilize a thermoacoustic field caused by interaction between heat release and acoustic pressure fluctuations of the downward-propagating premixed flames in a tube to enhance conductive heat loss at the tube wall and radiative heat loss at the open end of the tube due to extended flame residence time by diminished flame surface area, i.e., flat flame. The thermoacoustic field allowed pure observation of the pulsating motion since the primary acoustic force suppressed the intrinsic hydrodynamic instability resulting from thermal expansion. By employing this method, we have provided new experimental observations of the pulsating instability for premixed flames. The Lewis number (i.e., Le ≈ 1.86) was less than the critical value suggested previously.

  17. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  18. Numerical study of primordial magnetic field amplification by inflation-produced gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    We numerically study the interaction of inflation-produced magnetic fields with gravitational waves, both of which originate from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The resonance between the magnetic field perturbations and the gravitational waves has been suggested as a possible mechanism for magnetic field amplification. However, some analytical studies suggest that the effect of the inflationary gravitational waves is too small to provide significant amplification. Our numerical study shows more clearly how the interaction affects the magnetic fields and confirms the weakness of the influence of the gravitational waves. We present an investigation based on the magnetohydrodynamic approximation and take into account the differences of the Alfven speed.

  19. Holding characteristics of planar objects suspended by near-field acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo; Koike; Nakamura; Ueha; Hashimoto

    2000-03-01

    The authors have found the acoustic levitation phenomenon where planar objects of 10 kg weight can be levitated near a vibration surface. This phenomenon has been studied for non-contact transportation. A circular planar object can be suspended without contacting a circular vibration plate. We have studied the holding force which acts horizontally on the levitated objects. The horizontal position of the object is stabilized by this force. In this paper, we discuss the effect of the radius of a levitated object, levitation distance, displacement amplitude of the vibration plate and the vibration mode on the suspending force.

  20. Polarization operator in quantum electrodynamics with a pair-producing external field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashev, V.P.; Shvartsman, Sh.M.; Shabad, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Various radiative processes with one-photon initial state are treated in QED with pair-producing external field. It is shown that the probabilities of such processes are expressed in terms of two different polarization operators. For the case of a constant field the polarization operator which is expressed through the so-called causal Green electron function, is calculated. This operator has never been calculated previously. It enters the formula for probability of production of N arbitrary pairs by a photon

  1. Direct measurement of macroscopic electric fields produced by collective effects in electron-impact experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velotta, R.; Avaldi, L.; Camilloni, R.; Giammanco, F.; Spinelli, N.; Stefani, G.

    1996-01-01

    The macroscopic electric field resulting from the space charge produced in electron-impact experiments has been characterized by using secondary electrons of well-defined energy (e.g., Auger or autoionizing electrons) as a probe. It is shown that the measurement of the kinetic-energy shifts suffered by secondary electrons is a suitable tool for the analysis of the self-generated electric field in a low-density plasma. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Permanent magnet assembly producing a strong tilted homogeneous magnetic field: towards magic angle field spinning NMR and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dimitris; Hugon, Cédric; Guiga, Angelo; Aubert, Guy; Cazaux, Sandrine; Hardy, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a cylindrical permanent magnet design that generates a homogeneous and strong magnetic field having an arbitrary inclination with respect to the axis of the cylinder. The analytical theory of 3 D magnetostatics has been applied to this problem, and a hybrid magnet structure has been designed. This structure contains two magnets producing a longitudinal and transverse component for the magnetic field, whose amplitudes and homogeneities can be fully controlled by design. A simple prototype has been constructed using inexpensive small cube magnets, and its magnetic field has been mapped using Hall and NMR probe sensors. This magnet can, in principle, be used for magic angle field spinning NMR and MRI experiments allowing for metabolic chemical shift profiling in small living animals. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. [Acoustic emission diagnostic techniques for high-field high current-density super inducting poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic emission technology was introduced in the late 1970's to monitor superconducting magnets. It has now been firmly established that acoustic signals in superconducting magnets are emitted principally by mechanical events such as conductor strain, conductor motion, frictional motion, and epoxy cracking. Despite earlier suggestions, flux motion, except during flux jumping, does not appear to be an important source of AE signals in superconducting magnets. Of these several potential sources of AE signals in superconducting magnets, mechanical disturbances have been identified to be most important in high-performance, ''adiabatic'' magnets such as the dipoles used in accelerators. These mechanical disturbances are transitory, each generating a packet of AE signals that can be located with sensors. Source identification and location has been achieved with a number of superconducting magnets. In this section, the basic principle for the operation of adiabatic magnets is discussed, followed by presentation of some of the important experimental results relevant to the question of premature quench obtained at MIT

  4. Active control of passive acoustic fields: passive synthetic aperture/Doppler beamforming with data from an autonomous vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Spain, Gerald L; Terrill, Eric; Chadwell, C David; Smith, Jerome A; Lynch, Stephen D

    2006-12-01

    The maneuverability of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with hull-mounted arrays provides the opportunity to actively modify received acoustic fields to optimize extraction of information. This paper uses ocean acoustic data collected by an AUV-mounted two-dimensional hydrophone array, with overall dimension one-tenth wavelength at 200-500 Hz, to demonstrate aspects of this control through vehicle motion. Source localization is performed using Doppler shifts measured at a set of receiver velocities by both single elements and a physical array. Results show that a source in the presence of a 10-dB higher-level interferer having exactly the same frequency content (as measured by a stationary receiver) is properly localized and that white-noise-constrained adaptive beamforming applied to the physical aperture data in combination with Doppler beamforming provides greater spatial resolution than physical-aperture-alone beamforming and significantly lower sidelobes than single element Doppler beamforming. A new broadband beamformer that adjusts for variations in vehicle velocity on a sample by sample basis is demonstrated with data collected during a high-acceleration maneuver. The importance of including the cost of energy expenditure in determining optimal vehicle motion is demonstrated through simulation, further illustrating how the vehicle characteristics are an integral part of the signal/array processing structure.

  5. Study of non-spherical bubble oscillations near a surface in a weak acoustic standing wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoyu; Cegla, Frederic; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    The interaction of acoustically driven bubbles with a wall is important in many applications of ultrasound and cavitation, as the close boundary can severely alter the bubble dynamics. In this paper, the non-spherical surface oscillations of bubbles near a surface in a weak acoustic standing wave field are investigated experimentally and numerically. The translation, the volume, and surface mode oscillations of bubbles near a flat glass surface were observed by a high speed camera in a standing wave cell at 46.8 kHz. The model approach is based on a modified Keller-Miksis equation coupled to surface mode amplitude equations in the first order, and to the translation equations. Modifications are introduced due to the adjacent wall. It was found that a bubble's oscillation mode can change in the presence of the wall, as compared to the bubble in the bulk liquid. In particular, the wall shifts the instability pressure thresholds to smaller driving frequencies for fixed bubble equilibrium radii, or to smaller equilibrium radii for fixed excitation frequency. This can destabilize otherwise spherical bubbles, or stabilize bubbles undergoing surface oscillations in the bulk. The bubble dynamics observed in experiment demonstrated the same trend as the theoretical results.

  6. Manual of plant producers and services in environmental protection. Database in the field of environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serve, C.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of an enquiry, the Stuttgart Chamber of Industry and Commerce produced a database of the services offered by regional and supraregional companies in the field of environmental protection. The data are presented in this manual, classified as follows: noise protection systems; sanitation systems and services; other systems and services. (orig.) [de

  7. Remark on the gravitational field produced by an infinite straight string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, G.; Matsas, G.E.A.

    1989-01-01

    The results predicted by Newtonian gravity and general relativity are compared regarding the field produced by an infinite gauge string with constant density λ. A simple gedankenexperiment is suggested to stress the remarkable differences between these two theories. The existence of the usual Newtonian limit is discussed in this case

  8. Edge effects on forces and magnetic fields produced by a conductor moving past a magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Almer, J.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rossing, T.D. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to further understand the forces acting on magnets moving along and over the edge of a continuous conducting sheet and to produce a comprehensive data set for the validation of analysis methods. Mapping the magnetic field gives information about the eddy currents induced in the conductor, which agrees with numerical calculations.

  9. Edge effects on forces and magnetic fields produced by a conductor moving past a magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulcahy, T.M.; Hull, J.R.; Almer, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rossing, T.D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Experiments have been performed to further understand the forces acting on magnets moving along and over the edge of a continuous conducting sheet and to produce a comprehensive data set for the validation of analysis methods. Mapping the magnetic field gives information about the eddy currents induced in the conductor, which agrees with numerical calculations.

  10. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mros@lle.rochester.edu; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  11. Method and apparatus for producing average magnetic well in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic well reversed field plasma pinch method and apparatus produces hot magnetically confined pinch plasma in a toroidal chamber having a major toroidal axis and a minor toroidal axis and a small aspect ratio, e.g. < 6. A pinch current channel within the plasma and at least one hyperbolic magnetic axis outside substantially all of the plasma form a region of average magnetic well in a region surrounding the plasma current channel. The apparatus is operated so that reversal of the safety factor q and of the toroidal magnetic field takes place within the plasma. The well-producing plasma cross section shape is produced by a conductive shell surrounding the shaped envelope and by coils. A shell is of copper or aluminium with non-conductive breaks, and is bonded to a thin aluminium envelope by silicone rubber. (author)

  12. Statistically optimized near field acoustic holography using an array of pressure-velocity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Jaud, Virginie

    2007-01-01

    of a measurement aperture that extends well beyond the source can be relaxed. Both NAH and SONAH are based on the assumption that all sources are on one side of the measurement plane whereas the other side is source free. An extension of the SONAH procedure based on measurement with a double layer array...... of pressure microphones has been suggested. The double layer technique makes it possible to distinguish between sources on the two sides of the array and thus suppress the influence of extraneous noise coming from the “wrong” side. It has also recently been demonstrated that there are significant advantages...... in NAH based on an array of acoustic particle velocity transducers (in a single layer) compared with NAH based on an array of pressure microphones. This investigation combines the two ideas and examines SONAH based on an array of pressure-velocity intensity probes through computer simulations as well...

  13. Magnetic fields produced by rotating symmetrical bodies with homogeneous surface charge density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espejel-Morales, R; Murguía-Romero, G; Calles, A; Cabrera-Bravo, E; Morán-López, J L

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical calculation for the stationary magnetic field produced by different rotating bodies with homogeneous and constant surface charge density. The calculation is done by superposing the magnetic field produced by a set of loops of current which mimic the magnetic field produced by belts of current defined by slices of fixed width. We consider the cases of a sphere, ellipsoids, open and closed cylinders and a combination of these in a dumbbell -like shell. We also plot their magnetic field lines using a technique that make use of the Runge–Kutta fourth-order method. Up to our knowledge, the case of closed cylinders was not calculated before. In contrast to previous results, we find that the magnetic field inside finite hollow bodies is homogeneous only in the case of a sphere. This is consequence of the fact that, for the sphere, the surface of any slice taken perpendicularly to the rotation axis, depends only on its thickness, like in the case of an infinite cylinder. (paper)

  14. Study of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) radiation produced by consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roha Tukimin; Ahmad Fazli Ahmad Sanusi; Rozaimah Abd Rahim; Mohd Yusof Mohd Ali; Mohamad Amirul Nizam Mohamad Thari

    2006-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field ( ELF EMF) radiation falls under category of non-ionising radiation (NIR).ELF EMF consists of electric and magnetic fields. Excessive exposure to ELF EMF radiation may cause biological and health effects to human beings such as behavioral changes, stochastic and as initiator of cancer. In daily life, the main source of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation are consumer products in our home and office. Due to its ability to cause hazard, a study of ELF EMF radiation produced by consumer product was conducted. For this preliminary study, sample of 20 types electrical appliances were selected. The measurement was covered electric and magnetic field strength produced by the sample. PMM model EHP50A were used for measurement and data analysis. The results were compared with the permissible limits recommended by International Commission of Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) for members of public (1000 mGauss and 5000 V/m). The results showed that all tested sample produced magnetic and electric field but still under the permissible limit recommended by ICNIRP. Besides that we found that field strengths can be very high at closer distance to the sample. (Author)

  15. Effects of the Distance from a Diffusive Surface on the Objective and Perceptual Evaluation of the Sound Field in a Small Simulated Variable-Acoustics Hall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louena Shtrepi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of the acoustic effects that diffusive surfaces have on the objective acoustic parameters and on sound perception have not yet been fully understood. To this end, acoustic simulations have been performed in Odeon in the model of a variable-acoustic concert hall. This paper is presented as a follow-up study to a previous paper that dealt with in-field measurements only. As in measurements, a diffusive and a reflective condition of one of the lateral walls have been considered in the room models. Two modeling alternatives of the diffusive condition, that is, (a a flat surface with high scattering coefficient applied; and (b a triangular relief modeled including edge diffraction, have been investigated. Objective acoustic parameters, such as early decay time (EDT, reverberation time (T30, clarity (C80, definition (D50, and interaural cross correlation (IACC, have been compared between the two conditions. Moreover, an auditory experiment has been performed to determine the maximum distance from a diffusive surface at which the simulated acoustic scattering effects are still audible. Although the simulated objective results showed a good match with measured values, the subjective results showed that the differences between the diffuse and reflective conditions become significant when model (b is used.

  16. Behavioral consequences of radiation exposure to simulated space radiation in the C57BL/6 mouse: open field, rotorod, and acoustic startle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecaut, Michael J.; Haerich, Paul; Zuccarelli, Cara N.; Smith, Anna L.; Zendejas, Eric D.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to investigate the consequences of exposure to proton radiation, such as might occur for astronauts during space flight. C57BL/6 mice were exposed, either with or without 15-g/cm2 aluminum shielding, to 0-, 3-, or 4-Gy proton irradiation mimicking features of a solar particle event. Irradiation produced transient direct deficits in open-field exploratory behavior and acoustic startle habituation. Rotorod performance at 18 rpm was impaired by exposure to proton radiation and was impaired at 26 rpm, but only for mice irradiated with shielding and at the 4-Gy dose. Long-term (>2 weeks) indirect deficits in open-field activity appeared as a result of impaired experiential encoding immediately following exposure. A 2-week recovery prior to testing decreased most of the direct effects of exposure, with only rotorod performance at 26 rpm being impaired. These results suggest that the performance deficits may have been mediated by radiation damage to hippocampal, cerebellar, and possibly, forebrain dopaminergic function.

  17. Modeling magnetic field and TEC signatures of large-amplitude acoustic and gravity waves generated by natural hazard events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.; Inchin, P.; Komjathy, A.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2017-12-01

    Ocean and solid earth responses during earthquakes are a significant source of large amplitude acoustic and gravity waves (AGWs) that perturb the overlying ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system. IT disturbances are routinely detected following large earthquakes (M > 7.0) via GPS total electron content (TEC) observations, which often show acoustic wave ( 3-4 min periods) and gravity wave ( 10-15 min) signatures with amplitudes of 0.05-2 TECU. In cases of very large earthquakes (M > 8.0) the persisting acoustic waves are estimated to have 100-200 m/s compressional velocities in the conducting ionospheric E and F-regions and should generate significant dynamo currents and magnetic field signatures. Indeed, some recent reports (e.g. Hao et al, 2013, JGR, 118, 6) show evidence for magnetic fluctuations, which appear to be related to AGWs, following recent large earthquakes. However, very little quantitative information is available on: (1) the detailed spatial and temporal dependence of these magnetic fluctuations, which are usually observed at a small number of irregularly arranged stations, and (2) the relation of these signatures to TEC perturbations in terms of relative amplitudes, frequency, and timing for different events. This work investigates space- and time-dependent behavior of both TEC and magnetic fluctuations following recent large earthquakes, with the aim to improve physical understanding of these perturbations via detailed, high-resolution, two- and three-dimensional modeling case studies with a coupled neutral atmospheric and ionospheric model, MAGIC-GEMINI (Zettergren and Snively, 2015, JGR, 120, 9). We focus on cases inspired by the large Chilean earthquakes from the past decade (viz., the M > 8.0 earthquakes from 2010 and 2015) to constrain the sources for the model, i.e. size, frequency, amplitude, and timing, based on available information from ocean buoy and seismometer data. TEC data are used to validate source amplitudes and to constrain

  18. Identifying fecal matter contamination in produce fields using multispectral reflectance imaging under ambient solar illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoonsoo; O'Donnell, Colm P.

    2016-05-01

    An imaging device to detect fecal contamination in fresh produce fields could allow the producer avoid harvesting fecal contaminated produce. E.coli O157:H7 outbreaks have been associated with fecal contaminated leafy greens. In this study, in-field spectral profiles of bovine fecal matter, soil, and spinach leaves are compared. A common aperture imager designed with two identical monochromatic cameras, a beam splitter, and optical filters was used to simultaneously capture two-spectral images of leaves contaminated with both fecal matter and soil. The optical filters where 10 nm full width half maximum bandpass filters, one at 690 nm and the second at 710 nm. These were mounted in front of the object lenses. New images were created using the ratio of these two spectral images on a pixel by pixel basis. Image analysis results showed that the fecal matter contamination could be distinguished from soil and leaf on the ratio images. The use of this technology has potential to allow detection of fecal contamination in produce fields which can be a source of foodbourne illnesses. It has the added benefit of mitigating cross-contamination during harvesting and processing.

  19. Does attention play a role in dynamic receptive field adaptation to changing acoustic salience in A1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Jonathan B; Elhilali, Mounya; David, Stephen V; Shamma, Shihab A

    2007-07-01

    Acoustic filter properties of A1 neurons can dynamically adapt to stimulus statistics, classical conditioning, instrumental learning and the changing auditory attentional focus. We have recently developed an experimental paradigm that allows us to view cortical receptive field plasticity on-line as the animal meets different behavioral challenges by attending to salient acoustic cues and changing its cortical filters to enhance performance. We propose that attention is the key trigger that initiates a cascade of events leading to the dynamic receptive field changes that we observe. In our paradigm, ferrets were initially trained, using conditioned avoidance training techniques, to discriminate between background noise stimuli (temporally orthogonal ripple combinations) and foreground tonal target stimuli. They learned to generalize the task for a wide variety of distinct background and foreground target stimuli. We recorded cortical activity in the awake behaving animal and computed on-line spectrotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) of single neurons in A1. We observed clear, predictable task-related changes in STRF shape while the animal performed spectral tasks (including single tone and multi-tone detection, and two-tone discrimination) with different tonal targets. A different set of task-related changes occurred when the animal performed temporal tasks (including gap detection and click-rate discrimination). Distinctive cortical STRF changes may constitute a "task-specific signature". These spectral and temporal changes in cortical filters occur quite rapidly, within 2min of task onset, and fade just as quickly after task completion, or in some cases, persisted for hours. The same cell could multiplex by differentially changing its receptive field in different task conditions. On-line dynamic task-related changes, as well as persistent plastic changes, were observed at a single-unit, multi-unit and population level. Auditory attention is likely to be pivotal in

  20. Deep diving odontocetes foraging strategies and their prey field as determined by acoustic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorli, Giacomo

    Deep diving odontocetes, like sperm whales, beaked whales, Risso's dolphins, and pilot whales are known to forage at deep depths in the ocean on squid and fish. These marine mammal species are top predators and for this reason are very important for the ecosystems they live in, since they can affect prey populations and control food web dynamics through top-down effects. The studies presented in this thesis investigate deep diving odontocetes. foraging strategies, and the density and size of their potential prey in the deep ocean using passive and active acoustic techniques. Ecological Acoustic Recorders (EAR) were used to monitor the foraging activity of deep diving odontocetes at three locations around the world: the Josephine Seamount High Sea Marine Protected Area (JHSMPA), the Ligurian Sea, and along the Kona coast of the island of Hawaii. In the JHSMPA, sperm whales. and beaked whales. foraging rates do not differ between night-time and day-time. However, in the Ligurian Sea, sperm whales switch to night-time foraging as the winter approaches, while beaked whales alternate between hunting mainly at night, and both at night and at day. Spatial differences were found in deep diving odontocetes. foraging activity in Hawaii where they forage most in areas with higher chlorophyll concentrations. Pilot whales (and false killer whales, clustered together in the category "blackfishes") and Risso's dolphins forage mainly at night at all locations. These two species adjust their foraging activity with the length of the night. The density and size of animals living in deep sea scattering layers was studied using a DIDSON imaging sonar at multiple stations along the Kona coast of Hawaii. The density of animals was affected by location, depth, month, and the time of day. The size of animals was influenced by station and month. The DIDSON proved to be a successful, non-invasive technique to study density and size of animals in the deep sea. Densities were found to be an

  1. The conducting shell stellarator: A simple means for producing complicated fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, G.V.

    1997-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of stellarators, both helical and modular, is that their coil sets must take difficult shapes in order to produce the complicated stellarator magnetic fields. The complex coil shapes make fabrication difficult and costly compared to say the toroidal field, TF, coil set of a tokamak. The conducting shell stellarator, CSS, configuration described in this report shows that complicated stellarator fields can be produced by inducing eddy currents in a conducting shell from a simple TF coil set (a field that varies like 1/R). This technique is applicable not only to a pulsed system at room or cryogenic temperatures, but can be implemented for a superconducting TF with a superconducting shell in a stellarator reactor. The CSS has the added benefit that within this device the metallic shell which can be made up of discrete plates can be changed out and replaced with new plates to create a different stellarator configuration within the same TF coil set. The work of creating the complicated magnetics is done by the passive conductor reshaping the simple TF field

  2. Effects of a static inhomogeneous magnetic field acting on a laser-produced carbon plasma plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Favre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present time- and space-resolved observations of the dynamics of a laser-produced carbon plasma, propagating in a sub-Tesla inhomogeneous magnetic field, with both, axial and radial field gradients. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 7 J/cm2, is used to generate the plasma from a solid graphite target, in vacuum. The magnetic field is produced using two coaxial sets of two NeFeB ring magnets, parallel to the laser target surface. The diagnostics include plasma imaging with 50 ns time resolution, spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy and Faraday cup. Based on our observations, evidence of radial and axial plasma confinement due to magnetic field gradients is presented. Formation of C2 molecules, previously observed in the presence of a low pressure neutral gas background, and enhanced on-axis ion flux, are ascribed to finite Larmor radius effects and reduced radial transport due to the presence of the magnetic field.

  3. Inverse estimation of the temperature field within a gas-filled duct section by use of acoustic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Kyoon; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the temperature distribution of an in-duct gaseous medium is essential in the monitoring of combustion status. To obtain the temperature distribution, an inverse relationship based on the Radon transform is formulated by using the measured time retardation data from a set of acoustic sensors and actuators. The entire spatial distribution can be obtained by interpolating the estimated discrete temperature data using either a path-based or spaced-based method. An interpolation method then determines the precision of the final imaging result. The characteristics and performance of two interpolation methods are investigated in a simulation study by reconstructing the temperature distribution of a rectangular cross-section. To calculate the temperature field, the path-based interpolation method adopts a direct expression of temperature variation along the propagation path, whereas the space-based interpolation method uses data obtained at predetermined points deployed inside the field. The average reconstruction accuracy of the space-based interpolation for temperature fields with 1 and 4 local maxima is 22% and 183% better than that of path-based interpolation, respectively. Also, the space-based interpolation method is more robust with regard to measurement noise than the path-based interpolation method. (paper)

  4. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux

  5. Perspective: Acoustic metamaterials in transition

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying; Yang, Min; Sheng, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials derive their novel characteristics from the interaction between acoustic waves with designed structures. Since its inception seventeen years ago, the field has been driven by fundamental geometric and physical principles

  6. Skin effects, ion acoustic turbulence and anomalous transport in a non-isothermal solid-state plasma, produced by a power femtosecond laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, N.B.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the experiments, wherein the absorption of the laser intensive radiation with duration of 400 fs in aluminium target was studied, are explained. It is shown that electro-conductivity of the nonisothermal solid-state aluminium plasma was determined in these experiments by the ion-acoustic oscillations (ion-acoustic turbulence). Possible ways of theoretical description of the ion-acoustic turbulence and interaction of the nonisothermal solid-state plasma with powerful ultrashort laser radiation are discussed [ru

  7. Modification of semiconductor materials using laser-produced ion streams additionally accelerated in the electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, B.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Pisarek, M.

    2009-01-01

    The laser-produced ion stream may be attractive for direct ultra-low-energy ion implantation in thin layer of semiconductor for modification of electrical and optical properties of semiconductor devices. Application of electrostatic fields for acceleration and formation of laser-generated ion stream enables to control the ion stream parameters in broad energy and current density ranges. It also permits to remove the useless laser-produced ions from the ion stream designed for implantation. For acceleration of ions produced with the use of a low fluence repetitive laser system (Nd:glass: 2 Hz, pulse duration: 3.5 ns, pulse energy:∼0.5 J, power density: 10 10 W/cm 2 ) in IPPLM the special electrostatic system has been prepared. The laser-produced ions passing through the diaphragm (a ring-shaped slit in the HV box) have been accelerated in the system of electrodes. The accelerating voltage up to 40 kV, the distance of the diaphragm from the target, the diaphragm diameter and the gap width were changed for choosing the desired parameters (namely the energy band of the implanted ions) of the ion stream. The characteristics of laser-produced Ge ion streams were determined with the use of precise ion diagnostic methods, namely: electrostatic ion energy analyser and various ion collectors. The laser-produced and post-accelerated Ge ions have been used for implantation into semiconductor materials for nanocrystal fabrication. The characteristics of implanted samples were measured using AES

  8. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  9. A field evaluation of an external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon: implications for estimating hydroturbine passage survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Brown

    Full Text Available Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to

  10. A field evaluation of an external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon: implications for estimating hydroturbine passage survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard S; Deng, Z Daniel; Cook, Katrina V; Pflugrath, Brett D; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao; Martinez, Jayson J; Li, Huidong; Trumbo, Bradly A; Ahmann, Martin L; Seaburg, Adam G

    2013-01-01

    Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System) used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm) downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss) to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days) single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to confirm this.

  11. Transfer functions of laminar premixed flames subjected to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and non-thermal plasma discharges

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna; Xiong, Yuan; Moeck, Jonas P.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Roberts, William L.; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    The responses of laminar methane-air flames to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges are reported here. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner with a nozzle made from a quartz tube. Three different flame geometries have been studied: conical, M-shaped and V-shaped flames. A central stainless steel rod is used as a cathode for the electric field and plasma excitations. The acoustic forcing is obtained with a loudspeaker located at the bottom part of the burner. For forcing by AC electric fields, a metallic grid is placed above the rod and connected to an AC power supply. Plasma forcing is obtained by applying high-voltage pulses of 10-ns duration applied at 10 kHz, between the rod and an annular stainless steel ring, placed at the outlet of the quartz tube. The chemiluminescence of CH is used to determine the heat release rate fluctuations. For forcing by acoustic waves and plasma, the geometry of the flame plays a key role in the response of the combustion, while the flame shape does not affect the response of the combustion to electric field forcing. The flame response to acoustic forcing of about 10% of the incoming flow is similar to those obtained in the literature. The flames are found to be responsive to an AC electric field across the whole range of frequencies studied. A forcing mechanism, based on the generation of ionic wind, is proposed. The gain of the transfer function obtained for plasma forcing is found to be up to 5 times higher than for acoustic forcing. A possible mechanism of plasma forcing is introduced.

  12. Transfer functions of laminar premixed flames subjected to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and non-thermal plasma discharges

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna

    2016-06-23

    The responses of laminar methane-air flames to forcing by acoustic waves, AC electric fields, and nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges are reported here. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner with a nozzle made from a quartz tube. Three different flame geometries have been studied: conical, M-shaped and V-shaped flames. A central stainless steel rod is used as a cathode for the electric field and plasma excitations. The acoustic forcing is obtained with a loudspeaker located at the bottom part of the burner. For forcing by AC electric fields, a metallic grid is placed above the rod and connected to an AC power supply. Plasma forcing is obtained by applying high-voltage pulses of 10-ns duration applied at 10 kHz, between the rod and an annular stainless steel ring, placed at the outlet of the quartz tube. The chemiluminescence of CH is used to determine the heat release rate fluctuations. For forcing by acoustic waves and plasma, the geometry of the flame plays a key role in the response of the combustion, while the flame shape does not affect the response of the combustion to electric field forcing. The flame response to acoustic forcing of about 10% of the incoming flow is similar to those obtained in the literature. The flames are found to be responsive to an AC electric field across the whole range of frequencies studied. A forcing mechanism, based on the generation of ionic wind, is proposed. The gain of the transfer function obtained for plasma forcing is found to be up to 5 times higher than for acoustic forcing. A possible mechanism of plasma forcing is introduced.

  13. Near-field acoustic holography with sound pressure and particle velocity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    of the particle velocity has notable potential in NAH, and furthermore, combined measurement of sound pressure and particle velocity opens a new range of possibilities that are examined in this study. On this basis, sound field separation methods have been studied, and a new measurement principle based on double...... layer measurements of the particle velocity has been proposed. Also, the relation between near-field and far-field radiation from sound sources has been examined using the concept of the supersonic intensity. The calculation of this quantity has been extended to other holographic methods, and studied...

  14. Generation of scaled protogalactic seed magnetic fields in laser-produced shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, G; Ravasio, A; Murphy, C D; Schaar, K; Baird, A; Bell, A R; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Bingham, R; Constantin, C; Drake, R P; Edwards, M; Everson, E T; Gregory, C D; Kuramitsu, Y; Lau, W; Mithen, J; Niemann, C; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Reville, B; Robinson, A P L; Ryutov, D D; Sakawa, Y; Yang, S; Woolsey, N C; Koenig, M; Miniati, F

    2012-01-25

    The standard model for the origin of galactic magnetic fields is through the amplification of seed fields via dynamo or turbulent processes to the level consistent with present observations. Although other mechanisms may also operate, currents from misaligned pressure and temperature gradients (the Biermann battery process) inevitably accompany the formation of galaxies in the absence of a primordial field. Driven by geometrical asymmetries in shocks associated with the collapse of protogalactic structures, the Biermann battery is believed to generate tiny seed fields to a level of about 10(-21) gauss (refs 7, 8). With the advent of high-power laser systems in the past two decades, a new area of research has opened in which, using simple scaling relations, astrophysical environments can effectively be reproduced in the laboratory. Here we report the results of an experiment that produced seed magnetic fields by the Biermann battery effect. We show that these results can be scaled to the intergalactic medium, where turbulence, acting on timescales of around 700 million years, can amplify the seed fields sufficiently to affect galaxy evolution.

  15. Zeptomole Detection Scheme Based on Levitation Coordinate Measurements of a Single Microparticle in a Coupled Acoustic-Gravitational Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Akihisa; Harada, Makoto; Okada, Tetsuo

    2018-02-06

    We present a novel analytical principle in which an analyte (according to its concentration) induces a change in the density of a microparticle, which is measured as a vertical coordinate in a coupled acoustic-gravitational (CAG) field. The density change is caused by the binding of gold nanoparticles (AuNP's) on a polystyrene (PS) microparticle through avidin-biotin association. The density of a 10-μm PS particle increases by 2% when 500 100-nm AuNP's are bound to the PS. The CAG can detect this density change as a 5-10 μm shift of the levitation coordinate of the PS. This approach, which allows us to detect 700 AuNP's bound to a PS particle, is utilized to detect biotin in solution. Biotin is detectable at a picomolar level. The reaction kinetics plays a significant role in the entire process. The kinetic aspects are also quantitatively discussed based on the levitation behavior of the PS particles in the CAG field.

  16. Signatures of the Primordial Universe from Its Emptiness: Measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from Minima of the Density Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Liang, Yu; Zhao, Cheng; Tao, Charling; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; McBride, Cameron; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-04-29

    Sound waves from the primordial fluctuations of the Universe imprinted in the large-scale structure, called baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), can be used as standard rulers to measure the scale of the Universe. These oscillations have already been detected in the distribution of galaxies. Here we propose to measure BAOs from the troughs (minima) of the density field. Based on two sets of accurate mock halo catalogues with and without BAOs in the seed initial conditions, we demonstrate that the BAO signal cannot be obtained from the clustering of classical disjoint voids, but it is clearly detected from overlapping voids. The latter represent an estimate of all troughs of the density field. We compute them from the empty circumsphere centers constrained by tetrahedra of galaxies using Delaunay triangulation. Our theoretical models based on an unprecedented large set of detailed simulated void catalogues are remarkably well confirmed by observational data. We use the largest recently publicly available sample of luminous red galaxies from SDSS-III BOSS DR11 to unveil for the first time a >3σ BAO detection from voids in observations. Since voids are nearly isotropically expanding regions, their centers represent the most quiet places in the Universe, keeping in mind the cosmos origin and providing a new promising window in the analysis of the cosmological large-scale structure from galaxy surveys.

  17. Acoustic calibration apparatus for calibrating plethysmographic acoustic pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Davis, David C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating an acoustic sensor is described. The apparatus includes a transmission material having an acoustic impedance approximately matching the acoustic impedance of the actual acoustic medium existing when the acoustic sensor is applied in actual in-service conditions. An elastic container holds the transmission material. A first sensor is coupled to the container at a first location on the container and a second sensor coupled to the container at a second location on the container, the second location being different from the first location. A sound producing device is coupled to the container and transmits acoustic signals inside the container.

  18. Observations of magnetic field and TEC fluctuations caused by ionospheric responses to acoustic and gravity waves from ground-level, natural hazard sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchin, P.; Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.; Komjathy, A.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have reported magnetic field fluctuations following intense seismic hazard events [e.g. Aoyama et al., EPS, 68, 2016; Toh et al., JGR, 116, 2011]. These perturbations can be associated with ionospheric dynamo phenomena driven by seismically generated acoustic and gravity waves (AGWs). AGW-related dynamo effects can be separated from other sources of magnetic fluctuations (e.g. piezo magnetic effects, magnetospheric forcing or Rayleigh surface waves) based on time delays from event onset (corresponding closely with travel times for AGWs from ground to the ionosphere) and spectral content measured concurrently in total electron content (TEC). Modeling studies aimed at understanding these magnetic field fluctuations have demonstrated the idea that AGWs propagating through the conducting ionosphere can induce current densities sufficient to produce observable magnetic signatures [Zettergren and Snively, JGR, 120, 2017]. Here, we investigate the features of seismic-related magnetic field fluctuations in data and their generation via the effects of seismically-forced AGWs on the ionosphere [Iyemori et al., EPS, 65, 2013; Hasbi et al., JASTP, 71, 2005]. Concurrent magnetic field and TEC data are analyzed for several events: the Chilean earthquakes of 2010 and 2015, Chile's Calbuco volcano eruption and the Sumatran earthquake on March 28, 2005. We investigate the qualitative features of the disturbances as well as quantitative spectral and timing analysis of the data. For Chilean earthquakes, TEC and ground-based magnetometer data reveal fluctuations in magnetic field exhibiting 4-5 mHz frequencies, the same as in TEC. For the Calbuco volcano eruption and Sumatran earthquake both TEC and magnetic field perturbations exhibit frequencies of 4-5 mHz. The results are consistent with previous reports [Aoyama et al., EPS, 68, 2016, Hasbi et al., JASTP, 71, 2005, Iyemori et al., EPS, 65, 2013]. These observations are further interpreted through detailed numerical

  19. Automated disposal of produced water from a coalbed methane well field, a case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckianow, B.J.; Findley, M.L.; Paschal, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the automated disposal system for produced water designed and operated by Taurus Exploration, Inc. This presentation draws from Taurus' case study in the planning, design, construction, and operation of production water disposal facilities for the Mt. Olive well field, located in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama. The common method for disposing of water produced from coalbed methane wells in the Warrior Basin is to discharge into a receiving stream. The limiting factor in the discharge method is the capability of the receiving stream to assimilate the chloride component of the water discharged. During the winter and spring, the major tributaries of the Black Warrior River are capable of assimilating far more production water than operations can generate. During the summer and fall months, however, these same tributaries can approach near zero flow, resulting in insufficient flow for dilution. During such periods pumping shut-down within the well field can be avoided by routing production waters into a storage facility. This paper discusses the automated production water disposal system on Big Sandy Creek designed and operated by Taurus. This system allows for continuous discharge to the receiving stream, thus taking full advantage of Big Sandy Creek's assimilative capacity, while allowing a provision for excess produced water storage and future stream discharge

  20. Investigation of scaling characteristics for defining design environments due to transient ground winds and near-field, nonlinear acoustic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    In order to establish a foundation of scaling laws for the highly nonlinear waves associated with the launch vehicle, the basic knowledge of the relationships among the paramaters pertinent to the energy dissipation process associated with the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves in thermoviscous media is required. The problem of interest is to experimentally investigate the temporal and spacial velocity profiles of fluid flow in a 3-inch open-end pipe of various lengths, produced by the propagation of nonlinear pressure waves for various diaphragm burst pressures of a pressure wave generator. As a result, temporal and spacial characteristics of wave propagation for a parametric set of nonlinear pressure waves in the pipe containing air under atmospheric conditions were determined. Velocity measurements at five sections along the pipes of up to 210 ft. in length were made with hot-film anemometers for five pressure waves produced by a piston. The piston was derived with diaphragm burst pressures at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 psi in the driver chamber of the pressure wave generator.

  1. Laminar and turbulent nozzle-jet flows and their acoustic near-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bühler, Stefan; Obrist, Dominik; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the effects of nozzle-exit flow conditions on the jet-flow development and the near-field sound at a diameter-based Reynolds number of Re D = 18 100 and Mach number Ma = 0.9. Our computational setup features the inclusion of a cylindrical nozzle which allows to establish a physical nozzle-exit flow and therefore well-defined initial jet-flow conditions. Within the nozzle, the flow is modeled by a potential flow core and a laminar, transitional, or developing turbulent boundary layer. The goal is to document and to compare the effects of the different jet inflows on the jet flow development and the sound radiation. For laminar and transitional boundary layers, transition to turbulence in the jet shear layer is governed by the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the turbulent nozzle boundary layer, the jet flow development is characterized by a rapid changeover to a turbulent free shear layer within about one nozzle diameter. Sound pressure levels are strongly enhanced for laminar and transitional exit conditions compared to the turbulent case. However, a frequency and frequency-wavenumber analysis of the near-field pressure indicates that the dominant sound radiation characteristics remain largely unaffected. By applying a recently developed scaling procedure, we obtain a close match of the scaled near-field sound spectra for all nozzle-exit turbulence levels and also a reasonable agreement with experimental far-field data

  2. A total generalized variation approach for near-field acoustic holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2017-01-01

    Near-field methods based on microphone array measurements are useful to understand how a source radiates sound. Due to discretization errors, these methods are typically restricted to low frequencies. Sparse approaches have gained considerable attention, as they can potentially recover a seemingl...

  3. Near-Field Acoustic Power Level Analysis of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Cruise Conditions, Technical Report II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Near-field acoustic power level analysis of F31A31 open rotor model has been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated cruise flight conditions. The non-proprietary parts of the test data obtained from experiments in the 8x6 supersonic wind tunnel were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center. The tone and broadband components of total noise have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, freestream Mach number, and input shaft power, with different blade-pitch setting angles at simulated cruise flight conditions, are presented and discussed. Empirical equations relating models acoustic power level and input shaft power have been developed. The near-field acoustic efficiency of the model at simulated cruise conditions is also determined. It is hoped that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  4. Origin of salinity in produced waters from the Palm Valley gas field, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, Anita S.; Whitford, David J.; Berry, Martin D.; Barclay, Stuart A.; Giblin, Angela M.

    2005-01-01

    The chemical composition and evolution of produced waters associated with gas production in the Palm Valley gas field, Northern Territory, has important implications for issues such as gas reserve calculations, reservoir management and saline water disposal. The occurrence of saline formation water in the Palm Valley field has been the subject of considerable debate. There were no occurrences of mobile water early in the development of the field and only after gas production had reduced the reservoir pressure, was saline formation water produced. Initially this was in small quantities but has increased dramatically with time, particularly after the initiation of compression in November 1996. The produced waters range from highly saline (up to 300,000 mg/L TDS), with unusual enrichments in Ca, Ba and Sr, to low salinity fluids that may represent condensate waters. The Sr isotopic compositions of the waters ( 87 Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7041-0.7172) are also variable but do not correlate closely with major and trace element abundances. Although the extreme salinity suggests possible involvement of evaporite deposits lower in the stratigraphic sequence, the Sr isotopic composition of the high salinity waters suggests a more complex evolutionary history. The formation waters are chemically and isotopically heterogeneous and are not well mixed. The high salinity brines have Sr isotopic compositions and other geochemical characteristics more consistent with long-term residence within the reservoir rocks than with present-day derivation from a more distal pool of brines associated with evaporites. If the high salinity brines entered the reservoir during the Devonian uplift and were displaced by the reservoir gas into a stagnant pool, which has remained near the reservoir for the last 300-400 Ma, then the size of the brine pool is limited. At a minimum, it might be equivalent to the volume displaced by the reservoired gas

  5. Characterization of microchannel anechoic corners formed by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Alam, Ashar; Ahmed, Husnain; Park, Jinsoo; Jung, Jin Ho; Park, Kwangseok; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2018-02-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) generated in a piezoelectric substrate couple with a liquid according to Snell's law such that a compressional acoustic wave propagates obliquely at a Rayleigh angle ( θ t) inside the microchannel to form a region devoid of a direct acoustic field, which is termed a microchannel anechoic corner (MAC). In the present study, we used microchannels with various heights and widths to characterize the width of the MAC region formed by a single travelling SAW. The attenuation of high-frequency SAWs produced a strong acoustic streaming flow that moved the particles in and out of the MAC region, whereas reflections of the acoustic waves within the microchannel resulted in standing acoustic waves that trapped particles at acoustic pressure nodes located within or outside of the MAC region. A range of actuation frequencies and particle diameters were used to investigate the effects of the acoustic streaming flow and the direct acoustic radiation forces by the travelling as well as standing waves on the particle motion with respect to the MAC region. The width of the MAC ( w c), measured experimentally by tracing the particles, increased with the height of the microchannel ( h m) according to a simple trigonometric equation w c = h m × tan ( θ t ).

  6. Acoustic Metamaterials in Aeronautics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Palma

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials, man-made composites that are scaled smaller than the wavelength, have demonstrated a huge potential for application in acoustics, allowing the production of sub-wavelength acoustic absorbers, acoustic invisibility, perfect acoustic mirrors and acoustic lenses for hyper focusing, and acoustic illusions and enabling new degrees of freedom in the control of the acoustic field. The zero, or even negative, refractive sound index of metamaterials offers possibilities for the control of acoustic patterns and sound at sub-wavelength scales. Despite the tremendous growth in research on acoustic metamaterials during the last decade, the potential of metamaterial-based technologies in aeronautics has still not been fully explored, and its utilization is still in its infancy. Thus, the principal concepts mentioned above could very well provide a means to develop devices that allow the mitigation of the impact of civil aviation noise on the community. This paper gives a review of the most relevant works on acoustic metamaterials, analyzing them for their potential applicability in aeronautics, and, in this process, identifying possible implementation areas and interesting metabehaviors. It also identifies some technical challenges and possible future directions for research with the goal of unveiling the potential of metamaterials technology in aeronautics.

  7. Induction heating of rotating nonmagnetic billet in magnetic field produced by high-parameter permanent magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Doležel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An advanced way of induction heating of nonmagnetic billets is discussed and modeled. The billet rotates in a stationary magnetic field produced by unmoving high-parameter permanent magnets fixed on magnetic circuit of an appropriate shape. The mathematical model of the problem consisting of two coupled partial differential equations is solved numerically, in the monolithic formulation. Computations are carried out using our own code Agros2D based on a fully adaptive higher-order finite element method. The most important results are verified experimentally on our own laboratory device.

  8. CO2-laser--produced plasma columns in a solenoidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offenberger, A.A.; Cervenan, M.R.; Smy, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    A 1-GW CO 2 laser pulse has been used to produce extended column breakdown of hydrogen at low pressure in a 20-cm-long solenoid. Magnetic fields of up to 110 kG were used to inhibit radial losses of the plasma column. A differential pumping scheme was devised to prevent formation of an opaque absorption wave travelling out of the solenoid back toward the focusing lens. Target burns give direct evidence for trapped laser beam propagation along the plasma column

  9. Production of a rapidly rotating plasma by cross-field injection of gun-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohzu, Akira; Ikehata, Takashi; Tanabe, Toshio; Mase, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    Cross-field plasma injection with use of a JxB plasma gun is described as a method to produce rapidly rotating plasma in a crossed electric and magnetic field system. The rotational velocity of the plasma is seriously limited by neutrals surrounding the plasma through strong interactions at the boundary layer. The concentration of neutrals can be reduced by the injection of fully or partially ionized plasma into the discharge volume instead of filling the volume with an operating gas. With use of this method, it is observed that the rotational velocity increases by a factor of 2 to 3 when compared with the conventional method of stationary gas-filling. (author)

  10. Architectural acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Marshall

    2014-01-01

    .... Beginning with a brief history, it reviews the fundamentals of acoustics, human perception and reaction to sound, acoustic noise measurements, noise metrics, and environmental noise characterization...

  11. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  12. A Small Acoustic Goniometer for General Purpose Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pook, Michael L; Loo, Sin Ming

    2016-04-29

    Understanding acoustic events and monitoring their occurrence is a useful aspect of many research projects. In particular, acoustic goniometry allows researchers to determine the source of an event based solely on the sound it produces. The vast majority of acoustic goniometry research projects used custom hardware targeted to the specific application under test. Unfortunately, due to the wide range of sensing applications, a flexible general purpose hardware/firmware system does not exist for this purpose. This article focuses on the development of such a system which encourages the continued exploration of general purpose hardware/firmware and lowers barriers to research in projects requiring the use of acoustic goniometry. Simulations have been employed to verify system feasibility, and a complete hardware implementation of the acoustic goniometer has been designed and field tested. The results are reported, and suggested areas for improvement and further exploration are discussed.

  13. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, Pierre; ter Haar, Gail; Saffari, Nader

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  14. Modelling of the acoustic field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelat, Pierre [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Ter Haar, Gail [Therapeutic Ultrasound Group, Physics Department, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Saffari, Nader, E-mail: Pierre.Gelat@npl.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-07

    The efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for the treatment of a range of different cancers, including those of the liver, prostate and breast, has been demonstrated. As a non-invasive focused therapy, HIFU offers considerable advantages over techniques such as chemotherapy and surgical resection in terms of reduced risk of harmful side effects. Despite this, there are a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the rib cage to induce tissue necrosis in the required volume whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes. Multi-element random-phased arrays are currently showing great promise in overcoming the limitations of single-element transducers. Nevertheless, successful treatment of a patient with liver tumours requires a thorough understanding of the way in which the ultrasonic pressure field from a HIFU array is scattered by the rib cage. In order to address this, a boundary element approach based on a generalized minimal residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was used in conjunction with phase conjugation techniques to focus the field of a 256-element random HIFU array behind human ribs at locations requiring intercostal and transcostal treatment. Simulations were carried out on a 3D mesh of quadratic pressure patches generated using CT scan anatomical data for adult ribs 9-12 on the right side. The methodology was validated on spherical and cylindrical scatterers. Field calculations were also carried out for idealized ribs, consisting of arrays of strip-like scatterers, demonstrating effects of splitting at the focus. This method has the advantage of fully accounting for the effect of scattering and diffraction in 3D under continuous wave excitation.

  15. Towards Predicting Room Acoustical Effects on Sound-Field ASSR from Stimulus Modulation Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zapata Rodriguez, Valentina; Laugesen, Søren; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    ) is considered. Instead of using insert earphones to deliver the stimuli, as is customary, the auditory signals are reproduced from a loudspeaker placed in front of the subject, so as to include the hearing aid in the transmission path. Loudspeaker presentation of the stimulus can lower its effective modulation...... properties of the measurement room has not been considered. The present work explores the relation between the stimulus modulation power and the ASSR amplitude in a simulated sound-field ASSR data set with varying reverberation time. Three rooms were simulated using the Green's function approach...

  16. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  17. Probability of acoustic transmitter detections by receiver lines in Lake Huron: results of multi-year field tests and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Binder, Thomas; Dettmers, John M.; Cooke, Steven J.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundAdvances in acoustic telemetry technology have led to an improved understanding of the spatial ecology of many freshwater and marine fish species. Understanding the performance of acoustic receivers is necessary to distinguish between tagged fish that may have been present but not detected and from those fish that were absent from the area. In this study, two stationary acoustic transmitters were deployed 250 m apart within each of four acoustic receiver lines each containing at least 10 receivers (i.e., eight acoustic transmitters) located in Saginaw Bay and central Lake Huron for nearly 2 years to determine whether the probability of detecting an acoustic transmission varied as a function of time (i.e., season), location, and distance between acoustic transmitter and receiver. Distances between acoustic transmitters and receivers ranged from 200 m to >10 km in each line. The daily observed probability of detecting an acoustic transmission was used in simulation models to estimate the probability of detecting a moving acoustic transmitter on a line of receivers.ResultsThe probability of detecting an acoustic transmitter on a receiver 1000 m away differed by month for different receiver lines in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay but was similar for paired acoustic transmitters deployed 250 m apart within the same line. Mean probability of detecting an acoustic transmitter at 1000 m calculated over the study period varied among acoustic transmitters 250 m apart within a line and differed among receiver lines in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. The simulated probability of detecting a moving acoustic transmitter on a receiver line was characterized by short periods of time with decreased detection. Although increased receiver spacing and higher fish movement rates decreased simulated detection probability, the location of the simulated receiver line in Lake Huron had the strongest effect on simulated detection probability.ConclusionsPerformance of receiver

  18. Towards direct realisation of the SI unit of sound pressure in the audible hearing range based on optical free-field acoustic particle measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukoulas, Triantafillos, E-mail: triantafillos.koukoulas@npl.co.uk; Piper, Ben [Acoustics Group, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-20

    Since the introduction of the International System of Units (the SI system) in 1960, weights, measures, standardised approaches, procedures, and protocols have been introduced, adapted, and extensively used. A major international effort and activity concentrate on the definition and traceability of the seven base SI units in terms of fundamental constants, and consequently those units that are derived from the base units. In airborne acoustical metrology and for the audible range of frequencies up to 20 kHz, the SI unit of sound pressure, the pascal, is realised indirectly and without any knowledge or measurement of the sound field. Though the principle of reciprocity was originally formulated by Lord Rayleigh nearly two centuries ago, it was devised in the 1940s and eventually became a calibration standard in the 1960s; however, it can only accommodate a limited number of acoustic sensors of specific types and dimensions. International standards determine the device sensitivity either through coupler or through free-field reciprocity but rely on the continuous availability of specific acoustical artefacts. Here, we show an optical method based on gated photon correlation spectroscopy that can measure sound pressures directly and absolutely in fully anechoic conditions, remotely, and without disturbing the propagating sound field. It neither relies on the availability or performance of any measurement artefact nor makes any assumptions of the device geometry and sound field characteristics. Most importantly, the required units of sound pressure and microphone sensitivity may now be experimentally realised, thus providing direct traceability to SI base units.

  19. Development of high-performance ER gel produced by electric-field assisted molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakinuma, Y; Aoyama, T; Anzai, H

    2009-01-01

    Electro-rheological gel (ERG) is a novel functional elastomer whose surface frictional and adhesive property varies according to the intensity of applied electric field. This peculiar phenomenon is named as Electro-adhesive effect. A generated shear stress of ERG under applied electric field is approximately 30∼40 times higher than that of ERF because of high adhesive strength. However, the performances of ERG vary widely due to its surface condition, especially density and distribution of ER particles at the surface. In order to stabilize and improve the performance of ERG, the electric- filed assisted molding process is proposed as the producing method of ERG. In this study, first, the principle of electro-adhesive effect is theoretically investigated. Second, a high-performance ERG produced by the proposed process, in which ER particles are aligned densely at the surface, is developed and its performance is evaluated experimentally. As the experimental result, the high-performance ERG shows twice higher shear stress than the conventional ERG.

  20. Development of high-performance ER gel produced by electric-field assisted molding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakinuma, Y; Aoyama, T [Department of System Design Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi Kouhoku-ku Yokohama (Japan); Anzai, H [Fujikura kasei Co., Ltd. 2-6-15 Shibakouen, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: kakinuma@sd.keio.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    Electro-rheological gel (ERG) is a novel functional elastomer whose surface frictional and adhesive property varies according to the intensity of applied electric field. This peculiar phenomenon is named as Electro-adhesive effect. A generated shear stress of ERG under applied electric field is approximately 30{approx}40 times higher than that of ERF because of high adhesive strength. However, the performances of ERG vary widely due to its surface condition, especially density and distribution of ER particles at the surface. In order to stabilize and improve the performance of ERG, the electric- filed assisted molding process is proposed as the producing method of ERG. In this study, first, the principle of electro-adhesive effect is theoretically investigated. Second, a high-performance ERG produced by the proposed process, in which ER particles are aligned densely at the surface, is developed and its performance is evaluated experimentally. As the experimental result, the high-performance ERG shows twice higher shear stress than the conventional ERG.

  1. PlumpyField – Network of local producers of RUF (contributed paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belete, Hilina

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Expanding coverage for the 35 million children in the world suffering from Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) will require sustainably scaling up regional procurement of lipid-based RUSF products. Momentum is now building to achieve this aim through ten local ready-to-use food (RUF) producers in the PlumpyField Network, which was established by the French company Nutriset in 2005. These independently-owned factories, located in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean, currently produce one-third of the world’s RUF supply. Overcoming substantial obstacles, they have achieved the same high quality standards of producers in Europe and the U.S., with increasingly competitive pricing. Being part of a mutually supportive and interactive network of RUF producers from around the world provides unique learning and partnership opportunities, from sharing insights on peanut supply chain development, increasingly complex quality challenges, to pooled procurement. This network system has been instrumental to the success of local production for the members of the PlumpyField Network. Historically, local producers achieving economies of scale and reliable local and international supply chains (i.e. for peanuts, oil, sugar, milk etc.) takes several years, making the cost of locally-procured products more expensive in the short term. However, there are numerous positive outcomes and externalities that cannot be ignored, such as decreased lead times (especially crucial to reach children with acute malnutrition), lower shipping costs, economic development, and maturation of the food processing and microbiological laboratory sectors. UNICEF and WFP have become leaders in local and regional procurement as they continually optimize their strategies to best meet global needs. Local production is often an important stimulant of public-private partnerships, including procurement of RUF by local governments for government-run acute malnutrition programs, furthering

  2. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  3. Far-Field Voice Activity Detection and Its Applications in Adverse Acoustic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petsatodis, Theodoros

    2012-01-01

    -sided Gamma distribution. The increased adaptability of the system along with the encapsulated adaptive threshold allows the system to perform remarkably under adverse complex phenomena. Following recent technological trends, of incorporating microphone arrays in numerous commercial applications (eg. mobile...... phones, VOIP terminals) and research environments (smart rooms), a multiple microphone VAD is also considered. The system processes signals captured by far-field sensors in order to integrate spatial information in addition to the frequency content available at a single sensor. The core of the system......-modality of speech production, a simple visual-VAD is also developed to examine performance enhancement when fusing audio and video information. In the final part of the work, applications of VAD in the context of integration with other signal processing systems are also considered. Performance benefits of combining...

  4. The effect of produced water reinjection on reservoir souring in the Statfjord field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoernestad, Eva Oe.; Sunde, Egil; Dinning, Anthony J.

    2006-03-15

    A produced water reinjection (PWRI) pilot test was performed in one well in the Statfjord field in the period 2000-2001. In order to establish the souring parameters and influence of PWRI in the near well area, the well was back flowed prior to PWRI, and at the end of the PWRI test period. Tracer was used for mass balance evaluations. After the PWRI pilot test was finished, the PWRI plant was upgraded at the Statfjord C platform and since 2003; two wells have been re injecting produced water. Nitrate has substituted biocides for corrosion control in the water injection system at the Statfjord B and Statfjord C platforms. Based on experience from other Statoil operated fields, nitrate will improve the corrosion control and in addition reduce the reservoir souring and hence the H2S production. In 2004, three wells were backflowed; a PWRI- injector, a seawater injector and a sea water injector with addition of nitrate. Results from the PWRI pilot test, showed that the sulphide production increased 17 times after PWRI in comparison with seawater injection. In the backflowing studies in 2004, water from the PWRI injector showed considerable higher H2S content (approximately 300 mg/l) than the well injecting only seawater (approximately 3-4 mg/l). The well injecting nitrate showed the lowest sulphide concentration in the backflowed fluids in comparison with the other wells (below 1 mg/l). This illustrates a significant increase in microbiological activity within the near injection area as a result of increased nutrient availability due to PWRI. The impact of PWRI in the lifetime of the Statfjord field has been evaluated and the PWRI strategy may be altered due to increases in souring. (Author)

  5. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  6. Select Internet Resources on Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Davis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Merriam-Webster (2016 defines acoustics as, “a science that deals with the production, control, transmission, reception, and effects of sounds.” According to Rossing (2014, the study of acoustics began in ancient Greece with Pythagoras’ study of vibrating strings on musical instruments. Since those early beginnings, famous scientists including Rayleigh, Alexander Graham Bell, and Thomas Edison, have helped expand the field of acoustics to include architectural, physical, engineering, structural, underwater, physiological and psychological, musical acoustics, and speech. Acoustics is a highly interdisciplinary field and researchers may need resources from physics, medicine, and engineering to understand all aspects of their research.

  7. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort.

  8. Transformation of iron sulfide to greigite by nitrite produced by oil field bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shiping; Krause, Federico; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2009-05-01

    Nitrate, injected into oil fields, can oxidize sulfide formed by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) through the action of nitrate-reducing sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). When reservoir rock contains siderite (FeCO(3)), the sulfide formed is immobilized as iron sulfide minerals, e.g. mackinawite (FeS). The aim of our study was to determine the extent to which oil field NR-SOB can oxidize or transform FeS. Because no NR-SOB capable of growth with FeS were isolated, the well-characterized oil field isolate Sulfurimonas sp. strain CVO was used. When strain CVO was presented with a mixture of chemically formed FeS and dissolved sulfide (HS(-)), it only oxidized the HS(-). The FeS remained acid soluble and non-magnetic indicating that it was not transformed. In contrast, when the FeS was formed by adding FeCl(2) to a culture of SRB which gradually produced sulfide, precipitating FeS, and to which strain CVO and nitrate were subsequently added, transformation of the FeS to a magnetic, less acid-soluble form was observed. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectrometry indicated the transformed mineral to be greigite (Fe(3)S(4)). Addition of nitrite to cultures of SRB, containing microbially formed FeS, was similarly effective. Nitrite reacts chemically with HS(-) to form polysulfide and sulfur (S(0)), which then transforms SRB-formed FeS to greigite, possibly via a sulfur addition pathway (3FeS + S(0) --> Fe(3)S(4)). Further chemical transformation to pyrite (FeS(2)) is expected at higher temperatures (>60 degrees C). Hence, nitrate injection into oil fields may lead to NR-SOB-mediated and chemical mineral transformations, increasing the sulfide-binding capacity of reservoir rock. Because of mineral volume decreases, these transformations may also increase reservoir injectivity.

  9. Behaviour of laser-produced plasma in a uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Shigefumi; Sato, Kohnosuke; Sekiguchi, Tadashi.

    1979-11-01

    A column of a laser-produced plasma is successfully made in a uniform magnetic field. The radius of the column increases and then decreases (bouncing motion). On the surface of this plasma column, where the steep density gradient exists with the scale length shorter than the ion Larmor radius, an azimuthal modulation appears in the plasma luminosity. This is indicative of the flute-like instability with the azimuthal wave number; k sub(perpendicular) -- 4 x 10 3 B sup(0.8) (in the MKSA system of units). The dispersion equation based on the linearized Vlasov equation with the local approximation is derived and the occurrence of the lower-hybrid-drift instability is predicted. A fairly good agreement between the theory and experiments is seen. (author)

  10. Stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability due to the spontaneous magnetic field in laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogasawara, Masatada; Takita, Masami.

    1981-08-01

    Spontaneous magnetic fields due to the temperature gradient nabla T 0 produced by a focussed laser beam on one point of a pellet are taken into account in deriving the dispersion relation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Growth rate γ decreases with time. Density fluctuation with wavelength shorter than 1.5(R/L sub(T)) x (n sub(s)/n 0 )sup(1/2) μm is remarkably stabilized, where R, L sub(T), n sub(s) and n 0 are the radius of a pellet, L sub(T)sup(-1) = + nabla T 0 /T 0 + , number densities of solid and the pellet. Validity condition of the theory is γt 0 >> 1 or in another form R >> L, where t 0 is the time of thermal expansion of a pellet and L -1 = + nabla n 0 /n 0 + . (author)

  11. Neutron measurements in the stray field produced by 158 GeV/c lead ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Birattari, C.; Foglio Para, A.; Nava, E.; Silari, M.; Ulrici, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses measurements carried out at CERN in the stray radiation field produced by 158 GeV/c 208 Pb 82+ ions. The purpose was to test and intercompare the response of several detectors, mainly neutron measuring devices, and to determine the neutron spectral fluence as well as the microdosimetric (absorbed dose and dose equivalent) distributions in different locations around the shielding. Both active instruments and passive dosimeters were employed, including different types of Andersson-Braun rem counters, a tissue equivalent proportional counter, a set of superheated drop detectors, a Bonner sphere system and different types of ion chambers. Activation measurements with 12 C plastic scintillators and with 32 S pellets were also performed to assess the neutron yield of high energy lead ions interacting with a thin gold target. The results are compared with previous measurements and with measurements made during proton runs. (author)

  12. Field Comparisons of the Elwha Bedload Sampler and an Acoustic Gravel-transport Sensor: Middle Fork of the Piedra River, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, J.; Ryan, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    Ten simultaneous bedload measurements were made with an Elhwa sampler and an acoustic-gravel-transport sensor (GTS) on the Middle Fork of the Piedra River in southwestern Colorado near the end of the spring freshet in water year 2001. The purpose was to compare bedload samples with acoustic measurements acquired under field conditions. Upstream of the measurement site, the river drains 86 km2 of andesite, ash flows, tuffs, and breccias in the San Juan Mountains, contributing a relatively high sediment load to the river system. The channel transitions from step-pools at high elevations to a plane bed with a slope of 0.018 in the study reach. Channel width, mean depth and bank-full velocity at the site are: 13.6 m, 0.52, and 1.5 m s-1. The D50 of the riverbed surface is 0.08 m which is 6 to 40 times larger than the D50s of the bedload samples. D16 and D84 of the bed = 0.02 and 0.21 m respectively. Water discharges from 7.3 to 9.3 m3 s-1 transported about 0.01 kg of gravel m-1 s-1 in the channel. Transport of coarse gravel (8-64 mm) ranged from 0.00063 to 0.024 kg m-1 s-1. The Elwha sampler is a portable, pressure-differential trap with a 0.2 m wide by 0.1 m high opening. The acoustic sensor is a 0.025-m wide by 0.1 m high strip of PVDF piezoelectric film connected to a signal processor and bonded to an aluminum pressure plate. When the plate is struck by stones, the GTS produces signal peaks with areas that are accurate measures of stone momentum. The GTS was calibrated with steels balls dropped on the pressure plate in still water to develop a curve of ball momentum as a function of peak areas. Based on these calibrations, the standard error of the GTS momentum estimates is 0.0017 kg m s-1. Five transects with 30 verticals, each occupied for 60 s, were completed with the sampler and GTS separated by < 1 m. Five additional verticals were occupied for about 1800 s each with the instruments separated by < 0.5 m. The trapped material was sieved and weighed and the water

  13. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  14. Potential-well model in acoustic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2010-06-01

    Standing-wave acoustic tweezers are popularly used for non-invasive and non-contact particle manipulation. Because of their good penetration in biological tissue, they also show promising prospects for in vivo applications. According to the concept of an optical vortex, we propose an acoustics-vortex- based trapping model of acoustic tweezers. A four-element 1-MHz planar transducer was used to generate 1-MHz sine waves at 1 MPa, with adjacent elements being driven with a pi/2-rad phase difference. Each element was a square with a side length of 5.08 mm, with kerfs initially set at 0.51 mm. An acoustic vortex constituting the spiral motion of an acoustic wave around the beam axis was created, with an axial null. Applying Gor'kov's theory in the Rayleigh regime yielded the potential energy and radiation force for use in subsequent analysis. In the transverse direction, the vortex structure behaved as a series of potential wells that tended to drive a suspended particle toward the beam axis. They were highly fragmented in the near field that is very close to the transducer where there was spiral interference, and well-constructed in the far field. We found that the significant trapping effect was only present between these two regions in the transverse direction--particles were free to move along the beam axis, and a repulsive force was observed in the outer acoustic vortex. Because the steepness of the potential gradient near an axial null dominates the trapping effect, the far field of the acoustic vortex is inappropriate for trapping. Particles too close to the transducer are not sufficiently trapped because of the fragmented potential pattern. We suggest that the ideal distance from the transducer for trapping particles is in front of one-fourth of the Rayleigh distance, based on the superposition of the wavefronts. The maximum trapping force acting on a 13-mum polystyrene sphere in the produced acoustic vortex was 50.0 pN, and it was possible to trap

  15. Rice Cluster I, an Important Group of Archaea Producing Methane in Rice Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, R.

    2006-12-01

    Rice fields are an important source for the greenhouse gas methane. Methane is a major degradation product of organic matter in the anoxic soil, is partially oxidized in the rhizosphere and is emitted into the atmosphere through the aerenchyma system of the plants. Anaerobic degradation of organic matter by fermenting bacteria eventually results in the production of acetate and hydrogen, the two major substrates for microbial methanogenesis. The community of methanogenic archaea consists of several major orders or families including hydrogen-utilizing Rice Cluster-I (RC-I). Environmental conditions affect the methanogenic degradation process and the community structure of the methanogenic archaea in soil and rhizosphere. For example, populations of acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae and Methanosarcinaceae are enhanced by low and high acetate concentrations, respectively. Stable isotope probing of 16S rRNA showed that RC-I methanogens are mainly active on rice roots and at low H2 concentrations. Growth and population size is largely consistent with energetic conditions. RC-I methanogens on roots seem to be responsible for methane production from plant photosynthates that account for a major part of the emitted methane. Populations of RC-I methanogens in rice field soil are also enhanced at elevated temperatures (40-50°C). Moderately thermophilic members of RC-I methanogens or other methanogenic families were found to be ubiquitously present in soils from rice fields and river marshes. The genome of a RC-I methanogen was completely sequenced out of an enrichment culture using a metagenome approach. Genes found are consistent with life in the rhizosphere and in temporarily drained, oxic soil. We found that the methanogenic community structure on the rice roots is mainly determined by the respective community structure of the soil, but is in addition affected by the rice cultivar. Rice microcosms in which soil and rice roots are mainly colonized by RC-I methanogens produce

  16. Semi-analytical computation of the acoustic field of a segment of a cylindrically concave transducer in lossless and attenuating media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbeyaz, Başak Ulker; Miller, Eric L; Cleveland, Robin O

    2007-02-01

    Conventional ultrasound transducers used for medical diagnosis generally consist of linearly aligned rectangular apertures with elements that are focused in one plane. While traditional beamforming is easily accomplished with such transducers, the development of quantitative, physics-based imaging methods, such as tomography, requires an accurate, and computationally efficient, model of the field radiated by the transducer. The field can be expressed in terms of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral; however, its direct numerical evaluation is a computationally intensive task. Here, a fast semianalytical method based on Stepanishen's spatial impulse response formulation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 49, 1627-1638 (1971)] is developed to compute the acoustic field of a rectangular element of cylindrically concave transducers in a homogeneous medium. The pressure field, for, lossless and attenuating media, is expressed as a superposition of Bessel functions, which can be evaluated rapidly. In particular, the coefficients of the Bessel series are frequency independent and need only be evaluated once for a given transducer. A speed up of two orders of magnitude is obtained compared to an optimized direct numerical integration. The numerical results are compared with Field II and the Fresnel approximation.

  17. Electromagnetic fields produced by incubators influence heart rate variability in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellieni, C V; Acampa, M; Maffei, M; Maffei, S; Perrone, S; Pinto, I; Stacchini, N; Buonocore, G

    2008-07-01

    Incubators are largely used to preserve preterm and sick babies from postnatal stressors, but their motors produce high electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Newborns are chronically exposed to these EMFs, but no studies about their effects on the fragile developing neonatal structure exist. To verify whether the exposure to incubator motor electric power may alter autonomous nervous system activity in newborns. Heart rate variability (HRV) of 43 newborns in incubators was studied. The study group comprised 27 newborns whose HRV was studied throughout three 5-minute periods: with incubator motor on, off, and on again, respectively. Mean HRV values obtained during each period were compared. The control group comprised 16 newborns with constantly unrecordable EMF and exposed to changes in background noise, similar to those provoked by the incubator motor. Mean (SD) total power and the high-frequency (HF) component of HRV increased significantly (from 87.1 (76.2) ms2 to 183.6 (168.5) ms2) and the mean low-frequency (LF)/HF ratio decreased significantly (from 2.0 (0.5) to 1.5 (0.6)) when the incubator motor was turned off. Basal values (HF = 107.1 (118.1) ms2 and LF/HF = 1.9 (0.6)) were restored when incubators were turned on again. The LF spectral component of HRV showed a statistically significant change only in the second phase of the experiment. Changes in background noise did not provoke any significant change in HRV. EMFs produced by incubators influence newborns' HRV, showing an influence on their autonomous nervous system. More research is needed to assess possible long-term consequences, since premature newborns may be exposed to these high EMFs for months.

  18. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2015-01-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse...... radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber...

  19. Preliminary characterization of a one-axis acoustic system. [acoustic levitation for space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, W. A.; Reiss, D. A.; Berge, L. H.; Parker, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The acoustic fields and levitation forces produced along the axis of a single-axis resonance system were measured. The system consisted of a St. Clair generator and a planar reflector. The levitation force was measured for bodies of various sizes and geometries (i.e., spheres, cylinders, and discs). The force was found to be roughly proportional to the volume of the body until the characteristic body radius reaches approximately 2/k (k = wave number). The acoustic pressures along the axis were modeled using Huygens principle and a method of imaging to approximate multiple reflections. The modeled pressures were found to be in reasonable agreement with those measured with a calibrated microphone.

  20. A field demonstration of the microbial treatment of sour produced water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sublette, K.L. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States); Morse, D.; Raterman, K. [Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The potential for detoxification and deodorization of sulfide-laden water (sour water) by microbial treatment was evaluated at a petroleum production site under field conditions. A sulfide-tolerant strain of the chemautotroph and facultative anaerobe, Thiobacillus denitrificans, was introduced into an oil-skimming pit of the Amoco Production Company LACT 10 Unit of the Salt Creek Field, Wyoming. Field-produced water enters this pit from the oil/water separation treatment train at an average flowrate of 5,000 bbl/D (795 m{sup 3}/D) with a potential maximum of 98,000 bbl/D (15,580 m{sup 3}/D). Water conditions at the pit inlet are 4,800 mg/l TDS, 100 mg/l sulfide, pH 7.8, and 107{degrees}F. To this water an aqueous solution of ammonium nitrate and diphosphorous pentoxide was added to provide required nutrients for the bacteria. The first 20% of the pit was aerated to a maximum depth of 5 ft (1.5 m) to facilitate the aerobic oxidation of sulfide. No provisions for pH control or biomass recovery and recycle were made. Pilot operations were initiated in October 1992 with the inoculation of the 19,000 bbl (3,020 m{sup 3}) pit with 40 lb (18.1 kg) of dry weight biomass. After a brief acclimation period, a nearly constant mass flux of 175 lb/D (80 kg/D) sulfide was established to the pit. Bio-oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur and sulfate was immediate and complete. Subsequent pilot operations focused upon process optimization and process sensitivity to system upsets. The process appeared most sensitive to large variations in sulfide loading due to maximum water discharge events. However, recoveries from such events could be accomplished within hours. This paper details all pertinent aspects of pilot operation, performance, and economics. Based on this body of evidence, it is suggested that the oxidation of inorganic sulfides by T denitrificans represents a viable concept for the treatment of sour water coproduced with oil and gas.

  1. Dynamics expansion of laser produced plasma with different materials in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabia Qindeel; Noriah Bte Bidin; Yaacob Mat daud [Laser Technology Laboratory, Physics Department, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor (Malaysia)], E-mail: plasmaqindeel@yahoo.com

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics expansion of the plasma generated by laser ablation of different materials has been investigated. The dynamics and confinement of laser generated plasma plumes are expanding across variable magnetic fields. A Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser with 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse width and 0.125 J laser energy was used to generate plasma that was allowed to expand across variable magnetic within 0.1 - 0.8 T. The expansions of laser-produced plasma of different materials are characterized by using constant laser power. CCD video camera was used to visualize and record the activities in the focal region. The plasma plume length, width and area were measured by using Matrox Inpector 2.1 and video Test 0.5 software. Spectrums of plasma beam from different materials are studied via spectrometer. The results show that the plasma generated by aluminum target is the largest than Brass and copper. The optical radiation from laser generated plasma beam spectrums are obtained in the range of UV to visible light.

  2. Local geology determines responses of stream producers and fungal decomposers to nutrient enrichment: A field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykrä, Heikki; Sarremejane, Romain; Laamanen, Tiina; Karjalainen, Satu Maaria; Markkola, Annamari; Lehtinen, Sirkku; Lehosmaa, Kaisa; Muotka, Timo

    2018-04-16

    We examined how short-term (19 days) nutrient enrichment influences stream fungal and diatom communities, and rates of leaf decomposition and algal biomass accrual. We conducted a field experiment using slow-releasing nutrient pellets to increase nitrate (NO 3 -N) and phosphate (PO 4 -P) concentrations in a riffle section of six naturally acidic (naturally low pH due to catchment geology) and six circumneutral streams. Nutrient enrichment increased microbial decomposition rate on average by 14%, but the effect was significant only in naturally acidic streams. Nutrient enrichment also decreased richness and increased compositional variability of fungal communities in naturally acidic streams. Algal biomass increased in both stream types, but algal growth was overall very low. Diatom richness increased in response to nutrient addition by, but only in circumneutral streams. Our results suggest that primary producers and decomposers are differentially affected by nutrient enrichment and that their responses to excess nutrients are context dependent, with a potentially stronger response of detrital processes and fungal communities in naturally acidic streams than in less selective environments.

  3. Characterization of Line Nanopatterns on Positive Photoresist Produced by Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh Mehdi Aghaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Line nanopatterns are produced on the positive photoresist by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM. A laser diode with a wavelength of 450 nm and a power of 250 mW as the light source and an aluminum coated nanoprobe with a 70 nm aperture at the tip apex have been employed. A neutral density filter has been used to control the exposure power of the photoresist. It is found that the changes induced by light in the photoresist can be detected by in situ shear force microscopy (ShFM, before the development of the photoresist. Scanning electron microscope (SEM images of the developed photoresist have been used to optimize the scanning speed and the power required for exposure, in order to minimize the final line width. It is shown that nanometric lines with a minimum width of 33 nm can be achieved with a scanning speed of 75 µm/s and a laser power of 113 mW. It is also revealed that the overexposure of the photoresist by continuous wave laser generated heat can be prevented by means of proper photoresist selection. In addition, the effects of multiple exposures of nanopatterns on their width and depth are investigated.

  4. The motions and wave fields produced by an ellipse moving through a stratified fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlen, Erik Curtis

    Solid-fluid interactions are ubiquitous in nature, from leaves falling from trees to fish swimming in the ocean. This dissertation examines a certain class of these interactions, namely asymmetric objects moving through stratified fluids. In the first part, the equations of motion are derived and subsequently solved for a displaced neutrally buoyant ellipse of varying aspect ratio. This is accomplished by using a spectral numerical algorithm, although in certain specific cases the equations can also be solved analytically using Laplace transform techniques. Experiments are conducted to which these analytical and numerical results are compared. General quantitative agreement is observed between the two sets of data. The discrepancies which are observed are consistent with both previous research and expectation. In the second part, the focus is shifted from the solid to the fluid, as the primary concern is now the wave field produced by these moving bodies. The spectral method developed in the first part is easily adapted to this second situation, in which the drag forces on the solid are also easily extracted. The results from this section are compared to previous results, and match very well. The results are then expanded to cases which have not been previously studied.

  5. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  6. Experimental observation of pulsating instability under acoustic field in downward-propagating flames at large Lewis number

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Hu, Longhua; Fujita, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    by interaction between heat release and acoustic pressure fluctuations of the downward-propagating premixed flames in a tube to enhance conductive heat loss at the tube wall and radiative heat loss at the open end of the tube due to extended flame residence time

  7. Noise disturbance in open-plan study environments : a field study on noise sources, student tasks and room acoustic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braat-Eggen, P.E.; van Heijst, A.W.M.; Hornikx, M.C.J.; Kohlrausch, A.G.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to gain more insight in the assessment of noise in open-plan study environments and to reveal correlations between noise disturbance experienced by students and the noise sources they perceive, the tasks they perform and the acoustic parameters of the open-plan study

  8. Anti-sound and Acoustical Cloaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veturia CHIROIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The principles by which the acoustics can be mimicked in order to reduce or cancel the vibrational field are based on anti-sound concept which can be materialized by acoustic cloaks. Geometric transformations open an elegant way towards the unconstrained control of sound through acoustic metamaterials. Acoustic cloaks can be achieved through geometric transformations which bring exotic metamaterial properties into the acoustic equations. Our paper brings new ideas concerning the technological keys for manufacturing of novel metamaterials based on the spatial compression of Cantor structures, and the architecture of 3D acoustic cloaks in a given frequency band, with application to architectural acoustics.

  9. Apparatus for production of ultrapure amorphous metals utilizing acoustic cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metals are produced by forming a molten unit of metal and deploying the unit into a bidirectional acoustical levitating field or by dropping the unit through a spheroidizing zone, a slow quenching zone, and a fast quenching zone in which the sphere is rapidly cooled by a bidirectional jet stream created in the standing acoustic wave field produced between a half cylindrical acoustic driver and a focal reflector or a curved driver and a reflector. The cooling rate can be further augmented first by a cryogenic liquid collar and secondly by a cryogenic liquid jacket surrounding a drop tower. The molten unit is quenched to an amorphous solid which can survive impact in a unit collector or is retrieved by a vacuum chuck.

  10. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  11. Ion acoustic waves in the solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnett, D.A.; Frank, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    Plasma wave measurements on the Helios I and 2 spacecraft have revealed the occurrence of electric field turbulence in the solar wind at frequencies between the electron and ion plasma frequencies. Wavelength measurements with the Imp 6 spacecraft now provide strong evidence that these waves are short-wavelength ion acoustic waves which are Doppler-shifted upward in frequency by the motion of the solar wind. Comparison of the Helios results with measurements from the earth-orbiting Imp 6 and 8 spacecraft shows that the ion acoustic turbulence detected in interplanetary space has characteristics essentially identical to those of bursts of electrostatic turbulence generated by protons streaming into the solar wind from the earth's bow shock. In a few cases, enhanced ion acoustic wave intensities have been observed in direct association with abrupt increases in the anisotropy of the solar wind electron distribution. This relationship strongly suggests that the ion acoustic waves detected by Helios far from the earth are produced by an electron heat flux instability, as was suggested by Forslund. Possible related mechanisms which could explain the generation of ion acoustic waves by protons streaming into the solar wind from the earth's bow shock are also considered

  12. Theory and experimental show up of axial magnetic fields self-generated in dense laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Tamer, M.

    1986-09-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns the magnetic fields generated in laser produced plasma. A summary of the theoretical and experimental studies concerning the toroidal magnetic fields and realised by different groups of research is presented. Then, we present our original contribution on the generation of axial magnetic fields by the dynamo effect. The experimental work for the detection of magnetic field is based on the Faraday rotation and Zeeman effects. The experimental diagrams are detailed and discussed. The experimental results are presented and compared to the theory. Finaly, we present some consequences of the generation of the axial magnetic fields in laser produced plasma as a discussion of the thermal conductivity [fr

  13. Influence of a single lightning discharge on the intensity of an air electric field and acoustic emission of near-surface rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Smirnov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect was observed as a sharp fall of the electric potential gradient from +80 V m−1 down to –21 V m−1. After that the field returned to its normal level according to the formula of the capacitor discharge with 17 s characteristic time. Simultaneously, the response of the acoustic emission of surface rocks in the range of frequencies between 6.5 kHz and 11 kHz was evaluated.

  14. Tunable coupled surface acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M. M.; Santos, P. V.; Kosevich, Yu. A.; Cantarero, A.

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate the electric tuning of the acoustic field in acoustic microcavities (MCs) defined by a periodic arrangement of metal stripes within a surface acoustic delay line on LiNbO3 substrate. Interferometric measurements show the enhancement of the acoustic field distribution within a single MC, the presence of a "bonding" and "anti-bonding" modes for two strongly coupled MCs, as well as the positive dispersion of the "mini-bands" formed by five coupled MCs. The frequency and amplitude of the resonances can be controlled by the potential applied to the metal stripes.

  15. Influence of classroom acoustics on the voice levels of teachers with and without voice problems: a field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelegrin Garcia, David; Lyberg-Åhlander, Viveka; Rydell, Roland

    2010-01-01

    of the classroom. The results thus suggest that teachers with voice problems are more aware of classroom acoustic conditions than their healthy colleagues and make use of the more supportive rooms to lower their voice levels. This behavior may result from an adaptation process of the teachers with voice problems...... of the voice problems was made with a questionnaire and a laryngological examination. During teaching, the sound pressure level at the teacher’s position was monitored. The teacher’s voice level and the activity noise level were separated using mixed Gaussians. In addition, objective acoustic parameters...... of Reverberation Time and Voice Support were measured in the 30 empty classrooms of the study. An empirical model shows that the measured voice levels depended on the activity noise levels and the voice support. Teachers with and without voice problems were differently affected by the voice support...

  16. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  17. Development and validation of a combined phased acoustical radiosity and image source model for predicting sound fields in rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Nilsson, Erling

    2015-09-01

    A model, combining acoustical radiosity and the image source method, including phase shifts on reflection, has been developed. The model is denoted Phased Acoustical Radiosity and Image Source Method (PARISM), and it has been developed in order to be able to model both specular and diffuse reflections with complex-valued and angle-dependent boundary conditions. This paper mainly describes the combination of the two models and the implementation of the angle-dependent boundary conditions. It furthermore describes how a pressure impulse response is obtained from the energy-based acoustical radiosity by regarding the model as being stochastic. Three methods of implementation are proposed and investigated, and finally, recommendations are made for their use. Validation of the image source method is done by comparison with finite element simulations of a rectangular room with a porous absorber ceiling. Results from the full model are compared with results from other simulation tools and with measurements. The comparisons of the full model are done for real-valued and angle-independent surface properties. The proposed model agrees well with both the measured results and the alternative theories, and furthermore shows a more realistic spatial variation than energy-based methods due to the fact that interference is considered.

  18. The accidental (acoustical) tourist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kirk, Wayne

    2002-11-01

    The acoustical phenomenon observed at an ancient temple in the Great Ball Court at Chichen Itza was described as ''little short of amazing--an ancient whispering gallery'' by Silvanus G. Morley, leader of the Carnegie Institute's archaeological team that excavated and restored these structures in the 1920s. Since then, many others have experienced the extraordinary acoustics at Chichen Itza and other Maya sites. Despite these reports, archaeologists and acousticians have until recently shown little interest in understanding these phenomena. After experiencing Chichen Itza's remarkable acoustics as a tourist in 1994, the author commenced collecting and disseminating information about acoustical phenomena there and at other Mayan sites, hoping to stimulate interest among archaeologists and acousticians. Were these designs accidental or intentional? If intentional, how was the knowledge obtained? How were acoustical features used? This paper highlights the author's collection of anecdotal reports of mysterious Mayan acoustics (http://http://www.ianlawton.com/pa1.htm), recommended reading for scientists and engineers who wish to pursue this fascinating study. Also recounted are some of the reactions of archaeologists-ranging from curious, helpful, and insightful to humorous and appalling--to outsiders' efforts to bring serious scientific attention to the new field of acoustical archaeology.

  19. Design of an automated cart and mount for a hyperspectral imaging system to be used in produce fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefcourt, Alan M.; Kistler, Ross; Gadsden, S. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this project was to construct a cart and a mounting system that would allow a hyperspectral laser-induced fluorescence imaging system (HLIFIS) to be used to detect fecal material in produce fields. Fecal contaminated produce is a recognized food safety risk. Previous research demonstrated the HLIFIS could detect fecal contamination in a laboratory setting. A cart was designed and built, and then tested to demonstrate that the cart was capable of moving at constant speeds or at precise intervals. A mounting system was designed and built to facilitate the critical alignment of the camera's imaging and the laser's illumination fields, and to allow the HLIFIS to be used in both field and laboratory settings without changing alignments. A hardened mount for the Powell lens that is used to produce the appropriate illumination profile was also designed, built, and tested.

  20. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Rey, Charles A A [Charles Ray, Inc.

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  1. Acoustic cloaking and transformation acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huanyang; Chan, C T

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we give a brief introduction to the application of the new technique of transformation acoustics, which draws on a correspondence between coordinate transformation and material properties. The technique is formulated for both acoustic waves and linear liquid surface waves. Some interesting conceptual devices can be designed for manipulating acoustic waves. For example, we can design acoustic cloaks that make an object invisible to acoustic waves, and the cloak can either encompass or lie outside the object to be concealed. Transformation acoustics, as an analog of transformation optics, can go beyond invisibility cloaking. As an illustration for manipulating linear liquid surface waves, we show that a liquid wave rotator can be designed and fabricated to rotate the wave front. The acoustic transformation media require acoustic materials which are anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Such materials are difficult to find in nature. However, composite materials with embedded sub-wavelength resonators can in principle be made and such 'acoustic metamaterials' can exhibit nearly arbitrary values of effective density and modulus tensors to satisfy the demanding material requirements in transformation acoustics. We introduce resonant sonic materials and Helmholtz resonators as examples of acoustic metamaterials that exhibit resonant behaviour in effective density and effective modulus. (topical review)

  2. Continuous micro-feeding of fine cohesive powders actuated by pulse inertia force and acoustic radiation force in ultrasonic standing wave field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongcheng; Wu, Liqun; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Rangrang; Zhang, Linan

    2018-07-10

    Stable continuous micro-feeding of fine cohesive powders has recently gained importance in many fields. However, it remains a great challenge in practice because of the powder aggregate caused by interparticle cohesive forces in small capillaries. This paper describes a novel method of feeding fine cohesive powder actuated by a pulse inertia force and acoustic radiation force simultaneously in an ultrasonic standing wave field using a tapered glass nozzle. Nozzles with different outlet diameters are fabricated using glass via a heating process. A pulse inertia force is excited to drive powder movement to the outlet section of the nozzle in a consolidated columnar rod mode. An acoustic radiation force is generated to suspend the particles and make the rod break into large quantities of small agglomerates which impact each other randomly. So the aggregation phenomenon in the fluidization of cohesive powders can be eliminated. The suspended powder is discharged continuously from the nozzle orifice owing to the self-gravities and collisions between the inner particles. The micro-feeding rates can be controlled accurately and the minimum values for RespitoseSV003 and Granulac230 are 0.4 mg/s and 0.5 mg/s respectively. The relative standard deviations of all data points are below 0.12, which is considerably smaller than those of existing vibration feeders with small capillaries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrostatic ion acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, A.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, certain aspects of plasma physics are illustrated through a study of electrostatic ion acoustic waves. The paper consists of three Sections. Section II deals with linear properties of the ion acoustic wave including derivation of the dispersions relation with the effect of Landau damping and of an ambient magnetic field. The section also introduces the excitation processes of the ion acoustic wave due to an electron drift or to a stimulated Brillouin scattering. The nonlinear properties are introduced in Section III and IV. In Section III, incoherent nonlinear effects such as quasilinear and mode-coupling saturations of the instability are discussed. The coherent nonlinear effects such as the generation of ion acoustic solitons, shocks and weak double layers are presented in Section IV. (Auth.)

  4. Topological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Gao, Fei; Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Zhen; Chong, Yidong; Zhang, Baile

    2015-03-01

    The manipulation of acoustic wave propagation in fluids has numerous applications, including some in everyday life. Acoustic technologies frequently develop in tandem with optics, using shared concepts such as waveguiding and metamedia. It is thus noteworthy that an entirely novel class of electromagnetic waves, known as "topological edge states," has recently been demonstrated. These are inspired by the electronic edge states occurring in topological insulators, and possess a striking and technologically promising property: the ability to travel in a single direction along a surface without backscattering, regardless of the existence of defects or disorder. Here, we develop an analogous theory of topological fluid acoustics, and propose a scheme for realizing topological edge states in an acoustic structure containing circulating fluids. The phenomenon of disorder-free one-way sound propagation, which does not occur in ordinary acoustic devices, may have novel applications for acoustic isolators, modulators, and transducers.

  5. Effect of a magnetic field on the fluorescence produced in irradiated anthracene solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.S.; Sargent, F.P.; Lopata, V.J.; Gardy, E.M.; Brocklehurst, B.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of an applied magnetic field on the fluorescence from radiolytic ion recombination has been studied for anthracene in some hydrocarbon solvents. In pulse-irradiated anthracene in squalane, the fluorescence intensity following the pulse increases as a function of applied magnetic field in the range studied. At a constant magnetic field strength, the field-induced enhancement of the fluorescence intensity varies with time after the pulse. At high field strengths the enhancement reaches a maximum about 50 ns after the pulse. Similar effects are observed in cyclohexane but the enhancement is smaller than that in squalane. In benzene solutions the effect is extremely small. These findings are confirmed by observations in continuously gamma-irradiated solutions. 9,10-Dimethylanthracene gives a larger enhancement and anthracene-d 10 a smaller enhancement than the parent anthracene at high fields. The results are in general agreement with recent theoretical predictions based on the effect of a magnetic field on the loss of spin correlation of geminate ions pairs prior to recombination

  6. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  7. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  8. General method for calculating polarization electric fields produced by auroral Cowling mechanism and application examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhamäki, Heikki; Amm, Olaf; Fujii, Ryo; Yoshikawa, Aki; Ieda, Aki

    2013-04-01

    The Cowling mechanism is characterized by the generation of polarization space charges in the ionosphere in consequence of a partial or total blockage of FAC flowing between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. Thus a secondary polarization electric field builds up in the ionosphere, which guarantees that the whole (primary + secondary) ionospheric current system is again in balance with the FAC. In the Earth's ionosphere the Cowling mechanism is long known to operate in the equatorial electrojet, and several studies indicate that it is important also in auroral current systems. We present a general method for calculate the secondary polarization electric field, when the ionospheric conductances, the primary (modeled) or the total (measured) electric field, and the Cowling efficiency are given. Here the Cowling efficiency is defined as the fraction of the divergent Hall current canceled by secondary Pedersen current. In contrast to previous studies, our approach is a general solution which is not limited to specific geometrical setups (like an auroral arc), and all parameters may have any kind of spatial dependence. The solution technique is based on spherical elementary current (vector) systems (SECS). This way, we avoid the need to specify explicit boundary conditions for the searched polarization electric field or its potential, which would be required if the problem was solved in a differential equation approach. Instead, we solve an algebraic matrix equation, for which the implicit boundary condition that the divergence of the polarization electric field vanishes outside our analysis area is sufficient. In order to illustrate the effect of Cowling mechanism on ionospheric current systems, we apply our method to two simple models of auroral electrodynamic situations: 1) a mesoscale strong conductance enhancement in the early morning sector within a relatively weak southward primary electric field, 2) a morning sector auroral arc with only a weak conductance

  9. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was

  10. Impact of internal waves on the acoustic field at a coastal station off Paradeep, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sridevi, B.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Murty, V.S.N.

    that in the ocean, sound (in contrast to light) is the only viable means for communication and range finding and also synoptically probing of above oceanic features. Sound can fulfill all the three requirements: (1) penetrative range is more, (2) high resolving... series data off Paradeep) as reproduced from the GM model at specified ranges due to these IW are utilized to estimate the changes in the acoustic transmission loss with the ray model which is useful for navy for under water communication. 2. Data...

  11. Proton radiography of dynamic electric and magnetic fields in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Sinenian, N.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-01-01

    Time-gated, monoenergetic-proton radiography provides unique measurements of the electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields produced in laser-foil interactions and during the implosion of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules. These experiments resulted in the first observations of several new and important features: (1) observations of the generation, decay dynamics, and instabilities of megagauss B fields in laser-driven planar plastic foils, (2) the observation of radial E fields inside an imploding capsule, which are initially directed inward, reverse direction during deceleration, and are likely related to the evolution of the electron pressure gradient, and (3) the observation of many radial filaments with complex electromagnetic field striations in the expanding coronal plasmas surrounding the capsule. The physics behind and implications of such observed fields are discussed.

  12. Field application of a multi-frequency acoustic instrument to monitor sediment for silt erosion study in Pelton turbine in Himalayan region, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, A. K.; Kumar, A.; Hies, T.; Nguyen, H. H.

    2016-11-01

    High sediment load passing through hydropower components erodes the hydraulic components resulting in loss of efficiency, interruptions in power production and downtime for repair/maintenance, especially in Himalayan regions. The size and concentration of sediment play a major role in silt erosion. The traditional process of collecting samples manually to analyse in laboratory cannot suffice the need of monitoring temporal variation in sediment properties. In this study, a multi-frequency acoustic instrument was applied at desilting chamber to monitor sediment size and concentration entering the turbine. The sediment size and concentration entering the turbine were also measured with manual samples collected twice daily. The samples collected manually were analysed in laboratory with a laser diffraction instrument for size and concentration apart from analysis by drying and filtering methods for concentration. A conductivity probe was used to calculate total dissolved solids, which was further used in results from drying method to calculate suspended solid content of the samples. The acoustic instrument was found to provide sediment concentration values similar to drying and filtering methods. However, no good match was found between mean grain size from the acoustic method with the current status of development and laser diffraction method in the first field application presented here. The future versions of the software and significant sensitivity improvements of the ultrasonic transducers are expected to increase the accuracy in the obtained results. As the instrument is able to capture the concentration and in the future most likely more accurate mean grain size of the suspended sediments, its application for monitoring silt erosion in hydropower plant shall be highly useful.

  13. A method for producing uniform dose distributions in the junction regions of large hinge angle electrol fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavgorodni, S.F.; Beckham, W.A.; Roos, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    The planning problems presented by abutting electron fields are well recognised. Junctioning electron fields with large hinge angle compounds the problems because of the creation of closely situated 'hot' and 'cold' spots. The technique involving a compensated superficial x-ray (SXR) field to treat the junction region between electron fields was developed and used in a particular clinical case (treatment of a squamous cell carcinoma of the forehead/scalp). The SXR beam parameters were chosen and the compensator was designed to make the SXR field complementary to the electron fields. Application of a compensated SXR field eliminated 'cold' spots in the junction region and minimised 'hot' spots to (110%). In the clinical case discusses the 'hot' spots due to the SXR field would not appear because of increased attenuation of the soft x-rays in bone. The technique proposed produces uniform dose distribution up to 3 cm deep and can be considered as an additional tool for dealing with electron fields junctioning problems. (author)

  14. Turbulent amplification of magnetic fields in laboratory laser-produced shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinecke, J.; Doyle, H.W.; Bell, A.R.; Schekochihin, A.A.; Miniati, F.; Bingham, R.; Koenig, M.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray and radio observations of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A reveal the presence of magnetic fields about 100 times stronger than those in the surrounding interstellar medium. Field coincident with the outer shock probably arises through a nonlinear feedback process involving cosmic rays. The origin of the large magnetic field in the interior of the remnant is less clear but it is presumably stretched and amplified by turbulent motions. Turbulence may be generated by hydrodynamic instability at the contact discontinuity between the supernova ejecta and the circumstellar gas. However, optical observations of Cassiopeia A indicate that the ejecta are interacting with a highly inhomogeneous, dense circumstellar cloud bank formed before the supernova explosion. Here we investigate the possibility that turbulent amplification is induced when the outer shock overtakes dense clumps in the ambient medium. We report laboratory experiments that indicate the magnetic field is amplified when the shock interacts with a plastic grid. We show that our experimental results can explain the observed synchrotron emission in the interior of the remnant. The experiment also provides a laboratory example of magnetic field amplification by turbulence in plasmas, a physical process thought to occur in many astrophysical phenomena. (authors)

  15. Mechanism of the quasi-zero axial acoustic radiation force experienced by elastic and viscoelastic spheres in the field of a quasi-Gaussian beam and particle tweezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G; Fellah, Z E A

    2014-01-01

    The present analysis investigates the (axial) acoustic radiation force induced by a quasi-Gaussian beam centered on an elastic and a viscoelastic (polymer-type) sphere in a nonviscous fluid. The quasi-Gaussian beam is an exact solution of the source free Helmholtz wave equation and is characterized by an arbitrary waist w₀ and a diffraction convergence length known as the Rayleigh range z(R). Examples are found where the radiation force unexpectedly approaches closely to zero at some of the elastic sphere's resonance frequencies for kw₀≤1 (where this range is of particular interest in describing strongly focused or divergent beams), which may produce particle immobilization along the axial direction. Moreover, the (quasi)vanishing behavior of the radiation force is found to be correlated with conditions giving extinction of the backscattering by the quasi-Gaussian beam. Furthermore, the mechanism for the quasi-zero force is studied theoretically by analyzing the contributions of the kinetic, potential and momentum flux energy densities and their density functions. It is found that all the components vanish simultaneously at the selected ka values for the nulls. However, for a viscoelastic sphere, acoustic absorption degrades the quasi-zero radiation force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  17. Acoustic Levitation Containerless Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whymark, R. R.; Rey, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    This research program consists of the development of acoustic containerless processing systems with applications in the areas of research in material sciences, as well as the production of new materials, solid forms with novel and unusual microstructures, fusion target spheres, and improved optical fibers. Efforts have been focused on the containerless processing at high temperatures for producing new kinds of glasses. Also, some development has occurred in the areas of containerlessly supporting liquids at room temperature, with applications in studies of fluid dynamics, potential undercooling of liquids, etc. The high temperature area holds the greatest promise for producing new kinds of glasses and ceramics, new alloys, and possibly unusual structural shapes, such as very uniform hollow glass shells for fusion target applications. High temperature acoustic levitation required for containerless processing has been demonstrated in low-g environments as well as in ground-based experiments. Future activities include continued development of the signals axis acoustic levitator.

  18. Acoustic loading effects on oscillating rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the interaction between an infinite acoustic medium and a cluster of circular rods is described. The acoustic field due to oscillating rods and the acoustic loading on the rods are first solved in a closed form. The acoustic loading is then used as a forcing function for rod responses, and the acousto-elastic couplings are solved simultaneously. Numerical examples are presented for several cases to illustrate the effects of various system parameters on the acoustic reaction force coefficients. The effect of the acoustic loading on the coupled eigenfrequencies are discussed

  19. Acoustic gain in piezoelectric semiconductors at ε-near-zero response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Christensen, Johan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate strong acoustic gain in electric-field biased piezoelectric semiconductors at frequencies near the plasmon frequency in the terahertz range. When the electron drift velocity produced by an external electric field is higher than the speed of sound, Cherenkov radiation of phonons...

  20. Effects of combined exposure to pyridostigmine bromide and shaker stress on acoustic startle response, pre-pulse inhibition and open field behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovicky, M; Paton, S; Morris, M; Mach, M; Lucot, J B

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of combined exposure of pyridostigmine bromide (PB) and chronic shaker stress on acoustic startle responses (ASR), pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and open field behavior of adult C57BL/6J mice. PB (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for 7 days) or saline was administered subcutaneously using osmotic Alzet minipumps implanted under the skin on the back of the mice. At the same time, the mice were exposed to 7 days of intermittent shaker stress. They were tested for ASR (100 dB and 120 dB stimuli) and PPI (70 dB + 100 dB and 70 dB + 120 dB) in the acoustic startle monitor system. The mice were assessed during the shaker stress on days 2 and 7 and 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after discontinuation of treatment. Separate groups of mice were tested in the open field in 15 min sessions on days 1, 3 and 6 during shaker stress and PB treatment. Exposure of mice to PB resulted in an exaggerated ASR, reduced PPI and non-significant decrease in locomotor activity. These behavioral changes were apparent only during exposure to PB. Repeated shaker stress did not have any effect on sensorimotor functions or open field behavior of mice. There was no prolonged or delayed effect of PB and/or stress on individual behavioral variables. The study found C57BL/6J mice to be behaviorally sensitive to PB treatment. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Series expansion of two-dimensional fields produced by iron-core magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Kotaro.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the validity of a series expansion of two-dimensional magnetic fields with harmonic functions, and suggests that the series may not converge outside of the pole gap. It also points out that this difficulty may appear due to a slow convergence of the series near to the pole edge, even within the convergent area. (author)

  2. New microscope produced by Lambda Praha Co. applicable to field studies of microorganisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2008), s. 457-461 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : lambda * microscope * field studies Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  3. Turbulent Dynamo Amplification of Magnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas: Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E.; Forest, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ross, J.; Ryutov, D.; Ryu, D.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A.; Froula, D.; Lamb, D.; Gregori, G.

    2017-10-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model for cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo. We have conceived experiments to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through large-scale 3D FLASH simulations on the Mira supercomputer at ANL, and the laser-driven experiments we conducted with the OMEGA laser at LLE. Our results indicate that turbulence is capable of rapidly amplifying seed fields to near equipartition with the turbulent fluid motions. This work was supported in part from the ERC (FP7/2007-2013, No. 256973 and 247039), and the U.S. DOE, Contract No. B591485 to LLNL, FWP 57789 to ANL, Grant No. DE-NA0002724 and DE-SC0016566 to the University of Chicago, and DE-AC02-06CH11357 to ANL.

  4. Two dimensional analytical considerations of large magnetic and electric fields in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.; Loeb, A.

    1985-08-01

    A simple model in two dimensions is developed and solved analytically taking into account the electric and magnetic fields in laser procuded plasmas. The electric potential in this model is described by a nonlinear differential equation. The stationary solution of this model is consistent for -0.1 less than or equal to psi 6 v/cm]/[B/MGauss] approx. 1

  5. Controlling Sample Rotation in Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Rotation of acoustically levitated object stopped or controlled according to phase-shift monitoring and control concept. Principle applies to square-cross-section levitation chamber with two perpendicular acoustic drivers operating at same frequency. Phase difference between X and Y acoustic excitation measured at one corner by measuring variation of acoustic amplitude sensed by microphone. Phase of driver adjusted to value that produces no rotation or controlled rotation of levitated object.

  6. Potential formation in a collisionless plasma produced in an open magnetic field in presence of volume negative ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phukan, Ananya; Goswami, K. S.; Bhuyan, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The electric potential near a wall for a multi-species plasma with volume produced negative ions in presence of axially varying magnetic field is studied following an analytical-numerical approach. A constant negative ion source is assumed throughout the plasma volume, along with finite temperature positive ions and Boltzmann electrons. The particles are assumed to be guided by an open magnetic field that has its maximum at the centre, and field strength decreasing towards the walls. The one dimensional (1D) Poisson equation is derived using an analytical approach, and then solved numerically to study the potential profiles. Effect of (a) negative ion production rate, (b) magnetic field profile, and (c) negative ion temperature on the potential profile has been investigated. A potential peak appears near the wall when the negative ion temperature and density are sufficiently high. Also, the presence of negative ions further decreases the potential in the plasma region for a finite Debye Length (λ D )

  7. Validation of a Previously Developed Geospatial Model That Predicts the Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in New York State Produce Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Shiwakoti, Suvash; Bergholz, Peter; Grohn, Yrjo; Wiedmann, Martin; Strawn, Laura K

    2016-02-01

    Technological advancements, particularly in the field of geographic information systems (GIS), have made it possible to predict the likelihood of foodborne pathogen contamination in produce production environments using geospatial models. Yet, few studies have examined the validity and robustness of such models. This study was performed to test and refine the rules associated with a previously developed geospatial model that predicts the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in produce farms in New York State (NYS). Produce fields for each of four enrolled produce farms were categorized into areas of high or low predicted L. monocytogenes prevalence using rules based on a field's available water storage (AWS) and its proximity to water, impervious cover, and pastures. Drag swabs (n = 1,056) were collected from plots assigned to each risk category. Logistic regression, which tested the ability of each rule to accurately predict the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, validated the rules based on water and pasture. Samples collected near water (odds ratio [OR], 3.0) and pasture (OR, 2.9) showed a significantly increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation compared to that for samples collected far from water and pasture. Generalized linear mixed models identified additional land cover factors associated with an increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation, such as proximity to wetlands. These findings validated a subset of previously developed rules that predict L. monocytogenes prevalence in produce production environments. This suggests that GIS and geospatial models can be used to accurately predict L. monocytogenes prevalence on farms and can be used prospectively to minimize the risk of preharvest contamination of produce. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Validation of a Previously Developed Geospatial Model That Predicts the Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in New York State Produce Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Shiwakoti, Suvash; Bergholz, Peter; Grohn, Yrjo; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Technological advancements, particularly in the field of geographic information systems (GIS), have made it possible to predict the likelihood of foodborne pathogen contamination in produce production environments using geospatial models. Yet, few studies have examined the validity and robustness of such models. This study was performed to test and refine the rules associated with a previously developed geospatial model that predicts the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in produce farms in New York State (NYS). Produce fields for each of four enrolled produce farms were categorized into areas of high or low predicted L. monocytogenes prevalence using rules based on a field's available water storage (AWS) and its proximity to water, impervious cover, and pastures. Drag swabs (n = 1,056) were collected from plots assigned to each risk category. Logistic regression, which tested the ability of each rule to accurately predict the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, validated the rules based on water and pasture. Samples collected near water (odds ratio [OR], 3.0) and pasture (OR, 2.9) showed a significantly increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation compared to that for samples collected far from water and pasture. Generalized linear mixed models identified additional land cover factors associated with an increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation, such as proximity to wetlands. These findings validated a subset of previously developed rules that predict L. monocytogenes prevalence in produce production environments. This suggests that GIS and geospatial models can be used to accurately predict L. monocytogenes prevalence on farms and can be used prospectively to minimize the risk of preharvest contamination of produce. PMID:26590280

  9. Assessment of Human Exposure to Magnetic Fields Produced by Domestic Appliances (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, A.W.; Kaune, W.T.; Grainger, P.; Golding, J.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 50 homes and their appliances examined whether a detailed appliance-use questionnaire and survey would yield data comparable with direct personal monitoring. This was coupled with direct measurement of the appliances in use to determine the field at 50 cm and 1 m. The findings were that individual time-weighted average (TWA) exposures calculated from questionnaire and activity diaries in conjunction with the appliance magnetic field were unrelated to actual personal exposure measurement. It was concluded that questionnaires are of little or no value for TWA estimation. However, peak exposure and short-term temporal variability could be modelled in subjects spending at least 15 min per day within 1 m of an operating microwave cooker or conventional cooker. This method could be extended to other appliances. (author)

  10. Visualizing and measuring the temperature field produced by medical diagnostic ultrasound using thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachutka, J; Grec, P; Mornstein, V; Caruana, C J

    2008-01-01

    The heating of tissues by diagnostic ultrasound can pose a significant hazard particularly in the imaging of the unborn child. The demonstration of the temperature field in tissue is therefore an important objective in the teaching of biomedical physics to healthcare professionals. The temperature field in a soft tissue model was made visible and measured using thermography. Temperature data from the images were used to investigate the dependence of temperature increase within the model on ultrasound exposure time and distance from the transducer. The experiment will be used within a multi-professional biomedical physics teaching laboratory for enhancing learning regarding the principles of thermography and the thermal effects of ultrasound to medical and healthcare students and also for demonstrating the quantitative use of thermographic imaging to students of biophysics, medical physics and medical technology

  11. Field-reversed configuration produced by a linear theta-pinch, Tupa-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayama, M.E.; Boeckelmann, H.K.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Machida, M.

    1987-01-01

    The formation of field reversed configuration, FRC, in one meter mirrorless linear theta-pinch device Tupa-I was observed. This configuration was studied during the first half magnetic cycle of ringing main bank discharge using magnetic probes. The separatrix radius by the exclude flux probe and the ion temperature by visible spectroscopy were measured. The plasma dynamics was observed by the image converter camera. A clear indication of the formation of FRC due to reconnection of the antiparallel bias to the main field and a fast reconnection, less than 0.2 microsec, that is explained in terms of forced reconnection driven by the Kruskal-Schwarzschild instability, are also observed. (author) [pt

  12. Non-Invasive Radiofrequency Field Treatment to Produce Hepatic Hyperthermia: Efficacy and Safety in Swine

    OpenAIRE

    ,; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,; ,

    2017-01-01

    The Kanzius non-invasive radio-frequency hyperthermia system (KNiRFH) has been investigated as a treatment option for hepatic hyperthermia cancer therapy. The treatment involves exposing the patient to an external high-power RF (13.56 MHz) electric field, whereby the propagating waves penetrate deep into the tumor causing targeted heating based on differential tissue dielectric properties. However, a comprehensive examination of the Kanzius system alongside any associated toxicities and its a...

  13. Effects of ion acoustic waves on diffusion in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yukio; Akazaki, Masanori; Fujiyama, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes on the behavior of ion acoustic waves in magnetized plasma. The plasma was produced with a discharge tube placed in an air-core coil. The pressure of argon gas in the discharge tube was 1--10 mTorr. The plasma was entracted along the externally applied magnetic field through a nozzle into a measuring part. The condition of stabilization of drift waves was investigated. Four small glass tubes were placed in contact with the wall of the discharge tube, and the drift wave was remarkably suppressed. Then the ion acoustic waves can be observed. The magnetic field dependence of the frequency of ion acoustic waves was studied. The frequency depends on magnetic field and gas pressure. The magnetic field dependence of the frequency is caused by the variation of electron temperature. The Timofee's theory can explain the magnetic field of generating ion acoustic waves. The ion acoustic waves being excited naturally propagate to the direction of the diamagnetic drift of electrons, and their spectra are monochromatic. The dependence of Dsub(perpendicular), diffusion constant, on magnetic field is explained by two-pole diffusion, and the effect of the monochromatic ion acoustic waves on diffusion is small. (Kato, T.)

  14. Scintillation camera for establishing the coordinates of a radiation stimuli produced by a radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zioni, J.; Klein, Y.; Inbar, D.

    1977-01-01

    A scintillation camera has a planar scintillating crystal that produces light events whose spatial distribution corresponds to the spatial distribution of the radiation stimuli causing such events, and a plurality of photomultipliers having photocathodes for receiving light from the crystal through a planar face thereof. Computing circuitry coupled to the photomultipliers computes the projection of a light event in the crystal on a reference axis by forming an analytical function of the outputs of the photomultipliers according to the spatial location of the light event in the crystal

  15. Magnetoactive Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kunhao; Fang, Nicholas X; Huang, Guoliang; Wang, Qiming

    2018-04-11

    Acoustic metamaterials with negative constitutive parameters (modulus and/or mass density) have shown great potential in diverse applications ranging from sonic cloaking, abnormal refraction and superlensing, to noise canceling. In conventional acoustic metamaterials, the negative constitutive parameters are engineered via tailored structures with fixed geometries; therefore, the relationships between constitutive parameters and acoustic frequencies are typically fixed to form a 2D phase space once the structures are fabricated. Here, by means of a model system of magnetoactive lattice structures, stimuli-responsive acoustic metamaterials are demonstrated to be able to extend the 2D phase space to 3D through rapidly and repeatedly switching signs of constitutive parameters with remote magnetic fields. It is shown for the first time that effective modulus can be reversibly switched between positive and negative within controlled frequency regimes through lattice buckling modulated by theoretically predicted magnetic fields. The magnetically triggered negative-modulus and cavity-induced negative density are integrated to achieve flexible switching between single-negative and double-negative. This strategy opens promising avenues for remote, rapid, and reversible modulation of acoustic transportation, refraction, imaging, and focusing in subwavelength regimes. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Method of producing exfoliated graphite composite compositions for fuel cell flow field plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-04-08

    A method of producing an electrically conductive composite composition, which is particularly useful for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The method comprises: (a) providing a supply of expandable graphite powder; (b) providing a supply of a non-expandable powder component comprising a binder or matrix material; (c) blending the expandable graphite with the non-expandable powder component to form a powder mixture wherein the non-expandable powder component is in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the powder mixture; (d) exposing the powder mixture to a temperature sufficient for exfoliating the expandable graphite to obtain a compressible mixture comprising expanded graphite worms and the non-expandable component; (e) compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi to about 50,000 psi in predetermined directions into predetermined forms of cohered graphite composite compact; and (f) treating the so-formed cohered graphite composite to activate the binder or matrix material thereby promoting adhesion within the compact to produce the desired composite composition. Preferably, the non-expandable powder component further comprises an isotropy-promoting agent such as non-expandable graphite particles. Further preferably, step (e) comprises compressing the mixture in at least two directions. The method leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  17. 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wen; Cheng, Qianliu; Zhao, Hangfang

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings are a collection of 16 selected scientific papers and reviews by distinguished international experts that were presented at the 4th Pacific Rim Underwater Acoustics Conference (PRUAC), held in Hangzhou, China in October 2013. The topics discussed at the conference include internal wave observation and prediction; environmental uncertainty and coupling to sound propagation; environmental noise and ocean dynamics; dynamic modeling in acoustic fields; acoustic tomography and ocean parameter estimation; time reversal and matched field processing; underwater acoustic localization and communication as well as measurement instrumentations and platforms. These proceedings provide insights into the latest developments in underwater acoustics, promoting the exchange of ideas for the benefit of future research.

  18. Cooling of ions trapped in potential wells produced by electromagnetic radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobehart, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The probability distributions for the ground state and the excited state of a two-level ion trapped in an harmonic potential well are studied. The ion is excited by electromagnetic radiation and relaxes back due to either spontaneous or stimulated emission. The photon statistics is considered Poissonian and the momentum transfer between the electromagnetic field and the ion is assumed discrete. The present results are closely related to the quantum treatment in the heavy particle limit as well as to those derived from previous semiclassical models. (Author) [es

  19. Investigation of the exposure level of electromagnetic fields produced by mobile telephone base stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abukassem, I.; Kharita, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the real values of microwave level distribution and propagation in the locality around samples of mobile phone base station, and to compare the results with the exposure restriction limits recommenced by the International Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). Measurements were performed using special meters for microwaves; the first (Narda SRM-3000) is used for electromagnetic waves frequency spectrum scanning and the second (NARDA) emr 300) determine the level of electric and magnetic fields and the power density of these waves nearby any sort of transmitters. Samples of different kinds of mobile phone base station were chosen to cover important zones of Damascus, and the region around each base station was also scanned in the emission direction and according to accessibility into the studies positions. Results showed that the signal level in all measured points is lower than the ICNIRP restriction level, but for few points the detected microwave level has relatively important values. The signal level inside building situated partially in the emission direction of the base station transmitters decreases stepwise and walls reduce considerably the signal intensity. To realize these kind of field studies in the best way and obtain the maximum profits for all people, the properties and operating system of transmitters used in mobile phone base station must be known, and therefore, it is very important to achieve a transparent collaboration between research laboratory and mobile phone company. (author)

  20. Experimental use of produced waters for waterflooding fields of Kuibyshev region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palii, P A; Gavura, V E; Redkin, I I; Sokolov, A G

    1970-01-01

    Large volumes of produced waters have been used for waterflooding in the Kuibyshev region. Before underground injection, the water is conditioned by short-term storage. The treated water contains emulsified oil, suspended solids, hydrogen sulfide, and ferrous iron. This water is readily injected into fractured porous formations, even if suspended solids reach 42 mg/liter and emulsifed oil 67 mg/liter. However, better quality water has to be injected into nonfractured formations. In this case, the concentration of emulsified oil and suspended solids needs to be kept below 5 mg/liter. If concentration of suspended material exceeds this limit, water injectivity decreases rapidly. The partially plugged wells can be restored by acid treatment. Water injection has shown large economic gains in this region.

  1. Acoustic Surface Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Merely the presence of compressible entities, known as bubbles, greatly enriches the physical phenomena encountered when introducing ultrasound in a liquid. Mediated by the response of these bubbles, the otherwise diffuse and relatively low energy density of the acoustic field can induce strong,

  2. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes method including acoustic damping by eddy viscosity using RANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Kierkegaard, Axel; Weng, Chenyang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method for including damping of acoustic energy in regions of strong turbulence is derived for a linearized Navier-Stokes method in the frequency domain. The proposed method is validated and analyzed in 2D only, although the formulation is fully presented in 3D. The result is applied in a study of the linear interaction between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic field in a 2D T-junction, subject to grazing flow at Mach 0.1. Part of the acoustic energy at the upstream edge of the junction is shed as harmonically oscillating disturbances, which are conveyed across the shear layer over the junction, where they interact with the acoustic field. As the acoustic waves travel in regions of strong shear, there is a need to include the interaction between the background turbulence and the acoustic field. For this purpose, the oscillation of the background turbulence Reynold's stress, due to the acoustic field, is modeled using an eddy Newtonian model assumption. The time averaged flow is first solved for using RANS along with a k-ε turbulence model. The spatially varying turbulent eddy viscosity is then added to the spatially invariant kinematic viscosity in the acoustic set of equations. The response of the 2D T-junction to an incident acoustic field is analyzed via a plane wave scattering matrix model, and the result is compared to experimental data for a T-junction of rectangular ducts. A strong improvement in the agreement between calculation and experimental data is found when the modification proposed in this paper is implemented. Discrepancies remaining are likely due to inaccuracies in the selected turbulence model, which is known to produce large errors e.g. for flows with significant rotation, which the grazing flow across the T-junction certainly is. A natural next step is therefore to test the proposed methodology together with more sophisticated turbulence models.

  3. Acoustically and Electrokinetically Driven Transport in Microfluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Ersin

    Electrokinetically driven flows are widely employed as a primary method for liquid pumping in micro-electromechanical systems. Mixing of analytes and reagents is limited in microfluidic devices due to the low Reynolds number of the flows. Acoustic excitations have recently been suggested to promote mixing in the microscale flow systems. Electrokinetic flows through straight microchannels were investigated using the Poisson-Boltzmann and Nernst-Planck models. The acoustic wave/fluid flow interactions in a microchannel were investigated via the development of two and three-dimensional dynamic predictive models for flows with field couplings of the electrical, mechanical and fluid flow quantities. The effectiveness and applicability of electrokinetic augmentation in flexural plate wave micropumps for enhanced capabilities were explored. The proposed concept can be exploited to integrate micropumps into complex microfluidic chips improving the portability of micro-total-analysis systems along with the capabilities of actively controlling acoustics and electrokinetics for micro-mixer applications. Acoustically excited flows in microchannels consisting of flexural plate wave devices and thin film resonators were considered. Compressible flow fields were considered to accommodate the acoustic excitations produced by a vibrating wall. The velocity and pressure profiles for different parameters including frequency, channel height, wave amplitude and length were investigated. Coupled electrokinetics and acoustics cases were investigated while the electric field intensity of the electrokinetic body forces and actuation frequency of acoustic excitations were varied. Multifield analysis of a piezoelectrically actuated valveless micropump was also presented. The effect of voltage and frequency on membrane deflection and flow rate were investigated. Detailed fluid/solid deformation coupled simulations of piezoelectric valveless micropump have been conducted to predict the

  4. Space-time resolved measurements of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pisarczyk, T.; Gus’kov, S.Yu.; Dudžák, Roman; Chodukowski, T.; Dostál, Jan; Demchenko, N. N.; Korneev, Ph.; Kalinowska, Z.; Kalal, M.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Borodziuk, S.; Krouský, Eduard; Ullschmied, Jiří; Hřebíček, Jan; Medřík, Tomáš; Golasowski, Jiří; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2015), č. článku 102706. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010014; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089; GA ČR GPP205/11/P712 Grant - others:FP7(XE) 284464 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : space-time resolved spontaneous magnetic field (SMF) * Laser System Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics); Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.207, year: 2015 http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pop/22/10/10.1063/1.4933364

  5. Investigation of the exposure level of electromagnetic fields produced by mobile telephone base stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abukassem, I.; Kharita, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic field levels in the surrounding of different samples of mobile phone base station were investigated in order to cover residential zones of Damascus and her environs. Measurements were achieved according to the emission direction and to the studied positions environment. Results showed that the signal level in all measured points is lower than the International Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) restriction level, but for few measurement points the detected microwave level has relatively important values. The signal level inside building situated partially in the emission direction of the base station transmitters decreases stepwise and walls reduce considerably the signal intensity. This study showed the importance of achieving a transparent collaboration between research laboratory and mobile phone companies in order to improve the protection level.(author)

  6. Static magnetic field effects on proteases with fibrinolytic activity produced by Mucor subtilissimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Wendell; Nascimento, Thiago; Brandão-Costa, Romero; Fernandes, Thiago; Porto, Ana

    2017-02-01

    The influence of a static magnetic field (SMF) on crude enzyme extracts with proteolytic activity is described and discussed. Proteolytic enzymes, which hydrolyze peptide bonds, and fibrinolytic enzymes, which dissolve fibrin clots, have industrial relevance, and applicability dependent on improvements of productivity and activity. We investigated whether a moderate SMF affects proteolysis in different in vitro tests: general proteolysis of azocasein substrate, and static and dynamic fibrinolytic processes (to compare fibrin gel configuration under exposure). Crude enzyme extracts, obtained from solid state fermentation of Mucor subtilissimus UCP (Universidade Católica de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil) 1262, were used to carry out assays under slightly heterogeneous fields: a varied vertical SMF (for tests in Eppendorf tubes, from 0.100 to 0.170 T) and a varied horizontal SMF (for tests in Petri dishes, from 0.01 to 0.122 T), generated by two permanent magnets (NdFeB alloy). Results showed significant differences (P < 0.05) in static fibrinolysis assays after 24 h of exposure. The mean diameter of halos of fibrin degradation in the treated group increased by 21% compared to the control group; and the pixel number count of fibrin consumption (in a computational analysis of the area of each halo) enhanced by 30% with exposure. However, in dynamic fibrinolysis assays, no effects of SMF were observed. These results suggest a response of fibrin monomers to the SMF as a possible cause of the observed effects. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:109-120, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Low temperature superconductor and aligned high temperature superconductor magnetic dipole system and method for producing high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ramesh; Scanlan, Ronald; Ghosh, Arup K.; Weggel, Robert J.; Palmer, Robert; Anerella, Michael D.; Schmalzle, Jesse

    2017-10-17

    A dipole-magnet system and method for producing high-magnetic-fields, including an open-region located in a radially-central-region to allow particle-beam transport and other uses, low-temperature-superconducting-coils comprised of low-temperature-superconducting-wire located in radially-outward-regions to generate high magnetic-fields, high-temperature-superconducting-coils comprised of high-temperature-superconducting-tape located in radially-inward-regions to generate even higher magnetic-fields and to reduce erroneous fields, support-structures to support the coils against large Lorentz-forces, a liquid-helium-system to cool the coils, and electrical-contacts to allow electric-current into and out of the coils. The high-temperature-superconducting-tape may be comprised of bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper-oxide or rare-earth-metal, barium-copper-oxide (ReBCO) where the rare-earth-metal may be yttrium, samarium, neodymium, or gadolinium. Advantageously, alignment of the large-dimension of the rectangular-cross-section or curved-cross-section of the high-temperature-superconducting-tape with the high-magnetic-field minimizes unwanted erroneous magnetic fields. Alignment may be accomplished by proper positioning, tilting the high-temperature-superconducting-coils, forming the high-temperature-superconducting-coils into a curved-cross-section, placing nonconducting wedge-shaped-material between windings, placing nonconducting curved-and-wedge-shaped-material between windings, or by a combination of these techniques.

  8. Seasonal variations of microbial community in a full scale oil field produced water treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the microbial community in a full scale anaerobic baffled reactor and sequencing batch reactor system for oil-produced water treatment in summer and winter. The community structures of fungi and bacteria were analyzed through polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and Illumina high-throughput sequencing, respectively. Chemical oxygen demand effluent concentration achieved lower than 50 mg/L level after the system in both summer and winter, however, chemical oxygen demand removal rates after anaerobic baffled reactor treatment system were significant higher in summer than that in winter, which conformed to the microbial community diversity. Saccharomycotina, Fusarium, and Aspergillus were detected in both anaerobic baffled reactor and sequencing batch reactor during summer and winter. The fungal communities in anaerobic baffled reactor and sequencing batch reactor were shaped by seasons and treatment units, while there was no correlation between abundance of fungi and chemical oxygen demand removal rates. Compared to summer, the total amount of the dominant hydrocarbon degrading bacteria decreased by 10.2% in anaerobic baffled reactor, resulting in only around 23% of chemical oxygen demand was removed in winter. Although microbial community significantly varied in the three parallel sulfide reducing bacteria, the performance of these bioreactors had no significant difference between summer and winter.

  9. Seasonal variations of microbial community in a full scale oil field produced water treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Q.; Bai, S.; Li, Y.; Liu, L.; Wang, S.; Xi, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the microbial community in a full scale anaerobic baffled reactor and sequencing batch reactor system for oil-produced water treatment in summer and winter. The community structures of fungi and bacteria were analyzed through polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and Illumina high throughput sequencing, respectively. Chemical oxygen demand effluent concentration achieved lower than 50 mg/L level after the system in both summer and winter, however, chemical oxygen demand removal rates after anaerobic baffled reactor treatment system were significant higher in summer than that in winter, which conformed to the microbial community diversity. Saccharomycotina, Fusarium, and Aspergillus were detected in both anaerobic baffled reactor and sequencing batch reactor during summer and winter. The fungal communities in anaerobic baffled reactor and sequencing batch reactor were shaped by seasons and treatment units, while there was no correlation between abundance of fungi and chemical oxygen demand removal rates. Compared to summer, the total amount of the dominant hydrocarbon degrading bacteria decreased by 10.2% in anaerobic baffled reactor, resulting in only around 23% of chemical oxygen demand was removed in winter. Although microbial community significantly varied in the three parallel sulfide reducing bacteria, the performance of these bioreactors had no significant difference between summer and winter.

  10. Validation and application of Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranya, Sandor; Muste, Marian

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a novel methodology to estimate bedload transport in rivers based on an improved bedform tracking procedure. The measurement technique combines components and processing protocols from two contemporary nonintrusive instruments: acoustic and image-based. The bedform mapping is conducted with acoustic surveys while the estimation of the velocity of the bedforms is obtained with processing techniques pertaining to image-based velocimetry. The technique is therefore called Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The implementation of this technique produces a whole-field velocity map associated with the multi-directional bedform movement. Based on the calculated two-dimensional bedform migration velocity field, the bedload transport estimation is done using the Exner equation. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed to validate the AMV based bedload estimation in a laboratory flume at IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering (IIHR). The bedform migration was analysed at three different flow discharges. Repeated bed geometry mapping, using a multiple transducer array (MTA), provided acoustic maps, which were post-processed with a particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Bedload transport rates were calculated along longitudinal sections using the streamwise components of the bedform velocity vectors and the measured bedform heights. The bulk transport rates were compared with the results from concurrent direct physical samplings and acceptable agreement was found. As a first field implementation of the AMV an attempt was made to estimate bedload transport for a section of the Ohio river in the United States, where bed geometry maps, resulted by repeated multibeam echo sounder (MBES) surveys, served as input data. Cross-sectional distributions of bedload transport rates from the AMV based method were compared with the ones obtained from another non-intrusive technique (due to the lack of direct samplings), ISSDOTv2, developed by the US Army

  11. Acoustic Emission Technology and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Y. S.; Lim, S. H.; Eom, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Jung, H. K.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic emission is the elastic wave that is generated by the rapid release of energy from the localized sources within a material. After the observation of acoustic emission phenomenon in 1950, the research and further investigation had been performed. Acoustic emission examination becomes a rapidly matured nondestructive testing method with demonstrated capabilities for characterizing material behavior and for detecting the defect. It is of interest as a possible passive monitoring technique for detecting, locating and characterizing the defects in component and structure. Acoustic emission technology has recently strengthened the on-line monitoring application for the detection of incipient failures and the assurance of structural integrity. The field of acoustic emission testing is still growing vigorously and presents many challenges. Especially, acoustic emission has been successfully applied in the leak detection of primary pressure boundary of nuclear power plants. In this state-of-art report, the principle, measurement and field applications of acoustic emission technique is reviewed and summarized. Acoustic emission technology will contribute to the assurance of nuclear safety as the on-line monitoring technique of structural integrity of NSSS components and structures

  12. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  13. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  14. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  15. Hidden acoustic information revealed by intentional nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, David R.

    2017-11-01

    Acoustic waves are omnipresent in modern life and are well described by the linearized equations of fluid dynamics. Once generated, acoustic waves carry and collect information about their source and the environment through which they propagate, respectively, and this information may be retrieved by analyzing recordings of these waves. Because of this, acoustics is the primary means for observation, surveillance, reconnaissance, and remote sensing in otherwise opaque environments, such as the Earth's oceans and crust, and the interior of the human body. For such information-retrieval tasks, acoustic fields are nearly always interrogated within their recorded frequency range or bandwidth. However, this frequency-range restriction is not general; acoustic fields may also carry (hidden) information at frequencies outside their bandwidth. Although such a claim may seem counter intuitive, hidden acoustic-field information can be revealed by re-introducing a marquee trait of fluid dynamics: nonlinearity. In particular, an intentional quadratic nonlinearity - a form of intra-signal heterodyning - can be used to obtain acoustic field information at frequencies outside a recorded acoustic field's bandwidth. This quadratic nonlinearity enables a variety of acoustic remote sensing applications that were long thought to be impossible. In particular, it allows the detrimental effects of sparse recordings and random scattering to be suppressed when the original acoustic field has sufficient bandwidth. In this presentation, the topic is developed heuristically, with a just brief exposition of the relevant mathematics. Hidden acoustic field information is then revealed from simulated and measured acoustic fields in simple and complicated acoustic environments involving frequencies from a few Hertz to more than 100 kHz, and propagation distances from tens of centimeters to hundreds of kilometers. Sponsored by ONR, NAVSEA, and NSF.

  16. Ionization Capabilities of Hydronium Ions and High Electric Fields Produced by Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuhiko; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharge (APCD) was applied to the ionization of volatile organic compounds. The mass spectra of analytes having aromatic, phenolic, anilinic, basic and aliphatic in nature were obtained by using vapor supply and liquid smear supply methods. The vapor supply method mainly gave protonated analytes [A+H] + caused by proton transfer from hydronium ion H 3 O + , except for benzene, toluene and n -hexane that have lower proton affinity. The use of the liquid smear supply method resulted in the formation of molecular ion A ·+ and/or dehydride analyte [A-H] + , according to the nature of analytes used. The formation of A ·+ without fragment ions could be explained by the electron tunneling via high electric fields 10 8  V/m at the tip of the corona needle. The dehydride analytes [A-H] + observed in the mass spectra of n -hexane, di- and tributylamines may be explained by the hydride abstraction from the alkyl chains by the hydronium ion. The hydronium ion can play the two-roles for analytes, i.e. , the proton donor to form [A+H] + and the hydride acceptor to form [A-H] + .

  17. Exploring field-of-view non-uniformities produced by a hand-held spectroradiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamir Caras

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shape of a spectroradiometer’s field of view (FOV affects the way spectral measurements are acquired. Knowing this property is a prerequisite for the correct use of the spectrometer. If the substrate is heterogeneous, the ability to accurately know what is being measured depends on knowing the FOV location, shape, spectral and spatial sensitivity. The GER1500 is a hand-held spectrometer with a fixed lens light entry slit and has a laser guide that allows control over the target by positioning the entire unit. In the current study, the FOV of the GER1500 was mapped and analysed. The spectral and spatial non-uniformities of the FOV were examined and were found to be spectrally independent. The relationship between the FOV and the built-in laser guide was tested and found to have a linear displacement dependent on the distance to the target. This allows an accurate prediction of the actual FOV position. A correction method to improve the agreement between the expected and measured reflectance over heterogeneous targets was developed and validated. The methods described are applicable and may be of use with other hand-held spectroradiometers.

  18. Characteristics of a plasma flow field produced by a metal array bridge foil explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junying, WU; Long, WANG; Yase, LI; Lijun, YANG; Manzoor, SULTAN; Lang, CHEN

    2018-07-01

    To improve the energy utilization efficiency of metal bridge foil explosion, and increase the function range of plasmas, array bridge foil explosion experiments with different structures were performed. A Schlieren photographic measurement system with a double-pulse laser source was used to observe the flow field of a bridge foil explosion. The evolution laws of plasmas and shock waves generated by array bridge foil explosions of different structures were analyzed and compared. A multi-phase flow calculation model was established to simulate the electrical exploding process of a metal bridge foil. The plasma equation of state was determined by considering the effect of the changing number of particles and Coulomb interaction on the pressure and internal energy. The ionization degree of the plasma was calculated via the Saha–Eggert equation assuming conditions of local thermal equilibrium. The exploding process of array bridge foils was simulated, and the superposition processes of plasma beams were analyzed. The variation and distribution laws of the density, temperature, pressure, and other important parameters were obtained. The results show that the array bridge foil has a larger plasma jet diameter than the single bridge foil for an equal total area of the bridge foil. We also found that the temperature, pressure, and density of the plasma jet’s center region sharply increase because of the superposition of plasma beams.

  19. Studies in musical acoustics and psychoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book comprises twelve articles which cover a range of topics from musical instrument acoustics to issues in psychoacoustics and sound perception as well as neuromusicology. In addition to experimental methods and data acquisition, modeling (such as FEM or wave field synthesis) and numerical simulation plays a central role in studies addressing sound production in musical instruments as well as interaction of radiated sound with the environment. Some of the studies have a focus on psychoacoustic aspects in regard to virtual pitch and timbre as well as apparent source width (for techniques such as stereo or ambisonics) in music production. Since musical acoustics imply subjects playing instruments or singing in order to produce sound according to musical structures, this area is also covered including a study that presents an artifical intelligent agent capable to interact with a real ('analog') player in musical genres such as traditional and free jazz. .

  20. Is newborn melatonin production influenced by magnetic fields produced by incubators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellieni, Carlo Valerio; Tei, Monica; Iacoponi, Francesca; Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Negro, Simona; Proietti, Fabrizio; Longini, Mariangela; Perrone, Serafina; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    During permanence in most incubators, newborns are very close to the electric engine, which represents a source of electromagnetic fields (EMF). Previous studies demonstrated a decrease in melatonin production in adults and animals exposed to EMF. To assess melatonin production in a group of newborns exposed to EMF, and to evaluate whether removing the babies from the source of MF can affect melatonin production. We have recruited 28 babies (study group), who had spent at least 48 h in incubator where we had previously assessed the presence of significant EMF. We have measured their mean 6-hydroxy-melatonin-sulfate (6OHMS) urine excretion at the end of their permanence in the incubators, and compared it with their mean 6OHMS excretion after having been put in cribs, where EMF are below the detectable limit (babies who were not exposed to EMF during both samples. Mean 6OHMS/cr values were respectively 5.34±4.6 and 7.68±5.1ng/mg (p=0.026) when babies were exposed to EMF in incubators, and after having been put in the crib. In the control group, mean 6OHMS/cr values in the first and in the second sample were respectively 5.91±5.41 vs 6.17±3.94ng/mg (p=0.679). The transitory increase in melatonin production soon after removing newborns from incubators demonstrates a possible influence of EMF on melatonin production in newborns. Further studies are needed to confirm these data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  2. An efficient thermotolerant and halophilic biosurfactant-producing bacterium isolated from Dagang oil field for MEOR application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Langping; Richnow, Hans; Yao, Jun; Jain, Anil

    2014-05-01

    Dagang Oil field (Petro China Company Limited) is one of the most productive oil fields in China. In this study, 34 biosurfactant-producing strains were isolated and cultured from petroleum reservoir of Dagang oil field, using haemolytic assay and the qualitative oil-displacement test. On the basis of 16S rDNA analysis, the isolates were closely related to the species in genus Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Bacillus. One of the isolates identified as Bacillus subtilis BS2 were selected for further study. This bacterium was able to produce a type of biosurfactant with excessive foam-forming properties at 37ºC as well as at higher temperature of 55ºC. The biosurfactant produced by the strain BS2 could reduce the surface tension of the culture broth from 70.87 mN/m to 28.97 mN/m after 8 days of incubation at 37ºC and to 36.15 mN/m after 20 days of incubation at 55ºC, respectively. The biosurfactant showed stability at high temperature (up to 120ºC), a wide range of pH (2 to 12) and salt concentrations (up to 12%) offering potential for biotechnology. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of extracted biosurfactant tentatively characterized the produced biosurfactant as glycolipid derivative. Elemental analysis of the biosurfactant by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) reveals that the biosurfactant was anionic in nature. 15 days of biodegradation of crude oil suggested a preferential usage of n-alkane upon microbial metabolism of BS2 as a carbon substrate and consequently also for the synthesis of biosurfactants. Core flood studies for oil release indicated 9.6% of additional oil recovery over water flooding at 37ºC and 7.2% of additional oil recovery at 55 ºC. Strain BS2 was characterized as an efficient biosurfactant-producing, thermotolerant and halophillic bacterium and has the potential for application for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) through water flooding in China's oil fields even in situ as adapted to reservoir chemistry and

  3. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  4. Objective mapping of temperature field by stochastic inverse method using acoustic tomography experimental data of eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Rao, M.M.M.; Sadhuram, Y.

    . The data are revisited for objective mapping of the temperature fields using Stochastic Inverse Method. Hourly reciprocal transmissions were carried with time lag of 30 minutes between each direction. From the multipath arrival patterns, significant peaks...

  5. Acoustic and Perceptual Correlates of Stress in Nonwords Produced by Children with Suspected Developmental Apraxia of Speech and Children with Phonological Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Benjamin; Bjorum, Elissa M.; Windsor, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    This study examined whether accuracy in producing linguistic stress reliably distinguished between five children with suspected developmental apraxia of speech (sDAS) and five children with phonological disorder (PD). No group differences in the production of stress were found; however, listeners judged that nonword repetitions of the children…

  6. Characterizing the variability in chemical composition of flowback and produced waters - results from lab and field studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.; Schmid, Franziska E.; Zhu, Yaling; Lipińska, Olga; Konieczyńska, Monika

    2017-04-01

    The huge volumes and unknown composition of flowback and produced waters cause major public concerns about the environmental and social compatibility of hydraulic fracturing and the exploitation of gas from unconventional reservoirs. Flowback and produced waters contain not only residues of fracking additives but also chemical species that are dissolved from the target shales themselves. Shales are a heterogeneous mixture of minerals, organic matter, and formation water and little is actually understood about the fluid-rock interactions occurring during hydraulic fracturing of the shales and their effects on the chemical composition of flowback and produced water. To overcome this knowledge gap, interactions of different shales with different artificial stimulation fluids were studied in lab experiments under ambient and elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These lab experiments showed clearly that fluid-rock interactions change the chemical composition of the initial stimulation fluid and that geochemistry of the fractured shale is relevant for understanding flowback water composition. In addition, flowback water samples were taken after hydraulic fracturing of one horizontal well in Pomeranian region, Poland and investigated for their chemical composition. With this presentation, results from lab and field studies will be presented and compared to decipher possible controls on chemical compositions of flowback and produced water.

  7. Droplet behaviour in an acoustic field: application to high frequency instability in liquid propellant rocket engines; Comportement de gouttes dans un champ acoustique: applications aux instabilites hautes-frequences dans les moteurs de fusees a ergols liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisneau, O.; Lecourt, R.; Grisch, F.; Orain, M.

    2002-07-01

    A setup has been developed at ONERA in the scope of studying interaction between calibrated droplets and a transversal acoustic wave in the scope of high frequency instabilities in liquid rocket engines. First, the setup has been checked acoustically by hot-wire anemometer and microphone. We present an analytical solution of the Stokes' droplet motion equation in an acoustic field. The trajectory equation can be split into three different parts: a sinusoidal part (negligible in liquid rocket engines), a transient part and a final mean position (only function of the loudspeaker characteristics but never reached). Some kind of vibrational breakup at low Weber's number has been observed using line-of-sight visualization of acoustic/droplet interactions. However, preponderant phenomena observed were jet oscillations and droplet coalescence. For ambient temperature, PLIF visualization has shown a coupling between the created vapor cylinder and the acoustic induced jet position. For hot temperature, some unsteady phenomena seem to appear but further processing are needed. (authors)

  8. Modificações vocais acústicas produzidas pela fonação reversa Acoustic vocal modifications produced by reverse phonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Susana Finger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as modificações vocais acústicas e as sensações ocorridas após a técnica vocal de fonação reversa em mulheres adultas jovens, sem queixas vocais e com laringe normal. MÉTODOS: Trinta e duas mulheres adultas jovens submeteram-se à avaliação otorrinolaringológica e triagem fonoaudiológica para descartar possíveis alterações que pudessem interferir nos resultados da pesquisa; tiveram amostras vocais coletadas antes e após realizarem três séries de 15 repetições de fonação reversa, em tempo máximo de fonação com tom e intensidade habituais, e 30 segundos de repouso passivo entre cada série. Após, responderam a um questionário referente às sensações percebidas. A análise vocal acústica foi realizada através do software Praat (versão 4.6.10 e os dados analisados por meio da estatística descritiva e pelo teste de Wilcoxon, com nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: Aumento estatisticamente significativo da frequência fundamental e da frequência máxima; diminuição da frequência mínima; aumento das medidas de Jitter, exceto da medida de Jitter local-absoluto que diminuiu; diminuição das medidas de Shimmer, relação ruído/harmônico (NHR e relação harmônico/ruído (HNR; e predomínio das sensações positivas. CONCLUSÃO: A fonação reversa pareceu promover efeito positivo sobre a vibração da mucosa das pregas vocais e sobre o seu alongamento. Sugere efeito sobre a musculatura, favorecendo mudanças de frequência fundamental; e sobre sua homogeneização e modificação da camada de muco. Além disso, promoveu melhora global do sinal vocal e das sensações durante sua produção.PURPOSE: To describe the acoustic vocal modifications and the sensations occurred after the reverse phonation technique in young adult women without vocal complaints and with normal larynx. METHODS: Thirty-two young adult women were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic and speech-language pathology

  9. Oscillating microbubbles for selective particle sorting in acoustic microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Priscilla; Xu, Lin; Neild, Adrian

    2012-05-01

    In this study, acoustic waves were used to excite a microbubble for selective particle trapping and sorting. Excitation of the bubble at its volume resonance, as necessary to drive strong fluid microstreaming, resulted in the particles being either selectively attracted to the bubble or continuing to follow the local microstreamlines. The operating principle exploited two acoustic phenomena acting on the particle suspension: the drag force arising from the acoustic microstreaming and the secondary Bjerknes force, i.e. the attractive radiation force produced between an oscillating bubble and a non-buoyant particle. It was also found that standing wave fields within the fluid chamber could be used to globally align bubbles and particles for local particle sorting by the bubble.

  10. Acoustic and electromagnetic emission as a tool for crack localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlak, P; Sikula, J; Lokajicek, T; Mori, Y

    2008-01-01

    The creation of cracks is accompanied by electric charge redistribution due to loosened chemical bounds. Electric charge on a crack wall creates dipole moments. Vibrations of crack walls produce time-dependent dipole moments and, consequently, electric and magnetic fields are generated. An electric signal is induced on metal electrodes. Simultaneously with the electromagnetic emission (EME) signal, an acoustic emission (AE) signal is generated, but due to the different velocities of propagation of both waves, the detection of the AE signal is delayed. This time delay presents the time of the wave propagation from the individual acoustic emission sensor to the crack. The defect can be located by means of these time intervals. This paper describes the localization using acoustic and electromagnetic emission signals for the two-dimensional case

  11. Acoustic levitation of liquid drops: Dynamics, manipulation and phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Duyang; Yu, Yinkai; Chen, Zhen; Li, Xiaoguang; Wu, Hongjing; Geng, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    The technique of acoustic levitation normally produces a standing wave and the potential well of the sound field can be used to trap small objects. Since no solid surface is involved it has been widely applied for the study of fluid physics, nucleation, bio/chemical processes, and various forms of soft matter. In this article, we survey the works on drop dynamics in acoustic levitation, focus on how the dynamic behavior is related to the rheological properties and discuss the possibility to develop a novel rheometer based on this technique. We review the methods and applications of acoustic levitation for the manipulation of both liquid and solid samples and emphasize the important progress made in the study of phase transitions and bio-chemical analysis. We also highlight the possible open areas for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilization of solar energy in the photodegradation of gasoline in water and of oil-field-produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, José Ermírio F; Silva, Douglas N; Quina, Frank H; Chiavone-Filho, Osvaldo; Nascimento, Cláudio Augusto O

    2004-07-01

    The photo-Fenton process utilizes ferrous ions (Fe2+), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation as a source of hydroxyl radicals for the oxidation of organic matter present in aqueous effluents. The cost associated with the use of artificial irradiation sources has hindered industrial application of this process. In this work, the applicability of solar radiation for the photodegradation of raw gasoline in water has been studied. The photo-Fenton process was also applied to a real effluent, i.e., oil-field-produced water, and the experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of employing solar irradiation to degrade this complex saturated-hydrocarbon-containing system.

  13. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. On the magnon interaction in Haematite. 2: Magnon energy of the acoustical mode and magnetic critical fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Nagai, O.; Tanaka, T.

    1975-01-01

    Previous spin wave theories of the antiferromagnet hematite were extended. The behavior of thermodynamic quantities around the Morin transition temperature was studied, and the latent heat of the Morin transition was calculated. The temperature dependence of the antiferromagnetic resonance frequency and the parallel and perpendicular critical spin-flop magnetic fields were calculated. It was found that the theory agrees well with experiment.

  15. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations in the southern Caspian Sea: shelf currents and flow field off Feridoonkenar Bay, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ghaffari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of offshore bottom-mounted ADCP measurements and wind records carried out from August to September 2003 in the coastal waters off Feridoon-kenar Bay (FB in the south Caspian Sea (CS are examined in order to characterize the shelf motion, the steady current field and to determine the main driving forces of currents on the study area. Owing to closed basin and absence of the astronomical tide, the atmospheric forcing plays an important role in the flow field of the CS. The lasting regular sea breeze system is present almost throughout the year. This system performs the forcing in diurnal and semi-diurnal bands similar to tides in other regions. In general, current field in the continental shelf could be separated into two distinguishable schemes, which in cross-shelf direction is dominated by high frequencies (1 cpd and higher frequencies, and in along-shelf orientation mostly proportional to lower frequencies in synoptic weather bands. Long-period wave currents, whose velocities are much greater than those of direct wind-induced currents, dominates the current field in the continental shelf off FB. The propagation of the latter could be described in terms of shore-controlled waves that are remotely generated and travel across the shelf in the southern CS. It has also been shown that long term displacements in this area follow the classic cyclonic, circulation pattern in the southern CS.

  16. Radial focusing and energy compression of a laser-produced proton beam by a synchronous rf field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ikegami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a MeV laser-produced proton beam affected by a radio frequency (rf electric field has been studied. The proton beam was emitted normal to the rear surface of a thin polyimide target irradiated with an ultrashort pulsed laser with a power density of 4×10^{18}  W/cm^{2}. The energy spread was compressed to less than 11% at the full width at half maximum (FWHM by an rf field. Focusing and defocusing effects of the transverse direction were also observed. These effects were analyzed and reproduced by Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results show that the transversely focused protons had a broad continuous spectrum, while the peaks in the proton spectrum were defocused. Based on this new information, we propose that elimination of the continuous energy component of laser-produced protons is possible by utilizing a focal length difference between the continuous spectral protons and the protons included in the spectral peak.

  17. High-quality laser-produced proton beam realized by the application of a synchronous RF electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shu; Ikegami, Masahiro; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Tongu, Hiromu; Souda, Hikaru; Noda, Akira; Daido, Hiroyuki; Mori, Michiaki; Kado, Masataka; Sagisaka, Akito; Ogura, Koichi; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Orimo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Yogo, Akifumi; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur; Nagashima, Akira; Kimura, Toyoaki; Tajima, Toshiki; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Fukumi, Atsushi; Li, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    A short-pulse (∼210fs) high-power (∼1 TW) laser was focused on a tape target 3 and 5 μm in thickness to a size of 11 x 15 μm 2 with an intensity of 3 x 10 17 W/cm 2 . Protons produced by this laser with an energy spread of 100% were found to be improved to create peaks in the energy distribution with a spread of ∼7% by the application of the RF electric field with an amplitude of ±40kV synchronous to the pulsed laser. This scheme combines the conventional RF acceleration technique with laser-produced protons for the first time. It is possible to be operated up to 10 Hz, and is found to have good reproducibility for every laser shot with the capability of adjusting the peak positions by control of the relative phase between the pulsed laser and the RF electric field. (author)

  18. Dynamic rayed aurora and enhanced ion-acoustic radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Blixt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation mechanism for naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes is still debated. One important issue is how these enhancements are related to auroral activity. All events of enhanced ion-acoustic echoes observed simultaneously with the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR and with high-resolution narrow field-of-view auroral imagers have been collected and studied. Characteristic of all the events is the appearance of very dynamic rayed aurora, and some of the intrinsic features of these auroral displays are identified. Several of these identified features are directly related to the presence of low energy (10-100eV precipitating electrons in addition to the higher energy population producing most of the associated light. The low energy contribution is vital for the formation of the enhanced ion-acoustic echoes. We argue that this type of aurora is sufficient for the generation of naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes. In one event two imagers were used to observe the auroral rays simultaneously, one from the radar site and one 7km away. The data from these imagers shows that the auroral rays and the strong backscattering filaments (where the enhanced echoes are produced are located on the same field line, which is in contrast to earlier statements in the litterature that they should be separated.

  19. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  20. Building Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, James

    This chapter summarizes and explains key concepts of building acoustics. These issues include the behavior of sound waves in rooms, the most commonly used rating systems for sound and sound control in buildings, the most common noise sources found in buildings, practical noise control methods for these sources, and the specific topic of office acoustics. Common noise issues for multi-dwelling units can be derived from most of the sections of this chapter. Books can be and have been written on each of these topics, so the purpose of this chapter is to summarize this information and provide appropriate resources for further exploration of each topic.

  1. Far-Field Acoustic Power Level and Performance Analyses of F31/A31 Open Rotor Model at Simulated Scaled Takeoff, Nominal Takeoff, and Approach Conditions: Technical Report I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Far-field acoustic power level and performance analyses of open rotor model F31/A31 have been performed to determine its noise characteristics at simulated scaled takeoff, nominal takeoff, and approach flight conditions. The nonproprietary parts of the data obtained from experiments in 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (9?15 LSWT) tests were provided by NASA Glenn Research Center to perform the analyses. The tone and broadband noise components have been separated from raw test data by using a new data analysis tool. Results in terms of sound pressure levels, acoustic power levels, and their variations with rotor speed, angle of attack, thrust, and input shaft power have been presented and discussed. The effect of an upstream pylon on the noise levels of the model has been addressed. Empirical equations relating model's acoustic power level, thrust, and input shaft power have been developed. The far-field acoustic efficiency of the model is also determined for various simulated flight conditions. It is intended that the results presented in this work will serve as a database for comparison and improvement of other open rotor blade designs and also for validating open rotor noise prediction codes.

  2. Acoustic Particle Detection with the ANTARES Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Neff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The (Antares Modules for Acoustic Detection Under the Sea AMADEUS system within the (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESsearch ANTARES neutrino telescope is designed to investigate detection techniques for acoustic signals produced by particle cascades. While passing through a liquid a cascade deposits energy and produces a measurable pressure pulse. This can be used for the detection of neutrinos with energies exceeding 1018 eV. The AMADEUS setup consists of 36 hydrophones grouped in six local clusters measuring about one cubic meter each. This article focuses on acoustic particle detection, the hardware of the AMADEUS detector and techniques used for acoustic signal processing.

  3. Acoustic Particle Detection with the ANTARES Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardt C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The (Antares Modules for Acoustic Detection Under the Sea AMADEUS system within the (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESsearch ANTARES neutrino telescope is designed to investigate detection techniques for acoustic signals produced by particle cascades. While passing through a liquid a cascade deposits energy and produces a measurable pressure pulse. This can be used for the detection of neutrinos with energies exceeding  eV. The AMADEUS setup consists of 36 hydrophones grouped in six local clusters measuring about one cubic meter each. This article focuses on acoustic particle detection, the hardware of the AMADEUS detector and techniques used for acoustic signal processing.

  4. Physical acoustics principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    2012-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume IV, Part B: Applications to Quantum and Solid State Physics provides an introduction to the various applications of quantum mechanics to acoustics by describing several processes for which such considerations are essential. This book discusses the transmission of sound waves in molten metals. Comprised of seven chapters, this volume starts with an overview of the interactions that can happen between electrons and acoustic waves when magnetic fields are present. This text then describes acoustic and plasma waves in ionized gases wherein oscillations are subject to hydrodynamic as well as electromagnetic forces. Other chapters examine the resonances and relaxations that can take place in polymer systems. This book discusses as well the general theory of the interaction of a weak sinusoidal field with matter. The final chapter describes the sound velocities in the rocks composing the Earth. This book is a valuable resource for physicists and engineers.

  5. Large-Scale Flows and Magnetic Fields Produced by Rotating Convection in a Quasi-Geostrophic Model of Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2017-12-01

    Convection is the main heat transport process in the liquid cores of planets. The convective flows are thought to be turbulent and constrained by rotation (corresponding to high Reynolds numbers Re and low Rossby numbers Ro). Under these conditions, and in the absence of magnetic fields, the convective flows can produce coherent Reynolds stresses that drive persistent large-scale zonal flows. The formation of large-scale flows has crucial implications for the thermal evolution of planets and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. In this work, we explore this problem with numerical simulations using a quasi-geostrophic approximation to model convective and zonal flows at Re 104 and Ro 10-4 for Prandtl numbers relevant for liquid metals (Pr 0.1). The formation of intense multiple zonal jets strongly affects the convective heat transport, leading to the formation of a mean temperature staircase. We also study the generation of magnetic fields by the quasi-geostrophic flows at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

  6. Characteristics of gas-liquid dynamics in operation of oil fields producing non-Newtonian crude oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadzhanzade, A Kh; Khasaev, A M; Gurbanov, R S; Akhmedov, Z M

    1968-08-01

    Experimental studies have shown that crude oils from Azerbaidzhan, Uzbekistan, Tataria, Kazakhstan and other areas have anomalous properties under reservoir conditions. Such crude oils are non-Newtonian and (1) obey Darcys Law at low velocities; (2) obey an exponential law at higher velocities; and (3) obey a modified Darcys Law at most velocities. A discussion is given of (1) flow of non-Newtonian crude oils together with gas or water; (2) flow of non-Newtonian crude oils in well tubing; (3) behavior of wells producing non-Newtonian crude oils; and (4) pumping of non-Newtonian oils in wells. Experiments have shown that a visco-plastic liquid does not fill pump inlets completely; as the diameter of the pump inlet decreases so also does the degree of liquid filling. A statistical analysis of production data from 160 fields with Newtonian oil and 129 fields with non- Newtonian oil has shown that much higher production is obtained from fields with Newtonian crude oils.

  7. Characterisation of the IRSN CANEL/T400 facility producing realistic neutron fields for calibration and test purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressier, V.; Lacoste, V.; Lebreton, L.; Muller, H.; Pelcot, G.; Bakali, M.; Fernandez, F.; Tomas, M.; Roberts, N. J.; Thomas, D. J.; Reginatto, M.; Wiegel, B.; Wittstock, J.

    2004-01-01

    The new CANEL/T400 facility has been set-up at the Inst. for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) to produce a realistic neutron field. The accurate characterisation of this neutron field is mandatory since this facility will be used as a reference neutron source. For this reason an international measuring campaign, involving four laboratories with extensive expertise in neutron metrology and spectrometry, was organised through a concerted EUROMET project. Measurements were performed with Bonner sphere (BS) systems to determine the energy distribution of the emitted neutrons over the whole energy range (from thermal energy up to a few MeV). Additional measurements were performed with proton recoil detectors to provide detailed information in the energy region above 90 keV. The results obtained by the four laboratories are in agreement with each other and are compared with a calculation performed with the MCNP4C Monte-Carlo code. As a conclusion of this exercise, a reliable characterisation of the CANEL/T400 neutron field is obtained. (authors)

  8. Low frequency sound field control in rectangular listening rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) will also reduce sound transmission to neighbor rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Sound reproduction is often taking place in small and medium sized rectangular rooms. As rectangular rooms have 3 pairs of parallel walls the reflections at especially low frequencies will cause up to 30 dB spatial variations of the sound pressure level in the room. This will take place not only...... at resonance frequencies, but more or less at all frequencies. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) has been developed and is able to create a homogeneous sound field in the whole room at low frequencies by proper placement of multiple loudspeakers. A normal setup...... from the rear wall, and thereby leaving only the plane wave in the room. With a room size of (7.8 x 4.1 x 2.8) m. it is possible to prevent modal frequencies up to 100 Hz. An investigation has shown that the sound transmitted to a neighbour room also will be reduced if CABS is used. The principle...

  9. Dual-Mode Gas Sensor Composed of a Silicon Nanoribbon Field Effect Transistor and a Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonator: A Case Study in Freons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop a novel dual-mode gas sensor system which comprises a silicon nanoribbon field effect transistor (Si-NR FET and a film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR. We investigate their sensing characteristics using polar and nonpolar organic compounds, and demonstrate that polarity has a significant effect on the response of the Si-NR FET sensor, and only a minor effect on the FBAR sensor. In this dual-mode system, qualitative discrimination can be achieved by analyzing polarity with the Si-NR FET and quantitative concentration information can be obtained using a polymer-coated FBAR with a detection limit at the ppm level. The complementary performance of the sensing elements provides higher analytical efficiency. Additionally, a dual mixture of two types of freons (CFC-113 and HCFC-141b is further analyzed with the dual-mode gas sensor. Owing to the small size and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS-compatibility of the system, the dual-mode gas sensor shows potential as a portable integrated sensing system for the analysis of gas mixtures in the future.

  10. Electron-acoustic solitary waves in the Earth's inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, C. S.; Vasko, I. Y.; Mozer, F. S.; Agapitov, O. V.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2018-02-01

    The broadband electrostatic turbulence observed in the inner magnetosphere is produced by large-amplitude electrostatic solitary waves of generally two types. The solitary waves with symmetric bipolar parallel (magnetic field-aligned) electric field are electron phase space holes. The solitary waves with highly asymmetric bipolar parallel electric field have been recently shown to correspond to the electron-acoustic plasma mode (existing due to two-temperature electron population). Through theoretical and numerical analysis of hydrodynamic and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations, we demonstrate that the asymmetric solitary waves appear due to the steepening of initially quasi-monochromatic electron-acoustic perturbation arrested at some moment by collisionless dissipation (Landau damping). The typical steepening time is found to be from a few to tens of milliseconds. The steepening of the electron-acoustic waves has not been reproduced in self-consistent kinetic simulations yet, and factors controlling the formation of steepened electron-acoustic waves, rather than electron phase space holes, remain unclear.

  11. Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Havelock, David; Vorländer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics presents signal processing as it is practiced in the field of acoustics. The Handbook is organized by areas of acoustics, with recognized leaders coordinating the self-contained chapters of each section. It brings together a wide range of perspectives from over 100 authors to reveal the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Success in acoustic applications often requires juggling both the acoustic and the signal processing parameters of the problem. This handbook brings the key issues from both into perspective and is complementary to other reference material on the two subjects. It is a unique resource for experts and practitioners alike to find new ideas and techniques within the diversity of signal processing in acoustics.

  12. Acoustic inverse scattering using topological derivative of far-field measurements-based L2 cost functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellis, Cédric; Bonnet, Marc; Cakoni, Fioralba

    2013-01-01

    Originally formulated in the context of topology optimization, the concept of topological derivative has also proved effective as a qualitative inversion tool for a wave-based identification of finite-sized objects. This approach remains, however, largely based on a heuristic interpretation of the topological derivative, whereas most other qualitative approaches to inverse scattering are backed by a mathematical justification. As an effort toward bridging this gap, this study focuses on a topological derivative approach applied to the L 2 -norm of the misfit between far-field measurements. Either an inhomogeneous medium or a finite number of point-like scatterers are considered, using either the Born approximation or a full-scattering model. Topological derivative-based imaging functionals are analyzed using a suitable factorization of the far-field operator, for each of the considered cases, in order to characterize their behavior and assess their ability to reconstruct the unknown scatterer(s). Results include the justification of the usual sign heuristic underpinning the method for (i) the Born approximation and (ii) full-scattering models limited to moderately strong scatterers. Semi-analytical and numerical examples are presented. Within the chosen framework, the topological derivative approach is finally discussed and compared to other well-known qualitative methods. (paper)

  13. Acoustic streaming in a microfluidic channel with a reflector: Case of a standing wave generated by two counterpropagating leaky surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Thibault, Pierre; Marmottant, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    A theory is developed for the modeling of acoustic streaming in a microfluidic channel confined between an elastic solid wall and a rigid reflector. A situation is studied where the acoustic streaming is produced by two leaky surface waves that propagate towards each other in the solid wall and thus form a combined standing wave in the fluid. Full analytical solutions are found for both the linear acoustic field and the field of the acoustic streaming. A dispersion equation is derived that allows one to calculate the wave speed in the system under study. The obtained solutions are used to consider particular numerical examples and to reveal the structure of the acoustic streaming. It is shown that two systems of vortices are established along the boundaries of the microfluidic channel.

  14. Acoustic-hydrodynamic-flame coupling—A new perspective for zero and low Mach number flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulikkottil, V. V.; Sujith, R. I.

    2017-04-01

    A combustion chamber has a hydrodynamic field that convects the incoming fuel and oxidizer into the chamber, thereby causing the mixture to react and produce heat energy. This heat energy can, in turn, modify the hydrodynamic and acoustic fields by acting as a source and thereby, establish a positive feedback loop. Subsequent growth in the amplitude of the acoustic field variables and their eventual saturation to a limit cycle is generally known as thermo-acoustic instability. Mathematical representation of these phenomena, by a set of equations, is the subject of this paper. In contrast to the ad hoc models, an explanation of the flame-acoustic-hydrodynamic coupling, based on fundamental laws of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, is presented in this paper. In this paper, we use a convection reaction diffusion equation, which, in turn, is derived from the fundamental laws of conservation to explain the flame-acoustic coupling. The advantage of this approach is that the physical variables such as hydrodynamic velocity and heat release rate are coupled based on the conservation of energy and not based on an ad hoc model. Our approach shows that the acoustic-hydrodynamic interaction arises from the convection of acoustic velocity fluctuations by the hydrodynamic field and vice versa. This is a linear mechanism, mathematically represented as a convection operator. This mechanism resembles the non-normal mechanism studied in hydrodynamic theory. We propose that this mechanism could relate the instability mechanisms of hydrodynamic and thermo-acoustic systems. Furthermore, the acoustic-hydrodynamic interaction is shown to be responsible for the convection of entropy disturbances from the inlet of the chamber. The theory proposed in this paper also unifies the observations in the fields of low Mach number flows and zero Mach number flows. In contrast to the previous findings, where compressibility is shown to be causing different physics for zero and low Mach

  15. West Texas array experiment: Noise and source characterization of short-range infrasound and acoustic signals, along with lab and field evaluation of Intermountain Laboratories infrasound microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Aileen

    spatial wind noise filtering hoses or pipes. The grid was within the distance limits of a single gauge's normal hose array, and data were used to perform a spatial noise correlation study. The highest correlation values were not found in the lower frequencies as anticipated, owing to a lack of sources in the lower range and the uncorrelated nature of wind noise. The highest values, with cross-correlation averages between 0.4 and 0.7 from 3 to 17 m between gauges, were found at night from 10 and 20 Hz due to a continuous local noise source and low wind. Data from the larger array were used to identify continuous and impulsive signals in the area that comprise the ambient noise field. Ground truth infrasound and acoustic, time and location data were taken for a highway site, a wind farm, and a natural gas compressor. Close-range sound data were taken with a single IML "traveler" gauge. Spectrograms and spectrum peaks were used to identify their source signatures. Two regional location techniques were also tested with data from the large array by using a propane cannon as a controlled, impulsive source. A comparison is presented of the Multiple Signal Classification Algorithm (MUSIC) to a simple, quadratic, circular wavefront algorithm. MUSIC was unable to effectively separate noise and source eignenvalues and eigenvectors due to spatial aliasing of the propane cannon signal and a lack of incoherent noise. Only 33 out of 80 usable shots were located by MUSIC within 100 m. Future work with the algorithm should focus on location of impulsive and continuous signals with development of methods for accurate separation of signal and noise eigenvectors in the presence of coherent noise and possible spatial aliasing. The circular wavefront algorithm performed better with our specific dataset and successfully located 70 out of 80 propane cannon shots within 100 m of the original location, 66 of which were within 20 m. This method has low computation requirements, making it well

  16. Manipulation of biomimetic objects in acoustic levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Castro , Angelica

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains 9 chapters making a total of 205 pages including articles. The articles are menctioned throughout the work and are listed as annexes. These articles were produced during the PhD.; Levitation is a promising tool for contactless guiding and non-toxic manipulation. Acoustic levitation by ultrasonic standing waves (USW) allows micron-scale particle manipulation in acoustic resonators. The main goal of this thesis is to explore the possibilities given by the acoustic levitatio...

  17. Acoustic tweezers via sub-time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides.

  18. Perspective: Acoustic metamaterials in transition

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2017-12-15

    Acoustic metamaterials derive their novel characteristics from the interaction between acoustic waves with designed structures. Since its inception seventeen years ago, the field has been driven by fundamental geometric and physical principles that guide the structure design rules as well as provide the basis for wave functionalities. Recent examples include resonance-based acoustic metasurfaces that offer flexible control of acoustic wave propagation such as focusing and re-direction; parity-time (PT)-symmetric acoustics that utilizes the general concept of pairing loss and gain to achieve perfect absorption at a single frequency; and topological phononics that can provide one-way edge state propagation. However, such novel functionalities are not without constraints. Metasurface elements rely on resonances to enhance their coupling to the incident wave; hence, its functionality is limited to a narrow frequency band. Topological phononics is the result of the special lattice symmetry that must be fixed at the fabrication stage. Overcoming such constraints naturally forms the basis for further developments. We identify two emergent directions: Integration of acoustic metamaterial elements for achieving broadband characteristics as well as acoustic wave manipulation tasks more complex than the single demonstrative functionality; and active acoustic metamaterials that can adapt to environment as well as to go beyond the constraints on the passive acoustic metamaterials. Examples of a successful recent integration of multi-resonators in achieving broadband sound absorption can be found in optimal sound-absorbing structures, which utilize causality constraint as a design tool in realizing the target-set absorption spectrum with a minimal sample thickness. Active acoustic metamaterials have also demonstrated the capability to tune bandgaps as well as to alter property of resonances in real time through stiffening of the spring constants, in addition to the PT symmetric

  19. Acoustic Holography With Incoherent Sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Raangs, R.

    2005-01-01

    In near field acoustic holography the sound field is scanned near the surface of the vibrating object; from these measurements the vibration of the structure can be calculated. In the case of correlated sources one reference signal is sufficient. When incoherent sources are present the separation of

  20. Acoustic Territoriality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzfeldt, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Under the heading of "Gang i København" a number of initiatives was presented by the Lord Mayer and the Technical and Environmental Mayer of Copenhagen in May 2006. The aim of the initiative, which roughly translates to Lively Copenhagen, was both to make Copenhagen a livelier city in terms of city...... this article outline a few approaches to a theory of acoustic territoriality....

  1. Magneto-thermal-acoustic differential-frequency imaging of magnetic nanoparticle with magnetic spatial localization: a theoretical prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Daqing

    2017-02-01

    The magneto-thermo-acoustic effect that we predicted in 2013 refers to the generation of acoustic-pressure wave from magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) when thermally mediated under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) at a pulsed or frequency-chirped application. Several independent experimental studies have since validated magneto-thermoacoustic effect, and a latest report has discovered acoustic-wave generation from MNP at the second-harmonic frequency of the AMF when operating continuously. We propose that applying two AMFs with differing frequencies to MNP will produce acoustic-pressure wave at the summation and difference of the two frequencies, in addition to the two second-harmonic frequencies. Analysis of the specific absorption dynamics of the MNP when exposed to two AMFs of differing frequencies has shown some interesting patterns of acoustic-intensity at the multiple frequency components. The ratio of the acoustic-intensity at the summation-frequency over that of the difference-frequency is determined by the frequency-ratio of the two AMFs, but remains independent of the AMF strengths. The ratio of the acoustic-intensity at the summation- or difference-frequency over that at each of the two second-harmonic frequencies is determined by both the frequency-ratio and the field-strength-ratio of the two AMFs. The results indicate a potential strategy for localization of the source of a continuous-wave magneto-thermalacoustic signal by examining the frequency spectrum of full-field non-differentiating acoustic detection, with the field-strength ratio changed continuously at a fixed frequency-ratio. The practicalities and challenges of this magnetic spatial localization approach for magneto-thermo-acoustic imaging using a simple envisioned set of two AMFs arranged in parallel to each other are discussed.

  2. Acoustic and psychoacoustic analysis of the noise produced by the police force firearms Análise acústica e psicoacústica do ruído de armas utilizadas pela Polícia Militar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo Lorena Guida

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Police officers are exposed to impact noise coming from firearms, which may cause irreversible injuries to the hearing system. AIM: To evaluate the noise exposure in shooting stands during gunfire exercises, to analyze the acoustic impact of the noise produced by the firearms and to associate it with tonal audiometry results. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To measure noise intensity we used a digital sound level meter, and the acoustic analysis was carried out by means of the oscillations and cochlear response curves provided by the praat software. 30 police officers were selected (27 males and 3 females. RESULTS: The peak level measured was 113.1 dB(C from a .40 pistol and 116.8 dB(C for a .38 revolver. The values obtained for oscillation and praat was 17.9±0.3 Barks, corresponding to the rate of 4,120 and 4,580 Hz. Audiometry indicated greater hearing loss at 4,000Hz in 86.7% of the cases. CONCLUSION: With the acoustic analysis it was possible to show cause and effect between the main areas of energy excitation of the cochlea (praat cochlear response curve and the frequencies of low hearing acuity.Os policiais militares estão expostos a ruídos de impacto provenientes de armas de fogo, os quais são capazes de causar lesões irreversíveis ao sistema auditivo. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a exposição ao ruído no estande de tiros durante os exercícios de tiro, analisar acusticamente o ruído de impacto e relacioná-lo com os resultados de audiometria tonal. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: A medição do ruído foi feita por meio de decibelímetro digital e a análise acústica foi feita no software Praat, levantando as curvas de oscilograma e cocleograma. Foi selecionada uma amostra de 30 policiais militares (27 masculinos e 3 femininos. RESULTADOS: Os picos máximos medidos no estante de tiros foram de 113,1 dB(C para pistola .40 e 116,8 dB(C para revólver .38. Os valores obtidos por meio da relação entre

  3. Dynamics of two methanogenic microbiomes incubated in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, naphthenic acids, and oil field produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oko, Bonahis J; Tao, Yu; Stuckey, David C

    2017-01-01

    Oil field produced water (OFPW) is widely produced in large volumes around the world. Transforming the organic matter in OFPW into bioenergy, such as biomethane, is one promising way to sustainability. However, OFPW is difficult to biologically degrade because it contains complex compounds such as naphthenic acids (NAs), or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although active microbial communities have been found in many oil reservoirs, little is known about how an exotic microbiome, e.g. the one which originates from municipal wastewater treatment plants, would evolve when incubated with OFPW. In this study, we harvested methanogenic biomass from two sources: a full-scale anaerobic digester (AD) treating oil and gas processing wastewater (named O&G sludge), and from a full-scale AD reactor treating multiple fractions of municipal solid wastes (named MS, short for mixed sludge). Both were incubated in replicate microcosms fed with PAHs, NAs, or OFPW. The results showed that the PAHs, NAs, and OFPW feeds could rapidly alter the methanogenic microbiomes, even after 14 days, while the O&G sludge adapted faster than the mixed sludge in all the incubations. Two rarely reported microorganisms, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen Candidatus methanoregula and a saccharolytic fermenter Kosmotoga , were found to be prevalent in the PAHs and OFPW microcosms, and are likely to play an important role in the syntrophic degradation of PAHs and OFPW, cooperating with methanogens such as Methanoregula, Methanosarcina, or Methanobacterium . The dominant phyla varied in certain patterns during the incubations, depending on the biomass source, feed type, and variation in nutrients. The sludge that originated from the oil and gas processing wastewater treatment (O&G) reactor adapted faster than the one from municipal solid waste reactors, almost certainly because the O&G biomass had been "pre-selected" by the environment. This study reveals the importance of biomass selection for other

  4. The geometrical acoustic method for calculating the echo of targets submerged in a shallow water waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yan; TANG Weilin; FAN Wei; FAN Jun

    2012-01-01

    A geometrical acoustic method based on image-source method and physicM acoustic method was developed to calculate the echo of targets submerged in the shallow water waveguide. The incident rays and the scattering rays are reflected by two boundaries for many times, and then the back rays become countless. The total backscattering field is obtained through summing up the scattering field produced by each combination of incident rays and back rays. The echo of the 10m-radius pressure release sphere in Pekeris waveguide with the range is calculated by the geometrical acoustic method. Compared with the results calculated by the wave acoustic method in the available literature, it shows that both are in accordance on average value and descend trend. The following results indicate that the difference between Effective Target Strength (ETS) in shallow water and the Target Strength (TS) in free space for spheres and certain other rounded objects is small. However, the ETS of some targets such as cone-shaped is quite different from TS in free space, which can lead to large errors in estimating a target's scattering property using traditional sonar equation. Compared with the method of wave acoustics, the geometrical acoustic method not only has the definite physical meaning but also can calculate the echo of complex objects in shallow water waveguide.

  5. Levitation of objects using acoustic energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whymark, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Activated sound source establishes standing-wave pattern in gap between source and acoustic reflector. Solid or liquid material introduced in region will move to one of the low pressure areas produced at antinodes and remain suspended as long as acoustic signal is present.

  6. Analyzing the Acoustic Beat with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Hirth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this column, we have previously presented various examples of how physical relationships can be examined by analyzing acoustic signals using smartphones or tablet PCs. In this example, we will be exploring the acoustic phenomenon of small beats, which is produced by the overlapping of two tones with a low difference in frequency ?f. The…

  7. Failure to produce taste-aversion learning in rats exposed to static electric fields and air ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creim, J.A.; Lovely, R.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Forsythe, W.C.; Anderson, L.E. [Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Taste-aversion (TA) learning was measured to determine whether exposure to high-voltage direct current (HVdc) static electric fields can produce TA learning in male Long Evans rats. Fifty-six rats were randomly distributed into four groups of 14 rats each. All rats were placed on a 20 min/day drinking schedule for 12 consecutive days prior to receiving five conditioning trials. During the conditioning trials, access to 0.1% sodium saccharin-flavored water was given for 20 min, followed 30 min later by one of four treatments. Two groups of 14 rats each were individually exposed to static electric fields and air ions, one group to +75 kV/m (+2 {times} 10{sup 5} air ions/cm{sup 3}) and the other group to {minus}75 kV/m ({minus}2 {times} 10{sup 5} air ions/cm{sup 3}). Two other groups of 14 rats each served as sham-exposed controls, with the following variation in one of the sham-exposed groups: this group was subdivided into two subsets of seven rats each, so that a positive control group could be included to validate the experimental design. The positive control group (n = 7) was injected with cyclophosphamide 25 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min after access to saccharin-flavored water on conditioning days, whereas the other subset of seven rats was similarly injected with an equivalent volume of saline. Access to saccharin-flavored water on conditioning days was followed by the treatments described above and was alternated daily with water recovery sessions in which the rats received access to water for 20 min in the home cage without further treatment. Following the last water-recovery session, a 20 min, two-bottle preference test (between water and saccharin-flavored water) was administered to each group. The positive control group did show TA learning, thus validating the experimental protocol.

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EVENTS DONATE NEWS Home Learn Back Learn about acoustic neuroma AN Facts What is acoustic neuroma? Diagnosing ... Brain Freeze ? READ MORE Read More What is acoustic neuroma? Identifying an AN Learn More Get Info ...

  9. The effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic wave beams on single electron acoustic charge transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jianhong; Guo Huazhong; Song Li; Zhang Wei; Gao Jie; Lu Chuan

    2010-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of two counterpropagating surface acoustic waves on the acoustoelectric current of single electron transport devices. A significant improvement in the accuracy of current quantization is achieved as a result of an additional surface acoustic wave beam. The experiments reveal the sinusoidally periodical modulation in the acoustoelectric current characteristic as a function of the relative phase of the two surface acoustic wave beams. Besides, by using standing surface acoustic waves, the acoustoelectric current is detected which we consider as the so-called anomalous acoustoelectric current produced by acoustic wave mechanical deformations. This kind current is contributed to one component of the acoustoelectric current in surface acoustic wave device, which could enable us to establish a more adequate description of acoustoelectric effects on single-electron acoustic charge transport.

  10. Velocity profiles of acoustic streaming in resulting stokes layer by acoustic standing wave in a duct; Kannai kichi shindo ni okeru stokes sonai onkyoryu ryusoku bunpu no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, M; Kawahashi, M [Saitama University, Saitama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-07-25

    Acoustic streaming is generated by Reynolds stress in the sense of mean acoustic momentum flux in a sound field. In the case of an acoustic standing wave produced by an air column oscillation in a closed duct, the friction and the Reynolds stress in the resulting Stokes layer are the essentials of acoustic streaming generation in the vicinity of the duct wall. The thickness of the Stokes layer decreases with the oscillatory Reynolds number. The plane wave propagation in the duct is assumed for the case of high Reynolds number except for the thin Stokes layer adjacent to the duct wall. The velocity profiles of the streaming are estimated theoretically from the steady component of the second-order term of a perturbation expansion in which the first-order approximation is a sinusoidal oscillation of the air column with plane waves. The present paper describes theoretical analysis of the velocity profiles of the acoustic streaming in the Stokes layer by means of the matched asymptotic expansion method. The results obtained show the existence of reverse streaming in a very thin layer adjacent to the wall and the effects of thermal boundary conditions at the wall on the velocity profiles of acoustic streaming in the Stokes layer. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Studies of annealing of neutron-produced defects in silicon by transconductance measurements of junction field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Y.; Usami, A.

    1978-01-01

    Annealing behavior of neutron-produced defects in silicon was studied by measuring the phase angle theta of the small-signal transconductance of the junction field-effect transistors (JFET's). Three deep levels (N-1, N-2, and N-3 levels) in n-type silicon and two deep levels (P-1 and P-2 levels) in p-type silicon, introduced by irradiation, annealed gradually. Their energy levels and capture cross sections have been already reported by us. Three deep levels (P-3, P-4, and P-5 levels) were observed in annealed p-type silicon in the temperature range 150--300 0 C. For these defects, theta was measured as a function of frequency to obtain the time constant. From the temperature dependence of the time constant, assuming that capture cross sections are independent of temperature, the energy levels of P-3, P-4, and P-5 were estimated to be E/sub v/+0.21, E/sub v/+0.40, and E/sub v/+0.30 eV, respectively. The calculated hole capture cross sections of these levels were 2.2 x 10 -15 , 8.7 x 10 -14 , and 1.2 x 10 -14 cm 2 , respectively. Comparison with other published data was made. It was found that N-3 and P-2 levels corresponded to the divacancy. Furthermore, it seemed that P-3, P-4, and P-5 levels corresponded to the high-order vacancy defects

  12. [Acoustical parameters of toys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harazin, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Toys play an important role in the development of the sight and hearing concentration in children. They also support the development of manipulation, gently influence a child and excite its emotional activities. A lot of toys emit various sounds. The aim of the study was to assess sound levels produced by sound-emitting toys used by young children. Acoustical parameters of noise were evaluated for 16 sound-emitting plastic toys in laboratory conditions. The noise level was recorded at four different distances, 10, 20, 25 and 30 cm, from the toy. Measurements of A-weighted sound pressure levels and noise levels in octave band in the frequency range from 31.5 Hz to 16 kHz were performed at each distance. Taking into consideration the highest equivalent A-weighted sound levels produced by tested toys, they can be divided into four groups: below 70 dB (6 toys), from 70 to 74 dB (4 toys), from 75 to 84 dB (3 toys) and from 85 to 94 dB (3 toys). The majority of toys (81%) emitted dominant sound levels in octave band at the frequency range from 2 kHz to 4 kHz. Sound-emitting toys produce the highest acoustic energy at the frequency range of the highest susceptibility of the auditory system. Noise levels produced by some toys can be dangerous to children's hearing.

  13. Primary calibration in acoustics metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milhomem, T A Bacelar; Soares, Z M Defilippo

    2015-01-01

    SI unit in acoustics is realized by the reciprocity calibrations of laboratory standard microphones in pressure field, free field and diffuse field. Calibrations in pressure field and in free field are already consolidated and the Inmetro already done them. Calibration in diffuse field is not yet consolidated, however, some national metrology institutes, including Inmetro, are conducting researches on this subject. This paper presents the reciprocity calibration, the results of Inmetro in recent key comparisons and the research that is being developed for the implementation of reciprocity calibration in diffuse field

  14. Microfluidic device for acoustic cell lysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W.; Cooley, Erika Jane; Smith, Gennifer Tanabe; James, Conrad D.; McClain, Jaime L.

    2015-08-04

    A microfluidic acoustic-based cell lysing device that can be integrated with on-chip nucleic acid extraction. Using a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) transducer array, acoustic waves can be coupled into microfluidic cartridges resulting in the lysis of cells contained therein by localized acoustic pressure. Cellular materials can then be extracted from the lysed cells. For example, nucleic acids can be extracted from the lysate using silica-based sol-gel filled microchannels, nucleic acid binding magnetic beads, or Nafion-coated electrodes. Integration of cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction on-chip enables a small, portable system that allows for rapid analysis in the field.

  15. Internal stress analysis by acoustic polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouge, Jean; Robert, Andre

    The associated improvements of acoustics and electronics allow the field of applications relative to the ultrasonic methods to be extended to the non destructive control of materials and structures. Thus, the acoustical polarimetry is a new method allowing the measurement in orientation and intensity of residual or induced internal stresses in metals or other materials [fr

  16. Coherent acoustic excitation of cavity polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; de Lima, M. M.; Hey, R.

    The study of acoustic excitation of semiconductor based photonic structures is anemerging field with great potential for new types of photonic manipulation1. In this paperwe present results of using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) to modulate a microcavitywith embedded quantum-well (QW) active layer...

  17. Dynamic and Acoustic Characterisation of Automotive Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Curà

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the dynamic and acoustic characterisation of an automotive wheel. In particular, an experimental research activity previously performed by the authors about the dynamic behaviour of automotive wheels has been extended to the acoustic field.

  18. Modulation of photonic structures by surface acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauricio M de Lima Jr; Santos, Paulo V

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the interaction between coherently stimulated acoustic phonons in the form of surface acoustic waves with light beams in semiconductor based photonic structures. We address the generation of surface acoustic wave modes in these structures as well as the technological aspects related to control of the propagation and spatial distribution of the acoustic fields. The microscopic mechanisms responsible for the interaction between light and surface acoustic modes in different structures are then reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the acousto-optical interaction in semiconductor microcavities and its application in photon control. These structures exhibit high optical modulation levels under acoustic excitation and are compatible with integrated light sources and detectors

  19. Acoustical and optical radiation pressure and the development of single beam acoustical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jean-Louis; Marchiano, Régis; Baresch, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Studies on radiation pressure in acoustics and optics have enriched one another and have a long common history. Acoustic radiation pressure is used for metrology, levitation, particle trapping and actuation. However, the dexterity and selectivity of single-beam optical tweezers are still to be matched with acoustical devices. Optical tweezers can trap, move and position micron size particles, biological samples or even atoms with subnanometer accuracy in three dimensions. One limitation of optical tweezers is the weak force that can be applied without thermal damage due to optical absorption. Acoustical tweezers overcome this limitation since the radiation pressure scales as the field intensity divided by the speed of propagation of the wave. However, the feasibility of single beam acoustical tweezers was demonstrated only recently. In this paper, we propose a historical review of the strong similarities but also the specificities of acoustical and optical radiation pressures, from the expression of the force to the development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  20. Ultrasonic superlensing jets and acoustic-fork sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F.G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org

    2017-05-18

    Focusing acoustical (and optical) beams beyond the diffraction limit has remained a major challenge in imaging instruments and systems, until recent advances on “hyper” or “super” lensing and higher-resolution imaging techniques have shown the counterintuitive violation of this rule under certain circumstances. Nonetheless, the proposed technologies of super-resolution acoustical focusing beyond the diffraction barrier require complex tools such as artificially engineered metamaterials, and other hardware equipment that may not be easily synthesized or manufactured. The present contribution therefore suggests a simple and reliable method of using a sound-penetrable circular cylinder lens illuminated by a nonparaxial Gaussian acoustical sheet (i.e. finite beam in 2D) to produce non-evanescent ultrasonic superlensing jets (or bullets) and acoustical ‘snail-fork’ shaped wavefronts with limited diffraction. The generalized (near-field) scattering theory for acoustical sheets of arbitrary wavefronts and incidence is utilized to synthesize the incident beam based upon the angular spectrum decomposition method and the multipole expansion method in cylindrical wave functions to compute the scattered pressure around the cylinder with particular emphasis on its physical properties. The results show that depending on the beam and lens parameters, a tight focusing (with dimensions much smaller than the beam waist) can be achieved. Subwavelength resolution can be also achieved by selecting a lens material with a speed of sound exceeding that of the host fluid medium. The ultrasonic superlensing jets provide the impetus to develop improved subwavelength microscopy and acoustical image-slicing systems, cell lysis and surgery, and photoacoustic imaging to name a few examples. Moreover, an acoustical fork-sheet generation may open innovative avenues in reconfigurable on-chip micro/nanoparticle tweezers and surface acoustic waves devices. - Highlights: • Ultrasonic

  1. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  2. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  3. The acoustics of snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  4. Toward 3-D E-field visualization in laser-produced plasma by polarization-spectroscopic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong W.

    2004-01-01

    A 3-D volume radiator such as laser-produced plasma (LPP) plumes is observed in the form of a 2-D projection of its radiative structure. The traditional approach to 3-D structure reconstruction relies on multiple projections but is not suitable as a general method for unsteady radiating objects. We have developed a general method for 3-D structure reconstruction for LPP plumes in stages of increasing complexity. We have chosen neutral gas-confined LPP plumes from an aluminum target immersed in high-density argon because the plasma experiences Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We make use of two time-resolved, mutually orthogonal side views of a LPP plume and a front-view snapshot. No symmetry assumptions are needed. Two scaling relations are invoked that connects the plasma temperature and pressure to local specific intensity at selected wavelength(s). Two mutually-orthogonal lateral luminosity views of the plume at each known distance from the target surface are compared with those computed from the trial specific intensity profiles and the scaling relations. The luminosity error signals are minimized to find the structure. The front-view snapshot is used to select the initial trial profile and as a weighting function for allocation of the error signal into corrections for specific intensities from the plasma cells along the line of sight. Full Saha equilibrium for multiple stages of ionization is treated, together with the self-absorption, in the computation of the luminosity. We show the necessary optics for determination of local electric fields through polarization-resolved imaging. (author)

  5. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  6. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  7. The reduction of structural acoustic coupling in car bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    The nature of sound in cars is discussed in the light of previous experimental and theoretical work, and the major contributions to interior noise are identified. The acoustic field inside a vibrating structure is analysed theoretically in terms of the acoustic cavity modes and the structural modes, and it is shown that'reduction of structural-acoustic coupling could reduce the response for a wide variety of force inputs. Finite element analyses of prismatic acoustic cavi...

  8. The Grenoble station for producing strong transient magnetic fields higher than 100 teslas by an explosive driven flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot, M.

    1976-01-01

    Reproducible transient magnetic fields up to 400 teslas (4 megaoersted) are achieved by a simple explosive driven flux compression. The results are described simply from the point of view of energy conversion. The problems of field measurements are studied: the precision is +-2% with a field cavity of 5 mm diameter [fr

  9. 30th International Acoustical Imaging Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Joie; Lee, Hua

    2011-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2009 the 30th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Monterey, CA, USA, March 1-4. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 30 in the Series contains an excellent collection of forty three papers presented in five major categories: Biomedical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation Systems Analysis Signal Analysis and Image Processing Audience Researchers in medical imaging and biomedical instrumentation experts.

  10. Oscillating acoustic streaming jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudjed, Brahim; Botton, Valery; Henry, Daniel; Millet, Severine; Ben Hadid, Hamda; Garandet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present paper provides the first experimental investigation of an oscillating acoustic streaming jet. The observations are performed in the far field of a 2 MHz circular plane ultrasound transducer introduced in a rectangular cavity filled with water. Measurements are made by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in horizontal and vertical planes near the end of the cavity. Oscillations of the jet appear in this zone, for a sufficiently high Reynolds number, as an intermittent phenomenon on an otherwise straight jet fluctuating in intensity. The observed perturbation pattern is similar to that of former theoretical studies. This intermittently oscillatory behavior is the first step to the transition to turbulence. (authors)

  11. Acoustic multimode interference and self-imaging phenomena realized in multimodal phononic crystal waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Qiushun; Yu, Tianbao; Liu, Jiangtao; Wang, Tongbiao; Liao, Qinghua; Liu, Nianhua

    2015-01-01

    We report an acoustic multimode interference effect and self-imaging phenomena in an acoustic multimode waveguide system which consists of M parallel phononic crystal waveguides (M-PnCWs). Results show that the self-imaging principle remains applicable for acoustic waveguides just as it does for optical multimode waveguides. To achieve the dispersions and replicas of the input acoustic waves produced along the propagation direction, we performed the finite element method on M-PnCWs, which support M guided modes within the target frequency range. The simulation results show that single images (including direct and mirrored images) and N-fold images (N is an integer) are identified along the propagation direction with asymmetric and symmetric incidence discussed separately. The simulated positions of the replicas agree well with the calculated values that are theoretically decided by self-imaging conditions based on the guided mode propagation analysis. Moreover, the potential applications based on this self-imaging effect for acoustic wavelength de-multiplexing and beam splitting in the acoustic field are also presented. (paper)

  12. Acoustic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  13. Acoustic cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, G.W.; Martin, R.A.; Radebaugh, R.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effect to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15--60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintain a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K

  14. A Treatise on Acoustic Radiation. Volume 2. Acoustic Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Newton) V (meter/sec) acoustical p (Newton/meter2 ) U (meter 3/sec) To display Eq. 1.53.1 in simple form we take time to be given by exp(- iot ) and choose...if all the C-component edges and e-drivers are in the tree, all the L-component "A edges and idrivers are in the cotree, all the algebraic equations...momentum and mass of the elastic field then become, (a) Al - V -T + F 278 W-4. ,-,- * * * 4 % • *.• Design of Acoustic Transducers IOT (b) I + VV-s

  15. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10 000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm-2. The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices.

  16. Enhanced self-magnetic field by atomic polarization in partially stripped plasma produced by a short and intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qianglin; Liu Shibing; Jiang, Y.J.; Zhang Jie

    2005-01-01

    The enhancement and redistribution of a self-generated quasistatic magnetic field, due to the presence of the polarization field induced by partially ionized atoms, are analytically revealed when a linearly polarized intense and short pulse laser propagates in a partially stripped plasma with higher density. In particular, the shorter wavelength of the laser pulse can evidently intensify the amplitude of the magnetic field. These enhancement and redistribution of the magnetic field are considered physically as a result of the competition of the electrostatic field (electron-ion separation) associated with the plasma wave, the atomic polarization field, and the pondoromotive potential associated with the laser field. This competition leads to the generation of a positive, large amplitude magnetic field in the zone of the pulse center, which forms a significant difference in partially and fully stripped plasmas. The numerical result shows further that the magnetic field is resonantly modulated by the plasma wave when the pulse length is the integer times the plasma wavelength. This apparently implies that the further enhancement and restructure of the large amplitude self-magnetic field can evidently impede the acceleration and stable transfer of the hot-electron beam

  17. Metastable decomposition and hydrogen migration of ethane dication produced in an intense femtosecond near-infrared laser field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, Kennosuke; Kawamura, Haruna; Tsuge, Masashi; Tamiya, Minoru; Ishiguro, Masaji

    2011-02-14

    We investigated a formation channel of triatomic molecular hydrogen ions from ethane dication induced by irradiation of intense laser fields (800 nm, 100 fs, ∼1 × 10(14) W∕cm(2)) by using time of flight mass spectrometry. Hydrogen ion and molecular hydrogen ion (H,D)(n)(+) (n = 1-3) ejected from ethane dications, produced by double ionization of three types of samples, CH(3)CH(3), CD(3)CD(3), and CH(3)CD(3), were measured. All fragments were found to comprise components with a kinetic energy of ∼3.5 eV originating from a two-body Coulomb explosion of ethane dications. Based on the signal intensities and the anisotropy of the ejection direction with respect to the laser polarization direction, the branching ratios, H(+):D(+) = 66:34, H(2)(+):HD(+):D(2)(+) = 63:6:31, and H(3)(+):H(2)D(+):HD(2)(+):D(3)(+) = 26:31:34:9 for the decomposition of C(2)H(3)D(3)(2+), were determined. The ratio of hydrogen molecules, H(2):HD:D(2) = 31:48:21, was also estimated from the signal intensities of the counter ion C(2)(H,D)(4)(2+). The similarity in the extent of H∕D mixture in (H,D)(3)(+) with that of (H,D)(2) suggests that these two dissociation channels have a common precursor with the C(2)H(4)(2+)...H(2) complex structure, as proposed theoretically in the case of H(3)(+) ejection from allene dication [A. M. Mebel and A. D. Bandrauk, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 224311 (2008)]. In contrast, the (H,D)(2)(+) ejection path with a lower extent of H∕D mixture and a large anisotropy is expected to proceed essentially via a different path with a much rapid decomposition rate. For the Coulomb explosion path of C-C bond breaking, the yield ratios of two channels, CH(3)CD(3)(2+)→ CH(3)(+) + CD(3)(+) and CH(2)D(+) + CHD(2)(+), were 81:19 and 92:8 for the perpendicular and parallel directions, respectively. This indicates that the process occurs at a rapid rate, which is comparable to hydrogen migration through the C-C bond, resulting in smaller anisotropy for the latter channel that

  18. Ipsilateral masking between acoustic and electric stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Payton; Turner, Christopher W; Gantz, Bruce J; Djalilian, Hamid R; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    Residual acoustic hearing can be preserved in the same ear following cochlear implantation with minimally traumatic surgical techniques and short-electrode arrays. The combined electric-acoustic stimulation significantly improves cochlear implant performance, particularly speech recognition in noise. The present study measures simultaneous masking by electric pulses on acoustic pure tones, or vice versa, to investigate electric-acoustic interactions and their underlying psychophysical mechanisms. Six subjects, with acoustic hearing preserved at low frequencies in their implanted ear, participated in the study. One subject had a fully inserted 24 mm Nucleus Freedom array and five subjects had Iowa/Nucleus hybrid implants that were only 10 mm in length. Electric masking data of the long-electrode subject showed that stimulation from the most apical electrodes produced threshold elevations over 10 dB for 500, 625, and 750 Hz probe tones, but no elevation for 125 and 250 Hz tones. On the contrary, electric stimulation did not produce any electric masking in the short-electrode subjects. In the acoustic masking experiment, 125-750 Hz pure tones were used to acoustically mask electric stimulation. The acoustic masking results showed that, independent of pure tone frequency, both long- and short-electrode subjects showed threshold elevations at apical and basal electrodes. The present results can be interpreted in terms of underlying physiological mechanisms related to either place-dependent peripheral masking or place-independent central masking.

  19. Acoustic levitation in the presence of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collas, P.; Barmatz, M.; Shipley, C.

    1989-01-01

    The method of Gor'kov (1961) has been applied to derive general expressions for the total potential and force on a small spherical object in a resonant chamber in the presence of both acoustic and gravitational force fields. The levitation position is also determined in rectangular resonators for the simultaneous excitation of up to three acoustic modes, and the results are applied to the triple-axis acoustic levitator. The analysis is applied to rectangular, spherical, and cylindrical single-mode levitators that are arbitrarily oriented relative to the gravitational force field. Criteria are determined for isotropic force fields in rectangular and cylindrical resonators. It is demonstrated that an object will be situated within a volume of possible levitation positions at a point determined by the relative strength of the acoustic and gravitational fields and the orientation of the chamber relative to gravity.

  20. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be