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Sample records for acoustic emission sensor

  1. Characteristic evaluation of acoustic emission sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Joo, Y. S.; Lee, N. H

    2000-12-01

    This report introduces the various kinds of Acoustic Emission(AE) sensors as well as the basic principle of AE sensors in order to select AE sensor suitably. The described sensors include : high sensitivity sensor, broadband sensor, underwater sensor, miniature sensor, directional sensor, integral pre-amplifier sensor. Sensor has two critical aspects of reliability and repeatability. For the high reliability, sensor has to be calibrated in accordance with ASTM standard E 1106 which explains to measure the characteristics of AE sensor accurately. For investigating the degradation of AE sensor under the severe environment for example the high radiation condition, It is important to perform the repeatability test which is described in detail in according to the ASTM standard E 976. Two kinds of AE sensor applications are also summarized.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  3. Use of Macro Fibre Composite Transducers as Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eaton

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The need for ever lighter and more efficient aerospace structures and components has led to continuous optimization pushing the limits of structural performance. In order to ensure continued safe operation during long term service it is desirable to develop a structural health monitoring (SHM system. Acoustic emission (AE offers great potential for real time global monitoring of aerospace structures, however currently available commercial sensors have limitations in size, weight and adaptability to complex structures. This work investigates the potential use of macro-fibre composite (MFC film transducers as AE sensors. Due to the inhomogeneous make-up of MFC transducers their directional dependency was examined and found to have limited effect on signal feature data. However, signal cross-correlations revealed a strong directional dependency. The sensitivity and signal attenuation with distance of MFC sensors were compared with those of commercially available sensors. Although noticeably less sensitive than the commercial sensors, the MFC sensors still had an acceptable operating range. Furthermore, a series of compressive carbon fiber coupon tests were monitored in parallel using both an MFC sensor and a commercially available sensor for comparison. The results showed good agreement of AE trends recorded by both sensors.

  4. Development of a MEMS acoustic emission sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Wu, Wei; Wright, Amelia P.

    2007-04-01

    An improved multi-channel MEMS chip for acoustic emission sensing has been designed and fabricated in 2006 to create a device that is smaller in size, superior in sensitivity, and more practical to manufacture than earlier designs. The device, fabricated in the MUMPS process, contains four resonant-type capacitive transducers in the frequency range between 100 kHz and 500 kHz on a chip with an area smaller than 2.5 sq. mm. The completed device, with its circuit board, electronics, housing, and connectors, possesses a square footprint measuring 25 mm x 25 mm. The small footprint is an important attribute for an acoustic emission sensor, because multiple sensors must typically be arrayed around a crack location. Superior sensitivity was achieved by a combination of four factors: the reduction of squeeze film damping, a resonant frequency approximating a rigid body mode rather than a bending mode, a ceramic package providing direct acoustic coupling to the structural medium, and high-gain amplifiers implemented on a small circuit board. Manufacture of the system is more practical because of higher yield (lower unit costs) in the MUMPS fabrication task and because of a printed circuit board matching the pin array of the MEMS chip ceramic package for easy assembly and compactness. The transducers on the MEMS chip incorporate two major mechanical improvements, one involving squeeze film damping and one involving the separation of resonance modes. For equal proportions of hole area to plate area, a triangular layout of etch holes reduces squeeze film damping as compared to the conventional square layout. The effect is modeled analytically, and is verified experimentally by characterization experiments on the new transducers. Structurally, the transducers are plates with spring supports; a rigid plate would be the most sensitive transducer, and bending decreases the sensitivity. In this chip, the structure was designed for an order-of-magnitude separation between the first

  5. Structural tests using a MEMS acoustic emission sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Irving J.; Greve, David W.; Ozevin, Didem; Hay, D. Robert; Hay, Thomas R.; Pessiki, Stephen P.; Tyson, Nathan L.

    2006-03-01

    In a collaborative project at Lehigh and Carnegie Mellon, a MEMS acoustic emission sensor was designed and fabricated as a suite of six resonant-type capacitive transducers in the frequency range between 100 and 500 kHz. Characterization studies showed good comparisons between predicted and experimental electro-mechanical behavior. Acoustic emission events, simulated experimentally in steel ball impact and in pencil lead break tests, were detected and source localization was demonstrated. In this paper we describe the application of the MEMS device in structural testing, both in laboratory and in field applications. We discuss our findings regarding housing and mounting (acoustic coupling) of the MEMS device with its supporting electronics, and we then report the results of structural testing. In all tests, the MEMS transducers were used in parallel with commercial acoustic emission sensors, which thereby serve as a benchmark and permit a direct observation of MEMS device functionality. All tests involved steel structures, with particular interest in propagation of existing cracks or flaws. A series of four laboratory tests were performed on beam specimens fabricated from two segments (Grade 50 steel) with a full penetration weld (E70T-4 electrode material) at midspan. That weld region was notched, an initial fatigue crack was induced, and the specimens were then instrumented with one commercial transducer and with one MEMS device; data was recorded from five individual transducers on the MEMS device. Under a four-point bending test, the beam displayed both inelastic behavior and crack propagation, including load drops associated with crack instability. The MEMS transducers detected all instability events as well as many or most of the acoustic emissions occurring during plasticity and stable crack growth. The MEMS transducers were less sensitive than the commercial transducer, and did not detect as many events, but the normalized cumulative burst count obtained

  6. Fatigue crack monitoring with coupled piezoelectric film acoustic emission sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changjiang

    Fatigue-induced cracking is a commonly seen problem in civil infrastructures reaching their original design life. A number of high-profile accidents have been reported in the past that involved fatigue damage in structures. Such incidences often happen without prior warnings due to lack of proper crack monitoring technique. In order to detect and monitor the fatigue crack, acoustic emission (AE) technique, has been receiving growing interests recently. AE can provide continuous and real-time monitoring data on damage progression in structures. Piezoelectric film AE sensor measures stress-wave induced strain in ultrasonic frequency range and its feasibility for AE signal monitoring has been demonstrated recently. However, extensive work in AE monitoring system development based on piezoelectric film AE sensor and sensor characterization on full-scale structures with fatigue cracks, have not been done. A lack of theoretical formulations for understanding the AE signals also hinders the use of piezoelectric film AE sensors. Additionally, crack detection and source localization with AE signals is a very important area yet to be explored for this new type of AE sensor. This dissertation presents the results of both analytical and experimental study on the signal characteristics of surface stress-wave induced AE strain signals measured by piezoelectric film AE sensors in near-field and an AE source localization method based on sensor couple theory. Based on moment tensor theory, generalized expression for AE strain signal is formulated. A special case involving the response of piezoelectric film AE sensor to surface load is also studied, which could potentially be used for sensor calibration of this type of sensor. A new concept of sensor couple theory based AE source localization technique is proposed and validated with both simulated and experimental data from fatigue test and field monitoring. Two series of fatigue tests were conducted to perform fatigue crack

  7. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios. G. Aggelis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the acoustic emission (AE activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis. The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure.

  8. Embedded and conventional ultrasonic sensors for monitoring acoustic emission during thermal fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is widely used for monitoring pressure vessels, pipes, critical infrastructure, as well as land, sea and air vehicles. It is one of dominant approaches to explore material degradation under fatigue and events leading to material fracture. Addressing a recent interest in structural health monitoring of space vehicles, a need has emerged to evaluate material deterioration due to thermal fatigue during spacecraft atmospheric reentry. Thermal fatigue experiments were conducted, in which aluminum plates were subjected to localized heating and acoustic emission was monitoring by embedded and conventional acoustic emission sensors positioned at various distances from a heat source. At the same time, surface temperature of aluminum plates was monitored using an IR camera. Acoustic emission counts collected by embedded sensors were compared to counts measured with conventional acoustic emission sensors. Both types of sensors show noticeable increase of acoustic emission activity as localized heating source was applied to aluminum plates. Experimental data demonstrate correlation between temperature increase on the surface of the plates and increase in measured acoustic emission activity. It is concluded that under particular conditions, embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors can be used for acoustic emission monitoring of thermally-induced structural degradation.

  9. A New Acoustic Emission Sensor Based Gear Fault Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce wind energy costs, prognostics and health management (PHM of wind turbine is needed to ensure the reliability and availability of wind turbines. A gearbox is an important component of a wind turbine. Therefore, developing effective gearbox fault detection tools is important to the PHM of wind turbine. In this paper, a new acoustic emission (AE sensor based gear fault detection approach is presented. This approach combines a heterodyne based frequency reduction technique with time synchronous average (TSA and spectrum kurtosis (SK to process AE sensor signals and extract features as condition indictors for gear fault detection. Heterodyne technique commonly used in communication is first employed to preprocess the AE signals before sampling. By heterodyning, the AE signal frequency is down shifted from several hundred kHz to below 50 kHz. This reduced AE signal sampling rate is comparable to that of vibration signals. The presented approach is validated using seeded gear tooth crack fault tests on a notational split torque gearbox. The approach presented in this paper is physics based and the validation results have showed that it could effectively detect the gear faults.

  10. Thick-film acoustic emission sensors for use in structurally integrated condition-monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, Andrew J; Dorey, Robert A; Mba, David

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring the condition of complex engineering structures is an important aspect of modern engineering, eliminating unnecessary work and enabling planned maintenance, preventing failure. Acoustic emissions (AE) testing is one method of implementing continuous nondestructive structural health monitoring. A novel thick-film (17.6 μm) AE sensor is presented. Lead zirconate titanate thick films were fabricated using a powder/sol composite ink deposition technique and mechanically patterned to form a discrete thick-film piezoelectric AE sensor. The thick-film sensor was benchmarked against a commercial AE device and was found to exhibit comparable responses to simulated acoustic emissions.

  11. Acoustic Emission Behavior of Early Age Concrete Monitored by Embedded Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Qin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE is capable of monitoring the cracking activities inside materials. In this study, embedded sensors were employed to monitor the AE behavior of early age concrete. Type 1–3 cement-based piezoelectric composites, which had lower mechanical quality factor and acoustic impedance, were fabricated and used to make sensors. Sensors made of the composites illustrated broadband frequency response. In a laboratory, the cracking of early age concrete was monitored to recognize different hydration stages. The sensors were also embedded in a mass concrete foundation to localize the temperature gradient cracks.

  12. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  13. A Novel Acoustic Emission Fiber Optic Sensor Based on a Single Mode Optical Fiber Coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rongsheng; LIAO Yanbiao; ZHENG Gangtie; LIU Tongyu; Gerard Franklyn Fernando

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, on the use of a fused-taper single mode optical fiber coupler as a sensing element for the detection of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound. When an acoustic wave impinges on the mode-coupling region of a coupler, the coupling coefficient is modulated via the photo-elastic effect. Therefore, the transfer function of the coupler is modulated by an acoustic wave. The sensitivity of the sensor at 140 kHz was approximately 5.2 mV/Pa and the noise floor was 1 Pa. The bandwidth of the sensor was up to several hundred kHz. This AE sensor exhibits significant advantage compared with interferometer-based AE sensors.

  14. Remote structural health monitoring with serially multiplexed fiber optic acoustic emission sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Development and testing of a serially multiplexed fiber optic sensor system is described. The sensor differs from conventional fiber optic acoustic systems, as it is capable of sensing AE emissions at several points along the length of a single fiber. Multiplexing provides for single channel detection of cracks and their locations in large structural systems. An algorithm was developed for signal recognition and tagging of the AE waveforms for detection of crack locations. Laboratory experiments on plain concrete beams and post-tensioned FRP tendons were performed to evaluate the crack detection capability of the sensor system. The acoustic emission sensor was able to detect initiation, growth and location of the cracks in concrete as well as in the FRP tendons. The AE system is potentially suitable for applications involving health monitoring of structures following an earthquake.

  15. Acoustic emission localization in plates with dispersion and reverberations using sparse PZT sensors in passive mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelli, Alessandro; De Marchi, Luca; Marzani, Alessandro; Speciale, Nicolò

    2012-02-01

    A strategy for the localization of acoustic emissions (AE) in plates with dispersion and reverberation is proposed. The procedure exploits signals received in passive mode by sparse conventional piezoelectric transducers and a three-step processing framework. The first step consists in a signal dispersion compensation procedure, which is achieved by means of the warped frequency transform. The second step concerns the estimation of the differences in arrival time (TDOA) of the acoustic emission at the sensors. Complexities related to reflections and plate resonances are overcome via a wavelet decomposition of cross-correlating signals where the mother function is designed by a synthetic warped cross-signal. The magnitude of the wavelet coefficients in the warped distance-frequency domain, in fact, precisely reveals the TDOA of an acoustic emission at two sensors. Finally, in the last step the TDOA data are exploited to locate the acoustic emission source through hyperbolic positioning. The proposed procedure is tested with a passive network of three/four piezo-sensors located symmetrically and asymmetrically with respect to the plate edges. The experimentally estimated AE locations are close to those theoretically predicted by the Cramèr-Rao lower bound.

  16. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongzhi Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  17. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongzhi; Pang, Fufei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cheng, Jiajing; Lv, Longbao; Zhang, Xiaobei; Chen, Na; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-11-30

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD) of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa ) . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  18. Simple discrimination method between False Acoustic Emission and Acoustic Emission revealed by piezoelectric sensors, in Gran Sasso mountain measurements (L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodati, Paolo; Piazza, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    Recently it was shown, studying data acquired with in-situ measurements on the Gran Sasso mountain (Italy), for about ten years, by means of a high sensitivity transducer coupled to the free-end section of a stainless steel rod fixed by cement in a rock-drill hole 10 m high, about 2500 m above sea level, that Acoustic Emission (AE) can be affected by more than 90% False Acoustic Emission (FAE) of an electromagnetic origin. A very simple method to solve the problem of the discrimination between AE events due to elastic waves, from FAE signals, due to electromagnetic noise, both coming from the same ``reception-point,'' is presented. The reliability of the obtained separation is confirmed also by the reported amplitude and time distribution of AE events, typical of fracture dynamics and those of FAE events, similar to those of noise.

  19. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhard Michael Reindl; Bernd Henning; Jens Rautenberg; Gerhard Lindner; Sergei Olfert; Martin Schmitt

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide ...

  20. Continuous and recurrent testing of acoustic emission sensors; Kontinuierliche und wiederkehrende Pruefung von Schallemissionssensoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sause, Markus G.R.; Schmitt, Stefan; Potstada, Philipp [Augsburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Materials Resource Management, Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    In many fields of application of acoustic emission, the testing can lead to a lasting change in the sensor characteristics. This can be caused by mechanical damage, thermal stress or use under aggressive environmental conditions. Irrespective of visually testable damages of the sensors, a shift in the spectral sensitivity, a reduction in the absolute sensitivity or a reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio can occur. During the test, this requires a possibility to periodically check the sensors, including the coupling aids used. For recurring testing, recommendations are given in Directive SE 02 ''Verification of acoustic emission sensors and their coupling in the laboratory''. This paper discusses possibilities for continuous monitoring of the sensors during the test and presents an application example for the partly automated recurring testing of acoustic emission sensors using Directive SE 02. For this purpose, a test stand for the supply of the sensors to be tested was constructed and the signal recording and data reduction implemented in freely available software programs. The operating principle is demonstrated using selected case studies. [German] In vielen Anwendungsbereichen der Schallemission kann es bei der Pruefung zu einer nachhaltigen Veraenderung der Sensorcharakteristik kommen. Dies kann durch mechanische Beschaedigung, thermische Belastung oder Verwendung unter aggressiven Umweltbedingungen geschehen. Unabhaengig von visuell pruefbaren Beschaedigungen der Sensoren kann es dabei zu einer Verschiebung der spektralen Empfindlichkeit, einer Verringerung der absoluten Empfindlichkeit oder einer Erniedrigung des Signal-Rausch Verhaeltnis kommen. Bei der Pruefung erfordert dies eine Moeglichkeit zur periodischen Ueberpruefung der Sensoren inklusive der verwendeten Koppelhilfsmittel. Fuer die wiederkehrende Pruefung finden sich entsprechende Handlungsempfehlungen in der Richtlinie SE 02 ''Verifizierung von

  1. Deciphering acoustic emission signals in drought stressed branches: the missing link between source and sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidewei L Vergeynst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When drought occurs in plants, acoustic emission signals can be detected, but the actual causes of these signals are still unknown. By analyzing the waveforms of the measured signals, it should however be possible to trace the characteristics of the acoustic emission source and get information about the underlying physiological processes. A problem encountered during this analysis is that the waveform changes significantly from source to sensor and lack of knowledge on wave propagation impedes research progress made in this field. We used finite element modeling and the well-known pencil lead break source to investigate wave propagation in a branch. A cylindrical rod of polyvinyl chloride was first used to identify the theoretical propagation modes. Two wave propagation modes could be distinguished and we used the finite element model to interpret their behavior in terms of source position for both the PVC rod and a wooden rod. Both wave propagation modes were also identified in drying-induced signals from woody branches, and we used the obtained insights to provide recommendations for further acoustic emission research in plant science.

  2. Combined optical fiber interferometric sensors for the detection of acoustic emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-jun; MU Lin-lin; LIU Jun-feng; YU Xiao-tao

    2008-01-01

    A type of combined optical fiber interferometric acoustic emission sensor is proposed.The sensor can be independent on the laser source and make light interference by matching the lengths of two arms,so it can be used to monitor the health of large structure.Theoretical analyses indicate that the system can be equivalent to the Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors,and its sensitivity has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy.PZT is powered by DC regulator to control the operating point of the system,so the system can accurately detect feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating on the surface of solid.The amplitude and the frequency of feeble vibration signal are obtained by detecting the output light intensity of intefferometer and using Fourier transform technique.The results indicate that the system can be used to detect the acoustic emission signals by the frequency characteristics.

  3. Visualization of stress wave propagation via air-coupled acoustic emission sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua C.; Lee, Gil-Yong; Yang, Jinkyu; Kim, Youngkey; Kim, Sungchan

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing stress waves propagating in plates using air-coupled acoustic emission sensors. Specifically, we employ a device that embeds arrays of microphones around an optical lens in a helical pattern. By implementing a beamforming technique, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot and full-field measurement. This is a significant improvement over the conventional wave propagation tracking approaches based on laser doppler vibrometry or digital image correlation techniques. In this paper, we focus on demonstrating the feasibility and efficacy of this air-coupled acoustic emission technique by using large metallic plates exposed to external impacts. The visualization results of stress wave propagation will be shown under various impact scenarios. The proposed technique can be used to characterize and localize damage by detecting the attenuation, reflection, and scattering of stress waves that occurs at damage locations. This can ultimately lead to the development of new structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation methods for identifying hidden cracks or delaminations in metallic or composite plate structures, simultaneously negating the need for mounted contact sensors.

  4. Evaluation of PTCa/PEKK composite sensors for acoustic emission detection

    CERN Document Server

    Marin-Franch, P

    2002-01-01

    This thesis reports for the first time the fabrication and characterisation of novel electroactive ceramic/polymer composite films of calcium modified lead titanate (PTCa) and poly (ether ketone ketone). Composite sensors with different concentrations of ceramic were fabricated using a hot pressing technique. The PTCa ceramic was treated using titanate coupling agent in order to improve sample quality. Dielectric measurements have been performed to study sample characteristics. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of the composites have been measured and the mixed connectivity cube model used to determine the relative amounts of 0-3 and 1-3 connectivity. The advantages and limitations of the model have been discussed. Additionally, some mechanical properties of the composites have been assessed to study their potential ability to detect acoustic emission (AE) in carbon fibre reinforced composites (CFRC). The composite sensors were placed on and inserted into different panels in order to compare their abi...

  5. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  6. Fiber-optic sensor-based remote acoustic emission measurement of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Wu, Qi; Shigeta, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection functioning at high temperatures could clarify the damage process in high heat-resistant composites. To achieve the high-temperature AE detection, a remote AE measurement based on a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) sensor with a high sensitivity over a broad bandwidth was proposed. The common optical fibers were made from glass with good heat resistance. Hence, in this method, optical fiber was used as the waveguide to propagate the AE in the composite from a high-temperature environment to the room-temperature environment wherein the PS-FBG was located. Owing to the special AE detection configuration, this method was a new adhesive method for remote measurement (ADRM). The experiment and numerical simulation revealed that the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration demonstrated accurate remote sensing for the AE signals. This was because of the good waveguide system provided by the thin optical fiber and the sensitivity of the PS-FBG sensor to the axial strain in the core of the fiber. Consequently, the remote measurement utilizing the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration has a high potential for AE detection in high-temperature conditions.

  7. Studies of Elastic Waves in Ethylene Propylene Rubber Using Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Masanori; Sakoda, Tatsuya; Otsubo, Masahisa; Akaiwa, Shigeru; Iki, Masatoshi; Nakano, Shigeharu

    The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between lowering of the insulation performance of cross-linked polyethylene (CV) cable and partial discharges (PDs) followed by the dielectric breakdown and to establish a diagnostic technique using an acoustic emission (AE) sensor. In this study, we focused on characterization of AE signals detected from ethylene propylene rubbers (EPRs) used as insulating materials of CV cables. Elastic waves with various frequencies were added to the surface of the EPR, and then characteristics of the detected AE signals due to the elastic waves propagated in the EPR were evaluated. We showed characteristics of Lamb waves whose low frequency components around 100 kHz were large and their small attenuation characteristics.

  8. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  9. A probabilistic framework for single-sensor acoustic emission source localization in thin metallic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    Tracking edge-reflected acoustic emission (AE) waves can allow the localization of their sources. Specifically, in bounded isotropic plate structures, only one sensor may be used to perform these source localizations. The primary goal of this paper is to develop a three-step probabilistic framework to quantify the uncertainties associated with such single-sensor localizations. According to this framework, a probabilistic approach is first used to estimate the direct distances between AE sources and the sensor. Then, an analytical model is used to reconstruct the envelope of edge-reflected AE signals based on the source-to-sensor distance estimations and their first arrivals. Finally, the correlation between the probabilistically reconstructed envelopes and recorded AE signals are used to estimate confidence contours for the location of AE sources. To validate the proposed framework, Hsu-Nielsen pencil lead break (PLB) tests were performed on the surface as well as the edges of an aluminum plate. The localization results show that the estimated confidence contours surround the actual source locations. In addition, the performance of the framework was tested in a noisy environment simulated by two dummy transducers and an arbitrary wave generator. The results show that in low-noise environments, the shape and size of the confidence contours depend on the sources and their locations. However, at highly noisy environments, the size of the confidence contours monotonically increases with the noise floor. Such probabilistic results suggest that the proposed probabilistic framework could thus provide more comprehensive information regarding the location of AE sources.

  10. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhard Michael Reindl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  11. Multi reflection of Lamb wave emission in an acoustic waveguide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-02-27

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid-liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  12. ACOUSTIC EMISSION ANALYZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Almeida-Pérez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper appears a solution for acoustic emission analysis commonly known as noise. For the accomplishmentof this work a personal computer is used, besides sensors (microphones and boards designed and built for signalconditioning. These components are part of a virtual instrument used for monitoring the acoustical emission. Themain goal of this work is to develop a virtual instrument that supplies many important data as the result of ananalysis allowing to have information in an easy and friendly way. Moreover this information is very useful forstudying and resolving several situations in planning, production and testing areas.The main characteristics of the virtual instrument are: signal analysis in time, effective power measurement inDecibels (dB, average intensity taken from the principle of paired microphones, as well as the data analysis infrequency. These characteristics are included to handle two information channels.

  13. Gearbox tooth cut fault diagnostics using acoustic emission and vibration sensors--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongzhi; He, David; Yoon, Jae; Van Hecke, Brandon; Bechhoefer, Eric; Zhu, Junda

    2014-01-14

    In recent years, acoustic emission (AE) sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  14. Gearbox Tooth Cut Fault Diagnostics Using Acoustic Emission and Vibration Sensors — A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhi Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, acoustic emission (AE sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  15. Fabrication of a high performance acoustic emission (AE) sensor to monitor and diagnose disturbances in HTS tapes and magnet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hyung; Song, Jung-Bin; Jeong, Young Hun; Lee, Young-Jin; Paik, Jong-Hoo; Kim, Woo-Seok; Lee, Haigun

    2010-02-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced as a non-destructive method to monitor sudden deformation caused by local heat concentrations and micro-cracks within superconductors and superconducting magnets. However, the detection of AE signals in a high temperature superconductor (HTS) tape is not easy because of its low signal to noise ratio caused by the noise from boiling liquid cryogen or mechanical vibration from the cryo-cooler. Therefore, high performance piezoelectric ceramics are needed to improve the sensitivity of the AE sensor. The aim of this study was to improve the piezoelectric and dielectric properties to enhance the performance of an AE sensor. This study examined the effects of Nb2O5 addition (0.0 wt.% to 2.0 wt.%) on the properties of high performance piezoelectric ceramics, Pb(Zr0.54 Ti0.46)O3 + 0.2 wt.% Cr2O3, sintered at 1200 °C for 2 h. The performance was examined with respect to the acoustic emission response of AE sensors manufactured using the specimens with various Nb2O5 contents. Superior sensor performance was obtained for the AE sensors fabricated with the specimens containing 1.0 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% Nb2O5. The performance and characteristics of the AE sensors were in accordance with their piezoelectric and dielectric properties.

  16. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  17. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Hančič

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals’ peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process.

  18. Feasibility study of using smart aggregates as embedded acoustic emission sensors for health monitoring of concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijie; Kong, Qingzhao; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Lim, Ing; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a nondestructive evaluation technique that is capable of monitoring the damage evolution of concrete structures in real time. Conventionally, AE sensors are surface mounted on the host structures, however, the AE signals attenuate quickly due to the high attenuation properties of concrete structures. This study conducts a feasibility study of using smart aggregates (SAs), which are a type of embedded piezoceramic transducers, as embedded AE sensors for the health monitoring of concrete structures. A plain concrete beam with two surface mounted AE sensors and two embedded SAs was fabricated in laboratory and loaded under a designed three-point-bending test. The performance of embedded SAs were compared with the traditional surface mounted AE sensors in their ability to detect and evaluate the damage to the concrete structure. The results verified the feasibility of using smart aggregates as embedded AE sensors for monitoring structural damage in concrete. Potentially, the low cost smart aggregates could function as embedded AE sensors, providing great sensitivity and high reliability in applications for the structural health monitoring of concrete structures.

  19. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.

  20. Monitoring and failure analysis of corroded bridge cables under fatigue loading using acoustic emission sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.

  1. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  2. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  3. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eber Huanca Cayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  4. Sensoring fusion data from the optic and acoustic emissions of electric arcs in the GMAW-S process for welding quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  5. An effective sensor for tool wear monitoring in face milling: Acoustic emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M T Mathew; P Srinivasa Pai; L A Rocha

    2008-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring manufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the machining process is very important since tool condition will affect the part size, quality and an unexpected tool failure may damage the tool, work-piece and sometimes the machine tool itself. AE can be effectively used for tool condition monitoring applications because the emissions from process changes like tool wear, chip formation i.e. plastic deformation, etc. can be directly related to the mechanics of the process. Also AE can very effectively respond to changes like tool fracture, tool chipping, etc. when compared to cutting force and since the frequency range is much higher than that of machine vibrations and environmental noises, a relatively uncontaminated signal can be obtained. AE signal analysis was applied for sensing tool wear in face milling operations. Cutting tests were carried out on a vertical milling machine. Tests were carried out for a given cutting condition, using single insert, two inserts (adjacent and opposite) and three inserts in the cutter. AE signal parameters like ring down count and rms voltage were measured and were correlated with flank wear values (VB max). The results of this investigation indicate that AE can be effectively used for monitoring tool wear in face milling operations.

  6. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  7. A new strategy toward Internet of Things: structural health monitoring using a combined fiber optic and acoustic emission wireless sensor platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. D.; Page, C.; Wilson, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates a new low-power structural health monitoring (SHM) strategy where fiber Bragg grating (FBG) rosettes can be used to continuously monitor for changes in a host structure's principal strain direction, suggesting damage and thus enabling the immediate triggering of a higher power acoustic emissions (AE) sensor to provide for better characterization of the damage. Unlike traditional "always on" AE platforms, this strategy has the potential for low power, while the wireless communication between different sensor types supports the Internet of Things (IoT) approach. A combination of fiber-optic sensor rosettes for strain monitoring and a fiber-optic sensor for acoustic emissions monitoring was attached to a sample and used to monitor crack initiation. The results suggest that passive principal strain direction monitoring could be used as a damage initiation trigger for other active sensing elements such as acoustic emissions. In future work, additional AE sensors can be added to provide for damage location; and a strategy where these sensors can be powered on periodically to further establish reliability while preserving an energy efficient scheme can be incorporated.

  8. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...

  9. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  10. A new sparse design method on phased array-based acoustic emission sensor for partial discharge detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Cheng, Shuyi; Lü, Fangcheng; Li, Yanqing

    2014-03-01

    The acoustic detecting performance of a partial discharge (PD) ultrasonic sensor array can be improved by increasing the number of array elements. However, it will increase the complexity and cost of the PD detection system. Therefore, a sparse sensor with an optimization design can be chosen to ensure good acoustic performance. In this paper, first, a quantitative method is proposed for evaluating the acoustic performance of a square PD ultrasonic array sensor. Second, a method of sparse design is presented to combine the evaluation method with the chaotic monkey algorithm. Third, an optimal sparse structure of a 3 × 3 square PD ultrasonic array sensor is deduced. It is found that, under different sparseness and sparse structure, the main beam width of the directivity function shows a small variation, while the sidelobe amplitude shows a bigger variation. For a specific sparseness, the acoustic performance under the optimal sparse structure is close to that using a full array. Finally, some simulations based on the above method show that, for certain sparseness, the sensor with the optimal sparse structure exhibits superior positioning accuracy compared to that with a stochastic one. The sensor array structure may be chosen according to the actual requirements for an actual engineering application.

  11. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  12. Acoustic/Magnetic Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, J. S.; Namkung, M.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution sensor fast, portable, does not require permanent bonding to structure. Sensor measures nondestructively type (compressive or tensile) and magnitude of stresses and stress gradients present in class of materials. Includes precise high-resolution acoustic interferometer, sending acoustic transducer, receiving acoustic transducer, electromagnet coil and core, power supply, and magnetic-field-measuring device such as Hall probe. This measurement especially important for construction and applications where steel is widely used. Sensor useful especially for nondestructive evaluation of stress in steel members because of portability, rapid testing, and nonpermanent installation.

  13. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...... reveals presence of a true emission from all ears tested. It is concluded that the cochlear echo can be recorded in normal-hearing newborns with an extremely low rate of type I errors.......Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...... a minor effect on the power spectra, i.e. the maximum jumps from one spectral peak to another. Experiments with deconvolution demonstrate that the emission generating system at least at a fixed intensity can be regarded as being linear and characterized by its impulse response which is similar...

  14. Localization of CO2 Leakage from a Circular Hole on a Flat-Surface Structure Using a Circular Acoustic Emission Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwang Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leak localization is essential for the safety and maintenance of storage vessels. This study proposes a novel circular acoustic emission sensor array to realize the continuous CO2 leak localization from a circular hole on the surface of a large storage vessel in a carbon capture and storage system. Advantages of the proposed array are analyzed and compared with the common sparse arrays. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale stainless steel plate and leak signals were obtained from a circular hole in the center of this flat-surface structure. In order to reduce the influence of the ambient noise and dispersion of the acoustic wave on the localization accuracy, ensemble empirical mode decomposition is deployed to extract the useful leak signal. The time differences between the signals from the adjacent sensors in the array are calculated through correlation signal processing before estimating the corresponding distance differences between the sensors. A hyperbolic positioning algorithm is used to identify the location of the circular leak hole. Results show that the circular sensor array has very good directivity toward the circular leak hole. Furthermore, an optimized method is proposed by changing the position of the circular sensor array on the flat-surface structure or adding another circular sensor array to identify the direction of the circular leak hole. Experiential results obtained on a 100 cm × 100 cm stainless steel plate demonstrate that the full-scale error in the leak localization is within 0.6%.

  15. Cooperative implementation of a high temperature acoustic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, S. E.; Nowakowski, Edward; Smith, Herbert G.; Friebele, E. J.; Putnam, Martin A.; Rogowski, Robert; Melvin, Leland D.; Claus, Richard O.; Tran, Tuan; Holben, Milford S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The current status and results of a cooperative program aimed at the implementation of a high-temperature acoustic/strain sensor onto metallic structures are reported. The sensor systems that are to be implemented under this program will measure thermal expansion, maneuver loads, aircraft buffet, sonic fatigue, and acoustic emissions in environments that approach 1800 F. The discussion covers fiber development, fabrication of an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer acoustic sensor, sensor mounting/integration, and results of an evaluation of the sensor capabilities.

  16. Study of Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. An introduction to acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruby, C. B.

    1987-08-01

    The technique of acoustic emission (AE) uses one or more sensors to 'listen' to a wide range of events that may take place inside a solid material. Depending on the source of this high frequency sound, there are broadly three application areas: structural testing and surveillance, process monitoring and control, and materials characterization. In the first case the source is probably a defect which radiates elastic waves as it grows. Provided these waves are detectable, AE can be used in conjunction with other NDT techniques to assess structural integrity. Advances in deterministic and statistical analysis methods now enable data to be interpreted in greater detail and with more confidence than before. In the second area the acoustic signature of processes is monitored, ranging from for instance the machining of metallic components to the mixing of foodstuffs, and changes correlated with variations in the process, with the potential for feedback and process control. In the third area, AE is used as an additional diagnostic technique for the study of, for instance, fracture, because it gives unique dynamic information on defect growth.

  18. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  19. In-flight fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense) system for the real time detection, localization, and classification of damage in composite aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic emission sensing is a leading structural health monitoring technique use for the early warning detection of structural damage associated with impacts, cracks, fracture, and delaminations in advanced materials. Current AE systems based on electronic PZT transducers suffer from various limitations that prevent its wide dynamic use in practical avionics and aerospace applications where weight, size and power are critical for operation. This paper describes progress towards the development of a wireless in-flight distributed fiber optic acoustic emission monitoring system (FAESense™) suitable for the onboard-unattended detection, localization, and classification of damage in avionics and aerospace structures. Fiber optic AE sensors offer significant advantages over its counterpart electronic AE sensors by using a high-density array of micron-size AE transducers distributed and multiplex over long lengths of a standard single mode optical fiber. Immediate SHM applications are found in commercial and military aircraft, helicopters, spacecraft, wind mil turbine blades, and in next generation weapon systems, as well as in the petrochemical and aerospace industries, civil structures, power utilities, and a wide spectrum of other applications.

  20. Potential of acoustic emissions from three point bending tests as rock failure precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Agioutantis Z.; Kaklis K.; Mavrigiannakis S.; Verigakis M.; Vallianatos F.; Saltas V.

    2016-01-01

    Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. This paper presents results from acoustic emission mea-surements obtained during three point bending tests on Nestos marble under laboratory conditions. Acoustic emission activity was monitored using piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors, and the potential for accurate prediction of rock damage based on acoustic emission data was investigated. Damage local-ization was determined based on acoustic emissions generated from the critically stressed region as scat-tered events at stresses below and close to the strength of the material.

  1. High-sensitivity fiber optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Liu, Deming; Liao, Hao

    2016-11-01

    Due to the overwhelming advantages compared with traditional electronicsensors, fiber-optic acoustic sensors have arisen enormous interest in multiple disciplines. In this paper we present the recent research achievements of our group on fiber-optic acoustic sensors. The main point of our research is high sensitivity interferometric acoustic sensors, including Michelson, Sagnac, and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In addition, some advanced technologies have been proposed for acoustic or acoustic pressure sensing such as single-mode/multimode fiber coupler, dual FBGs and multi-longitudinal mode fiber laser based acoustic sensors. Moreover, our attention we have also been paid on signal demodulation schemes. The intensity-based quadrature point (Q-point) demodulation, two-wavelength quadrature demodulation and symmetric 3×3 coupler methodare discussed and compared in this paper.

  2. Acoustic Emission Measurement with Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structure Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Walker, James L.; Russell, Sam; Roth, Don; Mabry, Nehemiah; Wilson, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Structural Health monitoring (SHM) is a way of detecting and assessing damage to large scale structures. Sensors used in SHM for aerospace structures provide real time data on new and propagating damage. One type of sensor that is typically used is an acoustic emission (AE) sensor that detects the acoustic emissions given off from a material cracking or breaking. The use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to provide acoustic emission data for damage detection is studied. In this research, FBG sensors are used to detect acoustic emissions of a material during a tensile test. FBG sensors were placed as a strain sensor (oriented parallel to applied force) and as an AE sensor (oriented perpendicular to applied force). A traditional AE transducer was used to collect AE data to compare with the FBG data. Preliminary results show that AE with FBGs can be a viable alternative to traditional AE sensors.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  4. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  5. Identification of Damage Types in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Laminates by a Novel Optical Fiber Acoustic Emission Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fengming; Wu, Qi; Okabe, Yoji; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Saito, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this research, phase-shifted FBG (PS-FBG) sensor was employed to practical AE detection for carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminate. Firstly, we evaluated the characteristics of AE signals detected by this kind of sensor. Secondly, through the experiment and simulation concerning AE source orientation, quantitative information about the standard for discriminating the AE signals due to transverse cracks and delaminations was obtained. Finally, acco...

  6. Acoustic emission methodology and application

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarchuk, Zinoviy; Serhiyenko, Oleh

    2017-01-01

    This monograph analyses in detail the physical aspects of the elastic waves radiation during deformation or fracture of materials. I presents the  methodological bases for the practical use of acoustic emission device, and describes the results of theoretical and experimental researches of evaluation of the crack growth resistance of materials, selection of the useful AE signals. The efficiency of this methodology is shown through the diagnostics of various-purpose industrial objects. The authors obtain results of experimental researches with the help of the new methods and facilities.

  7. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  8. Wearable knee health rehabilitation assessment using acoustical emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Caitlin N.; Hersek, Sinan; Conant, Jordan L.; Gilliland, Scott M.; Inan, Omer T.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a novel, wearable sensing system based on miniature piezoelectric contact microphones for measuring the acoustical emissions from the knee during movement. The system consists of two contact microphones, positioned on the medial and lateral sides of the patella, connected to custom, analog pre-amplifier circuits and a microcontroller for digitization and data storage on a secure digital card. Tn addition to the acoustical sensing, the system includes two integrated inertial measurement sensors including accelerometer and gyroscope modalities to enable joint angle calculations; these sensors, with digital outputs, are connected directly to the same microcontroller. The system provides low noise, accurate joint acoustical emission and angle measurements in a wearable form factor and has several hours of battery life.

  9. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015 (WCAE-2015) in Hawaii. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  10. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the 2013 World Conference on Acoustic Emission in Shanghai. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  11. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise...

  12. Acoustic Emission During Tensile Testing of Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Začal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with possibilities of acoustic emission method utilization as an online surveillance tool for improvement of identification of structural damage onset in composite materials. With employment of AE method we are able to localize the degraded areas in stressed components and subsequently estimate the extent of degradation. In experimental part the piezoelectric sensor was employed for continuous record of emission signals, continuous processing and analysis of measured data and monitoring of stressed material feedback on applied mechanical load in real time. Partial results from distinctive areas of conducted research were implemented in this method, especially detection of emission signals and analysis of recorded signals in both frequency and temporal zones. Samples were reinforcement of 6 layers aramide-carbon weave 0/90° of specific mass 180 g/m2. In total 7 samples were tested in monoaxial tension on universal testing apparatus ZDM 5/51 with acoustic emission measurement recording in course of testing.

  13. Acoustic Emission of Deformation Twinning in Magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyang Mo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Acoustic Emission of deformation twinning in Magnesium is investigated in this article. Single crystal testing with combined full field deformation measurements, as well as polycrystalline testing inside the scanning electron microscope with simultaneous monitoring of texture evolution and twin nucleation were compared to testing at the laboratory scale with respect to recordings of Acoustic Emission activity. Single crystal testing revealed the formation of layered twin boundaries in areas of strain localization which was accompanied by distinct changes in the acoustic data. Testing inside the microscope directly showed twin nucleation, proliferation and growth as well as associated crystallographic reorientations. A post processing approach of the Acoustic Emission activity revealed the existence of a class of signals that appears in a strain range in which twinning is profuse, as validated by the in situ and ex situ microscopy observations. Features extracted from such activity were cross-correlated both with the available mechanical and microscopy data, as well as with the Acoustic Emission activity recorded at the laboratory scale for similarly prepared specimens. The overall approach demonstrates that the method of Acoustic Emission could provide real time volumetric information related to the activation of deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys, in spite of the complexity of the propagation phenomena, the possible activation of several deformation modes and the challenges posed by the sensing approach itself when applied in this type of materials evaluation approach.

  14. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Vibration Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Filipiak

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  16. A novel sensor for monitoring acoustic cavitation. Part II: Prototype performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Lee, Nigel D; Hodnett, Mark; Gélat, Pierre N

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes a series of experimental studies to evaluate the performance of newly developed sensors for monitoring broadband acoustic emissions generated by acoustic cavitation. The prototype sensors are fabricated in the form of hollow, open-ended cylinders, whose inner surface is made from a thin film of piezoelectric polymer acting as a passive acoustic receiver of bandwidth greater than 10 MHz. A 4-mm thick coating of special acoustical absorber forms the outer surface of the sensor. The layer functions as a shield to cavitation events occurring outside the hollow sensor body, allowing megahertz acoustic emissions emanating from within the liquid contained in the sensor to be monitored. Testing of the new sensor concept has been carried out within the cavitating field provided by a commercial ultrasonic cleaning vessel operating at 40 kHz whose power output is rated at 1 kW. It is demonstrated that the prototype cavitation sensors are able to record a systematic increase in the level of the high-frequency acoustic spectrum (> 1 MHz) as electrical power to the cleaning vessel is increased. Through careful control of the experimental conditions, reproducibility of the high frequency "energy" associated with the cavitation spectrum was found to be typically +25%.

  17. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks †

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu Wang; Hong-Ning Dai; Xuran Li; Hao Wang; Hong Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones ...

  18. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea-Manuela Zelenyak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing.

  19. Individually Identifiable Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors, Tags and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor); Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Tucker, Dana Y. G. (Inventor); Hines, Andrew T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A surface-launched acoustic wave sensor tag system for remotely sensing and/or providing identification information using sets of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor tag devices is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include coding and other diversity techniques to produce groups of sensors that interact minimally, reducing or alleviating code collision problems typical of prior art coded SAW sensors and tags, and specific device embodiments of said coded SAW sensor tags and systems. These sensor/tag devices operate in a system which consists of one or more uniquely identifiable sensor/tag devices and a wireless interrogator. The sensor device incorporates an antenna for receiving incident RF energy and re-radiating the tag identification information and the sensor measured parameter(s). Since there is no power source in or connected to the sensor, it is a passive sensor. The device is wirelessly interrogated by the interrogator.

  20. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  1. Surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) flow sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1991-03-01

    The use of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device to measure the rate of gas flow is described. A SAW oscillator heated to a suitable temperature above ambient is placed in the path of a flowing gas. Convective cooling caused by the gas flow results in a change in the oscillator frequency. A 73-MHz oscillator fabricated on 128 deg rotated Y-cut lithium niobate substrate and heated to 55 C above ambient shows a frequency variation greater than 142 kHz for flow-rate variation from 0 to 1000 cu cm/min. The output of the sensor can be calibrated to provide a measurement of volume flow rate, pressure differential across channel ports, or mass flow rate. High sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct digital output are among the attractive features of this sensor. Theoretical expressions for the sensitivity and response time of the sensor are derived. It is shown that by using ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating in thin membranes, a flow sensor with faster response than a SAW sensor can be realized.

  2. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  3. Acoustic Sensor Network for Relative Positioning of Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Villadangos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an acoustic sensor network for a relative localization system is analyzed by reporting the accuracy achieved in the position estimation. The proposed system has been designed for those applications where objects are not restricted to a particular environment and thus one cannot depend on any external infrastructure to compute their positions. The objects are capable of computing spatial relations among themselves using only acoustic emissions as a ranging mechanism. The object positions are computed by a multidimensional scaling (MDS technique and, afterwards, a least-square algorithm, based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA, is applied to refine results. Regarding the position estimation, all the parameters involved in the computation of the temporary relations with the proposed ranging mechanism have been considered. The obtained results show that a fine-grained localization can be achieved considering a Gaussian distribution error in the proposed ranging mechanism. Furthermore, since acoustic sensors require a line-of-sight to properly work, the system has been tested by modeling the lost of this line-of-sight as a non-Gaussian error. A suitable position estimation has been achieved even if it is considered a bias of up to 25 of the line-of-sight measurements among a set of nodes.

  4. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  5. Broadband Field Directionally Mapping using Maneuverable Acoustic Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Maneuverable Acoustic Sensor Arrays David Smith Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering Duke University, Box 90291 Durham, NC 27708 phone: (919) 660...splines) EM algorithm. Both algorithms were run using a simulated 30 element acoustic vector sensor array with 900 snapshots. Attention has also

  6. Adaptive Noise Reduction Techniques for Airborne Acoustic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    8 2.3.3 Low Cost Scout UAV Acoustics System ( LOSAS ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.3.4 Shot Spotter...detecting supersonic projectiles. 2.3.3 Low Cost Scout UAV Acoustics System ( LOSAS ) SARA, Inc. has developed an acoustic sensor package that is...www.armytimes.com/legacy/new/0-ARMYPAPER-620646.php [25] (2012) Sara, inc. [Online]. Available: http://www.sara.com/ISR/acoustic sensing/ LOSAS . html [26

  7. Correlation of acoustic emission with normal zone occurrence in epoxy-impregnated windings: An application of acoustic emission diagnostic technique to pulse superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, O.; Iwasa, Y.

    1984-05-01

    We report results of experiments correlating acoustic emission (AE) data to the presence of normal zones in epoxy-impregnated windings. The results suggest the feasibility of using AE sensors to determine whether or not a superconducting magnet has been driven normal after a rapid discharge. This AE diagnostic technique may be particularly valuable in application to pulse magnets.

  8. ACOUSTIC EMISSION MODEL WITH THERMOACTIVATIVE DESTRUCTION OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Filonenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of acoustic emission energy during the composite material machining for termoactivativemodel of acoustic radiation is simulated. The regularities of resultant signals energy parameters change dependingon composite materials machining speed are determined. Obtained regularities with their statistical characteristicsare described. Sensitivity of acoustic emission energy parameters to the change of composite material machiningspeed is shown.

  9. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenyuan (Oakdale, MN); Huizinga, John S. (Dellwood, MN)

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  10. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  11. Acoustic emission evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge beam with graphite composite laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dan E.; Shen, H. Warren; Finlayson, Richard D.

    2001-07-01

    A test was recently conducted on August 1, 2000 at the FHwA Non-Destructive Evaluation Validation Center, sponsored by The New York State DOT, to evaluate a graphite composite laminate as an effective form of retrofit for reinforced concrete bridge beam. One portion of this testing utilized Acoustic Emission Monitoring for Evaluation of the beam under test. Loading was applied to this beam using a two-point loading scheme at FHwA's facility. This load was applied in several incremental loadings until the failure of the graphite composite laminate took place. Each loading culminated by either visual crack location or large audible emissions from the beam. Between tests external cracks were located visually and highlighted and the graphite epoxy was checked for delamination. Acoustic Emission data was collected to locate cracking areas of the structure during the loading cycles. To collect this Acoustic Emission data, FHwA and NYSDOT utilized a Local Area Monitor, an Acoustic Emission instrument developed in a cooperative effort between FHwA and Physical Acoustics Corporation. Eight Acoustic Emission sensors were attached to the structure, with four on each side, in a symmetrical fashion. As testing progressed and culminated with beam failure, Acoustic Emission data was gathered and correlated against time and test load. This paper will discuss the analysis of this test data.

  12. Sensitive acoustic vibration sensor using single-mode fiber tapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Wang, Xiaozhen; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2011-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are a good alternative to piezoelectric devices in electromagnetic sensitive environments. In this study, we reported a fiber acoustic sensor based on single-mode fiber (SMF) tapers. The fiber taper is used as the sensing arm in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Benefiting from their micrometer dimensions, fiber tapers have shown higher sensitivities to the acoustic vibrations than SMFs. Under the same conditions, the thinnest fiber taper in this report, with a diameter of 1.7 µm, shows a 20 dB improvement in the signal to noise ratio as compared to that of an SMF. This acoustic vibration sensor can detect the acoustic waves over the frequencies of 30 Hz-40 kHz, which is limited by the acoustic wave generator in experiments. We also discussed the phase changes of fiber tapers with different diameters under acoustic vibrations.

  13. Improved fibre optic acoustic sensors for partial discharge in elastomeric insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwetter, Philipp; Lothongkam, Chaiyaporn; Habel, Wolfgang; Heidmann, Gerd; Pepper, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Partial discharge in elastomeric high voltage insulations is a major reason for device failure. The special challenges of the high voltage environment limit the use of conventional acoustic emission sensors. Fibre-optic sensors can cope with these challenges thanks to their optical sensing principle and the use of all-dielectric materials. In this contribution, improvements to a previously introduced design of ultrasonic fibre-optic acoustic partial discharge sensors for elastomeric insulations are presented. The improved performance of fibre-optic acoustic sensors in detecting AC partial discharge is demonstrated. Furthermore, their ability to detect low-level damage processes in elastomeric insulation under DC dielectric stress is shown to outperform the highly sensitive electrical detection method.

  14. Investigation of the nature of thermal stimulation of acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muravin, G.B.; Ship, V.V.; Lezvinskaya, L.M.

    1988-12-01

    The nature of thermal stimulation of acoustic emission was investigated. Data are given on the distribution of the density of the energy of deformation at a crack tip and the parameters of acoustic emission with different combinations of mechanical and thermal action. It was established that thermal stimulation of acoustic emission is related to advance and growth of a crack under the action of thermoelastic shear stresses. An increases in heating power causes an increase in the energy of deformation, shear stresses at the crack edges, and acoustic emission energy. The position of the minimum in the density of the energy of deformation and of the maximum in acoustic emission energy coincides with the direction of crack advance, which with the use of the method of thermally stimulated acoustic emission makes it possible to not only reveal crack-like defects but also to determine potentially dangerous directions of their development.

  15. Development of Acoustic Sensors for the ANTARES Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Naumann, C L; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Salomon, K; Naumann, Christopher Lindsay; Anton, Gisela; Graf, Kay; Hoessl, Juergen; Kappes, Alexander; Karg, Timo; Katz, Uli; Lahmann, Robert; Salomon, Karsten

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the possibility of acoustic detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in water, our group is planning to deploy and operate an array of acoustic sensors using the ANTARES Neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Therefore, acoustic sensor hardware has to be developed which is both capable of operation under the hostile conditions of the deep sea and at the same time provides the high sensitivity necessary to detect the weak pressure signals resulting from the neutrino's interaction in water. In this paper, two different approaches to building such sensors, as well as performance studies in the laboratory and in situ, are presented.

  16. Advanced flow noise reducing acoustic sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Kevin; Drzymkowski, Mark; Cleckler, Jay

    2009-05-01

    SARA, Inc. has developed microphone arrays that are as effective at reducing flow noise as foam windscreens and sufficiently rugged for tough battlefield environments. These flow noise reducing (FNR) sensors have a metal body and are flat and conformally mounted so they can be attached to the roofs of land vehicles and are resistant to scrapes from branches. Flow noise at low Mach numbers is created by turbulent eddies moving with the fluid flow and inducing pressure variations on microphones. Our FNR sensors average the pressure over the diameter (~20 cm) of their apertures, reducing the noise created by all but the very largest eddies. This is in contrast to the acoustic wave which has negligible variation over the aperture at the frequencies of interest (f less or equal than 400 Hz). We have also post-processed the signals to further reduce the flow noise. Two microphones separated along the flow direction exhibit highly correlated noise. The time shift of the correlation corresponds to the time for the eddies in the flow to travel between the microphones. We have created linear microphone arrays parallel to the flow and have reduced flow noise as much as 10 to 15 dB by subtracting time-shifted signals.

  17. Based on optical fiber Michelson interferometer for acoustic emission detection experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yijun; Qu, Dandan; Deng, Hu

    2013-08-01

    A type of Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors acoustic emission sensor is proposed in the article to detect the vibrations produced by ultrasonic waves propagating in a solid body. Two optical fiber loop reflectors are equivalent to the sensing arm and the reference arm instead of traditional Michelson interferometer end reflecter Theoretical analyses indicate that the sensitivity of the system has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy. The best operating point of optical fiber sensor is fixed by theoretical derivation and simulation of computer, and the signal frequency which is detected by the sensor is the frequency of input signal. PZT (Piezoelectric Ceramic) is powered by signal generator as known ultrasonic source, The Polarization controller is used to make the reflected light interference,The fiber length is changed by adjusting the DC voltage on the PZT with the fiber loop to make the sensor system response that ΔΦ is closed to π/2. the signal basis frequency detected by the sensor is the frequency of the input signal. Then impacts the surface of the marble slab with home-made mechanical acoustic emission source. And detect it. and then the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal is obtained by Fourier technique. The experimental results indicate that the system can identify the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal, and it can be also used to detect the surface feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating in material structure.

  18. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  19. An acoustic emission study of plastic deformation in polycrystalline aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Frederick, J. R.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission experiments were performed on polycrystalline and single crystal 99.99% aluminum while undergoing tensile deformation. It was found that acoustic emission counts as a function of grain size showed a maximum value at a particular grain size. Furthermore, the slip area associated with this particular grain size corresponded to the threshold level of detectability of single dislocation slip events. The rate of decline in acoustic emission activity as grain size is increased beyond the peak value suggests that grain boundary associated dislocation sources are giving rise to the bulk of the detected acoustic emissions.

  20. Acoustic Emissions (AE) Electrical Systems' Health Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acoustic Emissions (AE) are associated with physical events, such as thermal activity, dielectric breakdown, discharge inception, as well as crack nucleation and...

  1. Condition Monitoring and Management from Acoustic Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik Bohl

    2005-01-01

    In the following, I will use technical terms without explanation as it gives the freedom to describe the project in a shorter form for those who already know. The thesis is about condition monitoring of large diesel engines from acoustic emission signals. The experiments have been focused...... is the analysis of the angular position changes of the engine related events such as fuel injection and valve openings, caused by operational load changes. With inspiration from speech recognition and voice effects the angular timing changes have been inverted with the event alignment framework. With the event...

  2. Palladium nanoparticle-based surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Devika; Hines, Jacqueline; Udeoyo, Uduak; Borguet, Eric

    2015-03-18

    Palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (5-20 nm) are used as the sensing layer on surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices for detecting H2. The interaction with hydrogen modifies the conductivity of the Pd nanoparticle film, producing measurable changes in acoustic wave propagation, which allows for the detection of this explosive gas. The nanoparticle-based SAW sensor responds rapidly and reversibly at room temperature.

  3. Distributed acoustic fibre optic sensors for condition monitoring of pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussels, Maria-Teresa; Chruscicki, Sebastian; Habib, Abdelkarim; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-05-01

    Industrial piping systems are particularly relevant to public safety and the continuous availability of infrastructure. However, condition monitoring systems based on many discrete sensors are generally not well-suited for widespread piping systems due to considerable installation effort, while use of distributed fibre-optic sensors would reduce this effort to a minimum. Specifically distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is employed for detection of third-party threats and leaks in oil and gas pipelines in recent years and can in principle also be applied to industrial plants. Further possible detection routes amenable by DAS that could identify damage prior to emission of medium are subject of a current project at BAM, which aims at qualifying distributed fibre optic methods such as DAS as a means for spatially continuous monitoring of industrial piping systems. Here, first tests on a short pipe are presented, where optical fibres were applied directly to the surface. An artificial signal was used to define suitable parameters of the measurement system and compare different ways of applying the sensor.

  4. Correlating Inertial Acoustic Cavitation Emissions with Material Erosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, I.; Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Frota, M. N.

    The standard ASTM G32-10 concerns the hydrodynamic cavitation erosion resistance of materials by subjecting them to acoustic cavitation generated by a sonotrode. The work reported extends this technique by detecting and monitoring the ultrasonic cavitation, considered responsible for the erosion process, specifically for coupons of aluminium-bronze alloy. The study uses a 65 mm diameter variant of NPL's cavitation sensor, which detects broadband acoustic emissions, and logs acoustic signals generated in the MHz frequency range, using NPL's Cavimeter. Cavitation readings were made throughout the exposure duration, which was carried out at discrete intervals (900 to 3600 s), allowing periodic mass measurements to be made to assess erosion loss under a strict protocol. Cavitation measurements and erosion were compared for different separations of the sonotrode tip from the material under test. The maximum variation associated with measurement of cavitation level was between 2.2% and 3.3% when the separation (λ) between the transducer horn and the specimen increased from 0.5 to 1.0 mm, for a transducer (sonotrode) displacement amplitude of 43.5 μm. Experiments conducted at the same transducer displacement amplitude show that the mass loss of the specimen -a measure of erosion- was 67.0 mg (λ = 0.5 mm) and 66.0 mg (λ = 1.0 mm).

  5. Temperature effects on an acoustic emission based SHM system - Applied to composite materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargalui, A.; Martinez, M.J.; Zarouchas, D.; Pant, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the effect of temperature variations and the position of the piezoelectric sensors with respect to fiber orientation angle, as it relates to acoustic emission wave velocity in composite structures. A hybrid panel consisting of Unidirectional Carbon Fiber (UDCF)

  6. Effect of face fracturing on shear wave coda quality factor estimated from acoustic emission events

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kgarume, T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The dependency of the quality factor derived from S wave coda (Q(subc)) on frequency is analysed in order to understand the effect of fracturing ahead of a mining stope. Micro seismic events recorded using acoustic emission sensors in a mining...

  7. Temperature effects on an acoustic emission based SHM system - Applied to composite materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargalui, A.; Martinez, M.J.; Zarouchas, D.; Pant, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the effect of temperature variations and the position of the piezoelectric sensors with respect to fiber orientation angle, as it relates to acoustic emission wave velocity in composite structures. A hybrid panel consisting of Unidirectional Carbon Fiber (UDCF) co

  8. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  9. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Felis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L.

  10. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal borehole televiewer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  11. Development of an acoustic sensor for a geothermal Borehole Televiewer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wonn, J.W.

    1979-03-01

    The objective of this project is to upgrade acoustic sensor technology such that appropriate well logging instruments can be made to operate under the hostile environment conditions anticipated in geothermal resource exploration and evaluation. The Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) was selected as the vehicle for this sensor improvement work, primarily because of its demonstrated ability to detect and characterize fractures under sub-geothermal conditions. The work done toward providing an improved sensor for the televiewer is described. An experimental sensor concept was devised, incorporating a thin metal acoustic window, an improved, high-temperature internal coupling fluid, and thermally resistant sensor internals. During an autoclave test, it was successfully demonstrated that the resulting experimental sensor design concept provides the basic target detection and characterization functions required of a fracture mapping, Borehole Televiewer under simulated geothermal conditions. In particular, the experimental sensor remained operational at 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi.

  12. Low Bandwidth Vocoding using EM Sensor and Acoustic Signal Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L C; Holzrichter, J F; Larson, P E

    2001-10-25

    Low-power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference [1]. By combining these data with the corresponding acoustic signal, we've demonstrated an almost 10-fold bandwidth reduction in speech compression, compared to a standard 2.4 kbps LPC10 protocol used in the STU-III (Secure Terminal Unit, third generation) telephone. This paper describes a potential EM sensor/acoustic based vocoder implementation.

  13. Speaker verification using combined acoustic and EM sensor signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L C; Gable, T J; Holzrichter, J F

    2000-11-10

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantity of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. SOC. Am . 103 ( 1) 622 (1998). By combining the Glottal-EM-Sensor (GEMS) with the Acoustic-signals, we've demonstrated an almost 10 fold reduction in error rates from a speaker verification system experiment under a moderate noisy environment (-10dB).

  14. Localization of acoustic sensors from passive Green's function estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Thibault; Daudet, Laurent; de Rosny, Julien

    2015-11-01

    A number of methods have recently been developed for passive localization of acoustic sensors, based on the assumption that the acoustic field is diffuse. This article presents the more general case of equipartition fields, which takes into account reflections off boundaries and/or scatterers. After a thorough discussion on the fundamental differences between the diffuse and equipartition models, it is shown that the method is more robust when dealing with wideband noise sources. Finally, experimental results show, for two types of boundary conditions, that this approach is especially relevant when acoustic sensors are close to boundaries.

  15. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones. PMID:27213379

  16. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu; Dai, Hong-Ning; Li, Xuran; Wang, Hao; Xiao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed) and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones) in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones.

  17. On Modeling Eavesdropping Attacks in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The security and privacy of underwater acoustic sensor networks has received extensive attention recently due to the proliferation of underwater activities. This paper proposes an analytical model to investigate the eavesdropping attacks in underwater acoustic sensor networks. Our analytical framework considers the impacts of various underwater acoustic channel conditions (such as the acoustic signal frequency, spreading factor and wind speed and different hydrophones (isotropic hydrophones and array hydrophones in terms of network nodes and eavesdroppers. We also conduct extensive simulations to evaluate the effectiveness and the accuracy of our proposed model. Empirical results show that our proposed model is quite accurate. In addition, our results also imply that the eavesdropping probability heavily depends on both the underwater acoustic channel conditions and the features of hydrophones.

  18. Development of combined Opto-Acoustical sensor Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzenhoefer, A., E-mail: alexander.enzenhoefer@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Anton, G.; Graf, K.; Hoessl, J.; Katz, U.; Lahmann, R.; Neff, M.; Richardt, C. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-01-11

    The faint fluxes of cosmic neutrinos expected at very high energies require large instrumented detector volumes. The necessary volumes in combination with a sufficient shielding against background constitute forbidding and complex environments (e.g. the deep sea) as sites for neutrino telescopes. To withstand these environments and to assure the data quality, the sensors have to be reliable and their operation has to be as simple as possible. A compact sensor module design including all necessary components for data acquisition and module calibration would simplify the detector mechanics and ensures the long term operability of the detector. The compact design discussed here combines optical and acoustical sensors inside one module, therefore reducing electronics and additional external instruments for calibration purposes. In this design the acoustical sensor is primary used for acoustic positioning of the module. The module may also be used for acoustic particle detection and marine science if an appropriate acoustical sensor is chosen. First tests of this design are promising concerning the task of calibration. To expand the field of application also towards acoustic particle detection further improvements concerning electromagnetic shielding and adaptation of the single components are necessary.

  19. Secondary Emission Calorimeter Sensor Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, David R.; Onel, Yasar

    2012-12-01

    In a Secondary Emission electron(SEe) detector module, Secondary Emission electrons (SEe) are generated from an SE surface/cathode, when charged hadronic or electromagnetic particles, particularly shower particles, penetrate an SE sampling module placed between absorber materials (Fe, Cu, Pb, W etc) in calorimeters. The SE cathode is a thin (10-50 nm thick) film (simple metal-oxides, or other higher yield materials) on the surface of a metal plate, which serves as the entrance “window” to a compact vacuum vessel (metal or metal-ceramic); this SE film cathode is analogous to a photocathode, and the SEe are similar to p.e., which are then amplified by dynodes, also is in a PMT. SE sensor modules can make use of electrochemically etched/machined or laser-cut metal mesh dynode sheets, as large as ~30 cm square, to amplify the Secondary Emission Electrons (SEe), much like those that compact metal mesh or mesh dynode PMT's use to amplify p.e.'s. The construction requirements easier than a PMT, since the entire final assembly can be done in air; there are no critical controlled thin film depositions, cesiation or other oxygen-excluded processes or other required vacuum activation, and consequently bake-out can be a refractory temperatures; the module is sealed by normal vacuum techniques (welding or brazing or other high temperature joinings), with a simple final heated vacuum pump-out and tip-off. The modules envisioned are compact, high gain, high speed, exceptionally radiation damage resistant, rugged, and cost effective, and can be fabricated in arbitrary tileable shapes. The SE sensor module anodes can be segmented transversely to sizes appropriate to reconstruct electromagnetic cores with high precision. The GEANT4 and existing calorimeter data estimated calorimeter response performance is between 35-50 Secondary Emission electrons per GeV, in a 1 cm thick Cu absorber calorimeter, with a gain per SEe > 105 per SEe, and an e/pi<1.2. The calorimeter pulse width is

  20. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  1. Preliminary OFDM based acoustic communication for underwater sensor networks synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Pallarés Valls, Oriol; Sarriá Gandul, David; Viñolo Monzoncillo, Carlos; Río Fernandez, Joaquín del; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a first approach to wireless underwater sensor networks UWSN time synchronization, using OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) acoustic communication and time reference served by a synchronization protocol. This synchronization and type of modulation allows getting a low drift clock on each sensor, on a high efficiency underwater communication network. Peer Reviewed

  2. Fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in developing fiber-optic interferometric sensors for aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels, performed under the NASA program, is reported. Preliminary results show that the fiber-optic interferometer sensor array is a powerful instrument for solving complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels, which cannot be resolved with the conventional transducer technique.

  3. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqian Xu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor.

  4. Acoustic emission and released seismic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Gregori

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense crises of crustal stress appear to cross large regions, and to precede by several months the eventual occurrence of some strong earthquake within them. The phenomenon is not linear, and the stress control reflects some wide scale-size rather than local effects. The stress propagation through the crust can be effectively monitored by means of acoustic emission (AE techniques (ultrasounds. The correlation is here investigated between crustal stress crises and the total release of seismic energy within some space domain around the AE recording site. Some clear inferences can be envisaged, although a significant diagnosis of the state of the crust within a given region ought to request arrays of simultaneously operated AE recorders. Some case histories are described dealing with the Italian peninsula and with the Cephallonia Island.

  5. Acoustic Emission from Breaking a Bamboo Chopstick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Wang, Li-Min; Huang, Panpan; Yang, Zhengning; Chang, Chin-De; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg and Richter, Omori, and Båth. By the use of a force-sensing detector, we establish a positive correlation between the statistics of sound intensity and the magnitude of a tremor. We also manage to derive these laws analytically without invoking the concept of a phase transition, self-organized criticality, or fractal. Our model is deterministic and relies on the existence of a structured cross section, either fibrous or layered. This success at explaining the power-law behavior supports the proposal that geometry is sometimes more important than mechanics.

  6. Need and Role of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajinder Singh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The field of underwater acoustic sensor networking is growing rapidly thanks to the key role it plays in many military and commercial applications. Among these are disaster prevention, tactical surveillance, offshore exploration, pollution monitoring and oceanographic data collection. Moreover, unmanned or autonomous underwater vehicles (UUVs, AUVs, equipped with sensors, will enable the exploration of natural undersea resources and gathering of scientific data in collaborative monitoring missions. Underwater acoustic networking is the enabling technology for these applications. The objective of this paper is to understand several fundamental key aspects of underwater acoustic communications. Different architectures for two-dimensional and three-dimensional underwater sensor networks are discussed, and the characteristics of the underwater channel are detailed. The main challenges for the development of efficient networking solutions posed by the underwater environment are detailed. This paper also presents a detailed explanation of the sensor networks used in tsunami detection. We then present an overview of the recent advances

  7. Monitoring of Changes Signal Acoustic Emission Signals Using Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Začal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on possibilities of acoustic emission (AE signal detection from material surface through waveguide for commonly used piezoelectric sensors. It also considers the experimental study of enhanced detection of occurrence of signal guided through waveguide corpus, its changes and deformities. Aim of this work is verification of several waveguide setup possibilities for maximization of AE signal detection in practice. For this purpose, multiple waveguide setups were manufactured from stainless steel and aluminium alloy. Hsu‑Nielson pen test was utilized for signal actuation. Results demonstrate the differences between measured AE signal with and without employment of waveguide (changes in signal course through different materials and shapes, as well as magnitude of signal dampening and amplification necessary for veritable signal interpretation. Measurements were conducted on agglomerated composite of medium density fibreboard (MDF.

  8. Circuit Design of Surface Acoustic Wave Based Micro Force Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure sensors are commonly used in industrial production and mechanical system. However, resistance strain, piezoresistive sensor, and ceramic capacitive pressure sensors possess limitations, especially in micro force measurement. A surface acoustic wave (SAW based micro force sensor is designed in this paper, which is based on the theories of wavelet transform, SAW detection, and pierce oscillator circuits. Using lithium niobate as the basal material, a mathematical model is established to analyze the frequency, and a peripheral circuit is designed to measure the micro force. The SAW based micro force sensor is tested to show the reasonable design of detection circuit and the stability of frequency and amplitude.

  9. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented

  10. Enhanced Acoustic Emission in Relation to the Acoustic Halo Surrounding Active Region 11429

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Chris S; Leka, K D

    2015-01-01

    The use of acoustic holography in the high-frequency $p$-mode spectrum can resolve the source distributions of enhanced acoustic emissions within halo structures surrounding active regions. In doing so, statistical methods can then be applied to ascertain relationships with the magnetic field. This is the focus of this study. The mechanism responsible for the detected enhancement of acoustic sources around solar active regions has not yet been explained. Furthermore the relationship between the magnetic field and enhanced acoustic emission has not yet been comprehensively examined. We have used vector magnetograms from the \\Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to image the magnetic-field properties in the halo. We have studied the acoustic morphology of an active region, with a complex halo and "glories," and we have linked some acoustic properties to the magnetic-field configuration. In particular, we find that acoustic sources are significantly enhanced in reg...

  11. Acoustic emission technique based rubbing identification for Rotor-bearing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Rubbing is the frequent and dangerous fault in the rotating machine, and efficient identi-fication of the rubbing is a hot research subject in the field of fault diagnosis. In this paper, a newrubbing identification method is proposed, which is based on the acoustic emission technique. Inthis method, the acoustic emission signal of the rubbing in the multi-support rotor-bearing systemis acquired by the acoustic emission sensor, and then the continuous wavelet transform is utilizedto analyze this signal. Based on the rubbing mechanism, the frequency feature of the multiple fre-quency relation in the instantaneous frequency wave is extracted as the rubbing identification fea-ture. The experimental results prove that the proposed method is efficient and feasible.

  12. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Angelica Lo Duca; Gianluca Dini

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable f...

  13. Online monitoring of Accessories for Underground Electrical Installations through Acoustics Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casals-Torrens P.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic waves caused by Partial Discharges inside the dielectric materials, can be detected by acoustic emission (AE sensors and analyzed in the time domain. The experimental results presented, show the online detection capability of these sensors in the environment near a cable accessory, such as a splice or terminal. The AE sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference and constitute a detection method non-intrusive and non-destructive, which ensures a galvanic decoupling with respect to electric networks, this technique of partial discharge detection can be applied as a test method for preventive or predictive maintenance (condition-based maintenance to equipments or facilities of medium and high voltage in service and represents an alternative method to electrical detection systems, conventional or not, that continue to rely on the detection of current pulses. This paper presents characterization tests of the sensors AE through comparative tests of partial discharge on accessories for underground power cables.

  14. Calibration of acoustic sensors in ice using the reciprocity method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meures, Thomas; Bissok, Martin; Laihem, Karim; Paul, Larissa; Wiebusch, Christopher; Zierke, Simon [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Semburg, Benjamin [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal (Germany). Fachbereich C

    2010-07-01

    Within the IceCube experiment at the South Pole an R and D program investigates new ways of ultra high energy neutrino detection. In particular when aiming for detector volumes of the order of 100 km{sup 3} acoustic or radio detectors are promising approaches. The acoustic detection method relies on the thermo-acoustic effect occurring when high energetic particles interact and deposit heat within a detection medium. This effect is investigated in the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL). The high energy particle interaction is simulated by a powerful pulsed Nd:YAG LASER shooting into a 3m{sup 3} tank of clear ice (or water). Eighteen acoustic sensors are situated on three rings in different depths and record the generated signals. These sensors serve as reference for later measurements of other devices. The reciprocity method, used for the absolute calibration of these sensors, is independent of an absolutely calibrated reference. This method and its application to the calibration of the AAL sensors are presented and first results are shown.

  15. Acoustic emission based damage localization in composites structures using Bayesian identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, A.; Eaton, M. J.; Al-Jumali, S.; Sikdar, S.; Pullin, R.

    2017-05-01

    Acoustic emission based damage detection in composite structures is based on detection of ultra high frequency packets of acoustic waves emitted from damage sources (such as fibre breakage, fatigue fracture, amongst others) with a network of distributed sensors. This non-destructive monitoring scheme requires solving an inverse problem where the measured signals are linked back to the location of the source. This in turn enables rapid deployment of mitigative measures. The presence of significant amount of uncertainty associated with the operating conditions and measurements makes the problem of damage identification quite challenging. The uncertainties stem from the fact that the measured signals are affected by the irregular geometries, manufacturing imprecision, imperfect boundary conditions, existing damages/structural degradation, amongst others. This work aims to tackle these uncertainties within a framework of automated probabilistic damage detection. The method trains a probabilistic model of the parametrized input and output model of the acoustic emission system with experimental data to give probabilistic descriptors of damage locations. A response surface modelling the acoustic emission as a function of parametrized damage signals collected from sensors would be calibrated with a training dataset using Bayesian inference. This is used to deduce damage locations in the online monitoring phase. During online monitoring, the spatially correlated time data is utilized in conjunction with the calibrated acoustic emissions model to infer the probabilistic description of the acoustic emission source within a hierarchical Bayesian inference framework. The methodology is tested on a composite structure consisting of carbon fibre panel with stiffeners and damage source behaviour has been experimentally simulated using standard H-N sources. The methodology presented in this study would be applicable in the current form to structural damage detection under varying

  16. Laser ablation method for production of surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Dmitry; Shevchenko, Sergey; Kukaev, Alexander; Safronov, Daniil

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors are produced using a photolithography method. In case of inertial sensors it suffers several disadvantages, such as difficulty in matching topologies produced on opposite sides of the wafer, expensive in small series production, not allowing further topology correction. In this case a laser ablation method seems promising. Details of a proposed technique are described in the paper along with results of its experimental test and discussion.

  17. A New Fault Location Approach for Acoustic Emission Techniques in Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Quiterio Gómez Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The renewable energy industry is undergoing continuous improvement and development worldwide, wind energy being one of the most relevant renewable energies. This industry requires high levels of reliability, availability, maintainability and safety (RAMS for wind turbines. The blades are critical components in wind turbines. The objective of this research work is focused on the fault detection and diagnosis (FDD of the wind turbine blades. The FDD approach is composed of a robust condition monitoring system (CMS and a novel signal processing method. CMS collects and analyses the data from different non-destructive tests based on acoustic emission. The acoustic emission signals are collected applying macro-fiber composite (MFC sensors to detect and locate cracks on the surface of the blades. Three MFC sensors are set in a section of a wind turbine blade. The acoustic emission signals are generated by breaking a pencil lead in the blade surface. This method is used to simulate the acoustic emission due to a breakdown of the composite fibers. The breakdown generates a set of mechanical waves that are collected by the MFC sensors. A graphical method is employed to obtain a system of non-linear equations that will be used for locating the emission source. This work demonstrates that a fiber breakage in the wind turbine blade can be detected and located by using only three low cost sensors. It allows the detection of potential failures at an early stages, and it can also reduce corrective maintenance tasks and downtimes and increase the RAMS of the wind turbine.

  18. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  19. Bio-Inspired Micromechanical Directional Acoustic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, William; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    Conventional directional sound sensors employ an array of spatially separated microphones and the direction is determined using arrival times and amplitudes. In nature, insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly can determine the direction of sound using a hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are mechanically coupled, only separated by about 1 mm, and have remarkable directional sensitivity. A micromechanical sensor based on the fly's hearing system was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two 1 mm2 wings connected using a bridge and to the substrate using two torsional legs. The dimensions of the sensor and material stiffness determine the frequency response of the sensor. The vibration of the wings in response to incident sound at the bending resonance was measured using a laser vibrometer and found to be about 1 μm/Pa. The electronic response of the sensor to sound was measured using integrated comb finger capacitors and found to be about 25 V/Pa. The fabricated sensors showed good directional sensitivity. In this talk, the design, fabrication and characteristics of the directional sound sensor will be described. Supported by ONR and TDSI.

  20. Snow drift: acoustic sensors for avalanche warning and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehning, M.; Naaim, F.; Naaim, M.; Brabec, B.; Doorschot, J.; Durand, Y.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Michaux, J.-L.; Zimmerli, M.

    Based on wind tunnel measurements at the CSTB (Jules Verne) facility in Nantes and based on field observations at the SLF experimental site Versuchsfeld Weissfluhjoch, two acoustic wind drift sensors are evaluated against different mechanical snow traps and one optical snow particle counter. The focus of the work is the suitability of the acoustic sensors for applications such as avalanche warning and research. Although the acoustic sensors have not yet reached the accuracy required for typical research applications, they can, however, be useful for snow drift monitoring to help avalanche forecasters. The main problem of the acoustic sensors is a difficult calibration that has to take into account the variable snow properties. Further difficulties arise from snow fall and high wind speeds. However, the sensor is robust and can be operated remotely under harsh conditions. It is emphasized that due to the lack of an accurate reference method for snow drift measurements, all sensors play a role in improving and evaluating snow drift models. Finally, current operational snow drift models and snow drift sensors are compared with respect to their usefulness as an aid for avalanche warning. While drift sensors always make a point measurement, the models are able to give a more representative drift index that is valid for a larger area. Therefore, models have the potential to replace difficult observations such as snow drift in operational applications. Current models on snow drift are either only applicable in flat terrain, are still too complex for an operational application (Lehning et al., 2000b), or offer only limited information on snow drift, such as the SNOWPACK drift index (Lehning et al., 2000a). On the other hand, snow drift is also difficult to measure. While mechanical traps (Mellor 1960; Budd et al., 1966) are probably still the best reference, they require more or less continuous manual operation and are thus not suitable for remote locations or long

  1. Snow drift: acoustic sensors for avalanche warning and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lehning

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on wind tunnel measurements at the CSTB (Jules Verne facility in Nantes and based on field observations at the SLF experimental site Versuchsfeld Weissfluhjoch, two acoustic wind drift sensors are evaluated against different mechanical snow traps and one optical snow particle counter. The focus of the work is the suitability of the acoustic sensors for applications such as avalanche warning and research. Although the acoustic sensors have not yet reached the accuracy required for typical research applications, they can, however, be useful for snow drift monitoring to help avalanche forecasters. The main problem of the acoustic sensors is a difficult calibration that has to take into account the variable snow properties. Further difficulties arise from snow fall and high wind speeds. However, the sensor is robust and can be operated remotely under harsh conditions. It is emphasized that due to the lack of an accurate reference method for snow drift measurements, all sensors play a role in improving and evaluating snow drift models. Finally, current operational snow drift models and snow drift sensors are compared with respect to their usefulness as an aid for avalanche warning. While drift sensors always make a point measurement, the models are able to give a more representative drift index that is valid for a larger area. Therefore, models have the potential to replace difficult observations such as snow drift in operational applications. Current models on snow drift are either only applicable in flat terrain, are still too complex for an operational application (Lehning et al., 2000b, or offer only limited information on snow drift, such as the SNOWPACK drift index (Lehning et al., 2000a. On the other hand, snow drift is also difficult to measure. While mechanical traps (Mellor 1960; Budd et al., 1966 are probably still the best reference, they require more or less continuous manual operation and are thus not suitable for remote locations

  2. A Flexible Acoustic Sensor Network for Various Monitoring Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wessels, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring using a sensor network is a powerful instrument to assess and manage complex noise situations. It can provide a basis to identify appropriate and cost effective measures, and to assess their effect by comparing before and after implementation. It can also be an instrument for com

  3. Underwater target positioning with a single acoustic sensor

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    David, M-S; Pascoal, A.M.; Joaquin, A.

    by these considerations, in this paper we address the problem of single underwater target positioning based on measurements of the ranges between the target and a moving sensor at the sea surface, obtained via acoustic ranging devices. In particular, and speaking in loose...

  4. Sound source localization using distributed elevated acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xiao; Wagstaff, Ronald A.; Anderson, John D.; Gilbert, Kenneth E.

    2009-05-01

    Detecting and localizing impulsive acoustic sources in the daytime using distributed elevated acoustic sensors with large baseline separations has distinct advantages over small ground-based arrays. There are generally two reasons for this: first, during the daytime, because of more direct and less encumbered propagation paths, signal levels are generally larger at altitude than near the ground. Second, larger baselines provide improved localization accuracy. Results are reported from a distributed array of acoustic sensors deployed during an experiment near Bourges, France during June of 2008. The distributed array consisted of microphones and GPS receivers attached to the tether lines of three widely separated aerostats. The sound sources were various impulsive devices. Results from the measurements are presented and discussed. Localization errors (GPS accuracy, propagation calculation, and aerostat motion, etc) are discussed. Possible ways to improve the localization accuracy are suggested.

  5. Some Applications of Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the evaluation of thin amorphous magnetic film by using of surface acoustic waves on piezo electric substrate. The obtained experimental data show strong dependence of material parameters on the annealing temperature. The mixed ferromagnetic/SAW devices for electronic applications will be also discussed.

  6. Optimization of Sensor Monitoring Strategies for Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klise, K. A.; Laird, C. D.; Downey, N.; Baker Hebert, L.; Blewitt, D.; Smith, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    Continuous or regularly scheduled monitoring has the potential to quickly identify changes in air quality. However, even with low-cost sensors, only a limited number of sensors can be placed to monitor airborne pollutants. The physical placement of these sensors and the sensor technology used can have a large impact on the performance of a monitoring strategy. Furthermore, sensors can be placed for different objectives, including maximum coverage, minimum time to detection or exposure, or to quantify emissions. Different objectives may require different monitoring strategies, which need to be evaluated by stakeholders before sensors are placed in the field. In this presentation, we outline methods to enhance ambient detection programs through optimal design of the monitoring strategy. These methods integrate atmospheric transport models with sensor characteristics, including fixed and mobile sensors, sensor cost and failure rate. The methods use site specific pre-computed scenarios which capture differences in meteorology, terrain, concentration averaging times, gas concentration, and emission characteristics. The pre-computed scenarios become input to a mixed-integer, stochastic programming problem that solves for sensor locations and types that maximize the effectiveness of the detection program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  8. Direction Finding Using Multiple MEMS Acoustic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    24 b. Output Wires .....................................................................25 c. Connection to Programming Board...stabilizing capacitors on the left. All connections between the readout, sensor, and interface lines are wirebonded. Individual wires on the back of the...θoff (Figure 9), a mount was designed that uses nylon bolts to hold the sensors in position (Figure 15). The mount was printed on a MakerBot 3D printer

  9. Acoustic Sensor Network Design for Position Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    frequency fw as follows, [Morse and Ingard 1968; Johnson and Dudgeon 1993]: y(t) = x(t) + n(t) = s(t)√ βR e−j 2πfwR βc + n(t), (22) where β(t) = 1 + vc...Processing. Prentice Hall. Morse, P. and Ingard , K. 1968. Theoretical Acoustics. McGraw-Hill. Nemhauser, G. L. and Wolsey, L. A. 1988. Integer and

  10. Amplitude, phase, location and orientation calibration of an acoustic vector sensor array, part I: Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, B.; Wind, J.; Bree, H.E. de; Basten, T.G.H.; Druyvesteyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic vector sensor array consists of multiple sound pressure microphones and particle velocity sensors. A pressure microphone usually has an omni-directional response, yet a particle velocity sensor is directional. Currently, acoustic vector sensor arrays are under investigation for far field

  11. Amplitude, phase, location and orientation calibration of an acoustic vector sensor array, part I: Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, B.; Wind, J.; Bree, H.E. de; Basten, T.G.H.; Druyvesteyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic vector sensor array consists of multiple sound pressure microphones and particle velocity sensors. A pressure microphone usually has an omni-directional response, yet a particle velocity sensor is directional. Currently, acoustic vector sensor arrays are under investigation for far field

  12. The study of underwater acoustic communication technology based-on the acoustic vector sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Gang; SANG Enfang

    2007-01-01

    Underwater acoustic (UWA) communication based on an acoustic vector sensor is studied. The method of joint weighted sound pressure and velocity processing is used in phase modulation high-speed UWA communication system combined with coherent demodulation and adaptive equalization algorithm to demodulate and decode. Whereas the sound intensity could be used instead of pressure for frequency decoding in frequency modulation UWA communication system. The results of theory analysis, simulation calculations and lake trials have shown that either in phase modulation or in frequency modulation UWA communication system, the processing gain can be evidently increased, so that the BER (bit error rate) can be effectively reduced and the telemetry distance can be enlarged by using the acoustic vector sensor.

  13. Layer-guided shear acoustic plate mode sensor

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for an acoustic wave sensor based on a layer-guided shear acoustic plate mode excited on a thin quartz substrate. The effect of coating the front and back faces with polymer waveguiding layers is shown to convert the plate modes into layer-guided plate modes in a manner analogous to Love waves and to produce a similar enhancement of mass sensitivity. These layer-guided plate mode devices offer the possibility of liquid-phase sensing with transducers situated on...

  14. A secure communication suite for underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Gianluca; Lo Duca, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead.

  15. A Secure Communication Suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Lo Duca

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a security suite for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks comprising both fixed and mobile nodes. The security suite is composed of a secure routing protocol and a set of cryptographic primitives aimed at protecting the confidentiality and the integrity of underwater communication while taking into account the unique characteristics and constraints of the acoustic channel. By means of experiments and simulations based on real data, we show that the suite is suitable for an underwater networking environment as it introduces limited, and sometimes negligible, communication and power consumption overhead.

  16. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  17. High-fidelity simulation capability for virtual testing of seismic and acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. Keith; Moran, Mark L.; Ketcham, Stephen A.; Lacombe, James; Anderson, Thomas S.; Symons, Neill P.; Aldridge, David F.; Marlin, David H.; Collier, Sandra L.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes development and application of a high-fidelity, seismic/acoustic simulation capability for battlefield sensors. The purpose is to provide simulated sensor data so realistic that they cannot be distinguished by experts from actual field data. This emerging capability provides rapid, low-cost trade studies of unattended ground sensor network configurations, data processing and fusion strategies, and signatures emitted by prototype vehicles. There are three essential components to the modeling: (1) detailed mechanical signature models for vehicles and walkers, (2) high-resolution characterization of the subsurface and atmospheric environments, and (3) state-of-the-art seismic/acoustic models for propagating moving-vehicle signatures through realistic, complex environments. With regard to the first of these components, dynamic models of wheeled and tracked vehicles have been developed to generate ground force inputs to seismic propagation models. Vehicle models range from simple, 2D representations to highly detailed, 3D representations of entire linked-track suspension systems. Similarly detailed models of acoustic emissions from vehicle engines are under development. The propagation calculations for both the seismics and acoustics are based on finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) methodologies capable of handling complex environmental features such as heterogeneous geologies, urban structures, surface vegetation, and dynamic atmospheric turbulence. Any number of dynamic sources and virtual sensors may be incorporated into the FDTD model. The computational demands of 3D FDTD simulation over tactical distances require massively parallel computers. Several example calculations of seismic/acoustic wave propagation through complex atmospheric and terrain environments are shown.

  18. Study of acoustic signal in the process of resistance spot welding based on array sensor system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This investigation was performed to study acoustic field signal in order to improve RSW quality. Researchers firstly built an acoustic array sensor system, which included 8 MPA-416 acoustic sensors, data acquisition card and LabVIEW. The system obtained the acoustic field information in the process of nugget growing. Due to the nonlinearity field signal, array sensor algorithm was utilized to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of acoustic field and reduced noise. The experiment and calculation results show that array sensor system can acquire acoustic field signal of nugget growing in the RSW process and array processing algorithm based on acoustic field can extract characteristic parameters to evaluate RSW quality. It was concluded that the acoustic array sensor system offers a new methodology for RSW quality inspection.

  19. Study on Michelson interferometer-based fiber acoustic emission sensor%基于 Michelson 干涉仪的光纤 AE 传感器的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚建永; 张森

    2008-01-01

    文章介绍了光纤传感器的应用和S状光纤声发射(Acoustic Emission,AE)传感器的结构,给出了此类光纤AE传感器与超声波之间的相互作用,以及基于光纤Michelson干涉仪的此类光纤AE传感器灵敏度的理论分析,最后得到的灵敏度理论分析结论与MATLAB模拟结果相一致.

  20. Acoustic Emission, b-values and Foliation Plane Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehizadeh, Mahdi; Nasseri, Mohammad H.; Ye, Sheng; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    The b-value and D-value are two parameters related to size and distance distribution of earthquakes. There are many different factors affecting b-value such as stress state, thermal gradients, focal mechanism and heterogeneity. For example, the literature shows that the b-value changes systematically with respect to the focal mechanism. In laboratory experiments, foliation planes introduce a weakness in samples and can be considered as a potential for rupture or pre-existing faults, so they may exhibit similar relationships. The D-value defines the degree of clustering of earthquakes and would be expected to have a defined relationship with respect to the anisotropy. Using a unique facility in the Rock Fracture Dynamics laboratory at the University of Toronto, three sets of polyaxial experiments have been performed on cubic samples with foliation planes systematically oriented at different angles to the principal stress direction. During these tests, samples were loaded under controlled true-triaxial stress conditions until they failed or had severe damage and acoustic emission events were recorded using 18 sensors around the samples. The paper describes how the combination of stress state and foliation planes affects the b-value and D-value under laboratory conditions.

  1. Cloaking an acoustic sensor with single-negative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Chen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu, Xue-Feng [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zou, Xin-Ye, E-mail: xyzou@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-07-15

    In this review, a brief introduction is given to the development of acoustic superlens cloaks that allow the cloaked object to receive signals while its presence is not sensed by the surrounding, which can be regarded as “cloaking an acoustic sensor”. Remarkably, the designed cloak consists of single-negative materials with parameters independent of the background medium or the sensor system, which is proven to be a magnifying superlens. This has facilitated significantly the design and fabrication of acoustic cloaks that generally require double-negative materials with customized parameters. Such innovative design has then been simplified further as a multi-layered structure comprising of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative materials. Based on this, a scattering analyses method is developed for the numerical simulation of such multi-layered cloak structures, which may serve as an efficient approach for the investigation on such devices.

  2. Passive Downhole Pressure Sensor Based on Surface Acoustic Wave Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Sully M M; Figueiredo, Sávio W O; Takahashi, Victor L; Llerena, Roberth A W; Braga, Arthur M B

    2017-07-15

    A passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) pressure sensor was developed for real-time pressure monitoring in downhole application. The passive pressure sensor consists of a SAW resonator, which is attached to a circular metal diaphragm used as a pressure transducer. While the membrane deflects as a function of pressure applied, the frequency response changes due to the variation of the SAW propagation parameters. The sensitivity and linearity of the SAW pressure sensor were measured to be 8.3 kHz/bar and 0.999, respectively. The experimental results were validated with a hybrid analytical-numerical analysis. The good results combined with the robust design and packaging for harsh environment demonstrated it to be a promising sensor for industrial applications.

  3. The use of acoustic emission for bearing condition monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, A W; Quiney, Z [Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Ganji, A; Murray, B, E-mail: a.w.lees@swansea.ac.uk, E-mail: z.quiney.294103@swansea.ac.uk, E-mail: ali.ganji@skf.com [SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Kelvinbaan 16, 3439 MT Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-07-19

    This paper reports research currently in progress at Swansea University in collaboration with SKF Engineering and Research Centre as part of a continuing investigation into high frequency Acoustic Emission. The primary concerns are experimentally producing subsurface cracks, the type of which would occur in a service failure of a ball bearing, within a steel ball and to closely monitor the properties of this AE from crack initiation to the formation of a ball on the ball surface. It is worth noting that there is evidence that the frequency content of the AE changes during this period, although this has yet to be proved consistent or even fully explained. Conclusive evidence could lead to a system which detects such cracks in a bearing operating in real life conditions, advantageous for many reasons including safety, downtime and maintenance and associated costs. The results from two experimental procedures are presented, one of which loads a single ball held stationary in a test rig to induce subsurface cracks, which are in turn detected by a pair of broadband AE sensors and recorded via a Labview based software system. This approach not only allows detailed analysis of the AE waveforms but also approximate AE source location from the time difference between two sensors. The second experimental procedure details an adaptation of a four-ball lubricant tester in an attempt to produce naturally occurring subsurface cracks from rolling contact whilst minimising the AE arising from surface wear. This thought behind this experiment is reinforced with 3D computational modelling of the rotating system.

  4. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  5. A large fiber sensor network for an acoustic neutrino telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buis Ernst-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific prospects of detecting neutrinos with an energy close or even higher than the GKZ cut-off energy has been discussed extensively in literature. It is clear that due to their expected low flux, the detection of these ultra-high energy neutrinos (Ev > 1018 eV requires a telescope larger than 100 km3. Acoustic detection may provide a way to observe these ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos, as sound that they induce in the deep sea when neutrinos lose their energy travels undisturbed for many kilometers. To realize a large scale acoustic neutrino telescope, dedicated technology must be developed that allows for a deep sea sensor network. Fiber optic hydrophone technology provides a promising means to establish a large scale sensor network [1] with the proper sensitivity to detect the small signals from the neutrino interactions.

  6. Surface acoustic wave vapor sensors based on resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W.; Klusty, Mark

    1991-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices fabricated in the resonator configuration have been used as organic vapor sensors and compared with delay line devices more commonly used. The experimentally determined mass sensitivities of 200, 300, and 400 MHz resonators and 158 MHz delay lines coated with Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(vinyl tetradecanal) are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The response of LB- and spray-coated sensors to various organic vapors were determined, and scaling laws for mass sensitivities, vapor sensitivities, and detection limits are discussed. The 200 MHz resonators provide the lowest noise levels and detection limits of all the devices examined.

  7. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  8. Nonlinear optical field sensors in extreme electromagnetic and acoustic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong Ho

    2014-03-01

    Sensors based on electro-optic (EO) and magneto-optic (MO) crystals measure external electric and magnetic fields through changes in birefringence which the fields induce on the nonlinear crystals. Due to their small size and all-dielectric structure, EO and MO sensors are ideal in environments involving very large electromagnetic powers. Conventional antennas and metallic probes not only present safety hazards, due to their metallic structure and the presence of large currents, but they can also perturb the very fields they intend to measure. In the case of railguns, the large electromagnetic signals are also accompanied by tremendous acoustic noise, which presents a noise background that the sensors must overcome. In this presentation, we describe extensive data obtained from fiber optic EO and MO sensors used in the railgun of the Naval Research Laboratory. Along with the field measurements obtained, we will describe the interactions between the acoustic noise and the nonlinear crystals (most notably, photoelastic effects), the noise equivalent fields they produce, and methods they could be suppressed through the optical and geometrical configurations of the sensor so that the signal to noise ratio can be maximized.

  9. A Surface Acoustic Wave Ethanol Sensor with Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Giffney

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface acoustic wave (SAW sensors are a class of piezoelectric MEMS sensors which can achieve high sensitivity and excellent robustness. A surface acoustic wave ethanol sensor using ZnO nanorods has been developed and tested. Vertically oriented ZnO nanorods were produced on a ZnO/128∘ rotated Y-cut LiNbO3 layered SAW device using a solution growth method with zinc nitrate, hexamethylenetriamine, and polyethyleneimine. The nanorods have average diameter of 45 nm and height of 1 μm. The SAW device has a wavelength of 60 um and a center frequency of 66 MHz at room temperature. In testing at an operating temperature of 270∘C with an ethanol concentration of 2300 ppm, the sensor exhibited a 24 KHz frequency shift. This represents a significant improvement in comparison to an otherwise identical sensor using a ZnO thin film without nanorods, which had a frequency shift of 9 KHz.

  10. Acoustic Communications and Navigation for Mobile Under-Ice Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-04

    filled hose with spiral conductors for the through- ice transition where a cable would be vulnerable. The buoy is designed to float after melting out...From- To) 04/02/2017 Final Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Acoustic Communications and Navigation for Mobile Under- Ice Sensors...Arctic ice . The system consists of ice -tethered sources making GPS-synchronized transmissions and receivers based on the WHOI Micro-Modem that are

  11. An Amplitude-Based Estimation Method for International Space Station (ISS) Leak Detection and Localization Using Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Madaras, Eric I.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a robust and efficient leak detection and localization system within a space station environment presents a unique challenge. A plausible approach includes the implementation of an acoustic sensor network system that can successfully detect the presence of a leak and determine the location of the leak source. Traditional acoustic detection and localization schemes rely on the phase and amplitude information collected by the sensor array system. Furthermore, the acoustic source signals are assumed to be airborne and far-field. Likewise, there are similar applications in sonar. In solids, there are specialized methods for locating events that are used in geology and in acoustic emission testing that involve sensor arrays and depend on a discernable phase front to the received signal. These methods are ineffective if applied to a sensor detection system within the space station environment. In the case of acoustic signal location, there are significant baffling and structural impediments to the sound path and the source could be in the near-field of a sensor in this particular setting.

  12. Wavelet analysis of acoustic emission signals from thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; ZHOU Yi-chun

    2006-01-01

    The wavelet transform is applied to the analysis of acoustic emission signals collected during tensile test of the ZrO2-8% Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The acoustic emission signals are de-noised using the Daubechies discrete wavelets,and then decomposed into different wavelet levels using the programs developed by the authors. Each level is examined for its specific frequency range. The ratio of energy in different levels to the total energy gives information on the failure modes (coating micro-failures and substrate micro-failures) associated with TBCs system.

  13. Distribution theory approach to implementing directional acoustic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Dean J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of directional acoustic sensors is to provide high directivity while occupying a small amount of space. An idealized point sensor achieves this objective from a knowledge of the spatial partial derivatives of acoustic pressure at a point in space. Direct measurement of these derivatives is difficult in practice. Consequently, it is expedient to come up with indirect methods. The use of pressure sensors to construct finite-difference approximations is an example of such a method. This paper utilizes the theory of distributions to derive another indirect method for estimating the various spatial partial derivatives of the pressure. This alternate method is then used to construct a multichannel filter which processes the acoustic pressure by mean of three-dimensional integral transforms throughout a 6epsilon-length cube centered at the origin. The output of the multichannel filter is a spatially and temporally filtered version of the pressure at the origin. The temporal filter is a lowpass Gaussian filter whose bandwidth is inversely proportional to epsilon. Finally, the lattice method for numerical multiple integration is utilized to develop a discrete-spatial version of the multichannel filter.

  14. Microstructured polymer optical fibre sensors for opto-acoustic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Pospori, Andreas; Zubel, Michal; Webb, David J.; Sugden, Kate; Carpintero, Guillermo; Lamela, Horacio

    2016-04-01

    Opto-acoustic imaging is a growing field of research in recent years, providing functional imaging of physiological biomarkers, such as the oxygenation of haemoglobin. Piezo electric transducers are the industry standard detector for ultrasonics, but their limited bandwidth, susceptibility to electromagnetic interference and their inversely proportional sensitivity to size all affect the detector performance. Sensors based on polymer optical fibres (POF) are immune to electromagnetic interference, have lower acoustic impedance and a reduced Young's Modulus compared to silica fibres. Furthermore, POF enables the possibility of a wideband sensor and a size appropriate to endoscopy. Micro-structured POF (mPOF) used in an interferometric detector has been shown to be an order of magnitude more sensitive than silica fibre at 1 MHz and 3 times more sensitive at 10 MHz. We present the first opto-acoustic measurements obtained using a 4.7mm PMMA mPOF Bragg grating with a fibre diameter of 130 μm and present the lateral directivity pattern of a PMMA mPOF FBG ultrasound sensor over a frequency range of 1-50 MHz. We discuss the impact of the pattern with respect to the targeted application and draw conclusions on how to mitigate the problems encountered.

  15. Love wave acoustic sensor for testing in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Huizhong; Feng, Guanping

    2001-09-01

    Love wave is one type of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs). It is guided acoustic mode propagating in ta thin layer deposited on a substrate. Because of its advantages of high mass sensitivity, low noise level and being fit for operating in liquids, Love wave acoustic sensors have become one of the hot spots in the research of biosensor nowadays. In this paper the Love wave devices with the substrate of ST-cut quartz and the guiding layers of PMMA and fused quartz were fabricated successfully. By measuring the transfer function S21 and the insertion loss of the devices, the characteristics of the Rayleigh wave device and the Love wave devices with different guiding layers in gas phase and liquid phase were compared. It was validated that the Love wave sensor is suitable for testing in liquids but the Rayleigh wave sensor is not. What's more, SiO2 is the more proper material for the guiding layer of the Love wave device.

  16. Precursory Acoustic Signals Detection in Rockfall Events by Means of Optical Fiber Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenato, L.; Marcato, G.; Gruca, G.; Iannuzzi, D.; Palmieri, L.; Galtarossa, A.; Pasuto, A.

    2012-12-01

    Rockfalls represent a major source of hazard in mountain areas: they occur at the apex of a process of stress accumulation in the unstable slope, during which part of the accumulated energy is released in small internal cracks. These cracks and the related acoustic emissions (AE) can, therefore, be used as precursory signals, through which the unstable rock could be monitored. In particular, according to previous scientific literature AE can be monitored in the range 20÷100 kHz. With respect to traditional AE sensors, such as accelerometers and piezoelectric transducers, fiber optic sensors (FOSs) may provide a reliable solution, potentially offering more robustness to electromagnetic interference, smaller form factor, multiplexing ability and increased distance range and higher sensitivity. To explore this possibility, in this work we have experimentally analyzed two interferometric fiber optical sensors for AE detection in rock masses. In particular, the first sensor is made of 100 m of G.657 optical fiber, tightly wound on an aluminum flanged hollow mandrel (inner diameter 30 mm, height 42 mm) that is isolated from the environment with acoustic absorbing material. A 4-cm-long M10 screw, which acts also as the main mean of acoustic coupling between the rock and the sensor, is used to fasten the sensor to the rock. This fiber coil sensor (FCS) is inserted in the sensing arm of a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The second sensor consists in a micro cantilever carved on the top of a cylindrical silica ferrule, with a marked mechanical resonance at about 12.5 kHz (Q-factor of about 400). A standard single mode fiber is housed in the same ferrule and the gap between the cantilever and the fiber end face acts as a vibration-sensitive Fabry-Perot cavity, interrogated with a low-coherence laser, tuned at the quadrature point of the cavity. The sensor is housed in a 2-cm-long M10 bored bolt. Performance have been compared with those from a standard piezo

  17. Vibration analysis based on surface acoustic wave sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnadinger Alfred P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to know, whether a civil engineering structure is safe or unsafe. One way to determine this is to measure vibrations at critical locations and feeding this data into an appropriate algorithm. Albido Corporation has developed wireless strain sensors based on surface acoustic wave (SAW principles that are mainly employed on rotating structures and in harsh environments. Albido's sensors could also be used to measure vibrations in civil engineering structures. They are small (~1 × 3 mm, passive and inexpensive (< 1$ in volume. They are powered by the electromagnetic field emanating from the antenna of a Reader System, similar to an RFID. The Reader System is essentially a computer with special software and has signal processing capability. One Reader System can service a multitude of sensors. The Reader antenna has to be within the reading range of the sensor. If large distances are required, a small electronic component acting as a Reader System can be placed within the reading range of the sensor that receives the sensor signal, generates a radio signal and encodes the sensor information on the radio signal. Then, the final data processing center can be placed anywhere.

  18. Amplitude, phase, location and orientation calibration of an acoustic vector sensor array, part II: Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wind, J.; Xu, B.; Bree, H.E. de; Druyvesteyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic vector sensor array consists of multiple sound pressure microphones and particle velocity sensors. A pressure microphone usually has an omni-directional response, yet a particle velocity sensor is directional and usually has a response pattern as a figure of eight. Currently, acoustic

  19. Amplitude, phase, location and orientation calibration of an acoustic vector sensor array, part II: Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wind, J.; Xu, B.; Bree, H.E. de; Druyvesteyn, E.

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic vector sensor array consists of multiple sound pressure microphones and particle velocity sensors. A pressure microphone usually has an omni-directional response, yet a particle velocity sensor is directional and usually has a response pattern as a figure of eight. Currently, acoustic ve

  20. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  1. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  2. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGugan, M.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Østergaard, R.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material ispresented. The contribution of the acoustic emission...

  3. A micromachined surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting inert gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, S.; Hersam, M.; Ross, C.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1996-12-31

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors must be specifically designed for each application because many variables directly affect the acoustic wave velocity. In the present work, the authors have designed, fabricated, and tested an SAW sensor for detection of metastable states of He. The sensor consists of two sets of micromachined interdigitated transducers (IDTs) and delay lines fabricated by photolithography on a single Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} substrate oriented for Z-propagation of the SAWs. One set is used as a reference and the other set employs a delay line coated with a titanium-based thin film sensitive to electrical conductivity changes when exposed to metastable states of He. The reference sensor is used to obtain a true frequency translation in relation to a voltage controlled oscillator. An operating frequency of 109 MHz has been used, and the IDT finger width is 8 {micro}m. Variation in electrical conductivity of the thin film at the delay line due to exposure to He is detected as a frequency shift in the assembly, which is then used as a measure of the amount of metastable He exposed to the sensing film on the SAW delay line. A variation in the He pressure versus frequency shifts indicates the extent of the metastable He interaction.

  4. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  5. Acoustic emissions in rock deformation experiments under micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisato, Nicola; Goodfellow, Sebastian D.; Moulas, Evangelos; Di Toro, Giulio; Young, Paul; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The study of acoustic emissions (AE) generated by rocks undergoing deformation has become, in the last decades, one of the most powerful tools for boosting our understanding of the mechanisms which are responsible for rock failures. AE are elastic waves emitted by the local failure of micro- or milli-metric portions of the tested specimen. At the same time, X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) has become an affordable, reliable and powerful tool for imaging the internal structure of rock samples. In particular, micro-CT coupled with a deformation apparatus offers the unique opportunity for observing, without perturbing, the sample while the deformation and the formation of internal structures, such as shear bands, is ongoing. Here we present some preliminary results gathered with an innovative apparatus formed by the X-ray transparent pressure vessel called ERDμ equipped with AE sensors, an AE acquisition system and a micro-CT apparatus available at the University of Toronto. The experiment was performed on a 12 mm diameter 36 mm long porous glass sample which was cut on a 60 deg inclined plane (i.e. saw-cut sample). Etna basaltic sand with size ~1 mm was placed between the two inclined faces forming an inclined fault zone with ~2 mm thickness. The sample assembly was jacketed with a polyefin shrink tube and two AE sensors were glued onto the glass samples above and below the fault zone. The sample was then enclosed in the pressure vessel and confined with compressed air up to 3 MPa. A third AE sensor was placed outside the vessel. The sample was saturated with water and AE were generated by varying the fluid and confining pressure or the vertical force, causing deformations concentrated in the fault zone. Mechanical data and AE traces were collected throughout the entire experiment which lasted ~24 hours. At the same time multiple micro-CT 3D datasets and 2D movie-radiographies were collected, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the deformed sample at

  6. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  7. Localization with a Mobile Beacon in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangho Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB. The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node’s location and then the node’s location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals.

  8. Localization with a mobile beacon in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangho; Kim, Kiseon

    2012-01-01

    Localization is one of the most important issues associated with underwater acoustic sensor networks, especially when sensor nodes are randomly deployed. Given that it is difficult to deploy beacon nodes at predetermined locations, localization schemes with a mobile beacon on the sea surface or along the planned path are inherently convenient, accurate, and energy-efficient. In this paper, we propose a new range-free Localization with a Mobile Beacon (LoMoB). The mobile beacon periodically broadcasts a beacon message containing its location. Sensor nodes are individually localized by passively receiving the beacon messages without inter-node communications. For location estimation, a set of potential locations are obtained as candidates for a node's location and then the node's location is determined through the weighted mean of all the potential locations with the weights computed based on residuals.

  9. Characterization of Acoustic Emission Source to Identify Fracture in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Hardy, "An Approach to Acoustic Emission Signal Analysis," Materials Evaluation, 35, 1977 , pp. 100-106. [5] Hsu, N.N. and F.R. Breckenridge...Measurements," Journal of Applied Mechanics, 53, 1986, pp. 61-68. [17] Mindess , S., "The Fracture Process Zone in Concrete," Toughening Mechanisms in

  10. Simulated acoustic emission in a composite test assembly: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamstad, M.A.

    1985-08-15

    A study was made of the effects of frequency bandpass, internal fluid, and internal fluid pressure on simulated acoustic emission (AE) in a composite test assembly. The results of this study indicate requirements for AE source location and calibration in such a test assembly. 3 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Acoustic Emissions to Measure Drought-Induced Cavitation in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus De Roo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emissions are frequently used in material sciences and engineering applications for structural health monitoring. It is known that plants also emit acoustic emissions, and their application in plant sciences is rapidly increasing, especially to investigate drought-induced plant stress. Vulnerability to drought-induced cavitation is a key trait of plant water relations, and contains valuable information about how plants may cope with drought stress. There is, however, no consensus in literature about how this is best measured. Here, we discuss detection of acoustic emissions as a measure for drought-induced cavitation. Past research and the current state of the art are reviewed. We also discuss how the acoustic emission technique can help solve some of the main issues regarding quantification of the degree of cavitation, and how it can contribute to our knowledge about plant behavior during drought stress. So far, crossbreeding in the field of material sciences proved very successful, and we therefore recommend continuing in this direction in future research.

  12. Ellipsoidal reflector for measuring oto-acoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Pulkki, Ville; Heiskanen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    A truncated prolate ellipsoidal reflector having the ear canal of a listener at one focal point and large- diaphragm low-noise microphone at the other focal point is proposed for free-field recordings of oto-acoustic emissions. A prototype reflector consisting of three pieces is presented, which ...

  13. Following butter flavour deterioration with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Cláudia R B S; Gomes, M Teresa S R

    2012-09-15

    Off-flavours develop naturally in butter and the process is accelerated by heat. An acoustic wave sensor was used to detect the aroma compounds evolved from heated butter and the results have shown that registered marked changes were coincident to odour changes detected by sensory analysis. The flavour compounds have also been analysed by GC/MS for identification. The response of the sensor was fully characterized in terms of the sensitivity to each of the identified compounds, and sensitivities of the system SPME/sensor were compared with the sensitivities of the system SPME/GC/MS. It was found that the sensor analytical system was more sensitive to methylketones than to fatty acids. The SPME/GC/MS system also showed the highest sensitivity to 2-heptanone, followed by 2-nonanone, but third place was occupied by undecanone and butanoic acid, to which the sensor showed moderate sensitivity. 2-heptanone was found to be an appropriate model compound to follow odour changes till the 500 h, and the lower sensitivity of the sensor to butanoic acid showed to be a positive characteristic, as saturation was prevented, and other more subtle changes in the flavour could be perceived.

  14. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application to distributed wireless hydrogen leak...

  15. Passive Wireless Hydrogen Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors for NASA application...

  16. Optimization of autonomous magnetic field sensor consisting of giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transducer

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a novel autonomous thin film magnetic field sensor consisting of a tri-layer giant magnetoimpedance sensor and a surface acoustic wave transponder. Double and single electrode interdigital transducer (IDT) designs are employed and compared. The integrated sensor is fabricated using standard microfabrication technology. The results show the double electrode IDT has an advantage in terms of the sensitivity. In order to optimize the matching component, a simulation based on P-matrix is carried out. A maximum change of 2.4 dB of the reflection amplitude and a sensitivity of 0.34 dB/Oe are obtained experimentally. © 2012 IEEE.

  17. Soldier detection using unattended acoustic and seismic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, P.; Hengy, S.; Hamery, P.

    2012-06-01

    During recent military conflicts, as well as for security interventions, the urban zone has taken a preponderant place. Studies have been initiated in national and in international programs to stimulate the technical innovations for these specific scenarios. For example joint field experiments have been organized by the NATO group SET-142 to evaluate the capability for the detection and localization of snipers, mortars or artillery guns using acoustic devices. Another important operational need corresponds to the protection of military sites or buildings. In this context, unattended acoustic and seismic sensors are envisaged to contribute to the survey of specific points by the detection of approaching enemy soldiers. This paper describes some measurements done in an anechoic chamber and in free field to characterize typical sounds generated by the soldier activities (walking, crawling, weapon handling, radio communication, clothing noises...). Footstep, speech and some specific impulsive sounds are detectable at various distances from the source. Such detection algorithms may be easily merged with the existing weapon firing detection algorithms to provide a more generic "battlefield acoustic" early warning system. Results obtained in various conditions (grassy terrain, gravel path, road, forest) will be presented. A method to extrapolate the distances of detection has been developed, based on an acoustic propagation model and applied to the laboratory measurements.

  18. Current capability of a matured disposable acoustic sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, D. A. R.; Geddes, N. J., II; Hume, A.; Gray, A. J.

    2006-05-01

    In response to the needs of the UK MOD QinetiQ have designed, developed and trialled an ad-hoc, self organising network of acoustic nodes for in-depth deployment that can detect and track military targets in a range of environments and for all types of weapon locating. Research conducted has shown that disposable technologies are sufficiently mature to provide a useful military capability. Work this year has included a 3 month series of trials to exercise the prototype equipment and has provided an indication of in-service capability across a broad range of environments. This paper will discuss the scientific approach that was applied to the development of the equipment, from early laboratory development through to the prototype sensor network deployment in operationally representative environments. Highlights from the trials have been provided. New findings from the fusion of a low cost thermal imager that can be cued by the acoustic network are also discussed.

  19. Single-sensor multispeaker listening with acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Brady, David J; Cummer, Steven A

    2015-08-25

    Designing a "cocktail party listener" that functionally mimics the selective perception of a human auditory system has been pursued over the past decades. By exploiting acoustic metamaterials and compressive sensing, we present here a single-sensor listening device that separates simultaneous overlapping sounds from different sources. The device with a compact array of resonant metamaterials is demonstrated to distinguish three overlapping and independent sources with 96.67% correct audio recognition. Segregation of the audio signals is achieved using physical layer encoding without relying on source characteristics. This hardware approach to multichannel source separation can be applied to robust speech recognition and hearing aids and may be extended to other acoustic imaging and sensing applications.

  20. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  1. Multiple-frequency surface acoustic wave devices as sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Martin, Stephen J.

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a multiple-frequency acoustic wave (MUFAW) device on ST-cut quartz with nominal surface acoustic wave (SAW) center frequencies of 16, 40, 100, and 250 MHz. The four frequencies are obtained by patterning four sets of input and output interdigital transducers of differing periodicities on a single substrate. Such a device allows the frequency dependence of AW sensor perturbations to be examined, aiding in the elucidation of the operative interaction mechanism(s). Initial measurements of the SAW response to the vacuum deposition of a thin nickel film show the expected frequency dependence of mass sensitivity in addition to the expected frequency independence of the magnitude of the acoustoelectric effect. By measuring changes in both wave velocity and attenuation at multiple frequencies, extrinsic perturbations such as temperature and pressure changes are readily differentiated from one another and from changes in surface mass.

  2. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (pcomposite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process.

  3. PASSIVE WIRELESS MULTI-SENSOR TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE SENSING SYSTEM USING ACOUSTIC WAVE DEVICES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of...

  4. Passive Wireless Multi-Sensor Temperature and Pressure Sensing System Using Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive, orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors and multi-sensor systems, an...

  5. A surface acoustic wave ICP sensor with good temperature stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Hu, Hong; Ye, Aipeng; Zhang, Peng

    2017-07-20

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring is very important for assessing and monitoring hydrocephalus, head trauma and hypertension patients, which could lead to elevated ICP or even devastating neurological damage. The mortality rate due to these diseases could be reduced through ICP monitoring, because precautions can be taken against the brain damage. This paper presents a surface acoustic wave (SAW) pressure sensor to realize ICP monitoring, which is capable of wireless and passive transmission with antenna attached. In order to improve the temperature stability of the sensor, two methods were adopted. First, the ST cut quartz was chosen as the sensor substrate due to its good temperature stability. Then, a differential temperature compensation method was proposed to reduce the effects of temperature. Two resonators were designed based on coupling of mode (COM) theory and the prototype was fabricated and verified using a system established for testing pressure and temperature. The experiment result shows that the sensor has a linearity of 2.63% and hysteresis of 1.77%. The temperature stability of the sensor has been greatly improved by using the differential compensation method, which validates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90

  7. On Mass Loading and Dissipation Measured with Acoustic Wave Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Voinova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize current trends in the analysis of physical properties (surface mass density, viscosity, elasticity, friction, and charge of various thin films measured with a solid-state sensor oscillating in a gaseous or liquid environment. We cover three different types of mechanically oscillating sensors: the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D monitoring, surface acoustic wave (SAW, resonators and magnetoelastic sensors (MESs. The fourth class of novel acoustic wave (AW mass sensors, namely thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (TFBARs on vibrating membranes is discussed in brief. The paper contains a survey of theoretical results and practical applications of the sensors and includes a comprehensive bibliography.

  8. FBG-based ultrasonic wave detection and acoustic emission linear location system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming-shun; Sui, Qing-mei; Jia, Lei; Peng, Peng; Cao, Yuqiang

    2012-05-01

    The ultrasonic (US) wave detection and an acoustic emission (AE) linear location system are proposed, which employ fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as US wave sensors. In the theoretical analysis, the FBG sensor response to longitudinal US wave is investigated. The result indicates that the FBG wavelength can be modulated as static case when the grating length is much shorter than US wavelength. The experimental results of standard sinusoidal and spindle wave test agree well with the generated signal. Further research using two FBGs for realizing linear location is also achieved. The maximum linear location error is obtained as less than 5 mm. FBG-based US wave sensor and AE linear location provide useful tools for specific requirements.

  9. FBG-based ultrasonic wave detection and acoustic emission linear location system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming-shun; SUI Qing-mei; JIA Lei; PENG Peng; CAO Yu-qiang

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonic (US) wave detection and an acoustic emission (AE) linear location system are proposed,which employ fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as US wave sensors.In the theoretical analysis,the FBG sensor response to longitudinal US wave is investigated.The result indicates that the FBG wavelength can be modulated as static case when the grating length is much shorter than US wavelength.The experimental results of standard sinusoidal and spindle wave test agree well with the generated signal.Further research using two FBGs for realizing linear location is also achieved.The maximumlinear location error is obtained as less than 5 mm.FBG-based US wave sensor and AE linear location provide useful tools for specific requirements.

  10. Waveform Based Acoustic Emission Detection and Location of Matrix Cracking in Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of damage mechanisms in a material or structure under load produces transient acoustic waves. These acoustic waves are known as acoustic emission (AE). In composites they can be caused by a variety of sources including matrix cracking, fiber breakage, and delamination. AE signals can be detected and analyzed to determine the location of the acoustic source by triangulation. Attempts are also made to analyze the signals to determine the type and severity of the damage mechanism. AE monitoring has been widely used for both laboratory studies of materials, and for testing the integrity of structures in the field. In this work, an advanced, waveform based AE system was used in a study of transverse matrix cracking in cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates. This AE system featured broad band, high fidelity sensors, and high capture rate digital acquisition and storage of acoustic signals. In addition, analysis techniques based on plate wave propagation models were employed. These features provided superior source location and noise rejection capabilities.

  11. Using acoustic sensors to discriminate between nasal and mouth breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2012-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing.

  12. The Sound Emission Board of the KM3NeT Acoustic Positioning System

    CERN Document Server

    Llorens, C D; Sogorb, T; Bou--Cabo, M; Martínez-Mora, J A; Larosa, G; Adrián-Martínez, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the sound emission board proposed for installation in the acoustic positioning system of the future KM3NeT underwater neutrino telescope. The KM3NeT European consortium aims to build a multi-cubic kilometre underwater neutrino telescope in the deep Mediterranean Sea. In this kind of telescope the mechanical structures holding the optical sensors, which detect the Cherenkov radiation produced by muons emanating from neutrino interactions, are not completely rigid and can move up to dozens of meters in undersea currents. Knowledge of the position of the optical sensors to an accuracy of about 10 cm is needed for adequate muon track reconstruction. A positioning system based on the acoustic triangulation of sound transit time differences between fixed seabed emitters and receiving hydrophones attached to the kilometre-scale vertical flexible structures carrying the optical sensors is being developed. In this paper, we describe the sound emission board developed in the framework of KM3NeT project, whi...

  13. Health monitoring of Ceramic Matrix Composites from waveform-based analysis of Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maillet Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs are anticipated for use in the hot section of aircraft engines. Their implementation requires the understanding of the various damage modes that are involved and their relation to life expectancy. Acoustic Emission (AE has been shown to be an efficient technique for monitoring damage evolution in CMCs. However, only a waveform-based analysis of AE can offer the possibility to validate and precisely examine the recorded AE data with a view to damage localization and identification. The present work fully integrates wave initiation, propagation and acquisition in the analysis of Acoustic Emission waveforms recorded at various sensors, therefore providing more reliable information to assess the relation between Acoustic Emission and damage modes. The procedure allows selecting AE events originating from damage, accurate determination of their location as well as the characterization of effects of propagation on the recorded waveforms. This approach was developed using AE data recorded during tensile tests on carbon/carbon composites. It was then applied to melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites.

  14. An Approach to Acoustic Emission Technique Applications to Evaluate Damage Mechanisms in Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios-Soberanis C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission technique is a versatile method for characterization in materials science. It is considered to be a “passive” non-destructive method since damage can be only evaluated when de defects are being developed during the test which, at the end of the day, it is considered an advantage because failure mechanisms and damage process can be monitored and identified during the load history. When a failure mechanism is activated due to a discontinuity in the material such as crack propagation, part of the total strain energy is dissipated as an elastic waves that propagate from the damage source through the medium. Therefore, this released energy can be detected by piezoelectric sensors that perceive the emitted signal from the damage notation site by the surface dynamic movement and convert it in an electrical response. Acoustic emission signals can be correlated with the onset of damage process occurring in the tested materials and also to de diverse failure mechanisms such as matrix cracking, interface damage, fiber fracture, etc. This paper proposes to discuss our information and results on acoustic emission materials characterization undertaken on different types of materials.

  15. Damage accumulation in cyclically-loaded glass-ceramic matrix composites monitored by acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, D G; Dassios, K G; Kordatos, E Z; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  16. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Aggelis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium osumilite (BMAS ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  17. Acoustic emission-based in-process monitoring of surface generation in robot-assisted polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring of surface generation in the robot-assisted polishing (RAP) was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate...... removal of the part from the machine tool. In this study, stabilisation of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was monitored by AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing arm in direct contact with a bonded abrasive polishing tool...

  18. Mechanical degradation of cross-ply laminates monitored by acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paipetis, A.; Xyrafa, M.; Barkoula, N. M.; Matikas, T. E.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2011-04-01

    This study deals with the investigation of cross ply composites failure by acoustic emission (AE). Broadband AE sensors monitor the different sources of failure in coupons of this material during a tensile loading-unloading test. The cumulative number of AE activity, and other qualitative indices based on the shape of the waves, were well correlated to the sustained load. AE parameters indicate the shift of failure mechanisms within the composite as the load increases. The ultimate goal is a methodology based on NDT techniques for real time characterization of the degradation and identification of the fracture stage of advanced composite materials.

  19. AUVs as integrated, adaptive acoustic sensors for ocean exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Henrik; Edwards, Joseph R.; Liu, Te-Chih; Montanari, Monica

    2001-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) are rapidly being transitioned into operational systems for national defense, offshore exploration, and ocean science. AUVs provide excellent sensor platform control, allowing for, e.g., accurate acoustic mapping of seabeds not easily reached by conventional platforms, such as the deep ocean. However, the full potential of the robotic platforms is far from exhausted by such applications. Thus, for example, most seabed-mapping applications use imaging sonar technology, the data volume of which cannot be transmitted back to the operators in real time due to the severe bandwidth limitation of the acoustic communication. The sampling patterns are therefore in general being preprogramed and the data are being stored for postmission analysis. This procedure is therefore associated with indiscriminate distribution of the sampling throughout the area of interest, irrespective of whether features of interest are present or not. However, today's computing technology allows for a significant amount of signal processing and analysis to be performed on the platforms, where the results may then be used for real-time adaptive sampling to optimally concentrate the sampling in area of interest, and compress the results to a few parameters which may be transmitted back to the operators. Such adaptive sensing concepts combining environmental acoustics, signal processing, and robotics are currently being developed for concurrent detection, localization, and classification of buried objects, with application to littoral mine countermeasures, deep ocean seabed characterization, and marine archeology. [Work supported by ONR and NATO Undersea Research Center.

  20. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Meneses Chaus, Juan Manuel; Eckert, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research. PMID:27011193

  1. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research.

  2. A Survey on Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network Routing Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Martínez, José-Fernán; Meneses Chaus, Juan Manuel; Eckert, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) have become more and more important in ocean exploration applications, such as ocean monitoring, pollution detection, ocean resource management, underwater device maintenance, etc. In underwater acoustic sensor networks, since the routing protocol guarantees reliable and effective data transmission from the source node to the destination node, routing protocol design is an attractive topic for researchers. There are many routing algorithms have been proposed in recent years. To present the current state of development of UASN routing protocols, we review herein the UASN routing protocol designs reported in recent years. In this paper, all the routing protocols have been classified into different groups according to their characteristics and routing algorithms, such as the non-cross-layer design routing protocol, the traditional cross-layer design routing protocol, and the intelligent algorithm based routing protocol. This is also the first paper that introduces intelligent algorithm-based UASN routing protocols. In addition, in this paper, we investigate the development trends of UASN routing protocols, which can provide researchers with clear and direct insights for further research.

  3. An acoustic sensor for monitoring airflow in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscher, Thomas; Wicks Phd, Alexandrina; Muelenaer Md, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Without proper monitoring, patients with artificial airways in the trachea are at high risk for complications or death. Despite routine maintenance of the tube, dislodged or copious mucus can obstruct the airway. Young children ( 3yrs) have difficulty tending to their own tubes and are particularly vulnerable to blockages. They require external respiratory sensors. In a hospital environment, ventilators, end-tidal CO2 monitors, thermistors, and other auxiliary equipment provide sufficient monitoring of respiration. However, outpatient monitoring methods, such as thoracic impedance and pulse oximetry, are indirect and prone to false positives. Desensitization of caregivers to frequent false alarms has been cited in medical literature as a contributing factor in cases of child death. Ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) is a technique used in specialized industrial applications to non-invasively measure liquid and gas flow. Two transducers are oriented at a diagonal across a flow channel. Velocity measurement is accomplished by detecting slight variations in transit time of contra-propagating acoustic signals with a directional component parallel to air flow. Due to the symmetry of acoustic pathway between sensors, velocity measurements are immune to partial fouling in the tube from mucus, saliva, and condensation. A first generation proof of concept prototype was constructed to evaluate the ultrasonic TOF technique for medical tracheostomy monitoring. After successful performance, a second generation prototype was designed with a smaller form factor and more advanced electronics. This prototype was tested and found to measure inspired volume with a root-mean-square error < 2% during initial trials.

  4. Determination of the sensitivity behavior of an acoustic thermal flow sensor by electronic characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honschoten, van J.W.; Svetovoy, V.B.; Lammerink, T.S.J.; Krijnen, G.J.M.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    The microflown is an acoustic, thermal flow sensor that measures sound particle velocity instead of sound pressure. It is a specific example of a wide range of two- and three-wire thermal flow sensors. For most applications the microflown should be calibrated, which is usually performed acoustically

  5. Two-dimensional acoustic particle velocity sensors based on a crossing wires topology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pjetri, O.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and realization of two-dimensional acoustic particle velocity sensors based on thermal convection. The sensors are of the order of 1 mm×1 mm and consist of two crossing wires with each wire sensing the acoustic particle velocity in the direction parallel to it. Their

  6. Employing Acoustic Emission for Monitoring Oil Film Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mba

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of a gear lubricant is to provide adequate oil film thickness to reduce and prevent gear tooth surface failures. Real time monitoring for gear failures is important in order to predict and prevent unexpected failures which would have a negative impact on the efficiency, performance and safety of the gearbox. This paper presents experimental results on the influence of specific oil film thickness on Acoustic Emission (AE activity for operational helical gears. Variation in film thickness during operations was achieved by spraying liquid nitrogen onto the rotating gear wheel. The experimental results demonstrated a clear relationship between the root mean square (r.m.s value of the AE signal and the specific film thickness. The findings demonstrate the potential of Acoustic Emission technology to quantify lubrication regimes on operational gears.

  7. Analysis of acoustic emission data for bearings subject to unbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapinder Sawhney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE is an effective nondestructive method for investigating the behavior of materials under stress. In recent decades, AE applications in structural health monitoring have been extended to other areas such as rotating machineries and cutting tools. This research investigates the application of acoustic emission data for unbalance analysis and detection in rotary systems. The AE parameter of interest in this study is a discrete variable that covers the significance of count, duration and amplitude of AE signals. A statistical model based on Zero-Inflated Poisson (ZIP regression is proposed to handle over-dispersion and excess zeros of the counting data. The ZIP model indicates that faulty bearings can generate more transient wave in the AE waveform. Control charts can easily detect the faulty bearing using the parameters of the ZIP model. Categorical data analysis based on generalized linear models (GLM is also presented. The results demonstrate the significance of the couple unbalance.

  8. Fault growth and acoustic emissions in confined granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, David A.; Byerlee, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The failure process in a brittle granite was studied by using acoustic emission techniques to obtain three dimensional locations of the microfracturing events. During a creep experiment the nucleation of faulting coincided with the onset of tertiary creep, but the development of the fault could not be followed because the failure occurred catastrophically. A technique has been developed that enables the failure process to be stabilized by controlling the axial stress to maintain a constant acoustic emission rate. As a result the post-failure stress-strain curve has been followed quasi-statically, extending to hours the fault growth process that normally would occur violently in a fraction of a second. The results from the rate-controlled experiments show that the fault plane nucleated at a point on the sample surface after the stress-strain curve reached its peak. Before nucleation, the microcrack growth was distributed throughout the sample. The fault plane then grew outward from the nucleation site and was accompanied by a gradual drop in stress. Acoustic emission locations showed that the fault propagated as a fracture front (process zone) with dimensions of 1 to 3 cm. As the fracture front passed by a given fixed point on the fault plane, the subsequent acoustic emission would drop. When growth was allowed to progress until the fault bisected the sample, the stress dropped to the frictional strength. These observations are in accord with the behavior predicted by Rudnicki and Rice's bifurcation analysis but conflict with experiments used to infer that shear localization would occur in brittle rock while the material is still hardening.

  9. Acoustic Emission Sensing for Maritime Diesel Engine Performance and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    conditions is given in Figure 10. 2. Coefficient of variation . This is a measure of signal dispersion: A coefficient of variation metric...Misfire UNCLASSIFIED DST-Group-TN-1486 UNCLASSIFIED 16 Figure 11 Average coefficient of variation for rms AE signals Figure 12...increases in big end bearing clearance were not definitely identified from the acoustic emission signals. DST Group recommends that for any subsequent

  10. Acoustic emission and shape memory effect in the martensitic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekala, S; Ananthakrishna, G

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic emission signals are known to exhibit a high degree of reproducibility in time and show correlations with the growth and shrinkage of martensite domains when athermal martensites are subjected to repeated thermal cycling in a restricted temperature range. We show that a recently introduced two dimensional model for the martensitic transformation mimics these features. We also show that these features are related to the shape memory effect where near full reversal of morphological features are seen under these thermal cycling conditions.

  11. Feasibility Study of Sensor Aided Impact Acoustic Sorting of Plastic Materials from End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs)

    OpenAIRE

    Jiu Huang; Zhengfu Bian; Shaogang Lei

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this feasibility research was to study a novel sensor based separation method for recycling of plastic materials from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by using eigen-frequency response of impact acoustic emission. In this research three kinds of commonly used plastics, polypropylene (PP), acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and styrene-maleic-anhydride (SMA) sampled from end-of-life vehicles, were researched. Almost all the crushed plastic scraps had a flake structure, theoretica...

  12. Doppler effect for sound emitted by a moving airborne source and received by acoustic sensors located above and below the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, B G

    1993-12-01

    The acoustic emissions from a propeller-driven aircraft are received by a microphone mounted just above ground level and then by a hydrophone located below the sea surface. The dominant feature in the output spectrum of each acoustic sensor is the spectral line corresponding to the propeller blade rate. A frequency estimation technique is applied to the acoustic data from each sensor so that the Doppler shift in the blade rate can be observed at short time intervals during the aircraft's transit overhead. For each acoustic sensor, the observed variation with time of the Doppler-shifted blade rate is compared with the variation predicted by a simple ray-theory model that assumes the atmosphere and the sea are distinct isospeed sound propagation media separated by a plane boundary. The results of the comparison are shown for an aircraft flying with a speed of about 250 kn at altitudes of 500, 700, and 1000 ft.

  13. Challenges in the development of sensors for monitoring automobile emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.S.; Pham, A.Q.

    1997-02-20

    A new generation of on-board automotive sensors are needed for diagnosis and control of engines and catalytic converters. With regard to catalytic converters, the intent of these regulations is to ensure that the vehicle operator is informed when emission control system are no longer performing adequately. In order to be commercialized, sensors for emission control must meet certain criteria, including low cost, reliability, and manufacturability. We have been developing solid state electrochemical sensors for emission control. Most recently, our work has focused on the development of hydrocarbon sensors for monitoring catalytic converter performance. Previous work was concerned with the development of an oxygen sensor having appropriate sensitivity for lean-burn engines. Operational limits for oxygen sensors have been defined and new materials have been developed for hydrocarbon sensors. Technical results are presented here as well as challenges to be met in the development of materials and designs for new chemical sensors for monitoring automotive emissions.

  14. Optimal Node Placement in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network

    KAUST Repository

    Felemban, Muhamad

    2011-10-01

    Almost 70% of planet Earth is covered by water. A large percentage of underwater environment is unexplored. In the past two decades, there has been an increase in the interest of exploring and monitoring underwater life among scientists and in industry. Underwater operations are extremely difficult due to the lack of cheap and efficient means. Recently, Wireless Sensor Networks have been introduced in underwater environment applications. However, underwater communication via acoustic waves is subject to several performance limitations, which makes the relevant research issues very different from those on land. In this thesis, we investigate node placement for building an initial Underwater Wireless Sensor Network infrastructure. Firstly, we formulated the problem into a nonlinear mathematic program with objectives of minimizing the total transmission loss under a given number of sensor nodes and targeted volume. We conducted experiments to verify the proposed formulation, which is solved using Matlab optimization tool. We represented each node with a truncated octahedron to fill out the 3D space. The truncated octahedrons are tiled in the 3D space with each node in the center where locations of the nodes are given using 3D coordinates. Results are supported using ns-3 simulator. Results from simulation are consistent with the obtained results from mathematical model with less than 10% error.

  15. Real-time structural integrity monitoring using a passive quadrature demodulated, localised Michelson optical fibre interferometer capable of simultaneous strain and acoustic emission sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapanes, Edward

    1991-12-01

    A Michelson Fiber optic sensor (MFOS) is described for in-situ strain and vibration monitoring as well as acoustic emission detection in composite material structures. The phase sensitive fiber optic sensor is localized, all-fiber, and intrinsic. The MFOS was successfully embedded in Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/epoxy thermosets as well as graphite/PEEK thermoplastic in order to perform local strain and vibration measurements at the lamina level. A technique allowing acoustic emission detection in parallel with strain and vibration monitoring is illustrated.

  16. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests.

  17. Langasite surface acoustic wave gas sensors: modeling and verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Zheng,; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.

    2013-03-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  18. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W; Oppenheim, Irving J

    2013-01-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  19. Variation of solar acoustic emission and its relation to phase of the solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Solar acoustic emission is closely related to solar convection and photospheric magnetic field. Variation of acoustic emission and its relation to the phase of solar cycles are important to understand dynamics of solar cycles and excitation of acoustic waves. In this work we use 6 years of SDO/HMI Dopplergram data to study acoustic emissions of the whole sun and of the quiet-sun regions, respectively, in multiple acoustic frequency bands. We show the variation of acoustic emission from May 2010 to April 2016, covering half of the solar cycle 24, and analyze its correlation with the solar activity level indexed by daily sunspot number and total magnetic flux. Results show that the correlation between the whole-Sun acoustic emission and the solar activity level is strongly negative for low frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 mHz, but strongly positive for high frequencies between 4.5 and 6.0 mHz. For high frequencies, the acoustic emission excess in sunspot halos overwhelms the emission deficiency in sunspot umbrae and penumbrae. The correlation between the acoustic emission in quiet regions and the solar activity level is negative for 2.5-4.0 mHz and positive for 4.0-5.5 mHz. This shows that the solar background acoustic power, with active regions excluded, also varies during a solar cycle, implying the excitation frequencies or depths are highly related to the solar magnetic field.

  20. Acoustic emissions correlated with hydration of Saguaro Cactus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, L. J.; Rowe, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    For some years it has been demonstrated that hardwood trees produce acoustic emissions during periods of drought, which arise from cavitation in the xylem as water is withdrawn. These emissions not only provide insights into the fluid transport behavior within these trees, but also the degree to which cavitation can proceed before inevitable tree mortality. Such studies can have significant impact on our understanding of forest die-off in the face of climate change. Plant mortality is not limited to woody trees, however, and it is not only the coniferous and deciduous forests whose response to climate and rainfall changes are important. In the desert Southwest we observe changes to survival rates of numerous species of flora. One of the most conspicuous of these plants is the iconic Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea gigantean). These behemoths of the Sonoran Desert are very sensitive to small perturbations in their environment. Specifically, during the summer monsoon season when the cacti become well-hydrated, they can absorb hundreds of gallons of water within a very short time frame. We have obtained a juvenile saguaro on which we are conducting experiments to monitor acoustic emissions during hydration and dessication cycles. We will report on our observations obtained using piezoelectric ceramic accelerometers whose signals are digitized up to 44 Khz and recorded during hydration.

  1. Feasibility Study of Sensor Aided Impact Acoustic Sorting of Plastic Materials from End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiu Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this feasibility research was to study a novel sensor based separation method for recycling of plastic materials from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs by using eigen-frequency response of impact acoustic emission. In this research three kinds of commonly used plastics, polypropylene (PP, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS, and styrene-maleic-anhydride (SMA sampled from end-of-life vehicles, were researched. Almost all the crushed plastic scraps had a flake structure, theoretically their impact response behaviors were determined by their diameters and thicknesses. The equivalent diameters of the scraps were characterized by fine sieving and their thicknesses were measured online by a 3D laser triangulation sensor above the conveying path. Following this the scraps were free dropped one-by-one to impact with an impact passive body on which impact acoustic emission (AE signals were generated and acquired by an acoustic pickup sensor. Thirdly, the AE signals which carried eigen-frequency response features were processed and characterized. Results demonstrated that the scraps with diameters < 8 mm were too weak for the actual devices to process; the scraps with diameter from 8–13 mm still generated quite a lot of AE signals of inadequate intensity. Finally the general characterization and recognition yields were 64.6%, 61.7%, and 63.9% of PP, ABS, and SMA in mass, respectively of tested materials.

  2. Starch viscoelastic properties studied with an acoustic wave sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M D; Gomes, M T S R

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinization and retrogradation of starch was followed in real time with an acoustic wave sensor. This study relies on the monitorization of the frequency of oscillation of a piezoelectric quartz crystal in contact with a 2.5% emulsion of a commercial maize starch, during heating and cooling. The technique showed to be very powerful and sensitive to most of the changes described in the literature, which have been elucidated by some other techniques. The value for the temperature of gelatinization found using the sensor was confirmed by the analysis of the same starch emulsion by polarized light microscopy. Temperatures of gelatinization were found to vary with the sample heating rate, as follows: 73.5 °C at 2.0 °C/min, 66.0 °C at 1.0 °C/min, and 65.0 °C at 0.5 °C/min. Hysteresis of the studied system was evidenced by the frequency shift before heating and after cooling till the initial temperature. Analysis performed on a 1.5% emulsion of a rice starch heated at 2.0 °C/min and cooled as before, evidenced no hysteresis and showed complete reversibility, in which concerns to the series frequency of the piezoelectric quartz crystal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. PVDF-based acoustic sensors prototype for the study of the thermoacoustic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drinck, Fabian; Laihem, Karim; Schumann, Manuel; Wiebusch, Christopher [RWTH Aachen University, Physikzentrum, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    To measure the ultra-hight energy neutrino flux, studies on a larger IceCube neutrino observatory at the south pole have been intensively investigated in the last years. These studies have introduced a hybrid detection concept including radio and acoustic detection in addition to existing optical detection. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) was built and deployed to evaluate the acoustic properties of the South Pole ice for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of an acoustic neutrino detection array. The Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) is supporting these efforts and providing infrastructures for the calibration of PZT-based acoustic sensors used in SPATS, study of a laser-based thermoacoustic model under laboratory conditions and investigating new piezoelectric materials for use in a next generation of acoustic sensors. In this talk we present the R and D status and first results of an acoustic sensor prototype based on PVDF material (Polyvinylidene Fluoride). With a flat frequency response and sensitivity the PVDF response to a thermoacoustic signal has shown the expected bipolar signal free of any superimposed resonances. The analysis of such a clean bipolar signal allow a deeper insight into understanding the thermoacoustic model and leading to a further development of optimized acoustic sensors for deployment at the South Pole.

  4. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y. [University Montpellier, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); CNRS, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F. [CEA, DEN, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  5. Monitoring of Robot Assisted Polishing through parameters of acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarev, Ruslan; Top, Søren; Bilberg, Arne

    , the duration of each process stage and predict the end of process in a precise and unmanned way. This paper presents and analyses the utilization of acoustic emission for generation of control signals in the stone polishing process for achieving these control objectives in an industrial set-up prototype........ The determination of the point in time to change a polishing media or stop the process is needed for computer controlled functional surface generation. During the last years, several research works have been done in order to build grinding/polishing monitoring systems to determine process characteristics...

  6. CONFINING PRESSURE EFFECT ON ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS IN ROCK FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈忠辉; 唐春安; 傅宇方

    1998-01-01

    Based on the phenomenon that acoustic emissions (AE) generated by rock massincreas uddenly because of underground excavation, time sequence of AE rate in rock failurehas been discussed by using statistical damage theory. It has been demonstrated that how theinfluence of confining pressure on the deformation behavior and AE characteristics in rocks can beinferred from a simple mechanics model. The results show that loading confining pressure sharplybrings out increasing of AE. On the other hand, few AE emits when confining pressure is loadedsharply, and AE occurs again when axial pressure keeps on increasing. These results have beenwell simulated with computer and show close correspondence with directly measured curves" inexperiments.

  7. Localization by Acoustic Emission in Transversely Isotropic Slate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Debecker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for localization by acoustic emission in transversely isotropic media is developed and validated. Velocities are experimentally measured and then used to calculate a database of theoretical arrival times for a large number of positions. During an actual test, positions are assigned by comparing measured arrival times with the database's arrival times. The method is applied during load tests on slate samples and compared with visual observations of fractures. The localization method allowed for a good identification of the regions of fracturing at different stages during the test.

  8. Standard practice for examination of fiberglass reinforced plastic fan blades using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) fan blades of the type used in industrial cooling towers and heat exchangers. 1.2 This practice uses simulated service loading to determine structural integrity. 1.3 This practice will detect sources of acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. 1.4 This practice applies to examinations of new and in-service fan blades. 1.5 This practice is limited to fan blades of FRP construction, with length (hub centerline to tip) of less than 3 m [10 ft], and with fiberglass content greater than 15 % by weight. 1.6 AE measurements are used to detect emission sources. Other nondestructive examination (NDE) methods may be used to evaluate the significance of AE sources. Procedures for other NDE methods are beyond the scope of this practice. 1.7 Units—The values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as sta...

  9. Acoustic emissions in granular structures under gravitational destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirot, J.-L.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Kergosien, B.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we perform experiments in an acoustic tank to record acoustic emissions (AEs) occurring when a granular medium is submitted to a gravitational destabilization. The granular medium is composed of monodisperse glass beads filling a box which can be inclined from α=0° up to the avalanche threshold angle α0=28°. To respect quasi-static conditions, the angle increases by steps less than 3°/mn. An omnidirectional hydrophone records the continuous acoustic field in the bead structure until the avalanche occurs. We compare the results for different experimental configurations, in particular for dry and water saturated granular media, but also for different bead diameters (d=8, 3 and 0.3 mm) in order to span the viscosity range of the granular structure. We show that the AE signatures strongly depend on the viscosity parameter, which can be related to the Stokes number and the fluid/solid density ratio. The transition from a viscous to an inertial dynamic of the granular structure is discussed, based on these experimental results.

  10. Progressive Shear Failure in Granular Materials: Linking Force Fluctuations With Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlmayr, G. K.; Cohen, D. O.; Or, D.

    2011-12-01

    Natural hazards associated with rapid mass movements such as shallow landslides, rock falls or debris flows are notoriously difficult to predict even though precursor events associated with small internal failures are known to occur. In this study we focus on grain scale processes preceding the formation of a shear plane in granular materials such as frictional sliding of grain contacts, accommodation of contact networks and fracturing of grain bonds (in cohesive materials) - all of which are discrete micro-mechanical failure events that emit characteristic acoustic emissions that could be used to study internal failure and potentially provide early warning (albeit short). Experiments involving direct shear tests using glass beads and sand were combined with acoustic emission (AE) measurements using piezoelectric sensors with sensitivities to frequencies in the range of 20kHz - 200kHz and accelerometers (0.2kHz - 20kHz) buried within the sheared sample. We obtained good correlations between shear deformation and associated grain-scale mechanical behavior with key characteristics of measured AE (frequency content, signal energy). Fluctuations of shear force occurring during strain controlled deformation are assumed to represent micro-structural rearrangements of the material. We obtained exponential distributions of force fluctuation magnitudes and low frequency AE event statistics. The number of AE events increased with confining stress as well as with particle roughness and were inversely related to grain size. These results were linked with conceptual models of failure accumulation such as the fiber-bundle model. The statistics of AE event occurrence, particularly magnitude-frequency distributions may provide prediction of imminent mechanical collapse. The strong attenuation of acoustic signals within most earth materials present a major challenge to field applications requiring innovative deployment strategies such as the use of acoustic waveguides.

  11. Biomedical signals and sensors II linking acoustic and optic biosignals and biomedical sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Kaniusas, Eugenijus

    2015-01-01

    The book set develops a bridge between physiologic mechanisms and diagnostic human engineering. While the first volume is focused on the interface between physiologic mechanisms and the resultant biosignals, this second volume is devoted to the interface between biosignals and biomedical sensors. That is, in the first volume, the physiologic mechanisms determining biosignals are described from the basic cellular level up to their advanced mutual coordination level. This second volume, considers the genesis of acoustic and optic biosignals and the associated sensing technology from a strategic point of view. As a novelty, this book discusses heterogeneous biosignals within a common frame. This frame comprises both the biosignal formation path from the biosignal source at the physiological level to biosignal propagation in the body, and the biosignal sensing path from the biosignal transmission in the sensor applied on the body up to its conversion to a, usually electric, signal. Some biosignals arise in the co...

  12. Experimental Investigations into the Effects of Lithology on Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhu Tian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to study how lithology affects acoustic emissions (AE, a series of tunnel rock burst simulation experiments, monitored by acoustic emission instruments, were conducted on granite, marble and basalt. By analyzing the characteristic parameters, this study found that AE events occur more frequently during the rock burst process on granite and basalt. Marble remains dormant until 75% of the loading time before the peak, at which point, cracks develop rapidly and AE events dramatically increase. During the rock burst process, the AE energy release demonstrates that low energy is released in the incubation phase and robust energy is released during the later phase. Before the rock burst occurs, increased in the heterogeneity index Cv values of the AE event are subject to lithology. The Cv values of granite and basalt have an increase of about 0.2-0.4, while marble shows an increase of 1.0-1.2. The heterogeneity index Cv value of an AE event is in line with the rock burst process.

  13. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  14. Particle filtering based structural assessment with acoustic emission sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wuzhao; Abdelrahman, Marwa; Zhang, Bin; Ziehl, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear structures are designed to withstand severe loading events under various stresses. Over time, aging of structural systems constructed with concrete and steel will occur. This deterioration may reduce service life of nuclear facilities and/or lead to unnecessary or untimely repairs. Therefore, online monitoring of structures in nuclear power plants and waste storage has drawn significant attention in recent years. Of many existing non-destructive evaluation and structural monitoring approaches, acoustic emission is promising for assessment of structural damage because it is non-intrusive and is sensitive to corrosion and crack growth in reinforced concrete elements. To provide a rapid, actionable, and graphical means for interpretation Intensity Analysis plots have been developed. This approach provides a means for classification of damage. Since the acoustic emission measurement is only an indirect indicator of structural damage, potentially corrupted by non-genuine data, it is more suitable to estimate the states of corrosion and cracking in a Bayesian estimation framework. In this paper, we will utilize the accelerated corrosion data from a specimen at the University of South Carolina to develop a particle filtering-based diagnosis and prognosis algorithm. Promising features of the proposed algorithm are described in terms of corrosion state estimation and prediction of degradation over time to a predefined threshold.

  15. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  16. Characterization of corrosion damage in prestressed concrete using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    The corrosion of reinforced concrete structures is a major issue from both a structural safety and maintenance management point of view. Early detection of the internal degradation process provides the owner with sufficient options to develop a plan of action. An accelerated corrosion test was conducted in a small scale concrete specimen reinforced with a 0.5 inch (13 mm) diameter prestressing strand to investigate the correlation between corrosion rate and acoustic emission (AE). Corrosion was accelerated in the laboratory by supplying anodic current via a rectifier while continuously monitoring acoustic emission activity. Results were correlated with traditional electrochemical techniques such as half-cell potential and linear polarization. The location of the active corrosion activity was found through a location algorithm based on time of flight of the stress waves. Intensity analysis was used to plot the relative significance of the damage states present in the specimen and a preliminary grading chart is presented. Results indicate that AE may be a useful non-intrusive technique for the detection and quantification of corrosion damage.

  17. Acoustic emission of retrofitted fiber-wrapped columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Echary, Hazem; Mirmiran, Amir

    1998-03-01

    In recent years, fiber-wrapping technique has become increasingly popular for retrofitting of existing bridge pier columns in seismic zones. By the way of confinement, the external jacket enhances strength, ductility and shear performance of the column. However, since state of the concrete core is not visible from outside of the jacket, it is of great necessity to develop proper non-destructive methods to evaluate structural integrity of the column. Extensive research on FRP-confined concrete at the University of Central Florida has shown that failure of such hybrid columns is often accompanied by considerable audible and sub-audible noise, making acoustic emission (AE) a viable NDE technique for retrofitted columns. Acoustic emission from fiber-wrapped concrete specimens were monitored. A total of 24 concrete specimens with two types of construction (bonded and unbonded) and four different number of layers (1, 3, 5 and 7) were tested under uniaxial compression. All specimens were made of S-glass fabric and polyester resin with a core diameter of 6' and a length of 12'. Some of the specimens were subjected to cycles of loading and unloading to examine the presence of the Kaiser and the Felicity effects. A 4-channel AEDSP-32/16 (Mistras-2001) machine from Physical Acoustics Corp. was used for the experiments. Results indicate that AE energy and the number of AE counts can both be good representatives for the response of confined concrete. Further, plots of AE energy versus load follows the same bilinear trend that has been observed in the stress-strain response of such specimens. Finally, Felicity effect was observed in all composite specimens.

  18. Oscillating load-induced acoustic emission in laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Alexander; Lockner, David A.; Stroganova, S.; Stanchits, S.; Smirnov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of acoustic emission (AE) were studied. A pre-fractured cylinder of granite was loaded in a triaxial machine at 160 MPa confining pressure until stick-slip events occurred. The experiments were conducted at a constant strain rate of 10−7 s−1 that was modulated by small-amplitude sinusoidal oscillations with periods of 175 and 570 seconds. Amplitude of the oscillations was a few percent of the total load and was intended to simulate periodic loading observed in nature (e.g., earth tides or other sources). An ultrasonic acquisition system with 13 piezosensors recorded acoustic emissions that were generated during deformation of the sample. We observed a correlation between AE response and sinusoidal loading. The effect was more pronounced for higher frequency of the modulating force. A time-space spectral analysis for a “point” process was used to investigate details of the periodic AE components. The main result of the study was the correlation of oscillations of acoustic activity synchronized with the applied oscillating load. The intensity of the correlated AE activity was most pronounced in the “aftershock” sequences that followed large-amplitude AE events. We suggest that this is due to the higher strain-sensitivity of the failure area when the sample is in a transient, unstable mode. We also found that the synchronization of AE activity with the oscillating external load nearly disappeared in the period immediately after the stick-slip events and gradually recovered with further loading.

  19. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  20. Optimal Sensor placement for acoustic range-based underwater robotic positioning

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Glotzbach, T.; Moreno-Salinas, D.; Aranda, J.; Pascoal, A.M.

    This paper addresses the problem of optimal sensor placement for acoustic range-based underwater target positioning. In particular, we focus on the experimental set-up whereby target positioning is performed by measuring...

  1. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the continued development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic liquid...

  2. Passive Wireless Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensors Using Orthogonal Frequency Coded Acoustic Wave Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive wireless surface acoustic wave (SAW) based liquid level sensors for NASA application to cryogenic liquid level...

  3. Investigation of acoustic sensors to detect coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coconut rhinoceros beetle, Oryctes rhinoceros, was accidentally introduced into Guam last year and now threatens the Island’s forests and tourist industry. These large insects can be detected easily with acoustic sensors, and procedures are being developed to incorporate acoustic technology int...

  4. Concepts and Development of Bio-Inspired Distributed Embedded Wired/Wireless Sensor Array Architectures for Acoustic Wave Sensing in Integrated Aerospace Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Prosser, William H.; Kirikera, Goutham; Schulz, Mark J.; Hughes, Derke J.; Orisamolu, Wally

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of acoustic emissions in plate structures and their sensing by embedded or surface bonded piezoelectric sensor arrays. Three different modeling efforts for acoustic emission (AE) wave generation and propagation are discussed briefly along with their advantages and disadvantages. Continuous sensors placed at right angles on a plate are being discussed as a new approach to measure and locate the source of acoustic waves. Evolutionary novel signal processing algorithms and bio-inspired distributed sensor array systems are used on large structures and integrated aerospace vehicles for AE source localization and preliminary results are presented. These systems allow for a great reduction in the amount of data that needs to be processed and also reduce the chances of false alarms from ambient noises. It is envisioned that these biomimetic sensor arrays and signal processing techniques will be useful for both wireless and wired sensor arrays for real time health monitoring of large integrated aerospace vehicles and earth fixed civil structures. The sensor array architectures can also be used with other types of sensors and for other applications.

  5. Damage characterization of thermal barrier coatings by acoustic emission and thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nies, Daniel; Rehmer, Birgit; Skrotzki, Birgit [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Vassen, Robert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Thermal barrier coatings allow increasing the operating temperature and efficiency of land-, sea-, or air-based turbines. As failure of the coating may result in serious damage of the turbine, reliable estimation of its lifetime is essential. To assess the lifetime, cyclic tests are conceived to combine thermal loading by heating the surface of the coating with laser irradiation and nondestructive methods for damage determination. Using laser irradiation allows a high reproducibility of the thermal load. The temperature of the sample surface during thermal loading is determined by an infrared-camera which also enables the possibility to detect damage in the coating via thermography. Additionally, four acoustic sensors, attached to the experimental setup, are used to detect damage in the sample and determine the source of acoustic events. Results of acoustic emission correlate well with thermographic images that visualize the formation and evolution of damage through delaminations in the samples. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Integration of optical and acoustic sensors for D underwater scene reconstruction.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurtós, N.; Cufí Solè, Xavier; Salvi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Combination of optical and acoustic sensors to overcome the shortcomings presented by optical systems in underwater 3D acquisition is an emerging field of research. In this work, an opti-acoustic system composed by a single camera and a multibeam sonar is proposed, providing a simulation environment to validate its potential use in 3D reconstruction. Since extrinsic calibration is a prerequisite for this kind of feature-level sensor fusion, an effective approach to address the ...

  7. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  8. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    OpenAIRE

    Karg, Timo; Bissok, Martin; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia; Collaboration, for the IceCube

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been ...

  9. Diagnostic System of Wireless Acoustic Emission Signal Transfer for Monitoring Oil-and-Gas Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skalsky, V.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of diagnostic 8-channel system for wireless transfer of acoustic emission information during monitoring the objects of long operation is revealed. The results of the development of algorithmic software for hardware system and personal computer, which performs system control and post-processing of acoustic emission information. are presented. The basic specifications of the system are described.

  10. Demodulation of diaphragm based acoustic sensor using Sagnac interferometer with stable phase bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Yu, Yongqin; Jin, Wei

    2015-11-01

    A stable phase demodulation system for diaphragm-based acoustic sensors is reported. The system is based on a modified fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer with a stable quadrature phase bias, which is independent of the parameters of the sensor head. The phase bias is achieved passively by introducing a nonreciprocal frequency shift between the counter-propagating waves, avoiding the use of complicated active servo-control. A 100 nm-thick graphite diaphragm-based acoustic sensor interrogated by the proposed demodulation system demonstrated a minimum detectable pressure level of ~450 µPa/Hz(1/2) and an output signal stability of less than 0.35 dB over an 8-hour period. The system may be useful as a universal phase demodulation unit for diaphragm-based acoustic sensors as well as other sensors operating in a reflection mode.

  11. Unvoiced Speech Recognition Using Tissue-Conductive Acoustic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heracleous Panikos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the use of stethoscope and silicon NAM (nonaudible murmur microphones in automatic speech recognition. NAM microphones are special acoustic sensors, which are attached behind the talker's ear and can capture not only normal (audible speech, but also very quietly uttered speech (nonaudible murmur. As a result, NAM microphones can be applied in automatic speech recognition systems when privacy is desired in human-machine communication. Moreover, NAM microphones show robustness against noise and they might be used in special systems (speech recognition, speech transform, etc. for sound-impaired people. Using adaptation techniques and a small amount of training data, we achieved for a 20 k dictation task a word accuracy for nonaudible murmur recognition in a clean environment. In this paper, we also investigate nonaudible murmur recognition in noisy environments and the effect of the Lombard reflex on nonaudible murmur recognition. We also propose three methods to integrate audible speech and nonaudible murmur recognition using a stethoscope NAM microphone with very promising results.

  12. Processing Chip for Thin Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator Mass Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at portable application, a new integrated process chip for thin film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR mass sensor is proposed and verified with 0.18 um CMOS processing in this paper. The longitudinal mode FBAR with back-etched structure is fabricated, which has resonant frequency 1.878 GHz and factor 1200. The FBAR oscillator, based on the current-reuse structure, is designed with Modified Butterworth Van Dyke (MBVD model. The result shows that the FBAR oscillator operates at 1.878 GHz with a phase noise of −107 dBc/Hz and −135 dBc/Hz at 10 KHz and 100 KHz frequency offset, respectively. The whole process chip size with pads is 1300 μm × 950 μm. The FBAR and process chip are bonded together to sense tiny mass. The measurement results show that this chip precision is 1 KHz with the FBAR frequency gap from 25 kHz to 25 MHz.

  13. The Identification of the Deformation Stage of a Metal Specimen Based on Acoustic Emission Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shenao; Yan, Fengying; Yang, Guoan; Sun, Wei

    2017-04-07

    The acoustic emission (AE) signals of metal materials have been widely used to identify the deformation stage of a pressure vessel. In this work, Q235 steel samples with different propagation distances and geometrical structures are stretched to get the corresponding acoustic emission signals. Then the obtained acoustic emission signals are de-noised by empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and then decomposed into two different frequency ranges, i.e., one mainly corresponding to metal deformation and the other mainly corresponding to friction signals. The ratio of signal energy between two frequency ranges is defined as a new acoustic emission characteristic parameter. Differences can be observed at different deformation stages in both magnitude and data distribution range. Compared with other acoustic emission parameters, the proposed parameter is valid in different setups of the propagation medium and the coupled stiffness.

  14. Denoising of human speech using combined acoustic and em sensor signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L C; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F; Gable, T J

    1999-11-29

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantify of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. Soc. Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). By using combined Glottal-EM- Sensor- and Acoustic-signals, segments of voiced, unvoiced, and no-speech can be reliably defined. Real-time Denoising filters can be constructed to remove noise from the user's corresponding speech signal.

  15. Catalytic sensor based continuous emissions monitor in boiler applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, P.F.; Devita, S.P.; Budd, A. [Monitor Labs, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Until the development of reliable, solid state NO{sub x} sensors, sensor based continuous monitoring of NO{sub x} emissions was primarily by predictive or parametric methods which use data collected from other types of sensors to predict what a NO{sub x} sensor would read. While some success has been achieved using these methods, direct measurement of desired exhaust gases provides greater confidence than can be achieved using modeling approaches. The recent development of a solid state catalytic NO{sub x} sensor allowed development of an analyzer combining the advantages of sensors with the direct measurement capability of traditional continuous emissions monitors. The new sensor based analyzer, the CEMcat{trademark} continuous emissions monitor, utilizes a single, compact, sensor module containing the three sensors for NO{sub x}, CO and O{sub 2} measurement. Its development was sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), and additional support was provided by the Southern California Gas Co. The use of the CEMcat analyzer to monitor emissions from gas turbine engines and large gas-fired reciprocating engines has previously been reported. In these applications, the CEMcat analyzer demonstrated its capability to meet 40CFR60 relative accuracy requirements. This sensor based analyzer has recently been applied in boiler applications.

  16. Temperature Frequency Characteristics of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) Polymer Coated Rayleigh Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators for Gas-Phase Sensor Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaterina I. Radeva; Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Avramov, Ivan D.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature induced frequency shifts may compromise the sensor response of polymer coated acoustic wave gas-phase sensors operating in environments of variable temperature. To correct the sensor data with the temperature response of the sensor the latter must be known. This study presents and discusses temperature frequency characteristics (TFCs) of solid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) polymer coated sensor resonators using the Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (RSAW) mode on ST-cut quartz. Using ...

  17. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  18. Analysis of acoustic emission effect accompanying metal crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorontsov, V B [Urals State University of Railway Transport (USURT), 66 Kolmogorov Street, Ekaterinburg, 620034 (Russian Federation); Katalnikov, V V [Ural State Technical University (USTU), 19 Mira St, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vorontsov@bgd.usart.ru, E-mail: vdeka@mail.ru

    2008-02-15

    The work is devoted to acoustic emission (AE) which occurs in the process of crystallization of metals and non-organic substances. The objective of the research is to obtain an AE signal from the interphase surface and carry out frequency analysis of the spectrum. The results of the research have shown that the signals generated have maximum amplitude in 21-27 kHz range with maximums at 21 and 24 kHz at v=0,8 cm/sec and at 21 and 23 kHz at v=1,43 cm/sec. To explain the results obtained the cluster model of melts was applied. Every AE signal corresponds to the advance of interphase surface by a step equal to 3 layers of clusters.

  19. Quality Testing of Gaseous Helium Pressure Vessels by Acoustic Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco-Luque, M; Hervé, C; Margaroli, C; Sergo, V

    1998-01-01

    The resistance of pressure equipment is currently tested, before commissioning or at periodic maintenance, by means of normal pressure tests. Defects occurring inside materials during the execution of these tests or not seen by usual non-destructive techniques can remain as undetected potential sources of failure . The acoustic emission (AE) technique can detect and monitor the evolution of such failures. Industrial-size helium cryogenic systems employ cryogens often stored in gaseous form under pressure at ambient temperature. Standard initial and periodic pressure testing imposes operational constraints which other complementary testing methods, such as AE, could significantly alleviate. Recent reception testing of 250 m3 GHe storage vessels with a design pressure of 2.2 MPa for the LEP and LHC cryogenic systems has implemented AE with the above-mentioned aims.

  20. ANALYSIS OF CHIP FORMATION DURING HARD TURNING THROUGH ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Neslušan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analysis of chip formation and related aspects of the chip formation during turning hardened steel 100Cr6. The paper draws a comparison of some aspects of the chip formation between turning annealed and hardened roll bearing steel. The results of the analysis show that there is the formation of a segmented chip in the case of hard turning. Frequency of segmentation is very high. A conventional piezoelectric dynamometer limits the frequency response to about 3.5 kHz. On the other hand, the frequency of process fluctuation may by obtained by using accelerometers or acoustic emission. This paper reports about the dynamic character of cutting process when hard turning and correlation among the calculated segmentation frequencies and the experimental analysis.

  1. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Laser cleaning of steam generator tubing based on acoustic emission technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Su-xia; Luo, Ji-jun; Shen, Tao; Li, Ru-song [Xi' an Hi-Tech Institute, Xi' an (China)

    2015-12-15

    As a physical method, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect. The experimental apparatus for laser cleaning of heat tubes in the steam generator was designed according to the results of theoretical analysis. There are two conclusions; one is that laser cleaning technology is attached importance to traditional methods. Which has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes. The other is that the acoustic emission signal includes lots of information on the laser cleaning process, which can be used as real-time monitoring in laser cleaning processes. When the laser acts for 350 s, 100 % contaminants of heat tubes is cleaned off, and the sensor only receives weak AE signal at that time.

  3. Dynamic behaviour of magneto-acoustic emission in a grain-oriented steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupakov, A.; Perevertov, O.; Landa, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magneto-acoustic emission (MAE) in a grain-oriented electrical steel is measured in a wide range of the magnetizing frequencies fmag = 0.5 - 100 Hz at the controllable sinusoidal/triangular waveforms of the magnetic induction B(t). Magnetic field is measured directly by a Hall sensor positioned on the steel surface. Intensity of the MAE signal (rms value) follows a loss separation formula a√{fmag } +bfmag + c and reveals a linear relationship with the hysteresis loss. Number of the MAE individual pulses drops with the magnetizing frequency hyperbolically. Shape of the induction waveform at the fixed magnetizing amplitude and frequency has no visible impact on the above-mentioned behaviour. However, rms profiles of the MAE signal are driven by the field rate of change dH / dt . Integration of the MAE profiles allows to evaluate the hysteresis coercive field.

  4. Deformation, acoustic emission and ultrasound velocity during fatigue tests on paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hæggström E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the evolution of mechanical properties of paper samples during cyclic experiments. The issue is to look at the sample-to-sample variation, and we try to predict the number of loading cycles to failure. We used two concurrent methods to obtain the deformation: the strain was calculated from vertical displacement measured by laser interferometer sensor, as well as, computed by digital image correlation technique from pictures taken each 2s by a camera. Acoustic emission of fracture was also recorded, and an active ultrasonic wave method using piezoelectric transducers is used to follow the viscoelastic behaviour of each sample. We found that a sharp final increase of different variables like deformation, strain rate and fluctuations, are signs of an imminent rupture of the paper. Moreover looking at the evolution of these quantities during the first cycle only is already an indicator about the lifetime of the sample.

  5. Experimental facility for the study of acoustic emission registered in the primary circuit components of WWER power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Hovakimyan, T. H.; Yeghoyan, E. A.; Hovhannisyan, H. T.; Mayilyan, D. G.; Petrosyan, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the creation of a facility for the experimental study of a phenomenon of background acoustic emission (AE), which is detected in the main circulation loop (MCL) of WWER power units. The analysis of the operating principle and the design of a primary feed-and-blow down system (FB) deaerator of NPP as the most likely source of continuous acoustic emission is carried out. The experimental facility for the systematic study of a phenomenon of continuous AE is developed. A physical model of a thermal deaerator is designed and constructed. A thermal monitoring system is introduced. An automatic system providing acoustic signal registration in a low frequency (0.03-30 kHz) and high frequency (30-300 kHz) bands and study of its spectral characteristics is designed. Special software for recording and processing of digitized electrical sensor signals is developed. A separate and independent principle of study of the most probable processes responsible for the generation of acoustic emission signals in the deaerator is applied. Trial series of experiments and prechecks of acoustic signals in different modes of the deaerator model are conducted. Compliance of basic technological parameters with operating range of the real deaerator was provided. It is shown that the acoustic signal time-intensity curve has several typical regions. The pilot research showed an impact of various processes that come about during the operation of the deaerator physical model on the intensity of the AE signal. The experimental results suggest that the main sources of generation of the AE signals are the processes of steam condensation, turbulent flow of gas-vapor medium, and water boiling.

  6. Unipolar and Bipolar High-Magnetic-Field Sensors Based on Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewczyk, V.; Dumesnil, K.; Lacour, D.; Moutaouekkil, M.; Mjahed, H.; Tiercelin, N.; Petit Watelot, S.; Mishra, H.; Dusch, Y.; Hage-Ali, S.; Elmazria, O.; Montaigne, F.; Talbi, A.; Bou Matar, O.; Hehn, M.

    2017-08-01

    While surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors have been used to measure temperature, pressure, strains, and low magnetic fields, the capability to measure bipolar fields and high fields is lacking. In this paper, we report magnetic surface acoustic wave sensors that consist of interdigital transducers made of a single magnetostrictive material, either Ni or TbFe2 , or based on exchange-biased (Co /IrMn ) multilayers. By controlling the ferromagnet magnetic properties, high-field sensors can be obtained with unipolar or bipolar responses. The issue of hysteretic response of the ferromagnetic material is especially addressed, and the control of the magnetic properties ensures the reversible behavior in the SAW response.

  7. Detection of Delamination in Composite Beams Using Broadband Acoustic Emission Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, A. C.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Jiang, Y. P.

    1996-01-01

    Delamination in composite structure may be caused by imperfections introduced during the manufacturing process or by impact loads by foreign objects during the operational life. There are some nondestructive evaluation methods to detect delamination in composite structures such as x-radiography, ultrasonic testing, and thermal/infrared inspection. These methods are expensive and hard to use for on line detection. Acoustic emission testing can monitor the material under test even under the presence of noise generated under load. It has been used extensively in proof-testing of fiberglass pressure vessels and beams. In the present work, experimental studies are conducted to investigate the use of broadband acoustic emission signatures to detect delaminations in composite beams. Glass/epoxy beam specimens with full width, prescribed delamination sizes of 2 inches and 4 inches are investigated. The prescribed delamination is produced by inserting Teflon film between laminae during the fabrication of composite laminate. The objectives of this research is to develop a method for predicting delamination size and location in laminated composite beams by combining smart materials concept and broadband AE analysis techniques. More specifically, a piezoceramic (PZT) patch is bonded on the surface of composite beams and used as a pulser. The piezoceramic patch simulates the AE wave source as a 3 cycles, 50KHz, burst sine wave. One broadband AE sensor is fixed near the PZT patch to measure the AE wave near the AE source. A second broadband AE sensor, which is used as a receiver, is scanned along the composite beams at 0.25 inch step to measure propagation of AE wave along the composite beams. The acquired AE waveform is digitized and processed. Signal strength, signal energy, cross-correlation of AE waveforms, and tracking of specific cycle of AE waveforms are used to detect delamination size and location.

  8. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  9. Detecting Acoustic Emissions With/Without Dehydration of Serpentine Outside P-T Field of Conventional Brittle Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H.; Fei, Y.; Silver, P. G.; Green, H. W.

    2005-12-01

    It is currently thought that earthquakes cannot be triggered at depths greater than ~60 km by unassisted brittle failure or frictional sliding, but could be triggered by dehydration embrittlement of hydrous minerals (Raleigh and Paterson, 1965; Green and Houston, 1995; Kirby, 1995; Jung et al., 2004). Using a new multianvil-based system for detecting acoustic emissions with four channels at high pressure and high temperature that was recently developed (Jung et al., 2005), we tested this hypothesis by deforming samples of serpentine. We found that acoustic emissions were detected not only during/after the dehydration of serpentine, but even in the absence of dehydration. These emissions occurred at high pressure and high temperature, and thus outside pressure-temperature field of conventional brittle failure. Backscattered-electron images of microstructures of the post-run specimen revealed fault slip at elevated pressure, with offsets of up to ~500 μm, even without dehydration. Analysis of P-wave travel times from the four sensors confirmed that the acoustic emissions originated from within the specimen during fault slip. These observations suggest that earthquakes can be triggered by slip along a fault containing serpentine at significantly higher pressure and temperature conditions than that previously thought, even without dehydration. They are thus consistent with faulting mechanisms that appeal to dehydration embrittlement, as well as those that rely solely on the rheology of non-dehydrated serpentine.

  10. Influence of viscoelasticity and interfacial slip on acoustic wave sensors

    OpenAIRE

    McHale, G; Lucklum, R.; Newton, MI; Cowen, JA

    2000-01-01

    Acoustic wave devices with shear horizontal displacements, such as quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) and shear horizontally polarised surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) devices provide sensitive probes of changes at solid-solid and solid- liquid interfaces. Increasingly the surfaces of acoustic wave devices are being chemically or physically modified to alter surface adhesion or coated with one or more layers to amplify their response to any change of mass or material properties. In this work, w...

  11. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments.

  12. Energy Constrained Reliable Routing Optimized Cluster Head Protocol for Multihop under Water Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy.T.V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor network is an emerging technique consisting of sensor nodes, and AUVs all working together to sense various phenomenon, converts the sensed information into digital data, storethe digital data and communicate to the base stations through the intermediate nodes. Also UnderwaterAcoustic Sensor Networks are playing a main role in ocean applications. Unfortunately the efficiency of underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks is inferior to that of terrestrial sensor networks due to the longpropagation delay, narrow bandwidth and high error rates. Also battery life and storage capacity of node is limited. Many routing protocols are proposed to improve the efficiency of Under Water Acoustic Sensor Networks. However their improvement is not enough, so there is a need of suitable routing protocol that consider all these limitations and makes communication in underwater network viable. In this paper, we propose a protocol called Reliable Routing Optimized Cluster Head (RROCH protocol, a network coding approach for multihop topologies. We used performance metrics like packet delivery ratio, energy consumption, end-to-end delay and throughput of sensor nodes. LEACH, HMR-LEACH, LEACH-M are compared for their performance at different traffic conditions, number of nodes and depth. By analyzing our simulation results we found that RROCH protocol may be used for denser network with low traffic and HMR- LEACH protocol is suitable for higher traffic with less number of nodes.

  13. Influence of the vibro-acoustic sensor position on cavitation detection in a Kaplan turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H.; Kirschner, O.; Riedelbauch, S.; Necker, J.; Kopf, E.; Rieg, M.; Arantes, G.; Wessiak, M.; Mayrhuber, J.

    2014-03-01

    Hydraulic turbines can be operated close to the limits of the operating range to meet the demand of the grid. When operated close to the limits, the risk increases that cavitation phenomena may occur at the runner and / or at the guide vanes of the turbine. Cavitation in a hydraulic turbine can cause material erosion on the runner and other turbine parts and reduce the durability of the machine leading to required outage time and related repair costs. Therefore it is important to get reliable information about the appearance of cavitation during prototype operation. In this experimental investigation the high frequency acoustic emissions and vibrations were measured at 20 operating points with different cavitation behaviour at different positions in a large prototype Kaplan turbine. The main goal was a comparison of the measured signals at different sensor positions to identify the sensitivity of the location for cavitation detection. The measured signals were analysed statistically and specific values were derived. Based on the measured signals, it is possible to confirm the cavitation limit of the examined turbine. The result of the investigation shows that the position of the sensors has a significant influence on the detection of cavitation.

  14. Relationship between geometric welding parameters and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arc in GMAW-S process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Huanca Cayo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Show the relationship between geometric characteristics of the weld bead and the optical-acoustic emissions from electric arc during welding in the GMAW-S process.Design/methodology/approach: Bead on plate welding experiments was carried out setting different process parameters. Every welding parameter group was set aiming to reach a high stability level what guarantee a geometrical uniformity in the weld beads. In each experiment was simultaneously acquired arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emissions; from them were computed parameters as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate. It was used a tri-dimensional LASER scanner for to acquire geometrical information from the weld beads surface as width and height of the bead. Depth penetration was measured from sectional cross cutting of weld beads.Findings: Previous analysis showed that the arc emission parameters reach a stationary state with different characteristic for each experiment group which means that there is some correlation level between them. Posterior analysis showed that from infrared parameter is possible to monitoring external weld bead geometry and principally its penetration depth. From acoustic parameter is possible to monitoring principally the external weld bead geometry. Therefore is concluded that there is a close relation between the arc emissions and the weld bead geometry and that them could be used to measuring the welding geometrical parameters.Research limitations/implications: After analysis it was noticed that the infrared sensing has a better performance than acoustic sensing in the depth penetration monitoring. Infrared sensing also sources some information about external geometric parameters that in conjunction with the acoustic sensing is possible to have reliable information about weld bead geometry. This method of sensing geometric parameters could be applied in other welding processes, but is necessary to have

  15. Co-detection of acoustic emissions during failure of heterogeneous media: new perspectives for natural hazard early warning

    CERN Document Server

    Faillettaz, J; Reiweger, I

    2015-01-01

    A promising method for real time early warning of gravity driven rupture that considers both the heterogeneity of natural media and characteristics of acoustic emissions attenuation is proposed. The method capitalizes on co-detection of elastic waves emanating from micro-cracks by multiple and spatially separated sensors. Event co-detection is considered as surrogate for large event size with more frequent co-detected events marking imminence of catastrophic failure. Using a spatially explicit fiber bundle numerical model with spatially correlated mechanical strength and two load redistribution rules, we constructed a range of mechanical failure scenarios and associated failure events (mapped into AE) in space and time. Analysis considering hypothetical arrays of sensors and consideration of signal attenuation demonstrate the potential of the co-detection principles even for insensitive sensors to provide early warning for imminent global failure.

  16. Embedded Acoustic Sensor Array for Engine Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Feasibility of Noise Telemetry via Wireless Smart Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Afroz; Bauch, Matthew; Raible, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines have evolved into a highly complex system to meet ever-increasing demands. The evolution of engine technologies has primarily been driven by fuel efficiency, reliability, as well as engine noise concerns. One of the sources of engine noise is pressure fluctuations that are induced on the stator vanes. These local pressure fluctuations, once produced, propagate and coalesce with the pressure waves originating elsewhere on the stator to form a spinning pressure pattern. Depending on the duct geometry, air flow, and frequency of fluctuations, these spinning pressure patterns are self-sustaining and result in noise which eventually radiate to the far-field from engine. To investigate the nature of vane pressure fluctuations and the resulting engine noise, unsteady pressure signatures from an array of embedded acoustic sensors are recorded as a part of vane noise source diagnostics. Output time signatures from these sensors are routed to a control and data processing station adding complexity to the system and cable loss to the measured signal. "Smart" wireless sensors have data processing capability at the sensor locations which further increases the potential of wireless sensors. Smart sensors can process measured data locally and transmit only the important information through wireless communication. The aim of this wireless noise telemetry task was to demonstrate a single acoustic sensor wireless link for unsteady pressure measurement, and thus, establish the feasibility of distributed smart sensors scheme for aircraft engine vane surface unsteady pressure data transmission and characterization.

  17. Strategies for rock slope failure early warning using acoustic emission monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeglia, D.; Dixon, N.; Fowmes, G. J.; Marcato, G.

    2015-09-01

    Research over the last two decades has led to development of a system for soil slopes monitoring based on the concept of measuring Acoustic Emission (AE). A feature of the system is the use of waveguides installed within unstable soil slopes. It has been demonstrated that the AE measured through this technique are proportional to soil displacement rate. Attention has now been focused on the prospect of using the system within rock materials. The different nature of the slope material to be monitored and its setting means that different acoustic trends are measured, and development of new approaches for their interpretation are required. A total of six sensors have been installed in two pilot sites, firstly in Italy, for monitoring of a stratified limestone slope which can threaten a nationally important road, and secondly in Austria, for monitoring of a conglomerate slope that can endanger a section of the local railway. In this paper an outline of the two trial sites is given and AE data collected are compared with other physical measurements (i.e. rainfall and temperature) and traditional geotechnical instrumentation, to give an overview of recurring AE trends. These include clear AE signatures generated by stress changes linked to increased ground water levels and high energy events generated by freeze-thaw of the rock mass.

  18. Evaluation of acoustic shock induced early hearing loss with audiometer and distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acoustic shock injury has been described as a permanent injury to the auditory system either due to daily noise dose of in excess of 85 decibels or very loud impulse sound reputed to be in excess of 120 decibels and acoustic incidents. This study was performed to compare the results of audiogram and the newer diagnostic method distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) parameters due to acoustic shock injury in call center professionals working in a noisy environment and pr...

  19. New Research on MEMS Acoustic Vector Sensors Used in Pipeline Ground Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Song

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the demands of current pipeline detection systems, the above-ground marker (AGM system based on sound detection principle has been a major development trend in pipeline technology. A novel MEMS acoustic vector sensor for AGM systems which has advantages of high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, and good low frequency performance has been put forward. Firstly, it is presented that the frequency of the detected sound signal is concentrated in a lower frequency range, and the sound attenuation is relatively low in soil. Secondly, the MEMS acoustic vector sensor structure and basic principles are introduced. Finally, experimental tests are conducted and the results show that in the range of 0°~90°, when r = 5 m, the proposed MEMS acoustic vector sensor can effectively detect sound signals in soil. The measurement errors of all angles are less than 5°.

  20. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  1. Development of sensors for the acoustic detection of ultra high energy neutrinos in the deep sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, C.L.

    2007-09-17

    In addition to the optical detection system used by the ANTARES detector, a proposal was made to include an acoustic system consisting of several modified ANTARES storeys to investigate the feasibility of building and operating an acoustic particle detection system in the deep sea and at the same time perform an extensive study of the acoustic properties of the deep sea environment. The directional characteristics of the sensors and their placement within the ANTARES detector had to be optimised for the study of the correlation properties of the acoustic noise at different length scales - from below a metre to above 100 metres. The so-called 'equivalent circuit diagram (=ECD) model' - was applied to predict the acoustic properties of piezo elements, such as sensitivity and intrinsic noise, and was extended by including effects resulting from the geometrical shape of the sensors. A procedure was devised to gain the relevant ECD parameters from electrical impedance measurements of the piezo elements, both free and coupled to a surrounding medium. Based on the findings of this ECD model, intensive design studies were performed with prototype hydrophones using piezo elements as active sensors. The design best suited for the construction of acoustic sensors for ANTARES was determined, and a total of twelve hydrophones were built with a sensitivity of -145 to -140 dB re 1V/{mu}Pa between 5 and 50 kHz and an intrinsic noise power density around -90 dB re 1 V/{radical}(Hz), giving a total noise rms of 7 mV in this frequency range. The hydrophones were pressure tested and calibrated for integration into the ANTARES acoustic system. In addition, three so-called Acoustic Modules, sensors in pressure resistant glass spheres with a sensitive bandwidth of about 80 kHz, were developed and built. The calibration procedure employed during the sensor design studies as well as for the final sensors to be installed in the ANTARES framework is presented, together with

  2. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne (France); Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois [IFP Energies nouvelles, BP3 rond-point de l' echangeur de Solaize (France)

    2014-11-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C{sub 4}H{sub 10} + H{sub 2} + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  3. Modal structural acoustic sensing with minimum number of optimally placed piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmani, Ali; Danesh, Mohammad; Keshmiri, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    Structural acoustic sensing is a method of obtaining radiated sound pressure from a vibrating structure using vibration information. Structural acoustic sensing is used in active structural acoustic control for attenuating the sound radiated from a structure. In this paper, a new approach called Modal Structural Acoustic Sensing (MSAS) is proposed for estimating the pressure radiated from a vibrating cylindrical shell using piezoelectric sensors. The motion equations of a cylindrical shell in conjunction with piezoelectric patches are derived based on the Donnel-Mushtari shell theory. The locations of the piezoelectric sensors are optimized by the Genetic Algorithm based on maximizing the observability gramian matrix. The Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral is used for estimating the sound pressure radiated from the cylindrical shell. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed approach in comparison with previous methods such as discrete structural acoustic sensing and distributed modal sensors. Results show that the MSAS can increase the estimation accuracy and decrease the controller dimensionality and the number of required sensors.

  4. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  5. Scanning thermoelectric and acoustic emission dignostic of structural inhomogeneities of thermocouple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorenko V.J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New method for diagnostic of constructional and functional materials by means of thermoelectric and acoustic- emission measurements is proposed. The method allows not only to establish the defect location, but its partial temperature relaxation achieve.

  6. Damage depth estimation on a fatigue loaded composite structure using thermography and acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Horne, Michael R.

    2017-02-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained on a three stringer panel during periodic fatigue loading. The acoustic emission data were mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. Furthermore, sudden changes in thermally measured damage growth related to a previously measured higher energy acoustic emission event are studied to determine damage depth. A thermal model with a periodic flux heat source is presented to determine the relationship between the damage depth and thermal response. The model results are compared to the measured data. Lastly, the practical application and limitations of this technique are discussed.

  7. ?Smart COPVs? - Continued Successful Development of JSC IR&D Acoustic Emissions (AE) SHM Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and apply promising quantitative pass/fail criteria to CPV using acoustic emission (AE) and lay the foundation for continued development of an automated...

  8. Changes in oto-acoustic emissions after exposure to live music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte; Voetmann, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Distortion Product Oto-acoustic Emissions (DPOAE) and Transient Evoked Oto-acoustic Emissions (TEOAE) were measured in subjects before and after attendance to live music. The changes measured were compared to the exposure levels measured at the position of the subject. The main objectives...... of this experiment were two fold: 1) to assess the validity of the proposed measurement protocol to measure changes in DPOAE and TEOAE after a concert; 2) to test the reliability of the oto-acoustic emission measurement system under field conditions; Initial results shows that it is possible to measure changes...... in hearing after exposures of relative short duration (1.5 hours). There are large individual differences both in sound exposure levels as well as in the changes on oto-acoustic emissions produced by similar exposures. Current results will be presented....

  9. Changes in oto-acoustic emissions after exposure to live music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte; Voetmann, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Distortion Product Oto-acoustic Emissions (DPOAE) and Transient Evoked Oto-acoustic Emissions (TEOAE) were measured in subjects before and after attendance to live music. The changes measured were compared to the exposure levels measured at the position of the subject. The main objectives...... of this experiment were two fold: 1) to assess the validity of the proposed measurement protocol to measure changes in DPOAE and TEOAE after a concert; 2) to test the reliability of the oto-acoustic emission measurement system under field conditions; Initial results shows that it is possible to measure changes...... in hearing after exposures of relative short duration (oto-acoustic emissions produced by similar exposures. Current results will be presented....

  10. Acoustic Emission Based In-process Monitoring in Robot Assisted Polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring in the Robot Assisted Polishing (RAP) process was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate removal of the...

  11. High frequency surface acoustic wave resonator-based sensor for particulate matter detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Sanju; Cole, Marina; Villa-López, Farah Helue; Gardner, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of high frequency Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator-based (SAWR) sensors, for the detection of micron and sub-micron sized particles. The sensor comprises two 262 MHz ST-cut quartz based Rayleigh wave SAWRs where one is used for particle detection and the other as a reference. Electro-acoustic detection of different sized particles shows a strong relationship between mass sensitivity (Δf/Δm) and particle diameter (Dp). This enables frequency-dependent S...

  12. Towards efficient real-time submarine power cable monitoring using distributed fibre optic acoustic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicke, Konstantin; Krebber, Katerina

    2017-04-01

    Online condition monitoring of submarine power cables helps to avert failures and damages produced by mechanical impacts. We report, to our knowledge for the first time, on investigations regarding the feasibility of distributed fiber optic acoustic sensors based on C-OTDR, with the sensor fibers being embedded in the cable, to detect vibrations due to mechanical disturbances along the cable. We present first results of sensing experiments where acoustic signals are transmitted through water to simulate the corresponding submarine conditions. Furthermore, we show results evaluating the usefulness of fibre commonly embedded in existing power cable designs for our sensing purposes.

  13. MEMS acoustic emission transducers designed with high aspect ratio geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, H.; Ozevin, D.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, micro-electro-mechanic systems (MEMS) acoustic emission (AE) transducers are manufactured using an electroplating technique. The transducers use a capacitance change as their transduction principle, and are tuned to the range 50-200 kHz. Through the electroplating technique, a thick metal layer (20 μm nickel + 0.5 μm gold) is used to form a freely moving microstructure layer. The presence of the gold layer reduces the potential corrosion of the nickel layer. A dielectric layer is deposited between the two electrodes, thus preventing the stiction phenomenon. The transducers have a measured quality factor in the range 15-30 at atmospheric pressure and are functional without vacuum packaging. The transducers are characterized using electrical and mechanical tests to identify the capacitance, resonance frequency and damping. Ultrasonic wave generation using a Q-switched laser shows the directivity of the transducer sensitivity. The comparison of the MEMS transducers with similar frequency piezoelectric transducers shows that the MEMS AE transducers have better response characteristics and sensitivity at the resonance frequency and well-defined waveform signatures (rise time and decay time) due to pure resonance behavior in the out-of-plane direction. The transducers are sensitive to a unique wave direction, which can be utilized to increase the accuracy of source localization by selecting the correct wave velocity at the structures.

  14. Acoustic Emission Technique Applied in Textiles Mechanical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios-Soberanis Carlos Rolando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The common textile architecture/geometry are woven, braided, knitted, stitch boded, and Z-pinned. Fibres in textile form exhibit good out-of-plane properties and good fatigue and impact resistance, additionally, they have better dimensional stability and conformability. Besides the nature of the textile, the architecture has a great role in the mechanical behaviour and mechanisms of damage in textiles, therefore damage mechanisms and mechanical performance in structural applications textiles have been a major concern. Mechanical damage occurs to a large extent during the service lifetime consequently it is vital to understand the material mechanical behaviour by identifying its mechanisms of failure such as onset of damage, crack generation and propagation. In this work, textiles of different architecture were used to manufacture epoxy based composites in order to study failure events under tensile load by using acoustic emission technique which is a powerful characterization tool due to its link between AE data and fracture mechanics, which makes this relation a very useful from the engineering point of view.

  15. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals using WaveletTransformation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Subba Rao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE monitoring is carried out during proof pressure testing of pressurevessels to find the occurrence of any crack growth-related phenomenon. While carrying out AEmonitoring, it is often found that the background noise is very high. Along with the noise, thesignal includes various phenomena related to crack growth, rubbing of fasteners, leaks, etc. Dueto the presence of noise, it becomes difficult to identify signature of the original signals related to the above phenomenon. Through various filtering/ thresholding techniques, it was found that the original signals were getting filtered out along with noise. Wavelet transformation technique is found to be more appropriate to analyse the AE signals under such situations. Wavelet transformation technique is used to de-noise the AE data. The de-noised signal is classified to identify a signature based on the type of phenomena.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.559-564, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1677

  16. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  17. Acoustic Emission Parameters of Three Gorges Sandstone during Shear Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental investigation of sandstone samples from the Three Gorges during shear failure was conducted using acoustic emission (AE and direct shear tests. The AE count rate, cumulative AE count, AE energy, and amplitude of the sandstone samples were determined. Then, the relationships among the AE signals and shearing behaviors of the samples were analyzed in order to detect micro-crack initiation and propagation and reflect shear failure. The results indicated that both the shear strength and displacement exhibited a logarithmic relationship with the displacement rate at peak levels of stress. In addition, the various characteristics of the AE signals were apparent in various situations. The AE signals corresponded with the shear stress under different displacement rates. As the displacement rate increased, the amount of accumulative damage to each specimen decreased, while the AE energy peaked earlier and more significantly. The cumulative AE count primarily increased during the post-peak period. Furthermore, the AE count rate and amplitude exhibited two peaks during the peak shear stress period due to crack coalescence and rock bridge breakage. These isolated cracks later formed larger fractures and eventually caused ruptures.

  18. Structural health condition monitoring of rails using acoustic emission techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Pinar

    In-service rails can develop several types of structural defects due to fatigue and wear caused by rolling stock passing over them. Most rail defects will develop gradually over time thus permitting inspection engineers to detect them in time before final failure occurs. In the UK, certain types of severe rail defects such as tache ovales, require the fitting of emergency clamps and the imposing of an Emergency Speed Restriction (ESR) until the defects are removed. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques can be applied for the detection and continuous monitoring of defect growth therefore removing the need of imposing strict ESRs. The work reported herewith aims to develop a sound methodology for the application of AE in order to detect and subsequently monitor damage evolution in rails. To validate the potential of the AE technique, tests have been carried out under laboratory conditions on three and four-point bending samples manufactured from 260 grade rail steel. Further tests, simulating the background noise conditions caused by passing rolling stock have been carried out using special experimental setups. The crack growth events have been simulated using a pencil tip break..

  19. Modal acoustic emission source determination in silicon carbide matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, G. N.

    2000-05-01

    Modal acoustic emission has been used to monitor damage accumulation in woven silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites during tensile testing. There are several potential sources of damage in these systems including transverse matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interphase debonding and sliding, longitudinal cracks in between plies, and fiber breakage. In the past, it has been shown that modal AE is excellent at detecting when damage occurs and subsides, where the damage occurs along the length of the sample, and the loss in material stiffness as a consequence of damage accumulation. The next step is to determine the extent that modal AE can be used to identify specific physical sources. This study will discuss the status of this aim for this composite system. Individual events were analyzed and correlated to specific sources based on the characteristics of the received waveforms, e.g., frequency spectrum and energy, and when the event occurred during the stress-history of the tensile test. Post-test microstructural examination of the test specimens enabled some correlation between specific types of AE events and damage sources.

  20. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Chandra; Anubha S Gour; Vivek K Chandra; Yuvraj Patil

    2004-06-01

    The present paper reports the dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission (AE) from alkali halide crystals. Equations are derived for the strain dependence of the transient AE pulse rate, peak value of the AE pulse rate and the total number of AE pulse emitted. It is found that the AE pulse rate should be maximum for a particular strain of the crystals. The peak value of the AE pulse rate should depend on the volume and strain rate of the crystals, and also on the pinning time of dislocations. Since the pinning time of dislocations decreases with increasing strain rate, the AE pulse rate should be weakly dependent on the strain rate of the crystals. The total number of AE should increase linearly with deformation and then it should attain a saturation value for the large deformation. By measuring the strain dependence of the AE pulse rate at a fixed strain rate, the time constant $_{\\text{s}}$ for surface annihilation of dislocations and the pinning time $_{\\text{p}}$ of the dislocations can be determined. A good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results related to the AE from alkali halide crystals.

  1. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  2. Assessment of corrosion rate in prestressed concrete with acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) sensing was employed to assess the rate of corrosion of steel strands in small scale concrete block specimens. The corrosion process was accelerated in a laboratory environment using a potentiostat to supply a constant potential difference with a 3% NaCl solution as the electrolyte. The embedded prestressing steel strand served as the anode, and a copper plate served as the cathode. Corrosion rate, half-cell potential measurements, and AE activity were recorded continuously throughout each test and examined to assess the development of corrosion and its rate. At the end of each test the steel strands were cleaned and re-weighed to determine the mass loss and evaluate it vis-á-vis the AE data. The initiation and propagation phases of corrosion were correlated with the percentage mass loss of steel and the acquired AE signals. Results indicate that AE monitoring may be a useful aid in the detection and differentiation of the steel deterioration phases, and estimation of the locations of corroded areas.

  3. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  4. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface.

  5. Measurement of Plasma Clotting Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Tatsuya; Kondoh, Jun; Oonishi, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Kazuya

    2013-07-01

    The monitoring of blood coagulation is important during operation. In this study, a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) sensor is applied to monitor plasma clotting. An SH-SAW sensor with a metallized surface for mechanical perturbation detection can detect plasma clotting. As plasma clotting is a gel formation reaction, the SH-SAW sensor detects viscoelastic property changes. On the other hand, an SH-SAW sensor with a free surface for electrical perturbation detection detects only the liquid mixing effect. No electrical property changes due to plasma clotting are obtained using this sensor. A planar electrochemical sensor is also used to monitor plasma clotting. In impedance spectral analysis, plasma clotting is measured. However, in the measurement of time responses, no differences between clotting and nonclotting are obtained. Therefore, the SH-SAW sensor is useful for monitoring plasma clotting.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of unstable damage growth in CFRP composites under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills-Dadson, B.; Tran, D.; Asamene, K.; Whitlow, T.; Sundaresan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Composite structural members experience extensive and complex damage that accumulate in a relatively steady pace as the structure is quasi-statically loaded. This damage progression which starts as matrix cracks, delaminations, and random fiber breaks, turns unstable when groups of adjacent fibers, ranging from four to ten fibers fail together, after about 85% of ultimate strength, as reported in the literature. Identifying this critical damage that precedes the final fracture has been difficult even in laboratory specimens. There is little consensus on successful use of AE signals to differentiate failure modes. The inability of AE patterns to identify failure modes is likely caused by the limited frequency bandwidth of available AE sensors, and the high attenuation seen in AE signals particularly in the frequency range likely to be associated with fiber fractures. As a part of this study new acoustic emission sensors capable of measuring frequencies to 2 MHz were developed. In addition, composite specimens were instrumented with sufficient number of sensors to capture high frequency signals before they are attenuated. Unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic carbon-epoxy composite tensile specimens were monitored while they were statically loaded to failure. Distinctly different signals corresponding to the three failure modes could be observed. High frequency acoustic emission signals with frequencies well in excess of 1MHz, mostly seen in the last 20% of the loading cycle. Signals with frequencies in the range of 300 kHz to 700 kHz and duration of the order of 50 microseconds, were observed in cross ply and quasi-isotropic specimens, and are believed to be from matrix cracks. Fewer events with frequencies below 300 kHz and duration that exceeded about 200 microseconds are believed to be from delaminations. An important observation in this study is the appearance of groups of near identical waveforms, which are believed to be from clusters of adjacent

  7. Detection of the deterministic component in acoustic emission signals from mechanically loaded rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilarov, V. L.

    2015-11-01

    Using the Takens theorem, the attractor was reconstructed for amplitudes of acoustic emission signals measured during fracture of granite samples. Systematic features of the temporal behavior of system dynamic characteristics, such as the embedding dimension, fractal dimensions, recurrence plots, and their numerical parameters, were determined. For a preliminarily water-saturated sample, an order-disorder phase transition was detected in the structure of acoustic emission signals.

  8. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGugan, M.; Soerensen, Bent F.; Oestergaard, R.; Bech, T.

    2006-12-15

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material is presented. The contribution of the acoustic emission monitoring technique in defining different failure modes identified during the testing is discussed. The development of in-situ structural monitoring and control systems is considered. (au)

  9. Fiber-optic photo-acoustic spectroscopy sensor for harsh environment gas detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juntao; Deng, Kung-Li; Guida, Renato; Lee, Boon

    2007-09-01

    Photo-acoustic spectroscopy (PAS) has been successfully applied to detect various gases and chemicals due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. However, the performance of the conventional acoustic sensors prohibits the application of PAS for harsh environment gas species real-time monitoring. By replacing conventional acoustic sensors, such as microphone and piezo-transducers, with a high-temperature Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) vibration sensor, we developed a fiber-optic PAS sensing system that can be used in high-temperature and high-pressure harsh environments for gas species identification and concentration measurement. A resonant acoustic chamber is designed, and FBG vibration sensor is embedded in the molybdenum membrane. An OPO laser is used for spectrum scanning. Preliminary test on water vapor has been conducted, and the result is analyzed. This sensing technology can be adapted into harsh environments, such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant, and provide on-line real-time monitoring of gases species, such as CO, H IIO, and O II. Presently, our FBG-based vibration sensor can withstand the high temperature up to 800°C.

  10. Acoustic emission detection of early stages of cracks in rotating gearbox components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dan

    2017-02-01

    Many critical, highly loaded rotating gearbox components have fast crack propagation rates. Early detection of cracks in gearbox is critical to mitigating the risk of catastrophic failure. Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have proven to be capable of continuously monitoring the crack initiation and propagation. Due to the long distance of AE signal propagation from the AE sources to the sensors installed in the housing, the AE signal suffers from severe attenuation and noises. Accurate AE signal classification technology that is capable of extracting the true AE signal out of background noises generated by the surrounding environment of a gearbox is desired. In this paper, an innovative feature extraction and analysis based AE signal classification technology is developed to address this issue. Potential AE signals are first pulled out of the noisy background in real-time through a set of automated AE detection algorithms. Then features including count, energy, duration, amplitude, rise time, amplitude rise time ratio, etc. are extracted and analyzed. Through the comparison and correlation of features extracted from signals recorded by multiple AE sensors, respective feature thresholds are determined to distinguish noises from real AE signal. The classification results are experimentally validated through fatigue tests.

  11. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  12. Resonance Effects of Bilayered Piezoelectric Films Used for Bulk Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; ZHANG Shu-Yi; FAN Li

    2011-01-01

    The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied.When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition,i.e.the phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals π,both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor.The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor,which is useful for improving the mass sensitivity and resolution of acoustic sensors.Additionally,both of the piezoelectric films have larger thickness and decrease the risk of mechanical damage in device production processes.Thin film bulk acoustic sensors have attracted great attention due to their small sizes,low power consumption and high sensitivity,etc.[1] The thickness shear mode (TSM) is more suitable for liquid sensing applications since much less acoustic energy is transferred into the liquid medium than that of longitudinal acoustic waves,due to the fact that ideal liquids cannot support propagations of shear waves.By using a TSM with a high resonance frequency,sensorsbased on thin film bulk acoustic resonator structures can be fabricated by the fixing of a sensitive coating on the surface of the device.[2] The binding events at the sensitive coating can cause a shift of the resonance frequency.[3]%The resonance vibrations of acoustic sensors with two layers of (1120) textured hexagonal piezoelectric films are studied. When the acoustic and electric fields satisfy a special match condition, I.e. The phase variation of thickness shear mode (TSM) at each film equals it, both piezoelectric layers with opposite polarization directions reduce the first TSM and generate the second TSM with higher frequency and a higher quality factor. The excited second TSM can increase the product of the operating frequency and the quality factor, which

  13. Measurement of low-frequency ultrasonic wave in water using an acoustic fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    An acoustic fiber sensor for measurement of ultrasonic waves, which used the approximate Raman-Nath diffraction effect where light diffraction waves were generated in an optical fiber by strain due to the ultrasonic waves, was proposed and examined. In order to characterize the acoustic fiber sensor as a basic study, measurements of low-frequency ultrasonic waves in water were examined using a step index fiber operating as a detection sensor. The results showed that characteristics of detected signals agreed with the theoretical prediction based on Fraunhofer diffraction. This indicates that our proposed fiber sensor can be used for the detection of low-frequency ultrasonic waves as well as the transmission of light diffraction signals.

  14. Fabry-Perot micro-structured polymer optical fibre sensors for opto-acoustic endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet;

    2015-01-01

    Opto-Acoustic Endoscopy (OAE) requires sensors with a high sensitivity and small physical dimensions in order to facilitate integration into an endoscope of less than 1mm in diameter. We present fibre Bragg grating (FBG) and Fabry- Perot intrinsic fibre sensors for ultrasound detection. We presen...... and a simplification of the detection regime for an optimal interferometric OAE configuration. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only....

  15. Effect of aluminium in propellant composition on acoustic emission parameters (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rm. Muthiah

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The study reports the variation in acoustic emission signals acquired during combustion of typical propellants with varying aluminium and ammonium perchlorate content. It was observed that when propellant strands having the same composition undergo combustion under similar conditions, they produce consistent acoustic emission signals. To study the effect of variation of aluminium content in the propellant composition on the acoustic emission produced during combustion, the aluminium content was varied from 6 per cent to 18 per cent in a HTPB-based composite propellant with 86 per cent solid loading. Experiments were carried out with propellant strands under the same conditions for a comparative study. Acoustic emission parameters, such as peak amplitude, ring-down counts, average frequency, hits and energy were studied as functions of time. Among these parameters, only energy ring-down counts and frequency varied significantly with aluminium content. The effect of cumulative values of energy, frequency and ring-down counts, the effect of burn rate and theoretical specific impulse against the aluminium percentage variation, and the variation of specific impulse against acoustic energy can all be correlated. The clear trend is indicative of possible prediction of propellant performance parameter like specific impulse from acoustic emission parameters.

  16. Bio-Inspired Miniature Direction Finding Acoustic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmott, Daniel; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2016-07-01

    A narrowband MEMS direction finding sensor has been developed based on the mechanically coupled ears of the Ormia Ochracea fly. The sensor consists of two wings coupled at the middle and attached to a substrate using two legs. The sensor operates at its bending resonance frequency and has cosine directional characteristics similar to that of a pressure gradient microphone. Thus, the directional response of the sensor is symmetric about the normal axis making the determination of the direction ambiguous. To overcome this shortcoming two sensors were assembled with a canted angle similar to that employed in radar bearing locators. The outputs of two sensors were processed together allowing direction finding with no requirement of knowing the incident sound pressure level. At the bending resonant frequency of the sensors (1.69 kHz) an output voltage of about 25 V/Pa was measured. The angle uncertainty of the bearing of sound ranged from less than 0.3° close to the normal axis (0°) to 3.4° at the limits of coverage (±60°) based on the 30° canted angle used. These findings indicate the great potential to use dual MEMS direction finding sensor assemblies to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  17. Array gain for a conformal acoustic vector sensor array: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Yi-Xin; He, Zheng-Yao; Lei, Bo; Sun, Chao; Ma, Yuan-Liang

    2016-12-01

    An acoustic vector sensor can measure the components of particle velocity and the acoustic pressure at the same point simultaneously, which provides a larger array gain against the ambient noise and a higher angular resolution than the omnidirectional pressure sensor. This paper presents an experimental study of array gain for a conformal acoustic vector sensor array in a practical environment. First, the manifold vector is calculated using the real measured data so that the effects of array mismatches can be minimized. Second, an optimal beamformer with a specific spatial response on the basis of the stable directivity of the ambient noise is designed, which can effectively suppress the ambient noise. Experimental results show that this beamformer for the conformal acoustic vector sensor array provides good signal-to-noise ratio enhancement and is more advantageous than the delay-and-sum and minimum variance distortionless response beamformers. Project supported by the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2016M592782) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274253 and 11604259).

  18. Studies on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) dosimeter sensor for organophosphorous nerve agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.; Harteveld, J.L.N.

    1997-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor for nerve agents, irreversible response effects have been studied in more detail. Surface analytical studies indicated that degradation products are responsible for the effects observed. In addition it was tried to explore these

  19. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Acoustic Fixed Sensors Using Separate, Non-Linked Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Cheap DECAF: Density Estimation for Cetaceans from... cetaceans using passive fixed acoustics rely on large, dense arrays of cabled hydrophones and/or auxiliary information from animal tagging projects...estimating cetacean density. Therefore, the goal of Cheap DECAF is to focus on the development of cetacean density estimation methods using sensors that

  20. Studies on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) dosimeter sensor for organophosphorous nerve agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.; Harteveld, J.L.N.

    1997-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work on a Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor for nerve agents, irreversible response effects have been studied in more detail. Surface analytical studies indicated that degradation products are responsible for the effects observed. In addition it was tried to explore these

  1. Diaphragm based long cavity Fabry-Perot fiber acoustic sensor using phase generated carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Lin, Jie; Liu, Huan; Ma, Yuan; Yan, Lei; Jin, Peng

    2017-01-01

    A diaphragm based long cavity Fabry-Perot interferometric fiber acoustic sensor is proposed. The Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a flat fiber facet and an ultra-thin silver diaphragm with a 6-meter long fiber inserted in the cavity. A narrow-linewidth ring-cavity erbium-doped fiber laser is applied to demodulate the sensing signal in the phase generated carrier algorithm. Experimental results have demonstrated that the phase sensitivity is about -140 dB re 1 rad/μPa at 2 kHz. The noise equivalent acoustic signal level is 60.6 μPa/Hz1/2 and the dynamic range is 65.1 dB-SPL at 2 kHz. The sensor is suitable for sensing of weak acoustic signals.

  2. Source localization using acoustic vector sensors: a music approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Jelmer; Tijs, Emiel; de Bree, H.E.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, a large array of microphones is used to localize multiple far field sources in acoustics. We present a sound source localization technique that requires far less channels and measurement locations (affecting data channels, setup times and cabling issues). This is achieved by using an

  3. Standard practice for examination of liquid-Filled atmospheric and Low-pressure metal storage tanks using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of new and in-service aboveground storage tanks of the type used for storage of liquids. 1.2 This practice will detect acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. For flat-bottom tanks these areas will generally include the sidewalls (and roof if pressure is applied above the liquid level). The examination may not detect flaws on the bottom of flat-bottom tanks unless sensors are located on the bottom. 1.3 This practice may require that the tank experience a load that is greater than that encountered in normal use. The normal contents of the tank can usually be used for applying this load. 1.4 This practice is not valid for tanks that will be operated at a pressure greater than the examination pressure. 1.5 It is not necessary to drain or clean the tank before performing this examination. 1.6 This practice applies to tanks made of carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum and oth...

  4. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Girard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  5. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Girard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  6. Development of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor for In-Situ Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome L. Wright

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW sensor that is designed to be operated continuously and in situ to detect volatile organic compounds. A ruggedized stainless-steel package that encases the SAW device and integrated circuit board allows the sensor to be deployed in a variety of media including air, soil, and even water. Polymers were optimized and chosen based on their response to chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene, which are common groundwater contaminants. Initial testing indicates that a running-average data-logging algorithm can reduce the noise and increase the sensitivity of the in-situ sensor.

  7. A Study on the Evaluation of Valve Leak Rates Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Sun Ki; Shon, Seok Man; Lee, Wook Ryun; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yong Jae; Choo, Kee Young [Hana Evertech Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, two types of valve(a 3 1/2 inch glove valve for 600 psi steam and a 4 inch ball valve water ) leak tests using three different leak path and numerous leak rates were performed in order to analyze acoustic emission properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound amplitude increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were plotted versus peak acoustic amplitudes recorded within those two narrow frequency bands on each spectral plot. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak acoustic amplitude were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. The large amount of data collected also allowed a grief investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leakage rates, pressure differentials and transducers on the acoustic amplitude spectra. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the acoustic emission method for monitoring of leak was feasible.

  8. Acoustic Emission Determination of Deformation Mechanisms Leading to Failure of Naval Alloys. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    Emission Laser Beam Interferometer HY80 , 100, 130 Steels Mechanical Deformation Nondestructive Evaluation 2. ABSTRACT (Conetnue an rovere eli if necoo y...publication, J. Applied Phys.). 43. A. Peterlin, B.B. Djordjvic, J.C. Murphy, R.E. Green, "Acoustic Emission During Craze Forma- tion in Polymers

  9. LDB: Localization with Directional Beacons for Sparse 3D Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanjiang Luo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel distributed localization scheme LDB, a 3D localization scheme with directional beacons for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks (UWA-SNs. LDB localizes sensor nodes using an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV as a mobile beacon sender. Mounted with a directional transceiver which creates conical shaped directional acoustic beam, the AUV patrols over the 3D deployment volume with predefined trajectory sending beacons with constant interval towards the sensor nodes. By listening two or more beacons sent from the AUV, the nodes can localize themselves silently. Through theoretical analysis, we provide the upper bound of the estimation error of the scheme. We also evaluate the scheme by simulations and the results show that our scheme can achieve a high localization accuracy, even in sparse networks.

  10. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  11. A methodology for analyzing an acoustic scene in sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Hong; Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2007-10-01

    Presented here is a novel clustering method for Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and its application in acoustic scene analysis. In this method, HMMs are clustered based on a similarity measure for stochastic models defined as the generalized probability product kernel (GPPK), which can be efficiently evaluated according to a fast algorithm introduced by Chen and Man (2005) [1]. Acoustic signals from various sources are partitioned into small frames. Frequency features are extracted from each of the frames to form observation vectors. These frames are further grouped into segments, and an HMM is trained from each of such segments. An unknown segment is categorized with a known event if its HMM has the closest similarity with the HMM from the corresponding labeled segment. Experiments are conducted on an underwater acoustic dataset from Steven Maritime Security Laboratory, Data set contains a swimmer signature, a noise signature from the Hudson River, and a test sequence with a swimmer in the Hudson River. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully associate the test sequence with the swimmer signature at very high confidence, despite their different time behaviors.

  12. A micro-Doppler sonar for acoustic surveillance in sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaonian

    Wireless sensor networks have been employed in a wide variety of applications, despite the limited energy and communication resources at each sensor node. Low power custom VLSI chips implementing passive acoustic sensing algorithms have been successfully integrated into an acoustic surveillance unit and demonstrated for detection and location of sound sources. In this dissertation, I explore active and passive acoustic sensing techniques, signal processing and classification algorithms for detection and classification in a multinodal sensor network environment. I will present the design and characterization of a continuous-wave micro-Doppler sonar to image objects with articulated moving components. As an example application for this system, we use it to image gaits of humans and four-legged animals. I will present the micro-Doppler gait signatures of a walking person, a dog and a horse. I will discuss the resolution and range of this micro-Doppler sonar and use experimental results to support the theoretical analyses. In order to reduce the data rate and make the system amenable to wireless sensor networks, I will present a second micro-Doppler sonar that uses bandpass sampling for data acquisition. Speech recognition algorithms are explored for biometric identifications from one's gait, and I will present and compare the classification performance of the two systems. The acoustic micro-Doppler sonar design and biometric identification results are the first in the field as the previous work used either video camera or microwave technology. I will also review bearing estimation algorithms and present results of applying these algorithms for bearing estimation and tracking of moving vehicles. Another major source of the power consumption at each sensor node is the wireless interface. To address the need of low power communications in a wireless sensor network, I will also discuss the design and implementation of ultra wideband transmitters in a three dimensional

  13. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the acoustic emission activity of cement pastes was investigated during the first day of hydration. Deaired, fresh cement pastes were cast in sealed sample holders designed to minimize friction and restraint. The majority of acoustic emission events occurred in lower water to cement....... According to these experimental results, the acoustic emission measured around setting time was attributed to cavitation events occurring in the pores of the cement paste due to self-desiccation. This paper shows how acoustic emission might be used to indicate the time when the fluid–solid transition occurs...

  14. Integration of acoustical sensors into the KM3NeT optical modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzenhöfer, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The next generation multi-cubic-kilometre water Cherenkov neutrino telescope will be build in the Mediterranean Sea. This telescope, called KM3NeT, is currently entering a first construction phase. The KM3NeT research infrastructure will comprise 690 so-called Detection Units in its final design which will be anchored to the sea bed and held upright by submerged floats. The positions of these Detection Units, several hundred metres in length, and their attached Optical Modules for the detection of Cherenkov light have to be monitored continously to provide the telescope with its desired pointing precision. A standard way to do this is the utilisation of an acoustic positioning system using emitters at fixed positions and receivers distributed along the Detection Units. The KM3NeT neutrino telescope comprises a custom-made acoustic positioning system with newly designed emitters attached to the anchors of the Detection Units and custom-designed receivers attached to the Detection Units. This article describes an approach for a receiver and its performance. The proposed Opto-Acoustical Modules combine the optical sensors for the telescope with the acoustical sensors necessary for the positioning of the module itself. This combination leads to a compact design suited for an easy deployment of the numerous Detection Units. Furthermore, the instrumented volume can be used for scientific analyses such as marine science and acoustic particle detection.

  15. Demonstration of novel high-power acoustic through-the-wall sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Felber, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    A high-power acoustic sensor, capable of detecting and tracking persons through steel walls of cargo containers, trailer truck bodies, and train cars, has been developed and demonstrated. The sensor is based on a new concept for narrowband mechanical-impact acoustic transmitters and matched resonant receivers. The lightweight, compact, and low-cost transmitters produce high-power acoustic pulses at one or more discrete frequencies with little input power. The energy for each pulse is accumulated over long times at low powers, like a mousetrap, and therefore can be operated with ordinary batteries and no power conditioning. A breadboard impact-transmitter and matched-receiver system that detected human motion through thick walls with only rudimentary signal processing is described, and results are presented. A conceptual design is presented of an acoustic through-the-wall sensor, costing about $10,000 per unit and capable of remotely and non-intrusively scanning steel cargo containers for stowaways at a rate o...

  16. Uniaxial compression CT and acoustic emission test on the coal crack propagation destruction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-hong LIU; Yao-dong JIANG; Yi-xin ZHAO; Jie ZHU

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission test and CT scanning are important techniques in the study of coal crack propagation.A uniaxial compression test was performed on coal samples by integrating CT and acoustic emission.The test comparison analyzes the acoustic emission load and CT images for an effective observation on the entire process,from crack propagation to the samples' destruction.The box dimension of the coal samples' acoustic emission series and the CT images were obtained through calculations by using the authors' own program.The results show that the fractal dimension of both the acoustic emission energy and CT image increase rapidly,indicating coal and rock mass has entered a dangerous condition.Hence,measures should be taken to unload the pressure of the coal and rock mass.The test results provide intuitive observation data for the coal meso-damage model.The test contributes to in-depth studies of coal or rock crack propagation mechanisms and provides a theoretical basis for rock burst mechanism.

  17. Fluorescent sensor for Cu2+ with a tunable emission wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhir, Andriy; Kiel, Alexander; Herten, Dirk-Peter; Kraemer, Roland

    2005-08-08

    A concept of fluorescent metal ion sensing with an easily tunable emission wavelength is presented and its principle demonstrated by detection of Cu(2+). A fluorescein dye was chemically modified with a metal chelating group and then attached to the terminus of ss-DNA. This was combined with a complementary ss-DNA modified with another fluorescent dye (ATTO 590), emitting at a longer wavelength. In the assembled duplex, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the fluorescein donor (excited at 470 nm) and the ATTO 590 acceptor (emitting at 624 nm) is observed. Proper positioning within the rigid DNA double helix prevents intramolecular contact quenching of the two dyes. Coordination of paramagnetic Cu(2+) ions by the chelating unit of the sensor results in direct fluorescence quenching of the fluorescein dye and indirect (by loss of FRET) quenching of the ATTO 590 emission at 624 nm. As a result, emission of the acceptor dye can be used for monitoring of the concentration of Cu(2+), with a 20 nM detection limit. The emission wavelength is readily tuned by replacement of ATTO-DNA by other commercially available DNA-acceptor dye conjugates. Fluorescent metal ion sensors emitting at >600 nm are very rare. The possibility of tuning the emission wavelength is important with respect to the optimization of this sensor type for application to biological samples, which usually show broad autofluorescence at <550 nm.

  18. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  19. Acoustic vibration sensor based on nonadiabatic tapered fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben; Li, Yi; Sun, Miao; Zhang, Zhen-Wei; Dong, Xin-Yong; Zhang, Zai-Xuan; Jin, Shang-Zhong

    2012-11-15

    A simple and low-cost vibration sensor based on single-mode nonadiabatic fiber tapers is proposed and demonstrated. The environmental vibrations can be detected by demodulating the transmission loss of the nonadiabatic fiber taper. Theoretical simulations show that the transmission loss is related to the microbending of the fiber taper induced by vibrations. Unlike interferometric sensors, this vibration sensor does not need any feedback loop to control the quadrature point to obtain a stable performance. In addition, it has no requirement for the coherence of the light source and is insensitive to temperature changes. Experimental results show that this sensing system has a wide frequency response range from a few hertz to tens of kilohertz with the maximal signal to noise ratio up to 73 dB.

  20. A joint fatigue - creep deterioration model for masonry with acoustic emission based damage assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Tomor, Adrienn K.; Verstrynge, Els

    2013-01-01

    The paper investigates the long-term fatigue and creep deterioration processes in historical brick masonry. Based on two independent laboratory test series, the relationship between stress level and life expectancy was considered for fatigue and creep loading in the form of SN type models. The process of deterioration was investigated with the help of acoustic emission technique to identify stages and characteristics of the damage accumulation process. Based on the test data and acoustic emis...

  1. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amami, Souhail [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)], E-mail: souhail.amami@utc.fr; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  2. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  3. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  4. The evaluation of moisture damage for CFRC pipes in conjunction with acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Su, Yu-Min; Liu, Yanjun; Tia, Mang

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the in-situ serviceability of cellulose fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) pipes using Acoustic Emission (AE). Three-edge-bearing test was conducted on CFRC pipes in the laboratory in accordance with ASTM C497-05. Pipes were saturated in water for various periods of time to simulate the practical field situations of CFRC pipes with different service life exposed to moisture effects. AE sensors and LVDT were installed on pipes detect the damage phases during loading. Both monotonic and cyclic loading modes were conducted on the CFRC pipes. Results showed that the CFRC pipes generally exhibited the nonlinear load-displacement behavior before failure, yet the level of ductility was reduced with longer exposure to moisture condition. AE data were evaluated through two feature signals, that is, intensity analysis and calm ratio analysis. Results showed that AE can detect the onset of damage and the ultimate failure of CFRC pipes. Additionally, the analysis on CFRC pipes subjected to various moisture effects showed different features of AE results. It is found that intensity analysis can distinguish different periods of exposure to moisture and levels of ductility, which make it feasible to monitor the health of CFRC pipes under moisture effects.

  5. Identification of the Onset of Cracking in Gear Teeth Using Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, R.; Clarke, A.; Eaton, M. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Holford, K. M.

    2012-08-01

    The development of diagnostic methods for gear tooth faults in aerospace power transmission systems is an active research area being driven largely by the interests of military organisations or large aerospace organisations. In aerospace applications, the potential results of gear failure are serious, ranging from increased asset downtime to, at worst, catastrophic failure with life-threatening consequences. New monitoring techniques which can identify the onset of failure at earlier stages are in demand. Acoustic Emission (AE) is the most sensitive condition monitoring tool and is a passive technique that detects the stress wave emitted by a structure as cracks propagate. In this study a gear test rig that allows the fatigue loading of an individual gear tooth was utilised. The rig allows a full AE analysis of damage signatures in gear teeth without the presence of constant background noise due to rotational and frictional sources. Furthermore this approach allows validation of AE results using crack gauges or strain gauges. Utilising a new approach to AE monitoring a sensor was mounted on the gear and used to continuously capture AE data for a complete fatigue load cycle of data, rather than the traditional approach where discrete signals are captured on a threshold basis. Data was captured every 10th load cycle for the duration of the test. A developed fast fourier transform analysis technique was compared with traditional analytical methods. In this investigation the developed techniques were validated against visual inspection and were shown to be far superior to the traditional approach.

  6. Acoustic emission studies for characterization of fatigue crack growth behavior in HSLA steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Ahmad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    High strength low alloy (HSLA) steels are a group of low carbon steels and used in oil and gas pipelines, automotive components, offshore structures and shipbuilding. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) characteristics of a HSLA steel have been studied at two different stress ratios (R = 0.3 and 0.5). Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated during the FCG tests have been used to understand the FCG processes. The AE signals were captured by mounting two piezoelectric sensors on compact tension specimens in liner location configuration. The AE generated in stage II of the linear Paris region of FCG has been attributed to the presence of two sub-stages with two different slopes. The AE generated at higher values of stress intensity factor is found to be useful to identify the transition from stage II to stage III of the FCG. AE location analysis has provided support for increased damage at the crack tip for higher stress ratio. The peak stress intensity (Kmax) values at the crack tip have shown good correlation with the transitions from stage IIa to stage IIb and stage II to stage III of the FCG for the two stress ratios.

  7. Toward a probabilistic acoustic emission source location algorithm: A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Thomas; Straub, Daniel; Higgins, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) are stress waves initiated by sudden strain releases within a solid body. These can be caused by internal mechanisms such as crack opening or propagation, crushing, or rubbing of crack surfaces. One application for the AE technique in the field of Structural Engineering is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). With piezo-electric sensors mounted to the surface of the structure, stress waves can be detected, recorded, and stored for later analysis. An important step in quantitative AE analysis is the estimation of the stress wave source locations. Commonly, source location results are presented in a rather deterministic manner as spatial and temporal points, excluding information about uncertainties and errors. Due to variability in the material properties and uncertainty in the mathematical model, measures of uncertainty are needed beyond best-fit point solutions for source locations. This paper introduces a novel holistic framework for the development of a probabilistic source location algorithm. Bayesian analysis methods with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation are employed where all source location parameters are described with posterior probability density functions (PDFs). The proposed methodology is applied to an example employing data collected from a realistic section of a reinforced concrete bridge column. The selected approach is general and has the advantage that it can be extended and refined efficiently. Results are discussed and future steps to improve the algorithm are suggested.

  8. Research on the Monitoring System of CNC Grinding Process Based on Acoustic Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhongxiang; TENG Jiaxu; YANG Junwei; HUO Xiaojing; SHI Xiaojun

    2006-01-01

    Using on-line monitoring during the CNC grinding process, the hazard case such as the crushing of grinding wheel and various safety accidents could be avoided, and the optimum time for dressing and replacing grinding wheel could also be determined, and hence, the service life of the grinding wheel could be prolonged and grinding quality could be improved. To overcome the limitation of some traditional techniques in which some parameters including the grinding power and force, torque and so on were monitored, the acoustic emission (AE) technique, which provides high sensitivity and responding speed, were developed in the present paper. The mechanism of AE during grinding was reviewed. Moreover, a virtual AE monitoring system, which could monitor the grinding state under different working conditions during the grinding, has been developed based on the Virtual Instruments technique. Some experiments were also performed on the internal grinder. The results showed that the AE signals became stronger with increasing the main shaft speed and grinding depth or decreasing the distance between the AE sensor and grinding area.

  9. Comparison of alternatives to amplitude thresholding for onset detection of acoustic emission signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, F.; Gagar, D.; Foote, P.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring can be used to detect the presence of damage as well as determine its location in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. Information on the time difference of the signal generated by the damage event arriving at different sensors in an array is essential in performing localisation. Currently, this is determined using a fixed threshold which is particularly prone to errors when not set to optimal values. This paper presents three new methods for determining the onset of AE signals without the need for a predetermined threshold. The performance of the techniques is evaluated using AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth and compared to the established Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and fixed threshold methods. It was found that the 1D location accuracy of the new methods was within the range of < 1 - 7.1 % of the monitored region compared to 2.7% for the AIC method and a range of 1.8-9.4% for the conventional Fixed Threshold method at different threshold levels.

  10. A Bayesian Approach for Localization of Acoustic Emission Source in Plate-Like Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Bayesian approach for localizing acoustic emission (AE source in plate-like structures with consideration of uncertainties from modeling error and measurement noise. A PZT sensor network is deployed to monitor and acquire AE wave signals released by possible damage. By using continuous wavelet transform (CWT, the time-of-flight (TOF information of the AE wave signals is extracted and measured. With a theoretical TOF model, a Bayesian parameter identification procedure is developed to obtain the AE source location and the wave velocity at a specific frequency simultaneously and meanwhile quantify their uncertainties. It is based on Bayes’ theorem that the posterior distributions of the parameters about the AE source location and the wave velocity are obtained by relating their priors and the likelihood of the measured time difference data. A Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is employed to draw samples to approximate the posteriors. Also, a data fusion scheme is performed to fuse results identified at multiple frequencies to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty of the final localization results. Experimental studies on a stiffened aluminum panel with simulated AE events by pensile lead breaks (PLBs are conducted to validate the proposed Bayesian AE source localization approach.

  11. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Al Haj [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Véronique, Peres, E-mail: peres@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Eric, Serris [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital [IFP Energies nouvelles, Rond-point de l’échangeur de Solaize BP3, 69360 Solaize (France); Michel, Cournil [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thermogravimetry associated to acoustic emission (AE) improves knowledge on the corrosion of metals at high temperature. • Kinetic transition is detected under air oxidation tests at 900 °C of Zircaloy-4 by a change in the rate of mass gain and by the AE activity. • AE analysis is complementary to characterizations of post mortem oxidized samples. • AE allows us to distinguish the cracks which occur during the Zircaloy-4 oxidation from the cracks which arise during the cooling of the samples. - Abstract: Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO{sub 2} layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and

  12. A reverse localization scheme for underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Marjan; Rezazadeh, Javad; Ismail, Abdul Samad

    2012-01-01

    Underwater Wireless Sensor Networks (UWSNs) provide new opportunities to observe and predict the behavior of aquatic environments. In some applications like target tracking or disaster prevention, sensed data is meaningless without location information. In this paper, we propose a novel 3D centralized, localization scheme for mobile underwater wireless sensor network, named Reverse Localization Scheme or RLS in short. RLS is an event-driven localization method triggered by detector sensors for launching localization process. RLS is suitable for surveillance applications that require very fast reactions to events and could report the location of the occurrence. In this method, mobile sensor nodes report the event toward the surface anchors as soon as they detect it. They do not require waiting to receive location information from anchors. Simulation results confirm that the proposed scheme improves the energy efficiency and reduces significantly localization response time with a proper level of accuracy in terms of mobility model of water currents. Major contributions of this method lie on reducing the numbers of message exchange for localization, saving the energy and decreasing the average localization response time.

  13. Surface roughness evaluation based on acoustic emission signals in robot assisted polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Marín, Marta María; Teti, Roberto; Rubio, Eva María

    2014-11-14

    The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE) signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state.

  14. Acoustic emission characterization of fracture toughness for fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Hui, E-mail: phdhuimei@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710072 (China); Sun, Yuyao; Zhang, Lidong; Wang, Hongqin; Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2013-01-10

    The fracture toughness of a carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite was investigated relating to classical critical stress intensity factor K{sub IC}, work of fracture, and acoustic emission energy. The K{sub IC} was obtained by the single edge notch beam method and the work of fracture was calculated using the featured area under the load-displacement curves. The K{sub IC}, work of fracture, and acoustic emission energy were compared for the composites before and after heat treatment and then analyzed associated with toughening microstructures of fiber pullout. It indicates that the work of fracture and acoustic emission energy can be more suitable to reflect the toughness rather than the traditional K{sub IC}, which has certain limitation for the fracture toughness characterization of the crack tolerant fiber ceramic composites.

  15. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal by Fractal Theory in Aluminum Alloy Spot Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The relation between acoustic emission signal and nugget during aluminum alloy spot welding was investigated in order to evaluate spot welding quality. Due to the nonlinearity of the signals, fractal theory was utilized to quantitatively describe the characteristics of the signals instead of classical Euclidean geometry which cannot describe the acoustic emission signal accurately. Through experiments and computing, the box counting dimension is found distinct from other acoustic emission signals and is a better approach to discriminating weld nugget stages. Results show that fractal dimensions increase from 1.51 to 1.78,and they are related to nugget areas added from non-fusion to over-heated nugget.And the box counting dimension can effectively evaluate the quality of the nugget in the spot welding and can be applied with current, displace, and other spot welding parameters.

  16. Identification of acoustic emission signal in aluminum alloys spot welding based on fractal theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic emission signal of aluminum alloys spot welding includes the information of forming nugget and is one of the important parameters in the quality control. Due to the nonlinearity of the signals, classic Euclidean geometry can not be applied to depict exactly. The fractal theory is implemented to quantitatively describe the characteristics of the acoustic emission signals. The experiment and calculation results show that the box counting dimension of acoustic emission signal, between 1 and 2, are distinctive from different nugget areas in AC spot welding. It is proved that box counting dimension is an effective characteristic parameter to evaluate spot welding quality. In addition, fractal theory can also be applied in other spot welding parameters, such as voltage, current, electrode force and so on, for the purpose of recognizing the spot welding quality.

  17. Surface Roughness Evaluation Based on Acoustic Emission Signals in Robot Assisted Polishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Agustina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state.

  18. Acoustic emission partial discharge detection technique applied to fault diagnosis: Case studies of generator transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanker Tangella Bhavani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In power transformers, locating the partial discharge (PD source is as important as identifying it. Acoustic Emission (AE sensing offers a good solution for both PD detection and PD source location identification. In this paper the principle of the AE technique, along with in-situ findings of the online acoustic emission signals captured from partial discharges on a number of Generator Transformers (GT, is discussed. Of the two cases discussed, the first deals with Acoustic Emission Partial Discharge (AEPD tests on two identical transformers, and the second deals with the AEPD measurement of a transformer carried out on different occasions (years. These transformers are from a hydropower station and a thermal power station in India. Tests conducted in identical transformers give the provision for comparing AE signal amplitudes from the two transformers. These case studies also help in comprehending the efficacy of integrating Dissolved Gas is (DGA data with AEPD test results in detecting and locating the PD source.

  19. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  20. Towards identifying the dynamics of sliding by acoustic emission and vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The results of experiments with high load and sliding speed sliding conditions on tribologically mated pairs such as steel 1045/steel 1045 (test 1), steel 1045/basalt (test 2) and Hadfield steel/basalt (test 3) have been carried out in order to identify their response in terms of the acoustic emission and vibration signals. The steel to rock and rock to steel transfer has been revealed by examining the worn surfaces of both steel and rock samples with the use of laser scanning microscopy. The AE signal characteristics have been determined for the tribological pairs studied. The dynamics of sliding has been evaluated by measuring the vibration accelerations. Relationship between wear mode and either acoustic emission signal or vibration signal has been established. The minimal vibration oscillations amplitude and acoustic emission signal energy have been found out in sliding Hadfield steel/basalt pair.

  1. Initiation of acoustic emission in fluid-saturated sandstone samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, V. B.; Patonin, A. V.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Potanina, M. G.; Smirnov, V. B.; Stroganova, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    A rock behavior experiment with uniaxial compression revealed the effect of acoustic activity in loaded fluid-saturated Berea sandstone samples in response to an electric current. It is established that it is substantially intensified in periods of the current impact and decreases after its cut-off. The current impact also results in a growth of radial deformation indicating an increase in the sample volume. The effect of acoustic activation increases in response to increased heat emitted by the electric current during its flow through the sample, which allows the discovered effect to be explained by initiation of its destruction due to thermal expansion of the fluid in rock interstices and fissures.

  2. Evaluation of acoustic shock induced early hearing loss with audiometer and distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Vinodh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acoustic shock injury has been described as a permanent injury to the auditory system either due to daily noise dose of in excess of 85 decibels or very loud impulse sound reputed to be in excess of 120 decibels and acoustic incidents. This study was performed to compare the results of audiogram and the newer diagnostic method distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs parameters due to acoustic shock injury in call center professionals working in a noisy environment and prone to acoustic injury. Materials and Methods: Hearing functions of 340 subjects were first assessed with pure tone audiometry and then DPOAEs results were compared among acoustic shock exposed subjects with normal audiogram and those with abnormal audiogram. Results: Out of 340 acoustic shock exposed subjects 304 were normal on audiometric testing and 34 had abnormal audiograms. Subsequently on DPOAE testing out of 304 acoustic shock exposed subjects with normal audiogram 125 failed and 181 passed. Conclusions: This study showed that DPOAEs are more sensitive than audiometry to detect pre-symptomatic inner ear damage. It may play a role as screening and monitoring test for acoustic shock-exposed workers.

  3. Source Localization with Acoustic Sensor Arrays Using Generative Model Based Fitting with Sparse Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Macias-Guarasa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach for indoor acoustic source localization using sensor arrays. The proposed solution starts by defining a generative model, designed to explain the acoustic power maps obtained by Steered Response Power (SRP strategies. An optimization approach is then proposed to fit the model to real input SRP data and estimate the position of the acoustic source. Adequately fitting the model to real SRP data, where noise and other unmodelled effects distort the ideal signal, is the core contribution of the paper. Two basic strategies in the optimization are proposed. First, sparse constraints in the parameters of the model are included, enforcing the number of simultaneous active sources to be limited. Second, subspace analysis is used to filter out portions of the input signal that cannot be explained by the model. Experimental results on a realistic speech database show statistically significant localization error reductions of up to 30% when compared with the SRP-PHAT strategies.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maria De Rosa, Alessandro Dell'Era, Mauro Pasquali, Carlo Santulli and Fabrizio Sarasini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements.

  5. Acoustic emission localization on ship hull structures using a deep learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgoulas, George; Kappatos, Vassilios; Nikolakopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high dimension......In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high...

  6. Acoustic emission localization on ship hull structures using a deep learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgoulas, George; Kappatos, Vassilios; Nikolakopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high dimension......In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high...

  7. Acoustic Emission Determination of Deformation Mechanisms Leading to Failure of Naval Alloys. Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    boundaries; formation and growth of twins, crazes , microcracks, I t i4 2 Fig. 1. Typical acoustic emission waveforms as detected with piezoelectric transducers...captured on the Nicolet. Materials presently available for testing are 6Ak 4V and 6AZ 2Cb lTa lMo titanium alloys; HY80 , HY100 and HY 130 steel; 2024...Djordjevic, J. C. Murphy, and R. E. Green, Jr., "Acoustic Emission During Craze Formation in Polymers (submitted for publication in J. AppI. Phys.). 32. W

  8. Temporal window system: A new approach for dynamic detection application to surface acoustic wave gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordieu, C.; Rebiere, D.; Pistre, J. [and others

    1996-12-31

    Pattern recognition techniques based on artificial neural networks are now frequently used with good results for gas sensor signal processing (this includes the detection, the identification and the quantification of gases). In the literature, data sets needed for neural networks are practically always built with steady state sensor responses. This situation prevents these techniques from being used in real time applications. Nevertheless, for example in the case of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors, because of quite long response times due to kinetic factors concerning the gas adsorption and because gases are sometimes extremely dangerous and/or toxic (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organophosphorus compounds,...), the detection speed is an essential parameter and hence must be monitored in a real time mode. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new dynamic approach and to illustrate it with SAW sensor responses.

  9. Network Lifetime Extension Based On Network Coding Technique In Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy.T.V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic sensor networks (UWASNs are playing a lot of interest in ocean applications, such as ocean pollution monitoring, ocean animal surveillance, oceanographic data collection, assisted- navigation, and offshore exploration, UWASN is composed of underwater sensors that engage sound to transmit information collected in the ocean. The reason to utilize sound is that radio frequency (RF signals used by terrestrial sensor networks (TWSNs can merely transmit a few meters in the water. Unfortunately, the efficiency of UWASNs is inferior to that of the terrestrial sensor networks (TWSNs. Some of the challenges in under water communication are propagation delay, high bit error rate and limited bandwidth. Our aim is to minimize the power consumption and to improve the reliability of data transmission by finding the optimum number of clusters based on energy consumption.

  10. Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor with Pd/ZnO Bilayer Structure for Room Temperature Hydrogen Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viespe, Cristian; Miu, Dana

    2017-06-29

    A Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) hydrogen sensor with a Pd/ZnO bilayer structure for room temperature sensing operation has been obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The sensor structure combines a Pd layer with optimized porosity for maximizing mass effects, with the large acoustoelectric effect at the Pd/ZnO interface. The large acoustoelectric effect is due to the fact that ZnO has a surface conductivity which is highly sensitive to chemisorbed gases. The sensitivity of the sensor was determined for hydrogen concentrations between 0.2% and 2%. The limit of detection (LOD) of the bilayer sensor was about 4.5 times better than the single ZnO films and almost twice better than single Pd films.

  11. Understanding and exploiting the acoustic propagation delay in underwater sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Affan Ahmed

    An understanding of the key areas of difference in acoustic underwater sensor networks and their impact on network design is essential for a rapid deployment of aquatic sensornets. Such an understanding will allow system designers to harvest the vast literature of research present in RF sensornets and focus on just those key aspects that are different for acoustic sensornets. Most complexities at the physical layer will eventually be handled either by assuming short ranges or with technology advancements making complex algorithms both cost and power efficient. However, the impact of large latency and the resulting magnification of multipath will remain a great impediment for developing robust sensor networks. This thesis contributes towards an understanding of, and solutions to, the impact of latency on sensornet migration to an underwater acoustic environment. The thesis of this dissertation is that Latency-awareness allows both migration of existing terrestrial sensornet protocols and design of new underwater protocols that can overcome and exploit the large propagation delay inherent to acoustic underwater networks. We present four studies that contribute to this thesis. First, we formalize the impact of large propagation delay on networking protocols in the concept of space-time uncertainty. Second, we use the understanding developed from this concept to design the first high-latency aware time synchronization protocol for acoustic sensor networks that is able to overcome an error source unique to the underwater environment. Third, we exploit the space-time volume during medium access to propose T-Lohi, a new class of energy and throughput efficient medium access control (MAC) protocols. Last, with our protocol implementations we are able to indicate the importance of a different type of multipath which we call self-multipath. This self-multipath adversely affects the throughput of T-Lohi MAC, and to overcome this affect we develop a novel Bayesian learning

  12. Sagnac interferometer based stable phase demodulation system for diaphragm based acoustic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Yu, Yongqin; Jin, Wei

    2015-07-01

    A modified fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer with a stable π/2 phase bias is demonstrated for the demodulation of diaphragm-based acoustic sensors. The phase bias is obtained by introducing a nonreciprocal frequency shift between the counter-propagating waves. The system is passive and without complicated servo-control for phase stabilization. Interrogated by the proposed demodulation system, a 100 nm-thick graphite diaphragm-based acoustic sensor demonstrated a minimum detectable pressure level of ~ 450 μPa/Hz1/2 at the frequency of 5 kHz and the output signal stability is less than 0.35 dB over an 8-hour period.

  13. A novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bingbing; Lu, Wenke; Zhu, Changchun; Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Haoxin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel optimal sensitivity design scheme for the yarn tension sensor using surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. In order to obtain the best sensitivity, the regression model between the size of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate and the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was established using the least square method. The model was validated too. Through analyzing the correspondence between the regression function monotonicity and its partial derivative sign, the effect of the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate size on the sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor was investigated. Based on the regression model, a linear programming model was established to gain the optimal sensitivity of the SAW yarn tension sensor. The linear programming result shows that the maximum sensitivity will be achieved when the SAW yarn tension sensor substrate length is equal to 15 mm and its width is equal to 3mm within a fixed interval of the substrate size. An experiment of SAW yarn tension sensor about 15 mm long and 3mm wide was presented. Experimental results show that the maximum sensitivity 1982.39 Hz/g was accomplished, which confirms that the optimal sensitivity design scheme is useful and effective. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. On the Selection of Transmission Range in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingsheng Gao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Transmission range plays an important role in the deployment of a practical underwater acoustic sensor network (UWSN, where sensor nodes equipping with only basic functions are deployed at random locations with no particular geometrical arrangements. The selection of the transmission range directly influences the energy efficiency and the network connectivity of such a random network. In this paper, we seek analytical modeling to investigate the tradeoff between the energy efficiency and the network connectivity through the selection of the transmission range. Our formulation offers a design guideline for energy-efficient packet transmission operation given a certain network connectivity requirement.

  15. On the selection of transmission range in underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingsheng; Foh, Chuan Heng; Cai, Jianfei

    2012-01-01

    Transmission range plays an important role in the deployment of a practical underwater acoustic sensor network (UWSN), where sensor nodes equipping with only basic functions are deployed at random locations with no particular geometrical arrangements. The selection of the transmission range directly influences the energy efficiency and the network connectivity of such a random network. In this paper, we seek analytical modeling to investigate the tradeoff between the energy efficiency and the network connectivity through the selection of the transmission range. Our formulation offers a design guideline for energy-efficient packet transmission operation given a certain network connectivity requirement.

  16. Surface Acoustic WaveAmmonia Sensors Based on ST-cut Quartz under Periodic Al Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yau Su

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface acoustic wave (SAW devices are key components for sensing applications. SAW propagation under a periodic grating was investigated in this work. The theoretical method used here is the space harmonic method. We also applied the results of SAW propagation studied in this work to design a two-port resonator with an Al grating on ST-cut quartz. The measured frequency responses of the resonator were similar to the simulation ones. Then, the chemical interface of polyaniline/WO3 composites was coated on the SAW sensor for ammonia detection. The SAW sensor responded to ammonia gas and could be regenerated using dry nitrogen.

  17. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  18. A GPS-free passive acoustic localization scheme for underwater wireless sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Mirza, Mohammed

    2011-10-01

    Seaweb is an acoustic communication technology that enables communication between sensor nodes. Seaweb interconnects the underwater nodes through digital signal processing (DSP)-based modem by using acoustic links between the neighbouring sensors. In this paper, we design and investigate a global positioning system (GPS)-free passive localization protocol using seaweb technology. This protocol uses the range data and planar trigonometry to estimate the positions of the discovered nodes. We take into consideration the small displacement of sensor nodes due to watch circles and placement of sensor nodes on non-uniform underwater surface, for precise localization. Once the nodes are localized, we divide the whole network .eld into circular levels that minimizes the traf.c complexity and thereby increases the lifetime of the sensor network .eld. We then form the mesh network inside each of the circular levels that increases the reliability. The algorithm is designed in such a way that it overcomes the ambiguous nodes errata and re.ected paths and makes the algorithm more robust. The synthetic network geometries are so designed which can evaluate the algorithm in the presence of perfect or imperfect ranges or in case of incomplete data. A comparative study is made with the existing algorithms which proves our newly proposed algorithm to be more effective. © 2011 IEEE.

  19. A finite element model of a MEMS-based surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gowini, Mohamed M; Moussa, Walied A

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT) patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd) film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced.

  20. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walied A. Moussa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced.

  1. An adaptive OFDMA-based MAC protocol for underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Issa M; Gadallah, Yasser; Hayajneh, Mohammad; Khreishah, Abdallah

    2012-01-01

    Underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks (UAWSNs) have many applications across various civilian and military domains. However, they suffer from the limited available bandwidth of acoustic signals and harsh underwater conditions. In this work, we present an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA)-based Media Access Control (MAC) protocol that is configurable to suit the operating requirements of the underwater sensor network. The protocol has three modes of operation, namely random, equal opportunity and energy-conscious modes of operation. Our MAC design approach exploits the multi-path characteristics of a fading acoustic channel to convert it into parallel independent acoustic sub-channels that undergo flat fading. Communication between node pairs within the network is done using subsets of these sub-channels, depending on the configurations of the active mode of operation. Thus, the available limited bandwidth gets fully utilized while completely avoiding interference. We derive the mathematical model for optimal power loading and subcarrier selection, which is used as basis for all modes of operation of the protocol. We also conduct many simulation experiments to evaluate and compare our protocol with other Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA)-based MAC protocols.

  2. An Adaptive OFDMA-Based MAC Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa M. Khalil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks (UAWSNs have many applications across various civilian and military domains. However, they suffer from the limited available bandwidth of acoustic signals and harsh underwater conditions. In this work, we present an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA-based Media Access Control (MAC protocol that is configurable to suit the operating requirements of the underwater sensor network. The protocol has three modes of operation, namely random, equal opportunity and energy-conscious modes of operation. Our MAC design approach exploits the multi-path characteristics of a fading acoustic channel to convert it into parallel independent acoustic sub-channels that undergo flat fading. Communication between node pairs within the network is done using subsets of these sub-channels, depending on the configurations of the active mode of operation. Thus, the available limited bandwidth gets fully utilized while completely avoiding interference. We derive the mathematical model for optimal power loading and subcarrier selection, which is used as basis for all modes of operation of the protocol. We also conduct many simulation experiments to evaluate and compare our protocol with other Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA-based MAC protocols.

  3. An Adaptive OFDMA-Based MAC Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Issa M.; Gadallah, Yasser; Hayajneh, Mohammad; Khreishah, Abdallah

    2012-01-01

    Underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks (UAWSNs) have many applications across various civilian and military domains. However, they suffer from the limited available bandwidth of acoustic signals and harsh underwater conditions. In this work, we present an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA)-based Media Access Control (MAC) protocol that is configurable to suit the operating requirements of the underwater sensor network. The protocol has three modes of operation, namely random, equal opportunity and energy-conscious modes of operation. Our MAC design approach exploits the multi-path characteristics of a fading acoustic channel to convert it into parallel independent acoustic sub-channels that undergo flat fading. Communication between node pairs within the network is done using subsets of these sub-channels, depending on the configurations of the active mode of operation. Thus, the available limited bandwidth gets fully utilized while completely avoiding interference. We derive the mathematical model for optimal power loading and subcarrier selection, which is used as basis for all modes of operation of the protocol. We also conduct many simulation experiments to evaluate and compare our protocol with other Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA)-based MAC protocols. PMID:23012517

  4. Contributed Review: Recent developments in acoustic energy harvesting for autonomous wireless sensor nodes applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Khattak, Muhammad Umair

    2016-02-01

    Rapid developments in micro electronics, micro fabrication, ultra-large scale of integration, ultra-low power sensors, and wireless technology have greatly reduced the power consumption requirements of wireless sensor nodes (WSNs) and make it possible to operate these devices with energy harvesters. Likewise, other energy harvesters, acoustic energy harvesters (AEHs), have been developed and are gaining swift interest in last few years. This paper presents a review of AEHs reported in the literature for the applications of WSNs. Based on transduction mechanism, there are two types of AEHs: piezoelectric acoustic energy harvesters (PEAEHs) and electromagnetic acoustic energy harvesters (EMAEHs). The reported AEHs are mostly characterized under the sound pressure level (SPL) that ranges from 45 to 161 dB. The range for resonant frequency of the produced AEHs is from 146 Hz to 24 kHz and these produced 0.68 × 10(-6) μW to 30 mW power. The maximum power (30 mW) is produced by a PEAEH, when the harvester is subjected to a SPL of 161 dB and 2.64 kHz frequency. However, for EMAEHs, the maximum power reported is about 1.96 mW (at 125 dB and 143 Hz). Under the comparable SPLs, the power production by the reported EMAEHs is relatively better than that of PEAEHs, moreover, due to lower resonant frequency, the EMAEHs are more feasible for the low frequency band acoustical environment.

  5. Mass Sensitivity Optimization of a Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Incorporating a Resonator Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Wenchang Hao; Jiuling Liu; Minghua Liu; Yong Liang; Shitang He

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the sensitive area of the two-port resonator configuration on the mass sensitivity of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (R-SAW) sensor was investigated theoretically, and verified in experiments. A theoretical model utilizing a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach was established to extract the coupling-of-modes (COM) parameters in the absence and presence of mass loading covering the electrode structures. The COM model was used to simulate the frequency response of...

  6. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela Puiu; Ana-Maria Gurban; Lucian Rotariu; Simona Brajnicov; Cristian Viespe; Camelia Bala

    2015-01-01

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporat...

  7. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Capel, P.J.S.; Turchinovich, D.; Porte, H.P.; Lahmann, S.; Rossow, U.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic signals

  8. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  9. AURP: An AUV-Aided Underwater Routing Protocol for Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghwan Kim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Deploying a multi-hop underwater acoustic sensor network (UASN in a large area brings about new challenges in reliable data transmissions and survivability of network due to the limited underwater communication range/bandwidth and the limited energy of underwater sensor nodes. In order to address those challenges and achieve the objectives of maximization of data delivery ratio and minimization of energy consumption of underwater sensor nodes, this paper proposes a new underwater routing scheme, namely AURP (AUV-aided underwater routing protocol, which uses not only heterogeneous acoustic communication channels but also controlled mobility of multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs. In AURP, the total data transmissions are minimized by using AUVs as relay nodes, which collect sensed data from gateway nodes and then forward to the sink. Moreover, controlled mobility of AUVs makes it possible to apply a short-range high data rate underwater channel for transmissions of a large amount of data. To the best to our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to employ multiple AUVs as relay nodes in a multi-hop UASN to improve the network performance in terms of data delivery ratio and energy consumption. Simulations, which are incorporated with a realistic underwater acoustic communication channel model, are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme, and the results indicate that a high delivery ratio and low energy consumption can be achieved.

  10. AURP: an AUV-aided underwater routing protocol for underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seokhoon; Azad, Abul K; Oh, Hoon; Kim, Sunghwan

    2012-01-01

    Deploying a multi-hop underwater acoustic sensor network (UASN) in a large area brings about new challenges in reliable data transmissions and survivability of network due to the limited underwater communication range/bandwidth and the limited energy of underwater sensor nodes. In order to address those challenges and achieve the objectives of maximization of data delivery ratio and minimization of energy consumption of underwater sensor nodes, this paper proposes a new underwater routing scheme, namely AURP (AUV-aided underwater routing protocol), which uses not only heterogeneous acoustic communication channels but also controlled mobility of multiple autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). In AURP, the total data transmissions are minimized by using AUVs as relay nodes, which collect sensed data from gateway nodes and then forward to the sink. Moreover, controlled mobility of AUVs makes it possible to apply a short-range high data rate underwater channel for transmissions of a large amount of data. To the best to our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to employ multiple AUVs as relay nodes in a multi-hop UASN to improve the network performance in terms of data delivery ratio and energy consumption. Simulations, which are incorporated with a realistic underwater acoustic communication channel model, are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme, and the results indicate that a high delivery ratio and low energy consumption can be achieved.

  11. A new surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay line sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shashank S.; Yadava, R. D. S.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new configuration for SAW chemical sensing. A polymer coated SAW delay line device provides the coupling for synchronization of two stable self-sustained limit cycle oscillators. The dependence of synchronization frequency on the SAW delay time has been made the basis for chemical sensing. The analysis has carried out under conditions of weak phase coupling [1]. The dependence of synchronization modes on coupling parameters is analyzed. The sensitivity of a synchronization branch for vapor sorption induced delay perturbations is analyzed. This analysis shows the possibility of realizing high performance SAW sensors by this approach.

  12. ST Quartz Acoustic Wave Sensors with Sectional Guiding Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen McHale

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of removing a section of guiding layer from the propagation paths of ST-quartz Love wave sensors; this offers the ease of fabrication of a polymer guiding layer whilst retaining the native surface of the quartz which may then be used for the attachment of a sensitizing layer. Data is presented for the rigid and viscous loading, which indicates a small reduction in mass sensitivity compared to a Love wave device. Biosensing capabilities of these discontinuous ‘sectional’ guiding layer devices are demonstrated using protein adsorption from solution.

  13. Vibration impact acoustic emission technique for identification and analysis of defects in carbon steel tubes: Part A Statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Zakiah Abd [Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (Malaysia); Jamaludin, Nordin; Junaidi, Syarif [Faculty of Engineering and Built, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi (Malaysia); Yahya, Syed Yusainee Syed [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2015-04-15

    Current steel tubes inspection techniques are invasive, and the interpretation and evaluation of inspection results are manually done by skilled personnel. This paper presents a statistical analysis of high frequency stress wave signals captured from a newly developed noninvasive, non-destructive tube inspection technique known as the vibration impact acoustic emission (VIAE) technique. Acoustic emission (AE) signals have been introduced into the ASTM A179 seamless steel tubes using an impact hammer, and the AE wave propagation was captured using an AE sensor. Specifically, a healthy steel tube as the reference tube and four steel tubes with through-hole artificial defect at different locations were used in this study. The AE features extracted from the captured signals are rise time, peak amplitude, duration and count. The VIAE technique also analysed the AE signals using statistical features such as root mean square (r.m.s.), energy, and crest factor. It was evident that duration, count, r.m.s., energy and crest factor could be used to automatically identify the presence of defect in carbon steel tubes using AE signals captured using the non-invasive VIAE technique.

  14. Vibration impact acoustic emission technique for identification and analysis of defects in carbon steel tubes: Part B Cluster analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Zakiah Abd [Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (Malaysia); Jamaludin, Nordin; Junaidi, Syarif [Faculty of Engineering and Built, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi (Malaysia); Yahya, Syed Yusainee Syed [Universiti Teknologi MARA, Shah Alam (Malaysia)

    2015-04-15

    Current steel tubes inspection techniques are invasive, and the interpretation and evaluation of inspection results are manually done by skilled personnel. Part A of this work details the methodology involved in the newly developed non-invasive, non-destructive tube inspection technique based on the integration of vibration impact (VI) and acoustic emission (AE) systems known as the vibration impact acoustic emission (VIAE) technique. AE signals have been introduced into a series of ASTM A179 seamless steel tubes using the impact hammer. Specifically, a good steel tube as the reference tube and four steel tubes with through-hole artificial defect at different locations were used in this study. The AEs propagation was captured using a high frequency sensor of AE systems. The present study explores the cluster analysis approach based on autoregressive (AR) coefficients to automatically interpret the AE signals. The results from the cluster analysis were graphically illustrated using a dendrogram that demonstrated the arrangement of the natural clusters of AE signals. The AR algorithm appears to be the more effective method in classifying the AE signals into natural groups. This approach has successfully classified AE signals for quick and confident interpretation of defects in carbon steel tubes.

  15. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  16. Development of a Multi-Channel Piezoelectric Acoustic Sensor Based on an Artificial Basilar Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdo Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we have developed a multi-channel piezoelectric acoustic sensor (McPAS that mimics the function of the natural basilar membrane capable of separating incoming acoustic signals mechanically by their frequency and generating corresponding electrical signals. The McPAS operates without an external energy source and signal processing unit with a vibrating piezoelectric thin film membrane. The shape of the vibrating membrane was chosen to be trapezoidal such that different locations of membrane have different local resonance frequencies. The length of the membrane is 28 mm and the width of the membrane varies from 1 mm to 8 mm. Multiphysics finite element analysis (FEA was carried out to predict and design the mechanical behaviors and piezoelectric response of the McPAS model. The designed McPAS was fabricated with a MEMS fabrication process based on the simulated results. The fabricated device was tested with a mouth simulator to measure its mechanical and piezoelectrical frequency response with a laser Doppler vibrometer and acoustic signal analyzer. The experimental results show that the as fabricated McPAS can successfully separate incoming acoustic signals within the 2.5 kHz–13.5 kHz range and the maximum electrical signal output upon acoustic signal input of 94 dBSPL was 6.33 mVpp. The performance of the fabricated McPAS coincided well with the designed parameters.

  17. Surface emissivity and temperature retrieval for a hyperspectral sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, C.C.

    1998-12-01

    With the growing use of hyper-spectral imagers, e.g., AVIRIS in the visible and short-wave infrared there is hope of using such instruments in the mid-wave and thermal IR (TIR) some day. The author believes that this will enable him to get around using the present temperature-emissivity separation algorithms using methods which take advantage of the many channels available in hyper-spectral imagers. A simple fact used in coming up with a novel algorithm is that a typical surface emissivity spectrum are rather smooth compared to spectral features introduced by the atmosphere. Thus, a iterative solution technique can be devised which retrieves emissivity spectra based on spectral smoothness. To make the emissivities realistic, atmospheric parameters are varied using approximations, look-up tables derived from a radiative transfer code and spectral libraries. One such iterative algorithm solves the radiative transfer equation for the radiance at the sensor for the unknown emissivity and uses the blackbody temperature computed in an atmospheric window to get a guess for the unknown surface temperature. By varying the surface temperature over a small range a series of emissivity spectra are calculated. The one with the smoothest characteristic is chosen. The algorithm was tested on synthetic data using MODTRAN and the Salisbury emissivity database.

  18. Real-Time Source Classification with an Waveform Parameter Filtering of Acoustic Emission Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Park, Jae Ha; Ahn, Bong Young [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The acoustic emission(AE) technique is a well established method to carry out structural health monitoring(SHM) of large structures. However, the real-time monitoring of the crack growth in the roller coaster support structures is not easy since the vehicle operation produces very large noise as well as crack growth. In this investigation, we present the waveform parameter filtering method to classify acoustic sources in real-time. This method filtrates only the AE hits by the target acoustic source as passing hits in a specific parameter band. According to various acoustic sources, the waveform parameters were measured and analyzed to verify the present filtering method. Also, the AE system employing the waveform parameter filter was manufactured and applied to the roller coaster support structure in an actual amusement park

  19. A wireless demodulation system for passive surface acoustic wave torque sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaojun; Fan, Yanping; Qi, Hongli; Chen, Jing; Han, Tao; Cai, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are utilized as torque sensors for their passive and wireless features. However, the response of a SAW torque sensor is difficult to detect because of the transient response duration and interruption of channel noise, which limit the application of SAW torque sensors. The sensitive mechanism and response function of a passive wireless SAW torque sensor are analyzed in this study. A novel demodulation system involving both hardware and software is developed for the SAW torque sensor. A clipping amplifier is utilized in the hardware to widen the dynamic response range and increase the length of the valid signal. Correlation extension and centroid algorithms are designed to lengthen the received signal and improve the estimation accuracy of the center frequency of the response signal, respectively. Meanwhile, a fast binary search algorithm is proposed to accelerate the scanning cycle according to the developed response function. Finally, the SAW torque sensor demodulation system is set up and SAW resonators with high sensitivity are fabricated on a quartz substrate. The presented demodulation system is tested, and a standard deviation of 0.28 kHz is achieved. This value is much smaller than that of classic and modern spectrum estimation methods. The sensitivity of resonance frequency shift versus torque on the shaft of the assembled senor is 2.03 kHz/Nm; the coefficient of determination is 0.999, and the linearity is 0.87%. Experimental results verify the validity and feasibility of the proposed SAW torque sensor demodulation system.

  20. Development of a Magnetostrictive FeNi Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Current Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A magnetostrictive FeNi-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW-based current sensor was proposed in this work. The weak remanence and hysteresis effect of the FeNi itself contributes to suppress the asymmetry in sensor response at increasing and decreasing current. The sensor response was simulated by solving the coupled electromechanical field equation in layered structure considering the magnetostrictive effect and an approach of effective dielectric constant. The effects from the aspect ratio and thickness of the FeNi film on sensor response were analyzed to determine the optimal design parameters. Differential oscillation structure was used to form the sensor, in which, the FeNi thin film was deposited along the SAW propagation of the sensor chip by using RF magnetron sputtering. The magnetostrictive effect of the FeNi coating induced by the magnetic loading generates the perturbation in SAW velocity, and corresponding oscillation frequency. High sensitivity of 10.7 KHz/A, good linearity and repeatability, lower hysteresis error of 0.97% were obtained from the developed prototype 150 MHz SAW FeNi coated current sensor.

  1. Study of acoustic emission due to vaporisation of superheated droplets at higher pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rupa; Mondal, Prasanna Kumar; Chatterjee, Barun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Bubble nucleation in superheated liquids can be controlled by adjusting the ambient pressure and temperature. At higher pressure the threshold energy for bubble nucleation increases, and we have observed that the amplitude of the acoustic emission during vaporisation of superheated droplet decreases with increase in pressure at any given temperature. Other acoustic parameters such as the primary harmonic frequency and the decay time constant of the acoustic signal also decrease with increase in pressure. This behavior is independent of the type of superheated liquid. The decrease in signal amplitude limits the detection of bubble nucleation at higher pressure. This effect is explained by the emission of shockwave generated during the supersonic growth of the microbubble in superheated liquids.

  2. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  3. Polymer Optical Fibre Sensors for Endoscopic Opto-Acoustic Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet

    2015-01-01

    is the physical size of the device, allowing compatibility with current technology, while governing flexibility of the distal end of the endoscope based on the needs of the sensor. Polymer optical fibre (POF) presents a novel approach for endoscopic applications and has been positively discussed and compared...... in existing publications. A great advantage can be obtained for endoscopy due to a small size and array potential to provide discrete imaging speed improvements. Optical fibre exhibits numerous advantages over conventional piezo-electric transducers, such as immunity from electromagnetic interference...... and a higher resolution at small sizes. Furthermore, micro structured polymer optical fibres offer over 12 times the sensitivity of silica fibre. We present a polymer fibre Bragg grating ultrasound detector with a core diameter of 125 microns. We discuss the ultrasonic signals received and draw conclusions...

  4. Coupling thermogravimetric and acoustic emission measurements: its application to study the inhibition of catalytic coke deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropital, Francois; Dascotte, Philippe; Marchand, Pierre [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 Avenue Bois Preau, 92952 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Faure, Thierry; Lenain, Jean-Claude; Proust, Alain [Euro Physical Acoustics, 27 Rue Magellan, 94373 Sucy-en-Brie Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to improve the knowledge on the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials, the coupling of several in situ physical analysis methods is a promising way. For this purpose a thermogravimetric balance has been equipped with a specific acoustic emission device in order to continuously measure the mass variation of the corrosion sample and the acoustic emission transient under experimental conditions of temperature and gas phase compositions that are representative of the industrial environments. The catalytic coke deposition condition that is a major problem for the refinery and petrochemical industries, has been studied with such a device. The carbon deposition on reactor walls can induce localised disruption in the process such as heat-transfer reduction and pressure drops. To prevent these perturbations, proper selections of the metallurgical or internal coating compositions of the equipment, or the injection of accurate amount of inhibitors have to be decided. The feasibility of the coupling at high temperature of thermogravimetric and acoustic emission has been demonstrated. This new technique has been applied to study the inhibition of the catalytic coke deposition on pure iron by sulphur additives in the temperature range of 650 deg. C and under different mixed atmospheres of hydrocarbon and hydrogen contents. Good correlation has been obtained between the coking rates measured by thermogravimetric measurements and the intensities of the acoustic emission parameters. (authors)

  5. A study of the mechanical properties of highly porous ceramics using acoustic emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aué, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the results of indirect tensile tests on highly porous ceramics are presented. A relation between the mechanical strength of the highly porous ceramic materials and Acoustic Emission (AE) has been established. We have shown that the amplitude distribution of the AE events depends on th

  6. Advanced Computing Methods for Knowledge Discovery and Prognosis in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has gained significant popularity in the last decade. This growing interest, coupled with new sensing technologies, has resulted in an overwhelming amount of data in need of management and useful interpretation. Acoustic emission (AE) testing has been particularly fraught by the problem of growing data and is…

  7. Acoustic detection and localization of weapons fire by unattended ground sensors and aerostat-borne sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, P.; Marty, Ch.; Hengy, S.; Miller, L. S.

    2009-05-01

    The detection and localization of artillery guns on the battlefield is envisaged by means of acoustic and seismic waves. The main objective of this work is to examine the different frequency ranges usable for the detection of small arms, mortars, and artillery guns on the same hardware platform. The main stages of this study have consisted of: data acquisition of the acoustic signals of the different weapons used, signal processing and evaluation of the localization performance for various types of individual arrays, and modeling of the wave propagation in the atmosphere. The study of the propagation effects on the signatures of these weapons is done by comparing the acoustic signals measured during various days, at ground level and at the altitude of our aerostat (typically 200 m). Numerical modeling has also been performed to reinforce the interpretation of the experimental results.

  8. Advanced vapor recognition materials for selective and fast responsive surface acoustic wave sensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Adeel; Iqbal, Naseer; Mujahid, Adnan; Schirhagl, Romana

    2013-07-17

    The necessity of selectively detecting various organic vapors is primitive not only with respect to regular environmental and industrial hazard monitoring, but also in detecting explosives to combat terrorism and for defense applications. Today, the huge arsenal of micro-sensors has revolutionized the traditional methods of analysis by, e.g. replacing expensive laboratory equipment, and has made the remote screening of atmospheric threats possible. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors - based on piezoelectric crystal resonators - are extremely sensitive to even very small perturbations in the external atmosphere, because the energy associated with the acoustic waves is confined to the crystal surface. Combined with suitably designed molecular recognition materials SAW devices could develop into highly selective and fast responsive miniaturized sensors, which are capable of continuously monitoring a specific organic gas, preferably in the sub-ppm regime. For this purpose, different types of recognition layers ranging from nanostructured metal oxides and carbons to pristine or molecularly imprinted polymers and self-assembled monolayers have been applied in the past decade. We present a critical review of the recent developments in nano- and micro-engineered synthetic recognition materials predominantly used for SAW-based organic vapor sensors. Besides highlighting their potential to realize real-time vapor sensing, their limitations and future perspectives are also discussed.

  9. Multilayer graphene electrodes for one-port surface acoustic wave resonator mass sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ainan; Swamy, Varghese; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2017-02-01

    A one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator mass sensor composed of multilayer graphene (MLG) electrodes was investigated by the finite element method (FEM) and analyses were carried out to study the enhancement of sensitivity and the secondary effects caused by MLG electrodes on the performance of the resonator. Unlike metal electrodes, MLG electrode offers elastic loading to the contact surface, as evidenced by the increase in the surface velocity of the SAW device. In terms of the sensitivity of the mass sensor, MLG electrode showed the largest center frequency shift in response to a change in mass loading, as well as when used as a gas sensor to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Also, MLG electrodes offered the least triple transit signal (TTS) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) generations compared with Al and Au–Cr electrodes. Thus, the one-port SAW resonator with graphene electrodes not only possesses excellent performance characteristics but also gives rise to new opportunities in the development of highly sensitive mass sensors.

  10. Algorithm for heart rate extraction in a novel wearable acoustic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangwei; Imtiaz, Syed Anas; Aguilar-Pelaez, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Phonocardiography is a widely used method of listening to the heart sounds and indicating the presence of cardiac abnormalities. Each heart cycle consists of two major sounds - S1 and S2 - that can be used to determine the heart rate. The conventional method of acoustic signal acquisition involves placing the sound sensor at the chest where this sound is most audible. Presented is a novel algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 heart sounds and the use of them to extract the heart rate from signals acquired by a small sensor placed at the neck. This algorithm achieves an accuracy of 90.73 and 90.69%, with respect to heart rate value provided by two commercial devices, evaluated on more than 38 h of data acquired from ten different subjects during sleep in a pilot clinical study. This is the largest dataset for acoustic heart sound classification and heart rate extraction in the literature to date. The algorithm in this study used signals from a sensor designed to monitor breathing. This shows that the same sensor and signal can be used to monitor both breathing and heart rate, making it highly useful for long-term wearable vital signs monitoring.

  11. Frequency-Based Precursory Acoustic Emission Failure Sequences In Sedimentary And Igneous Rocks Under Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, C.; Anderson, R. C.; Chasek, M. D.; Peters, G. H.; Carey, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Identifiable precursors to rock failure have been a long pursued and infrequently encountered phenomena in rock mechanics and acoustic emission studies. Since acoustic emissions in compressed rocks were found to follow the Gutenberg-Richter law, failure-prediction strategies based on temporal changes in b-value have been recurrent. In this study, we extend on the results of Ohnaka and Mogi [Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 87, No. B5, p. 3873-3884, (1982)], where the bulk frequency characteristics of rocks under incremental uniaxial compression were observed in relation to changes in b-value before and after failure. Based on the proposition that the number of low-frequency acoustic emissions is proportional to the number of high-amplitude acoustic emissions in compressed rocks, Ohnaka and Mogi (1982) demonstrated that b-value changes in granite and andesite cores under incremental uniaxial compression could be expressed in terms of the percent abundance of low-frequency events. In this study, we attempt to demonstrate that the results of Ohnaka and Mogi (1982) hold true for different rock types (basalt, sandstone, and limestone) and different sample geometries (rectangular prisms). In order to do so, the design of the compression tests was kept similar to that of Ohnaka and Mogi (1982). Two high frequency piezoelectric transducers of 1 MHz and a 500 kHz coupled to the sides of the samples detected higher and lower frequency acoustic emission signals. However, rather than gathering parametric data from an analog signal using a counter as per Ohnaka and Mogi (1982), we used an oscilloscope as an analog to digital converter interfacing with LabVIEW 2015 to record the complete waveforms. The digitally stored waveforms were then processed, detecting acoustic emission events using a statistical method, and filtered using a 2nd order Butterworth filter. In addition to calculating the percent abundance of low-frequency events over time, the peak frequency of the

  12. Status reports on the development and application of acoustic emission analysis. Proceedings; Statusberichte zur Entwicklung und Anwendung der Schallemissionsanalyse. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-08-01

    The colloquium lectures represent the wide range of applications in acoustic emission analysis and testing in the areas of damage development and damage mechanisms, testing of components, condition monitoring, development of new measuring systems and sensors as well as software development regarding locating methods and signal analysis. One focus of the colloquium is on current hardware and software developments for status monitoring by means of AE monitoring. One of the papers was separately analyzed for this database. [German] Die Vortraege des Kolloquiums repraesentieren das breite Spektrum der Anwendungen der Schallemissionsanalyse und -pruefung in den Bereichen der Schadensentwicklung und Schadensmechanismen, Pruefung von Bauteilen, Zustandsueberwachung, Entwicklung neuer Messsysteme und Sensoren sowie Softwareentwicklung bezueglich Ortungsverfahren und Signalanalyse. Ein Schwerpunkt des Kolloquiums betrifft aktuelle Hard- und Softwareentwicklungen zur Zustandsueberwachung durch AE-Monitoring.

  13. Two-dimensional direction finding for low altitude target based on intensity measurement using an acoustic vector-sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Huawei; ZHAO Junwei

    2004-01-01

    A method of two-dimensional direction of arrival (DOA) estimation for low altitude target, which is based on intensity measurement using a three-dimensional differential pressure acoustic vector-sensor, is presented. With the perfect characteristics of acoustic vector sensor in the low frequency band, accurate DOA estimation is achieved under small array size. The validity of the proposed method was assessed by experiments on the noise signals radiated by a helicopter. The influence of acoustic sensor size, integral time and signal to noise ratio to the accuracy of DOA estimation were investigated, respectively. The performance comparisons demonstrated that it outperformed the traditional time-delay measurement based method for a small acoustic array.

  14. Noise reduction in acoustic measurements with a particle velocity sensor by means of a cross-correlation technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honschoten, van J.W.; Druyvesteyn, W.F.; Kuipers, H.; Raangs, R.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a method is presented to reduce the noise level of a particle velocity sensor, a thermal two-wire sensor sensitive to acoustic particle velocities, which yields a reduction of the noise of 30 dB. The method is based on utilisation of cross- instead of auto-correlation spectra of two of

  15. Fabry-Perot micro-structured polymer optical fibre sensors for opto-acoustic endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet

    2015-01-01

    Opto-Acoustic Endoscopy (OAE) requires sensors with a high sensitivity and small physical dimensions in order to facilitate integration into an endoscope of less than 1mm in diameter. We present fibre Bragg grating (FBG) and Fabry- Perot intrinsic fibre sensors for ultrasound detection. We present...... a structure profile characterisation setup to analyse tune the fibre sensors in preparation for ultrasonic detection. We evaluate the suitability of the different structures and grating parameters for ultrasonic sensing. By analysing the prepared gratings, we enable the optimisation of the profile...... and a simplification of the detection regime for an optimal interferometric OAE configuration. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only....

  16. Optimizing an infrasound sensor network for measuring acoustic background noise and its inversion for stratospheric winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcillo, O. E.; Arrowsmith, S.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the design of an infrasound network (and the associated analysis) for measuring and inverting low-frequency acoustic background noise (microbaroms) for stratospheric winds. We developed a mathematical framework for the inversion of local stratospheric winds using microbaroms, and found theoretical constraints on the optimum sensor network topology. Based on these results, we deployed, over the winter months (January to March, 2013), a prototype sensor network comprising six infrasound stations separated between 5 and 70 km; the initial analysis shows periods of very high coherency (suitable for our inversion) lasting several hours with associated tropospheric and low stratospheric celerities. We are analyzing the coherency between signals with distance and relative azimuth. Following this pilot study, we are designing a denser sensor network further optimized to capture microbaroms and planning for its validation using independent measurements.

  17. Multiple concurrent sources localization based on a two-node distributed acoustic sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaxin; Zhao, Zhao; Chen, Chunzeng; Xu, Zhiyong

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we propose a new approach to localize multiple concurrent sources using a distributed acoustic sensor network. Only two node-arrays are required in this sensor network, and each node-array consists of only two widely spaced sensors. Firstly, direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) of multiple sources are estimated at each node-array by utilizing a new pooled angular spectrum proposed in this paper, which can implement the spatial aliasing suppression effectively. Based on minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming and the DOA estimates of the sources, the time-frequency spectra containing the corresponding energy distribution features associated with those sources are reconstructed in each node-array. Then, scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) is employed to solve the DOA association problem. Performance evaluation is conducted with field recordings and experimental results prove the effectivity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Response Mechanism for Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors Based on Surface-Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansheng Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent’s method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP. The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data.

  19. Integration of thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor and surface acoustic wave transponder

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2012-03-09

    Passive and remote sensing technology has many potential applications in implantable devices, automation, or structural monitoring. In this paper, a tri-layer thin film giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) sensor with the maximum sensitivity of 16%/Oe and GMI ratio of 44% was combined with a two-port surface acoustic wave(SAW) transponder on a common substrate using standard microfabrication technology resulting in a fully integrated sensor for passive and remote operation. The implementation of the two devices has been optimized by on-chip matching circuits. The measurement results clearly show a magnetic field response at the input port of the SAW transponder that reflects the impedance change of the GMI sensor.

  20. Maximization of the Supportable Number of Sensors in QoS-Aware Cluster-Based Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi-Tham Nguyen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a practical low-complexity MAC (medium access control scheme for quality of service (QoS-aware and cluster-based underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASN, in which the provision of differentiated QoS is required. In such a network, underwater sensors (U-sensor in a cluster are divided into several classes, each of which has a different QoS requirement. The major problem considered in this paper is the maximization of the number of nodes that a cluster can accommodate while still providing the required QoS for each class in terms of the PDR (packet delivery ratio. In order to address the problem, we first estimate the packet delivery probability (PDP and use it to formulate an optimization problem to determine the optimal value of the maximum packet retransmissions for each QoS class. The custom greedy and interior-point algorithms are used to find the optimal solutions, which are verified by extensive simulations. The simulation results show that, by solving the proposed optimization problem, the supportable number of underwater sensor nodes can be maximized while satisfying the QoS requirements for each class.

  1. Maximization of the supportable number of sensors in QoS-aware cluster-based underwater acoustic sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi-Tham; Le, Duc Van; Yoon, Seokhoon

    2014-03-07

    This paper proposes a practical low-complexity MAC (medium access control) scheme for quality of service (QoS)-aware and cluster-based underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASN), in which the provision of differentiated QoS is required. In such a network, underwater sensors (U-sensor) in a cluster are divided into several classes, each of which has a different QoS requirement. The major problem considered in this paper is the maximization of the number of nodes that a cluster can accommodate while still providing the required QoS for each class in terms of the PDR (packet delivery ratio). In order to address the problem, we first estimate the packet delivery probability (PDP) and use it to formulate an optimization problem to determine the optimal value of the maximum packet retransmissions for each QoS class. The custom greedy and interior-point algorithms are used to find the optimal solutions, which are verified by extensive simulations. The simulation results show that, by solving the proposed optimization problem, the supportable number of underwater sensor nodes can be maximized while satisfying the QoS requirements for each class.

  2. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Capel, P. J. S.; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Porte, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic...... emission. This confirms the ultrafast dynamical screening mechanism in MQWs as a highly efficient method for impulsive strain generation....

  3. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Van Capel, P.J.S.; Turchinovich, D.; Porte, H.P.; Lahmann, S.; Rossow, U.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic signals and THz electromagnetic radiation signals demonstrates that transient strain generation in InGaN/GaN MQWs is correlated with electromagnetic THz generation, and both types of emission find their o...

  4. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Van Capel, P.J.S.; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Porte, Henrik; Lahmann, S.; Rossow, U.; Hangleiter, A.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic signals and THz electromagnetic radiation signals demonstrates that transient strain generation in InGaN/GaN MQWs is correlatedwith electromagnetic THz generation, and both types of emission find their or...

  5. Surface acoustic wave ammonia sensor based on ZnO/SiO2 composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang-Yue; Ma, Jin-Yi; Li, Zhi-Jie; Su, H Q; Alkurd, N R; Zhou, Wei-Lie; Wang, Lu; Du, Bo; Tang, Yong-Liang; Ao, Dong-Yi; Zhang, Shou-Chao; Yu, Q K; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2015-03-21

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator with ZnO/SiO2 (ZS) composite film was used as an ammonia sensor in this study. ZS composite films were deposited on the surface of SAW devices using the sol-gel method, and were characterized using SEM, AFM, and XRD. The performance of the sensors under ammonia gas was optimized by adjusting the molar ratio of ZnO:SiO2 to 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, and the sensor with the ratio of ZnO to SiO2 equaling to 1:2 was found to have the best performance. The response of sensor was 1.132 kHz under 10 ppm NH3, which was much higher than that of the sensor based on a pristine ZnO film. Moreover, the sensor has good selectivity, reversibility and stability at room temperature. These can be attributed to the enhanced absorption of ammonia and unique surface reaction on composite films due to the existence of silica. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A room temperature surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor with Pt coated ZnO nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fu-Chun; Chen, Yung-Yu; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2009-02-11

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor with Pt coated ZnO nanorods as the selective layer has been investigated for hydrogen detection. The SAW sensor was fabricated based on a 128 degrees YX-LiNbO(3) substrate with a operating frequency of 145 MHz. A dual delay line configuration was adopted to eliminate external environmental fluctuations. The Pt coated ZnO nanorods were chosen as a selective layer due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, large penetration depth, and fast charge diffusion rate. The ZnO nanorods were synthesized by an aqueous solution method and coated with the noble metal Pt as a catalyst. Finally, the SAW sensor responses to humidity and hydrogen were tested. Results show that the sensor is not sensitive to humidity; moreover, the frequency shift for a hydrogen concentration variation of 6000 ppm is 26 kHz while operating at room temperature. It can be concluded that the Pt coated ZnO nanorod based SAW hydrogen sensor exhibits fast response, good sensitivity and short-term repeatability. It is worth noting that not only is the sensor sensitive enough to operate at room temperature, but also it can avoid the influence of humidity.

  7. The role of acoustic emission in the study of rock fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of faults and shear fracture systems over a broad range of temperature and pressure and for a variety of rock types involves the growth and interaction of microcracks. Acoustic emission (AE), which is produced by rapid microcrack growth, is a ubiquitous phenomenon associated with brittle fracture and has provided a wealth of information regarding the failure process in rock. This paper reviews the successes and limitations of AE studies as applied to the fracture process in rock with emphasis on our ability to predict rock failure. Application of laboratory AE studies to larger scale problems related to the understanding of earthquake processes is also discussed. In this context, laboratory studies can be divided into the following categories. 1) Simple counting of the number of AE events prior to sample failure shows a correlation between AE rate and inelastic strain rate. Additional sorting of events by amplitude has shown that AE events obey the power law frequency-magnitude relation observed for earthquakes. These cumulative event count techniques are being used in conjunction with damage mechanics models to determine how damage accumulates during loading and to predict failure. 2) A second area of research involves the location of hypocenters of AE source events. This technique requires precise arrival time data of AE signals recorded over an array of sensors that are essentially a miniature seismic net. Analysis of the spatial and temporal variation of event hypocenters has improved our understanding of the progression of microcrack growth and clustering leading to rock failure. Recently, fracture nucleation and growth have been studied under conditions of quasi-static fault propagation by controlling stress to maintain constant AE rate. 3) A third area of study involves the analysis of full waveform data as recorded at receiver sites. One aspect of this research has been to determine fault plane solutions of AE source events from first motion

  8. Localization of a continuous CO2 leak from an isotropic flat-surface structure using acoustic emission detection and near-field beamforming techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Cui, Xiwang; Guo, Miao; Han, Xiaojuan

    2016-11-01

    Seal capacity is of great importance for the safety operation of pressurized vessels. It is crucial to locate the leak hole timely and accurately for reasons of safety and maintenance. This paper presents the principle and application of a linear acoustic emission sensor array and a near-field beamforming technique to identify the location of a continuous CO2 leak from an isotropic flat-surface structure on a pressurized vessel in the carbon capture and storage system. Acoustic signals generated by the leak hole are collected using a linear high-frequency sensor array. Time-frequency analysis and a narrow-band filtering technique are deployed to extract effective information about the leak. The impacts of various factors on the performance of the localization technique are simulated, compared and discussed, including the number of sensors, distance between the leak hole and sensor array and spacing between adjacent sensors. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory-scale test rig to assess the effectiveness and operability of the proposed method. The results obtained suggest that the proposed method is capable of providing accurate and reliable localization of a continuous CO2 leak.

  9. Phase-Sensitive Noise Suppression in a Photoacoustic Sensor based on Acoustic Circular Membrane Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Lassen, Mikael; Balslev-Harder, David; Petersen, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) sensor based on higher order acoustic modes is demonstrated. The PA sensor is designed to enhance the gas-detection performance and simultaneously suppress ambient noise sources (e.g. flow noise, electrical noise and external acoustic noise). Two microphones are used and positioned such that the PA signals are ($\\pi$) out of phase. Ambient acoustic noise are approximately in the same phase and will be subtracted and thus improve the SNR. In addition, by placing the gas in- and outlets so that the gas flows through the node of the first higher order membrane mode the coupling of flow noise is approximately 20 dB lower compared with flow through the fundamental mode at 5 L/min. The noise reduction and thus the increase in sensitivity is demonstrated by measuring vibrational lines of methanol and methane using a broadband interband cascade laser emitting radiation at 3.38 $\\mu$m. A signal-to-noise improvement of 20 (26 dB) using higher order modes are demonstrated compared with the fundament...

  10. Monitoring Anthropogenic Ocean Sound from Shipping Using an Acoustic Sensor Network and a Compressive Sensing Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Peter; Philip, Rachel; Robinson, Stephen; Wang, Lian

    2016-03-22

    Monitoring ocean acoustic noise has been the subject of considerable recent study, motivated by the desire to assess the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine life. A combination of measuring ocean sound using an acoustic sensor network and modelling sources of sound and sound propagation has been proposed as an approach to estimating the acoustic noise map within a region of interest. However, strategies for developing a monitoring network are not well established. In this paper, considerations for designing a network are investigated using a simulated scenario based on the measurement of sound from ships in a shipping lane. Using models for the sources of the sound and for sound propagation, a noise map is calculated and measurements of the noise map by a sensor network within the region of interest are simulated. A compressive sensing algorithm, which exploits the sparsity of the representation of the noise map in terms of the sources, is used to estimate the locations and levels of the sources and thence the entire noise map within the region of interest. It is shown that although the spatial resolution to which the sound sources can be identified is generally limited, estimates of aggregated measures of the noise map can be obtained that are more reliable compared with those provided by other approaches.

  11. High-sensitivity open-loop electronics for gravimetric acoustic-wave-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, David; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Ballandras, Sylvain; Martin, Gilles; Carry, Emile; Blondeau-Patissier, Virginie

    2013-06-01

    Detecting chemical species in gas phase has recently received an increasing interest mainly for security control, trying to implement new systems allowing for extended dynamics and reactivity. In this work, an open-loop interrogation strategy is proposed to use radio-frequency acoustic transducers as micro-balances for that purpose. The resulting system is dedicated to the monitoring of chemical compounds in gaseous or liquid-phase state. A 16 Hz standard deviation is demonstrated at 125 MHz, with a working frequency band in the 60 to 133 MHz range, answering the requirements for using Rayleigh- and Love-wave-based delay lines operating with 40-μm acoustic wavelength transducers. Moreover, this electronic setup was used to interrogate a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR) microbalance, a new sensor class allowing for multi-mode interrogation for gravimetric measurement improvement. The noise source still limiting the system performance is due to the analog-to-digital converter of the microcontroller, thus leaving open degrees-of-freedom for improving the obtained results by optimizing the voltage reference and board layout. The operation of the system is illustrated using a calibrated galvanic deposition at the surface of Love-wave delay lines to assess theoretical predictions of their gravimetric sensitivity and to compare them with HBAR-based sensor sensitivity.

  12. Relationship between electromagnetic and acoustic emissions during plastic deformation of gamma-irradiated LiF monocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjicontis, V.; Mavromatou, C.; Mastrogiannis, D. [Department of Solid State Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, TK 157 84, Athens (Greece); Antsygina, T. N.; Chishko, K. A. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, 47 Lenin Ave., 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2011-07-15

    Simultaneous measurements of acoustic emissions (AE) and electromagnetic emissions (EME) during plastic deformation and destruction under uniaxial compression along <001> direction are made on LiF monocrystals after gamma irradiation by {sup 60}Co source. The irradiation doses are 1, 2, and 10 Mrad. The EME measurements in the radio-frequency range are carried out using two types of electromagnetic sensors: (i) a simple electrical stub antenna and (ii) a toroidal inductance coil. Two checking experiments on unirradiated crystals are performed as the starting point to discover the effect of gamma irradiation on acoustic and electromagnetic emissive ability of plastically deformed ionic crystals. Unirradiated LiF monocrystals demonstrate high-intensive EME at easy glide and work hardening stages, as well as at the fracture during destruction of the sample. At radiation doses more than {approx}1 Mrad, in the active loading stage the EME of LiF monocrystals vanishes, except few individual electromagnetic pulses (only at 1 and 2 Mrad doses), which are time correlated with well-defined drop-jumps on the loading diagram and therefore can be associated with macroscopic crack openings. Moderate electromagnetic activity in irradiated crystals occurs only in the final stage of deformation at the complete fracture of the sample. Thus, after gamma irradiation the formation of polarization currents due to dynamic interaction between charged vacancies and moving dislocations is suppressed, and only EME connected with the redistribution of the free charge on the crack branches is observed. Acoustic emission diagrams of low-irradiated LiF are typical for the work hardening stage in crystals containing a great amount of strong point stoppers. At larger irradiation doses the AE diagram displays quite different behavior at low- and high-loading regions with a sharp boundary between them. The low-loading region shows poor AE activity, which changes sharply into high-active burst

  13. Evaluation of SHM System Produced by Additive Manufacturing via Acoustic Emission and Other NDT Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Strantza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, structural health monitoring (SHM systems are used in order to detect damage in structures. We have developed a novel structural health monitoring approach, the so-called “effective structural health monitoring” (eSHM system. The current SHM system is incorporated into a metallic structure by means of additive manufacturing (AM and has the possibility to advance life safety and reduce direct operative costs. It operates based on a network of capillaries that are integrated into an AM structure. The internal pressure of the capillaries is continuously monitored by a pressure sensor. When a crack nucleates and reaches the capillary, the internal pressure changes signifying the existence of the flaw. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the crack detection capacity of the eSHM system and crack location accuracy by means of various non-destructive testing (NDT techniques. During this study, detailed acoustic emission (AE analysis was applied in AM materials for the first time in order to investigate if phenomena like the Kaiser effect and waveform parameters used in conventional metals can offer valuable insight into the damage accumulation of the AM structure as well. Liquid penetrant inspection, eddy current and radiography were also used in order to confirm the fatigue damage and indicate the damage location on un-notched four-point bending AM metallic specimens with an integrated eSHM system. It is shown that the eSHM system in combination with NDT can provide correct information on the damage condition of additive manufactured metals.

  14. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  15. Estimating cetacean population density using fixed passive acoustic sensors: an example with Blainville's beaked whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len; Ward, Jessica; DiMarzio, Nancy; Tyack, Peter L

    2009-04-01

    Methods are developed for estimating the size/density of cetacean populations using data from a set of fixed passive acoustic sensors. The methods convert the number of detected acoustic cues into animal density by accounting for (i) the probability of detecting cues, (ii) the rate at which animals produce cues, and (iii) the proportion of false positive detections. Additional information is often required for estimation of these quantities, for example, from an acoustic tag applied to a sample of animals. Methods are illustrated with a case study: estimation of Blainville's beaked whale density over a 6 day period in spring 2005, using an 82 hydrophone wide-baseline array located in the Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas. To estimate the required quantities, additional data are used from digital acoustic tags, attached to five whales over 21 deep dives, where cues recorded on some of the dives are associated with those received on the fixed hydrophones. Estimated density was 25.3 or 22.5 animals/1000 km(2), depending on assumptions about false positive detections, with 95% confidence intervals 17.3-36.9 and 15.4-32.9. These methods are potentially applicable to a wide variety of marine and terrestrial species that are hard to survey using conventional visual methods.

  16. Probabilistic Neighborhood-Based Data Collection Algorithms for 3D Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guangjie; Li, Shanshan; Zhu, Chunsheng; Jiang, Jinfang; Zhang, Wenbo

    2017-02-08

    Marine environmental monitoring provides crucial information and support for the exploitation, utilization, and protection of marine resources. With the rapid development of information technology, the development of three-dimensional underwater acoustic sensor networks (3D UASNs) provides a novel strategy to acquire marine environment information conveniently, efficiently and accurately. However, the specific propagation effects of acoustic communication channel lead to decreased successful information delivery probability with increased distance. Therefore, we investigate two probabilistic neighborhood-based data collection algorithms for 3D UASNs which are based on a probabilistic acoustic communication model instead of the traditional deterministic acoustic communication model. An autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is employed to traverse along the designed path to collect data from neighborhoods. For 3D UASNs without prior deployment knowledge, partitioning the network into grids can allow the AUV to visit the central location of each grid for data collection. For 3D UASNs in which the deployment knowledge is known in advance, the AUV only needs to visit several selected locations by constructing a minimum probabilistic neighborhood covering set to reduce data latency. Otherwise, by increasing the transmission rounds, our proposed algorithms can provide a tradeoff between data collection latency and information gain. These algorithms are compared with basic Nearest-neighbor Heuristic algorithm via simulations. Simulation analyses show that our proposed algorithms can efficiently reduce the average data collection completion time, corresponding to a decrease of data latency.

  17. An Electronic-Nose Sensor Node Based on a Polymer-Coated Surface Acoustic Wave Array for Wireless Sensor Network Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kea-Tiong Tang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study developed an electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW sensor array. The sensor node comprised an SAW sensor array, a frequency readout circuit, and an Octopus II wireless module. The sensor array was fabricated on a large K2 128° YX LiNbO3 sensing substrate. On the surface of this substrate, an interdigital transducer (IDT was produced with a Cr/Au film as its metallic structure. A mixed-mode frequency readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC was fabricated using a TSMC 0.18 μm process. The ASIC output was connected to a wireless module to transmit sensor data to a base station for data storage and analysis. This sensor node is applicable for wireless sensor network (WSN applications.

  18. An electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave array for wireless sensor network applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kea-Tiong; Li, Cheng-Han; Chiu, Shih-Wen

    2011-01-01

    This study developed an electronic-nose sensor node based on a polymer-coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor array. The sensor node comprised an SAW sensor array, a frequency readout circuit, and an Octopus II wireless module. The sensor array was fabricated on a large K(2) 128° YX LiNbO3 sensing substrate. On the surface of this substrate, an interdigital transducer (IDT) was produced with a Cr/Au film as its metallic structure. A mixed-mode frequency readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was fabricated using a TSMC 0.18 μm process. The ASIC output was connected to a wireless module to transmit sensor data to a base station for data storage and analysis. This sensor node is applicable for wireless sensor network (WSN) applications.

  19. Design of a piezoelectric transducer cylindrical phase modulator for simulating acoustic emission signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Cunfu; HANG Lijun; WU Bin

    2007-01-01

    To conveniently carry out the pipeline leak experiment in a laboratory,leak acoustic signals are simulated by using the converse piezoelectric effect of a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) cylindrical phase modulator.On the basis of the piezoelectric equations and electromechanical equivalence principle,the transfer function of a PZT cylindrical phase modulator is delivered.A PZT cylindrical phase modulator is designed,and the numerical simulation is conducted.Results prove that the PZT cylindrical phase modulator can effectively simulate leak acoustic emission signals when the frequency is lower than 25 KHz.

  20. Distributed Remote Vector Gaussian Source Coding for Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Adel; Østergaard, Jan; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of remote vector Gaussian source coding for a wireless acoustic sensor network. Each node receives messages from multiple nodes in the network and decodes these messages using its own measurement of the sound field as side information. The node’s measurement...... and the estimates of the source resulting from decoding the received messages are then jointly encoded and transmitted to a neighboring node in the network. We show that for this distributed source coding scenario, one can encode a so-called conditional sufficient statistic of the sources instead of jointly...... encoding multiple sources. We focus on the case where node measurements are in form of noisy linearly mixed combinations of the sources and the acoustic channel mixing matrices are invertible. For this problem, we derive the rate-distortion function for vector Gaussian sources and under covariance...

  1. Robust Distributed Noise Reduction in Hearing Aids with External Acoustic Sensor Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Moonen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of using external acoustic sensor nodes for noise reduction in hearing aids is demonstrated in a simulated acoustic scenario with multiple sound sources. A distributed adaptive node-specific signal estimation (DANSE algorithm, that has a reduced communication bandwidth and computational load, is evaluated. Batch-mode simulations compare the noise reduction performance of a centralized multi-channel Wiener filter (MWF with DANSE. In the simulated scenario, DANSE is observed not to be able to achieve the same performance as its centralized MWF equivalent, although in theory both should generate the same set of filters. A modification to DANSE is proposed to increase its robustness, yielding smaller discrepancy between the performance of DANSE and the centralized MWF. Furthermore, the influence of several parameters such as the DFT size used for frequency domain processing and possible delays in the communication link between nodes is investigated.

  2. Influences of prolate spheroidal baffle of sound diffraction on spatial directivity of acoustic vector sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The directivity of acoustic vector sensor (AVS) will be distorted by the sound diffraction of the AVS carrier. In this paper,the scattering of a plane acoustic wave from a prolate spheroid baffle is considered. At first,the sound diffraction of prolate spheroidal baffle is established,then the mathematical expressions of sound pressure field and particle vibration velocity field of sound diffraction are derived and the characteristic of the directivity of pressure and velocity of sound diffraction field at different frequencies and distances is analyzed. The directivity of AVS is determined by the amplitude and phase difference of diffraction wave and incident wave,which possesses a close relationship with frequency and incident angle. Finally,the calculated results are compared with the experimental results.

  3. Acoustic Source Localization via Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imam, Neena [ORNL; Barhen, Jacob [ORNL; Wardlaw, Michael [Office of Naval Research

    2008-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. The complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on an optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. They investigate key concepts of threat-detection algorithms such as Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) estimation via sensor data correlation in the time domain with the purpose of implementation on the optical-core processor. they illustrate their results with the aid of numerical simulation and actual optical hardware runs. The major accomplishments of this research, in terms of computational speedup and numerical accurcy achieved via the deployment of optical processing technology, should be of substantial interest to the acoustic signal processing community.

  4. Implementation of cooperative virtual MISO communication in underwater acoustic wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Jannati

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, for the first time, virtual antennas are used in an underwater acoustic wireless sensor network and their effects on total system performance are studied. In multiple input single output (MISO channels, spacial diversity is used to improve the system performance. In certain networks, especially in underwater networks, nodes are too small to have more than one antenna. Therefore, to achieve spacial diversity gain, cooperation between adjacent nodes can be a proper alternate method. For this purpose, each node of network tries to use its nearest adjacent node as a virtual antenna at some portions of time and with the aid of space time coding this new antenna profits from spacial diversity. It means that a cooperative virtual MISO scenario must be devised to determine the transmission and cooperation method in the network. Thus, the most frequently used cooperation schemes andamp;quot;decode and forward,andamp;quot; and andamp;quot;amplify and forward,andamp;quot; are applied, simulated and studied in an arbitrary underwater acoustic wireless sensor network and compared with the noncooperation mode. In this paper the alamouti space time coding, and the maximum ratio combiner are used to transmit, and combine data, respectively. Simulations show that virtual antenna in underwater wireless sensor networks can improve system performance up to 12.08%.

  5. Online monitoring of accessories for underground electrical installations through acoustics emissions; Monitoreo en linea de accesorios de instalaciones electricas subterraneas mediante emisiones acusticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casals-Torrens, P. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Espana)]. E-mail: p.casals@upc.edu; Gonzalez-Parada, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico)]. E-mail: gonzaleza@salamanca.ugto.mx; Bosch-Tous, R. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Espana)

    2012-04-15

    The acoustic waves caused by Partial Discharges inside the dielectric materials, can be detected by acoustic emission (AE) sensors and analyzed in the time domain. The experimental results presented, show the online detection capability of these sensors in the environment near a cable accessory, such as a splice or terminal. The AE sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference and constitute a detection method non-intrusive and non-destructive, which ensures a galvanic decoupling with respect to electric networks, this technique of partial discharge detection can be applied as a test method for preventive or predictive maintenance (condition-based maintenance) to equipment or facilities of medium and high voltage in service and represents an alternative method to electrical detection systems, conventional or not, that continue to rely on the detection of current pulses. This paper presents characterization tests of the sensors AE through comparative tests of partial discharge on accessories for underground power cables. [Spanish] Las ondas acusticas provocadas por las descargas parciales en el interior de un dielectrico pueden ser detectadas por sensores de Emisiones Acusticas (EA) y analizadas en el dominio del tiempo. Los resultados experimentales que se presentan, evidencian la capacidad de deteccion en linea de estos sensores, en el entorno proximo a un accesorio de cable, empalme o terminal. Los sensores EA son inmunes a las interferencias electromagneticas, son un metodo de deteccion no destructivo y garantizan desacople galvanico respecto a la red electrica; esta tecnica de deteccion de descargas parciales puede ser aplicada como metodo de prueba para mantenimiento preventivo o predictivo (mantenimiento basado en la condicion), en equipos o instalaciones de media y alta tension en servicio, y representa una alternativa a los sistemas electricos de deteccion, convencionales o no, que continuan basandose en la deteccion del impulsos de corriente. En el

  6. On the Application of the Raspberry Pi as an Advanced Acoustic Sensor Network for Noise Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Emilio Noriega-Linares

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Smart Cities and the monitoring of environmental parameters is an area of research that has attracted scientific attention during the last decade. These environmental parameters are well-known as important factors in their affection towards people. Massive monitoring of this kind of parameters in cities is an expensive and complex task. Recent technologies of low-cost computing and low-power devices have opened researchers to a wide and more accessible research field, developing monitoring devices for deploying Wireless Sensor Networks. Gathering information from them, improved urban plans could be carried out and the information could help citizens. In this work, the prototyping of a low-cost acoustic sensor based on the Raspberry Pi platform for its use in the analysis of the sound field is described. The device is also connected to the cloud to share results in real time. The computation resources of the Raspberry Pi allow treating high quality audio for calculating acoustic parameters. A pilot test was carried out with the installation of two acoustic devices in the refurbishment works of a neighbourhood. In this deployment, the evaluation of these devices through long-term measurements was carried out, obtaining several acoustic parameters in real time for its broadcasting and study. This test has shown the Raspberry Pi as a powerful and affordable computing core of a low-cost device, but also the pilot test has served as a query tool for the inhabitants of the neighbourhood to be more aware about the noise in their own place of residence.

  7. Bedload transport monitoring with acoustic sensors in the Swiss Albula mountain river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickenmann, Dieter; Antoniazza, Gilles; Wyss, Carlos R.; Fritschi, Bruno; Boss, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Bedload transport measurements with acoustic sensors were obtained during summer 2015 in the Albula River in Switzerland. An impact plate measuring system was used with geophone and accelerometer sensors. This system provides indirect estimations of bedload transport in water courses. In April 2015, 30 impact sensors were installed in a new permanent measuring station to monitor continuously bedload transport in a mountain river with a large annual rate of sediment transport (around 90 000 m3 yr-1). Records of the first year of measurement showed that (i) the signal response in terms of geophone and accelerometer impulses is comparable for both types of sensors; (ii) there is a good correlation between discharge data and impulses recorded by both types of sensors; (iii) the critical discharge at the start of bedload transport is around 5 m3 s-1; (iv) a mean calibration factor for the geophone impulses can be estimated which is in a similar range as values determined from other sites with field calibration measurements.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of gas concentration and temperature by the ball surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kazushi; Akao, Shingo; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Tsukahara, Yusuke

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture sensor with an amorphous silica sensitive film and realized wide-range measurement from 0.017 ppmv [a frost point (FP) of -99 °C] to 6.0 × 103 ppmv (0 °C FP). However, since the sensitivity of the sensor depends on the temperature, measurement results are disturbed when the temperature largely changes. To overcome this problem, we developed a method to simultaneously measure temperature and gas concentration using a ball SAW sensor. Temperature and concentration is derived by solving equations for the delay time change at two frequencies. When the temperature had a large jump, the delay time change was significantly disturbed, but the water concentration was almost correctly measured, by compensating the sensitivity change using measured temperature. The temperature measured by a ball SAW sensor will also be used to control the ball temperature. This method will make a ball SAW sensor reliable in environments of varying temperatures.

  9. ZnO nanomaterials based surface acoustic wave ethanol gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Li, X; Liu, J H; He, Y N; Yu, L M; Liu, W H

    2012-08-01

    ZnO nanomaterials based surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensor has been investigated in ethanol environment at room temperature. The ZnO nanomaterials have been prepared through thermal evaporation of high-purity zinc powder. The as-prepared ZnO nanomaterials have been characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results indicate that the obtained ZnO nanomaterials, including many types of nanostructures such as nanobelts, nanorods, nanowires as well as nanosheets, are wurtzite with hexagonal structure and well-crystallized. The SAW sensor coated with the nanostructured ZnO materials has been tested in ethanol gas of various concentrations at room temperature. A network analyzer is used to monitor the change of the insertion loss of the SAW sensor when exposed to ethanol gas. The insertion loss of the SAW sensor varies significantly with the change of ethanol concentration. The experimental results manifest that the ZnO nanomaterials based SAW ethanol gas sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and good short-term reproducibility at room temperature.

  10. A surface acoustic wave passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature, and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an integrated single-chip surface acoustic wave sensor with the capability of measuring magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The sensor is fabricated using a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate, a humidity sensitive hydrogel coating, and a magnetic field sensitive impedance load. The sensor response to individually and simultaneously changing magnetic field, temperature and humidity is characterized by connecting a network analyzer directly to the sensor. Analytical models for each measurand are derived and used to compensate noise due to cross sensitivities. The results show that all three measurands can be monitored in parallel with sensitivities of 75 ppm/°C, 0.13 dB/%R.H. (at 50%R.H.), 0.18 dB/Oe and resolutions of 0.1 °C, 0.4%R.H., 1 Oe for temperature, humidity and magnetic field, respectively. A passive wireless measurement is also conducted on a current line using, which shows the sensors capability to measure both temperature and current signals simultaneously.

  11. Guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave sensors for chemical and biochemical detection in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, F; Bender, F; Cernose, R W

    2001-12-15

    The design and performance of guided shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (guided SH-SAW) devices on LiTaO3 substrates are investigated for high-sensitivity chemical and biochemical sensors in liquids. Despite their structural similarity to Rayleigh SAW, SH-SAWs often propagate slightly deeper within the substrate, hence preventing the implementation of high-sensitivity detectors. The device sensitivity to mass and viscoelastic loading is increased using a thin guiding layer on the device surface. Because of their relatively low shear wave velocity, various polymers including poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and cyanoethyl cellulose (cured or cross-linked) are investigated as the guiding layers to trap the acoustic energy near the sensing surface. The devices have been tested in biosensing and chemical sensing experiments. Suitable design principles for these applications are discussed with regard to wave guidance, electrical passivation of the interdigital transducers from the liquid environments, acoustic loss, and sensor signal distortion. In biosensing experiments, using near-optimal PMMA thickness of approximately 2 microm, mass sensitivity greater than 1500 Hz/(ng/mm2) is demonstrated, resulting in a minimum detection limit less than 20 pg/mm2. For chemical sensor experiments, it is found that optimal waveguide thickness must be modified to account for the chemically sensitive layer which also acts to guide the SH-SAW. A detection limit of 780 (3 x peak-to-peak noise) or 180 ppb (3 x rms noise) is estimated from the present measurements for some organic compounds in water.

  12. Standard practice for acoustic emission examination of cast iron yankee and steam heated paper dryers

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for carrying out acoustic emission (AE) examinations of Yankee and Steam Heated Paper Dryers (SHPD) of the type to make tissue, paper, and paperboard products. 1.2 This practice requires pressurization to levels used during normal operation. The pressurization medium may be high temperature steam, air, or gas. The dryer is also subjected to significant stresses during the heating up and cooling down periods of operation. Acoustic Emission data maybe collected during these time periods but this testing is beyond the scope of this document. 1.3 The AE measurements are used to detect, as well as, localize emission sources. Other methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) may be used to further evaluate the significance of acoustic emission sources. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine th...

  13. Acoustic, electromagnetic, neutron emissions from fracture and earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Manuello, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the relevant consequences of recently discovered and interdisciplinary phenomena, triggered by local mechanical instabilities. In particular, it looks at emissions from nano-scale mechanical instabilities such as fracture, turbulence, buckling and cavitation, focussing on vibrations at the TeraHertz frequency and Piezonuclear reactions. Future applications for this work could include earthquake precursors, climate change, energy production, and cellular biology. A series of fracture experiments on natural rocks demonstrates that the TeraHertz vibrations are able to induce fission reactions on medium weight elements accompanied by neutron emissions. The same phenomenon appears to have occurred in several different situations, particularly in the chemical evolution of the Earth and Solar System, through seismicity (rocky planets) and storms (gaseous planets). As the authors explore, these phenomena can also explain puzzles related to the history of our planet, like the ocean formation or th...

  14. On the Mutual Information of Multi-hop Acoustic Sensors Network in Underwater Wireless Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Function In our thesis, we perform a serial data communication via serial port using RS-232 levels. The data are transmitted at 4800 baud and 8 data...Acoustic Communication Channel,” WUWNet, 2006, pp 41-47. [4] S. Ali, A. Fakoorian, G . R. Solat, H. Eidi, “Maximizing Capacity in Wireless Sensor...16] B. C. Geiger, G . Kubin, “On the Rate of Information Loss in Memoryless Systems,” IEE Signal Processing, April 2013. [17] F. Zhao, J. Shin

  15. Studies of complex terrain wind flows using acoustic sounder and optical cross-wind remote sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porch, W.M.; Neff, W.; King, C.

    1985-08-01

    Remote sensing instrumentation has played an important role in the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) field experimental program. The goal of this program is to better understand transport and diffusion processes in complex terrain with an emphasis focused on nighttime drainage wind conditions. Two aspects of the instrumentation are discussed in this paper: acoustic sounders (doppler and monostatic) and space averaging optical cross-wind sensors. Data from these two sources are discussed and compared with data from conventional tower and tethersonde instrumentation. 13 refs., 10 figs. (WRF)

  16. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ramakrishnan; Parthiban, R.; Sawal Hamid Md Ali; Md. Shabiul Islam; Ajay Achath Mohanan

    2013-01-01

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film...

  17. Determination of dipyridamole by modified extraction-gravimetry with a surface acoustic wave resonator sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D Z; Wang, R H; Nie, L H; Yao, S Z

    1996-08-01

    A simple and sensitive extraction-gravimetric method for the determination of dipyridamole is presented. The method is based on the extraction of free dipyridamole with chloroform, after neutralization with a basic agent, followed by measurement of the frequency shift response of the specially designed surface acoustic wave resonator sensor after evaporation of the extractant from the surface of the resonator. The frequency shift response was proportional to the amount of dipyridamole in the range 0.065-1.12 micrograms. Experimental parameters and the effect of interfering substances on the assay of dipyridamole were also examined in this study. The method was applied to the determination of dipyridamole in tablets.

  18. Enhanced Sensitive Love Wave Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor Designed for Immunoassay Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Puiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT applications.

  19. Enhanced sensitive love wave surface acoustic wave sensor designed for immunoassay formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiu, Mihaela; Gurban, Ana-Maria; Rotariu, Lucian; Brajnicov, Simona; Viespe, Cristian; Bala, Camelia

    2015-05-05

    We report a Love wave surface acoustic wave (LW-SAW) immunosensor designed for the detection of high molecular weight targets in liquid samples, amenable also for low molecular targets in surface competition assays. We implemented a label-free interaction protocol similar to other surface plasmon resonance bioassays having the advantage of requiring reduced time analysis. The fabricated LW-SAW sensor supports the detection of the target in the nanomolar range, and can be ultimately incorporated in portable devices, suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  20. Development of an acoustic sensor for the future IceCube-Gen2 detector for neutrino detection and position calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickmann, Stefan; Eliseev, Dmitry; Heinen, Dirk; Linder, Peter; Rongen, Martin; Scholz, Franziska; Weinstock, Lars Steffen; Wiebusch, Christopher; Zierke, Simon

    2017-03-01

    For the planned high-energy extension of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in the glacial ice at the South Pole the spacing of detector modules will be increased with respect to IceCube. Because of these larger distances the quality of the geometry calibration based on pulsed light sources is expected to deteriorate. To counter this an independent acoustic geometry calibration system based on trilateration is introduced. Such an acoustic positioning system (APS) has already been developed for the Enceladus Explorer Project (EnEx), initiated by the DLR Space Administration. In order to integrate such APS-sensors into the IceCube detector the power consumption needs to be minimized. In addition, the frequency response of the front end electronics is optimized for positioning as well as the acoustic detection of neutrinos. The new design of the acoustic sensor and results of test measurements with an IceCube detector module will be presented.

  1. An Empirical Study of Underwater Acoustic Sensor Network and Terrestrial Wireless Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Ehmer Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two third of the earth is covered with water and there has been a growing interest in monitoring underwater medium for scientific exploration and attack protection. Underwater sensor nodes will find application in ocean-graphic data collection, pollution monitoring, disaster prevention and tactical surveillance application. Underwater network consist of a variable number of sensors and vehicles that are deployed to perform collaborative monitoring task over a given area. On the other hand the terrestrial wireless networks are the networks without cable and are very easy to install and offer portability and convenience which other network solutions do not offer. The terrestrial wireless networks utilized radio waves to maintain communication channels between computers. In our paper some of the fundamental key aspects of underwater acoustic communication are investigated and three different UASN architectures are discussed.

  2. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  3. A PARALIND Decomposition-Based Coherent Two-Dimensional Direction of Arrival Estimation Algorithm for Acoustic Vector-Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Zhou, Min; Li, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the acoustic vector-sensor array parameter estimation problem with the parallel profiles with linear dependencies (PARALIND) model, which was originally applied to biology and chemistry. Exploiting the PARALIND decomposition approach, we propose a blind coherent two-dimensional direction of arrival (2D-DOA) estimation algorithm for arbitrarily spaced acoustic vector-sensor arrays subject to unknown locations. The proposed algorithm works well to achieve automatically paired azimuth and elevation angles for coherent and incoherent angle estimation of acoustic vector-sensor arrays, as well as the paired correlated matrix of the sources. Our algorithm, in contrast with conventional coherent angle estimation algorithms such as the forward backward spatial smoothing (FBSS) estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT) algorithm, not only has much better angle estimation performance, even for closely-spaced sources, but is also available for arbitrary arrays. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of our algorithm. PMID:23604030

  4. Detection of corrosion processes and fatigue cracks by means of acoustic emission monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagenbrein, Andreas; Tscheliesnig, Peter [TUEV Austria Services GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Wachsmuth, Janne; Bohse, Juergen [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes for structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars, and ships. Within the 7{sup th} EC framework programme the aim of project CORFAT is to develop a new monitoring technology based on acoustic emission testing (AT) of the structural integrity in terms of proceeding degradation. Differentiation of acoustic emission (AE) signals of real degradation processes by fatigue crack growth or active corrosion from operational or environmental background noise requires the signal classification using also pattern recognition. Therefore, a data base of AE signals related to the different source mechanisms was built up experimentally. In this article selected results of corrosion and fatigue tests in the laboratory as well as results of monitoring background noise during moving of a road tanker are described. (orig.)

  5. Effects of Specimen Height on the Acoustic Emission Rate Value ‘a’ for Cement Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; HU Hongxiang; LU Guijuan; CHEN Shijie; LIU Shaojun; WANG Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the size effect on the AE rate ‘a’ value, three kinds of mix ratios were set up by different particle sizes and water cement ratios, 45 cement mortar specimens with ifve different heights were tested under axial compression. And the whole damage processes were monitored by full-digital acoustic emission acquisition system, followed by an analysis of mechanical behavior and AE activity. The experimental results show that the height of the cement specimen has signiifcant effects on the compressive strength and the acoustic emission rate ‘a’ value, but a slight effect on the accumulated AE hits number, which is analyzed from aspects of failure process of cement mortar specimens.

  6. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mario Bilmes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation"' triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  7. Study of electromagnetic and acoustic emission in creep experiments of water-containing rock samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hong-wen; ZHANG Zhong-yu; XU Guo-an

    2008-01-01

    Based on biaxial shear creep tests conducted on rock samples with different water contents, we present the results of our study on the regularities of electromagnetic and acoustic emission during the process of creep experiments in which we have ana-lyzed the contribution of water to the occurrence of electromagnetic radiation. The result shows that in the creep-fracturing course of rock samples, when the water content increases, the initial frequency and amplitude of electromagnetic and acoustic emission also increases, but at a decreasing growth rate caused by loading stress. This can be used as a criterion for the long-term stability of rock masses under conditions of repeated inundation and discharge of water.

  8. Monitoring of Acoustic Emissions Within Geothermal Areas in Iceland: A new Tool for Geothermal Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsdóttir, B.; Gudmundsson, O.

    2007-12-01

    With increased emphasis on geothermal development new exploration methods are needed in order to improve general understanding of geothermal reservoirs, characterize their extent and assess the potential for sustainable power production. Monitoring of acoustic emissions within geothermal areas may provide a new tool to evaluate the spatial extent of geothermal fields and model rock-fluid interactions. Three-dimensional seismic data have been used to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of noise within several high-temperature geothermal fields in Iceland. Seismic noise in the 4-6 Hz range within the Svartsengi field can be attributed to steam hydraulics and pressure oscillations within the geothermal reservoirs. Seismic noise surveys compliment electrical resistivity soundings and TEM-surveys by providing information pertinent to the current geothermal activity and extent of steam fields within the uppermost crust of the geothermal reservoir. Information related to acoustic emissions can thus help define targets for future wells.

  9. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, E; Bilmes, G M; 10.4279/PIP.040003

    2012-01-01

    Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation" triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  10. First-Order Acoustic Wave Equation Reverse Time Migration Based on the Dual-Sensor Seismic Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jiachun; Liu, Xuewei; Wu, Ru-Shan

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the mathematical requirements for conventional reverse time migration (RTM) and summarize their rationale. The known information provided by current acquisition system is inadequate for the second-order acoustic wave equations. Therefore, we introduce a dual-sensor seismic acquisition system into the coupled first-order acoustic wave equations. We propose a new dual-sensor reverse time migration called dual-sensor RTM, which includes two input variables, the pressure and vertical particle velocity data. We focus on the performance of dual-sensor RTM in estimating reflection coefficients compared with conventional RTM. Synthetic examples are used for the study of estimating coefficients of reflectors with both dual-sensor RTM and conventional RTM. The results indicate that dual-sensor RTM with two inputs calculates amplitude information more accurately and images structural positions of complex substructures, such as the Marmousi model, more clearly than that of conventional RTM. This shows that the dual-sensor RTM has better accuracy in backpropagation and carries more information in the directivity because of particle velocity injection. Through a simple point-shape model, we demonstrate that dual-sensor RTM decreases the effect of multi-pathing of propagating waves, which is helpful for focusing the energy. In addition, compared to conventional RTM, dual-sensor RTM does not cause extra memory costs. Dual-sensor RTM is, therefore, promising for the computation of multi-component seismic data.

  11. Simulation Experiment and Acoustic Emission Study on Coal and Gas Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Feng, Zengchao; Zhao, Dong; Duan, Dong

    2017-08-01

    A coal and gas outburst is an extreme hazard in underground mining. The present paper conducts a laboratory simulation of a coal and gas outburst combined with acoustic emission analysis. The experiment uses a three-dimensional stress loading system and a PCI-2 acoustic emission monitoring system. Furthermore, the development of a coal and gas outburst is numerically studied. The results demonstrate that the deformation and failure of a coal sample containing methane under three-dimensional stress involves four stages: initial compression, elastic deformation, plastic deformation and failure. The development of internal microscale fractures within a coal sample containing methane is reflected by the distribution of acoustic emission events. We observed that the deformation and failure zone for a coal sample under three-dimensional stress has an ellipsoid shape. Primary acoustic emission events are generated at the weak structural surface that compresses with ease due to the external ellipsoid-shaped stress. The number of events gradually increases until an outburst occurs. A mathematical model of the internal gas pressure and bulk stress is established through an analysis of the internal gas pressure and bulk stress of a coal sample, and it is useful for reproducing experimental results. The occurrence of a coal and gas outburst depends not only on the in situ stress, gas pressure and physical and mechanical characteristics of the coal mass but also on the free weak surface of the outburst outlet of the coal mass. It is more difficult for an outburst to occur from a stronger free surface.

  12. Acoustic emission characteristics on microscopic damage behavior of carbon fiber sheet reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun

    2002-05-01

    In this study, a three-point bend test has been carried out to understand the damage progress and the micro-failure mechanism of carbon fiber sheet (CFS) reinforced concretes. For these purposes, four kinds of specimens were used; unreinforced concrete, steel bar reinforced concrete, CFS reinforced concrete, and concrete reinforced by both steel bar and CFS. Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was used to evaluate the characteristics of damage progress and the failure mechanism of the specimens.

  13. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  14. Study of Acoustic Emission and Mechanical Characteristics of Coal Samples under Different Loading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huamin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of loading rate on mechanical properties and acoustic emission characteristics of coal samples, collected from Sanjiaohe Colliery, the uniaxial compression tests are carried out under various levels of loading rates, including 0.001 mm/s, 0.002 mm/s, and 0.005 mm/s, respectively, using AE-win E1.86 acoustic emission instrument and RMT-150C rock mechanics test system. The results indicate that the loading rate has a strong impact on peak stress and peak strain of coal samples, but the effect of loading rate on elasticity modulus of coal samples is relatively small. When the loading rate increases from 0.001 mm/s to 0.002 mm/s, the peak stress increases from 22.67 MPa to 24.99 MPa, the incremental percentage is 10.23%, and under the same condition the peak strain increases from 0.006191 to 0.007411 and the incremental percentage is 19.71%. Similarly, when the loading rate increases from 0.002 mm/s to 0.005 mm/s, the peak stress increases from 24.99 MPa to 28.01 MPa, the incremental percentage is 12.08%, the peak strain increases from 0.007411 to 0.008203, and the incremental percentage is 10.69%. The relationship between acoustic emission and loading rate presents a positive correlation, and the negative correlation relation has been determined between acoustic emission cumulative counts and loading rate during the rupture process of coal samples.

  15. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Multicell Reinforced Concrete Box Girders Subjected to Torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Marya Bagherifaez; Arash Behnia; Abeer Aqeel Majeed; Chai Hwa Kian

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) box girders are a common structural member for road bridges in modern construction. The hollow cross-section of a box girder is ideal in carrying eccentric loads or torques introduced by skew supports. This study employed acoustic emission (AE) monitoring on multicell RC box girder specimens subjected to laboratory-based torsion loading. Three multicell box girder specimens with different cross-sections were tested. The aim is to acquire AE analysis data indicative fo...

  16. Initial Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Multi-bay Box Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) HWB Multi-Bay Test Article were conducted during the second quarter of 2015 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This report documents the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests along with an initial analysis of the data. A more detailed analysis will be presented in future publications.

  17. Fatigue Damage Monitoring in 304L Steel Specimens by an Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ould-Amer Ammar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to clarify fatigue crack initiation and propagation mechanisms in 304L austenitic stainless steel under different total-strain-amplitudes. A complete process from crack initiation and propagation was recorded by using the acoustic emission method in one hand, and replica method in another hand. The effect of strain amplitude on fatigue crack growth was investigated and a new representation of various fatigue curves associated to various levels of fatigue damage is proposed.

  18. Practical acoustic thermometry with twin-tube and single-tube sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Podesta, M.; Sutton, G.; Edwards, G.; Stanger, L.; Preece, H. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Accurate measurement of high temperatures in a nuclear environment presents unique challenges. All secondary techniques inevitably drift because the thermometric materials in thermocouples and resistance sensors are sensitive not just to temperature, but also their own chemical and physical composition. The solution is to use primary methods that rely on fundamental links between measurable physical properties and temperature. In the nuclear field the best known technique is the measurement of Johnson Noise in a resistor (See Paper 80 at this conference). In this paper we describe the measurement of temperature in terms of the speed of sound in a gas confined in a tube - an acoustic waveguide. Acoustic thermometry is the most accurate technique of primary thermometry ever devised with the best uncertainty of measurement below 0.001 C. In contrast, the acoustic technique described in this work has a much larger uncertainty, approximately 1 deg. C. But the cost and ease of use are improved by several orders of magnitude, making implementation eminently practical. We first describe the basic construction and method of operation of thermometers using twin-tubes and single tubes. We then present results using a twin-tube design showing that showing long term stability (i.e. no detectable drift) at 700 deg. C over periods of several weeks. We then outline how the technique may be developed for different nuclear applications. (authors)

  19. Research on acoustic emission in-service inspection for large above-ground storage tank floors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingchun Lin; Yewei Kang; Min Xiong; Juan Zheng; Dongjie Tan [Petrochina Pipeline R and Center, Langfang (China)

    2009-07-01

    Much manpower is needed and a lot of materials are wasted when the floor of large above-ground storage tank (AST) is inspected with conventional methods which need to shut down the tank, then to empty and clean it before inspection. Due to the disadvantages of that, an in-service inspection method using acoustic emission (AE) technology is presented. By this mean the rational inspection plan and integrity evaluation of tank floors can be constructed. First, specific inspection steps are established based on the acoustic emission principle for large AST's floors and the practical condition of AST in order to acquire the AE corrosion data. Second, analysis method of acoustic emission dataset is studied. Finally, maintenance proposes are provided based on results of analysis for the corrosion status of the tank floors. In order to evaluate the performance of our method, an in-service field inspection is practiced on product oil tank with a volume of 5000 cubic meters. Then a traditional inspection procedure using magnetic flux leakage (MFL) technology is followed up. Comparative analysis of the results of the two inspection methods shows that there is consistency in localizing the position of corrosion between them. The feasibility of in-service inspection of AST's floors with AE is demonstrated. (author)

  20. Acoustic emissions for particle sizing of powders through signal processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastari, A.; Cristalli, C.; Morlacchi, R.; Pomponi, E. [Loccioni Group (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    The present work introduces an innovative method for measuring particle size distribution of an airborne powder, based on the application of signal processing techniques to the acoustic emission signals produced by the impacts of the powder with specific metallic surfaces. The basic idea of the proposed methodology lies on the identification of the unknown relation between the acquired acoustic emission signals and the powder particle size distribution, by means of a multi-step procedure. In the first step, wavelet packet decomposition is used to extract useful features from the acoustic emission signals: the dimensionality of feature space is further reduced through multivariate data analysis techniques. As a final step, a neural network is properly trained to map the feature vector into the particle size distribution. The proposed solution has several advantages, such as low cost and low invasiveness which allow the system based on this technique to be easily integrated in pre-existing plants. It has been successfully applied to the PSD measurement of coal powder produced by grinding mills in a coal-fired power station, and the experimental results are reported in the paper. The measurement principle can also be applied to different particle sizing applications, whenever a solid powder is carried in air or in other gases.