WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic emission monitoring

  1. Acoustic emission leak monitoring system LMS-96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, J.; Cvrcek, M.; Mueller, L.

    1997-01-01

    On-line acoustic emission leak monitoring under industrial conditions of nuclear power plants is a problem with specific features setting specific demands on the leak monitoring system. The paper briefly reviews those problems (attenuation pattern of a real structure, acoustic background, alarm system, etc.) and the solution of some of them is discussed. Information is presented on the Acoustic Emission Leak Monitoring System LMS-96 by SKODA NUCLEAR MACHINERY and the system's function is briefly described. (author)

  2. Flaw evolution monitoring by acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghia, S.; Sala, A.; Lucia, A.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw evolution monitoring during mechanical fatigue test has been performed by acoustic emission (AE) technique. Testing on 1:5 reduced scale vessel containing fabrication defects was carried out in the frame of an European program for pressure component residual life evaluation. Characteristics of AE signals associated to flaw evolution are discussed

  3. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  4. Condition Monitoring and Management from Acoustic Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik Bohl

    2005-01-01

    In the following, I will use technical terms without explanation as it gives the freedom to describe the project in a shorter form for those who already know. The thesis is about condition monitoring of large diesel engines from acoustic emission signals. The experiments have been focused...... is the analysis of the angular position changes of the engine related events such as fuel injection and valve openings, caused by operational load changes. With inspiration from speech recognition and voice effects the angular timing changes have been inverted with the event alignment framework. With the event...

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results

  6. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Cementitious Wasteforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasova, L.M.; Ojovan, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    A summary is presented of the potential of non-destructive acoustic emission (AE) method to be applied for structures immobilising nuclear wastes. The use and limitations of the method are discussed with given examples of experimental configurations and results obtained from AE monitoring and data analysis of two different processes addressing particular issues related to the nuclear waste immobilisation. These are (a) corrosion of aluminium, classified as intermediate level waste (ILW) in the UK, encapsulated in cementitious structures and (b) partial melting and solidification during cooling of granite at a pressure of 0.15 GPa which simulates the conditions in a deep borehole disposal of canisters of vitrified high level waste (HLW). Methodology for analysis of the collected data and characterisation of the potential AE sources is performed at different steps including simple signals count and more complex signal parameter-based approach and advanced signal processing. The AE method has been shown as a potential tool for monitoring and inspection of structures immobilising nuclear wastes in relation to the time progress of different interactions of the waste with the encapsulating matrix or the wasteform with the hosting environment for permanent disposal. (author)

  7. Acoustic emission monitoring of the bending under tension test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghadam, Marcel; Sulaiman, Mohd Hafis Bin; Christiansen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary investigations have shown that acoustic emission has promising aspects as an online monitoring technique for assessment of tribological conditions during metal forming as regards to determination of the onset of galling. In the present study the acoustic emission measuring technique h...... in BUT testing has been found to describe the frictional conditions during forming well and to allow for accurate assessment of the limits of lubrication....... been applied for online monitoring of the frictional conditions experienced during Bending Under Tension (BUT) testing. The BUT test emulates the forming conditions experienced when drawing sheet material over a die curvature as in deep drawing processes. Monitoring of the developed acoustic emission...

  8. Mechanical Seal Opening Condition Monitoring Based on Acoustic Emission Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erqing Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the measurement of mechanical sealing film thickness and just-lift-off time is very difficult, the sealing film condition monitoring method based on acoustic emission signal is proposed. The mechanical seal acoustic emission signal present obvious characteristics of time-varying nonlinear and pulsating. In this paper, the acoustic emission signal is used to monitor the seal end faces just-lift-off time and friction condition. The acoustic emission signal is decomposed by empirical mode decomposition into a series of intrinsic mode function with independent characteristics of different time scales and different frequency band. The acoustic emission signal only generated by end faces friction is obtained by eliminating the false intrinsic mode function components. The correlation coefficient of acoustic emission signal and Multi-scale Laplace Wavelet is calculated. It is proved that the maximum frequency (8000 Hz of the correlation coefficient is appeared at the spindle speed of 300 rpm. And at this time (300 rpm the end faces have just lifted off. By a set of mechanical oil seal running test, it is demonstrated that this method could accurately identify mechanical seal end faces just-lift-off time and friction condition.

  9. Design of acoustic emission monitoring system based on VC++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; He, Wei

    2015-12-01

    At present, a lot of companies at home and abroad have researched and produced a batch of specialized monitoring instruments for acoustic emission (AE). Most of them cost highly and the system function exists in less stable and less portability for the testing environment and transmission distance and other aspects. Depending on the research background and the status quo, a dual channel intelligent acoustic emission monitoring system was designed based on Microsoft Foundation Classes in Visual Studio C++ to solve some of the problems in the acoustic emission research and meet the needs of actual monitoring task. It contains several modules such as main module, acquisition module, signal parameters setting module and so on. It could give out corrosion AE waveform and signal parameters results according to the main menu selected parameters. So the needed information could be extracted from the experiments datum to solve the problem deeply. This soft system is the important part of AE detection g system.

  10. Acoustic emission/flaw relationships for inservice monitoring of LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Friesel, M.A.; Skorpik, J.R.; Dawson, J.F.

    1991-10-01

    The program concerning Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of LWRs was initiated in FY76 with the objective of validating the application of acoustic emission (AE) to monitor nuclear reactor pressure-containing components during operation to detect cracking. The program has been supported by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Research and development has been performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle Memorial Institute. The program has shown the feasibility of continuous, on-line AE monitoring to detect crack growth and produced validated methods for applying the technology. Included are relationships for estimating flaw severity from AE data and field applications at Watts Bar Unit 1 Reactor, Limerick Unit 1 Reactor, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor. This report discusses the program scope and organization, the three program phases and the results obtained, standard and code activities, and instrumentation and software developed under this program

  11. Monitoring of lubrication conditions in journal bearing by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dong Jin; Kwon, Oh Yang; Jung, Min Hwa

    1993-01-01

    Systems with journal bearings generally operate in large scale and under severe loading conditions such as steam generator turbines and internal combustion engines, in contrast to the machinery using rolling element bearings. Failure of the bearings in these machinery can result in the system breakdown. To avoid the time consuming repair and considerable economic loss, the detection of incipient failure in journal bearings becomes very important. In this experimental approach, acoustic emission monitoring is employed to the detection of incipient failure caused by intervention of foreign particles most probable in the journal bearing systems. It has been known that the intervention of foreign materials, insufficient lubrication and misassembly etc. are principal factors to cause bearing failure and distress. The experiment was conducted under such designed conditions as inserting alumina particles to the lubrication layer in the simulated journal bearing system. The results showed that acoustic emission could be an effective tool to detect the incipient failure in journal bearings.

  12. An assessment of acoustic emission for nuclear pressure vessel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruby, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Recent research has greatly improved our understanding of the basic mechanisms of deformation and fracture that generate detectable acoustic emission signals in structural steels. A critical review of the application of acoustic emission (AE) to the fabrication, proof testing and in-service monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels is presented in the light of this improved understanding. The detectability of deformation and fracture processes in pressure vessel steels is discussed, and recommendations made for improving source location accuracy and the development of quantitative source assessment techniques. Published data suggest that AE can make an important contribution to fabrication monitoring, and to the detection of defects in lower toughness materials during vessel proof testing. In high toughness materials, however, the signals generated during ductile crack growth may frequently be too weak for reliable detection. The feasibility of AE for continuous monitoring has not yet been adequately demonstrated because of high background noise levels and uncertainty about AE signal strengths from the defect growth processes that occur in service. In-service leak detection by AE shows considerable promise. It is recommended that further tests are carried out with realistic defects, and under realistic conditions of loading (including thermal shock and fatigue) and of environment. (author)

  13. Proportional monitoring of the acoustic emission in crypto-conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dostál

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is aimed at studying corrosion and fatigue properties of aluminum alloys by means of acoustic emission (AE. During material degradation are acoustic events scanned and evaluated. The main objective of the article is a description of behavior of aluminum alloys degraded in specific conditions and critical degradation stages determination. The first part of the article describes controlled degradation of the material in the crypto–conditions. The acoustic emission method is used for process analyzing. This part contains the AE signals assessment and comparing aluminium alloy to steel. Then the specimens are loaded on high-cyclic loading apparatus for fatigue life monitoring. Also, the synergy of fatigue and corrosion processes is taken into account.The aim is the description of fatigue properties for aluminum alloys that have already been corrosion-degraded. Attention is also focused on the structure of fatigue cracks. The main part of the article is aimed at corrosion degradation of aluminium alloys researched in real time by means of AE. The most important benefit of AE detection/recording is that it provides information about the process in real time. Using this measurement system is possible to observe the current status of the machines/devices and to prevent serious accidents.

  14. Mechanical seal monitoring technique by acoustic emission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Tadashi; Fujita, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Saito, Kazuhiro; Yokota, Setsuo; Hisada, Yasuhide; Masahiro, Komatsu

    1987-09-20

    This report describes a technique for mechanical seal monitoring through acoustic emission (AE) measurement. The equipment consists of an AE sensor, preamplifier, multiplexer, main amplifier, effective value transducer and computer system. When the sealed liquid pressure undergoes a large change, the seal surface configuration is monitored and evaluated accurately through AE measurement. If the mechanical seal surface id damaged or worn, the AE level is kept high or continues to fluctuate largely for a rather long period. When leak occurs, the AE value shows great fluctuations either at extremely low levels or at high levels. The former trend is considered to result from a decrease in solid contact due to an excessive amount of liquid film being formed at the seal surface during leak. In the latter case, the leak is attributed to severe damage to the seal surface. (18 figs, 1 tab, 5 photos, 3 refs)

  15. Modified Acoustic Emission for Prognostic Health Monitoring, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Photonics proposes to team with Dr. Duke of Virginia Tech to develop a multi-mode, enhanced piezoelectric acoustic emission sensing system to couple large...

  16. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  17. A monitoring of superconducting magnets by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Harehiko; Tateishi, Hiroshi; Onishi, Toshitada

    1990-01-01

    Since superconducting magnets (SCM) are going to be indispensable to magnetic levitated train, nuclear fusion, magnetic resonating imaging, rotational machines, etc., they must be placed great reliance on its repetitional operations. But without appropriate evaluating methods, these promising techniques must remain still in science levels and hard to be transferable to real human technologies. SCM, being used under dynamical operation with linking other electro-magnetic systems as said above, induce high voltage from which monitoring superconducting to normal transitional voltage is difficult to distinguish. To solve this problem, monitoring SCM by Acoustic Emission (AE) from themselves, have been found effective, in particular, during the dynamical energizing of them. As for a demonstration, this paper will report mainly how to monitor 3 MJ-SCM and a few results of the experiments aquired both by counting and locational mode of AE in pulsed and repeated operations of the magnet. Some discussions on the AE monitorings are also made along the main issues to be solved in future. (author)

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring during hydrotest of a thin wall pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, E.; Grugni, G.; Panzani, C.; Pirovano, B.; Possa, G.; Tonolini, F.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of the acoustic emission monitoring during hydrotests of a thin wall steel pressure vessel. Location of acoustic sources was based on longitudinal wave front detection. The careful calibration of the three sensors used for acoustic source location was found to be very useful, and allowed an accurate location error analysis. Acoustic emission in the hydrotests was found to be due mainly to stress release in weld seams

  19. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  20. Inspection of nuclear power plant piping welds by in-process acoustic emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of using in-process acoustic emission monitoring on nuclear power plant piping welds are discussed. The technique was applied to good and intentionally flawed test welds as well as production welds, and the acoustic emission results are compared to standard NDT methods and selected metallographic cross-sections

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring of crack formation during alkali silica\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lokajíček, Tomáš; Přikryl, R.; Šachlová, Š.; Kuchařová, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 220, MAR 30 (2017), s. 175-182 ISSN 0013-7952 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/12/0915 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Alkali-silica reaction * accelerated expansion test * ultrasonic sounding * acoustic emission * backscattered electron imaging Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.569, year: 2016

  2. A Preliminary Study Application Clustering System in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Bahari Nur Amira Afiza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE is a non-destructive testing known as assessment on damage detection in structural engineering. It also can be used to discriminate the different types of damage occurring in a composite materials. The main problem associated with the data analysis is the discrimination between the different AE sources and analysis of the AE signal in order to identify the most critical damage mechanism. Clustering analysis is a technique in which the set of object are assigned to a group called cluster. The objective of the cluster analysis is to separate a set of data into several classes that reflect the internal structure of data. In this paper was used k-means algorithm for partitioned clustering method, numerous effort have been made to improve the performance of application k-means clustering algorithm. This paper presents a current review on application clustering system in Acoustic Emission.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring during hydrotests of a thin wall pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, E.; Grugni, G.; Panzani, C.; Pirovano, B.; Possa, G.; Tonolini, F.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of an acoustic emission monitoring performed during hydrotests of a thin wall steel pressure vessel. The location of acoustic sources was based on longitudinal wave front detection. The careful calibration of the three sensors instrumentation system used for acoustic source location was found to be useful, and alllowed an accurate location error analysis. Acoustic emission in the hydrotests was found to be mainly due to stress release in weld seams. (Fontana, E.; Grugni, G.; Panzani, C.; Pirovano, B.; Possa, G.; Tonolini, F.)

  4. Progress for on-line acoustic emission monitoring of cracks in reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Friesel, M.A.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    This paper reviews FY1985 accomplishments and FY1986 plans for the NRC sponsored research program concerned with ''Acoustic Emission/Flaw Relationships for Inservice Monitoring of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Boundaries''. The objective of the acoustic emission (AE) monitoring program is to develop and validate the use of AE methods for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect flaw growth. Topics discussed include testing AE monitoring on reactors, refinement of an AE signal identification relationship, study of slow crack growth rate effects on AE generation, and activity to produce an ASTM standard for AE monitoring and to gain ASME code acceptance of AE monitoring

  5. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  6. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  7. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul

    2005-11-01

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set shows an intense

  8. Monitoring of Acoustic Emission During the Disintegration of Rock

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tripathi, R.; Srivastava, M.; Hloch, Sergej; Adamčík, P.; Chattopadhyaya, S.; Das, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 149 (2016), s. 481-488 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [International Conference on Manufacturing Engineering and Materials, ICMEM 2016. Nový Smokovec, 06.06.2016-10.06.2016] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : acoustic emission * rock disintegration * waterjet Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877705816312127

  9. Large hoisting machinery local damage acoustic emission monitoring of optical information acquisition research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AE technology, an advanced fault diagnosis technique,is impacted by environmental noise during monitoring equipment. The occurrence of interfere noise,the fashion of interfere and the effect to the system in the AE automatic online monitoring system is analyzed. At present, most of the acoustic emission signal transmission by cable, this way of transmission has a limited transmission distance, shortcomings and so on signal easily disturbed. Is proposed in this paper based on the optical fiber transmission technology, designed and developed a information collection system based on optical fiber acoustic emission monitoring.This way has the advantages of long distance transmission, strong anti-jamming capability.

  10. Research Based on the Acoustic Emission of Wind Power Tower Drum Dynamic Monitoring Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Penglin; Sang, Yuan; Xu, Yaxing; Zhao, Zhiqiang

    Wind power tower drum is one of the key components of the wind power equipment. Whether the wind tower drum performs safety directly affects the efficiency, life, and performance of wind power equipment. Wind power tower drum in the process of manufacture, installation, and operation may lead to injury, and the wind load and gravity load and long-term factors such as poor working environment under the action of crack initiation or distortion, which eventually result in the instability or crack of the wind power tower drum and cause huge economic losses. Thus detecting the wind power tower drum crack damage and instability is especially important. In this chapter, acoustic emission is used to monitor the whole process of wind power tower drum material Q345E steel tensile test at first, and processing and analysis tensile failure signal of the material. And then based on the acoustic emission testing technology to the dynamic monitoring of wind power tower drum, the overall detection and evaluation of the existence of active defects in the whole structure, and the acoustic emission signals collected for processing and analysis, we could preliminarily master the wind tower drum mechanism of acoustic emission source. The acoustic emission is a kind of online, efficient, and economic method, which has very broad prospects for work. The editorial committee of nondestructive testing qualification and certification of personnel teaching material of science and technology industry of national defense, "Acoustic emission testing" (China Machine Press, 2005.1).

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring from a lab scale high shear granulator--a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, N J; Povey, M J W; Reynolds, G K; Xu, B H; Ding, Y

    2014-04-25

    A new approach to the monitoring of granulation processes using passive acoustics together with precise control over the granulation process has highlighted the importance of particle-particle and particle-bowl collisions in acoustic emission. The results have shown that repeatable acoustic results could be obtained but only when a spray nozzle water addition system was used. Acoustic emissions were recorded from a transducer attached to the bowl and an airborne transducer. It was found that the airborne transducer detected very little from the granulation and only experienced small changes throughout the process. The results from the bowl transducer showed that during granulation the frequency content of the acoustic emission shifted towards the lower frequencies. Results from the discrete element model indicate that when larger particles are used the number of collisions the particles experience reduces. This is a result of the volume conservation methodology used in this study, therefore larger particles results in less particles. These simulation results coupled with previous theoretical work on the frequency content of an impacting sphere explain why the frequency content of the acoustic emissions reduces during granule growth. The acoustic system used was also clearly able to identify when large over-wetted granules were present in the system, highlighting its benefit for detecting undesirable operational conditions. High-speed photography was used to study if visual changes in the granule properties could be linked with the changing acoustic emissions. The high speed photography was only possible towards the latter stages of the granulation process and it was found that larger granules produced a higher magnitude of acoustic emission across a broader frequency range. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acoustic Emission Behavior of Early Age Concrete Monitored by Embedded Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Ren, Hong-Wei; Dong, Bi-Qin; Xing, Feng

    2014-10-02

    Acoustic emission (AE) is capable of monitoring the cracking activities inside materials. In this study, embedded sensors were employed to monitor the AE behavior of early age concrete. Type 1-3 cement-based piezoelectric composites, which had lower mechanical quality factor and acoustic impedance, were fabricated and used to make sensors. Sensors made of the composites illustrated broadband frequency response. In a laboratory, the cracking of early age concrete was monitored to recognize different hydration stages. The sensors were also embedded in a mass concrete foundation to localize the temperature gradient cracks.

  13. Acoustic emission for on-line reactor monitoring: results from field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1984-09-01

    The objective of the acoustic emission (AE)/flaw characterization program is to develop use of the AE method on a continuous basis (during operation and during hydrotest) to detect and analyze flaw growth in reactor pressure vessels and primary piping. AE has the unique capability for continuous monitoring, high sensitivity, and remote flaw location

  14. Using acoustic emission technique to monitor fractures on the analogous pressure pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lichen

    1989-01-01

    By using the acoustic emission technique to monitor the fractures on analogous pressure pipes of the primary circuit which has had cracks and loading with pressure was investigated. The dynamical process, from cracking to fracturing, was recorded by the acoustic emission technique. Comparing with the conventional method, this method gives more informations, such as pre-cracking, cracking growing, fast fracturing and the pressure values at different phases. During testing time a microcomputer was used for real-time data processing and locating the fracturing position. These data are useful for the mechanical analysis of the reactor components

  15. Progress toward acoustic emission characterization for continuous monitoring of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in an operating reactor vessel using acoustic emission (AE) data. A preliminary AE-flaw growth relationship has been developed encompassing six variables. This model relates AE count and energy to fatigue crack driving force ΔK. Pattern recognition has been examined as a means of distinguishing crack growth AE from other acoustic signals with encouraging results. The program is moving into hardware implementation of relationships for testing and refinement by monitoring tests in heavy section specimens and subscale structures. The hardware system will become a reactor monitor prototype. (orig.) [de

  16. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic-emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the results of a four year research program on the utilization of acoustic emission techniques on light water reactor component applications. Two techniques of the acoustic emission technology were applied to specific problems occurring within the light water reactor system. Crack detection AE monitoring was applied to thermal cycle fatigue cracking problems and stress corrosion cracking problems. Leak detection AE monitoring was applied to valve leakage in the main steam safety relief valves and incontainment packing gland valves. The report provides AE data showing how AE crack detection can be used as an on-line diagnostic monitoring tool. By having an active monitor on light water reactor components, the inservice inspection of the components is being performed during operation rather than refueling periods, thereby reducing critical path time during outages. The resultant benefit is increased plant availability and a reduction in accumulated radiation exposure

  17. Utilisation of acoustic emission technique to monitor lubrication condition in a low speed bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordin Jamaludin; Mohd Jailani Mohd Nor

    2003-01-01

    Monitoring of lubrication condition in rolling element bearings through the use of vibration analysis is an established technique. However, this success has not mirrored at low rotational speeds. At low speeds the energy generated from the poor lubricated bearing lubrication might not show as an obvious change in signature and thus become undetectable using conventional vibration measuring equipment. This paper presents an investigation into the applicability of acoustic emission technique and analysis for detecting poorly lubricated bearing rotating at a speed of 1.12 rpm. Investigations were centered on a test-rig designed to simulate the real bearing used in the field. The variation of lubricant amount in the low-speed bearing was successfully monitored using a new developed method known as pulse injection technique (PIT). The PIT technique was based on acoustic emission method. The technique involved transmitting a Dirac pulse to the test bearing via a transmitting acoustic emission sensor while the bearing was in operation. Analysing the captured acoustic emission signatures using established statistical method could differentiate between properly and poorly lubricated bearing. (Author)

  18. Fundamental and assessment of concrete structure monitoring by using acoustic emission technique testing: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desa, M. S. M.; Ibrahim, M. H. W.; Shahidan, S.; Ghadzali, N. S.; Misri, Z.

    2018-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the non-destructive (NDT) testing, where it can be used to determine the damage of concrete structures such as crack, corrosion, stability, sensitivity, as structure monitoring and energy formed within cracking opening growth in the concrete structure. This article gives a comprehensive review of the acoustic emission (AE) technique testing due to its application in concrete structure for structural health monitoring (SHM). Assessment of AE technique used for structural are reviewed to give the perception of its structural engineering such as dam, bridge and building, where the previous research has been reviewed based on AE application. The assessment of AE technique focusing on basic fundamental of parametric and signal waveform analysis during analysis process and its capability in structural monitoring. Moreover, the assessment and application of AE due to its function have been summarized and highlighted for future references

  19. Lathe stability charts via acoustic emission monitoring | Keraita ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from showing the borderlines of stability, such charts can be used to identify the necessary changes required to eliminate chatter at minimum or no loss of production. The signal parameters investigated include AE mean intensity level, the skew and kurtosis of the power spectrum; as well as the count rate of the emissions.

  20. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  1. Monitoring of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Old Timber Beams via Strain and Multiresonant Acoustic Emission Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescalvo, Francisco J; Valverde-Palacios, Ignacio; Suarez, Elisabet; Roldán, Andrés; Gallego, Antolino

    2018-04-17

    This paper proposes the monitoring of old timber beams with natural defects (knots, grain deviations, fissures and wanes), reinforced using carbon composite materials (CFRP). Reinforcement consisted of the combination of a CFRP laminate strip and a carbon fabric discontinuously wrapping the timber element. Monitoring considered the use and comparison of two types of sensors: strain gauges and multi-resonant acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Results demonstrate that: (1) the mechanical behavior of the beams can be considerably improved by means of the use of CFRP (160% in bending load capacity and 90% in stiffness); (2) Acoustic emission sensors provide comparable information to strain gauges. This fact points to the great potential of AE techniques for in-service damage assessment in real wood structures.

  2. Monitoring of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Old Timber Beams via Strain and Multiresonant Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rescalvo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the monitoring of old timber beams with natural defects (knots, grain deviations, fissures and wanes, reinforced using carbon composite materials (CFRP. Reinforcement consisted of the combination of a CFRP laminate strip and a carbon fabric discontinuously wrapping the timber element. Monitoring considered the use and comparison of two types of sensors: strain gauges and multi-resonant acoustic emission (AE sensors. Results demonstrate that: (1 the mechanical behavior of the beams can be considerably improved by means of the use of CFRP (160% in bending load capacity and 90% in stiffness; (2 Acoustic emission sensors provide comparable information to strain gauges. This fact points to the great potential of AE techniques for in-service damage assessment in real wood structures.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of preservice testing at Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Pappas, R.A.; Friesel, M.A.

    1985-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Plant in the US during hot functional preservice testing is described. Background, methodology, and results are included. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by the US NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing to AE monitoring during reactor operation. 3 refs., 6 figs

  4. Acoustic Emission for on-line reactor pressure boundary monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Pappas, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The program objective is to develop AE for continuous surveillance to assess flaw growth in reactor pressure boundaries. Technology in the laboratory is being evaluated on structures. Results have demonstrated basic feasibility of the program objective. AE monitoring a long term fatigue test of a pressure vessel demonstrated an instrument system, and the ability to detect unexpected as well as well as known fatigue cracks. Monitoring a nuclear reactor system shows that the coolant flow noise problem is manageable and AE can be detected under simulated operating conditions

  5. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  6. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas D Arvanitis

    Full Text Available The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001 larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2 = 0.78. Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  7. Acoustic emission-based in-process monitoring of surface generation in robot-assisted polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring of surface generation in the robot-assisted polishing (RAP) was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate...... automatic detection of optimal process endpoint allow intelligent process control, creating fundamental elements in development of robust fully automated RAP process for its widespread industrial application....... removal of the part from the machine tool. In this study, stabilisation of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was monitored by AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing arm in direct contact with a bonded abrasive polishing tool...

  8. Monitoring of temperature fatigue failure mechanism for polyvinyl alcohol fiber concrete using acoustic emission sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Cao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) techniques to monitor the mechanism of evolution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber concrete damage under temperature fatigue loading is investigated. Using the temperature fatigue test, real-time AE monitoring data of PVA fiber concrete is achieved. Based on the AE signal characteristics of the whole test process and comparison of AE signals of PVA fiber concretes with different fiber contents, the damage evolution process of PVA fiber concrete is analyzed. Finally, a qualitative evaluation of the damage degree is obtained using the kurtosis index and b-value of AE characteristic parameters. The results obtained using both methods are discussed.

  9. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Karl A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guss, Gabe [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mathews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  10. Acoustic Emission Technology and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Y. S.; Lim, S. H.; Eom, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Jung, H. K.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustic emission is the elastic wave that is generated by the rapid release of energy from the localized sources within a material. After the observation of acoustic emission phenomenon in 1950, the research and further investigation had been performed. Acoustic emission examination becomes a rapidly matured nondestructive testing method with demonstrated capabilities for characterizing material behavior and for detecting the defect. It is of interest as a possible passive monitoring technique for detecting, locating and characterizing the defects in component and structure. Acoustic emission technology has recently strengthened the on-line monitoring application for the detection of incipient failures and the assurance of structural integrity. The field of acoustic emission testing is still growing vigorously and presents many challenges. Especially, acoustic emission has been successfully applied in the leak detection of primary pressure boundary of nuclear power plants. In this state-of-art report, the principle, measurement and field applications of acoustic emission technique is reviewed and summarized. Acoustic emission technology will contribute to the assurance of nuclear safety as the on-line monitoring technique of structural integrity of NSSS components and structures

  11. Health monitoring of Ceramic Matrix Composites from waveform-based analysis of Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maillet Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs are anticipated for use in the hot section of aircraft engines. Their implementation requires the understanding of the various damage modes that are involved and their relation to life expectancy. Acoustic Emission (AE has been shown to be an efficient technique for monitoring damage evolution in CMCs. However, only a waveform-based analysis of AE can offer the possibility to validate and precisely examine the recorded AE data with a view to damage localization and identification. The present work fully integrates wave initiation, propagation and acquisition in the analysis of Acoustic Emission waveforms recorded at various sensors, therefore providing more reliable information to assess the relation between Acoustic Emission and damage modes. The procedure allows selecting AE events originating from damage, accurate determination of their location as well as the characterization of effects of propagation on the recorded waveforms. This approach was developed using AE data recorded during tensile tests on carbon/carbon composites. It was then applied to melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of damage in ceramic matrix composites: Effects of weaves and feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Mordasky, Matt; Kumar, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are a class of high temperature materials with better damage tolerance properties compared to monolithic ceramics. The improved toughness is attributed to weak interface coating between the fiber and the matrix that allows for crack deflection and fiber pull-out. Thus, CMCs have gained consideration over monolithic materials for high temperature applications such as in gas turbines. The current standard fiber architecture for CMCs is a harness satin (HS) balanced weave (5HS and 8HS); however, other architectures such as uni-weave materials (tape layup) are now being considered due to fiber placement control and higher fiber volume fraction in the tensile loading direction. Engineering components require additional features in the CMC laminates, such as holes for attachments. Past work has shown that acoustic emission could differentiate the effect of changing interface conditions due to heat treatment effects. The focus of the present work is to investigate the effects of different weaves and the presence of a feature on damage behavior of CMCs as observed via acoustic emission technique. The results of the tensile testing with acoustic emission monitoring will be presented and discussed.

  13. Experimental study of advanced continuous acoustic emission monitoring of BWR components. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.W.; Hartman, W.F.

    1980-09-01

    The program consisted of installing, maintaining, and monitoring AE sensors located on primary piping, nozzles, and valves in the BWR system. Analysis of the AE data was correlated to the results of supplementary nondestructive testing techniques used during the in-service inspection, performed at refueling outages. Purpose of the program was to develop the on-line surveillance acoustic emission technique in order to identify areas of possible structural degradation. Result of reducing inspection time was to reduce accumulated radiation exposure to inspecting personnel and to reduce the amount of critical plant outage time by identifying the critical inspection areas during operation. The program demonstrated the capability of acoustic emission instrumentation to endure the nuclear reactor environment. The acoustic emission sensors withstood 12 months of reactor operation at temperatures of 400 0 F and greater in high radiation fields. The preamplifiers, also mounted in the reactor environment, operated for the 12-month period in 100% humidity, 250 0 F conditions. The remaining cable and AE instrumentation were operated in controlled environments

  14. The application of acoustic emission measurements on laboratory testpieces to large scale pressure vessel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingham, T.; Dawson, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    A test pressure vessel containing 4 artificial defects was monitored for emission whilst pressure cycling to failure. Testpieces cut from both the failed vessel and from as-rolled plate material were tested in the laboratory. A marked difference in emission characteristics was observed between plate and vessel testpieces. Activity from vessel material was virtually constant after general yield and emission amplitudes were low. Plate testpieces showed maximum activity at general yield and more frequent high amplitude emissions. An attempt has been made to compare the system sensitivities between the pressure vessel test and laboratory tests. In the absence of an absolute calibration device, system sensitivities were estimated using dummy signals generated by the excitation of an emission sensor. The measurements have shown an overall difference in sensitivity between vessel and laboratory tests of approximately 25db. The reduced sensitivity in the vessel test is attributed to a combination of differences in sensors, acoustic couplant, attenuation, and dispersion relative to laboratory tests and the relative significance of these factors is discussed. Signal amplitude analysis of the emissions monitored from laboratory testpieces showed that, whith losses of the order of 25 to 30db, few emissions would be detected from the pressure vessel test. It is concluded that no reliable prediction of acoustic behaviour of a structure may be made from laboratory test unless testpieces of the actual structural material are used. A considerable improvement in detection sensitivity, is also required for reliable detection of defects in low strength ductile materials and an absolute method of system calibration is required between tests

  15. Analysis of Precursors Prior to Rock Burst in Granite Tunnel Using Acoustic Emission and Far Infrared Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zhengzhao; Liu, Xiangxin; Zhang, Yanbo; Tang, Chunan

    2013-01-01

    To understand the physical mechanism of the anomalous behaviors observed prior to rock burst, the acoustic emission (AE) and far infrared (FIR) techniques were applied to monitor the progressive failure of a rock tunnel model subjected to biaxial stresses. Images of fracturing process, temperature changes of the tunnel, and spatiotemporal serials of acoustic emission were simultaneously recorded during deformation of the model. The b-value derived from the amplitude distribution data of AE wa...

  16. Acoustic emission monitoring of leakage through seal-plug in PHWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, S K; Badgujar, B P; Goswami, G L [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Atomic Fuels Div.; Patel, R J; Bhattacharya, S; Agrawal, R G [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Refuelling Technology Division

    1994-12-31

    Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is being developed as an in-service inspection tool for monitoring the leakage through seal-plugs in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Time as well as frequency domain analysis have been utilised during the experiment carried out at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) using test set up simulating the pressure and temperature conditions. The work involved were to determine the temperature profile on end-fitting, effect of pressure and temperature on leakage etc. This paper discusses various relationships like signal-level vs. pressure, frequency spectrum of signal, signal-level vs. leakage based on the above experimental work. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Aggelis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium osumilite (BMAS ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  18. Monitoring the viscosity of diesel engine lubricating oil by using acoustic emission technique, the selection of measurement parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman Inayatullah; Nordin Jamaludin; Fauziah Mat

    2009-04-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been developed through years of monitoring and diagnosis of bearing, but it is still new in the diagnosis and monitoring of lubrication oil to bearings drive. The propagation of acoustic emission signal is generated when the signal piston on the cylinder liner lubricating oil which is a par. The signal is analyzed in time domain to obtain the parameters of root mean squared, amplitude, energy and courtesy. Lubricant viscosity will undergo changes due to temperature, pressure and useful. This study focuses on the appropriate parameters for the diagnosis and monitoring of lubricating oil viscosity. Studies were conducted at a constant rotational speed and temperature, but use a different age. The results showed that the energy parameter is the best parameter used in this monitoring. However, this parameter cannot be used directly and it should be analyzed using mathematical formulas. This mathematical formula is a relationship between acoustic emission energy with the viscosity of lubricating oil. (author)

  19. Considerations for acoustic emission monitoring of spherical Kevlar/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstad, M. A.; Patterson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    We are continuing to research the applications of acoustic emission testing for predicting burst pressure of filament-wound Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels. This study has focused on three specific areas. The first area involves development of an experimental technique and the proper instrumentation to measure the energy given off by the acoustic emission transducer per acoustic emission burst. The second area concerns the design of a test fixture in which to mount the composite vessel so that the acoustic emission transducers are held against the outer surface of the composite. Included in this study area is the calibration of the entire test setup including couplant, transducer, electronics, and the instrument measuring the energy per burst. In the third and final area of this study, we consider the number, location, and sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducers used for proof testing composite pressure vessels.

  20. Thermal Cracking in Westerly Granite Monitored Using Direct Wave Velocity, Coda Wave Interferometry, and Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, L.; Lengliné, O.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Schmittbuhl, J.

    2018-03-01

    To monitor both the permanent (thermal microcracking) and the nonpermanent (thermo-elastic) effects of temperature on Westerly Granite, we combine acoustic emission monitoring and ultrasonic velocity measurements at ambient pressure during three heating and cooling cycles to a maximum temperature of 450°C. For the velocity measurements we use both P wave direct traveltime and coda wave interferometry techniques, the latter being more sensitive to changes in S wave velocity. During the first cycle, we observe a high acoustic emission rate and large—and mostly permanent—apparent reductions in velocity with temperature (P wave velocity is reduced by 50% of the initial value at 450°C, and 40% upon cooling). Our measurements are indicative of extensive thermal microcracking during the first cycle, predominantly during the heating phase. During the second cycle we observe further—but reduced—microcracking, and less still during the third cycle, where the apparent decrease in velocity with temperature is near reversible (at 450°C, the P wave velocity is decreased by roughly 10% of the initial velocity). Our results, relevant for thermally dynamic environments such as geothermal reservoirs, highlight the value of performing measurements of rock properties under in situ temperature conditions.

  1. Monitoring of martensite formation during welding by means of acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohemen, S.M.C. van; Hermans, M.J.M.; Ouden, G. den

    2001-01-01

    The martensitic transformation during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of steel 42CrMo4 has been studied using the acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique. Welds were produced under static conditions (spot welding) and under stationary conditions (travelling arc welding). After spot welding, the root mean square (RMS) value of the continuous acoustic emission was measured, revealing a peak that reflects the evolution of martensite formation during cooling of the spot weld. The RMS value was also measured during travelling arc welding at different heat inputs and corrected for the noise of the welding process to obtain the RMS value due to martensite formation. After welding, optical metallography was carried out to quantify the amount of martensite formed during cooling of the weld. An analysis of the results shows that the squared RMS value is proportional to the volume rate of martensite formation during welding, which is consistent with theory and in good agreement with the results obtained in the case of spot welding. The obtained results suggest that AE can be applied as a real time monitoring technique for the detection of martensite formation during steel welding. (author)

  2. Feasibility of evaluating the integrity of FTR duct to end fixture welds using acoustic emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trantow, R.L.

    1975-11-01

    A method of applying real-time acoustic emission (AE) source location to evaluate the integrity of duct-to-end fixture welds was developed and evaluated using the HEDL R8-4 AE monitor coupled with a PDP-8e minicomputer. Operational software was developed to control the system's data acquisition, storage, and display functions. Performance was evaluated on the basis of comparisons between AE source location data and subsequent destructive examination of six duct-to-transition ring qualification welds. Ten separate discontinuities seen in the metallography performed at 35 locations along these welds correlated with the averaged acoustic emission activity revealed by the AE source location maps. This relationship is not presently considered to be usable as a system calibration method however, because of the limited range of discontinuity lengths (from 0.0003 to 0.004 in. long) that were correlated. The presence of six other discontinuities, found in regions showing low levels of emission activity, indicated that significant stress risers can go undetected under the conditions investigated

  3. Real-time measurement of electron beam weld penetration in uranium by acoustic emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, J.W.; Murphy, J.L.

    1991-07-01

    High quality electron beam (EB) welds are required in uranium test articles. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques are under development with the goal of measuring weld penetration in real-time. One technique, based on Average Signal Level (ASL) measurement was used to record weld AE signatures. Characteristic AE signatures were recorded for bead-on-plate (BOP) and butt joint (BJ) welds made under varied welding conditions. AE waveforms were sampled to determine what microscopic AE behavior led to the observed macroscopic signature features. Deformation twinning and weld expulsion are two of the main sources of emission. AE behavior was correlated with weld penetration as measured by standard metallographic techniques. The ASL value was found to increase approximately linearly with weld penetration in BJ welds. These results form the basis for a real-time monitoring technique for weld penetration. 5 refs

  4. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in KEVLAR® 49 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Andrade, E.; Saulsberry, R. L.

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar® 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio <1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  5. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in Kevlar (R) 49 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Andrade, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar(Registeres TradeMark) 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  6. Condition monitoring of a check valve for nuclear power plants by means of acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. R.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, J. T.; Kim, J. S.; Luk, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    This work performed in support of the International Nuclear Energy Research Institute (INERI) program, which was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensor and computational technology for on-line monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). This primary object of this work is to investigate advanced condition monitoring systems based on acoustic emission detection that can provide timely detection of check valve degeneration and service aging so that maintenance/replacement could be preformed prior to loss safety function. The research is focused on the capability of AE technique to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and degradation check valve failure and undesirable operating modes. This work also includes the investigation and adaptation of several advanced sensor technologies such as accelerometer and advanced ultrasonic technique. In addition, this work will develop advanced sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms from check valve degradation.

  7. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  8. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.

  9. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  10. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Incipient in Journal Bearings - Part I : Detectability and measurement for bearing damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dong Jin; Kwon, Oh Yang; Chung, Min Hwa; Kim, Kyung Woong

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the machinery using rolling element bearings, systems with journal bearings generally operate in large scale and under severe loading condition such as steam generator turbines and internal combustion engines. Failure of the bearings in these machinery can result in the system breakdown. To avoid the time consuming repair and considerable economic loss, the detection of incipient failure in journal bearings becomes very important. In this experimental approach, acoustic emission monitoring is applied to the detection of incipient failure caused by several types of abnormal operating condition most probable in the journal bearing systems. It has been known that the intervention of foreign materials, insufficient lubrication and misassembly etc. are principal factors to cause bearing failure and distress. The experiment was conducted under such designed conditions as hard particles in the lubrication layer, insufficient lubrication, and metallic contact in the simulated journal bearing system. The results showed that acoustic emission could be an effective tool to detect the incipient failure in journal bearings

  11. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index. PMID:22666009

  12. Preliminary Development of Online Monitoring Acoustic Emission System for the Integrity of Research Reactor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhri, S.; Sumarno, E.; Himawan, R.; Akbar, T. Y.; Subekti, M.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Three research reactors owned by BATAN have been more than 25 years. Aging of (Structure, System and Component) SSC which is mainly related to mechanical causes become the most important issue for the sustainability and safety operation. Acoustic Emission (AE) is one of the appropriate and recommended methods by the IAEA for inspection as well as at the same time for the monitoring of mechanical SSC related. However, the advantages of AE method in detecting the acoustic emission both for the inspection and the online monitoring require a relatively complex measurement system including hardware software system for the signal detection and analysis purposes. Therefore, aim of this work was to develop an AE system based on an embedded system which capable for doing both the online monitoring and inspection of the research reactor’s integrity structure. An embedded system was selected due to the possibility to install the equipment on the field in extreme environmental condition with capability to store, analyses, and send the required information for further maintenance and operation. The research was done by designing the embedded system based on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform, because of their execution speed and system reconfigurable opportunities. The AE embedded system is then tested to identify the AE source location and AE characteristic under tensile material testing. The developed system successfully acquire the AE elastic waveform and determine the parameter-based analysis such as the amplitude, peak, duration, rise time, counts and the average frequency both for the source location test and the tensile test.

  13. Preliminary studies for monitoring erosion in pipelines by the acoustic emission technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiboni, G.B. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais; Marquardt, T.A.S; SantaMaria, V.A.R.; Silva, C.H. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present some applications of Acoustic Emission (AE), which is a powerful technique for nondestructive testing in Tribology, treated here as tests of friction, wear by contact fatigue, wear by slip and wear by erosion. In this work a special attention is given to solid particle erosion and hydro-abrasive erosion, problems found in almost every pipeline that lead to local loss of material and eventually rupture of the line. The technique of AE can be used as an efficient online tool when, primarily, to monitor tribological aspects such as the rate of wear of materials, as well as detect the spread of flaws in them. In wear by erosion, specifically, the parameters of RMS and acoustic energy are capable of correlation with the type of mechanism for removal of material. As a preliminary goal, erosive tests were performed with gas (air) without erosive particles, monitored by AE, varying the surface of the samples and the internal diameter the nozzle, taking the differences in signs of AE. Correlation between parameters of RMS and amplitude were noticed with the variables of the tests, such as roughness and fluid velocity. The RMS parameter showed a exponential correction with the fluid velocity, however the amplitude signals had a linear behavior. The knowledge of these parameters is essential for the development of a system that is able to quantify the wear rate of a pipeline without taking it out of operation. (author)

  14. An experimental modeling and acoustic emission monitoring of abrasive wear in a steel/diabase pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The earthmoving of permafrost soil is a critical task for excavation of minerals and construction on new territories. Failure by abrasive wear is the main reason for excavation parts of earthmoving and soil cutting machines. Therefore investigation of this type of wear is a challenge for developing efficient and wear resistant working parts. This paper is focused on conducting tribological experiments with sliding the steel samples over the surface of diabase stone sample where abrasive wear conditions of soil cutting are modeled experimentally. The worn surfaces of all samples have been examined and transfer of metal and stone particles revealed. The acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. he acoustic emission (AE) signals have been recorded and related to the results of worn surface analysis. As shown the wear intensity correlates to that of acoustic emission. Both acoustic emission signal median frequency and energy are found to be sensitive to the wear mode.

  15. Application of acoustic emission monitoring to pressure tests of a steam receiver vessel with flawed nozzle welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, B.; McDonald, N.R.; Hincksman, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    As part of the first stage of an Australian Welding Research Association co-operative research project, acoustic emission monitoring has been applied to a steam receiver vessel withdrawn from service owing to severe weld cracking. This technique is used to check acceptance standards for defects in nozzle welds and to apply modern methods of assessing the integrity of pressurised plant. Acoustic emission monitoring has been used, together with strain gauge measurements and ultrasonic scanning, to detect the occurrence of any significant defect growth during cyclic pressurisation of the vessel. During this first stage, no significant defect growth has been produced by 1000 cycles of pressure up to 24.1 MPa (3500 psi), subsequent pressurisation up to 35.8 MPa (5200 psi), or 97 per cent of the expected yield stress of the vessel shell. The small amount of acoustic emission detected was consistent with this result. (author)

  16. Acoustic Emission Weld Monitoring in the 2195 Aluminum-Lithium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Due to its low density, the 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy was developed as a replacement for alloy 2219 in the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The external tank is the single largest component of the space shuttle system. It is 154 feet long and 27.6 feet in diameter, and serves as the structural backbone for the shuttle during launch, absorbing most of the 7 million plus pounds of thrust produced. The almost 4% decrease in density between the two materials provides an extra 7500 pounds of payload capacity necessary to put the International Space Station components into orbit. The ET is an all-welded structure; hence, the requirement is for up to five rewelds without hot cracking. Unfortunately, hot cracking during re-welding or repair operations was occurring and had to be dealt with before the new super lightweight tank could be used. Weld metal porosity formation was also of concern because it leads to hot cracking during weld repairs. Accordingly, acoustic emission (AE) nondestructive testing was employed to monitor the formation of porosity and hot cracks in order to select the best filler metal and optimize the weld schedule. The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of detecting hot cracking in welded aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) structures through the analysis of acoustic emission data. By acoustically characterizing the effects of reheating during a repair operation, the potential for hidden flaws coalescing and becoming "unstable" as the panel is repaired could be reduced. Identification of regions where microcrack growth is likely to occur and the location of active flaw growth in the repair weld will provide the welder with direct feedback as to the current weld quality enabling adjustments to the repair process be made in the field. An acoustic emission analysis of the source mechanisms present during welding has been conducted with the goals of locating regions in the weld line that are susceptible to damage from a repair operation

  17. Acoustic Emission Based In-process Monitoring in Robot Assisted Polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring in the Robot Assisted Polishing (RAP) process was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate removal...... improving the efficiency of the process. It also allows for intelligent process control and generally enhances the robustness and reliability of the automated RAP system in industrial applications....... of the part from the machine tool. In this study, development of surface roughness during polishing rotational symmetric surfaces by the RAP process was inferred from AE measurements. An AE sensor was placed on a polishing tool, and a cylindrical rod of Vanadis 4E steel having an initial turned surface...

  18. Acoustic emission condition monitoring of a nuclear power plant check valve using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Min Rae; Kim, Jung Teak

    2005-01-01

    In this study, an advanced condition monitoring technique based on acoustic emission (AE) detection and artificial neural networks was applied to a check valve, one of the components being used extensively in a safety system of a nuclear power plant (Npp). AE testing for a check valve under controlled flow loop conditions was performed to detect and evaluate disk movement for valve degradation such as wear and leakage due to foreign object interference in a check valve. It is clearly demonstrated that the evaluation of different types of failure modes such as disk wear and check valve leakage were successful by systematically analyzing the characteristics of various AE parameters. It is also shown that the leak size can be determined with an artificial neural network

  19. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carpinteri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy. During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  1. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  2. Numerical Models for the Assessment of Historical Masonry Structures and Materials, Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Invernizzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews some recent numerical applications for the interpretation and exploitation of acoustic emission (AE monitoring results obtained from historical masonry structures and materials. Among possible numerical techniques, the finite element method and the distinct method are considered. The analyzed numerical models cover the entire scale range, from microstructure and meso-structure, up to full-size real structures. The micro-modeling includes heterogeneous concrete-like materials, but mainly focuses on the masonry texture meso-structure, where each brick and mortar joint is modeled singularly. The full-size models consider the different typology of historical structures such as masonry towers, cathedrals and chapels. The main difficulties and advantages of the different numerical approaches, depending on the problem typology and scale, are critically analyzed. The main insight we can achieve from micro and meso numerical modeling concerns the scaling of AE as a function of volume and time, since it is also able to simulate the b-value temporal evolution as the damage spread into the structure. The finite element modeling of the whole structure provides useful hints for the optimal placement of the AE sensors, while the combination of AE monitoring results is crucial for a reliable assessment of structural safety.

  3. A new qualitative acoustic emission parameter based on Shannon's entropy for damage monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Mengyu; Zhang, Zaoxiao; Duan, Quan

    2018-02-01

    An important objective of acoustic emission (AE) non-destructive monitoring is to accurately identify approaching critical damage and to avoid premature failure by means of the evolutions of AE parameters. One major drawback of most parameters such as count and rise time is that they are strongly dependent on the threshold and other settings employed in AE data acquisition system. This may hinder the correct reflection of original waveform generated from AE sources and consequently bring difficulty for the accurate identification of the critical damage and early failure. In this investigation, a new qualitative AE parameter based on Shannon's entropy, i.e. AE entropy is proposed for damage monitoring. Since it derives from the uncertainty of amplitude distribution of each AE waveform, it is independent of the threshold and other time-driven parameters and can characterize the original micro-structural deformations. Fatigue crack growth test on CrMoV steel and three point bending test on a ductile material are conducted to validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed parameter. The results show that the new parameter, compared to AE amplitude, is more effective in discriminating the different damage stages and identifying the critical damage.

  4. Condition monitoring of a check valve for nuclear power plants by means of acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Rae; Leee, Jun Hyun; Kim, Jung Tack; Kim, Jung Soo; Luk, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    This work performed in support of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative(INERI) program, which was to develop and demonstrate advanced sensor and computational technology for on-line monitoring of the condition of components, structures, and systems in advanced and next-generation nuclear power plants (NPPs). The primary object of this work is to investigate advanced condition monitoring systems based on acoustic emission detection that can provide timely detection of check valve degradation and service aging so that maintenance/replacement could be preformed prior to loss of safety function. The research is focused on the capability of AE technique to provide diagnostic information useful in determining check valve aging and degradation, check valve failures and undesirable operating modes. This work also includes the investigation and adaptation of several advanced sensor technologies such as accelerometer and advanced ultrasonic technique. In addition, this work will develop advanced sophisticated signal processing, noise reduction, and pattern recognition techniques and algorithms from check valve degradation.

  5. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Lightning-Damaged CFRP Laminates during Compression-after-Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Oh Yang; Shin, Jae Ha [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastic(CFRP) laminates made of nano-particle-coated carbon fibers and damaged by a simulated lightning strike were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode, during which the damage progress due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. Conductive nano-particles were coated directly on the fibers, from which CFRP coupons were made. The coupon were subjected to the strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10-40 kA within a few . The effects of nano-particle coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terms of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. The assessment during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maria De Rosa, Alessandro Dell'Era, Mauro Pasquali, Carlo Santulli and Fabrizio Sarasini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements.

  7. Acoustic Emission based on sentry function to monitor the initiation of delamination in composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtiary Davijani, A.A.; Hajikhani, M.; Ahmadi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Constant load does not confirm constant damage in composite materials. → Different damages have different AE events. → Sentry function is a useful tool to monitor the initiation of damage in delamination. → The less sentry function number is the more damage the material has endured. -- Abstract: Delamination is the most common failure mode in composite materials, since it will result in the reduction of stiffness and can grow throughout other layers. Delamination is consisted of two main stages including initiation and propagation. Understanding the behavior of the material in these zones is very important, hence it has been thoroughly studied by different methods such as numerical methods, Acoustic Emission (AE), and modeling. Between these two regions initiation is a more vital stage in the delamination of the material. Once initiation occurs, which normally requires greater amount of force, cracks can easily propagate through the structure with little force and cause the failure of the structure. A better knowledge of initiation can lead to better design and production of stronger materials. Additionally, more knowledge about crack initiation and its internal microevents would help improve other parameters and result in higher strength against crack initiation. AE is a suitable method for in situ monitoring of damage in composite materials. In this study, AE was applied to test different glass/epoxy specimens which were loaded under mode I delamination. A function that combines AE and mechanical information is employed to investigate the initiation of delamination. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to verify the results of this function. It is shown that this method is an appropriate technique to monitor the behavior of the initiation of delamination.

  8. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal to Monitor Damage Evolution in Masonry Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A

    2011-01-01

    A crucial aspect in damage evaluation of masonry structures is the analysis of long-term behaviour and for this reason fatigue analysis has a great influence on safety assessment of this structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced and unreinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude and static loading has been carried out. During these tests, the AE signals were recorded. The AE signals were analysed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to examine the frequency distribution of the micro and macro cracking. It possible to evaluate the evolution of the wavelength of the AE signal through the two characteristic peak in the AE spectrum signals and the wave speed of the P or S waves. This wavelength evolution can be represent the microcrak and macrocrack evolution in masonry walls. This procedure permits to estimate the fracture dimension characteristic in several loading condition and for several masonry reinforced condition.

  9. Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Dry and Water Saturated Igneous Rock with Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The uniaxial cyclic loading tests have been conducted to study the mechanical behavior of dry and water saturated igneous rock with acoustic emission (AE monitoring. The igneous rock samples are dried, naturally immersed, and boiled to get specimens with different water contents for the testing. The mineral compositions and the microstructures of the dry and water saturated igneous rock are also presented. The dry specimens present higher strength, fewer strains, and rapid increase of AE count subjected to the cyclic loading, which reflects the hard and brittle behavior and strong burst proneness of igneous rock. The water saturated specimens have lower peak strength, more accumulated strains, and increase of AE count during the cyclic loading. The damage of the igneous rocks with different water contents has been identified by the Felicity Ratio Analysis. The cyclic loading and unloading increase the dislocation between the mineral aggregates and the water-rock interactions further break the adhesion of the clay minerals, which jointly promote the inner damage of the igneous rock. The results suggest that the groundwater can reduce the burst proneness of the igneous rock but increase the potential support failure of the surrounding rock in igneous invading area. In addition, the results inspire the fact that the water injection method is feasible for softening the igneous rock and for preventing the dynamic disasters within the roadways and working faces located in the igneous intrusion area.

  10. The Contact State Monitoring for Seal End Faces Based on Acoustic Emission Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the contact state of seal end faces would help the early warning of the seal failure. In the acoustic emission (AE detection for mechanical seal, the main difficulty is to reduce the background noise and to classify the dispersed features. To solve these problems and achieve higher detection rates, a new approach based on genetic particle filter with autoregression (AR-GPF and hypersphere support vector machine (HSSVM is presented. First, AR model is used to build the dynamic state space (DSS of the AE signal, and GPF is used for signal filtering. Then, multiple features are extracted, and a classification model based on HSSVM is constructed for state recognition. In this approach, AR-GPF is an excellent time-domain method for noise reduction, and HSSVM has advantage on those dispersed features. Finally experimental data shows that the proposed method can effectively detect the contact state of the seal end faces and has higher accuracy rates than some other existing methods.

  11. Acoustic emission monitoring of concrete columns and beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Wensong; Xian, Guijun

    2012-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is an effective method in the nondestructive testing (NDT) field of civil engineering. During the last two decades, Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) has been widely used in repairing and strengthening concrete structures. The damage state of FRP strengthened concrete structures has become an important issue during the service period of the structure and it is a meaningful work to use AE technique as a nondestructive method to assess its damage state. The present study reports AE monitoring results of axial compression tests carried on basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) confined concrete columns and three-point-bending tests carried on BFRP reinforced concrete beams. AE parameters analysis was firstly utilized to give preliminary results of the concrete fracture process of these specimens. It was found that cumulative AE events can reflect the fracture development trend of both BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams and AE events had an abrupt increase at the point of BFRP breakage. Then the fracture process of BFRP confined concrete columns and BFRP strengthened concrete beams was studied through RA value-average frequency analysis. The RA value-average frequency tendencies of BFRP confined concrete were found different from that of BFRP strengthened concrete beams. The variation tendency of concrete crack patterns during the loading process was revealed.

  12. Acoustic emission from polycrystalline graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, I.; Yoda, S.; Oku, T.; Miyamoto, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic emission was monitored from polycrystalline graphites with different microstructure (pore size and pore volume) subjected to compressive loading. The graphites used in this study comprised five brands, that is, PGX, ISEM-1, IG-11, IG-15, and ISO-88. A root mean square (RMS) voltage and event counts of acoustic emission for graphites were measured during compressive loading. The acoustic emission was measured using a computed-based data acquisition and analysis system. The graphites were first deformed up to 80 % of the average fracture stress, then unloaded and reloaded again until the fracture occured. During the first loading, the change in RMS voltage for acoustic emission was detected from the initial stage. During the unloading, the RMS voltage became zero level as soon as the applied stress was released and then gradually rose to a peak and declined. The behavior indicated that the reversed plastic deformation occured in graphites. During the second loading, the RMS voltage gently increased until the applied stress exceeded the maximum stress of the first loading; there is no Kaiser effect in the graphites. A bicrystal model could give a reasonable explanation of this results. The empirical equation between the ratio of σ AE to σ f and σ f was obtained. It is considered that the detection of microfracture by the acoustic emission technique is effective in macrofracture prediction of polycrystalline graphites. (author)

  13. Calibration of acoustic emission transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leschek, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for calibrating an acoustic emission transducer to be used in a pre-set frequency range. The absolute reception sensitivity of a reference transducer is determined at frequencies selected within the frequency range. The reference transducer and the acoustic emission transducer are put into acoustic communication with the surface of a limited acoustic medium representing an equivalent acoustic load appreciably identical to that of the medium in which the use of the acoustic emission transducer is intended. A blank random acoustic noise is emitted in the acoustic medium in order to establish a diffuse and reverberating sound field, after which the output responses of the reference transducer and of the acoustic emission transducer are obtained with respect to the diffuse and reverberating field, for selected frequencies. The output response of the acoustic emission transducer is compared with that of the reference transducer for the selected frequencies, so as to determine the reception sensitivity of the acoustic emission transducer [fr

  14. Flaw identification using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, B.; McDonald, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic emission 'signatures' contain information about the fine structure of metallurgical source events and their interpretation may provide a means of assessing the severity of internal flaws as well as surface flaws. The ultimate aim of this research on signature analysis is to develop a real time non-destructive testing technique having the capability of flaw recognition as well as flaw location in nuclear reactor components and structures under stress. Thus the requisite, unlike that in most acoustic emission work to date, is for a technique which affords discrimination between acoustic emission from different types of flaws propagating simultaneously. The approach described here requires detailed analysis of the emission signatures in terms of a specific statistical parameter, energy spectral density. In order to realise the full inspection potential of acoustic emission monitoring data obtained from zirconium and steel testpieces have been correlated with metallurgical condition and mechanical behaviour, since the nature of emission signatures is strongly affected by the physical characteristics and internal structure of the material. (Auth.)

  15. On-line monitoring on thermal shock damage of ceramics using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun; Song, Sang Hun

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the degree of the thermal shock damage on alumina ceramic using acoustic emission technique. For this purpose, alumina ceramic specimen was heated in the elastic furnace and then was quenched into the water tank. When the specimen was quenched into water tank, a lot of micro-cracks were generated on the surface of specimen due to the thermal shock damage. In this study, acoustic emission technique was used to evaluate the elastic waves generated by the crack initiation and propagation on the surface of specimen. It was found that when the micro-crack was initiated on the surface of specimen, AE signals were the higher in amplitude than those of bubbling effect and crack propagation. A lot of AE events were generated at the first thermal shock, the number of AE events decreased gradually as the thermal shock cycle increased.

  16. Online monitoring of Accessories for Underground Electrical Installations through Acoustics Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casals-Torrens P.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic waves caused by Partial Discharges inside the dielectric materials, can be detected by acoustic emission (AE sensors and analyzed in the time domain. The experimental results presented, show the online detection capability of these sensors in the environment near a cable accessory, such as a splice or terminal. The AE sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference and constitute a detection method non-intrusive and non-destructive, which ensures a galvanic decoupling with respect to electric networks, this technique of partial discharge detection can be applied as a test method for preventive or predictive maintenance (condition-based maintenance to equipments or facilities of medium and high voltage in service and represents an alternative method to electrical detection systems, conventional or not, that continue to rely on the detection of current pulses. This paper presents characterization tests of the sensors AE through comparative tests of partial discharge on accessories for underground power cables.

  17. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  18. Relationships between acoustic emissions and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.V.; Gopal, R.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a systematic study of 'microstructure-deformation-acoustic emission' relationships on two widely used pressure retaining component materials, namely A533-B nuclear pressure vessel steel and a 7075 aluminum alloy, are presented. The study consists of conducting acoustic monitored tensile tests on a variety of quenched and aged microstructures in the two alloy systems and extensive microstructural characterization of test specimens by light optic and electron microscopy techniques. The results suggest a consistent relationship between acoustic emissions and microdeformation mechanisms. The role of specific microstructural constituents in generating acoustic emissions in the two alloys is discussed. (author)

  19. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, D.W.; Whittaker, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal

  20. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    In order to improve the security of handling special nuclear materials at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a sensitive acoustic emission detector has been developed that will detect forcible entry through block or tile walls, concrete floors, or concrete/steel vault walls. A small, low-powered processor was designed to convert the output from a sensitive, crystal-type acoustic transducer to an alarm relay signal for use with a supervised alarm loop. The unit may be used to detect forcible entry through concrete, steel, block, tile, and/or glass

  1. Acoustic signal emission monitoring as a novel method to predict steam pops during radiofrequency ablation: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, William W B; Kosobrodov, Roman; Bhaskaran, Abhishek; Barry, Michael Anthony Tony; Nguyen, Doan Trang; Pouliopoulos, Jim; Byth, Karen; Sivagangabalan, Gopal; Thomas, Stuart P; Ross, David L; McEwan, Alistair; Kovoor, Pramesh; Thiagalingam, Aravinda

    2015-04-01

    predictably occur before imminent steam popping during RF ablations. Such acoustic emissions can be carefully monitored during an ablation and may be useful to prevent serious complications during RF delivery. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  3. Artificial Neural Network Model for Monitoring Oil Film Regime in Spur Gear Based on Acoustic Emission Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Hassan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thickness of an oil film lubricant can contribute to less gear tooth wear and surface failure. The purpose of this research is to use artificial neural network (ANN computational modelling to correlate spur gear data from acoustic emissions, lubricant temperature, and specific film thickness (λ. The approach is using an algorithm to monitor the oil film thickness and to detect which lubrication regime the gearbox is running either hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, or boundary. This monitoring can aid identification of fault development. Feed-forward and recurrent Elman neural network algorithms were used to develop ANN models, which are subjected to training, testing, and validation process. The Levenberg-Marquardt back-propagation algorithm was applied to reduce errors. Log-sigmoid and Purelin were identified as suitable transfer functions for hidden and output nodes. The methods used in this paper shows accurate predictions from ANN and the feed-forward network performance is superior to the Elman neural network.

  4. Flaw identification using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, B.; McDonald, N.R.

    1975-01-01

    In order to realise the full inspection potential of acoustic emission monitoring, data obtained from zirconium and steel testpieces have been correlated with metallurgical condition and mechanical behaviour, since the nature of emission signatures is strongly affected by the physical characteristics and internal structure of the material. During experiments, signals were tape recorded and the surface of each testpiece was recorded on movie film or videotape so that acoustic and visual information could be correlated. Large numbers of tape-recorded bursts have been analysed with a real time spectrum analyser, and statistical parameters (such as mean energy density, mean frequency and variance) derived from the spectra were calculated by an IBM 360/50 computer and selectively displayed on a line plotter. In the case of zirconium, observed differences in these parameters were an indication that the emission signals were generated by three different metallurgical mechanisms. A movie film of testpiece surface deformation revealed the occurrence of twin initiation, twin broadening and slip. Fracture events either in the zirconium matrix or in second phase particles are also possible although not observed directly. A direct correlation was confirmed between twin initiations and emission signals. Work is proceeding on establishing a different correlation between emission signals and stress corrosion cracks

  5. Analysis of Precursors Prior to Rock Burst in Granite Tunnel Using Acoustic Emission and Far Infrared Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengzhao Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the physical mechanism of the anomalous behaviors observed prior to rock burst, the acoustic emission (AE and far infrared (FIR techniques were applied to monitor the progressive failure of a rock tunnel model subjected to biaxial stresses. Images of fracturing process, temperature changes of the tunnel, and spatiotemporal serials of acoustic emission were simultaneously recorded during deformation of the model. The b-value derived from the amplitude distribution data of AE was calculated to predict the tunnel rock burst. The results showed that the vertical stress enhanced the stability of the tunnel, and the tunnels with higher confining pressure demonstrated a more abrupt and strong rock burst. Abnormal temperature changes around the wall were observed prior to the rock burst of the tunnel. Analysis of the AE events showed that a sudden drop and then a quiet period could be considered as the precursors to forecast the rock burst hazard. Statistical analysis indicated that rock fragment spalling occurred earlier than the abnormal temperature changes, and the abnormal temperature occurred earlier than the descent of the AE b-value. The analysis indicated that the temperature changes were more sensitive than the AE b-value changes to predict the tunnel rock bursts.

  6. On-line monitoring of crack propagation by the acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Park, D.Y.; Choi, S.P.; Kim, H.J.; Moon, Y.S.; Shon, G.H.; Kim, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking experiment was carried out to find out the acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of Al 5052 and SCM-4 steel in 3.5% NaCl-H 2 O solution. In advance of the above test, some mechanical properties of these materials were investigated through the tensile test with standard round tensile specimens and WOL specimens which were originaly designed for the stress corrosion cracking experiment. About 5mm fatigue crack was given to WOL specimen by MTS system. We measure the relationship between stress intensity factor and AE count rate under various temperature of the solution such as 15degC, 33 degC, 45 degC and compared their AE characteristics of two materials. While AE count rate of Al 5052 is even higher than that of SCM-4 steel by one order or two, velocity of corrosion crack is much slow. The AE generation rate of SCM-4 steel is discrete and about 0.25 mm corrosion growth corresponds to 10 3 counts. Also location of defects in linear specimen was studied. (Author)

  7. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukri Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML) based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) technique and DeltaTlocation. The results of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location results compared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure. (author)

  8. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-01-01

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure

  9. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd, Shukri [Nondestructive Testing Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys [Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Queen' s Buildings, The Parade, CARDIFF CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-12

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  10. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Incipient Failure in Journal Bearings( III ) - Development of AE Diagnosis System for Journal Bearings -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Min Hwa; Cho, Yong Sang; Yoon, Dong Jin; Kwon, Oh Yang

    1996-01-01

    For the condition monitoring of the journal bearing in rotating machinery, a system for their diagnosis by acoustic emission(AE) was developed. AE has been used to detect abnormal conditions in the bearing system. It was found from the field application study as well as the laboratory experiment using a simulated journal bearing system that AE RMS voltage was the most efficient parameter for the purpose of current study. Based on the above results, algorithms and judgement criteria for the diagnosis system was established. The system is composed of four parts as follows: the sensing part including AE sensor and preamplifier, the signal processing part for RMS-to-DC conversion to measure AE ms voltage, the interface part for transferring RMS voltage data into PC using A/D converter, and the software part including the graphic display of bearing conditions and the diagnosis program

  11. Integration of acoustic emission systems within Integri-TechTM analysis system for structural health monitoring of pressurised engineering plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghouri, A A; Galbraith, Walter; Pierce, S Gareth; Gachagan, Anthony; Rafferty, Steven; Pickwell, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this Acoustic Emission (AE) based Structural Health Monitoring project is to enable accurate location of AE sources in pressurised engineering plant and to use AE source location data to establish defect locations for use within Integri-Tech TM ; a finite element based analysis, monitoring and fitness for service assessment system. Integri-Tech TM is a windows based system which carries out combined analysis and assessment providing fatigue life and remnant life calculations and inspection priorities presenting the results in an accessible web portal format. The software uses finite element stress models created in the companion software Model Wizard. The AE monitoring system that has been developed can be used with an array of up to four AE broad band sensor channels with associated signal processing. Using a flexible approach in MATLAB, the authors have developed algorithms which were used for analysing the received AE signals to extract information about the nature and location of the source. The ability to carry out source location and possibly perform real time monitoring (detecting cracking as it occurs) is attractive feature of the AE system developed for this project. The time of arrival (TOA) data was used by Integri-Tech TM software to calculate source location using its own built-in algorithm, and this was verified independently using a MATLAB approach. (paper)

  12. Acoustic Emission Stethoscope - Measurements with Acoustic Emission on Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krystof Kryniski [AaF Infrastructure, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-15

    A remote ultrasonic stethoscope, designed on mobile devices to help a maintenance team in diagnosing drive train problems, has been demonstrated. By implementing an acoustic emission technology, the operating conditions of wind turbines have been assessed by trending techniques and ultrasonic acoustic emission converted into audible sound. The new approach has been developed and tested and compared to other monitoring techniques. Acoustic emission has generally been shown to provide a number of advantages over vibration and shock pulse methods because the system is operating in a substantially higher frequency range (100 kHz) and therefore it is more immune to operation of surrounding machines and components. Quick attenuation of ultrasonic propagation waves in the drive-train structure helps to pin-point the origin of any fault as the signals are sharper and more pronounced. Further, with the intensity measurements a direction of the source of ultrasonic energy can be identified. Using a high frequency thus makes the method suitable for measuring local effects and to determine local defects since the disturbing signals from other parts are damped. Recently developed programmable sensors capable of processing signals onboard, producing quality outputs with extremely low noise-to-signal ratio, have been used. It is discussed how the new approach can lower the cost of a wind-turbine monitoring system, while at the same time making it simple and more reliable, see Appendix A. The method has been tested on rotating parts of wind-turbines, including traditionally difficult areas such as low speed main bearings and planetary gearboxes. The method developed in the project was designed to see physical processes such as friction, impacts and metal removal, occurring when machinery degrades, can be detected and notified with the developed notification system. Apart from reporting the status and displaying the changes of the pre-defined parameters or symptoms, the system has

  13. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  14. Acoustic emission experiments for PHWR technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellionisz, P.; Jha, S.K.; Goswami, G.L.

    1992-06-01

    An Indian-Hungarian joint research project has been started with the aim of applying acoustic emission testing to solve specific problems of nuclear power plants. Acoustic emission measurement and analyzing instrumentation and software have been provided by the Hungarian side, while the measurements have been performed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India. The first task of the project was to check the capability of the method for leakage detection and shuttle movement monitoring of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR), and for monitoring manufacturing processes as laser welding. The preliminary measurements and results are presented. (R.P.) 15 refs.; 11 figs.; 3 tabs

  15. Elastic wave velocity and acoustic emission monitoring during Gypsum dehydration under triaxial stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantut, N.; David, E. C.; Héripré, E.; Schubnel, A. J.; Zimmerman, R. W.; Gueguen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Dehydration experiments were performed on natural Gypsum polycrystal samples coming from Volterra, Italy in order to study contemporaneously the evolution of P and S elastic wave velocities and acoustic emission (AE) triggering. During these experiments, temperature was slowly raised at 0.15 degrees C per minute under constant stress conditions. Two experiments were realized under quasi-hydrostatic stress (15 and 55 MPa respectively). The third experiment was realized under constant triaxial stress (σ3=45MPa, σ1=75MPa). All three were drained (10MPa constant pore pressure). In each experiments, both P and S wave velocities reduced drastically (as much as approx. 50% in the low confining pressure case) at the onset of dehydration. Importantly, the Vp/Vs ratio also decreased. Shortly after the onset of decrease in P and S wave velocities, the dehydration reaction was also accompanied by bursts of AEs. Time serie locations of the AEs show that they initiated from the pore pressure port, ie from where the pore fluid could easily be drained, and then slowly migrated within the sample. In each experiments, the AE rate could be positively correlated to the reaction rate, inferred from pore volumetry. In such a way, the AE rate reached a peak when the reaction was the fastest. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed they had a large volumetric component in compaction, confirming that AEs were indeed related to pore closure and/or collapse. In addition, the AE rate also increased with confinement, ie when a larger amount of compaction was observed. Interestingly, when under differential stress conditions, AE focal mechanisms were mainly in shear. Additional dehydration experiments performed within an environmental scanning electron microscope under low vacuum highlight that, in drained conditions at least, the reaction seems to take place in two phases. First, cracks are being opened along cleavage planes within a single gypsum crystal, which allows for the

  16. Experimental investigation on the fracture behaviour of black shale by acoustic emission monitoring and CT image analysis during uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, C. H.; Hu, Y. Z.

    2018-04-01

    Plenty of mechanical experiments have been done to investigate the deformation and failure characteristics of shale; however, the anisotropic failure mechanism has not been well studied. Here, laboratory Uniaxial Compressive Strength tests on cylindrical shale samples obtained by drilling at different inclinations to bedding plane were performed. The failure behaviours of the shale samples were studied by real-time acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and post-test X-ray computer tomography (CT) analysis. The experimental results suggest that the pronounced bedding planes of shale have a great influence on the mechanical properties and AE patterns. The AE counts and AE cumulative energy release curves clearly demonstrate different morphology, and the `U'-shaped curve relationship between the AE counts, AE cumulative energy release and bedding inclination was first documented. The post-test CT image analysis shows the crack patterns via 2-D image reconstructions, an index of stimulated fracture density is defined to represent the anisotropic failure mode of shale. What is more, the most striking finding is that the AE monitoring results are in good agreement with the CT analysis. The structural difference in the shale sample is the controlling factor resulting in the anisotropy of AE patterns. The pronounced bedding structure in the shale formation results in an anisotropy of elasticity, strength and AE information from which the changes in strength dominate the entire failure pattern of the shale samples.

  17. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10{approx}40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  18. A Comparative Study of the Monitoring of a Self Aligning Spherical Journal using Surface Vibration, Airborne Sound and Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raharjo, P; Tesfa, B; Gu, F; Ball, A D

    2012-01-01

    A Self aligning spherical journal bearing is a plain bearing which has spherical surface contact that can be applied in high power industrial machinery. This type of bearing can accommodate a misalignment problem. The journal bearing faults degrade machine performance, decrease life time service and cause unexpected failure which are dangerous for safety issues. Non-intrusive measurements such as surface vibration (SV), airborne sound (AS) and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are appropriate monitoring methods for early stage journal bearing fault in low, medium and high frequency. This paper focuses on the performance comparison using SV, AS and AE measurements in monitoring a self aligning spherical journal bearing for normal and faulty (scratch) conditions. It examines the signals in the time domain and frequency domain and identifies the frequency ranges for each measurement in which significant changes are observed. The results of SV, AS and AE experiments indicate that the spectrum can be used to detect the differences between normal and faulty bearing. The statistic parameter shows that RMS value and peak value for faulty bearing is higher than normal bearing.

  19. In-situ monitoring of pitting corrosion on vertically positioned 304 stainless steel by analyzing acoustic-emission energy parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Kaige; Jung, Woo-Sang; Byeon, Jai-Won

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pitting process in vertically positioned 304 SS is investigated by AE energy. • Gravity-influenced elongated pit, crack and rupture of pit cover were observed. • Hydrogen bubble evolution and pit covers rupturing were separately monitored by AE. • Four stages of AE energy were correlated with observed pitting mechanism. - Abstract: The acoustic emission (AE) energy was analyzed to monitor the pitting process on a vertically positioned 304-stainless steel. The gravity-dependent morphology of the elongated corrosion pits was observed. A scatter plot of the duration and energy indicated two AE clusters with different energy levels. There was a time delay after the detection of the low-energy hydrogen-bubble signals. Subsequently, high-energy signals were observed, whose AE source was attributed to large-scale cracks formed during the rupture of the elongated pit cover. An in-situ analysis of the AE energy evolution provided detailed insights into the corrosion process in relation to the specimen position.

  20. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Compression-after-Impact Test of Nano-Particles-Coated CFRP Damaged by Simulated Lightning Strikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Je Ha; Kwon, Oh Yang; Seo, Seong Wook

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles-coated and impact-damaged carbon-fiber reinforced plastics(CFRP) laminates were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode and the propagation of damage due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. CFRP laminates were made of carbon prepregs prepared by coating of conductive nano-particles directly on the fibers and the coupons were subjected to simulated lightning strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10∼40 kA within a few microseconds. The effects of nano-particles coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on the AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terns of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. From the results assessed during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be very useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes

  1. Optimum Position of Acoustic Emission Sensors for Ship Hull Structural Health Monitoring Based on Deep Machine Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappatos, Vassilios; Karvelis, Petros; Georgoulas, George

    2018-01-01

    In this paper a method for the estimation of the optimum sensor positions for acoustic emission localization on ship hull structures is presented. The optimum sensor positions are treated as a classification (localization) problem based on a deep learning paradigm. In order to avoid complex...

  2. Identification of a Critical Time with Acoustic Emission Monitoring during Static Fatigue Tests on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Towards Lifetime Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Godin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites are promising candidates for some aeronautic applications that require good thermomechanical behavior over long periods of time. This study focuses on the behavior of a SiCf/[Si-B-C] composite with a self-healing matrix at intermediate temperature under air. Static fatigue experiments were performed below 600 °C and a lifetime diagram is presented. Damage is monitored both by strain measurement and acoustic emission during the static fatigue experiments. Two methods of real-time analysis of associated energy release have been developed. They allow for the identification of a characteristic time that was found to be close to 55% of the measured rupture time. This critical time reflects a critical local energy release assessed by the applicability of the Benioff law. This critical aspect is linked to a damage phase where slow crack growth in fibers is prevailing leading to ultimate fracture of the composite.

  3. A Comparative Experimental Study on the Use of Machine Learning Approaches for Automated Valve Monitoring Based on Acoustic Emission Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Salah M.; Hui, K. H.; Hee, L. M.; Salman Leong, M.; Al-Obaidi, M. A.; Ali, Y. H.; Abdelrhman, Ahmed M.

    2018-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) analysis has become a vital tool for initiating the maintenance tasks in many industries. However, the analysis process and interpretation has been found to be highly dependent on the experts. Therefore, an automated monitoring method would be required to reduce the cost and time consumed in the interpretation of AE signal. This paper investigates the application of two of the most common machine learning approaches namely artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM) to automate the diagnosis of valve faults in reciprocating compressor based on AE signal parameters. Since the accuracy is an essential factor in any automated diagnostic system, this paper also provides a comparative study based on predictive performance of ANN and SVM. AE parameters data was acquired from single stage reciprocating air compressor with different operational and valve conditions. ANN and SVM diagnosis models were subsequently devised by combining AE parameters of different conditions. Results demonstrate that ANN and SVM models have the same results in term of prediction accuracy. However, SVM model is recommended to automate diagnose the valve condition in due to the ability of handling a high number of input features with low sampling data sets.

  4. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz; Olofsson, Tomas; Wennerstroem, Erik

    2006-12-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the ω-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization

  5. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Olofsson, Tomas; Wennerstroem, Erik [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Technical Sciences (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2006-12-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the {omega}-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization.

  6. Developments in acoustic emission for application to nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in acoustic emission are summarised as they relate to the principal applications to nuclear reactors, and light water reactor pressure vessels in particular. Improvement in the understanding of acoustic emission has come from materials tests and these confirm the problems in applying the technique for in-service or periodic proof test monitoring of growing fatique cracks. Applications in LMFBR have confirmed that acoustic emission can be applied in the nuclear environment and the detection of stress corrosion cracking in both BWR and LMFBR seems possible. Some information is included on the developing interest in applying the techniques of acoustic emission for leak detection during shop hydro and in-service monitoring. Acoustic emission is also being developed for weld fabrication monitoring and recently introduced pattern recognition techniques are having a significant impact in this application. (author)

  7. Use of Modal Acoustic Emission to Monitor Damage Progression in Carbon Fiber/Epoxy and Implications for Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. M.; Nichols, C. T.; Wentzel, D. J.; Saulsberry R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Broad-band modal acoustic emission (AE) data was used to characterize micromechanical damage progression in uniaxial IM7 and T1000 carbon fiber-epoxy tows and an IM7 composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) subjected to an intermittent load hold tensile stress profile known to activate the Felicity ratio (FR). Damage progression was followed by inspecting the Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) associated with acoustic emission events. FFT analysis revealed the occurrence of cooperative micromechanical damage events in a frequency range between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. Evidence was found for the existence of a universal damage parameter, referred to here as the critical Felicity ratio, or Felicity ratio at rupture (FR*), which had a value close to 0.96 for the tows and the COPV tested. The implications of using FR* to predict failure in carbon/epoxy composite materials and related composite components such as COPVs are discussed. Trends in the FFT data are also discussed; namely, the difference between the low and high energy events, the difference between early and late-life events, comparison of IM7 and T1000 damage progression, and lastly, the similarity of events occurring at the onset of significant acoustic emission used to calculate the FR.

  8. Acoustic emission from hydrogen saturated Type 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission is attributed to energy release within a material body by localized plastic deformation or failure processes. The elastic stress waves may come from slip band formation, mechanical twinning, martensite transformation, or crack propagation. Each of these processes has slightly different acoustic characteristics allowing for easy identification. Acoustic emission was monitored during tensile tests of Type 304L austenitic stainless steel to explore the applicability of the technique to hydrogen-assisted fracture

  9. Continuous acoustic emission from aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenici, P.; Kiesewetter, N.; Schiller, P.

    1976-01-01

    Continuous acoustic emission of aluminum single crystals and polycrystals during tensile tests at constant cross-head speed and at room temperature is measured with a Root Mean Square Level recorder. By means of the Kaiser effect it is shown that the continuous emission is related to the plastic deformation. The plot of continuous emission against strain takes different shapes for pure single crystals, pure polycrystals and impure polycrystals. The measured voltages have about the same value for pure single and polycrystals and are considerably greater than that for impure polycrystals. A method is developed to distinguish between continuous emission and burst

  10. Acoustic emission on stressed concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, P.; Birac, C.; Prunelle, D. de; Contre, M.; Astruc, M.; Kavyrchine, M.

    1983-08-01

    In a first part of this study, a comparison is made between the mechanical behaviour and the acoustic emission measurements on laboratory specimen during four points bending tests. The specimen were made of plain or/and reinforced concrete. The second part confirms, on real reinforced beams, the laboratory study results

  11. Acoustic emission from thermal-gradient cracks in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Kupperman, D.S.; Wrona, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted to evaluate the potential use of acoustic emission to monitor thermal-shock damage in direct electrical heating of UO 2 pellets. In the apparatus used for the present tests, two acoustic-emission sensors were placed on extensions of the upper and lower electrical feedthroughs. Commercially available equipment was used to accumulate acoustic-emission data. The accumulation of events displayed on a cathode-ray-tube screen indicates the total number of acoustic-emission events at a particular location within the pellet stack. These tests have indicated that acoustic emission can be used to monitor thermal-shock damage in UO 2 pellets subjected to direct-electrical heating. 8 references

  12. Holographic and acoustic emission evaluation of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical holographic interfereometry and acoustic emission monitoring were simultaneously used to evaluate two small, high pressure vessels during pressurization. The techniques provide pressure vessel designers with both quantitative information such as displacement/strain measurements and qualitative information such as flaw detection. The data from the holographic interferograms were analyzed for strain profiles. The acoustic emission signals were monitored for crack growth and vessel quality

  13. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2009 and September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox and Duckworth 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st April 2009 and 30th September 2009 and is the ninth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  14. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2009 and March 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Andrews, Jennifer [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, 2009, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox and Duckworth 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring periods can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st October 2009 and 31st March 2010 and is the tenth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  15. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2008 and March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Duckworth, Damion [ASC, Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st October 2008 and 31st March 2009 and is the eighth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  16. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2010 and September 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon (ASC Applied Seismology Consultants (United Kingdom))

    2011-05-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox et al. 2009a, b, 2010). Appendix I contains further information about previous monitoring periods. This report covers the period between 1st April 2010 and 30th September 2010 and is the eleventh 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  17. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2008 and March 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycox, Jon; Duckworth, Damion

    2009-06-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st October 2008 and 31st March 2009 and is the eighth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  18. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2009 and March 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycox, Jon; Andrews, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, 2009, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox and Duckworth 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring periods can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st October 2009 and 31st March 2010 and is the tenth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  19. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2009 and September 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will

    2009-12-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox and Duckworth 2009). Further information on the previous monitoring undertaken can be found in Appendix 1. This report covers the period between 1st April 2009 and 30th September 2009 and is the ninth 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  20. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2010 and September 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycox, Jon

    2011-05-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and changes in pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation (Pettitt et al. 1999), and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation (Haycox and Pettitt 2005a, b, 2006a, b, Zolezzi et al. 2007, 2008, Duckworth et al. 2008, 2009, Haycox et al. 2009a, b, 2010). Appendix I contains further information about previous monitoring periods. This report covers the period between 1st April 2010 and 30th September 2010 and is the eleventh 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  1. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the emission linear pulse holography which produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. A thirty two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The concept behind the AE linear pulse holography is illustrated, and a block diagram of a data acquisition system to implement the concept is given. Array element spacing, synthetic frequency criteria, and lateral depth resolution are specified. A reference timing transducer positioned between the array and the inspection zone and which inititates the time-of-flight measurements is described. The results graphically illustrate the technique using a one-dimensional FFT computer algorithm (ie. linear backward wave) for an AE image reconstruction

  2. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John l. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Deepak Mehra

    2003-07-01

    The 1st generation acoustic monitoring package was designed to detect and analyze weak acoustic signals inside natural gas transmission lines. Besides a microphone it housed a three-inch diameter aerodynamic acoustic signal amplifier to maximize sensitivity to leak induced {Delta}p type signals. The theory and test results of this aerodynamic signal amplifier was described in the master's degree thesis of our Research Assistant Deepak Mehra who is about to graduate. To house such a large three-inch diameter sensor required the use of a steel 300-psi rated 4 inch weld neck flange, which itself weighed already 29 pounds. The completed 1st generation Acoustic Monitoring Package weighed almost 100 pounds. This was too cumbersome to mount in the field, on an access port at a pipeline shut-off valve. Therefore a 2nd generation and truly Portable Acoustic Monitor was built. It incorporated a fully self-contained {Delta}p type signal sensor, rated for line pressures up to 1000 psi with a base weight of only 6 pounds. This is the Rosemont Inc. Model 3051CD-Range 0, software driven sensor, which is believed to have industries best total performance. Its most sensitive unit was purchased with a {Delta}p range from 0 to 3 inch water. This resulted in the herein described 2nd generation: Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) for pipelines up to 1000 psi. Its 32-pound total weight includes an 18-volt battery. Together with a 3 pound laptop with its 4-channel data acquisition card, completes the equipment needed for field acoustic monitoring of natural gas transmission pipelines.

  3. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenhave, P E [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1998-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  4. Acoustic multivariate condition monitoring - AMCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenhave, P.E. [Vestfold College, Maritime Dept., Toensberg (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    In Norway, Vestfold College, Maritime Department presents new opportunities for non-invasive, on- or off-line acoustic monitoring of rotating machinery such as off-shore pumps and diesel engines. New developments within acoustic sensor technology coupled with chemometric data analysis of complex signals now allow condition monitoring of hitherto unavailable flexibility and diagnostic specificity. Chemometrics paired with existing knowledge yields a new and powerful tool for condition monitoring. By the use of multivariate techniques and acoustics it is possible to quantify wear and tear as well as predict the performance of working components in complex machinery. This presentation describes the AMCM method and one result of a feasibility study conducted onboard the LPG/C `Norgas Mariner` owned by Norwegian Gas Carriers as (NGC), Oslo. (orig.) 6 refs.

  5. Acoustic emission: technical review for PWR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, P.G.

    1981-07-01

    Acoustic emission has been studied since the early 1960's, particularly with a view to periodic or continuous monitoring of steel pressure vessels. In the years 1970-75 it was realised that ductile steels, used in nuclear vessels, give small amplitude signals which are barely detectable by available instruments. The technique for application in periodic or continuous monitoring and also as applied to leak detection and weld fabrication monitoring is reviewed. It is concluded that manufacturing defects may be detectable during pre-service hydrotest, but that there is insufficient evidence on which to base an estimate of detection probability. In-service hydrotest or continuous monitoring is unlikely to detect growing cracks because of the quiet nature of the material and the noisy reactor background. Both leak detection and fabrication weld monitoring show some promise of successful application in the future. (author)

  6. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Ahmad; Chai, Hwa Kian; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Alver, Ninel

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC) structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods. PMID:26251904

  7. Non-Destructive Evaluation for Corrosion Monitoring in Concrete: A Review and Capability of Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zaki

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of reinforced concrete (RC structures has been one of the major causes of structural failure. Early detection of the corrosion process could help limit the location and the extent of necessary repairs or replacement, as well as reduce the cost associated with rehabilitation work. Non-destructive testing (NDT methods have been found to be useful for in-situ evaluation of steel corrosion in RC, where the effect of steel corrosion and the integrity of the concrete structure can be assessed effectively. A complementary study of NDT methods for the investigation of corrosion is presented here. In this paper, acoustic emission (AE effectively detects the corrosion of concrete structures at an early stage. The capability of the AE technique to detect corrosion occurring in real-time makes it a strong candidate for serving as an efficient NDT method, giving it an advantage over other NDT methods.

  8. In-situ acoustic signature monitoring in additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Lucas W.; Taheri, Hossein; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Faierson, Eric J.

    2018-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly maturing process for the production of complex metallic, ceramic, polymeric, and composite components. The processes used are numerous, and with the complex geometries involved this can make quality control and standardization of the process and inspection difficult. Acoustic emission measurements have been used previously to monitor a number of processes including machining and welding. The authors have identified acoustic signature measurement as a potential means of monitoring metal additive manufacturing processes using process noise characteristics and those discrete acoustic emission events characteristic of defect growth, including cracks and delamination. Results of acoustic monitoring for a metal additive manufacturing process (directed energy deposition) are reported. The work investigated correlations between acoustic emissions and process noise with variations in machine state and deposition parameters, and provided proof of concept data that such correlations do exist.

  9. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  10. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  11. Acoustic emission from fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupperman, D.S.; Kennedy, C.R.; Reimann, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal-shock damage of nuclear reactor fuel pellets in a simulated reactor environment has been correlated with acoustic-emission data obtained from sensors placed on extensions of the electrical feedthroughs. Ringdown counts, rms output data, and event-location data has been acquired for experiments carried out with single pellets as well as multiple pellet stacks. These tests have shown that acoustic-emission monitoring can provide information indicating the onset and the extent of cracking

  12. Acoustic Purcell Effect for Enhanced Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Landi, Maryam; Zhao, Jiajun; Prather, Wayne E.; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Likun

    2018-01-01

    We observe that our experimentally measured emission power enhancement of a speaker inside a previously proposed metacavity agrees with our numerically calculated enhancement of the density of states (DOS) of the source-cavity system. We interpret the agreement by formulating a relation between the emitted sound power and the acoustic DOS. The formulation is an analog to Fermi’s golden rule in quantum emission. The formulation complements the radiation impedance theory in traditional acoustics for describing sound emission. Our study bridges the gap between acoustic DOS and the acoustic Purcell effect for sound emission enhancement.

  13. Acoustic Purcell Effect for Enhanced Emission

    KAUST Repository

    Landi, Maryam

    2018-03-13

    We observe that our experimentally measured emission power enhancement of a speaker inside a previously proposed metacavity agrees with our numerically calculated enhancement of the density of states (DOS) of the source-cavity system. We interpret the agreement by formulating a relation between the emitted sound power and the acoustic DOS. The formulation is an analog to Fermi’s golden rule in quantum emission. The formulation complements the radiation impedance theory in traditional acoustics for describing sound emission. Our study bridges the gap between acoustic DOS and the acoustic Purcell effect for sound emission enhancement.

  14. Acoustic emission methodology and application

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarchuk, Zinoviy; Serhiyenko, Oleh

    2017-01-01

    This monograph analyses in detail the physical aspects of the elastic waves radiation during deformation or fracture of materials. I presents the  methodological bases for the practical use of acoustic emission device, and describes the results of theoretical and experimental researches of evaluation of the crack growth resistance of materials, selection of the useful AE signals. The efficiency of this methodology is shown through the diagnostics of various-purpose industrial objects. The authors obtain results of experimental researches with the help of the new methods and facilities.

  15. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Buttle, D.; Wallace-Sims, R.; O'Brien, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work carried out to investigate acoustic emission as a monitor of corrosion and degradation of wasteforms where the waste is potentially reactive metal. Electronic monitoring equipment has been designed, built and tested to allow long-term monitoring of a number of waste packages simultaneously. Acoustic monitoring experiments were made on a range of 1 litre cemented Magnox and aluminium samples cast into canisters comparing the acoustic events with hydrogen gas evolution rates and electrochemical corrosion rates. The attenuation of the acoustic signals by the cement grout under a range of conditions has been studied to determine the volume of wasteform that can be satisfactorily monitored by one transducer. The final phase of the programme monitored the acoustic events from full size (200 litre) cemented, inactive, simulated aluminium swarf wastepackages prepared at the AEA waste cementation plant at Winfrith. (Author)

  16. Acoustic emission measurement on large scale coils at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Hattori, Y.; Nishi, M.F.; Shimamoto, S.; Tsuji, H.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of acoustic emission measurement at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is an establishment of a general diagnostic method for superconducting magnet systems. Output of strain and displacement gages can not cover a whole system in monitoring premonitory phenomena of a magnet system s failure, because these sensors are mounted on points and therefore localized. Acoustic emissions can be transmitted to sensors through structural materials without electrical noise. Monitoring of acoustic emission will be one of the methods to predict a serious failure of magnet systems in a vacuum vessel. For this purpose, several sensors were installed on the Japanese LCT coil and the Test Module Coil (TMC). Some of acoustic activity was similar as seen in these coils. The correlation between voltage spikes and acoustic events is excellent during single coil charging mode, but poorer during out of plane force mode. There are no indicative acoustical phenomena before a magnet quench or during normal zone generation. The conditioning of acoustic events and voltage spikes can be seen after any cooling down. The localization of electrical insulation damage with the acoustic emission technique is one of its most useful applications

  17. Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA) Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Charles T.; Roth, Don J.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research and NASA White Sands Test Facility have developed software supporting an automated pressure vessel structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on acoustic emissions (AE). The software, referred to as the Acoustic Emission Analysis Applet (AEAA), provides analysts with a tool that can interrogate data collected on Digital Wave Corp. and Physical Acoustics Corp. software using a wide spectrum of powerful filters and charts. This software can be made to work with any data once the data format is known. The applet will compute basic AE statistics, and statistics as a function of time and pressure (see figure). AEAA provides value added beyond the analysis provided by the respective vendors' analysis software. The software can handle data sets of unlimited size. A wide variety of government and commercial applications could benefit from this technology, notably requalification and usage tests for compressed gas and hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Future enhancements will add features similar to a "check engine" light on a vehicle. Once installed, the system will ultimately be used to alert International Space Station crewmembers to critical structural instabilities, but will have little impact to missions otherwise. Diagnostic information could then be transmitted to experienced technicians on the ground in a timely manner to determine whether pressure vessels have been impacted, are structurally unsound, or can be safely used to complete the mission.

  18. Acoustic monitoring systems tests at Indian Point Unit 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Rao, G.V.; Craig, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the results of a program to test acoustic monitoring systems on Indian Point Unit No. 1 under actual plant operating conditions, less the reactor core. The two types of systems evaluated were the monitoring of acoustic emissions generated by growing flaws and the monitoring of acoustic signals from leaks

  19. Program to develop acoustic emission: flaw relationship for inservice monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels. Progress report No. 1, July 1, 1976--February 1, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Schwenk, E.B.

    1977-03-01

    This is a laboratory research program to characterize acoustic emission (AE) from flaw growth and noise from innocuous sources in A533B Class 1 pressure vessel steel. The objectives are: characterize AE from a limited range of defects and material property conditions of concern to reactor pressure vessel integrity; characterize AE from innocuous sources (including defects); develop criteria for distinguishing significant flaws from innocuous sources; and develop an AE flaw damage model to serve as a basis for relating in-service AE to pressure vessel integrity. The purpose of the program is to build an experimental evaluation of the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundaries by continuously monitoring for AE. A detailed program plan in the form of an analysis-before-test document has been prepared and approved

  20. Diagnostic method based on the analysis of vibration and acoustic emission. Monitoring of emergency diesel NPP Garona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua, L.; Munoz, M.; Moreno, F.; Arroyo, J.; Monne, C.

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance Technicians, more and more, must dispose of predictive tools to diagnose the state of the equipment, especially if they are responsible for the emergency diesel in a Nuclear Power Plant. the use of these tools should be understood as a complement to more classic Preventive Maintenance of the equipment, thus increasing their availability because the parameters necessary for evaluating motor behaviour are taken while the engine is in operation. In this way, it facilitates the decision-making on whether to carry out certain preventive tasks. The basic information about this diagnostic tool presented in this article is based on the reading, recording and analysis of pressure, vibrations and acoustic emission in each engine cylinder during its operating cycle. A nice addition to the above diagnosis is carrying out and endoscopy of each cylinder, which enables the observation of: water leaks, injector leaks, the spraying of each injector, valve leaks,... etc. This article describes the fundamentals of a non-intrusive, easy to use and low cost tool, used to check the function of Emergency Diesel engines, as well as the experience of its use in the St. Maria Garona Nuclear Plant. The article also describes the case of a fault which occurred in the Nuclear Power plant in Garona that would hardly have been possible to detect by other means. This tool was developed jointly by the Engines Laboratory of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Zaragoza and the St. Maria Garona Nuclear Plant. It has been further improved, extended and optimized over the more than 10 years of its use. (Author)

  1. Diesel Engine Valve Clearance Detection Using Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fathi Elamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated, using experimental method, the suitability of acoustic emission (AE technique for the condition monitoring of diesel engine valve faults. The clearance fault was adjusted experimentally in an exhaust valve and successfully detected and diagnosed in a Ford FSD 425 four-cylinder, four-stroke, in-line OHV, direct injection diesel engine. The effect of faulty exhaust valve clearance on engine performance was monitored and the difference between the healthy and faulty engine was observed from the recorded AE signals. The measured results from this technique show that using only time domain and frequency domain analysis of acoustic emission signals can give a superior measure of engine condition. This concludes that acoustic emission is a powerful and reliable method of detection and diagnosis of the faults in diesel engines and this is considered to be a unique approach to condition monitoring of valve performance.

  2. Pattern recognition methods for acoustic emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, P.G.; Harrington, T.P.; Hutton, P.H.

    1979-07-01

    Models have been developed that relate the rate of acoustic emissions to structural integrity. The implementation of these techniques in the field has been hindered by the noisy environment in which the data must be taken. Acoustic emissions from noncritical sources are recorded in addition to those produced by critical sources, such as flaws. A technique is discussed for prescreening acoustic events and filtering out those that are produced by noncritical sources. The methodology that was investigated is pattern recognition. Three different pattern recognition techniques were applied to a data set that consisted of acoustic emissions caused by crack growth and acoustic signals caused by extraneous noise sources. Examination of the acoustic emission data presented has uncovered several features of the data that can provide a reasonable filter. Two of the most valuable features are the frequency of maximum response and the autocorrelation coefficient at Lag 13. When these two features and several others were combined with a least squares decision algorithm, 90% of the acoustic emissions in the data set were correctly classified. It appears possible to design filters that eliminate extraneous noise sources from flaw-growth acoustic emissions using pattern recognition techniques

  3. Real-time nondestructive monitoring of the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process by combined airborne acoustic emission and non-contact ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Basantes-Defaz, Alexandra-Del-Carmen; Abbasi, Zeynab; Yuhas, Donald; Ozevin, Didem; Indacochea, Ernesto

    2018-03-01

    Welding is a key manufacturing process for many industries and may introduce defects into the welded parts causing significant negative impacts, potentially ruining high-cost pieces. Therefore, a real-time process monitoring method is important to implement for avoiding producing a low-quality weld. Due to high surface temperature and possible contamination of surface by contact transducers, the welding process should be monitored via non-contact transducers. In this paper, airborne acoustic emission (AE) transducers tuned at 60 kHz and non-contact ultrasonic testing (UT) transducers tuned at 500 kHz are implemented for real time weld monitoring. AE is a passive nondestructive evaluation method that listens for the process noise, and provides information about the uniformity of manufacturing process. UT provides more quantitative information about weld defects. One of the most common weld defects as burn-through is investigated. The influences of weld defects on AE signatures (time-driven data) and UT signals (received signal energy, change in peak frequency) are presented. The level of burn-through damage is defined by using single method or combine AE/UT methods.

  4. Signal frequency distribution and natural-time analyses from acoustic emission monitoring of an arched structure in the Castle of Racconigi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Niccolini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The stability of an arch as a structural element in the thermal bath of King Charles Albert (Carlo Alberto in the Royal Castle of Racconigi (on the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1997 was assessed by the acoustic emission (AE monitoring technique with application of classical inversion methods to recorded AE data. First, damage source location by means of triangulation techniques and signal frequency analysis were carried out. Then, the recently introduced method of natural-time analysis was preliminarily applied to the AE time series in order to reveal a possible entrance point to a critical state of the monitored structural element. Finally, possible influence of the local seismic and microseismic activity on the stability of the monitored structure was investigated. The criterion for selecting relevant earthquakes was based on the estimation of the size of earthquake preparation zones. The presented results suggest the use of the AE technique as a tool for detecting both ongoing structural damage processes and microseismic activity during preparation stages of seismic events.

  5. Signal frequency distribution and natural-time analyses from acoustic emission monitoring of an arched structure in the Castle of Racconigi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, Gianni; Manuello, Amedeo; Marchis, Elena; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    The stability of an arch as a structural element in the thermal bath of King Charles Albert (Carlo Alberto) in the Royal Castle of Racconigi (on the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1997) was assessed by the acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique with application of classical inversion methods to recorded AE data. First, damage source location by means of triangulation techniques and signal frequency analysis were carried out. Then, the recently introduced method of natural-time analysis was preliminarily applied to the AE time series in order to reveal a possible entrance point to a critical state of the monitored structural element. Finally, possible influence of the local seismic and microseismic activity on the stability of the monitored structure was investigated. The criterion for selecting relevant earthquakes was based on the estimation of the size of earthquake preparation zones. The presented results suggest the use of the AE technique as a tool for detecting both ongoing structural damage processes and microseismic activity during preparation stages of seismic events.

  6. Acoustic emission technique and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ichiya; Sasaki, Soji

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique is described. The characteristics of acoustic emission signal, measurement techniques, and its application are explained. The acoustic signals are grouped into continuous and burst types. The continuous signal is due to plastic deformation, and the burst type is due to the generation and growth of cracks. The latter can be used for the identification of the position of cracks. The frequency of the acoustic emission is in the range from several tens of KHz to two MHz. Piezoelectric ceramics are used as the oscillators of sensors. The dynamic behavior of acoustic emission can be observed with a two-channel acoustic emission measuring apparatus. Multi-channel method was developed at Hitachi, Ltd., and is used for large structures. General computer identification method and simple zone identification method are explained. Noise elimination is important for the measurement, and the methods were studied. Examples of application are the observation of acoustic emission in the plastic deformation of steel, the tensile test of large welded material with natural defects, and others. The method will be used for the diagnosis and observation of large structures, the test and quality control of products. (Kato, T.)

  7. Acoustic emission: who needs it - and why

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanner, J.C.

    1979-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is an emerging NDT method that offers attractive capabilities for monitoring structural integrity and characterizing materials behavior. Although its limitations are such that it should not be regarded as a panacea, AE is proving to be a viable complement to the other NDT methods. The paper examines the extent and reasons for the growing industrial interest in AE. Some of the inherent limitations of conventional NDT methods are discussed, and several surveys of defects found during the manufacture and operation of pressure boundary components are reviewed. Although welds and weld-affected areas are the most likely locations for significant defects, very little experience is available to date to describe the AE response during impending pressure vessel failures due to weld associated defects. Acoustic emission offers potential for providing increased assurance of both initial, and continued, structural integrity. Furthermore, if AE is properly applied in conjunction with recently proposed fitness-for-purpose criteria, it may be possible to reduce present manufacturing costs without compromising actual structural adequacy. This technology is exhibiting definite signs of increasing industrial maturity, as evidenced by the recent availability of industrial standards, and the activities of various AE related technical groups throughout the world

  8. Passive acoustic monitoring of bed load for fluvial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sediment transported as bed load in streams and rivers is notoriously difficult to monitor cheaply and accurately. Passive acoustic methods are relatively simple, inexpensive, and provide spatial integration along with high temporal resolution. In 1963 work began on monitoring emissions from par...

  9. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the 2013 World Conference on Acoustic Emission in Shanghai. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  10. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2015 (WCAE-2015) in Hawaii. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  11. A review of the application Acoustic Emission (AE) incorporating mechanical approach to monitor Reinforced concrete (RC) strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) properties under fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Mazlan, S. M. S.; Abdullah, S. R.; Shahidan, S.; Noor, S. R. Mohd

    2017-11-01

    Concrete durability may be affected by so many factors such as chemical attack and weathering action that reduce the performance and the service life of concrete structures. Low durability Reinforced concrete (RC) can be greatly improved by using Fiber Reinforce Polymer (FRP). FRP is a commonly used composite material for repairing and strengthening RC structures. A review on application of Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques of real time monitoring for various mechanical tests for RC strengthened with FRP involving four-point bending, three-point bending and cyclic loading was carried out and discussed in this paper. Correlations between each AE analyses namely b-value, sentry and intensity analysis on damage characterization also been critically reviewed. From the review, AE monitoring involving RC strengthened with FRP using b-value, sentry and intensity analysis are proven to be successful and efficient method in determining damage characterization. However, application of AE analysis using sentry analysis is still limited compared to b-value and intensity analysis in characterizing damages especially for RC strengthened with FRP specimen.

  12. Acoustic Emission Health Monitoring of Fill Purge COPV's Used in Aerospace and Automotive Applications and Designed for Long Cycle Life

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract Problem Description: Cumulative composite damage in composite pressure vessels (CPVs) currently is not monitored on-orbit. Consequently, hazards due to...

  13. Application of acoustic emission to hydride cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagat, S.; Ambler, J.F.R.; Coleman, C.E.

    1986-07-01

    Acoustic emission has been used for over a decade to study delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys. At first acoustic emission was used primarily to detect the onset of DHC. This was possible because DHC was accompanied by very little plastic deformation of the material and furthermore the amplitudes of the acoustic pulses produced during cracking of the brittle hydride phase were much larger than those from dislocation motion and twinning. Acoustic emission was also used for measuring crack growth when it was found that for a suitable amplitude threshold, the total number of acoustic emission counts was linearly related to the cracked area. Once the proportionality constant was established, the acoustic counts could be converted to the crack length. Now the proportionality between the count rate and the crack growth rate is used to provide feedback between the crack length and the applied load, using computer technology. In such a system, the stress at the crack tip can be maintained constant during the test by adjusting the applied load as the crack progresses, or it can be changed in a predetermined manner, for example, to measure the threshold stress for cracking

  14. Acoustic emission pickup essentially for waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, Michel; Saglio, Robert.

    1979-01-01

    Lambda wave length acoustic emission pickup comprising two juxtaposed piezoelectric capsules of equal lambda/2 thickness and with opposite polarization, separated by an electrically insulating foil, the two opposite sides of the capsules being earthed. The electric signal resulting from the acoustic emission is picked up on the two sides facing both sides of the insulating foil and the assembly of the two piezoelectric capsules is mounted on a base insulating it from the structure on which the acoustic emission is being listened to. Application of this pickup to the surveillance of defects in the steel vessels of nuclear reactors, characterized in that it is placed at the end of a metal ultrasonic wave guide the other end of which is welded directly to the vessel [fr

  15. Acoustic emission generated by fluid leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The noise generated by the leaking saturated steam and subcooled water form various sizes of hole has been measured as function of leak rate and stagnation pressure. Acoustic emission (proportinal to root mean sguare voltage) is shown to be proportional to the leak rate and stagnation pressure. A transition of acoustic emission power is observed at the stagnation pressure 0.185 MPa associated with the transition to the critical flow state. Substantially higher acoustic emission power generated by the subcooled water leakage is attributed to the flashing source involving the phase transformation and volume expansion. The relative amplitude of noise spectrum becomes more spiky as the leak rate and stagnation pressure increased. (Author)

  16. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Buttle, D.; Wallace-Sims, R.; O'Brien, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes work to investigate acoustic emission as a non-intrusive monitor of corrosion and degradation of cemented wasteforms where the waste is a potentially reactive metal. The acoustic data collected shows good correlation with the corrosion rate as measured by hydrogen gas evolution rates and the electrochemically measured corrosion rates post cement hardening. The technique has been shown to be sensitive in detecting stress caused by expansive corrosion product within the cemented wasteform. The attenuation of the acoustic signal by the wasteform reduced the signal received by the monitoring equipment by a factor of 10 over a distance of approximately 150-400 mm, dependent on the water level in the cement. Full size packages were successfully monitored. It is concluded that the technique offers good potential for monitoring cemented containers of the more reactive metals, for example Magnox and aluminium. (author)

  17. An acoustical model based monitoring network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the approach for an acoustical model based monitoring network is demonstrated. This network is capable of reconstructing a noise map, based on the combination of measured sound levels and an acoustic model of the area. By pre-calculating the sound attenuation within the network the

  18. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGugan, M.; Soerensen, Bent F.; Oestergaard, R.; Bech, T.

    2006-12-15

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material is presented. The contribution of the acoustic emission monitoring technique in defining different failure modes identified during the testing is discussed. The development of in-situ structural monitoring and control systems is considered. (au)

  19. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ''false negative or false positive'' indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments

  20. In-situ Monitoring of Sub-cooled Nucleate Boiling on Fuel Cladding Surface in Water at 1 bar and 130 bars using Acoustic Emission Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Seung Heon; Wu, Kaige; Shim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Crud deposition increases through a sufficient corrosion product supply around the steam-liquid interface of a boiling bubble. Therefore, the understanding of this SNB phenomenon is important for effective and safe operation of nuclear plants. The experimental SNB studies have been performed in visible conditions at a low pressure using a high speed video camera. Meanwhile, an acoustic emission (AE) method is an on-line non-destructive evaluation method to sense transient elastic wave resulting from a rapid release of energy within a dynamic process. Some researchers have investigated boiling phenomena using the AE method. However, their works were performed at atmospheric pressure conditions. Therefore, the objective of this work is for the first time to detect and monitor SNB on fuel cladding surface in simulated PWR primary water at 325 .deg. C and 130 bars using an AE technique. We successfully observed the boiling AE signals in primary water at 1 bar and 130 bars using AE technique. Visualization test was performed effectively to identify a correlation between water boiling phenomenon and AE signals in a transparent glass cell at 1 bar, and the boiling AE signals were in good agreement with the boiling behavior. Based on the obtained correlations at 1 bar, the AE signals obtained at 130 bars were analyzed. The boiling density and size of the AE signals at 130 bars were decreased by the flow parameters. However, overall AE signals showed characteristics and a trend similar to the AE signals at 1 bar. This indicates that boiling AE signals are detected successfully at 130 bars, and the AE technique can be effectively implemented in non-visualized condition at high pressures.

  1. Analysis of acoustic emission signals of fatigue crack growth and corrosion processes. Investigation of the possibilities for continuous condition monitoring of transport containers by acoustic emission testing; Analyse der Schallemissionssignale aus Ermuedungsrisswachstum und Korrosionsprozessen. Untersuchung der Moeglichkeiten fuer die kontinuierliche Zustandsueberwachung von Transportbehaeltern mittels Schallemissionspruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsmuth, Janne

    2016-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth and active corrosion processes are the main causes of structural failures of transport products like road tankers, railway tank cars and ships. To prevent those failures, preventive, time-based maintenance is performed. However, preventive inspections are costly and include the risk of not detecting a defect, which could lead to a failure within the next service period. An alternative is the idea of continuous monitoring of the whole structure by means of acoustic emission testing (AT). With AT, defects within the material shall be detected and repaired directly after their appearance. Acoustic emission testing is an online non-destructive testing method. Acoustic emission (AE) arises from changes within the material and is transported by elastic waves through the material. If the AE event generates enough energy, the elastic wave propagates to the boundaries of the component, produces a displacement in the picometre scale and can be detected by a piezoelectric sensor. The sensor produces an electrical signal. From this AE signal, AE features such as the maximum amplitude or the frequency can be extracted. Methods of signal analysis are used to investigate the time and frequency dependency of signal groups. The purpose of the signal analysis is to connect the AE signal with the originating AE source. If predefined damage mechanisms are identified, referencing the damage condition of the structure is possible. Acoustic emission from events of the actual crack propagation process can for example lead to the crack growth rate or the stress intensity factor, both specific values from fracture mechanics. A new development in the domain of acoustic emission testing is the pattern recognition of AE signals. Specific features are extracted from the AE signals to assign them to their damage mechanisms. In this thesis the AE signals from the damage mechanisms corrosion and fatigue crack growth are compared and analysed. The damage mechanisms were

  2. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing

  3. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between October 2007 and March 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The experiment has been designed to simulate a disposal tunnel in a real deep repository environment for storage of high-level radioactive waste. The test consists of a 90 m long, 5 m diameter subhorizontal tunnel excavated in dioritic granite. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing.

  4. Nondestructive online testing method for friction stir welding using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levikhina, Anastasiya

    2017-12-01

    The paper reviews the possibility of applying the method of acoustic emission for online monitoring of the friction stir welding process. It is shown that acoustic emission allows the detection of weld defects and their location in real time. The energy of an acoustic signal and the median frequency are suggested to be used as informative parameters. The method of calculating the median frequency with the use of a short time Fourier transform is applied for the identification of correlations between the defective weld structure and properties of the acoustic emission signals received during welding.

  5. Prototype acoustic resonance spectroscopy monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, D.N.; Olinger, C.T.

    1996-03-01

    This report reports on work performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through the Program Office for Technical Assistance (POTAS). In this work, we investigate possible applications of nondestructive acoustics measurements to facilitate IAEA safeguards at bulk processing facilities. Two different acoustic techniques for verifying the internal structure of a processing tank were investigated. During this effort we also examined two acoustic techniques for assessing the fill level within a processing tank. The fill-level measurements could be made highly portable and have an added safeguards advantage that they can also detect stratification of fill material. This later application may be particularly useful in confirming the absence of stratification in plutonium processing tanks before accountability samples are withdrawn

  6. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Han, Xiaole; Xia, Dong; Liu, Taolin; Lang, Hao

    2018-01-13

    Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  7. Novel Fiber-Optic Ring Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission technology has been applied to many fields for many years. However, the conventional piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors cannot be used in extreme environments, such as those with heavy electromagnetic interference, high pressure, or strong corrosion. In this paper, a novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor is proposed. The sensor exhibits high sensitivity, anti-electromagnetic interference, and corrosion resistance. First, the principle of a novel fiber-optic ring sensor is introduced. Different from piezoelectric and other fiber acoustic emission sensors, this novel sensor includes both a sensing skeleton and a sensing fiber. Second, a heterodyne interferometric demodulating method is presented. In addition, a fiber-optic ring sensor acoustic emission system is built based on this method. Finally, fiber-optic ring acoustic emission experiments are performed. The novel fiber-optic ring sensor is glued onto the surface of an aluminum plate. The 150 kHz standard continuous sinusoidal signals and broken lead signals are successfully detected by the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In addition, comparison to the piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor is performed, which shows the availability and reliability of the novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor. In the future, this novel fiber-optic ring acoustic emission sensor will provide a new route to acoustic emission detection in harsh environments.

  8. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S.

    2009-03-01

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment

  9. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype Repository between April 2008 and September 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, D.; Haycox, J.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2009-03-15

    This report describes results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring around a canister deposition hole (DA3545G01) in the Prototype Repository Experiment at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The monitoring aims to examine changes in the rock mass caused by an experimental repository environment, in particular due to thermal stresses induced from canister heating and pore pressures induced from tunnel sealing. Monitoring of this volume has previously been performed during excavation [Pettitt et al., 1999], and during stages of canister heating and tunnel pressurisation [Haycox et al., 2005a and 2005b; Haycox et al., 2006a and 2006b; Zolezzi et al., 2007 and Duckworth et al., 2008]. Further information on this monitoring can be found in Appendix I. This report covers the period between 1st April 2008 and 30th September 2008 and is the seventh instalment of the 6-monthly processing and interpretation of the results from the experiment.

  10. Acoustic emission measurements on type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, I.G.; Holt, J.; Goddard, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic emission measurements have been made on Type 316 stainless steel in the solution treated condition, as part of a feasibility study for the monitoring of fast reactor components. The work involved testing both plain tensile specimens and precracked compact tension specimens in the temperature range 20-200 deg C. At 20 deg C plastic deformation was a quiet process but ductile crack growth was accompanied by high amplitude emissions capable of detection on plant. At 200 deg C both plastic deformation and ductile crack growth were quiet

  11. Acoustic emission during the compaction of brittle UO2 particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegron, Lise

    2014-01-01

    One of the options considered for recycling minor actinides is to incorporate about 10% to UO 2 matrix. The presence of open pores interconnected within this fuel should allow the evacuation of helium and fission gases to prevent swelling of the pellet and ultimately its interaction with the fuel clad surrounding it. Implementation of minor actinides requires working in shielded cell, reducing their retention and outlawing additions of organic products. The use of fragmentable particles of several hundred micrometers seems a good solution to control the microstructure of the green compacts and thus control the open porosity after sintering. The goal of this study is to monitor the compaction of brittle UO 2 particles by acoustic emission and to link the particle characteristics to the open porosity obtained after the compact sintering. The signals acquired during tensile strength tests on individual granules and compacts show that the acoustic emission allows the detection of the mechanism of fragmentation and enables identification of a characteristic waveform of this fragmentation. The influences of compaction stress, of the initial particle size distribution and of the internal cohesion of the granules, on the mechanical strength of the compact and on the microstructure and open porosity of the sintered pellets, are analyzed. By its ability to identify the range of fragmentation of the granules during compaction, acoustic emission appears as a promising technique for monitoring the compaction of brittle particles in the manufacture of a controlled porosity fuel. (author) [fr

  12. Development of an incipient rotor crack detection method by acoustic emission techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Reverend, D.; Massouri, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the program presented is to develop a method of detection and monitoring of crack growth in machine rotor by application of acoustic emission techniques. This program is performed by R and D Division of Electricite de France, jointly with INSA de Lyon. The first task of the program is relative to the characterization of acoustic emission during a progressive tensile test performed on a NCT specimen. The second task of the program deals with the experimentation of acoustic emission techniques for the monitoring of a specimen during cycling bending tests. The last task of the program is relative to evaluation of application of acoustic emission techniques for a small rotor integrity monitoring during fatigue rotation tests [fr

  13. Acoustic emission measurement during instrumented impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crostack, H.A.; Engelhardt, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Results of instrumented impact tests are discussed. On the one hand the development of the loading process at the hammer tup was recorded by means of a piezoelectric transducer. This instrumentation supplied a better representation of the load versus time than the conventional strain gauges. On the other hand the different types of acoustic emission occurring during a test could be separated. The acoustic emission released at the impact of the hammer onto the specimen is of lower frequency and its spectrum is strongly decreasing with increasing frequency. Plastic deformation also emits signals of lower frequency that are of quasi-continuous character. Both signal types can be discriminated by filtering. As a consequence typical burst signal were received afterwards that can be correlated with crack propagation. Their spectra exhibit considerable portions up to about 1.9 MHz. The development in time of the burst signals points to the kind of crack propagation resp. its sequence of appearance. However, definitive comparison between load and acoustic emission should become possible, only when the disadvantages of the common load measurement can be reduced, e.g. by determining the load directly at the specimen instead of the hammer tup

  14. Microcracking in ceramics and acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    One of the limitations in the use of ceramics in critical applications is due to the presence of microcracks, which may arise from differential thermal expansion and phase changes, among others. Acoustic emission signals occur when there are abrupt microdeformations in a material and thus offer a convenient means of non-destructive detection of microcracking. Examples of a study of acoustic emission from microcracking due to anisotropic thermal expansion in low thermal expansion single phase ceramics such as niobia and sodium zirconium phosphate ceramics and due to phase changes in zirconia and superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 Osub(7-x) ceramics are presented, together with the case of lead titanate ceramics, which exhibits both a phase change (paraelectric to ferroelectric) and an anisotropic thermal expansion. The role of grain size on the extent of microcracking is illustrated in the case of niobia ceramics. Some indirect evidence of healing of microcracks on heating niobia and lead titanate ceramics is presented from the acoustic emission results. (author). 69 refs., 9 figs

  15. Analysis of acoustic emission data for bearings subject to unbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapinder Sawhney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE is an effective nondestructive method for investigating the behavior of materials under stress. In recent decades, AE applications in structural health monitoring have been extended to other areas such as rotating machineries and cutting tools. This research investigates the application of acoustic emission data for unbalance analysis and detection in rotary systems. The AE parameter of interest in this study is a discrete variable that covers the significance of count, duration and amplitude of AE signals. A statistical model based on Zero-Inflated Poisson (ZIP regression is proposed to handle over-dispersion and excess zeros of the counting data. The ZIP model indicates that faulty bearings can generate more transient wave in the AE waveform. Control charts can easily detect the faulty bearing using the parameters of the ZIP model. Categorical data analysis based on generalized linear models (GLM is also presented. The results demonstrate the significance of the couple unbalance.

  16. Inspection of nuclear reactor welding by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the work described is to evaluate in-process acoustic emission weld monitoring with the goal of upgrading the inspection techniques for assuring better weld quality in nuclear reactor piping and pressure vessels. To accomplish this overall objective, the following specific goals have been set within a three year program: (1) prove the feasibility of in-process AE under shop conditions and validate the AE findings by currently acceptable NDE techniques; (2) develop and build a prototype monitor for use in Nuclear Fabrication shops; and (3) provide data for NRC/ASME acceptance of the inspection practice

  17. Acoustic Emission from Elevator Wire Ropes During Tensile Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wenjie; Chai, Mengyu; Li, Lichan; Li, Yongquan; Duan, Quan

    The acoustic emission (AE) technique was used to monitor the tensile testing process for two kinds of elevator wire ropes in our work. The AE signals from wire breaks were obtained and analyzed by AE parameters and waveforms. The results showed that AE technique can be a useful tool to monitor wire break phenomenon of wire ropes and effectively capture information of wire break signal. The relationship between AE signal characteristics and wire breaks is investigated and it is found that the most effective acoustic signal discriminators are amplitude and absolute energy. Moreover, the wire break signal of two kinds of ropes is a type of burst signal and it is believed that the waveform and spectrum can be applied to analyze the AE wire break signals.

  18. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper reports the dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emis- sion (AE) from ... Acoustic emission; dislocation; alkali halide crystals; plastic deformation. ..... [5] T Nishimura, A Tahara and T Kolama, Jpn. Metal Inst. 64, 339 (2000).

  19. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  20. Time reversal signal processing in acoustic emission testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Převorovský, Zdeněk; Krofta, Josef; Kober, Jan; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Chlada, Milan; Dos Santos, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : acoustic emission (AE) * ultrasonic testing (UT) * signal processing * source location * time reversal acoustic s * acoustic emission * signal processing and transfer Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Slides/637_Prevorovsky.pdf

  1. Study on acoustic emission signals of active defect in pressure piping under hydraulic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai Qiong; Liu Caixue; Wang Yao; He Pan; Song Jian

    2009-01-01

    Experimental investigations of acoustic emission (AE) of active defect in pressure piping with a prefabricated crack under hydraulic pressure tester were conducted. AE signals of fatigue-crack-growth in pressure piping were monitored incessantly in all processes, and all signals recorded were analyzed and processed. The result of signal processing show that the amplitude and energy of acoustic emission signals from defect in pressure pipeline increase gradually with the load time, and thus the active defects in pipeline can be identified; the amplitude, energy and count of acoustic emission signals increase sharply before the defect runs through, and we can forecast the penetrated leakage of pipeline. (authors)

  2. Acoustic phonon emission by two dimensional plasmons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishonov, T.M.

    1990-06-01

    Acoustic wave emission of the two dimensional plasmons in a semiconductor or superconductor microstructure is investigated by using the phenomenological deformation potential within the jellium model. The plasmons are excited by the external electromagnetic (e.m.) field. The power conversion coefficient of e.m. energy into acoustic wave energy is also estimated. It is shown, the coherent transformation has a sharp resonance at the plasmon frequency of the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG). The incoherent transformation of the e.m. energy is generated by ohmic dissipation of 2DEG. The method proposed for coherent phonon beam generation can be very effective for high mobility 2DEG and for thin superconducting layers if the plasmon frequency ω is smaller than the superconducting gap 2Δ. (author). 21 refs, 1 fig

  3. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  4. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  5. Continuous and recurrent testing of acoustic emission sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sause, Markus G.R.; Schmitt, Stefan; Potstada, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In many fields of application of acoustic emission, the testing can lead to a lasting change in the sensor characteristics. This can be caused by mechanical damage, thermal stress or use under aggressive environmental conditions. Irrespective of visually testable damages of the sensors, a shift in the spectral sensitivity, a reduction in the absolute sensitivity or a reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio can occur. During the test, this requires a possibility to periodically check the sensors, including the coupling aids used. For recurring testing, recommendations are given in Directive SE 02 ''Verification of acoustic emission sensors and their coupling in the laboratory''. This paper discusses possibilities for continuous monitoring of the sensors during the test and presents an application example for the partly automated recurring testing of acoustic emission sensors using Directive SE 02. For this purpose, a test stand for the supply of the sensors to be tested was constructed and the signal recording and data reduction implemented in freely available software programs. The operating principle is demonstrated using selected case studies. [de

  6. Acoustic emission from zirconium alloys during mechanical and fracture testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.

    1986-10-01

    The application of acoustic emission during the mechanical and fracture testing of zirconium alloys is reviewed. Acoustic emission is successful in following delayed hydride cracking quantitatively. It is especially useful when great sensitivity is required. Application to fatigue, tensile deformation and stress corrosion cracking appears promising but requires more work to separate phenomena before it can be used quantitatively. This report is based on an invited review for the American Society of Non-Destructive Testing Handbook: Volume 5, Acoustic Emission Testing

  7. Pre-service Acoustic Emission Testing for Metal Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong O; Yoon, Woon Ha; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Jong Kyu

    2003-01-01

    The field application of acoustic emission(AE) testing for brand-new metal pressure vessel were performed. We will introduce the test procedure for acoustic emission test such as instrument check distance between sensors, sensor location, whole system calibration, pressurization sequence, noise reduction and evaluation. The data of acoustic emission test contain many noise signal, these noise can be reduced by time filtering which based on the description of observation during AE test

  8. Characteristics of Acceleration and Acoustic Emission Signals from Mechanical Seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Do Hwan; Ha, Che Woong

    2015-01-01

    Based on these results, the applicability of acceleration signals for condition monitoring of mechanical seals is examined in the present study. Mechanical seals are used for pumps to prevent excessive leakage that might be occurred between rotational and stationary parts. The mechanical seals account for the major pump component failures. In spite of its importance, there have been few studies on condition monitoring of the components. Recently, some researchers have paid attention to the application of acoustic emission (AE) sensors for the fault detection of seals. The characteristics of acceleration and AE signals obtained from various defects are investigated. In order to prevent excessive leakage from mechanical seals, a condition monitoring technique is necessary. Based on the previous studies on AE techniques for seal monitoring, the signal characteristics from accelerometer

  9. Characteristics of Acceleration and Acoustic Emission Signals from Mechanical Seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Hwan; Ha, Che Woong [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Based on these results, the applicability of acceleration signals for condition monitoring of mechanical seals is examined in the present study. Mechanical seals are used for pumps to prevent excessive leakage that might be occurred between rotational and stationary parts. The mechanical seals account for the major pump component failures. In spite of its importance, there have been few studies on condition monitoring of the components. Recently, some researchers have paid attention to the application of acoustic emission (AE) sensors for the fault detection of seals. The characteristics of acceleration and AE signals obtained from various defects are investigated. In order to prevent excessive leakage from mechanical seals, a condition monitoring technique is necessary. Based on the previous studies on AE techniques for seal monitoring, the signal characteristics from accelerometer.

  10. Acoustic emission during low temperature phase transformations in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khejpl, K.; Karpenter, S.

    1988-01-01

    To study the nature of phase transformations in plutonium and plutonium-gallium alloys (0.3 and 0.57% Ga) the measurement of acoustic emission is conducted. The presence of acoustic emission testifies to martensitic character of transformation, related to sharp local changes in the volume, which cause elastic waves. It is detected that during α reversible β transformations in non-alloyed plutonium acoustic emission is absent, and that testifies to nonmartensitic nature of the transformations. σ reversible α transformation in plutonium-gallium alloys is accompanied by the appearance of acoustic emission, i.e. it is of martensitic origin

  11. An acoustic emission study of plastic deformation in polycrystalline aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Frederick, J. R.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission experiments were performed on polycrystalline and single crystal 99.99% aluminum while undergoing tensile deformation. It was found that acoustic emission counts as a function of grain size showed a maximum value at a particular grain size. Furthermore, the slip area associated with this particular grain size corresponded to the threshold level of detectability of single dislocation slip events. The rate of decline in acoustic emission activity as grain size is increased beyond the peak value suggests that grain boundary associated dislocation sources are giving rise to the bulk of the detected acoustic emissions.

  12. Acoustic emission testing of piston check valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Based on test experience at Comanche Peak Unit 1, an acoustic emission data evaluation matrix for piston check valves has been developed. The degradations represented in this matrix were selected based on Edwards piston check valve failure data reported in the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System. Evidence to support this matrix was collected from site test data on a variety of valve types. Although still under refinement, the matrix provides three major attributes for closure verification, which have proven useful in developing test procedures for inservice testing and preventing unnecessary disassembly

  13. An introduction to acoustic emission technology for in-process inspection of welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    Weld quality monitoring, as it stands today, is primarily done by X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing which is applied after welding is complete. Acoustic Emission Technique (AET) also presents a possible substitute for weld quality monitoring which can be used during welding. Acoustic signals are generated during welding and the sound waves of weld defects are picked up by using AE sensors. With the introduction of sophisticated instrumentation in AET, it is possible to carry out the test even in noisy shop floor environments. Large number of reports on the subject of acoustic emission in recent years is a clear indication that it is gaining importance in welding industry. The present day status of the acoustic emission technology as an on-line weld quality monitoring technique has been reviewed. This report discusses the technique and system along with the acoustic emission parameters important for weld quality analysis. This also deals with the application of this technique in different welding processes like TIG, resistance, electro slag and submerged arc. It has been reported that monitoring of emission during welding can detect crack formation, crack growth and lack of fusion precisely. Static defects like porosity and inclusion do not generate very strong acoustic signals and are therefore difficult to intercept, but, however, lately they have detected successfully. (author)

  14. Acoustic emission during fracture of ceramic superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woźny, L; Kisiel, A; Łysy, K

    2016-01-01

    In the ceramic materials acoustic emission (AE) is associated with a rapid elastic energy release due to the formation and expansion of cracks, which causes generation and propagation of the elastic wave. AE pulses measurement allows monitoring of internal stresses changes and the development of macro- and micro-cracks in ceramic materials, and that in turn allows us to evaluate the time to failure of the object. In presented work the acoustic signals generated during cracking of superconducting ceramics were recorded. Results obtained were compared with other ceramic materials tested the same way. An analysis of the signals was carried out. The characteristics of the AE before destruction of the sample were determined, that allow the assessment of the condition of the material during operation and its expected lifetime. (paper)

  15. Size Effect on Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Coal-Rock Damage Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal-gas outburst, rock burst, and other mine dynamic disasters are closely related to the instability and failure of coal-rock. Coal-rock is the assemblies of mineral particles of varying sizes and shapes bonded together by cementing materials. The damage and rupture process of coal-rock is accompanied by acoustic emission (AE, which can be used as an effective means to monitor and predict the instability of coal-rock body. In this manuscript, considering the size effect of coal-rock, the influence of different height to diameter ratio on the acoustic emission characteristics of coal-rock damage evolution was discussed by microparticle flow PFC2D software platform. The results show that coal-rock size influences the uniaxial compressive strength, peak strain, and elastic modulus of itself; the size effect has little effect on the acoustic emission law of coal-rock damage and the effects of the size of coal-rock samples on acoustic emission characteristics are mainly reflected in three aspects: the triggering time of acoustic emission, the strain range of strong acoustic emission, and the intensity of acoustic emission; the damage evolution of coal-rock specimen can be divided into 4 stages: initial damage, stable development, accelerated development, and damage.

  16. Online monitoring of accessories for underground electrical installations through acoustics emissions; Monitoreo en linea de accesorios de instalaciones electricas subterraneas mediante emisiones acusticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casals-Torrens, P. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Espana)]. E-mail: p.casals@upc.edu; Gonzalez-Parada, A. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico)]. E-mail: gonzaleza@salamanca.ugto.mx; Bosch-Tous, R. [Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Barcelona (Espana)

    2012-04-15

    The acoustic waves caused by Partial Discharges inside the dielectric materials, can be detected by acoustic emission (AE) sensors and analyzed in the time domain. The experimental results presented, show the online detection capability of these sensors in the environment near a cable accessory, such as a splice or terminal. The AE sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference and constitute a detection method non-intrusive and non-destructive, which ensures a galvanic decoupling with respect to electric networks, this technique of partial discharge detection can be applied as a test method for preventive or predictive maintenance (condition-based maintenance) to equipment or facilities of medium and high voltage in service and represents an alternative method to electrical detection systems, conventional or not, that continue to rely on the detection of current pulses. This paper presents characterization tests of the sensors AE through comparative tests of partial discharge on accessories for underground power cables. [Spanish] Las ondas acusticas provocadas por las descargas parciales en el interior de un dielectrico pueden ser detectadas por sensores de Emisiones Acusticas (EA) y analizadas en el dominio del tiempo. Los resultados experimentales que se presentan, evidencian la capacidad de deteccion en linea de estos sensores, en el entorno proximo a un accesorio de cable, empalme o terminal. Los sensores EA son inmunes a las interferencias electromagneticas, son un metodo de deteccion no destructivo y garantizan desacople galvanico respecto a la red electrica; esta tecnica de deteccion de descargas parciales puede ser aplicada como metodo de prueba para mantenimiento preventivo o predictivo (mantenimiento basado en la condicion), en equipos o instalaciones de media y alta tension en servicio, y representa una alternativa a los sistemas electricos de deteccion, convencionales o no, que continuan basandose en la deteccion del impulsos de corriente. En el

  17. Acoustic Techniques for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, B.; Augustin, J.; Hentschel, D.; Schubert, F.; Köhler, B.; Meyendorf, N.

    2008-02-01

    Future safety and maintenance strategies for industrial components and vehicles are based on combinations of monitoring systems that are permanently attached to or embedded in the structure, and periodic inspections. The latter belongs to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and can be enhanced or partially replaced by structural health monitoring systems. However, the main benefit of this technology for the future will consist of systems that can be differently designed based on improved safety philosophies, including continuous monitoring. This approach will increase the efficiency of inspection procedures at reduced inspection times. The Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden Branch has developed network nodes, miniaturized transmitter and receiver systems for active and passive acoustical techniques and sensor systems that can be attached to or embedded into components or structures. These systems have been used to demonstrate intelligent sensor networks for the monitoring of aerospace structures, railway systems, wind energy generators, piping system and other components. Material discontinuities and flaws have been detected and monitored during full scale fatigue testing. This paper will discuss opportunities and future trends in nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring based on new sensor principles and advanced microelectronics. It will outline various application examples of monitoring systems based on acoustic techniques and will indicate further needs for research and development.

  18. Monitoring of pipeline hydrostatic testing with artificial flaws applying acoustic emission and ultra-sonic techniques; Monitoracao de teste hidrostatico de tubos com descontinuidades artificiais empregando as tecnicas de emissao acustica e ultra-som

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Sergio Damasceno [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2003-07-01

    Charts and parameters used to perform and analyzing the acoustic emission data collected during the hydrostatic test in pipe samples build in API XL 60 with 20 inches of diameter and 14 millimeters of thickness are shown. These pipes had internal and external artificial flaws done by electro-erosion process with aspect ratio 1 x 20. A relationship between acoustic emission results, ultrasound and J-Integral were established using the applied pressurization sequence. Characteristics values of acoustic emission signals were shown as a criteria of field tests. (author)

  19. Acoustic emission during hydrogen absorption and desorption in palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, R.; Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been used to study charging and discharging of hydrogen in palladium. During charging, breaking of oxide film due to surface activation and saturation of hydrogen absorption have been identified by acoustic emission. In the discharging cycle, the desorption of hydrogen from the specimen leads to high AE activity immediately after initiation of discharging, followed by gradual decrease in the acoustic activity, which reaches a minimum upon completion of the desorption. The potential of the acoustic emission technique for studying the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metals has been shown. (author)

  20. Acoustic emission signal measurements in pressure vessel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, A.

    1984-01-01

    The number of acoustic emission events per plastically deformed unit of volume caused by artificial notches in real pressure vessels has been calculated taking into account reference voltage, distance between acoustic emission source and sensor as well as the effect of noise background. A test performed at a 100 m 3 gasholder verifies the theoretical considerations. (author)

  1. Status reports on developments and applications of acoustic emission analysis. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The 25 lectures give a survey of the field of acoustic emission analysis. After a state-of-the-art report, the 4 new SE regulations of the DGZfP are presented which will standardize the applications of acoustic emission analysis. Acoustic emission sources and signal processing, including 3D detection, are discussed in 5 papers. After this, the practical applications of acoustic emission analysis are discussed in detail: Testing of gas tanks, inspection of storage container bottoms, reinforced concrete (3D analysis during extension testing), polymer-impregnated concrete, glass (testing up to 90 MHz), ceramics (thermoshock behaviour), fibre-reinforced plastics (4 contributions), PVD films, rock (analysis of workability and structure), glued joints between metals, monitoring of laser beam welding, metal cutting, and drying of cut wood. (orig.) [de

  2. Evaluation of damage accumulation behavior and strength anisotropy of NITE SiC/SiC composites by acoustic emission, digital image correlation and electrical resistivity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Ozawa, Kazumi; Asakura, Yuuki; Kohyama, Akira; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cracking process of the composites is essential to establish the design basis for practical applications. This study aims to investigate the damage accumulation process and its anisotropy for nano-infiltration transient eutectic sintered (NITE) SiC/SiC composites by various characterization techniques such as the acoustic emission (AE), digital image correlation (DIC) and electrical resistivity (ER) measurements. Cracking behavior below the proportional limit stress (PLS) was specifically addressed. Similar to the other generic SiC/SiC composites, the 1st AE event was identified below the PLS for NITE SiC/SiC composites with a dependency of fabric orientation. The DIC results support that the primary failure mode depending on fiber orientation affected more than the other minor modes did. Detailed AE waveform analysis by wavelet shows a potential to classify the failure behavior depending on architecture. Cracking below the PLS is a potential concern in component deign but the preliminary ER measurements imply that the impact of cracking below the PLS on composite function was limited

  3. Acoustic emission evolution during sliding friction of Hadfield steel single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Novitskaya, O. S.; Kolubaev, A. V.; Sizova, O. V.

    2017-12-01

    Friction is a complex dynamic process. Direct observation of processes occurring in the friction zone is impossible due to a small size of a real contact area and, as a consequence, requires various additional methods applicable to monitor a tribological contact state. One of such methods consists in the analysis of acoustic emission data of a tribological contact. The use of acoustic emission entails the problem of interpreting physical sources of signals. In this paper, we analyze the evolution of acoustic emission signal frames in friction of Hadfield steel single crystals. The chosen crystallographic orientation of single crystals enables to identify four stages related to friction development as well as acoustic emission signals inherent in these stages. Acoustic emission signal parameters are studied in more detail by the short-time Fourier transform used to determine the time variation of the median frequency and its power spectrum. The results obtained will facilitate the development of a more precise method to monitor the tribological contact based on the acoustic emission method.

  4. Particle filtering based structural assessment with acoustic emission sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wuzhao; Abdelrahman, Marwa; Zhang, Bin; Ziehl, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear structures are designed to withstand severe loading events under various stresses. Over time, aging of structural systems constructed with concrete and steel will occur. This deterioration may reduce service life of nuclear facilities and/or lead to unnecessary or untimely repairs. Therefore, online monitoring of structures in nuclear power plants and waste storage has drawn significant attention in recent years. Of many existing non-destructive evaluation and structural monitoring approaches, acoustic emission is promising for assessment of structural damage because it is non-intrusive and is sensitive to corrosion and crack growth in reinforced concrete elements. To provide a rapid, actionable, and graphical means for interpretation Intensity Analysis plots have been developed. This approach provides a means for classification of damage. Since the acoustic emission measurement is only an indirect indicator of structural damage, potentially corrupted by non-genuine data, it is more suitable to estimate the states of corrosion and cracking in a Bayesian estimation framework. In this paper, we will utilize the accelerated corrosion data from a specimen at the University of South Carolina to develop a particle filtering-based diagnosis and prognosis algorithm. Promising features of the proposed algorithm are described in terms of corrosion state estimation and prediction of degradation over time to a predefined threshold.

  5. Characteristic evaluation of acoustic emission sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Joo, Y. S.; Lee, N. H

    2000-12-01

    This report introduces the various kinds of Acoustic Emission(AE) sensors as well as the basic principle of AE sensors in order to select AE sensor suitably. The described sensors include : high sensitivity sensor, broadband sensor, underwater sensor, miniature sensor, directional sensor, integral pre-amplifier sensor. Sensor has two critical aspects of reliability and repeatability. For the high reliability, sensor has to be calibrated in accordance with ASTM standard E 1106 which explains to measure the characteristics of AE sensor accurately. For investigating the degradation of AE sensor under the severe environment for example the high radiation condition, It is important to perform the repeatability test which is described in detail in according to the ASTM standard E 976. Two kinds of AE sensor applications are also summarized.

  6. Magneto acoustic emission and magnetic barkhausen noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyra Astudillo, M R; Nunez, N; Lopez Pumarega, M I; Ruzzante, J

    2012-01-01

    Results obtained in the characterization of a sample of A508 Class II steel, are showed. This material is usually used for pressure vessels construction. Two techniques not very spread in our country, but developed at our Research Group were used: Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) and Magneto Acoustic Emission (MAE). Both techniques only can be used with ferromagnetic materials. A sinusoidal low frequency magnetic field (10 Hz) was applied on the material under test, producing a sudden movement of the magnetic domain walls. This movement produces an induced EMF. In this case it is amplified and filtered in the wide band between 20 kHz and 300 kHz. The electrical signal generated at the sensing coil is called Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN). The MBN was known since 1919 when it was observed for the first time. The movement of the magnetic domain walls generates at the same time elastic waves which propagate inside the material. Fixing a piezoelectric transducer on the sample surface, it is possible to detect these waves. This phenomenon is known as Magneto Acoustic Emission (MAE) and its frequency band is 20 kHz up to 1 MHz. As it is widely known, the domain structure and their walls movement are deeply influenced by the metal defects and microstructure (stress, grain size, precipitates, etc.). Then studying the domain wall movement it is possible to induce the material state. At the present study, we can infer that the material analyzed with these two techniques, has an anisotropy showed at the polar graphs, but does not totally showed at the metallographic study. Subsequent studies employing the Baumann imprint technique showed that manganese sulphides present an orientation similar to that founded with MNB and MAE. This work is completed with MEB and EDAX (author)

  7. Distributed acoustic sensing for pipeline monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, David; McEwen-King, Magnus [OptaSense, QinetiQ Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Optical fibre is deployed widely across the oil and gas industry. As well as being deployed regularly to provide high bandwidth telecommunications and infrastructure for SCADA it is increasingly being used to sense pressure, temperature and strain along buried pipelines, on subsea pipelines and downhole. In this paper we present results from the latest sensing capability using standard optical fibre to detect acoustic signals along the entire length of a pipeline. In Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fibre is used for both sensing and telemetry. In this paper we present results from the OptaSense{sup TM} system which has been used to detect third party intervention (TPI) along buried pipelines. In a typical deployment the system is connected to an existing standard single-mode fibre, up to 50km in length, and was used to independently listen to the acoustic / seismic activity at every 10 meter interval. We will show that through the use of advanced array processing of the independent, simultaneously sampled channels it is possible to detect and locate activity within the vicinity of the pipeline and through sophisticated acoustic signal processing to obtain the acoustic signature to classify the type of activity. By combining spare fibre capacity in existing buried fibre optic cables; processing and display techniques commonly found in sonar; and state-of-the-art in fibre-optic distributed acoustic sensing, we will describe the new monitoring capabilities that are available to the pipeline operator. Without the expense of retrofitting sensors to the pipeline, this technology can provide a high performance, rapidly deployable and cost effective method of providing gapless and persistent monitoring of a pipeline. We will show how this approach can be used to detect, classify and locate activity such as; third party interference (including activity indicative of illegal hot tapping); real time tracking of pigs; and leak detection. We will also show how an

  8. Design of crude oil storage tank for acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukri Mohd; Masrul Nizam Salleh; Abd Razak Hamzah; Norasiah Abd Kasim

    2005-01-01

    The integrity of crude oil storage tank needs to be well managed because they can contain a large inventory of hazardous material and because of the high cost such as cleaning and waste disposal prior to disposal and maintenance. Costs involved in cleaning and inspection can be up to several hundreds thousand Malaysian Ranting. If the floor then proves to be in good condition, these costs have been wasted. Acoustic Emission (AE) is proposed to be use for monitoring the floor of the storage tank on line without doing cleaning and waste disposal. A storage tank will be fabricated for storing the crude oil and then the corrosion process will be monitor using AE method. This paper will discuss the background, material and is technical specification, design and also the difficulties faced during design and fabrication process. (Author)

  9. Correlating Inertial Acoustic Cavitation Emissions with Material Erosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, I.; Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Frota, M. N.

    The standard ASTM G32-10 concerns the hydrodynamic cavitation erosion resistance of materials by subjecting them to acoustic cavitation generated by a sonotrode. The work reported extends this technique by detecting and monitoring the ultrasonic cavitation, considered responsible for the erosion process, specifically for coupons of aluminium-bronze alloy. The study uses a 65 mm diameter variant of NPL's cavitation sensor, which detects broadband acoustic emissions, and logs acoustic signals generated in the MHz frequency range, using NPL's Cavimeter. Cavitation readings were made throughout the exposure duration, which was carried out at discrete intervals (900 to 3600 s), allowing periodic mass measurements to be made to assess erosion loss under a strict protocol. Cavitation measurements and erosion were compared for different separations of the sonotrode tip from the material under test. The maximum variation associated with measurement of cavitation level was between 2.2% and 3.3% when the separation (λ) between the transducer horn and the specimen increased from 0.5 to 1.0 mm, for a transducer (sonotrode) displacement amplitude of 43.5 μm. Experiments conducted at the same transducer displacement amplitude show that the mass loss of the specimen -a measure of erosion- was 67.0 mg (λ = 0.5 mm) and 66.0 mg (λ = 1.0 mm).

  10. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J; Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D; Leighton, T G

    2011-01-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  11. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D [Urology Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT, London (United Kingdom); Leighton, T G, E-mail: fiammetta.fedele@gstt.nhs.uk [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, S017 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  12. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, F.; Thomas, K.; Leighton, T. G.; Ryves, S.; Phillips, D.; Coleman, A. J.

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  13. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D [Urology Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT, London (United Kingdom); Leighton, T G, E-mail: fiammetta.fedele@gstt.nhs.uk [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, S017 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  14. Experimental Investigations into the Effects of Lithology on Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhu Tian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to study how lithology affects acoustic emissions (AE, a series of tunnel rock burst simulation experiments, monitored by acoustic emission instruments, were conducted on granite, marble and basalt. By analyzing the characteristic parameters, this study found that AE events occur more frequently during the rock burst process on granite and basalt. Marble remains dormant until 75% of the loading time before the peak, at which point, cracks develop rapidly and AE events dramatically increase. During the rock burst process, the AE energy release demonstrates that low energy is released in the incubation phase and robust energy is released during the later phase. Before the rock burst occurs, increased in the heterogeneity index Cv values of the AE event are subject to lithology. The Cv values of granite and basalt have an increase of about 0.2-0.4, while marble shows an increase of 1.0-1.2. The heterogeneity index Cv value of an AE event is in line with the rock burst process.

  15. Development of monitoring system using acoustic emission for detection of helium gas leakage for primary cooling system and flow-induced vibration for heat transfer tube of heat exchangers for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Furusawa, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Satoh, Yoshiyuki; Yanagibashi, Minoru

    1998-10-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) uses helium gas for its primary coolant, whose leakage inside reactor containment vessel is considered in design of the HTTR. It is necessary to detect leakage of helium gas at an early stage so that total amount of the leakage should be as small as possible. On the other hand, heat transfer tubes of heat exchangers of the HTTR are designed not to vibrate at normal operation, but the flow-induced vibration is to be monitored to provide against an emergency. Thus monitoring system of acoustic emission for detection of primary coolant leakage and vibration of heat transfer tubes was developed and applied to the HTTR. Before the application to the HTTR, leakage detection test was performed using 1/4 scaled model of outer tube of primary concentric hot gas duct. Result of the test covers detectable minimum leakage rate and effect of difference in gas, pressure, shape of leakage path and distance from the leaking point. Detectable minimum leakage rate was about 5 Ncc/sec. The monitoring system is promising in leakage detection, though countermeasure to noise is to be needed after the HTTR starts operating. (author)

  16. Acoustic emission generated during scratch test of various thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháč, Petr; Tomáštík, J.; Čtvrtlík, R.; Dráb, M.; Koula, V.; Cvrk, K.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014), s. 16635 ISSN 1435-4934 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA03010743 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : acoustic emission * scratch test * thin films * AE data analysis * mechanical toughness Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  17. Analysis of the conical piezoelectric acoustic emission transducer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červená, Olga; Hora, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2008), s. 13-24 ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/1689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * conical transducer * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  18. Acoustic emission from fiber reinforced plastic damaged hoop wrapped cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhtar, A.; Kung, D.; Westbrook, D.R.

    2000-03-01

    Metal lined continuous fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) hoop wrapped cylinders with axial cuts to the FRP were modeled mathematically and tested experimentally. Steel lined and aluminum alloy lined glass FRP vessels were subjected to acoustic emission tests (AE) and hydraulic burst tests. The burst pressure decreased monotonically with the length of the axial cut. Acoustic emission increased initially with a decrease in burst pressure, and attained a maximum at an intermediate level of damage to the FRP. However, acoustic emission decreased when the level of damage was higher and the burst pressure was lower. Implications of the findings are discussed in the context of the search for an acoustic emission test method to inspect periodically the vessels used for the storage of compressed gaseous fuels on natural gas vehicles (NGV) and hydrogen vehicles.

  19. Characterization of martensitic transformations using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a highly sensitive technique which can reveal changes in materials not detectable by other means. The goal of this project was to obtain basic information on the AE response to martensitic transformation in steel. This information will enable the use of AE for improved quality assurance testing of rough-cut component blanks and semifinished parts. The AE response was measured as a function of temperature in four steels undergoing martensitic transformation, and the AE response was compared with martensitic start temperature M/sub s/ and finish temperature M/sub f/ obtained by other methods. As measured by AE activity, M/sub s/ occurred as much as 26 0 C higher than previously reported using less sensitive measurement techniques. It was also found that 10 to 30% of an alloy of Fe-0.2% C-27% Ni transformed to martensite during one AE burst. These results show that AE can be used to study transformations both inside and outside the classical M/sub s/-M/sub f/ ranges. The findings will help to achieve the goal of using AE for quality assurance testing, and will add to the knowledge of the basic materials science of martensitic transformations

  20. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfergani, H. A.; Pullin, R.; Holford, K. M.

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  1. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Prestressed Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfergani, H A; Pullin, R; Holford, K M

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion is a substantial problem in numerous structures and in particular corrosion is very serious in reinforced and prestressed concrete and must, in certain applications, be given special consideration because failure may result in loss of life and high financial cost. Furthermore corrosion cannot only be considered a long term problem with many studies reporting failure of bridges and concrete pipes due to corrosion within a short period after they were constructed. The concrete pipes which transport water are examples of structures that have suffered from corrosion; for example, the pipes of The Great Man-Made River Project of Libya. Five pipe failures due to corrosion have occurred since their installation. The main reason for the damage is corrosion of prestressed wires in the pipes due to the attack of chloride ions from the surrounding soil. Detection of the corrosion in initial stages has been very important to avoid other failures and the interruption of water flow. Even though most non-destructive methods which are used in the project are able to detect wire breaks, they cannot detect the presence of corrosion. Hence in areas where no excavation has been completed, areas of serious damage can go undetected. Therefore, the major problem which faces engineers is to find the best way to detect the corrosion and prevent the pipes from deteriorating. This paper reports on the use of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique to detect the early stages of corrosion prior to deterioration of concrete structures.

  2. Correlation between acoustic emission and microstructure. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, A.K.; Bunch, R.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emission from pure metals undergoing deformation is caused by dislocation unpinning and can be described by a theory which was a modified version of Gilman's mobile dislocation density theory. Acoustic emission from alloys can be dislocation related, but is primarily due to inclusion fracture. Factors affecting this include inclusion size, inclusion density, and the stress state. Inclusions crack more frequently during tensile testing than during fracture toughness testing

  3. Acoustic Emission Sensing for Maritime Diesel Engine Performance and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    system does not provide direct current power to the preamplifier, equivalent pre-amplifiers with external power inputs were purchased , but the... behaviour of piston ring/cylinder liner interaction in diesel engines using acoustic emission. Tribology International 39 (12) 12 / 01 / 1634-1642...diesel engine using in-cylinder pressure and acoustic emission techniques. Dyanmics for Sustainable Engineering 1 454-463 26. Lowe, D. P., et al

  4. Acoustic Emission Measurements for Tool Wear Evaluation in Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Martín P.; Migliori, Julio; Ruzzante, José E.; D'Attellis, Carlos E.

    2009-03-01

    In this work, the tool condition in a drilling process of SAE 1040 steel samples was studied by means of acoustic emission. The studied drill bits were modified with artificial and real failures, such as different degrees of wear in the cutting edge and in the outer corner. Some correlation between mean power of the acoustic emission parameters and the drill bit wear condition was found.

  5. Introducing passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring: Motor bike piston-bore fault identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, D. P.; Panigrahi, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    Requirement of designing a sophisticated digital band-pass filter in acoustic based condition monitoring has been eliminated by introducing a passive acoustic filter in the present work. So far, no one has attempted to explore the possibility of implementing passive acoustic filters in acoustic based condition monitoring as a pre-conditioner. In order to enhance the acoustic based condition monitoring, a passive acoustic band-pass filter has been designed and deployed. Towards achieving an efficient band-pass acoustic filter, a generalized design methodology has been proposed to design and optimize the desired acoustic filter using multiple filter components in series. An appropriate objective function has been identified for genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique with multiple design constraints. In addition, the sturdiness of the proposed method has been demonstrated in designing a band-pass filter by using an n-branch Quincke tube, a high pass filter and multiple Helmholtz resonators. The performance of the designed acoustic band-pass filter has been shown by investigating the piston-bore defect of a motor-bike using engine noise signature. On the introducing a passive acoustic filter in acoustic based condition monitoring reveals the enhancement in machine learning based fault identification practice significantly. This is also a first attempt of its own kind.

  6. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring

  7. Inspection of nuclear reactor welding by acoustic emission, May 1976--March 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prine, D.W.; Mathieson, T.A.

    1977-03-01

    Evaluation of acoustic emission monitoring of welds in heavy section steel under pressure vessel shop conditions is described for a nuclear pressure vessel inlet nozzle weld and a repair weld on a test pressure vessel (V-7) for ORNL. On-line analysis of the AE results indicates that both welds should be free of code rejectable flaws

  8. Research on Acoustic Emission and Electromagnetic Emission Characteristics of Rock Fragmentation at Different Loading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujun Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships among the generation of acoustic emission, electromagnetic emission, and the fracture stress of rock grain are investigated, which are based on the mechanism of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission produced in the process of indenting rock. Based on the relationships, the influence of loading rate on the characteristics of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission of rock fragmentation is further discussed. Experiment on rock braking was carried out with three loading rates of 0.001 mm/s, 0.01 mm/s, and 0.1 mm/s. The results show that the phenomenon of acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission is produced during the process of loading and breaking rock. The wave forms of the two signals and the curve of the cutter indenting load show jumping characteristics. Both curves have good agreement with each other. With the increase of loading rate, the acoustic emission and electromagnetic emission signals are enhanced. Through analysis, it is found that the peak count rate, the energy rate of acoustic emission, the peak intensity, the number of pulses of the electromagnetic emission, and the loading rate have a positive correlation with each other. The experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis. The proposed studies can lead to an in-depth understanding of the rock fragmentation mechanism and help to prevent rock dynamic disasters.

  9. Operational monitoring of acoustic sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boltenkov V.A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic sensor networks (ASN are widely used to monitor water leaks in the power generating systems. Since the ASN are used in harsh climatic conditions the failures of microphone elements of ASN are inevitable. That's why the failure detection of ASN elements is a problem of current interest. Two techniques of operational monitoring ASN are developed. Both of them are based on the placement of the test sound source within a network. The signal processing for ASN sensors had to detect the failed element. Techniques are based time difference of arrival (TDOA estimating at the each pair of ASN elements. TDOA estimates as argmaximum of cross-correlation function (CCF for signals on each microphone sensors pair. The M-sequence phase-shift keyed signal is applied as a test acoustic signal to ensure high accuracy of the CCF maximum estimation at low signal/noise ratio (SNR. The first technique is based on the isolation principle for TDOA sum at three points. It require to locate the test sound source in the far field. This is not always possible due to technological reasons. For the second proposed technique test sound source can be located near the ASN. It is based on a system of hyperbolic equations solving for each of the four elements of the ASN. Both techniques has been tested in the computer imitation experiment. It was found that for the SNR to –5 dB both techniques show unmistakable indicators of control quality. The second method requires significantly more time control.

  10. Monitoring power breakers using vibro acoustic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia Balan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Speaking about the commutation’s equipment, it can be said that the best solution in increasing reliability and lowering the maintenance costs is a continuous monitoring of the equipment. However, if the price/quality ratio is considered, it is obvious that, for the moment, the diagnosis can be also an acceptable solution. Nowadays the predictive maintenance for equipment’s diagnosis is currently replacing the preventive diagnosis. An efficient modality of lowering the maintenance costs is to online monitoring the power breakers, during their operation in the power systems. Consequently any connecting/disconnecting operations may be used in diagnosing a power breaker. Thus any supplementary and superfluous tests and/or maintenance maneuvers are avoided. The paper presents the operational maintenance in a power station with three high voltage active breakers, Areva type. The method of establishing the state of a breaker consists in the comparison between the signature of the acoustic signal provided by the manufacturer and the signal issued from the testing operation of the breaker’s state. The software processing procedure and the methodology of determining the faults of the monitored equipment are also developed. All the tests on the circuit breaker are made according the prescriptions of normative.

  11. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  12. An FBG acoustic emission source locating system based on PHAT and GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing-shi; Zeng, Xiao-dong; Li, Wei; Jiang, Ming-shun

    2017-09-01

    Using the acoustic emission locating technology to monitor the health of the structure is important for ensuring the continuous and healthy operation of the complex engineering structures and large mechanical equipment. In this paper, four fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used to establish the sensor array to locate the acoustic emission source. Firstly, the nonlinear locating equations are established based on the principle of acoustic emission, and the solution of these equations is transformed into an optimization problem. Secondly, time difference extraction algorithm based on the phase transform (PHAT) weighted generalized cross correlation provides the necessary conditions for the accurate localization. Finally, the genetic algorithm (GA) is used to solve the optimization model. In this paper, twenty points are tested in the marble plate surface, and the results show that the absolute locating error is within the range of 10 mm, which proves the accuracy of this locating method.

  13. Analysis of acoustic emission during abrasive waterjet machining of sheet metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Nazrin; Gebremariam, MA; Zohari, H.; Azhari, Azmir

    2018-04-01

    The present paper reports on the analysis of acoustic emission (AE) produced during abrasive waterjet (AWJ) machining process. This paper focuses on the relationship of AE and surface quality of sheet metals. The changes in acoustic emission signals recorded by the mean of power spectral density (PSD) via covariance method in relation to the surface quality of the cut are discussed. The test was made using two materials for comparison namely aluminium 6061 and stainless steel 304 with five different feed rates. The acoustic emission data were captured by Labview and later processed using MATLAB software. The results show that the AE spectrums correlated with different feed rates and surface qualities. It can be concluded that the AE is capable of monitoring the changes of feed rate and surface quality.

  14. A study on the evaluation of internal leak in valve using acoustic emission method(3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Wook Ryun; Park, Jong Hyuck; Kim, Kwang Hong

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, valve leak tests using various types of specimen simulated seat damage were performed in order to analyzer acoustic emission properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound level increased in proportion to the increase of hole diameter and leak velocity, and decreased in proportion to the increase of leak depth. And also, leak sound level has hysteresis for leak velocity. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the acoustic emission method for monitoring of leak was feasible.

  15. Detection of ductile crack initiation by acoustic emission testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.; Boehmert, J.; Viehrig, H.W.

    1998-08-01

    A Charpy impact test equipment is described permitting simultaneous measurement of impact force, crack tip opening, acoustic emissions and magnetic emissions. The core of the equipment is an inverted pendulum ram impact testing machine and the tests have been performed with laterally notched, pre-fatigue ISO-V specimens made of steels of various strength and toughness properties. The tests are intended to ascertain whether the acoustic emission method is suitable for detecting steady crack initiation in highly ductile steels. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Acoustic and electromagnetic emission as a tool for crack localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlak, P; Sikula, J; Lokajicek, T; Mori, Y

    2008-01-01

    The creation of cracks is accompanied by electric charge redistribution due to loosened chemical bounds. Electric charge on a crack wall creates dipole moments. Vibrations of crack walls produce time-dependent dipole moments and, consequently, electric and magnetic fields are generated. An electric signal is induced on metal electrodes. Simultaneously with the electromagnetic emission (EME) signal, an acoustic emission (AE) signal is generated, but due to the different velocities of propagation of both waves, the detection of the AE signal is delayed. This time delay presents the time of the wave propagation from the individual acoustic emission sensor to the crack. The defect can be located by means of these time intervals. This paper describes the localization using acoustic and electromagnetic emission signals for the two-dimensional case

  17. Acoustic Monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Chayes, D. N.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction The monitoring of the Arctic Ice Cap is important economically, tactically, and strategically. In the scenario of ice cap retreat, new paths of commerce open, e.g. waterways from Northern Europe to the Far East. Where ship-going commerce is conducted, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard have always stood guard and been prepared to assist from acts of nature and of man. It is imperative that in addition to measuring the ice from satellites, e.g. Icesat, that we have an ability to measure the ice extent, its thickness, and roughness. These parameters play an important part in the modeling of the ice and the processes that control its growth or shrinking and its thickness. The proposed system consists of three subsystems. The first subsystem is an acoustic source, the second is an array of geophones and the third is a system to supply energy and transmit the results back to the analysis laboratory. The subsystems are described below. We conclude with a plan on how to tackle this project and the payoff to the ice cap modeler and hence the users, i.e. commerce and defense. System Two historically tested methods to generate a large amplitude multi-frequency sound source include explosives and air guns. A new method developed and tested by the University of Texas, ARL is a combustive Sound Source [Wilson, et al., 1995]. The combustive sound source is a submerged combustion chamber that is filled with the byproducts of the electrolysis of sea water, i.e. Hydrogen and Oxygen, an explosive mixture which is ignited via a spark. Thus, no additional compressors, gases, or explosives need to be transported to the Arctic to generate an acoustic pulse capable of the sediment and the ice. The second subsystem would be geophones capable of listening in the O(10 Hz) range and transmitting that data back to the laboratory. Thus two single arrays of geophones arranged orthogonal to each other with a range of 1000's of kilometers and a combustive sound source where the two

  18. Ambiguity of source location in acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, P.; Mukherjee, P.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, B.

    1996-01-01

    Location of acoustic emission (AE) source in a plane is detected from the difference of the arrival times of the AE signal to at least three sensors placed on it. The detected location may not be unique in all cases. In this paper, the condition for the unambiguous solution for the location of the source has been deduced mathematically in terms of arrival times of the AE signal, the coordinate of the three sensors and the acoustic velocity. (author)

  19. Study of static characteristics of acoustic-emission radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakar, K B; Rzhevkin, V R [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii

    1982-09-01

    Experimental installation for measuring statistical parameters of acoustic emission is described and results of measuring dimetric histograms-amplitude of emission pulses-interval between pulses - are given. The installation was constructed on the base of CAMAC ideology and anables to analyse emission signals both in real time scale and after the experiment reading out the data from outer carrier. The given results demonstrate the principle possibility to distinguish processes, proceeding in material on load.

  20. Experience with digital acoustic monitoring systems for PWRs and BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olma, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Substantial progress could be reached both in system technics and in application of digital acoustic monitoring systems for assessing mechanical integrity of reactor primary systems. For the surveillance of PWRs and BWRs during power operation of the plants, acoustic signals of Loose Parts Monitoring System sensors are continuously monitored for signal bursts associated with metallic impacts. ISTec/GRS experience with its digital systems MEDEA and RAMSES has shown that acoustic signature analysis is very successful for detecting component failures at an early stage. Methods for trending and classification of digital burst signals are shown, experience with their practical use will be presented. (author)

  1. Acoustic and photon emissions during mechanical deformation of coloured alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and photon emissions take place in the elastic and plastic as well as the fracture region of x-irradiated KBr, KCl and NaCl crystals. The rate of photon emission is linear with the strain rate: however, the RMS value of the acoustic emission is proportional to the square root of the strain rate. The acoustic emission is maximum for x-irradiated NaCl crystals; however, the photon emission is maximum for x-irradiated KBr crystals. From the similarity between the acoustic emission and the photon emission, it seems that mobile dislocations are responsible for the acoustic emission in coloured alkali halide crystals. (author)

  2. Experimental Study on Mechanical and Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Rock-Like Material Under Non-uniformly Distributed Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Wen, Zhijie; Jiang, Yujing; Huang, Hao

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical and acoustic emission characteristics of rock-like materials under non-uniform loads were investigated by means of a self-developed mining-induced stress testing system and acoustic emission monitoring system. In the experiments, the specimens were divided into three regions and different initial vertical stresses and stress loading rates were used to simulate different mining conditions. The mechanical and acoustic emission characteristics between regions were compared, and the effects of different initial vertical stresses and different stress loading rates were analysed. The results showed that the mechanical properties and acoustic emission characteristics of rock-like materials can be notably localized. When the initial vertical stress and stress loading rate are fixed, the peak strength of region B is approximately two times that of region A, and the maximum acoustic emission hit value of region A is approximately 1-2 times that of region B. The effects of the initial vertical stress and stress loading rate on the peck strain, maximum hit value, and occurrence time of the maximum hit are similar in that when either of the former increase, the latter all decrease. However, peck strength will increase with the increase in loading rate and decrease with the increase in initial vertical stress. The acoustic emission hits can be used to analyse the damage in rock material, but the number of acoustic emission hits cannot be used alone to determine the degree of rock damage directly.

  3. Study of green state ceramics damage by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerboul, Genevieve

    1992-01-01

    Dry pressing is a delicate operation of the conventional process of elaboration of ceramic materials as most of the detected defects in sintered products are appearing during it, this research thesis reports the study of ceramic powder forming by using the non destructive technique of acoustic emission to detect defects in pressed samples as soon as they initiate. An original signal processing system has also been designed to analyse the effective value of acoustic signals emitted during pressing on industrial hydraulic presses, but comprising a single tooling. Three powders have been tested: UO_2, Al_2O_3 and a UO_2-PuO_2 mixture. In a first part, the author recalls some elements regarding the fabrication of nuclear fuel, knowledge on powder pressing, and general principles of acoustic emission. She reports a feasibility study and then defines experimental conditions. In the second part, she presents acoustic emission periods during a pressing cycle, and reports the study of the response of flawless and flawed pressed samples. She reports the examination of their evolution with respect to powder nature and to fabrication process parameters. She reports a detailed analysis of acoustic emission parameters as a basis to define the principle of operation of an in situ and real time detection of flawed pressed samples [fr

  4. Acoustic Signature Monitoring and Management of Naval Platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Graafland, F.; Hof, J. van 't

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic signatures make naval platforms susceptible to detection by threat sensors. The variable operational conditions and lifespan of a platform cause variations in the acoustic signature. To deal with these variations, a real time signature monitoring capability is being developed, with advisory

  5. Ellipsoidal reflector for measuring oto-acoustic emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epp, Bastian; Pulkki, Ville; Heiskanen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    A truncated prolate ellipsoidal reflector having the ear canal of a listener at one focal point and large- diaphragm low-noise microphone at the other focal point is proposed for free-field recordings of oto-acoustic emissions. A prototype reflector consisting of three pieces is presented, which...... enables measuring the response of the system with different truncations. The response of the system is measured with a miniature loud- speaker, and proof-of-concept measurements of oto-acoustic emissions are presented. The effect of truncation and other physical parameters to the performance of the system...

  6. Time-resolved tomography using acoustic emissions in the laboratory, and application to sandstone compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantut, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Acoustic emission and active ultrasonic wave velocity monitoring are often performed during laboratory rock deformation experiments, but are typically processed separately to yield homogenised wave velocity measurements and approximate source locations. Here I present a numerical method and its implementation in a free software to perform a joint inversion of acoustic emission locations together with the three-dimensional, anisotropic P-wave structure of laboratory samples. The data used are the P-wave first arrivals obtained from acoustic emissions and active ultrasonic measurements. The model parameters are the source locations and the P-wave velocity and anisotropy parameter (assuming transverse isotropy) at discrete points in the material. The forward problem is solved using the fast marching method, and the inverse problem is solved by the quasi-Newton method. The algorithms are implemented within an integrated free software package called FaATSO (Fast Marching Acoustic Emission Tomography using Standard Optimisation). The code is employed to study the formation of compaction bands in a porous sandstone. During deformation, a front of acoustic emissions progresses from one end of the sample, associated with the formation of a sequence of horizontal compaction bands. Behind the active front, only sparse acoustic emissions are observed, but the tomography reveals that the P-wave velocity has dropped by up to 15%, with an increase in anisotropy of up to 20%. Compaction bands in sandstones are therefore shown to produce sharp changes in seismic properties. This result highlights the potential of the methodology to image temporal variations of elastic properties in complex geomaterials, including the dramatic, localised changes associated with microcracking and damage generation.

  7. Probe beam deflection technique as acoustic emission directionality sensor with photoacoustic emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald A; Maswadi, Saher; Glickman, Randolph; Shadaram, Mehdi

    2014-01-20

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the unique capability of measuring the vector or angular information of propagating acoustic waves using an optical sensor. Acoustic waves were generated using photoacoustic interaction and detected by the probe beam deflection technique. Experiments and simulations were performed to study the interaction of acoustic emissions with an optical sensor in a coupling medium. The simulated results predict the probe beam and wavefront interaction and produced simulated signals that are verified by experiment.

  8. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  9. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype. Repository between April 2007 and September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolezzi, F.; Haycox, J.R.; Pettitt, W.S. (Applied Seismology Consultants, Shrewsbury (United Kingdom))

    2008-07-01

    This six-month period of ultrasonic monitoring in the Prototype Repository Experiment, has been undertaken with the following objectives; - Produce accurate source locations for AEs so as to delineate the spatial and temporal extent of any brittle microcracking within the rock mass around the deposition hole and locate any movements on pre-existing macroscopic fractures; - Conduct regular ultrasonic surveys to assess the effect of heating and other environmental changes on the velocity and amplitude of transmitted ultrasonic waves; - Investigate changes in dynamic moduli and crack density to show how the properties of the rock volume around the deposition hole change through the experiment; - Relate the AE and ultrasonic measurements to the measured in situ stress regime and other operating parameters such as temperature and fluid pressure; - Outline how the results from this reporting period relate to previous monitoring periods, and into the overall experimental aims and objectives.

  10. Prototype Repository. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring results from deposition hole DA3545G01 in the Prototype. Repository between April 2007 and September 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolezzi, F.; Haycox, J.R.; Pettitt, W.S.

    2008-01-01

    This six-month period of ultrasonic monitoring in the Prototype Repository Experiment, has been undertaken with the following objectives; - Produce accurate source locations for AEs so as to delineate the spatial and temporal extent of any brittle microcracking within the rock mass around the deposition hole and locate any movements on pre-existing macroscopic fractures; - Conduct regular ultrasonic surveys to assess the effect of heating and other environmental changes on the velocity and amplitude of transmitted ultrasonic waves; - Investigate changes in dynamic moduli and crack density to show how the properties of the rock volume around the deposition hole change through the experiment; - Relate the AE and ultrasonic measurements to the measured in situ stress regime and other operating parameters such as temperature and fluid pressure; - Outline how the results from this reporting period relate to previous monitoring periods, and into the overall experimental aims and objectives

  11. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.68 Section 61....68 Emission monitoring. (a) A vinyl chloride monitoring system is to be used to monitor on a... monitoring system(s) used to meet the requirement in paragraph (a) of this section is to be a device which...

  12. Acoustic surveillance techniques for SGU leak monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, J.A.; Rowley, R.; Beesley, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a brief review of the acoustic techniques applicable to the detection of steam generator unit leaks that have been studied in the UK. Before discussion of the acoustic detection methods a reference representation of the required performance as developed in the UK is given. The conclusion is made that preliminary specification for the acoustic leak detection of sodium/water leaks in steam generating units suggests that it will be necessary to detect better than a leak rate of 3 g/s within a few seconds. 10 refs, 12 figs

  13. Decision-making for acoustic emission data set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellionisz, P.

    1992-12-01

    Acoustic emission techniques are widely applied in proof tests of pressure vessels. Correct interpretation of experimental data is of primary importance. The AE DATA EXPERT system performs this task in three procedures: source separation, source purification and source classification. Basic production rules are discussed. (author) 19 refs.; 16 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Measurement of acoustic emission signal energy. Calibration and tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chretien, N.; Bernard, P.; Fayolle, J.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of using an Audimat W device for analyzing the electric energy of signals delivered by a piezo-electric sensor for acoustic emission was investigated. The characteristics of the prototype device could be improved. The tests performed revealed that the 7075-T651 aluminium alloy can be used as a reference material [fr

  15. Potential of acoustic monitoring for safety assessment of primary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olma, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Safety assessment of the primary system and its components with respect to their mechanical integrity is increasingly supported by acoustic signature analysis during power operation of the plants. Acoustic signals of Loose Parts Monitoring System sensors are continuously monitored by dedicated digital systems for signal bursts associated with metallic impacts. Several years of ISTec/GRS experience and the practical use of its digital systems MEDEA and RAMSES have shown that acoustic monitoring is very successful for detecting component failures at an early stage. Advanced powerful tools for classification and acoustic evaluation of burst signals have recently been realized. The paper presents diagnosis experiences of BWR's and PWR's safety assessment. (author). 7 refs, 8 figs

  16. Fort Davis National Historic Site : acoustical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    During the summer of 2010 (September - October 2010), the Volpe Center collected baseline acoustical data at Fort Davis National Historic Site (FODA)at two sites deployed for approximately 30 days each. The baseline data collected during this period ...

  17. Big Bend National Park: Acoustical Monitoring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    During the summer of 2010 (September October 2010), the Volpe Center collected baseline acoustical data at Big Bend National Park (BIBE) at four sites deployed for approximately 30 days each. The baseline data collected during this period will he...

  18. Acoustic emission in a superconductor (Nb-Ti) during magnetic field and current sweep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Harehiko

    1980-01-01

    Though superconducting magnets are indispensable in the fields of nuclear fusion, MHD power generation, high energy technology, and the trains using magnetic levitation, the safety of the magnets used for those fields is required to be fully investigated because their accumulating energy reaches up to several GJ. For this purpose, the improvement of monitoring techniques is extremely important to grasp exactly the magnetization of such large energy magnets. Although the detection of the terminal voltage of the magnets has been mainly used so far, the purpose has not yet been fulfilled because various phenomena appear in the form of noises in the terminal voltage. The authors have found the monitoring method using acoustic emission in a system completely independent from voltage observation. From this viewpoint, the experiments have been performed aiming at the generation of acoustic emission in conjunction with magnetization out of the fine structure of super-conductors, taking notice of the emitted sound frequency ranging over several hundred kHz. The results and investigation revealed that the superconductor itself emitted ultrasonic sound. It was found that the observation of this acoustic power intensity was able to monitor not only the magnetization of superconductors but also its current sweep. Since the motion of the magnetic flux is converted into the signal of acoustic field, this measuring method is less affected by noise disturbance from electromagnetic systems, and is expected to be useful for the researches on analyzing superconductor characteristics. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61... Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.163 Emission monitoring. (a) An owner or operator of a glass..., calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous monitoring system for the measurement of the opacity of...

  20. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.183 Section 61... Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a..., calibrate, maintain, and operate a continuous monitoring system for the measurement of the opacity of each...

  1. Program to develop acoustic emission-flaw relationship for inservice monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels. Annual report, July 1, 1976 - October 1, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Schwenk, E.B.; Pavloff, C.

    1978-06-01

    Laboratory mechanical tests were conducted to evaluate AE during uniaxial tensile, fracture and fatigue crack growth in A533B pressure vessel steel. The A533B steel included two heats of Class 1, one heat of Class 2 and a weldment made for the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Specimen types included uniaxial tensile specimens, size 2 compact tension specimens for fatigue crack growth and fracture tests, and a single-edge notch specimen also for fatigue crack growth through material that was uniformly strained 3% prior to fatigue testing. In addition, AE monitoring was conducted on the HSST V-7B 6-inch thick pressure vessel test. AE data were partitioned into four ranges of signal amplitude and rise time. All the AE data were analyzed, with respect to mechanical behavior of A533B steel. Linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis methods were used to relate AE parameters to fracture and fatigue crack growth parameters. AE data from the V-7B vessel test were correlated with stress intensity factor and crack opening displacement. AE data from the fatigue crack growth tests were investigated using models based on fatigue crack growth rate, fatigue crack area and theoretical crack tip plastic zone size.

  2. Program to develop acoustic emission-flaw relationship for inservice monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels. Annual report, July 1, 1976--October 1, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Schwenk, E.B.; Pavloff, C.

    1978-03-01

    Laboratory mechanical tests were conducted to evaluate AE during uniaxial tensile, fracture and fatigue crack growth in A533B pressure vessel steel. The A533B steel included two heats of Class 1, one heat of Class 2 and a weldment made for the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Specimen types included uniaxial tensile specimens, size 2 compact tension specimens for fatigue crack growth and fracture tests, and a single-edge notch specimen also for fatigue crack growth through material that was uniformly strained 3% prior to fatigue testing. In addition, AE monitoring was conducted on the HSST V-7B 6-inch thick pressure vessel test. AE data were partitioned into four ranges of signal amplitude and rise time. All the AE data were analyzed, with respect to mechanical behavior of A533B steel. Linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis methods were used to relate AE parameters to fracture and fatigue crack growth parameters. AE data from the V-7B vessel test were correlated with stress intensity factor and crack opening displacement. AE data from the fatigue crack growth tests were investigated using models based on fatigue crack growth rate, fatigue crack area and theoretical crack tip plastic zone size

  3. Bifurcation of ensemble oscillations and acoustic emissions from early stage cavitation clouds in focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Prentice, Paul; Rachmilevitch, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic emissions from single cavitation clouds at an early stage of development in 0.521 MHz focused ultrasound of varying intensity, are detected and directly correlated to high-speed microscopic observations, recorded at 1 × 10 6 frames per second. At lower intensities, a stable regime of cloud response is identified whereby bubble-ensembles exhibit oscillations at half the driving frequency, which is also detected in the acoustic emission spectra. Higher intensities generate clouds that develop more rapidly, with increased nonlinearity evidenced by a bifurcation in the frequency of ensemble response, and in the acoustic emissions. A single bubble oscillation model is subject to equivalent ultrasound conditions and fitted to features in the hydrophone and high-speed spectral data, allowing an effective quiescent radius to be inferred for the clouds that evolve at each intensity. The approach indicates that the acoustic emissions originate from the ensemble dynamics and that the cloud acts as a single bubble of equivalent radius in terms of the scattered field. Jetting from component cavities on the periphery of clouds is regularly observed at higher intensities. The results may be of relevance for monitoring and controlling cavitation in therapeutic applications of focused ultrasound, where the phenomenon has the potential to mediate drug delivery from vasculature. (paper)

  4. Mechanical Properties and Acoustic Emission Properties of Rocks with Different Transverse Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the stability of engineering rock masses has important practical significance to projects like mining, tunneling, and petroleum engineering, it is necessary to study mechanical properties and stability prediction methods for rocks, cementing materials that are composed of minerals in all shapes and sizes. Rocks will generate acoustic emission during damage failure processes, which is deemed as an effective means of monitoring the stability of coal rocks. In the meantime, actual mining and roadway surrounding rocks tend to have transverse effects; namely, the transverse scale is larger than the length scale. Therefore, it is important to explore mechanical properties and acoustic emission properties of rocks under transverse size effects. Considering the transverse scale effects of rocks, this paper employs the microparticle flow software PFC2D to explore the influence of different aspect ratios on damage mechanics and acoustic emission properties of rocks. The results show that (1 the transverse scale affects uniaxial compression strength of rocks. As the aspect ratio increases, uniaxial compression strength of rocks decreases initially and later increases, showing a V-shape structure and (2 although it affects the maximum hit rate and the strain range of acoustic emission, it has little influence on the period of occurrence. As the transverse scale increases, both damage degree and damage rate of rocks decrease initially and later increase.

  5. A case for Acoustic Emission surveillance of operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    In the nuclear power industry, the potential consequences of cracks and leaks, the problems of personnel and public exposure to radiation, are certainly as serious as ever. The costs of repairing advanced damage soar higher every year and the established inspection methods, taken together, still leave some gaps which Acoustic Emission (AE) can potentially close. The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) problem not only poses safety problems, but entails remedies costing the industry billions of dollars. If crack growth could be detected during plant operation, particular welds could be designated as requiring inspection during the next outage. Furthermore, if a highly sensitive, reliable leak-detection capability were applied to the system, any through-wall crack would be instantaneously detected. AE monitoring has the potential for both of these, on-line, in real time. So, there is renewed interest in what AE can do to solve these problems. Reviewing the progress in AE, relevant to nuclear applications, indicates that a strong case can be made for AE surveillance of operating reactors. This progress can be reviewed under two headings: leak detection and crack detection

  6. New methods for leaks detection and localisation using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, P.

    1993-01-01

    Real time monitoring of Pressurized Water nuclear Reactor secondary coolant system tends to integrate digital processing machines. In this context, the method of acoustic emission seems to exhibit good performances. Its principle is based on passive listening of noises emitted by local micro-displacements inside a material under stress which propagate as elastic waves. The lack of a priori knowledge on leak signals leads us to go deeper into understanding flow induced noise generation. Our studies are conducted using a simple leak model depending on the geometry and the king of flow inside the slit. Detection and localization problems are formulated according to the maximum likelihood principle. For detection, the methods using a indicator of similarity (correlation, higher order correlation) seems to give better results than classical ones (rms value, envelope, filter banks). For leaks location, a large panel of classical (generalized inter-correlation) and innovative (convolution, adaptative, higher order statistics) methods of time delay estimation are presented. The last part deals with the applications of higher order statistics. The analysis of higher order estimators of a non linear non Gaussian stochastic process family, the improvement of non linear prediction performances and the optimal-order choice problem are addressed in simple analytic cases. At last, possible applications to leak signals analysis are pointed out. (authors).264 refs., 7 annexes

  7. Inspection of copper canister for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Copper characterization, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission and ultrasonic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2009-08-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in 2008. The first part of the report is concerned with aspects related to ultrasonic attenuation of copper material used for canisters. We present results of attenuation measurement performed for a number of samples taken from a real canister; two from the lid and four from different parts of canister wall. Ultrasonic attenuation of the material originating from canister lid is relatively low (less that 50 dB/m) and essentially frequency independent in the frequency range up to 5 MHz. However, for the material originating from the extruded canister part considerable variations of the attenuation are observed, which can reach even 200 dB/m at 3.5 MHz. In the second part of the report we present further development of the concept of the friction stir welding process monitoring by means of multiple sensors formed into a uniform circular array (UCA). After a brief introduction into modeling Lamb waves and UCA we focus on array processing techniques that enable estimating direction of arrival of multimodal Lamb waves. We consider two new techniques, the Capon beamformer and the broadband multiple signal classification technique (MUSIC). We present simulation results illustrating their performance. In the final part we present the phase shift migration algorithm for ultrasonic imaging of layered media using synthetic aperture concept. We start from explaining theory of the phase migration concept, which is followed by the results of experiments performed on copper blocks with drilled holes. We show that the proposed algorithm performs well for immersion inspection of metal objects and yields both improved spatial resolution and suppressed grain noise

  8. Inspection of copper canister for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Copper characterization, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission and ultrasonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Engholm, Marcus; Olofsson, Tomas (Uppsala Univ., Signals and Systems, Dept. of Technical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-08-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in 2008. The first part of the report is concerned with aspects related to ultrasonic attenuation of copper material used for canisters. We present results of attenuation measurement performed for a number of samples taken from a real canister; two from the lid and four from different parts of canister wall. Ultrasonic attenuation of the material originating from canister lid is relatively low (less that 50 dB/m) and essentially frequency independent in the frequency range up to 5 MHz. However, for the material originating from the extruded canister part considerable variations of the attenuation are observed, which can reach even 200 dB/m at 3.5 MHz. In the second part of the report we present further development of the concept of the friction stir welding process monitoring by means of multiple sensors formed into a uniform circular array (UCA). After a brief introduction into modeling Lamb waves and UCA we focus on array processing techniques that enable estimating direction of arrival of multimodal Lamb waves. We consider two new techniques, the Capon beamformer and the broadband multiple signal classification technique (MUSIC). We present simulation results illustrating their performance. In the final part we present the phase shift migration algorithm for ultrasonic imaging of layered media using synthetic aperture concept. We start from explaining theory of the phase migration concept, which is followed by the results of experiments performed on copper blocks with drilled holes. We show that the proposed algorithm performs well for immersion inspection of metal objects and yields both improved spatial resolution and suppressed grain noise

  9. Acoustic emission results obtained from testing the ZB-1 intermediate scale pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Pappas, R.A.; Dawson, J.F.; Dake, L.S.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of flaw growth in an intermediate scale vessel during cyclic loading at 65 0 C and 288 0 C is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed is of major significance in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. Several areas of technical concern are addressed. Results support the feasibility of effective continuous monitoring

  10. Mechanical Properties and Acoustic Emission Properties of Rocks with Different Transverse Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xi; Jun, Li; Gonghui, Liu; Xueli, Guo

    2017-01-01

    Since the stability of engineering rock masses has important practical significance to projects like mining, tunneling, and petroleum engineering, it is necessary to study mechanical properties and stability prediction methods for rocks, cementing materials that are composed of minerals in all shapes and sizes. Rocks will generate acoustic emission during damage failure processes, which is deemed as an effective means of monitoring the stability of coal rocks. In the meantime, actual mining a...

  11. 40 CFR 60.84 - Emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.84 Section 60....84 Emission monitoring. (a) A continuous monitoring system for the measurement of sulfur dioxide... under § 60.13(d), shall be sulfur dioxide (SO2). Method 8 shall be used for conducting monitoring system...

  12. In process acoustic emission in multirun submerged arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, M.; Birac, C.

    1980-01-01

    In order to avoid the formation of deep grooves when repairing defects in welded joints in heavy plates, an investigation was made aiming to detect and locate the defects by in-process acoustic emission in multirun submerged arc welding. Twelve defects (lack of penetration, cracks, inclusions, lack of fusion together with inclusions, blowholes) were intentionally introduced when the first plate was welded. A space-time method for processing the acoustic activity during welding allowed the detection and the location of the intentional defects as well as of the most important accidental defects evidenced by ultrasonic testing [fr

  13. Distributed acoustic fibre optic sensors for condition monitoring of pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussels, Maria-Teresa; Chruscicki, Sebastian; Habib, Abdelkarim; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-05-01

    Industrial piping systems are particularly relevant to public safety and the continuous availability of infrastructure. However, condition monitoring systems based on many discrete sensors are generally not well-suited for widespread piping systems due to considerable installation effort, while use of distributed fibre-optic sensors would reduce this effort to a minimum. Specifically distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) is employed for detection of third-party threats and leaks in oil and gas pipelines in recent years and can in principle also be applied to industrial plants. Further possible detection routes amenable by DAS that could identify damage prior to emission of medium are subject of a current project at BAM, which aims at qualifying distributed fibre optic methods such as DAS as a means for spatially continuous monitoring of industrial piping systems. Here, first tests on a short pipe are presented, where optical fibres were applied directly to the surface. An artificial signal was used to define suitable parameters of the measurement system and compare different ways of applying the sensor.

  14. Secondary emission monitor (SEM) grids.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    A great variety of Secondary Emission Monitors (SEM) are used all over the PS Complex. At other accelerators they are also called wire-grids, harps, etc. They are used to measure beam density profiles (from which beam size and emittance can be derived) in single-pass locations (not on circulating beams). Top left: two individual wire-planes. Top right: a combination of a horizontal and a vertical wire plane. Bottom left: a ribbon grid in its frame, with connecting wires. Bottom right: a SEM-grid with its insertion/retraction mechanism.

  15. Spatial monitoring of auroral emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, Aa.

    1983-12-01

    A ground based technique to monitor the three-dimensional distribution of auroral emissions is presented. The system is composed of two subsystems. A monochromatic imaging system with digitizing capability monitors the two-dimensional variation of auroral intensity with 50 degree field of view. A second height measuring system obtains in real time the height distribution of the auroral luminosity within the field of view of the imaging system. This paper is a report of the stepwise development of the complete system. The measurements will be carried out in the magnetic meridian plane through the EISCAT-site in Norway and the Kiruna Geophysical Institute. The operation of the optical system will as much as possible be combined with incoherent scatter radar measurements. (author)

  16. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Avery, S; Sehgal, C M

    2014-01-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ∼1 mm. (paper)

  17. In Situ Acoustic Monitoring of Thermal Spray Process Using High-Frequency Impulse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Walther, Frank; Luo, Weifeng; Haack, Matthias; Nellesen, Jens; Knyazeva, Marina

    2018-01-01

    In order to guarantee their protective function, thermal spray coatings must be free from cracks, which expose the substrate surface to, e.g., corrosive media. Cracks in thermal spray coatings are usually formed because of tensile residual stresses. Most commonly, the crack occurrence is determined after the thermal spraying process by examination of metallographic cross sections of the coating. Recent efforts focus on in situ monitoring of crack formation by means of acoustic emission analysis. However, the acoustic signals related to crack propagation can be absorbed by the noise of the thermal spraying process. In this work, a high-frequency impulse measurement technique was applied to separate different acoustic sources by visualizing the characteristic signal of crack formation via quasi-real-time Fourier analysis. The investigations were carried out on a twin wire arc spraying process, utilizing FeCrBSi as a coating material. The impact of the process parameters on the acoustic emission spectrum was studied. Acoustic emission analysis enables to obtain global and integral information on the formed cracks. The coating morphology and coating defects were inspected using light microscopy on metallographic cross sections. Additionally, the resulting crack patterns were imaged in 3D by means of x-ray microtomography.

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchon, D.; Dukes, R.; Taylor, J.

    1975-01-01

    Results of some defect location studies on a pressure vessel are reported and correlated with those of ultrasonic inspection. Good agreement was observed, with a probability greater than 90% that a defect location detected would be confirmed by ultrasonics. This good agreement is considered to result from the use of peak sensing rather than the more commonly used leading edge triggering technique. Attention is drawn to the influence of the defect extension process upon the ease of detection, contrasting the difficulty of detecting slow crack growth with the ease of detection of pulses originating from the fracture of hard particles or their separation from the matrix, and to the influence of the Kaiser effect, which can mean that a flaw may not be detectable unless previously applied stress levels are exceeded, or that flaw growth has occurred since the previous inspection, or that some metallurgical recovery process has operated. (author)

  19. Automatic acoustic and vibration monitoring system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tothmatyas, Istvan; Illenyi, Andras; Kiss, Jozsef; Komaromi, Tibor; Nagy, Istvan; Olchvary, Geza

    1990-01-01

    A diagnostic system for nuclear power plant monitoring is described. Acoustic and vibration diagnostics can be applied to monitor various reactor components and auxiliary equipment including primary circuit machinery, leak detection, integrity of reactor vessel, loose parts monitoring. A noise diagnostic system has been developed for the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, to supervise the vibration state of primary circuit machinery. An automatic data acquisition and processing system is described for digitalizing and analysing diagnostic signals. (R.P.) 3 figs

  20. Why and how acoustic emission in pressure vessel first hydrotest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panzani, C.; Tonolini, F.; Villa, G.; Regis, V.

    1985-01-01

    The main advantages obtained performing the Acoustic Emission (AE) examination during pressure vessel first hydrotest are presented. The characteristics and performance of the AE instrumentation to be used for a correct test are illustrated. The main criteria for AE source characterization (location, typical AE parameters and their correlation with pressure value), the calibration and test procedures are discussed. The ndt post-test examinations and laboratory specimen experiments are also outlined. Personnel qualification requirements are finally indicated. (Author) [pt

  1. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart shall install, calibrate, maintain and operate a continuous monitoring system for measurement of the...

  2. Control of inhomogeneous materials strength by method of acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. В. Носов

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ambiguous connection between the results of acoustic emission control and the strength of materials makes acoustic-emission diagnosis ineffective and actualizes the problem of strength and metrological heterogeneity. Inhomogeneity is some deviation from a certain norm. The real object is always heterogeneous, homogeneity is an assumption that simplifies the image of the object and the solution of the tasks associated with it. The need to consider heterogeneity is due to the need to clarify a particular task and is a transition to a more complex level of research. Accounting for heterogeneity requires the definition of its type, criterion and method of evaluation. The type of heterogeneity depends on the problem being solved and should be related to the property that determines the function of the real object, the criterion should be informative, and the way of its evaluation is non-destructive. The complexity of predicting the behavior of heterogeneous materials necessitates the modeling of the destructive process that determines the operability, the formulation of the inhomogeneity criterion, the interpretation of the Kaiser effect, as showing inhomogeneity of the phenomenon of non-reproduction of acoustic emission (AE activity upon repeated loading of the examined object.The article gives an example of modeling strength and metrological heterogeneity, analyzes and estimates the informative effect of the Kaiser effect on the danger degree of state of diagnosed object from the positions of the micromechanical model of time dependencies of AE parameters recorded during loading of structural materials and technical objects.

  3. ACEMAN (II): a PDP-11 software package for acoustic emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, A.

    1976-01-01

    A powerful, but easy-to-use, software package (ACEMAN) for acoustic emission analysis has been developed at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories. The system is based on a PDP-11 minicomputer with 24 K of memory, an RK05 DISK Drive and a Tektronix 4010 Graphics terminal. The operation of the system is described in detail in terms of the functions performed in response to the various command mnemonics. The ACEMAN software package offers many useful facilities not found on other acoustic emission monitoring systems. Its main features, many of which are unique, are summarised. The ACEMAN system automatically handles arrays of up to 12 sensors in real-time operation during which data are acquired, analysed, stored on the computer disk for future analysis and displayed on the terminal if required. (author)

  4. Diagnostics of flexible workpiece using acoustic emission, acceleration and eddy current sensors in milling operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Filippova, E. O.; Chazov, P. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Podgornykh, O. A.

    2016-11-01

    Monitoring of the edge clamped workpiece deflection during milling has been carried our using acoustic emission, accelerometer and eddy current sensors. Such a monitoring is necessary in precision machining of vital parts used in air-space engineering where a majority of them made by milling. The applicability of the AE, accelerometers and eddy current sensors has been discussed together with the analysis of measurement errors. The appropriate sensor installation diagram has been proposed for measuring the workpiece elastic deflection exerted by the cutting force.

  5. Acoustic emission measurements at the pressure vessel ZB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.; Hanacek, L.

    1990-01-01

    The work presented here is the Swiss contribution to the project 'Zwischenbehaelter 2 (ZB2)' hosted by the 'Bundesministerium fuer Forschung und Technologie' of the Federal Republic of Germany. One of the crack-like defects introduced at the inside surface of the thick-walled pressure vessel ZB2 was locally monitored by acoustic emission. The measurement system was broadband (0.5 - 5 MHz) and allowed a threedimensional location of the source. The vessel was subjected to different tests. Signals were recorded during the second series of hydrotests, fast pressure cycles and fatigue test at 50 C. About 1 signal per hydrotest or cycle was recorded. For the hydrotests the signals were recorded generally at loading in the intermediate range of pressure; the sources were located in the artificial defect. Recurrent and non recurrent signals were recorded during the fatigue test. At loading, signals were captured up to the maximum pressure and for the recurrent signals at well defined pressure ranges. All the sources (except one, located in the base material ahead of the artificial defect) were situated in the artificial defect. The pressure and location depended on the loading phase and on the cycle range. The measurements were discussed by describing the signals by measurement, signal and source parameters. The goal was to identify the source mechanism and to assess the growth of the defect. For the hydrotests the identification of the mechanism at loading remains open. For the fatigue test the source situated in the base material was attributed to a primary mechanism; this source could assess the growth of the defect on the basis of linear elastic fracture mechanics. A secondary mechanism was suggested for recurrent sources active at loading. For all the tests, the sources active at unloading were attributed to a secondary mechanism. (author)

  6. Analysis of acoustic data from the PFR SGU condition monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, R.; Airey, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper gives an outline description of an acoustic monitoring system which has been installed on the SGU of the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay with the objective of giving early warning of any change in noise output which could be related to potentially damaging vibrations within the units. Data obtained from this PFR monitoring system is playing an important part in the development of acoustic instrumentation for leak detection although this had not been the primary objective of this particular installation. The PFR has three secondary circuits each containing an evaporator, a superheater and a reheater giving a total of nine SGUs. Although the design of the units is different from that intended for EFR, the measurements provide a valuable source of information on the character and amplitude of acoustic background noise in operational steam generator units. The vibration monitoring system uses the waveguides originally installed during reactor commissioning for leak detection studies. Twelve acoustic waveguides are fitted to the shell of each of the units. The superheaters and reheaters have three waveguides at each of four axial levels, while the evaporators have four waveguides at each of three axial levels. In addition the evaporators have a small number of waveguides attached to the top flange of the unit. Each waveguide is fitted with an accelerometer to record the acoustic signal from the SGU. Tape recordings of the acoustic noise from each unit are made on a regular basis and the tapes analysed on an automated analysis system which has been developed to extract and store in a database about 20 characteristic features from the data. The paper gives examples of the background noise from the SGU. The data demonstrates the use of location techniques to identify prominent acoustic source. 8 figs

  7. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  8. ONKALO POSE experiment. Phase 3: acoustic and ultrasonic monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Montes, J.; Flynn, W.; Huang, J.

    2014-01-01

    increase in rock stiffness and deformation is observed during the heating phase. After the heaters were switched off, values for both parameters return to background levels for all raypaths except for those skimming the hole wall, where values remain lower than the background level, indicating a permanent deformation and change in rock stiffness in the near vicinity of the hole wall. A similar trend is observed at shallow depth levels, down to a depth of 3.7 m, indicating permanent deformation and rock softening. A total of 609 Acoustic Emission events were located during the monitoring period, using a layered velocity model based on weekly analysis of the velocity surveys. Peak activity was recorded during the heating phase of the experiment. Average location magnitudes increased during the monitoring period. Magnitude distribution showed high b-values during the heating period, followed by low b-values and relatively higher magnitudes observed after the switching-off of the heaters, indicating of coalescence and development of the microfractures induced during the heating phase. (orig.)

  9. A New Fault Location Approach for Acoustic Emission Techniques in Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Quiterio Gómez Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The renewable energy industry is undergoing continuous improvement and development worldwide, wind energy being one of the most relevant renewable energies. This industry requires high levels of reliability, availability, maintainability and safety (RAMS for wind turbines. The blades are critical components in wind turbines. The objective of this research work is focused on the fault detection and diagnosis (FDD of the wind turbine blades. The FDD approach is composed of a robust condition monitoring system (CMS and a novel signal processing method. CMS collects and analyses the data from different non-destructive tests based on acoustic emission. The acoustic emission signals are collected applying macro-fiber composite (MFC sensors to detect and locate cracks on the surface of the blades. Three MFC sensors are set in a section of a wind turbine blade. The acoustic emission signals are generated by breaking a pencil lead in the blade surface. This method is used to simulate the acoustic emission due to a breakdown of the composite fibers. The breakdown generates a set of mechanical waves that are collected by the MFC sensors. A graphical method is employed to obtain a system of non-linear equations that will be used for locating the emission source. This work demonstrates that a fiber breakage in the wind turbine blade can be detected and located by using only three low cost sensors. It allows the detection of potential failures at an early stages, and it can also reduce corrective maintenance tasks and downtimes and increase the RAMS of the wind turbine.

  10. Improvements to Passive Acoustic Tracking Methods for Marine Mammal Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-02

    separate and associate calls from individual animals . Marine mammal; Passive acoustic monitoring; Localization; Tracking; Multiple source; Sparse array...position and hydrophone timing offset in addition to animal position Almost all marine mammal tracking methods treat animal position as the only unknown...Workshop on Detection, Classification and Localization (DCL) of Marine Mammals). The animals were expected to be relatively close to the surface

  11. A Flexible Acoustic Sensor Network for Various Monitoring Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Wessels, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring using a sensor network is a powerful instrument to assess and manage complex noise situations. It can provide a basis to identify appropriate and cost effective measures, and to assess their effect by comparing before and after implementation. It can also be an instrument for

  12. Acoustic monitoring of a fluidized bed coating process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naelapaa, Kaisa; Veski, Peep; Pedersen, Joan G.

    2007-01-01

      The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of acoustic monitoring of a production scale fluidized bed coating process. The correlation between sensor signals and the estimated amount of film applied and percentage release, respectively, were investigated in coating potassium chloride...

  13. Investigation and Characterization of Acoustic Emissions of Tornadoes Using Arrays of Infrasound Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, W. G.; Talmadge, C. L.; Waxler, R.; Knupp, K. R.; Goudeau, B.; Hetzer, C. H.

    2017-12-01

    Working in co-ordination with the NOAA Vortex Southeast (Vortex SE) research program, 9 infrasound sensor arrays were deployed at fixed sites across North Alabama, South-central Tennessee, and Northwest Georgia during March and April of 2017, to investigate the emission and characterization of infrasonic acoustic energy from tornadoes and related phenomena. Each array consisted of seven broadband acoustic sensors with calibrated frequency response from 0.02 Hz to 200 Hz. The arrays were configured in a pattern such that accurate bearings to acoustic sources could be obtained over a broad range of frequencies (nominally from 1 Hz to 100 Hz). Data were collected synchronously at a rate of 1000 samples per second. On 22 April 2017 a line of strong storms passed directly through the area being monitored producing at least three verified tornadoes. Two of these were rated at EF0 and the other an EF1. Subsequent processing of the data from several of the arrays revealed acoustic emissions from the tornadic storms ranging in frequencies below 1 Hz to frequencies greater than 10 Hz. Accurate bearings to the storms have been calculated from distances greater than 60 km. Preliminary analysis has revealed that continuous emissions occurred prior to the estimated touchdown times, while the storms were on the ground, and for short periods after the tornadoes lifted; however, the strongest emissions appeared to occur while the storms were on the ground. One of the storms passed near two arrays simultaneously, and therefore accurate an accurate track of the storm as it moved has been obtained only using the infrasound measurements. Initial results from the analysis of the infrasound data will be presented. Under Vortex SE meteorological data was collected on a large suite of sensors. Correlations between the infrasound data and the meteorological data will be investigated and discussed.

  14. Prediction of Fatigue Crack Growth in Gas Turbine Engine Blades Using Acoustic Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiheng; Yang, Guoan; Hu, Kun

    2018-04-25

    Fatigue failure is the main type of failure that occurs in gas turbine engine blades and an online monitoring method for detecting fatigue cracks in blades is urgently needed. Therefore, in this present study, we propose the use of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring for the online identification of the blade status. Experiments on fatigue crack propagation based on the AE monitoring of gas turbine engine blades and TC11 titanium alloy plates were conducted. The relationship between the cumulative AE hits and the fatigue crack length was established, before a method of using the AE parameters to determine the crack propagation stage was proposed. A method for predicting the degree of crack propagation and residual fatigue life based on the AE energy was obtained. The results provide a new method for the online monitoring of cracks in the gas turbine engine blade.

  15. Statistics of the acoustic emission signals parameters from Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveto, Maria E.; Lopez Pumarega, Maria I.; Ruzzante, Jose E.

    2000-01-01

    Statistic analysis of acoustic emission signals parameters: amplitude, duration and risetime was carried out. CANDU type Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings were pressurized up to rupture, one set of five normal pieces and six with defects included, acoustic emission was used on-line. Amplitude and duration frequency distributions were fitted with lognormal distribution functions, and risetime with an exponential one. Using analysis of variance, acoustic emission was appropriated to distinguish between defective and non-defective subsets. Clusters analysis applied on mean values of acoustic emission signal parameters were not effective to distinguish two sets of fuel claddings studied. (author)

  16. Acoustic emission characterization of the tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, D.R.; Arora, A.

    1983-01-01

    The processes accompanying the tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia (ZrO 2 ) have been studied using acoustic emission and electron microscopy in an attempt to characterize the different mechanisms by which the transformation can be accommodated in bulk materials. Experiments in which the acoustic emission is detected as specimens are cooled through the transformation, following densification by sintering, are described. For comparison, the acoustic emission from free, nominally unconstrained powders similarly cooled through the transformation is reported. The existence of distinct processes accompanying the phase transformation is established on the basis of postexperiment multiparametric correlation analysis of the acoustic emission

  17. Acoustic emission: a bibliography for 1970--1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouillard, T.F.

    1975-01-01

    The bibliography includes nearly all references in the literature on acoustic emission published during the three-year period, 1970 through 1972. Included in the 412 references are several for each of the associated technologies including: signature analysis, boiling detection, cavitation, leak detection, seismology, and rock mechanics. Information has also been obtained from eight abstracting and indexing services searched in compiling the bibliography. The bibliography has been arranged alphabetically by author and is cross referenced with a list of approximately 400 authors. Also included is a subject index. Technical articles listed were published in some 90 different journals and in 8 different languages. (U.S.)

  18. Magneto acoustical emission in nanocrystalline Mn–Zn ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveena, K.; Murthty, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Mn 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 powders were prepared by microwave hydrothermal method. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope. The powders were sintered at different temperatures 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C/30 min using microwave sintering method. The grain size was estimated by scanning electron microscope. The room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties were studied in the frequency range (100 kHz–1.8 GHz). The magnetization properties were measured upto 1.5 T. The acoustic emission has been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie temperature. It is found that the magneto-acoustic emission (MAE) activity along hysteresis loop is proportional to the hysteresis losses during the same loop. This law has been verified on series of polycrystalline ferrites and found that the law is valid whatever the composition, the grain size and temperature. It is also found that the domain wall creation/or annihilation processes are the origin of the MAE. - Highlights: • The AE been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie temperature. • The MAE activity along hysteresis loop is proportional to P h during the same loop. • It is found that the domain wall creation/or annihilation processes are the origin of the MAE. - Abstract: Mn 0.4 Zn 0.6 Fe 2 O 4 powders were prepared by microwave hydrothermal method. The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope. The powders were sintered at different temperatures 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C/30 min using microwave sintering method. The grain size was estimated by scanning electron microscope. The room temperature dielectric and magnetic properties were studied in the frequency range (100 kHz–1.8 GHz). The magnetization properties were measured upto 1.5 T. The acoustic emission has been measured along the hysteresis loops from 80 K to Curie temperature. It is found that the magneto-acoustic

  19. Background noise of acoustic emission signals in sodium piping loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Y.; Aoki, K.; Kuribayashi, K.; Kishi, T.; Sakakibara, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Background noise measurement in the frequency range of acoustic emission (AE) signals was made on the sodium piping loops of a 50 MW steam generator test facility in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). During the dynamic characteristics test of the steam generator over a wide range of operating conditions, the background noise generated on the pipe surface was measured using wideband AE sensor externally mounted with waveguide. Data were obtained for the effect of power loads of steam generator on both amplitude and frequency spectra of background noise signals. Source and nature of background noise were established

  20. Acoustic emission mechanism at switching of ferroelectric crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, V.V.; Morozova, G.P.; Serdobol'skaya, O.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    Process of acoustic emission (AE) in lead germanate (PGO) representing pure ferroelectric, and gadolinium molybdate (GMO) representing ferroelectric-ferroelastic, for which switching may be conducted both by the field and pressure, were studied. A conclusion has been drawn that piezoelectric excitation of a crystal from the surface by pulses of overpolarization current in the process of domain coalescence is the main AE source in PGO. Not only piezoresponse, but also direct sound generation in the moment of domain penetration and collapse is considered as AE mechanism in GMO

  1. Acoustic emission mechanism at switching of ferroelectric crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, V V; Morozova, G P; Serdobol' skaya, O Yu

    1986-01-01

    Process of acoustic emission (AE) in lead germanate (PGO) representing pure ferroelectric, and gadolinium molybdate (GMO) representing ferroelectric-ferroelastic, for which switching may be conducted both by the field and pressure, were studied. A conclusion has been drawn that piezoelectric excitation of a crystal from the surface by pulses of overpolarization current in the process of domain coalescence is the main AE source in PGO. Not only piezoresponse, but also direct sound generation in the moment of domain penetration and collapse is considered as AE mechanism in GMO.

  2. Acoustic monitoring to support plant life extension at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wit, M. de; Hovhanessian, G.

    2015-01-01

    Tensioned steel wires are widely used in civil engineering structures. They can, however, be vulnerable to corrosion. To reduce the probability of corrosion, sophisticated protection systems are used. Extensive inspection and maintenance regimes are also able to be implemented to confirm that the design strength is available over the lifetime of the wires. These regimes include tests to confirm the condition of post-tensioning cables or stay cables, which can verify the overall performance of the structure. This paper presents a technology to detect and locate wire failures in tensioned cables for use on a wide variety of pre-stressed or post tensioned structures, where they have increased confidence in the structures and reduced maintenance costs. This methodology is the continuous acoustic monitoring technology which uses distinctive acoustic characteristics of wire breaks to separate them from other acoustic activity on the structure. With a combination of instrumentation, data acquisition and data management, it is possible to identify a wire break event, as well as to locate the position and time of the failure. Over 10 years' experience of acoustic monitoring for this application with several independent and blind tests, shows that even in noisy environments the acoustic monitoring method is able to identify and locate wire breaks in fully grouted and partially grouted tendons, stay cables and suspension cables. The design (number of sensors and location) is very important to be sure to cover all wires in the structure. This paper explains the principles of the systems and shows them in practice on a case study of a project in a pre-stressed roof structure of an active tank farm at Sellafield site

  3. Structure Integrity Testing of Mineral Feed by Means of Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Začal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with specific method of non-destructive testing – Acoustic emission (AE. Theoretical part of article is focused on underlying principle of this method and its applicability. The experimental part is focused on research of pressure resistance in mineral feed using the AE. Mineral feed is condensed cube of rock salt (sodium chloride with supplementary minerals, which is fed to livestock and game to supply the mineral elements necessary for their health and condition. Using the AE sensor is possible to provide monitoring of internal changes in the material. AE gives the overview of internal changes in material structure. With use of specific software we can interpret the acoustic signal and identify the current state of material integrity in real time.

  4. Investigating deformation processes in AM60 magnesium alloy using the acoustic emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, K.; Chmelik, F.; Janecek, M.; Hadzima, B.; Trojanova, Z.; Lukac, P.

    2006-01-01

    Microstructure changes in an AM60 magnesium alloy were monitored using the acoustic emission (AE) technique during tensile tests in the temperature range from 20 to 300 deg. C. The correlation of the AE signal and the deformation processes is discussed. It is shown, using transmission electron and light microscopy, that the character of the AE response is associated with various modes of mechanical twinning at lower temperatures, whereas at higher temperatures also the influence of non-basal dislocations on the AE response must be taken into account

  5. Size Effect on Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Coal-Rock Damage Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Zhijie; Wang, Xiao; Chen, Lianjun; Lin, Guan; Zhang, Hualei

    2017-01-01

    Coal-gas outburst, rock burst, and other mine dynamic disasters are closely related to the instability and failure of coal-rock. Coal-rock is the assemblies of mineral particles of varying sizes and shapes bonded together by cementing materials. The damage and rupture process of coal-rock is accompanied by acoustic emission (AE), which can be used as an effective means to monitor and predict the instability of coal-rock body. In this manuscript, considering the size effect of coal-rock, the i...

  6. An overview of development and application of acoustic emission methods in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutten, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Beneficial uses being made of acoustic emission (AE) technology for flaw or fault detection both inside of and outside of the nuclear industry tend to be obscured by some of the earlier disappointing efforts to utilize the technology. The objective of this paper is to counter that tendency by providing an overview of a variety of AE applications being made in the United States. In addition to nuclear power applications, the paper discusses applications in other nuclear areas, fossil power plant applications, and other industrial uses including aircraft monitoring. Major AE research and development programs in progress in the United States are also summarized. (orig.)

  7. On the state of acoustic emission analysis in pressure vessel and model vessel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgner, W.; Theis, K.; Henke, F.; Imhof, D.

    1985-01-01

    In the GDR acoustic emission analysis is being applied primarily in connection with hydraulic pressure testing of vessels in chemical industry. It is, however, also used for testing and monitoring of equipment and components in other branches of industry. The state-of-the-art is presented with regard to equipment needed, training of personnel, licensing of testing methods and appropriate testing procedures. In particular, the evaluation of the sum curves and amplitude distributions is explained, using rupture tests of two oxygen cylinders and a compressed-air bottle as examples. (author)

  8. Acoustic emission as a screening tool for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojard, Greg; Goberman, Dan; Holowczak, John

    2017-02-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are composite materials with ceramic fibers in a high temperature matrix of ceramic or glass-ceramic. This emerging class of materials is viewed as enabling for efficiency improvements in many energy conversion systems. The key controlling property of ceramic matrix composites is a relatively weak interface between the matrix and the fiber that aids crack deflection and fiber pullout resulting in greatly increased toughness over monolithic ceramics. United Technologies Research Center has been investigating glass-ceramic composite systems as a tool to understand processing effects on material performance related to the performance of the weak interface. Changes in the interface have been shown to affect the mechanical performance observed in flexural testing and subsequent microstructural investigations have confirmed the performance (or lack thereof) of the interface coating. Recently, the addition of acoustic emission testing during flexural testing has aided the understanding of the characteristics of the interface and its performance. The acoustic emission onset stress changes with strength and toughness and this could be a quality tool in screening the material before further development and use. The results of testing and analysis will be shown and additional material from other ceramic matrix composite systems may be included to show trends.

  9. Evaluation on damage of pipe using ultrasonic and acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Sang Pill; Lee, Moon Hee [Dongeui Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joon Hyun [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    An elastic waves like ultrasonic and acoustic emission were used to evaluate the propagating properties of the wave in pipe, and study on mode conversion of the elastic wave due to the defects on the pipe was performed. In this study an Acoustic Emission (AE) sensor was used to receive the propagated ultrasonic wave. AE technique has a advantage that it can identify the received ultrasonic wave by the analysis of the AE parameters such as count, energy, frequency, duration time and amplitude. For transmitting and receiving of the wave, an universal angle wedge was manufactured. The optimum angles for transmitting of ultrasonic wave and signal receiving at the attached AE sensor on the pipe were determined. Theoretical dispersion curve was compared with the results of the time-frequency analysis based on the wavelet transformation. The received modes showed a good agreement with theoretical one. The used ultrasonic sensor was 1MHz, and AE sensor was broadband. The artificial cracks were induced in the pipe to measure the propagation characteristics of the elastic wave for the cracks. AE parameters for the received signals were also varied with the crack types in the pipe. AE parameters of amplitude and duration time were more effective factors than the analysis of mode conversion for evaluation of the cracks in the pipe.

  10. Automated valve fault detection based on acoustic emission parameters and support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah M. Ali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocating compressors are one of the most used types of compressors with wide applications in industry. The most common failure in reciprocating compressors is always related to the valves. Therefore, a reliable condition monitoring method is required to avoid the unplanned shutdown in this category of machines. Acoustic emission (AE technique is one of the effective recent methods in the field of valve condition monitoring. However, a major challenge is related to the analysis of AE signal which perhaps only depends on the experience and knowledge of technicians. This paper proposes automated fault detection method using support vector machine (SVM and AE parameters in an attempt to reduce human intervention in the process. Experiments were conducted on a single stage reciprocating air compressor by combining healthy and faulty valve conditions to acquire the AE signals. Valve functioning was identified through AE waveform analysis. SVM faults detection model was subsequently devised and validated based on training and testing samples respectively. The results demonstrated automatic valve fault detection model with accuracy exceeding 98%. It is believed that valve faults can be detected efficiently without human intervention by employing the proposed model for a single stage reciprocating compressor. Keywords: Condition monitoring, Faults detection, Signal analysis, Acoustic emission, Support vector machine

  11. Acoustic emission by self-organising effects of micro-hollow cathode discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotschate, Daniel; Gaal, Mate; Kersten, Holger

    2018-04-01

    We designed micro-hollow cathode discharge prototypes under atmospheric pressure and investigated their acoustic characteristics. For the acoustic model of the discharge, we correlated the self-organisation effect of the current density distribution with the ideal model of an acoustic membrane. For validation of the obtained model, sound particle velocity spectroscopy was used to detect and analyse the acoustic emission experimentally. The results have shown a behaviour similar to the ideal acoustic membrane. Therefore, the acoustic excitation is decomposable into its eigenfrequencies and predictable. The model was unified utilising the gas exhaust velocity caused by the electrohydrodynamic force. The results may allow a contactless prediction of the current density distribution by measuring the acoustic emission or using the micro-discharge as a tunable acoustic source for specific applications as well.

  12. Investigation into some regularities in acoustic emission during deformation of the 16 GNMA steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelyshev, N.A.; Chervov, G.A.; Petrov, V.I.; Yakovenko, V.S.; Kazakov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    A device with variable band of transmission and regulated width of emission band (3-20 kHz) is the most optimal variant of acoustic emission recorder. Change of signal registration frequency of acoustic emission results in change of both qualitative and quantitative peculiarities of summary emission during deformation. A zone of elastic deformation transition to elastic-plastic for the given steel is well marked out according to the data of summary acoustic emission and intensity of signals. Application of devices with variable registration frequency requires usage of wide-band transformers [ru

  13. Damage Detection Method of Wind Turbine Blade Using Acoustic Emission Signal Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Byeong Hee; Yoon, Dong JIn [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Seience, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Acoustic emission(AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect any further growth or expansion of preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this kind of technique, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures like a huge wind turbine blade. Therefore, it is required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. In this study, a new damage location method has been proposed by using signal napping algorithm, and an experimental verification is conducted by using small wind turbine blade specimen: a part of 750 kW real blade. The results show that this new signal mapping method has high advantages such as a flexibility for sensor location, improved accuracy, high detectability. The newly proposed method was compared with traditional AE source location method based on arrival time difference

  14. Computer-assisted acoustic emission analysis in alternating current magnetization and hardness testing of reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blochwitz, M.; Kretzschmar, F.; Rattke, R.

    1985-01-01

    Non-destructive determination of material characteristics such as nilductility transition temperature is of high importance in component monitoring during long-term operation. An attempt has been made to obtain characteristics correlating with mechanico-technological material characteristics by both acoustic resonance through magnetization (ARDM) and acoustic emission analysis in Vickers hardness tests. Taking into account the excitation mechanism of acoustic emission generation, which has a quasistationary stochastic character in a.c. magnetization and a transient nature in hardness testing, a microcomputerized device has been constructed for frequency analysis of the body sound level in ARDM evaluation and for measuring the pulse sum and/or pulse rate during indentation of the test specimen in hardness evaluation. Prerequisite for evaluating the measured values is the knowledge of the frequency dependence of the sensors and the instrument system. The results obtained are presented. (author)

  15. Variations in frequency content of acoustic emission during extension of HF-1 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, W.F.; Kline, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emissions resulting from continuous, dead-weight, tensile loading of quenched and tempered HF-1 steel were analyzed for frequency content. Three distinct frequency spectra were observed. These correspond to microplasticity, plasticity and deformation after recovery. It is shown that frequency analysis of acoustic emission can be a sensitive evaluation technique for assessing structural integrity

  16. Coating adherence in galvanized steel assessed by acoustic emission wavelet analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, Antolino; Gil, Jose F.; Vico, Juan M.; Ruzzante, Jose E.; Piotrkowski, Rosa

    2005-01-01

    Coating-substrate adherence in galvanized steel is evaluated by acoustic emission wavelet analysis in scratch tests on hot-dip galvanized samples. The acoustic emission results are compared with optical and electron microscopy observations in order to understand coating features related to adherence and to establish criteria aimed at improving the manufacture process

  17. Changes in oto-acoustic emissions after exposure to live music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte; Voetmann, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Distortion Product Oto-acoustic Emissions (DPOAE) and Transient Evoked Oto-acoustic Emissions (TEOAE) were measured in subjects before and after attendance to live music. The changes measured were compared to the exposure levels measured at the position of the subject. The main objectives...

  18. Acoustical monitoring of diesel engines in reverberant environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mein, M.

    1995-10-01

    The feed-back knowledge of emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants shows that some malfunctions, mainly affecting fuel-injection or distribution system of the engine can be heard and detected by experienced maintenance agents. This study consists in the feasibility,v of acoustical monitoring of those diesel engines, taking into account the reverberant environment of the machine. The operating cycle of the diesel is composed of transient events (injection, combustion, valve closure...) which generate highly non stationary acoustical signals. The detection of a malfunction appearing on such transients requires the use of adapted signal processing techniques. Visual analysis of the phenomena is first proceeded using time-frequency and time-scale representations. The second step will be parametric modeling of acoustical signatures for the extraction of characteristic parameters, in order to characterize the fault and to use an automatic classification system. The lest part of the study will concern the evaluation of the robustness of the detection methods in regard to acoustical reverberation. (author). 10 refs., 6 figs

  19. An acoustic sensor for monitoring airflow in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscher, Thomas; Wicks Phd, Alexandrina; Muelenaer Md, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Without proper monitoring, patients with artificial airways in the trachea are at high risk for complications or death. Despite routine maintenance of the tube, dislodged or copious mucus can obstruct the airway. Young children ( 3yrs) have difficulty tending to their own tubes and are particularly vulnerable to blockages. They require external respiratory sensors. In a hospital environment, ventilators, end-tidal CO2 monitors, thermistors, and other auxiliary equipment provide sufficient monitoring of respiration. However, outpatient monitoring methods, such as thoracic impedance and pulse oximetry, are indirect and prone to false positives. Desensitization of caregivers to frequent false alarms has been cited in medical literature as a contributing factor in cases of child death. Ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) is a technique used in specialized industrial applications to non-invasively measure liquid and gas flow. Two transducers are oriented at a diagonal across a flow channel. Velocity measurement is accomplished by detecting slight variations in transit time of contra-propagating acoustic signals with a directional component parallel to air flow. Due to the symmetry of acoustic pathway between sensors, velocity measurements are immune to partial fouling in the tube from mucus, saliva, and condensation. A first generation proof of concept prototype was constructed to evaluate the ultrasonic TOF technique for medical tracheostomy monitoring. After successful performance, a second generation prototype was designed with a smaller form factor and more advanced electronics. This prototype was tested and found to measure inspired volume with a root-mean-square error < 2% during initial trials.

  20. Monitoring of drilling process with the application of acoustic signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaš Milan

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of rock disintegration process at drilling, scanning of input quantities: thrust F, revolution n and the course of some output quantities: the drilling rate v and the power input P are needed for the control of this process. We can calculate the specific volume work of rock disintegration w and ϕ - quotient of drilling rate v and the specific volume work of disintegration w from the presented quantities.Works on an expertimental stand showed that the correlation relationships between the input and output quantities can be found by scanning the accompanying sound of the drilling proces.Research of the rock disintegration with small-diameter diamond drill tools and different rock types is done at the Institute of Geotechnics. The aim of this research is the possibility of monitoring and controlling the rock disintegration process with the application of acoustic signal. The acoustic vibrations accompanying the drilling process are recorded by a microphone placed in a defined position in the acoustic space. The drilling device (drilling stand, the drilling tool and the rock are the source of sound. Two basic sound states exist in the drilling stand research : the noise at no-load running and the noise at the rotary drilling of rock. Suitable quantities for optimizing the rock disintegration process are searched by the study of the acoustic signal. The dominant frequencies that characterize the disintegration process for the given rock and tool are searched by the analysis of the acoustic signal. The analysis of dominant frequencies indicates the possibility of determining an optimal regime for the maximal drilling rate. Extreme of the specific disintegration energy is determinated by the dispersion of the dominant frequency.The scanned acoustic signal is processed by the Fourier transformation. The Fourier transformation facilitates the distribution of the general non-harmonic periodic process into harmonic components. The harmonic

  1. Use of information system data of jet crushing acoustic monitoring for the process management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Bulanaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The graphic interpretation of amplitude and frequency of acoustic signals of loose material jet grinding process are resulted. Criteria of process management is determined on the basis of the acoustic monitoring data of jet mill acting.

  2. Testing of acoustic emission method during pressure tests of WWER-440 steam generators and pressurizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerfl, K.; Crha, J.

    1987-01-01

    The results are discussed of measuring acoustic emission in output pressure testing of steam generators and pressurizers for WWER-440 reactors. The objective of the measurements was to test the reproducibility of measurements and to find the criterion which would be used in assessing the condition of the components during manufacture and in operation. The acoustic emission was measured using a single-channel Dunegan/Endevco apparatus and a 16-channel LOCAMAT system. The results showed that after the first assembly, during a repeat dismantle of the lids and during seal replacement, processes due to seal contacts and bolt and washer deformations were the main source of acoustic emission. A procedure was defined of how to exclude new acoustic emission sources in such cases. The acoustic emission method can be used for the diagnostics of plastic deformation processes or of crack production and propagation in components during service. (Z.M.)

  3. Helium gas purity monitor based on low frequency acoustic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Jacob, S.; Karunanithi, R.; Karthikeyan, A.

    1996-05-01

    Monitoring gas purity is an important aspect of gas recovery stations where air is usually one of the major impurities. Purity monitors of Katherometric type are commercially available for this purpose. Alternatively, we discuss here a helium gas purity monitor based on acoustic resonance of a cavity at audio frequencies. It measures the purity by monitoring the resonant frequency of a cylindrical cavity filled with the gas under test and excited by conventional telephone transducers fixed at the ends. The use of the latter simplifies the design considerably. The paper discusses the details of the resonant cavity and the electronic circuit along with temperature compensation. The unit has been calibrated with helium gas of known purities. The unit has a response time of the order of 10 minutes and measures the gas purity to an accuracy of 0.02%. The unit has been installed in our helium recovery system and is found to perform satisfactorily.

  4. System for detecting acoustic emissions in multianvil experiments: Application to deep seismicity in the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Haemyeong; Fei Yingwei; Silver, Paul G.; Green, Harry W.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major goals in the experimental study of deep earthquakes is to identify slip instabilities at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) that might be responsible for the occurrence of earthquakes. Detecting acoustic emissions from a specimen during faulting provides unique constraints on the instability process. There are few experimental studies reporting acoustic emissions under HPHT conditions, due to technical challenges. And those studies have used only one or at most two acoustic sensors during the experiments. Such techniques preclude the accurate location of the acoustic emission source region and thus the ability to distinguish real signal from noise that may be coming from outside the sample. We have developed a system for detecting acoustic emissions at HPHT. Here we present a four-channel acoustic emission detecting system working in the HPHT octahedral multianvil apparatus. Each channel has high resolution (12 bits) and a sampling rate of 30 MHz. In experiments at the pressures up to 6 GPa and temperatures up to 770 deg. C, we have observed acoustic emissions under various conditions. Analyzing these signals, we are able to show that this system permits us to distinguish between signal and noise, locate the source of the acoustic emission, and obtain reliable data on the radiation pattern. This system has greatly improved our ability to study faulting instabilities under high pressure and high temperature

  5. Preliminary study of acoustic emission (ae) noise signal identification for crude oil storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Ain Ahmad Latif; Shukri Mohd

    2008-08-01

    This preliminary work was carried out to simulate the Acoustic Emission (AE) signal contributed by pitting corrosion, and noise signal from environment during crude oil storage tanks monitoring. The purpose of this study is to prove that acoustic emission (AE) could be used to detect the formation of pitting corrosion in the crude oil storage tank and differentiated it from other sources of noise signal. In this study, the pitting corrosion was simulated by inducing low voltage and low amperage current onto the crude oil storage tank material (ASTM 516 G 70). Water drop, air blow and surface rubbing were applied onto the specimen surface. To simulate the noise signal produce by rain fall, wind blow and other sources of noise during AE crude oil storage tanks monitoring. AE sensor was attached onto the other surface of specimen to acquire all of these AE signals which then has send to AE DiSP 24 data acquisition system for signal conditioning. AE win software has been used to analyse this entire signal. It is found that, simulated pitting corrosion could be detected by AE system and differentiated from other sources of noise by using amplitude analysis. From the amplitude analysis is shown that 20-30 dB is the range amplitude for the blow test, 50-60 dB for surface rubbing test and over than 60 dB for water drop test. (Author)

  6. Study of brittle crack jump rate using acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasnij, P.V.; Pokrovskij, V.V.; Strizhalo, V.A.; Dobrovol'skij, Yu.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new peocedure is elaborated to detect brittle jumps of small length (0.1...5mm) occuring both inside the specimen and along the crack front under static and cyclic loading using the phenomena of acoustic emission (AE). Recording of the crack start and stop moments with an AE sensor as well as evaluation of the brittle crack jump length by the after-failure specimen fracture make it possible to find the mean crack propagation rate. Experimental dependences are obtained for the crack propagation rate with a brittle crack jump in steel 15Kh2MFA (σ B =1157 MPa, σ 0.2 =100 MPa) at 293 K and under cyclic loading as a function of the jump length and also as a function of the critical stress intensity factor K jc i corresponding to the crack jump

  7. Laser method of acoustical emission control from vibrating surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motyka, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    For limitation of the noise in environment, the necessity occurs of determining and location of sources of sounds emitted from surfaces of many machines and devices, assuring in effect the possibility of suitable constructional changes implementation, targeted at decreasing of their nuisance. In the paper, the results of tests and calculations are presented for plane surface sources emitting acoustic waves. The tests were realized with the use of scanning laser vibrometer which enabled remote registration and the spectral analysis of the surfaces vibrations. The known hybrid digital method developed for determination of sound wave emission from such surfaces divided into small finite elements was slightly modified by distinguishing the phase correlations between such vibrating elements. The final method being developed may find use in wide range of applications for different forms of vibrations of plane surfaces.

  8. ANALYSIS OF CHIP FORMATION DURING HARD TURNING THROUGH ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Neslušan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analysis of chip formation and related aspects of the chip formation during turning hardened steel 100Cr6. The paper draws a comparison of some aspects of the chip formation between turning annealed and hardened roll bearing steel. The results of the analysis show that there is the formation of a segmented chip in the case of hard turning. Frequency of segmentation is very high. A conventional piezoelectric dynamometer limits the frequency response to about 3.5 kHz. On the other hand, the frequency of process fluctuation may by obtained by using accelerometers or acoustic emission. This paper reports about the dynamic character of cutting process when hard turning and correlation among the calculated segmentation frequencies and the experimental analysis.

  9. Acoustic emission diagnosis of concrete-piles damaged by earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotami, Tomoki; Sakaino, Norio; Ohtsu, Masayasu; Shigeishi, Mitsuhiro

    1997-01-01

    Earthquakes often impose unexpected damage on structures. Concerning the soundness of the structure, the upper portion is easily estimated by visual observation, while the lower portion located in deep underground is difficult to be estimated. Thus there exist few effective methods to investigate underground structures. In this paper, a new inspection technique for damage evaluation of concrete-piles utilizing acoustic emission (AE) is proposed, and is verified by a series of experiments. Firstly, such basic characteristics as the attenuation and effective wave-guides for detecting AE underground, are examined through laboratory tests. Secondary, fracture tests of full-scale prefabricated concrete piles are conducted, and the characteristics of the AE are examined. Finally, actual concrete-piles attacked by the 1995 Great Hanshin Earthquake are investigated. Results confirm that the estimated damages by the proposed method are in good agreement with actual damaged locations. Thus, the method is very effective for the diagnosis of the concrete-piles.

  10. Qualitative internal surface roughness classification using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizi Zohari; Mohd Hanif Saad

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes a novel new nondestructive method of qualitative internal surface roughness classification for pipes utilizing Acoustic Emission (AE) signal. Two different flowrate are introduced in a pipe obstructed using normally available components (e.g.: valve). The AE signal at suitable location from the obstruction are obtained and the peak amplitudes, RMS amplitude and energy of the AE signal are obtained. A dimensionless number, the Bangi Number, AB, is then calculated as a ratio of the AE parameters (peak amplitude, RMS amplitude or energy) in low flowrate measurement compared to the AE parameters in high flowrate measurement. It was observed that the Bangi Number, AB obtained can then be used to successfully discriminate between rough and smooth internal surface roughness. (author)

  11. Modeling of karst deformation and analysis of acoustic emission during sinkhole formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeev, R. A.; Stefanov, Yu. P.; Duchkov, A. A.; Myasnikov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the fracture pattern and formation of a sinkhole are estimated depending on the rock properties. The possibility of using geophysical methods for recording and analyzing acoustic emission to monitor and predict the state of the medium is considered. The problem of deformation of the sedimentary cover over the growing karst cavity is solved on the basis of the elastoplastic Drucker-Prager-Nikolaevsky model and the equation of damage accumulation. The specified kinetics of accumulation of damages allows us to describe slow processes of degradation of the strength of the medium under stresses that are low for the development of inelastic deformations. The results are obtained for different values of the strength of karst rock; we show the influence of the kinetic parameters of damage accumulation on the shape of collapse depressions. We also model acoustic emission caused by the material fracture. One can follow different stages of the karst development by looking at patterns of cells which fail at a given time. Our observations show the relation between the intensity of material fracture and the intensity of seismic emission.

  12. The JET neutron emission profile monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.M.; Syme, D.B.; Watkins, N.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides a technical description of the neutron emission profile monitor as used routinely at the Joint European Torus (JET), and includes representative examples of its operational capabilities. The primary function of this instrument is to measure the neutron emission as a function of both position and time in a poloidal (vertical along major radius) section through the torus. For the first time the spatially localised effects of sawteeth (magnetic relaxation phenomena) have been observed using a neutron diagnostic. The total (global) neutron emission can be obtained from the profile monitor data by performing a volume integral over the plasma; the absolute neutron emission rates agree with those obtained from the JET time-resolved neutron monitor to within ±15%. This was the first such instrument routinely in use on any tokamak. It provides unique data which are independent of all other diagnostic measurements. (orig.)

  13. Application of acoustic emission testing to quality control: examples and forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumousseau, P.

    1979-01-01

    A several years experience to evaluate and promote acoustic emission in the field of mechanical industries has permitted to recognize the domains of industrial interest. The first is detection of defective parts according to emissivity. Examples concerning forged, cast or welded fabrications are presented. It is concluded that signal processing is decisive but that its sophistication must be graded according to the case considered. The second is control of welding process. Examples concerning submerged arc, TIG and electron-beam welds are analyzed. It appears that automatic control is chiefly possible for welding under vacuum or inert gaz conditions. The third is monitoring of pressure vessels during hydrotest or in-service. Problems concerning materials behaviour, wave propagation, location accuracy are reviewed. To conclude prospects of future development are evaluated. Via signal processing the most important progresses are needed in characterization of defect severity and life time prediction. Importance of improving transducer calibration and codifying methods is also outlined [fr

  14. Acoustic remote monitoring of rock and concrete structures for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    Excavation and thermally induced damage is of significance for many types of engineering structures but no more so than in the case of nuclear waste repository design. My research and that of my group, formally at Queen's University Canada and Keele University UK and now at the University of Liverpool UK, has focused on the development of acoustic techniques for the in situ detection and quantification of induced damage and fracturing. The application of earthquake seismology to this problem has provided the opportunity to study the micro mechanics of damage mechanisms in situ and provide validation data for predictive geomechanical models used for engineering design. Since 1987 I have been a principal investigator at Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), responsible for the development of acoustic emission techniques (AE). In the last twelve years, the application of acoustic techniques to rock damage assessment has been pioneered by my group at the URL and successfully applied in several other major international projects including the ZEDEX, Retrieval and Prototype repository experiments at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) of SKB Sweden. In this paper I describe what information is available by remote acoustic monitoring of rock and concrete structures and demonstrate this with reference to two international scientific experiments carried out at the URL Canada and the HRL Sweden. (author)

  15. Acoustic displacement sensor for harsh environment: application to SFR core support plate monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PeRISSE, J.; MACe, J.R.; VOUAGNER, P.

    2013-06-01

    The need for instrumentation able to monitor internal parameters inside reactor vessels during plant operation is getting stronger. Internal mechanical structures important for safety are concerned: for example core support plate, fuel assemblies or primary pumps. Because of very harsh environmental conditions (high temperature, pressure and radiation) and maintenance requirements, sensors are generally located on the outer shell of the vessel with, for example, strain gages, accelerometers, eddy current or US sensors. Then, some complex signal processing calculations must be performed to address internal structure behavior or health analysis but with bias effects (transfer path analysis method for example). This study will show an original displacement sensor based on an acoustic wave guide that can measure small displacement of mechanical structures inside reactor vessels. The application selected in this case is the monitoring of the core support plate for a sodium fast reactor (SFR). The wave guide - a thin tube sealed with pressurized argon gas inside - is installed inside the liquid sodium vessel (temperature between 400 deg. C to 550 deg. C). One extremity is connected to the mechanical structure for control. It includes two acoustic reflectors; such reflectors are dedicated to a calibration procedure to estimate the acoustic wave velocity whatever the temperature profile along the wave guide (velocity is temperature dependent). The opposite extremity of the wave guide is located outside the vessel and includes an emission/reception acoustic transducer. Using acoustic pulse reflectometry method, a plane wave pressure signal propagates inside the tube and reflects from the extremity and acoustic reflectors. The pulse-echo signals are recorded and processed in the frequency domain. Signal processing is performed to estimate the time of flight of pulse reflections patterns along the acoustic path. Then, monitored structure displacement - i.e. movement of the

  16. Analysis on the Acoustic Emission Signals in the Crack Evolution of Steam Generator Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jung Ho; Hur, Do Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of a defect in steam generator (SG) tube during plant operation can be classified into the stages of initiation and propagation. However, the detection and discrimination of these two stages are difficult, and the real time monitoring of the defect evolution in plant operation is impossible. Moreover, it was generally known that the commercial nondestructive examination techniques such as eddy current test(ECT) can detect the defect already grown up to the size of more than 40% in tube wall thickness. Therefore, the scope of the present study is to develop the fundamental technology for monitoring the degradation process from the initiation stage to the subsequent propagation stage by acoustic emission (AE) signal measurement

  17. Microstructure-Sensitive Investigation of Fracture Using Acoustic Emission Coupled With Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Brian; Cabal, Mike; Vanniamparambiland, Prashanth A.; Leser, William; Hochhalter, Jacob; Kontsos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring is proposed to investigate microstructure-sensitive fatigue and fracture of metals. The coupling between quasi in situ microscopy with actual in situ nondestructive evaluation falls into the ICME framework and the idea of quantitative data-driven characterization of material behavior. To validate the use of AE monitoring inside the SEM chamber, Aluminum 2024-B sharp notch specimen were tested both inside and outside the microscope using a small scale mechanical testing device. Subsequently, the same type of specimen was tested inside the SEM chamber. Load data were correlated with both AE information and observations of microcracks around grain boundaries as well as secondary cracks, voids, and slip bands. The preliminary results are in excellent agreement with similar findings at the mesoscale. Extensions of the application of this novel technique are discussed.

  18. Bearing Fault Detection Based on Empirical Wavelet Transform and Correlated Kurtosis by Acoustic Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheyu; Lin, Jing; Wang, Xiufeng; Xu, Xiaoqiang

    2017-05-24

    Rolling bearings are widely used in rotating equipment. Detection of bearing faults is of great importance to guarantee safe operation of mechanical systems. Acoustic emission (AE), as one of the bearing monitoring technologies, is sensitive to weak signals and performs well in detecting incipient faults. Therefore, AE is widely used in monitoring the operating status of rolling bearing. This paper utilizes Empirical Wavelet Transform (EWT) to decompose AE signals into mono-components adaptively followed by calculation of the correlated kurtosis (CK) at certain time intervals of these components. By comparing these CK values, the resonant frequency of the rolling bearing can be determined. Then the fault characteristic frequencies are found by spectrum envelope. Both simulation signal and rolling bearing AE signals are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the new method performs well in identifying bearing fault frequency under strong background noise.

  19. Leak Detection in Water-Filled Small-Diameter Polyethylene Pipes by Means of Acoustic Emission Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Martini; Marco Troncossi; Alessandro Rivola

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of effective strategies to manage leaks represents an essential goal for all utilities involved with drinking water supply in order to reduce water losses affecting urban distribution networks. This study concerns the early detection of leaks occurring in small-diameter customers’ connections to water supply networks. An experimental campaign was carried out in a test bed to investigate the sensitivity of Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring to water leaks. Damages were artifi...

  20. Intermittent flow under constant forcing: Acoustic emission from creep avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.; Liu, Hanlong; Jin, Linsen; Jiang, Deyi; Xiao, Yang; Jiang, Xiang

    2018-01-01

    While avalanches in field driven ferroic systems (e.g., Barkhausen noise), domain switching of martensitic nanostructures, and the collapse of porous materials are well documented, creep avalanches (avalanches under constant forcing) were never observed. Collapse avalanches generate particularly large acoustic emission (AE) signals and were hence chosen to investigate crackling noise under creep conditions. Piezoelectric SiO2 has a strong piezoelectric response even at the nanoscale so that we chose weakly bound SiO2 spheres in natural sandstone as a representative for the study of avalanches under time-independent, constant force. We found highly non-stationary crackling noise with four activity periods, each with power law distributed AE emission. Only the period before the final collapse shows the mean field behavior (ɛ near 1.39), in agreement with previous dynamic measurements at a constant stress rate. All earlier event periods show collapse with larger exponents (ɛ = 1.65). The waiting time exponents are classic with τ near 2.2 and 1.32. Creep data generate power law mixing with "effective" exponents for the full dataset with combinations of mean field and non-mean field regimes. We find close agreement with the predicted time-dependent fiber bound simulations, including events and waiting time distributions. Båth's law holds under creep conditions.

  1. Correlation analysis between ceramic insulator pollution and acoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamín Álvarez-Nasrallah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the studies related to insulator pollution are normally performed based on individual analysis among leakage current, relative humidity and equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD. This paper presents a correlation analysis between the leakage current and the acoustic emissions measured in a 230 kV electrical substations in the city of Barranquilla, Colombia. Furthermore, atmospheric variables were considered to develop a characterization model of the insulator contamination process. This model was used to demonstrate that noise emission levels are a reliable indicator to detect and characterize pollution on high voltage insulators. The correlation found amount the atmospheric, electrical and sound variables allowed to determine the relations for the maintenance of ceramic insulators in high-polluted areas. In this article, the results on the behavior of the leakage current in ceramic insulators and the sound produced with different atmospheric conditions are shown, which allow evaluating the best time to clean the insulator at the substation. Furthermore, by experimentation on site and using statistical models, the correlation between ambient variables and the leakage current of insulators in an electrical substation was obtained. Some of the problems that bring the external noise were overcome using multiple microphones and specialized software that enabled properly filter the sound and better measure the variables.

  2. Diagnostic method based on the analysis of vibration and acoustic emission. Monitoring of emergency diesel NPP Garona; Metodo de diagnostico basado en el analisis de vibraciones y emision acustica. Monitorizacion de los diesel de emergencia de CN Garano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paniagua, L.; Munoz, M.; Moreno, F.; Arroyo, J.; Monne, C.

    2014-04-01

    Maintenance Technicians, more and more, must dispose of predictive tools to diagnose the state of the equipment, especially if they are responsible for the emergency diesel in a Nuclear Power Plant. the use of these tools should be understood as a complement to more classic Preventive Maintenance of the equipment, thus increasing their availability because the parameters necessary for evaluating motor behaviour are taken while the engine is in operation. In this way, it facilitates the decision-making on whether to carry out certain preventive tasks. The basic information about this diagnostic tool presented in this article is based on the reading, recording and analysis of pressure, vibrations and acoustic emission in each engine cylinder during its operating cycle. A nice addition to the above diagnosis is carrying out and endoscopy of each cylinder, which enables the observation of: water leaks, injector leaks, the spraying of each injector, valve leaks,... etc. This article describes the fundamentals of a non-intrusive, easy to use and low cost tool, used to check the function of Emergency Diesel engines, as well as the experience of its use in the St. Maria Garona Nuclear Plant. The article also describes the case of a fault which occurred in the Nuclear Power plant in Garona that would hardly have been possible to detect by other means. This tool was developed jointly by the Engines Laboratory of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Zaragoza and the St. Maria Garona Nuclear Plant. It has been further improved, extended and optimized over the more than 10 years of its use. (Author)

  3. A guide to processing bat acoustic data for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Brian; Lausen, Cori; Loeb, Susan; Weller, Ted; Allen, Ryan; Britzke, Eric; Hohoff, Tara; Siemers, Jeremy; Burkholder, Braden; Herzog, Carl; Verant, Michelle

    2018-06-14

    The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) aims to improve the state of conservation science for all species of bats shared by the United States, Canada, and Mexico. To accomplish this goal, NABat offers guidance and standardized protocols for acoustic monitoring of bats. In this document, “A Guide to Processing Bat Acoustic Data for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat),” we provide general recommendations and specific workflows for the process of identifying bat species from acoustic files recorded using the NABat stationary point and mobile transect acoustic monitoring protocols.

  4. Mercury emission monitoring on municipal waste combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Gerig, A.

    1991-01-01

    In waste incineration, mercury is the only heavy metal to be released as a gas, mostly as mercury(II) chloride, because of its high volatility. Continuous emission monitoring is possible only when mercury occurs in its elemental form. This paper reports on various possibilities of converting Hg(II) into Hg(0) that has been studied and tested on a laboratory scale and in the TAMARA refuse incineration pilot facility. Continuous mercury emission measurement appears to be possible, provided mercury is converted in the flue gas condensate precipitated. The measuring results obtained on two municipal solid waste and on one sewage treatment sludge incineration plants show that the mercury monitor is a highly sensitive and selective continuously working instrument for mercury emission monitoring

  5. Acoustic emission test on a 25mm thick mild steel pressure vessel with inserted defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, P.G.; Dawson, D.G.; Hanley, D.J.; Kirby, N.

    1976-12-01

    Acoustic emission measurements have been taken on an experimental mild steel vessel with 4 inserted defects ranging in severity up to 90% of through thickness. The vessel was subjected to a series of pressure excursions of increasing magnitude until failure occurred by extension of the largest inserted defect through the vessel wall. No acoustic emission was detected throughout any part of the tests which would indicate the presence of such serious defects or of impending failure. Measurements of acoustic emission from metallurgical specimens are included and the results of post test inspection using conventional NDT and metallographic techniques are reported. (author)

  6. Acoustic emission generated by dislocation mechanisms during the deformation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiple, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission is a transient elastic wave generated by the rapid release of energy within a material. A wide variety of mechanisms have been proposed as possible sources of acoustic emission. Proposed mechanisms have included crack propagation, precipitate fracture, twin formation, martensite formation, dislocation motion and/or multiplication. This paper is concerned with acoustic emission generated by dislocation mechanisms operating during plastic deformation. Twinning and martensitic phase transformations are excluded even though dislocation motion is involved in the nucleation and growth of twins and the growth of martensite.

  7. Acoustic emission generated by dislocation mechanisms during the deformation of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiple, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission is a transient elastic wave generated by the rapid release of energy within a material. A wide variety of mechanisms have been proposed as possible sources of acoustic emission. Proposed mechanisms have included crack propagation, precipitate fracture, twin formation, martensite formation, dislocation motion and/or multiplication. This paper is concerned with acoustic emission generated by dislocation mechanisms operating during plastic deformation. Twinning and martensitic phase transformations are excluded even though dislocation motion is involved in the nucleation and growth of twins and the growth of martensite

  8. On the possibility of the soliton description of acoustic emission during plastic deformation of crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelek, A.

    1987-06-01

    Two basic sources of acoustic emission (AE) during plastic deformation of pure crystals are discussed. One is related to non-stationary dislocation motion (the bremsstrahlung type of acoustic radiation), and the other to dislocation annihilation processes (the main component of the transition type of acoustic radiation). The possible soliton description of the bremsstrahlung acoustic radiation by oscillating dislocation kink and by bound kink-antikink pair (dislocation breather) is cosidered on the basis of Eshelby's theory (Proc. Roy. Soc. London A266, 222 (1962)). The dislocation annihilation component of transition acoustic emission is considered only in relation to the Frank-Read source operation. A soliton model for this type of acoustic radiation is proposed and the simple quantum-mechanical hypothesis is advanced for the purpose. Both soliton descriptions are discussed on the basis of available experimental data on the AE intensity behaviour during tensile deformation of crystals. (author). 36 refs, 5 figs

  9. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission generated during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches has been studied. The extent of acoustic activity generated depends on notch tip severity, notch tip blunting and tearing of the notches. The equation N=AK m applied to the acoustic emission data of the notched specimens has shown good correlation. Acoustic emission technique can be used to estimate the size of an unknown notch. (author)

  10. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  11. Experimental analysis of crack evolution in concrete by the acoustic emission technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saliba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fracture process zone (FPZ was investigated on unnotched and notched beams with different notch depths. Three point bending tests were realized on plain concrete under crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD control. Crack growth was monitored by applying the acoustic emission (AE technique. In order to improve our understanding of the FPZ, the width and length of the FPZ were followed based on the AE source locations maps and several AE parameters were studied during the entire loading process. The bvalue analysis, defined as the log-linear slope of the frequency-magnitude distribution of acoustic emissions, was also carried out to describe quantitatively the influence of the relative notch depth on the fracture process. The results show that the number of AE hits increased with the decrease of the relative notch depth and an important AE energy dissipation was observed at the crack initiation in unnotched beams. In addition, the relative notch depth influenced the AE characteristics, the process of crack propagation, and the brittleness of concrete.

  12. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Liang Zhichao; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-01-01

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 where the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.

  13. Characterization of granular collapse onto hard substrates by acoustic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Toussaint, Renaud; De Rosny, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Brittle deformation in granular porous media can generate gravitational instabilities such as debris flows and rock avalanches. These phenomena constitute a major natural hazard for the population in mountainous, volcanic and coastal areas but their direct observation on the field is very dangerous. Recent studies showed that gravitational instabilities can be detected and characterized (volume, duration,...) thanks to the seismic signal they generate. In an avalanche, individual block bouncing and rolling on the ground are expected to generated signals of higher frequencies than the main flow spreading. The identification of the time/frequency signature of individual blocks in the recorded signal remains however difficult. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the acoustic signature of diverse simple sources corresponding to grains falling over thin plates of plexiglas and rock blocks. The elastic energy emitted by a single bouncing steel bead into the support was first quantitatively estimated and compared to the potential energy of fall and to the potential energy change during the shock. Next, we consider the collapse of granular columns made of steel spherical beads onto hard substrates. Initially, these columns were held by a magnetic field allowing to suppress suddenly the cohesion between the beads, and thus to minimize friction effects that would arise from side walls. We varied systematically the column volume, the column aspect ratio (height over length) and the grain size. This is shown to affect the signal envelope and frequency content. In the experiments, two types of acoustic sensors were used to record the signals in a wide frequency range: accelerometers (1 Hz to 56 kHz) and piezoelectric sensors (100 kHz to 1 MHz). The experiments were also monitored optically using fast cameras. We developed a technique to use quantitatively both types of sensors to evaluate the elastic energy emitted by the sources. Eventually, we looked at what

  14. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide

  15. Acoustic monitoring of rotating machine by advanced signal processing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    The acoustic data remotely measured by hand held type microphones are investigated for monitoring and diagnosing the rotational machine integrity in nuclear power plants. The plant operator's patrol monitoring is one of the important activities for condition monitoring. However, remotely measured sound has some difficulties to be considered for precise diagnosis or quantitative judgment of rotating machine anomaly, since the measurement sensitivity is different in each measurement, and also, the sensitivity deteriorates in comparison with an attached type sensor. Hence, in the present study, several advanced signal processing methods are examined and compared in order to find optimum anomaly monitoring technology from the viewpoints of both sensitivity and robustness of performance. The dimension of pre-processed signal feature patterns are reduced into two-dimensional space for the visualization by using the standard principal component analysis (PCA) or the kernel based PCA. Then, the normal state is classified by using probabilistic neural network (PNN) or support vector data description (SVDD). By using the mockup test facility of rotating machine, it is shown that the appropriate combination of the above algorithms gives sensitive and robust anomaly monitoring performance. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the sensitivity of electro-acoustic measurements for process monitoring and control of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, V J [Dublin City University, National Centre of Plasma Science and Technology, Collins Avenue, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Dublin (Ireland); O' Neill, F T; Dowling, D P, E-mail: vic.law@dcu.ie [School Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    The development of non-invasive process diagnostic techniques for the control of atmospheric plasmas is a critical issue for the wider adoption of this technology. This paper evaluates the use of a frequency-domain deconvolution of an electro-acoustic emission as a means to monitor and control the plasma formed using an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) system. The air plasma system investigated was formed using a PlasmaTreat(TM) OpenAir applicator. Change was observed in the electro-acoustic signal with changes in substrate type (ceramic, steel, polymer). APPJ nozzle to substrate distance and substrate feature size were monitored. The decoding of the electro-acoustic emission yields three subdatasets that are described by three separate emission mechanisms. The three emissions are associated with the power supply fundamental drive frequency and its harmonics, the APPJ nozzle longitudinal mode acoustic emission and its odd overtones, and the acoustic surface reflection that is produced by the impedance mismatch between the discharge and the surface. Incorporating this knowledge into a LabVIEW program facilitated the continuous deconvolution of the electro-acoustic data. This enabled the use of specific frequency band test limits to control the APPJ treatment process which is sensitive to both plasma processing conditions and substrate type and features.

  17. Design of an Acoustic Probe to Measure Otoacoustic Emissions Below 0.5 kHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to hear is reflected in low-level acoustic signals emitted from the ear. These otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) can be measured with an acoustic probe assembly coupling one or more small loudspeakers and microphones into the sealed ear canal. The electroacoustic instrumentation of commerc...

  18. PEMS. Advanced predictive emission monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandvig Nielsen, J.

    2010-07-15

    In the project PEMS have been developed for boilers, internal combustion engines and gas turbines. The PEMS models have been developed using two principles: The one called ''first principles'' is based on thermo-kinetic modeling of the NO{sub x}-formation by modeling conditions (like temperature, pressure and residence time) in the reaction zones. The other one is data driven using artificial neural network (ANN) and includes no physical properties and no thermo-kinetic formulation. Models of first principles have been developed for gas turbines and gas engines. Data driven models have been developed for gas turbines, gas engines and boilers. The models have been tested on data from sites located in Denmark and the Middle East. Weel and Sandvig has conducted the on-site emission measurements used for development and testing the PEMS models. For gas turbines, both the ''first principles'' and the data driven models have performed excellent considering the ability to reproduce the emission levels of NO{sub x} according to the input variables used for calibration. Data driven models for boilers and gas engines have performed excellent as well. The rather comprehensive first principle model, developed for gas engines, did not perform as well in the prediction of NO{sub x}. Possible a more complex model formulation is required for internal combustion engines. In general, both model types have been validated on data extracted from the data set used for calibration. The data for validation have been selected randomly as individual samplings, and is scattered over the entire measuring campaign. For one natural gas engine a secondary measuring campaign was conducted half a year later than the campaign used for training the data driven model. In the meantime, this engine had been through a refurbishment that included new pistons, piston rings and cylinder linings and cleaning of the cylinder heads. Despite the refurbishment, the

  19. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel; Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois

    2014-01-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C 4 H 10 + H 2 + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  20. “Smart COPVs” - Continued Successful Development of JSC IR&D Acoustic Emissions (AE) SHM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Developed and applied promising quantitative pass/fail criteria to COPVs using acoustic emission (AE) and developed automated data analysis software. This lays the...

  1. 31{sup st} conference of the European Working Group on Acoustic Emission (EWGAE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-11-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures and posters which were held on the conference of the European Working Group on Acoustic Emission in Dresden (Germany). Six of the contributions are separately analyzed for the INIS database.

  2. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahedi, F; Huang, H

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch–catch and pencil lead break experiments. (paper)

  3. Acoustic Emission Technique Applied in Textiles Mechanical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios-Soberanis Carlos Rolando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The common textile architecture/geometry are woven, braided, knitted, stitch boded, and Z-pinned. Fibres in textile form exhibit good out-of-plane properties and good fatigue and impact resistance, additionally, they have better dimensional stability and conformability. Besides the nature of the textile, the architecture has a great role in the mechanical behaviour and mechanisms of damage in textiles, therefore damage mechanisms and mechanical performance in structural applications textiles have been a major concern. Mechanical damage occurs to a large extent during the service lifetime consequently it is vital to understand the material mechanical behaviour by identifying its mechanisms of failure such as onset of damage, crack generation and propagation. In this work, textiles of different architecture were used to manufacture epoxy based composites in order to study failure events under tensile load by using acoustic emission technique which is a powerful characterization tool due to its link between AE data and fracture mechanics, which makes this relation a very useful from the engineering point of view.

  4. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  5. Acoustic emission of fire damaged fiber reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpalaskas, A. C.; Matikas, T. E.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of a fiber-reinforced concrete after extensive thermal damage is studied in this paper. Undulated steel fibers have been used for reinforcement. After being exposed to direct fire action at the temperature of 850°C, specimens were subjected to bending and compression in order to determine the loss of strength and stiffness in comparison to intact specimens and between the two types. The fire damage was assessed using nondestructive evaluation techniques, specifically ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and acoustic emission (AE). Apart from the strong, well known, correlation of UPV to strength (both bending and compressive), AE parameters based mainly on the frequency and duration of the emitted signals after cracking events showed a similar or, in certain cases, better correlation with the mechanical parameters and temperature. This demonstrates the sensitivity of AE to the fracture incidents which eventually lead to failure of the material and it is encouraging for potential in-situ use of the technique, where it could provide indices with additional characterization capability concerning the mechanical performance of concrete after it subjected to fire.

  6. Failure Mechanism of Rock Bridge Based on Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE technique is widely used in various fields as a reliable nondestructive examination technology. Two experimental tests were carried out in a rock mechanics laboratory, which include (1 small scale direct shear tests of rock bridge with different lengths and (2 large scale landslide model with locked section. The relationship of AE event count and record time was analyzed during the tests. The AE source location technology and comparative analysis with its actual failure model were done. It can be found that whether it is small scale test or large scale landslide model test, AE technique accurately located the AE source point, which reflected the failure generation and expansion of internal cracks in rock samples. Large scale landslide model with locked section test showed that rock bridge in rocky slope has typical brittle failure behavior. The two tests based on AE technique well revealed the rock failure mechanism in rocky slope and clarified the cause of high speed and long distance sliding of rocky slope.

  7. Damage Detection in Railway Prestressed Concrete Sleepers using Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A.; Kaewunruen, S.; Janeliukstis, R.; Papaelias, M.

    2017-10-01

    Prestressed concrete sleepers (or railroad ties) are safety-critical elements in railway tracks that distribute the wheel loads from the rails to the track support system. Over a period of time, the concrete sleepers age and deteriorate in addition to experiencing various types of static and dynamic loading conditions, which are attributable to train operations. In many cases, structural cracks can develop within the sleepers due to high intensity impact loads or due to poor track maintenance. Often, cracks of sleepers develop and present at the midspan due to excessive negative bending. These cracks can cause broken sleepers and sometimes called ‘center bound’ problem in railway lines. This paper is the world first to present an application of non-destructive acoustic emission technology for damage detection in railway concrete sleepers. It presents experimental investigations in order to detect center-bound cracks in railway prestressed concrete sleepers. Experimental laboratory testing involves three-point bending tests of four concrete sleepers. Three-point bending tests correspond to a real failure mode, when the loads are not transferred uniformly to the ballast support. It is observed that AE sensing provides an accurate means for detecting the location and magnitude of cracks in sleepers. Sensor location criticality is also highlighted in the paper to demonstrate the reliability-based damage detection of the sleepers.

  8. Acoustic emission intensity analysis of corrosion in prestressed concrete piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion of steel strands in prestressed concrete (PC) bridges may lead to substantial damage or collapse well before the end of the design life. Acoustic Emission (AE) is a suitable nondestructive technique to detect and locate corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete, which is key to prioritize inspection and maintenance. An effective tool to analyze damage-related AE data is intensity analysis (IA), which is based on two data trends, namely Severity (average signal strength of high amplitude hits) and Historic Index (ratio of the average signal strength of the most recent hits to the average of all hits). IA criteria for corrosion assessment in PC were recently proposed based on empirical evidence from accelerated corrosion tests. In this paper, AE data from prestressed and non-prestressed concrete pile specimens exposed to salt water wet-dry cycling for over 600 days are used to analyze the relation between Severity and Historic Index and actual corrosion. Evidence of corrosion is gained from the inspection of decommissioned specimens. The selection of suitable J and K parameters for IA is discussed, and an IA chart with updated corrosion criteria for PC piles is presented.

  9. A New Acoustic Emission Sensor Based Gear Fault Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce wind energy costs, prognostics and health management (PHM of wind turbine is needed to ensure the reliability and availability of wind turbines. A gearbox is an important component of a wind turbine. Therefore, developing effective gearbox fault detection tools is important to the PHM of wind turbine. In this paper, a new acoustic emission (AE sensor based gear fault detection approach is presented. This approach combines a heterodyne based frequency reduction technique with time synchronous average (TSA and spectrum kurtosis (SK to process AE sensor signals and extract features as condition indictors for gear fault detection. Heterodyne technique commonly used in communication is first employed to preprocess the AE signals before sampling. By heterodyning, the AE signal frequency is down shifted from several hundred kHz to below 50 kHz. This reduced AE signal sampling rate is comparable to that of vibration signals. The presented approach is validated using seeded gear tooth crack fault tests on a notational split torque gearbox. The approach presented in this paper is physics based and the validation results have showed that it could effectively detect the gear faults.

  10. Modeling the complexity of acoustic emission during intermittent plastic deformation: Power laws and multifractal spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jagadish; Ananthakrishna, G

    2018-01-01

    Scale-invariant power-law distributions for acoustic emission signals are ubiquitous in several plastically deforming materials. However, power-law distributions for acoustic emission energies are reported in distinctly different plastically deforming situations such as hcp and fcc single and polycrystalline samples exhibiting smooth stress-strain curves and in dilute metallic alloys exhibiting discontinuous flow. This is surprising since the underlying dislocation mechanisms in these two types of deformations are very different. So far, there have been no models that predict the power-law statistics for discontinuous flow. Furthermore, the statistics of the acoustic emission signals in jerky flow is even more complex, requiring multifractal measures for a proper characterization. There has been no model that explains the complex statistics either. Here we address the problem of statistical characterization of the acoustic emission signals associated with the three types of the Portevin-Le Chatelier bands. Following our recently proposed general framework for calculating acoustic emission, we set up a wave equation for the elastic degrees of freedom with a plastic strain rate as a source term. The energy dissipated during acoustic emission is represented by the Rayleigh-dissipation function. Using the plastic strain rate obtained from the Ananthakrishna model for the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect, we compute the acoustic emission signals associated with the three Portevin-Le Chatelier bands and the Lüders-like band. The so-calculated acoustic emission signals are used for further statistical characterization. Our results show that the model predicts power-law statistics for all the acoustic emission signals associated with the three types of Portevin-Le Chatelier bands with the exponent values increasing with increasing strain rate. The calculated multifractal spectra corresponding to the acoustic emission signals associated with the three band types have a maximum

  11. Tools for automated acoustic monitoring within the R package monitoR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jonathan; Hafner, Sasha D.; Donovan, Therese

    2016-01-01

    The R package monitoR contains tools for managing an acoustic-monitoring program including survey metadata, template creation and manipulation, automated detection and results management. These tools are scalable for use with small projects as well as larger long-term projects and those with expansive spatial extents. Here, we describe typical workflow when using the tools in monitoR. Typical workflow utilizes a generic sequence of functions, with the option for either binary point matching or spectrogram cross-correlation detectors.

  12. Tools for automated acoustic monitoring within the R package monitoR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Jonathan; Hafner, Sasha D.; Donovan, Therese

    2016-01-01

    The R package monitoR contains tools for managing an acoustic-monitoring program including survey metadata, template creation and manipulation, automated detection and results management. These tools are scalable for use with small projects as well as larger long-term projects and those...... with expansive spatial extents. Here, we describe typical workflow when using the tools in monitoR. Typical workflow utilizes a generic sequence of functions, with the option for either binary point matching or spectrogram cross-correlation detectors....

  13. Acoustic system for pipe rupture monitoring and leak detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, W.; Jonas, H.

    1982-06-01

    As a safety aspect pipe rupture and leakage effects are of particular interest in nuclear power plants where severe consequences for the reactor may result. Counter measures against postulated pipe breaks and leakages in nuclear power plants are necessary whenever the main safety goals: safe shut-down, safe afterheat removal and retention of radioactivity, are endangered. The requirements to be met by a leak detection system depend on the time available for counter actions. If this time is short so that automatic actions are necessary the German safety criteria for nuclear power plants (Criterion 6.1) require two physically diverse signals to be monitored. One fairly obvious possibility of leak detection is to monitor process parameters (pressure, flow). As a diverse signal physical parameters outside the process may be employed: pressure transients temperature, humidity are principally suitable. In practical application, however, it is difficult to predict these parameters by way of calculation in order to establish the required set-point of the monitoring system. Experimental determination is possible only in special cases. A study of several ways of diverse leak detection methods leads to the very promising acoustic method. We investigated experimentally the feasibility of monitoring the sound created by a leakage. Air borne sound as well as body borne sound was analyzed

  14. Estimation of the Tool Condition by Applying the Wavelet Transform to Acoustic Emission Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, M. P.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J. E.; D'Attellis, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    This work follows the search of parameters to evaluate the tool condition in machining processes. The selected sensing technique is acoustic emission and it is applied to a turning process of steel samples. The obtained signals are studied using the wavelet transformation. The tool wear level is quantified as a percentage of the final wear specified by the Standard ISO 3685. The amplitude and relevant scale obtained of acoustic emission signals could be related with the wear level

  15. Barkhausen Effect and Acoustic Emission in a Metallic Glass - Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Sanchez, R.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Armeite, M.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Magneto Acoustic Emission, which is Barkhausen Noise (BN) and Acoustic Emission (AE), depends on microstructure and existing residual stresses in magnetic materials. Preliminary results obtained by magnetization along two perpendicular directions on a metal glass foil are presented. Signals were analyzed with Statistic, Fast Fourier and Wavelet methods. Results are part of a Joint Research Project of the Faculty of Science, Cantabria University, Spain, and the Elastic Waves Group of the National Atomic Energy Commission, Argentina

  16. Evaluation of forced-convection nucleate boiling detection by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.P.; Paterson, J.A.

    1981-10-01

    Acoustic Emission techniques are being investigated for use as protection systems in neutral beam accelerators and water cooled beam dumps. For this purpose, the characteristics of the boiling curve for forced-convection surface boiling have been compared to the Acoustic Emission (AE) produced. Results indicate that AE, in the form of count-rate, is a sensitive indicator of nucleate boiling incipience and is relatively insensitive to flow velocity in the 0 to 12 m/s range

  17. The Acoustic Emission in the Nest of the Honey Bee Depending on the Extreme Weather Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Tlačbaba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibroacoustic signals are an important part of communication in the honey bees (Apis mellifera L.. The aim of this study was to observe the acoustic emission that varies in a bee colony during different weather phenomena (strong winds and hailstorms and to estimate the nature and the extent of the reactions of the colony by the analysis of the obtained data. Experiments were carried out in the volume-reduced hives. The specific weather phenomena were followed by significant (P < 0.0001 increasing of the intensity of the acoustic emission in the colony in comparison with acoustic emission before or after the phenomena. Close linear positive relationship was confirmed between the intensity of wind gusts and intensity of acoustic emission (r = 0.72; P < 0.001. With the increase in the maximum gust of 1 km·h−1, the intensity of acoustic emission increased by 0.1466 mV. The character and degree of reaction of the colony can be estimated with analysis of the measured data. Permeability of vibration signals directly induced weather phenomena through the construction of the experimental hive and the stress in the colony are discussed. Observation of the acoustic emission distributed within the colony is one of the methodical alternatives for research of the vibroacoustic communication in the colony.

  18. Acoustic emission characteristics during bending fracture process of piezoelectric composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sung Choong; Goo, Nam Seo

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the damage mechanisms in a thin monolithic PZT wafer and an asymmetrically laminated piezoelectric composite actuator (PCA) under bending loading by the acoustic emission (AE) technique. Fracture surface examinations were conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. Using the fabricated PCAs, correlations were established between the observed damage growth mechanisms and the AE results in terms of the AE amplitude and dominant frequency band which was processed by fast Fourier transform (FFT). These correlations can be used to monitor the damage evolution in the plate-type piezoelectric composite actuators exhibiting multiple modes of damage. Results from this study revealed that the AE technique is a powerful and effective tool for identifying damage mechanisms such as brittle fracture in the PZT, matrix cracking, fiber-matrix debonding, fiber breakage and delamination between the PZT layer and fiber composite layer in the asymmetrically laminated PCAs.

  19. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Hančič

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals’ peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process.

  20. Accuracy of acoustic respiration rate monitoring in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Mario; Redford, Daniel T; Quigley, Thomas W; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Kurth, C Dean; Szmuk, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Rainbow acoustic monitoring (RRa) utilizes acoustic technology to continuously and noninvasively determine respiratory rate from an adhesive sensor located on the neck. We sought to validate the accuracy of RRa, by comparing it to capnography, impedance pneumography, and to a reference method of counting breaths in postsurgical children. Continuous respiration rate data were recorded from RRa and capnography. In a subset of patients, intermittent respiration rate from thoracic impedance pneumography was also recorded. The reference method, counted respiratory rate by the retrospective analysis of the RRa, and capnographic waveforms while listening to recorded breath sounds were used to compare respiration rate of both capnography and RRa. Bias, precision, and limits of agreement of RRa compared with capnography and RRa and capnography compared with the reference method were calculated. Tolerance and reliability to the acoustic sensor and nasal cannula were also assessed. Thirty-nine of 40 patients (97.5%) demonstrated good tolerance of the acoustic sensor, whereas 25 of 40 patients (62.5%) demonstrated good tolerance of the nasal cannula. Intermittent thoracic impedance produced erroneous respiratory rates (>50 b·min(-1) from the other methods) on 47% of occasions. The bias ± SD and limits of agreement were -0.30 ± 3.5 b·min(-1) and -7.3 to 6.6 b·min(-1) for RRa compared with capnography; -0.1 ± 2.5 b·min(-1) and -5.0 to 5.0 b·min(-1) for RRa compared with the reference method; and 0.2 ± 3.4 b·min(-1) and -6.8 to 6.7 b·min(-1) for capnography compared with the reference method. When compared to nasal capnography, RRa showed good agreement and similar accuracy and precision but was better tolerated in postsurgical pediatric patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cardiorespiratory system monitoring using a developed acoustic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Kesbi, Reza; Valipour, Atefeh; Imani, Khadije

    2018-02-01

    This Letter proposes a wireless acoustic sensor for monitoring heartbeat and respiration rate based on phonocardiogram (PCG). The developed sensor comprises a processor, a transceiver which operates at industrial, scientific and medical band and the frequency of 2.54 GHz as well as two capacitor microphones which one for recording the heartbeat and another one for respiration rate. To evaluate the precision of the presented sensor in estimating heartbeat and respiration rate, the sensor is tested on the different volunteers and the obtained results are compared with a gold standard as a reference. The results reveal that root-mean-square error are determined sensor estimate sounds of [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] obtained PCG signal with sensitivity and specificity 98.1% and 98.3% in turn that make 3% improvement than previous works. The results prove that the sensor can be appropriate candidate for recognising abnormal condition in the cardiorespiratory system.

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW Resonators for Monitoring Conditioning Film Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Hohmann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose surface acoustic wave (SAW resonators as a complementary tool for conditioning film monitoring. Conditioning films are formed by adsorption of inorganic and organic substances on a substrate the moment this substrate comes into contact with a liquid phase. In the case of implant insertion, for instance, initial protein adsorption is required to start wound healing, but it will also trigger immune reactions leading to inflammatory responses. The control of the initial protein adsorption would allow to promote the healing process and to suppress adverse immune reactions. Methods to investigate these adsorption processes are available, but it remains difficult to translate measurement results into actual protein binding events. Biosensor transducers allow user-friendly investigation of protein adsorption on different surfaces. The combination of several transduction principles leads to complementary results, allowing a more comprehensive characterization of the adsorbing layer. We introduce SAW resonators as a novel complementary tool for time-resolved conditioning film monitoring. SAW resonators were coated with polymers. The adsorption of the plasma proteins human serum albumin (HSA and fibrinogen onto the polymer-coated surfaces were monitored. Frequency results were compared with quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor measurements, which confirmed the suitability of the SAW resonators for this application.

  3. Acoustic emission events from sodium vapour bubble collapsing: a stochastic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombino, A; Dentico, G; Pacilio, N; Papalia, B; Taglienti, S; Tosi, V; Vigo, A [Comitato Nazionale per l' Energia Nucleare, Casaccia (Italy). Centro di Studi Nucleari; Galli, C [Rome Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica

    1981-01-01

    The forward Kolomogorov equation method has been applied to a zero-dimensional model which describes the time distribution of acoustic emissions from sodium vapour bubble collapsing. Processes taken into account as components for outlining the upstated phenomenon are: energy generation, energy dissipation, bubble creation, acoustic emission and energy release from bubble collapsing. Processes involve affect or are induced by a population of particles (bubbles, acoustic pulses) and pseudoparticles (energetic units). A formulation is obtained for the expected values of some stochastic indicators, i.e., factorial moments and cumulants, autocorrelation functions, waiting time distribution between contiguous events, of the time series consisting of acoustic emission pulses as detected by a suitable sensor. Preliminary, but promising, validation of the model and a sound prelude to effective boiling regime diagnosing is obtained by processing data from the out-of-pile CFNa loop in Grenoble, France. Data are collected from a piezoelectric accelerometer located nearby the circuit.

  4. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2009-01-01

    . According to these experimental results, the acoustic emission measured around setting time was attributed to cavitation events occurring in the pores of the cement paste due to self-desiccation. This paper shows how acoustic emission might be used to indicate the time when the fluid–solid transition occurs......In this study, the acoustic emission activity of cement pastes was investigated during the first day of hydration. Deaired, fresh cement pastes were cast in sealed sample holders designed to minimize friction and restraint. The majority of acoustic emission events occurred in lower water to cement...... ratio pastes, while cement pastes with higher water to cement ratios showed significantly less acoustic activity. These acoustic events occurred around the time of setting. A layer of water on the surface of the cement pastes substantially reduced acoustic emission activity at the time of setting...

  5. Acoustic emission behavior under bending deformation of YBCO bulk superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, K.; Ye, J.; Tomita, M.

    2005-01-01

    Bending tests were conducted on U-notched specimens cut from a YBCO bulk superconductor. Acoustic emission (AE) signals obtained under loading parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis were analyzed to investigate the correlation between crack growth behavior and the AE signals. As a result of analyzing log-log plots of strength (σ B ) versus total AE energy (ΣE AE ), a linear relationship was found between ΣE AE and σ B n . Cracks could be broadly divided into two types based on the value of n as an index of crack growth behavior. One type consisted of microcracks originating from cleavage planes and gas holes; these crack propagated parallel to the c-axis and had an n index value of approximately 0.7. The other type was a main crack that originated from the U-notch and had an n index value of approximately 6.5. A sample (A) loaded parallel to the c-axis showed mean bending strength of 74.8MPa. Cracks displaying two different growth patterns of n=0.7 and 6.5 were presented in this sample. Microcracks parallel to the c-axis occurred in the vicinity of 5-10MPa. This sample was characterized by mixed crack growth of a main crack and microcracks. A sample (B) loaded perpendicular to the c-axis displayed mean bending strength of 43MPa. A main crack occurred in the vicinity of 20MPa and displayed a single growth pattern of n=6.5. By analyzing AE signals in this way in the process of conducting a strength evaluation, it was possible to evaluate the failure process of the bulk superconductor in relation to the strength level induced by the applied load

  6. Estimation of Fine and Oversize Particle Ratio in a Heterogeneous Compound with Acoustic Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejay Nsugbe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The final phase of powder production typically involves a mixing process where all of the particles are combined and agglomerated with a binder to form a single compound. The traditional means of inspecting the physical properties of the final product involves an inspection of the particle sizes using an offline sieving and weighing process. The main downside of this technique, in addition to being an offline-only measurement procedure, is its inability to characterise large agglomerates of powders due to sieve blockage. This work assesses the feasibility of a real-time monitoring approach using a benchtop test rig and a prototype acoustic-based measurement approach to provide information that can be correlated to product quality and provide the opportunity for future process optimisation. Acoustic emission (AE was chosen as the sensing method due to its low cost, simple setup process, and ease of implementation. The performance of the proposed method was assessed in a series of experiments where the offline quality check results were compared to the AE-based real-time estimations using data acquired from a benchtop powder free flow rig. A designed time domain based signal processing method was used to extract particle size information from the acquired AE signal and the results show that this technique is capable of estimating the required ratio in the washing powder compound with an average absolute error of 6%.

  7. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongzhi; Pang, Fufei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cheng, Jiajing; Lv, Longbao; Zhang, Xiaobei; Chen, Na; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD) of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad/(m⋅Pa). A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work. PMID:27916900

  8. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongzhi Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  9. [Acoustic emission diagnostic techniques for high-field high current-density super inducting poles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic emission technology was introduced in the late 1970's to monitor superconducting magnets. It has now been firmly established that acoustic signals in superconducting magnets are emitted principally by mechanical events such as conductor strain, conductor motion, frictional motion, and epoxy cracking. Despite earlier suggestions, flux motion, except during flux jumping, does not appear to be an important source of AE signals in superconducting magnets. Of these several potential sources of AE signals in superconducting magnets, mechanical disturbances have been identified to be most important in high-performance, ''adiabatic'' magnets such as the dipoles used in accelerators. These mechanical disturbances are transitory, each generating a packet of AE signals that can be located with sensors. Source identification and location has been achieved with a number of superconducting magnets. In this section, the basic principle for the operation of adiabatic magnets is discussed, followed by presentation of some of the important experimental results relevant to the question of premature quench obtained at MIT

  10. Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbine Blades: Acoustic Source Localization Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mabrok Bouzid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM is important for reducing the maintenance and operation cost of safety-critical components and systems in offshore wind turbines. This paper proposes an in situ wireless SHM system based on an acoustic emission (AE technique. By using this technique a number of challenges are introduced due to high sampling rate requirements, limitations in the communication bandwidth, memory space, and power resources. To overcome these challenges, this paper focused on two elements: (1 the use of an in situ wireless SHM technique in conjunction with the utilization of low sampling rates; (2 localization of acoustic sources which could emulate impact damage or audible cracks caused by different objects, such as tools, bird strikes, or strong hail, all of which represent abrupt AE events and could affect the structural health of a monitored wind turbine blade. The localization process is performed using features extracted from aliased AE signals based on a developed constraint localization model. To validate the performance of these elements, the proposed system was tested by testing the localization of the emulated AE sources acquired in the field.

  11. Study on the Measurement of Valve Leak Rate Using Acoustic Emission Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Guk; Park, Jong-Hyuck; Yoo, Keun-Bae; Lee, Sun-Ki; Hong, Sung-Yull

    2006-01-01

    This study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission(AE) method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, 4 inch ball water valve leak tests using three different leak path and various leak rates were performed in order to analyze AE properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound amplitude increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were plotted versus peak acoustic amplitudes recorded within those two narrow frequency bands on each spectrum plot. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak AE amplitude were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. The large amount of data attained also allowed a favorable investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leak rates, pressure differentials and AE sensors on the AE amplitude spectrum. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the AE method for monitoring of leak was feasible. This paper describes quantitative measurements of fluid valve leak rates by the analysis of AE. Experimental apparatus were fabricated to accept a variety of leaking water valves in order to determine what characteristics of AE signal change with leak rate. The data for each valve were generated by varying the leak rate and recording the time averaged amplitude of AE versus frequency. Leak rates were varied by modifying the valve seating surfaces in ways designed to simulate actual defects observed in service. Most of the data analysis involved plotting the leak rate versus signal amplitude at a specific frequency to determine how well the two variables correlate in terms of accuracy, resolution, and repeatability

  12. Improved specifications for continuous emission monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dene, C.E.; Eggleston, T.E.; Gray, W.C. Jr.; Bisha, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous emission monitoring (CEM) in the electric utility industry historically has been plagued by poor performance and inconsistent system reliability. These problems have, in part, been caused by the complexity and diversity of the various systems available, and the dissimilarity of continuous emission monitors CEMs relative to conventional power plant instrumentation. Recognizing the problems faced by the utility industry in implementing CEM programs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a multi-phase project to define the current state of technology for CEMs and to provide a comprehensive guide for the purchase and installation of a CEM system. The second phase of this project was the application of these guidelines to the actual purchase, installation, and operation of a CEM system for an electric utility generating station. Through this application of the guidelines it has been possible to determine further research needs and areas of the manual which require clarification or enhancement. This paper describes the development of the guidelines and modifications to the guidelines, and discusses EPRI's plans for future activities in the area of continuous emission monitoring

  13. Multivariate data-driven modelling and pattern recognition for damage detection and identification for acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Arredondo, M-A; Fritzen, C-P; Tibaduiza, D-A; Mujica, L E; Rodellar, J; McGugan, M; Toftegaard, H; Borum, K-K

    2013-01-01

    Different methods are commonly used for non-destructive testing in structures; among others, acoustic emission and ultrasonic inspections are widely used to assess structures. The research presented in this paper is motivated by the need to improve the inspection capabilities and reliability of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems based on ultrasonic guided waves with focus on the acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics techniques. The use of a guided wave based approach is driven by the fact that these waves are able to propagate over relatively long distances, and interact sensitively and uniquely with different types of defect. Special attention is paid here to the development of efficient SHM methodologies. This requires robust signal processing techniques for the correct interpretation of the complex ultrasonic waves. Therefore, a variety of existing algorithms for signal processing and pattern recognition are evaluated and integrated into the different proposed methodologies. As a contribution to solve the problem, this paper presents results in damage detection and classification using a methodology based on hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis, square prediction measurements and self-organizing maps, which are applied to data from acoustic emission tests and acousto-ultrasonic inspections. At the end, the efficiency of these methodologies is experimentally evaluated in diverse anisotropic composite structures. (paper)

  14. Continuous and recurrent testing of acoustic emission sensors; Kontinuierliche und wiederkehrende Pruefung von Schallemissionssensoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sause, Markus G.R.; Schmitt, Stefan; Potstada, Philipp [Augsburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Materials Resource Management, Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    In many fields of application of acoustic emission, the testing can lead to a lasting change in the sensor characteristics. This can be caused by mechanical damage, thermal stress or use under aggressive environmental conditions. Irrespective of visually testable damages of the sensors, a shift in the spectral sensitivity, a reduction in the absolute sensitivity or a reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio can occur. During the test, this requires a possibility to periodically check the sensors, including the coupling aids used. For recurring testing, recommendations are given in Directive SE 02 ''Verification of acoustic emission sensors and their coupling in the laboratory''. This paper discusses possibilities for continuous monitoring of the sensors during the test and presents an application example for the partly automated recurring testing of acoustic emission sensors using Directive SE 02. For this purpose, a test stand for the supply of the sensors to be tested was constructed and the signal recording and data reduction implemented in freely available software programs. The operating principle is demonstrated using selected case studies. [German] In vielen Anwendungsbereichen der Schallemission kann es bei der Pruefung zu einer nachhaltigen Veraenderung der Sensorcharakteristik kommen. Dies kann durch mechanische Beschaedigung, thermische Belastung oder Verwendung unter aggressiven Umweltbedingungen geschehen. Unabhaengig von visuell pruefbaren Beschaedigungen der Sensoren kann es dabei zu einer Verschiebung der spektralen Empfindlichkeit, einer Verringerung der absoluten Empfindlichkeit oder einer Erniedrigung des Signal-Rausch Verhaeltnis kommen. Bei der Pruefung erfordert dies eine Moeglichkeit zur periodischen Ueberpruefung der Sensoren inklusive der verwendeten Koppelhilfsmittel. Fuer die wiederkehrende Pruefung finden sich entsprechende Handlungsempfehlungen in der Richtlinie SE 02 ''Verifizierung von

  15. Acoustic emission measurements during impacts tests for determining ductile fracture data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.

    2000-09-01

    The document reports work for further development of methods and tests to obtain better information on the crack initiation toughness (J id ) under impact loading conditions, by acoustic emission measurements. The applicability of the acoustic emission tests for the given purpose was proven by instrumented Charpy tests using modified ISO-V specimens. The physical crack initiation toughness served as the reference value for reliable evaluation of the characteristic data obtained. This reference value is derived from the crack resistance curve determined by the multi-specimen cleavage fracture method combined with data from measurements of the stretching zone width. Verification of the acoustic emission-defined initiation value included a variety of tests, as e.g. additional dynamic single-specimen methods (L-COD, magnetic emission), and supplementary tests (D3PB, pendulum impact testing machine). The test materials are various steels with different strength/toughness properties. (orig./CB) [de

  16. Identification of the Onset of Cracking in Gear Teeth Using Acoustic Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullin, R; Clarke, A; Eaton, M J; Pearson, M R; Holford, K M

    2012-01-01

    The development of diagnostic methods for gear tooth faults in aerospace power transmission systems is an active research area being driven largely by the interests of military organisations or large aerospace organisations. In aerospace applications, the potential results of gear failure are serious, ranging from increased asset downtime to, at worst, catastrophic failure with life-threatening consequences. New monitoring techniques which can identify the onset of failure at earlier stages are in demand. Acoustic Emission (AE) is the most sensitive condition monitoring tool and is a passive technique that detects the stress wave emitted by a structure as cracks propagate. In this study a gear test rig that allows the fatigue loading of an individual gear tooth was utilised. The rig allows a full AE analysis of damage signatures in gear teeth without the presence of constant background noise due to rotational and frictional sources. Furthermore this approach allows validation of AE results using crack gauges or strain gauges. Utilising a new approach to AE monitoring a sensor was mounted on the gear and used to continuously capture AE data for a complete fatigue load cycle of data, rather than the traditional approach where discrete signals are captured on a threshold basis. Data was captured every 10th load cycle for the duration of the test. A developed fast fourier transform analysis technique was compared with traditional analytical methods. In this investigation the developed techniques were validated against visual inspection and were shown to be far superior to the traditional approach.

  17. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C R; Cleveland, R O; Coussios, C C

    2013-01-01

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252–61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. (paper)

  18. Status reports on the development and application of acoustic emission analysis. Proceedings; Statusberichte zur Entwicklung und Anwendung der Schallemissionsanalyse. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-08-01

    The colloquium lectures represent the wide range of applications in acoustic emission analysis and testing in the areas of damage development and damage mechanisms, testing of components, condition monitoring, development of new measuring systems and sensors as well as software development regarding locating methods and signal analysis. One focus of the colloquium is on current hardware and software developments for status monitoring by means of AE monitoring. One of the papers was separately analyzed for this database. [German] Die Vortraege des Kolloquiums repraesentieren das breite Spektrum der Anwendungen der Schallemissionsanalyse und -pruefung in den Bereichen der Schadensentwicklung und Schadensmechanismen, Pruefung von Bauteilen, Zustandsueberwachung, Entwicklung neuer Messsysteme und Sensoren sowie Softwareentwicklung bezueglich Ortungsverfahren und Signalanalyse. Ein Schwerpunkt des Kolloquiums betrifft aktuelle Hard- und Softwareentwicklungen zur Zustandsueberwachung durch AE-Monitoring.

  19. Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions from landfill sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eade, G.

    2001-01-01

    Methane is the chief component of natural gas, but also occurs naturally by the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter in swamp areas, at landfill sites, in fact at any location where organic deposits are present. Carbon dioxide is also produced by the decomposition of organic material as well as being the primary by-product of combustion. This article focuses on techniques to test a wide variety of combustible and toxic gases, including surface emission testing of landfill sites. Specifically, it describes the Methane Emission Monitoring System (MEMS) developed by Hetek Solutions Inc., whose primary objective is to to effectively locate surface emissions of methane gas from active landfill sites using flame ionization (FI) technology, and to plot the 'hot spots' using a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS), which provides sub-metre accuracy for plotting emissions locations at landfill sites. The FI equipment is installed on all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). Several thousand kilometers of pipeline inspections have been performed in Alberta and Saskatchewan using this system in the mid-1990s. The mobile FI/ATV units have been redesigned for landfill gas emission testing, equipped with new DGPS equipment and interface software. They meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) drafted in the United States in 1996, which requires all landfill sites to be inspected for methane gas emissions. Using the FI/ATV combination, productivity over conventional walking inspection procedures increased some 400 per cent, while monitoring accuracy is equivalent to or better than those provided by previous conventional methods. The company can also provide the Optical Methane Detector (OMD) system using infrared technology. They are capable of performing 14,000 measurements per second, thus providing immediate response. To date, ATV emissions testing has been proven to be very effective in various types of gas detection. When interfaced with DGPS technology, computer

  20. The application of the acoustic emission technique to stone decay by sodium sulphate in laboratory tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossi, C. M.

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission was monitored during salt crystallisation cycles in order to study the mechanisms of rock deterioration by sodium sulphate in laboratory tests. Some porous carbonate stones used in Spanish monuments (Cathedral of Oviedo, Murcia and Seo Vella of Lérida were selected for this study. The acoustic emission detected during the different stages of the cycles (immersion, drying and cooling was interpreted to be the result of the salt behaviour inside the stone. The use of this technique has confirmed that this behaviour depends on salt characteristics (solubility, hydration state and polymorphism of anhydrous sodium sulphate and stone porosity and pore network.

    Para determinar los mecanismos de deterioro de las rocas debidos a la acción del sulfato de sodio, se ha registrado la emisión acústica durante ensayos de cristalización de sales en el laboratorio. Para ello, se han seleccionado tres piedras porosas carbonatadas utilizadas como materiales de construcción en monumentos españoles (Catedrales de Oviedo, Murcia y Seo Vella de Lérida. La emisión acústica detectada durante las diferentes etapas de los ciclos (inmersión, secado y enfriamiento se ha interpretado como debida al comportamiento de la sal en el interior de la piedra. Mediante esta técnica se ha confirmado que este comportamiento depende de las características de la sal (solubilidad, diferentes estados de hidratación y el polimorfismo del sulfato de sodio anhidro y de la porosidad y configuración del sistema poroso de las rocas.

  1. Time-resolved tomography using acoustic emissions in the laboratory, and application to sandstone compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantut, Nicolas

    2018-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and active ultrasonic wave velocity monitoring are often performed during laboratory rock deformation experiments, but are typically processed separately to yield homogenized wave velocity measurements and approximate source locations. Here, I present a numerical method and its implementation in a free software to perform a joint inversion of AE locations together with the 3-D, anisotropic P-wave structure of laboratory samples. The data used are the P-wave first arrivals obtained from AEs and active ultrasonic measurements. The model parameters are the source locations and the P-wave velocity and anisotropy parameter (assuming transverse isotropy) at discrete points in the material. The forward problem is solved using the fast marching method, and the inverse problem is solved by the quasi-Newton method. The algorithms are implemented within an integrated free software package called FaATSO (Fast Marching Acoustic Emission Tomography using Standard Optimisation). The code is employed to study the formation of compaction bands in a porous sandstone. During deformation, a front of AEs progresses from one end of the sample, associated with the formation of a sequence of horizontal compaction bands. Behind the active front, only sparse AEs are observed, but the tomography reveals that the P-wave velocity has dropped by up to 15 per cent, with an increase in anisotropy of up to 20 per cent. Compaction bands in sandstones are therefore shown to produce sharp changes in seismic properties. This result highlights the potential of the methodology to image temporal variations of elastic properties in complex geomaterials, including the dramatic, localized changes associated with microcracking and damage generation.

  2. Identifying Otosclerosis with Aural Acoustical Tests of Absorbance, Group Delay, Acoustic Reflex Threshold, and Otoacoustic Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Douglas H; Archer, Kelly L; Schmid, Kendra K; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Feeney, M Patrick; Hunter, Lisa L

    2017-10-01

    Otosclerosis is a progressive middle-ear disease that affects conductive transmission through the middle ear. Ear-canal acoustic tests may be useful in the diagnosis of conductive disorders. This study addressed the degree to which results from a battery of ear-canal tests, which include wideband reflectance, acoustic stapedius muscle reflex threshold (ASRT), and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), were effective in quantifying a risk of otosclerosis and in evaluating middle-ear function in ears after surgical intervention for otosclerosis. To evaluate the ability of the test battery to classify ears as normal or otosclerotic, measure the accuracy of reflectance in classifying ears as normal or otosclerotic, and evaluate the similarity of responses in normal ears compared with ears after surgical intervention for otosclerosis. A quasi-experimental cross-sectional study incorporating case control was used. Three groups were studied: one diagnosed with otosclerosis before corrective surgery, a group that received corrective surgery for otosclerosis, and a control group. The test groups included 23 ears (13 right and 10 left) with normal hearing from 16 participants (4 male and 12 female), 12 ears (7 right and 5 left) diagnosed with otosclerosis from 9 participants (3 male and 6 female), and 13 ears (4 right and 9 left) after surgical intervention from 10 participants (2 male and 8 female). Participants received audiometric evaluations and clinical immittance testing. Experimental tests performed included ASRT tests with wideband reference signal (0.25-8 kHz), reflectance tests (0.25-8 kHz), which were parameterized by absorbance and group delay at ambient pressure and at swept tympanometric pressures, and TEOAE tests using chirp stimuli (1-8 kHz). ASRTs were measured in ipsilateral and contralateral conditions using tonal and broadband noise activators. Experimental ASRT tests were based on the difference in wideband-absorbed sound power before and after

  3. Identification of acoustic emission sources in early stages of fatigue process of Inconel 713LC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartkova, Denisa; Vlasic, Frantisek; Mazal, Pavel [Brno Univ. of Technology, Brno (Czech Republic). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2014-11-01

    Inconel 713LC is low carbon variant of Inconel 713 nickel-based cast alloy. The biggest advantage of these alloys is their ability to resist a wide variety of operating conditions (corrosive environment, high temperature, high stresses). Main area of applications is aircraft, energetic, chemical and petrochemical industry etc. In many applications, components undergo cyclic stresses. This study presents results of acoustic emission response of Inconel 713LC during high-cycle fatigue testing. In comparison with low-cycle fatigue, stage of initiation of micro cracks is in high-cycle region much more significant and can take several tens of percent of whole fatigue life. This work is focused on comparison of selected parameters of acoustic emission signal in pre-initiation and initiation stage of fatigue crack creation. Signal data were specified by linear location technique, hence only signal from shallow notch was analysed. Acoustic emission signal was correlated with frequency of load reversals which is a function of specimen's rigidity (modulus). Acoustic emission hits with higher stress were detected in pre-initiation stage whereas initiation stage hits exhibited low stress. Acoustic emission signal measurements are supplemented by fractographic and metallographic analysis.

  4. Examination of ceramic/enamel interfacial debonding using acoustic emission and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Li; Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Yu, Jin-Jie; Lin, Yun-Chu

    2014-08-01

    This study investigates monitored micro-crack growth and damage in the ceramic/enamel adhesive interface using the acoustic emission (AE) technique with optical coherence tomography (OCT) under fatigue shear testing. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured first with eight prepared ceramic/enamel adhesive specimens under static loads. The fatigue shear testing was performed with three specimens at each cyclic load according to a modified ISO14801 method, applying at 80%, 75%, 70%, and 65% of the SBS to monitor interface debonding. The number of cycles at each load was recorded until ceramic/enamel adhesive interface debonding occurred. The AE technique was used to detect micro-crack signals in static and fatigue shear bond tests. The results showed that the average SBS value in the static tests was 18.07 ± 1.72 MPa (mean ± standard deviation), expressed in Newton's at 56.77 ± 5.40N. The average number of fatigue cycles in which ceramic/enamel interface damage was detected in 80%, 75%, 70% and 65% of the SBS were 41, 410, 8141 and 76,541, respectively. The acoustic behavior varied according to the applied load level. Events were emitted during 65% and 70% fatigue tests. A good correlation was observed between the crack location in OCT images and the number of AE signal hits. The AE technique combined with OCT images as a pre-clinical assessment tool to determine the integrity of cemented load bearing restored ceramic material. Sustainable cyclic load stresses in ceramic/enamel bonded specimens were substantially lower than the measured SBS. Predicted S-N curve showed that the maximum endured load was 10.98 MPa (about 34.48 N) passing 10(6) fatigue cyclic. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amami, Souhail; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim

    2010-01-01

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  6. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amami, Souhail [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)], E-mail: souhail.amami@utc.fr; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  7. In situ calibration of acoustic emission transducers by time reversal method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk; Chlada, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 240, April (2016), s. 50-56 ISSN 0924-4247 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : time reversed acoustic s * calibration * in situ * acoustic emission Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0924424716300334/1-s2.0-S0924424716300334-main.pdf?_tid=0acf4736-ef6d-11e5-b826-00000aacb362&acdnat=1458568911_1c21eda9762b905a684ff939463ef3fe

  8. Acoustic monitoring system to quantify ingestive behavior of free-grazing cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods to estimate intake in grazing livestock include using markers, visual observation, mechanical sensors that respond to jaw movement and acoustic recording. In most of the acoustic monitoring studies, the microphone is inverted on the forehead of the grazing livestock and the skull is utilize...

  9. Mesoscale analysis of failure in quasi-brittle materials: comparison between lattice model and acoustic emission data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, David; Verdon, Laura; Lefort, Vincent; Grassl, Peter; Saliba, Jacqueline; Regoin, Jean-Pierre; Loukili, Ahmed; Pijaudier-Cabot, Gilles

    2015-10-25

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse the development and the evolution of the fracture process zone during fracture and damage in quasi-brittle materials. A model taking into account the material details at the mesoscale is used to describe the failure process at the scale of the heterogeneities. This model is used to compute histograms of the relative distances between damaged points. These numerical results are compared with experimental data, where the damage evolution is monitored using acoustic emissions. Histograms of the relative distances between damage events in the numerical calculations and acoustic events in the experiments exhibit good agreement. It is shown that the mesoscale model provides relevant information from the point of view of both global responses and the local failure process. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Impact of the Test Device on the Behavior of the Acoustic Emission Signals: Contribution of the Numerical Modeling to Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issiaka Traore, Oumar; Cristini, Paul; Favretto-Cristini, Nathalie; Pantera, Laurent; Viguier-Pla, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    In a context of nuclear safety experiment monitoring with the non destructive testing method of acoustic emission, we study the impact of the test device on the interpretation of the recorded physical signals by using spectral finite element modeling. The numerical results are validated by comparison with real acoustic emission data obtained from previous experiments. The results show that several parameters can have significant impacts on acoustic wave propagation and then on the interpretation of the physical signals. The potential position of the source mechanism, the positions of the receivers and the nature of the coolant fluid have to be taken into account in the definition a pre-processing strategy of the real acoustic emission signals. In order to show the relevance of such an approach, we use the results to propose an optimization of the positions of the acoustic emission sensors in order to reduce the estimation bias of the time-delay and then improve the localization of the source mechanisms.

  11. Acoustical method of whole-body hydration status monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvazyan, A. P.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Calhoun, M.; Utter, A.

    2016-07-01

    An acoustical handheld hydration monitor (HM) for assessing the water balance of the human body was developed. Dehydration is a critical public health problem. Many elderly over age of 65 are particularly vulnerable as are infants and young children. Given that dehydration is both preventable and reversible, the need for an easy-to-perform method for the detection of water imbalance is of the utmost clinical importance. The HM is based on an experimental fact that ultrasound velocity in muscle is a linear function of water content and can be referenced to the hydration status of the body. Studies on the validity of HM for the assessment of whole-body hydration status were conducted in the Appalachian State University, USA, on healthy young adults and on elderly subjects residing at an assisted living facility. The HM was able to track changes in total body water during periods of acute dehydration and rehydration in athletes and day-to-day and diurnal variability of hydration in elderly. Results of human studies indicate that HM has a potential to become an efficient tool for detecting abnormal changes in the body hydration status.

  12. Identifying Technical Condition of Vehicle Gearbox Using Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furch, Jan; Glos, Josef

    2017-06-01

    The article examines the technical condition of rotating parts using acoustic diagnostics. The measured object was a mechanical transmission of a field vehicle. Recently this method has been developing very quickly and is expected to be used not only for the signal analysis itself, but also for the failure occurrence prediction which is our aim in the future. In our article we observe the technical condition of a four-speed transmission and analyse the acoustic signal expressed by the root mean square of a noise level in decibels.

  13. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  14. Acoustic emission characterization of fracture toughness for fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Hui; Sun, Yuyao; Zhang, Lidong; Wang, Hongqin; Cheng, Laifei

    2013-01-01

    The fracture toughness of a carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite was investigated relating to classical critical stress intensity factor K IC , work of fracture, and acoustic emission energy. The K IC was obtained by the single edge notch beam method and the work of fracture was calculated using the featured area under the load–displacement curves. The K IC , work of fracture, and acoustic emission energy were compared for the composites before and after heat treatment and then analyzed associated with toughening microstructures of fiber pullout. It indicates that the work of fracture and acoustic emission energy can be more suitable to reflect the toughness rather than the traditional K IC , which has certain limitation for the fracture toughness characterization of the crack tolerant fiber ceramic composites.

  15. Application of acoustic emission, as non destructive testing technique, to nuclear components inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Miro, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A panorama of actual state of acoustic emission as non destructive testing technique, from stand point of its safety applications to nuclear reactor is offered. In first place the physic grounds of acoustic emission phenomenon is briefly exposed. After we speak about the experimental methods for detection, and overall is made an explanation of the problems which are found during the application of this technology to on-line inspection of nuclear oower plants. It is hoped that this repport makes a contribution in the sense of to create a favourable atmosphere toward the introduction in our country of this important technique, and concretely within the nuclear power industry. In this last field the employ of acoustic emission is overcoming the experimental stage. (author)

  16. Coherent changes of multifractal properties of continuous acoustic emission at failure of heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleev, Ivan; Bayandin, Yuriy; Naimark, Oleg

    2017-12-01

    This work performs a correlation analysis of the statistical properties of continuous acoustic emission recorded in different parts of marble and fiberglass laminate samples under quasi-static deformation. A spectral coherent measure of time series, which is a generalization of the squared coherence spectrum on a multidimensional series, was chosen. The spectral coherent measure was estimated in a sliding time window for two parameters of the acoustic emission multifractal singularity spectrum: the spectrum width and the generalized Hurst exponent realizing the maximum of the singularity spectrum. It is shown that the preparation of the macrofracture focus is accompanied by the synchronization (coherent behavior) of the statistical properties of acoustic emission in allocated frequency intervals.

  17. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Hilton, B. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Newchurch, M. J.; Carr, J. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch between 2018 and 2021. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO observes from Mexico City, Cuba, and the Bahamas to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (approximately 2.1 kilometers N/S by 4.4 kilometers E/W at 36.5 degrees N, 100 degrees W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry, as well as contributing to carbon cycle knowledge. Measurements are made hourly from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability present in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry that are unobservable from current low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites that measure once per day. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), bromine monoxide (BrO), IO (iodine monoxide),water vapor, aerosols, cloud parameters, ultraviolet radiation, and foliage properties. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides these near-real-time air quality products that will be made publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the

  18. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  19. A Real-Time Audio Tele-Presence Device for Remote Acoustic Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaudrey, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... At the end of the Phase I effort, ATI delivered to ARL a fully functional wired binaural hearing device capable of accurately monitoring remote acoustic environments as far as 50 feet from the listener/operator...

  20. Head Injury and Intracranial Pressure Monitor Using Ultrasonic and Low-Frequency Acoustic (ULFA) Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this research project is the development of a non-invasive method and instrument for head injury detection and monitoring using a new approach based on ultrasonic and low-frequency acoustic (ULFA...

  1. Experimental Analysis of Hydraulic Fracture Growth and Acoustic Emission Response in a Layered Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Li; Shicheng, Zhang; Yushi, Zou; Xinfang, Ma; Shan, Wu; Yinuo, Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Microseismic/acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is an essential technology for understanding hydraulic fracture (HF) geometry and stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) during hydraulic fracturing in unconventional reservoirs. To investigate HF growth mechanisms and features of induced microseismic/AE events in a layered formation, laboratory fracturing experiments were performed on shale specimens (30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm) with multiple bedding planes (BPs) under triaxial stresses. AE monitoring was used to reveal the spatial distribution and hypocenter mechanisms of AE events induced by rock failure. Computerized tomography scanning was used to observe the internal fracture geometry. Experimental results showed that the various HF geometries could be obviously distinguished based on injection pressure curves and AE responses. Fracture complexity was notably increased when vertically growing HFs connected with and opened more BPs. The formation of a complex fracture network was generally indicated by frequent fluctuations in injection pressure curves, intense AE activity, and three-dimensionally distributed AE events. Investigations of the hypocenter mechanisms revealed that shear failure/event dominated in shale specimens. Shear and tensile events were induced in hydraulically connected regions, and shear events also occurred around BPs that were not hydraulically connected. This led to an overestimation of HF height and SRV in layered formations based on the AE location results. The results also showed that variable injection rate and using plugging agent were conducive in promoting HF to penetrate through the weak and high-permeability BPs, thereby increasing the fracture height.

  2. Acoustic Emission Detection and Prediction of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Composite Patch Repairs Using Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Singh, Navdeep; Singh, Navrag

    2007-01-01

    An aircraft is subjected to severe structural and aerodynamic loads during its service life. These loads can cause damage or weakening of the structure especially for aging military and civilian aircraft, thereby affecting its load carrying capabilities. Hence composite patch repairs are increasingly used to repair damaged aircraft metallic structures to restore its structural efficiency. This paper presents the results of Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring of crack propagation in 2024-T3 Clad aluminum panels repaired with adhesively bonded octagonal, single sided boron/epoxy composite patch under tension-tension fatigue loading. Crack propagation gages were used to monitor crack initiation. The identified AE sensor features were used to train neural networks for predicting crack length. The results show that AE events are correlated with crack propagation. AE system was able to detect crack propagation even at high noise condition of 10 Hz loading; that crack propagation signals can be differentiated from matrix cracking signals that take place due to fiber breakage in the composite patch. Three back-propagation cascade feed forward networks were trained to predict crack length based on the number of fatigue cycles, AE event number, and both the Fatigue Cycles and AE events, as inputs respectively. Network using both fatigue cycles and AE event number as inputs to predict crack length gave the best results, followed by Network with fatigue cycles as input, while network with just AE events as input had a greater error

  3. Acoustic Emission of Large PRSEUS Structures (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Michael R.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    In the role of structural health monitoring (SHM), Acoustic Emission (AE) analysis is being investigated as an effective method for tracking damage development in large composite structures under load. Structures made using Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) for damage tolerant, light, and economical airframe construction are being pursued by The Boeing Company and NASA under the Environmentally Responsible Aircraft initiative (ERA). The failure tests of two PRSEUS substructures based on the Boeing Hybrid Wing Body fuselage concept were conducted during third quarter 2011 and second quarter 2015. One fundamental concern of these tests was determining the effectiveness of the stitched integral stiffeners to inhibit damage progression. By design, severe degradation of load carrying capability should not occur prior to Design Ultimate Load (DUL). While minor damage prior to DUL was anticipated, the integral stitching should not fail since this would allow a stiffener-skin delamination to progress rapidly and alter the transfer of load into the stiffeners. In addition, the stiffeners should not fracture because they are fundamental to structural integrity. Getting the best information from each AE sensor is a primary consideration because a sparse network of sensors is implemented. Sensitivity to stiffener-contiguous degradation is supported by sensors near the stiffeners, which increases the coverage per sensor via AE waveguide actions. Some sensors are located near potentially critical areas or "critical zones" as identified by numerical analyses. The approach is compared with the damage progression monitored by other techniques (e.g. ultrasonic C-scan).

  4. Acoustic emissions of a boiling liquid - an experimental survey in water and extrapolation to SFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderhaegen, M.; Paumel, K.; Tourin, A.

    2013-06-01

    The acoustic detection of sodium boiling is seen as a promising and innovative surveillance technique for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). It could be especially useful to detect in-core boiling that are the consequence of initiating accidents or whilst the mean subassembly temperature is very close to the nominal value. This latter is a consequence of the fuel assembly design of SFRs. Furthermore, it is a technique that has been proven to be successful in the past to follow the boiling behavior during SFR experiments that were aimed at simulating accidental conditions. However its effectiveness as in-core instrumentation still has to be demonstrated. In that aim, the acoustic emissions of sodium boiling in subassemblies are studied. Experimental studies are however limited to the boiling of common coolants due to the complications that arise when boiling liquid metals. As such, simple water experiments are performed. And although the results of these experiments are not completely representative for sodium boiling due to the incomplete thermo-hydraulic similarities between sodium and water, they can provide an interesting knowledge of the many influences that control the acoustic pressure field. In this article we'll specifically show how the condensation of vapor in subcooled liquid, the principal contribution to the acoustic emissions during boiling and hence the acoustic spectrum, is influenced by a pin-bundle geometry. We study this influence by comparing pool boiling experimental acoustic recordings with those of a simple pin-bundle geometry boiling experiment. The qualitative link, between this relatively simple pin-bundle experiment and the condensation phenomena that take place during sodium boiling inside SFR subassemblies, is used as a basis for this analysis. This simple experimental evidence, together with other theoretical arguments based on a thorough analysis of the sodium material properties, enables us to deduce that simple sodium

  5. Acoustic emission localization on ship hull structures using a deep learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgoulas, George; Kappatos, Vassilios; Nikolakopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high dimension......In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high...

  6. Acoustic emission on thermoelastic martensitic transformations in alloys in the course of mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.A.; Kokhanenko, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    The connection of the emission process with the process of the deformation accumulation and relaxation in the cycle of the martensitic transformations is studied. The martensitic transformations cycling was investigated by cycling change in the temperature in the Ti 50 Ni 50 Cu 10 alloys. The deformation accumulation and recovery is observed in the alloys undergoing the thermoelastic martensitic transformations under the mechanical loading conditions. The acoustic emission, accompanying the martensitic transformations, reflects the peculiarities of the alloy deformation behavior by the martensitic transformations. The anomalous acoustic effect correlates with the reversible deformation accumulation and does not correlates with the irreversible deformation accumulation [ru

  7. Acoustic emission measurements on real reactor components with fracture mechanical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deuster, G

    1988-12-31

    This document presents acoustic emission measurements carried out on a reactor pressure vessel during different loadings: thermal shocking, hydro-test, cyclic loading. The acoustic emission system is described and results are provided. It appears that signals from crack border friction and crack propagation can be separated by the analysis of the signal parameters. During thermal shock, crack propagation can be detected very sensitively, together with crack border friction. During hydro-test, it appears that defects which do not grow during the experiment are not indicated, and no border friction appears. (TEC). 6 refs.

  8. Acoustic emission measurements on real reactor components with fracture mechanical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuster, G.

    1988-01-01

    This document presents acoustic emission measurements carried out on a reactor pressure vessel during different loadings: thermal shocking, hydro-test, cyclic loading. The acoustic emission system is described and results are provided. It appears that signals from crack border friction and crack propagation can be separated by the analysis of the signal parameters. During thermal shock, crack propagation can be detected very sensitively, together with crack border friction. During hydro-test, it appears that defects which do not grow during the experiment are not indicated, and no border friction appears. (TEC)

  9. Using acoustic emissions to enhance fracture toughness calculations for CCNBD marble specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kaklis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rock fracture mechanics has been widely applied to blasting, hydraulic fracturing, mechanical fragmentation, rock slope analysis, geophysics, earthquake mechanics and many other science and technology fields. Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. In the present study, acoustic emission (AE measurements were carried out during cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc (CCNBD tests on Nestos marble specimens. The fracture toughness of different modes of loading (mode-I and –II is calculated and the results are discussed in conjunction with the AE parameters.

  10. Listening to the Deep: Live monitoring of ocean noise and cetacean acoustic signals

    OpenAIRE

    André, Michel; Van der Schaar, Mike Connor Roger Malcolm; Zaugg, Serge Alain; Houégnigan, Ludwig; Sánchez, A.M.; Castell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The development and broad use of passive acoustic monitoring techniques have the potential to help assessing the large-scale influence of artificial noise on marine organisms and ecosystems. Deep-sea observatories have the potential to play a key role in understanding these recent acoustic changes. LIDO(Listening to the Deep Ocean Environment) is an international project that is allowing the real-time longterm monitoring of marine ambient noise as well as marine mammal sounds at cabled and...

  11. Damage characterization on human femur bone by means of ultrasonics and acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strantza, M; Boulpaep, F; Van Hemelrijck, D; Aggelis, D G; Polyzos, D; Louis, O

    2015-01-01

    Human bone tissue is characterized as a material with high brittleness. Due to this nature, visible signs of cracking are not easy to be detected before final failure. The main objective of this work is to investigate if the acoustic emission (AE) technique can offer valuable insight to the fracture process of human femur specimens as in other engineering materials characterization. This study describes the AE activity during fracture of whole femur bones under flexural load. Before fracture, broadband AE sensors were used in order to measure parameters like wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, were also examined relatively to the propagation distance as a preparation for the AE monitoring during fracture. After the ultrasonic study, the samples were partly cast in concrete and fixed as cantilevers. A point load was applied on the femur head, which due to the test geometry resulted in a combination of two different patterns of fracture, bending and torsion. Two AE broadband sensors were placed in different points of the sample, one near the fixing end and the other near the femur head. Preliminary analysis shows that parameters like the number of acquired AE signals and their amplitude are well correlated with the load history. Furthermore, the parameters of rise time and frequency can differentiate the two fracture patterns. Additionally, AE allows the detection of the load at the onset of fracture from the micro-cracking events that occur at the early loading stages, allowing monitoring of the whole fracture process. Parameters that have been used extensively for monitoring and characterization of fracture modes of engineering materials seem to poses characterization power in the case of bone tissue monitoring as well. (paper)

  12. Evaluation of SHM system produced by additive manufacturing via acoustic emission and other NDT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strantza, Maria; Aggelis, Dimitrios G; de Baere, Dieter; Guillaume, Patrick; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-10-21

    During the last decades, structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are used in order to detect damage in structures. We have developed a novel structural health monitoring approach, the so-called "effective structural health monitoring" (eSHM) system. The current SHM system is incorporated into a metallic structure by means of additive manufacturing (AM) and has the possibility to advance life safety and reduce direct operative costs. It operates based on a network of capillaries that are integrated into an AM structure. The internal pressure of the capillaries is continuously monitored by a pressure sensor. When a crack nucleates and reaches the capillary, the internal pressure changes signifying the existence of the flaw. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the crack detection capacity of the eSHM system and crack location accuracy by means of various non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques. During this study, detailed acoustic emission (AE) analysis was applied in AM materials for the first time in order to investigate if phenomena like the Kaiser effect and waveform parameters used in conventional metals can offer valuable insight into the damage accumulation of the AM structure as well. Liquid penetrant inspection, eddy current and radiography were also used in order to confirm the fatigue damage and indicate the damage location on un-notched four-point bending AM metallic specimens with an integrated eSHM system. It is shown that the eSHM system in combination with NDT can provide correct information on the damage condition of additive manufactured metals.

  13. Low temperature tensile deformation and acoustic emission signal characteristics of AISI 304LN stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K.; Bar, H.N. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Mandal, D. [Material Processing and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Roy, H., E-mail: himadri9504@gmail.com [NDT and Metallurgy Group, CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur 713209 (India); Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S. [Material Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2014-03-01

    This investigation examines low temperature tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304LN stainless steel along with synergistic analysis of acoustic emission signals. The tensile tests are done at a range of temperatures starting from 283 K till 223 K. The fracture surfaces of the broken specimens are investigated using scanning electron microscope. The amount of deformation induced martensite is measured using a feritscope. The obtained results reveal that with decrease in test temperature, both strength and ductility increase. The increase in strength and ductility with decreasing temperature is explained in terms of void morphologies and formation of deformation induced martensite. The rapid increment in strength and ductility at 223 K is associated with the burst of martensitic transformation at that temperature; which has been clarified from acoustic emission signals. An additional initiative has been taken to model the evolution of martensite formation from the observed cumulative emission counts using a non linear logarithmic functional form. The fitted curves from the recorded acoustic emission cumulative count data are found to be better correlated compared to earlier obtained results. However, at 223 K normal non-linear logarithmic fit is not found suitable due to presence of burst type signals at intervals, therefore; piecewise logarithmic function to model acoustic emission bursts is proposed.

  14. The use of the acoustic emission for the components of the primary circuit of the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, V.

    1992-01-01

    Full text: The Modrany Engineering Works (Modranske strojirny) is a producer and a final supplier of the main connecting piping circuit systems and valves for the nuclear power plants (type VVER 440 and VVER 1000) built in Czechoslovakia. Besides the delivery and assembly of valves and components methods there were developed for a monitoring of the stated equipment ability of a service in the Material and Diagnostic Laboratory, which is a part of the company. An important object of this work is to obtain a sufficient set of data and to work out suitable methods, on the basis of which it would be possible to perform a serious estimation of residual service life of the main piping components after certain service operation of the nuclear power plant. During the operation of a nuclear power station a failure of the main piping circuit could happen in either of two possible modes: 1.) A sudden break - by an unstable defect propagation leading to a. final fracture of the piping; 2) A fatigue failure - which is characterised by a gradual subcritical growth of defect in relation to the loading parameters. This process is frequently accelerated by further processes, e.g. corrosion. It is therefore suitable to use such physical and mechanical quantities, which characterize the material damage. Acoustic emission signals belongs to these quantities. A knowledge of the response of these signals in relation to the damage of the material gives us the possibility to evaluate the residual life of the piping containing defects. The importance of this is increasing mainly after a long period of service. She paper deals in details with experience gained in application of acoustic emission, during pressure tests of primary circuit components (elbow, welds, T- junction etc) in laboratory conditions which imitate those in service. There are shown some results of cyclic fatigue tests by internal pressure on prototypes models and specimen. Acoustic emission method represents the

  15. Towards Noise Tomography and Passive Monitoring Using Distributed Acoustic Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paitz, P.; Fichtner, A.

    2017-12-01

    Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) has the potential to revolutionize the field of seismic data acquisition. Thanks to their cost-effectiveness, fiber-optic cables may have the capability of complementing conventional geophones and seismometers by filling a niche of applications utilizing large amounts of data. Therefore, DAS may serve as an additional tool to investigate the internal structure of the Earth and its changes over time; on scales ranging from hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs to the entire globe. An additional potential may be in the existence of large fibre networks deployed already for telecommunication purposes. These networks that already exist today could serve as distributed seismic antennas. We investigate theoretically how ambient noise tomography may be used with DAS data. For this we extend the theory of seismic interferometry to the measurement of strain. With numerical, 2D finite-difference examples we investigate the impact of source and receiver effects. We study the effect of heterogeneous source distributions and the cable orientation by assessing similarities and differences to the Green's function. We also compare the obtained interferometric waveforms from strain interferometry to displacement interferometric wave fields obtained with existing methods. Intermediate results show that the obtained interferometric waveforms can be connected to the Green's Functions and provide consistent information about the propagation medium. These simulations will be extended to reservoir scale subsurface structures. Future work will include the application of the theory to real-data examples. The presented research depicts the early stage of a combination of theoretical investigations, numerical simulations and real-world data applications. We will therefore evaluate the potentials and shortcomings of DAS in reservoir monitoring and seismology at the current state, with a long-term vision of global seismic tomography utilizing DAS data from

  16. Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Heavy Water and Uranium Process Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Davis, Eric Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-20

    This presentation includes slides on Project Goals; Heavy Water Production Monitoring: A New Challenge for the IAEA; Noninvasive Measurements in SFAI Cell; Large Scatter in Literature Values; Large Scatter in Literature Values; Highest Precision Sound Speed Data Available: New Standard in H/D; ~400 pts of data; Noninvasive Measurements in SFAI Cell; New funding from NA241 SGTech; Uranium Solution Monitoring: Inspired by IAEA Challenge in Kazakhstan; Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Uranium in Solutions; Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Uranium in Solutions; and finally a summary.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Monitor for Deposition and Analysis of Ultra-Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) based thin film deposition monitor device and system for monitoring the deposition of ultra-thin films and nanomaterials and the analysis thereof is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include differential delay line device designs, and which can optionally have integral reference devices fabricated on the same substrate as the sensing device, or on a separate device in thermal contact with the film monitoring/analysis device, in order to provide inherently temperature compensated measurements. These deposition monitor and analysis devices can include inherent temperature compensation, higher sensitivity to surface interactions than quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, and the ability to operate at extreme temperatures.

  18. Influence of water-soaking time on the acoustic emission characteristics and spatial fractal dimensions of coal under uniaxial compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zheqiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The water-soaking time affects the physical and mechanical properties of coals, and the temporal and spatial evolution of acoustic emissions reflects the fracture damage process of rock. This study conducted uniaxial compression acoustic emissions tests of coal samples with different water-soaking times to investigate the influence of water-soaking time on the acoustic emissions characteristics and spatial fractal dimensions during the deformation and failure process of coals. The results demonstrate that the acoustic emissions characteristics decrease with increases in the water-soaking time. The acoustic emissions spatial fractal dimension changes from a single dimensionality reduction model to a fluctuation dimensionality reduction model, and the stress level of the initial descending point of the fractal dimension increases. With increases in the water-soaking time, the destruction of coal transitions from continuous intense failure throughout the process to a lower release of energy concentrated near the peak strength.

  19. 40 CFR 60.49Da - Emission monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.49Da Section 60... Generating Units for Which Construction is Commenced After September 18, 1978 § 60.49Da Emission monitoring...). (2) As an alternative to the monitoring requirements in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, an owner or...

  20. Acoustic Ecology and Remote Acoustic Monitoring of a Minke Whale Population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gedamke, Jason

    2000-01-01

    Sound is the most effective means of communication in the ocean. A uniquely inquisitive minke whale population on the northern Great Barrier Reef presents an unprecedented research opportunity to study minke acoustics...

  1. Casa Grande Ruins National Monument acoustical monitoring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    During September 2010, The Volpe Center collected baseline acoustical data at Casa Grande National Monument (CAGR), at one site for 28 days. The baseline data collected during this period will help park managers and planners estimate the effects of f...

  2. Acoustic monitoring of terrorist intrusion in a drinking water network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quesson, B.A.J.; Sheldon-Robert, M.K.; Vloerbergh, I.N.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.

    2009-01-01

    In collaboration with Kiwa Water Research, TNO (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research) has investigated the possibilities to detect and classify aberrant sounds in water networks, using acoustic sensors. Amongst the sources of such sounds are pumps, drills, mechanical impacts,

  3. Tropospheric emissions: Monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Hilton, B. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Newchurch, M. J.; Carr, J. L.; Janz, S. J.; Andraschko, M. R.; Arola, A.; Baker, B. D.; Canova, B. P.; Chan Miller, C.; Cohen, R. C.; Davis, J. E.; Dussault, M. E.; Edwards, D. P.; Fishman, J.; Ghulam, A.; González Abad, G.; Grutter, M.; Herman, J. R.; Houck, J.; Jacob, D. J.; Joiner, J.; Kerridge, B. J.; Kim, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L.; Li, C.; Lindfors, A.; Martin, R. V.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C.; Natraj, V.; Neil, D. O.; Nowlan, C. R.; O`Sullivan, E. J.; Palmer, P. I.; Pierce, R. B.; Pippin, M. R.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Szykman, J. J.; Torres, O.; Veefkind, J. P.; Veihelmann, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Chance, K.

    2017-01-01

    TEMPO was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch between 2018 and 2021. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO observes from Mexico City, Cuba, and the Bahamas to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution ( 2.1 km N/S×4.4 km E/W at 36.5°N, 100°W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry, as well as contributing to carbon cycle knowledge. Measurements are made hourly from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability present in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry that are unobservable from current low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites that measure once per day. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), bromine monoxide (BrO), IO (iodine monoxide), water vapor, aerosols, cloud parameters, ultraviolet radiation, and foliage properties. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides these near-real-time air quality products that will be made publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the North American component of the global geostationary constellation of pollution monitoring

  4. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  5. Efficacy of extracting indices from large-scale acoustic recordings to monitor biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Rachel; McKenna, Megan F; Clapp, Mary; Meyer, Erik; Stabenau, Erik; Angeloni, Lisa M; Crooks, Kevin; Wittemyer, George

    2018-04-20

    Passive acoustic monitoring has the potential to be a powerful approach for assessing biodiversity across large spatial and temporal scales. However, extracting meaningful information from recordings can be prohibitively time consuming. Acoustic indices offer a relatively rapid method for processing acoustic data and are increasingly used to characterize biological communities. We examine the ability of acoustic indices to predict the diversity and abundance of biological sounds within recordings. First we reviewed the acoustic index literature and found that over 60 indices have been applied to a range of objectives with varying success. We then implemented a subset of the most successful indices on acoustic data collected at 43 sites in temperate terrestrial and tropical marine habitats across the continental U.S., developing a predictive model of the diversity of animal sounds observed in recordings. For terrestrial recordings, random forest models using a suite of acoustic indices as covariates predicted Shannon diversity, richness, and total number of biological sounds with high accuracy (R 2 > = 0.94, mean squared error MSE indices assessed, roughness, acoustic activity, and acoustic richness contributed most to the predictive ability of models. Performance of index models was negatively impacted by insect, weather, and anthropogenic sounds. For marine recordings, random forest models predicted Shannon diversity, richness, and total number of biological sounds with low accuracy (R 2 = 195), indicating that alternative methods are necessary in marine habitats. Our results suggest that using a combination of relevant indices in a flexible model can accurately predict the diversity of biological sounds in temperate terrestrial acoustic recordings. Thus, acoustic approaches could be an important contribution to biodiversity monitoring in some habitats in the face of accelerating human-caused ecological change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

  6. Tasks tolerating application of analogue methods for determining acoustic emission source co-ordinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artyukhov, V.I.; Vakar, K.B.; Makarov, V.I.; Ovchinnikov, N.I.; Perevezentsev, V.N.; Rzhevkin, V.R.; Shemyakin, V.V.; Yakovlev, G.V.

    1980-01-01

    Described are cases of coordinate detection of the acoustic emission (AE) sources during AE-testing of power reactors using analog systems. Five testing variants of design linear elements are considered and fields of their practical application to welded joint testing are pointed out. Described is the method of coordinate detection based on ''multibeam'' effect

  7. Network sensor calibration for retrieving accurate moment tensors of acoustic emissions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davi, Rosalia; Vavryčuk, Václav; Charalampidou, E.-M.; Kwiatek, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, September (2013), s. 59-67 ISSN 1365-1609 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/12/1491 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 230669 - AIM Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : acoustic emissions * focal mechanisms * fracturing * moment tensors * sensor calibration Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.424, year: 2013

  8. Acoustic emission and estimation of flaw significance in reactor pressure boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The work discussed is intended to establish the feasibility of using acoustic emission (AE) to detect and evaluate growing flaws in nuclear reactor pressure boundaries. Basic AE identification and interpretation methods have grown out of Phase 1. Phases 2 and 3 to test and demonstrate developed methodology on a vessel test and on a reactor are in progress

  9. The characteristics of acoustic emission signal under composite destruction on GFRP gas cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Hyun Sup; Lee, Jong O; Ju, No Hoe; So, Cheal Ho; Lee, Jong Kyu

    2013-01-01

    This study is investigation of the characteristics for acoustic emission signal generated by destruction on glass fiber bundles and specimen that was machined composite materials surrounding the outside of GFRP cylinder. The Amplitude of acoustic emission signal gets bigger as the cutting angle of knife increases. Accordingly, the number of hits in destruction of composite materials specimen have more in longitudinal direction (longitudinal direction to the glass fiber) than in hoop direction (horizontal direction to the glass fiber) while the amplitude of signals were bigger in hoop direction than longitudinal direction. It was found out that the amplitude of the glass fiber breakage is more than 40 dB and that the amplitude of signal for matrix crack was less than 40 dB because matrix crack signal was not observed when threshold value is 40 dB and matrix crack signal suddenly appeared when threshold value is 32 dB. The slope of the amplitude is related to the acoustic emission source and the slope of the amplitude of the horizontal and vertical directions are 0.16 and 0.08. In particular, The slope of the amplitude of longitudinal direction breakage appear similar to the glass fiber breakage and therefore Acoustic emission source of longitudinal direction breakage is estimated the glass fiber breakage.

  10. Evoked acoustic emissions from the human ear. III. Findings in neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, N J; Bagi, P; Elberling, C

    1983-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in a consecutive series of 20 full-term and otherwise normal neonates with the equipment and method previously used in adults. One ear randomly chosen was tested in each baby, and otoscopy and tympanometry were normal in all ears. A 2 kHz click stimulus...

  11. Contribution of in situ acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry to study zirconium alloy oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Haj, O.; Peres, V.; Serris, E.; Cournil, M.; Grosjean, F.; Kittel, J.; Ropital, F.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloy (zircaloy-4) corrosion behavior under oxidizing atmosphere at high temperature was studied using thermogravimetric experiment associated with acoustic emission analysis. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion is observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen which produces zirconium nitride. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration is accompanied by an acoustic emission (AE) activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition or during the cooling of the sample. Acoustic emission signals analysis allows us to distinguish different populations of cracks in the ZrO 2 layer. These cracks have also been observed by SEM on post mortem cross section of oxidized samples and by in-situ microscopy observations on the top surface of the sample during oxidation. The numerous small convoluted thin cracks observed deeper in the zirconia scale are not detected by the AE technique. From these studies we can conclude that mechanisms as irreversible mechanisms, as cracks initiation and propagation, generate AE signals

  12. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation of M250 grade maraging steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Chandan Kumar; Rajkumar, Kesavan Vadivelu; Chandra Rao, Bhaghi Purna; Jayakumar, Tamanna

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) generated during room temperature tensile deformation of varyingly heat treated (solution annealed and thermally aged) M250 grade maraging steel specimens have been studied. Deformation of microstructure corresponding to different heat treated conditions in this steel could be distinctly characterized using the AE parameters such as RMS voltage, counts and peak amplitude of AE hits (events).

  13. Application of acoustic emission measurements in the evaluation of prestressed cast in-between decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hemert, P.H.A.; Fennis-Huijben, S.A.A.M.; Hordijk, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of concrete structures, that is built in the sixties and seventies of the twentieth century, need to be re-evaluated. It should be judged whether their capacity is still sufficient for the increased traffic loads. Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive technique that can possibly

  14. The Mechanical and Fracturing of Rockburst in Tunnel and Its Acoustic Emission Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxin Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE is associated with rock failure and rock fracturing. In order to investigate the influence of tectonic stress on rockburst in tunnel, a biaxial loading experiment system was used in this study. The excavation operation is undertaken at the center of samples to monitor the tunnel forming process in situ, and the different horizontal stresses can be studied by using the AE monitoring technique. The dynamical fracturing process of the tunnel model was summarized, and the timing parameters of AE signals in rockburst stages were obtained. The curves of AE energy and cumulative AE energy with time show a “step-like” rising trend before the occurrence of rockburst. The evolution of macro- and mesocracks is captured, and the mechanical conditions for a “V-shaped” rockburst pit are derived. As the horizontal stress increases, the effect of excavation unloading becomes more pronounced, and the damage caused by the rockburst intensifies. In the early stage of rockburst evolution, the fracturing type follows a model of tensile-shear mix model. A positive relationship between the ratio of shear fracturing type and the horizontal stress can be noted when the rock is about to burst, and the high intensity and the high energy released of from the rock-fracturing event have become evident. Thus, the results indicate that one should focus on monitoring both sides of the surrounding rock of the tunnel so as to extract the characteristics of the process of tunnel in tunnel. The applications of biaxial loading system and during an excavation operation provide a useful tool to simulate the rock burst in tunnel at an engineering site.

  15. Status reports on the development and application of acoustic emission analysis. Proceedings; Statusberichte zur Entwicklung und Anwendung der Schallemissionsanalyse. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This proceedings-CD comprises 20 papers presented at the 17. Kolloquium Schallemission (Acoustic Emission Colloquium) at Bad Schandau. The following subjects were discussed: 1. Acoustic emission analysis of tensile tests on standard test specimens of different wood materials; 2. Application of pattern recognition methods for damage analyses of fibre-reinforced plastics; 3. Acoustic emission analysis for measuring crack growth in finned armor steel under dynamic load; 4. Acoustic emission analysis with zonal sound location: Test objects, test results and evaluation of acoustic emission signals; 5. Acoustic emission analysis in overall fatigue testing of a wind rotor blade; 6. Laboratory methods for assessing the sensitivity of acoustic emission sensors; 7. Acoustic emission analysis in burst tests of cast aluminium casings; 8. Visualization of acoustic emission localizations; 9. Threshold-independent and complete recording of characteristics and wave forms of transient and continuous acoustic emission; 10. Characterization of wide-band acoustic emission sensors; 11. Handling of large data volumes in acoustic emission analysis, a contribution to the development of algorithms; 12. Acoustic emission analysis and ultrasonic analysis for the characterization of crack networks in saline rock. One of the papers is available as a separate record in this database. [German] Diese Tagungs-CD enthaelt 20 Vortraege, die auf dem 17. Kolloquium Schallemission in Bad Schandau gehalten wurden. Die Themen waren: 1. Schallemissionsanalyse von Zugversuchen an Standardpruefkoerpern aus unterschiedlichen Holzwerkstoffen; 2. Anwendung von Mustererkennungsverfahren zur Schadensanalyse in faserverstaerkten Kunststoffen; 3. Anwendung der Schallemissionsanalyse zur Ermittlung des Risswachstums bei schwingender Beanspruchung von geripptem Bewehrungsstahl; 4. Schallemissionspruefung mit zonaler Ortung Pruefobjekte, Pruefergebnisse und Nachbewertung von Schallemissionssignalen; 5

  16. Acoustic emission technique for characterisation of deformation, fatigue, fracture and phase transformation and for leak detection with high sensitivity- our experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been used for studying tensile deformation, fracture behaviour, detection and assessment of fatigue crack growth and α-martensite phase transformation in austenitic alloys. A methodology for amplification of weak acoustic emission signals has been established. Acoustic emission technique with advanced spectral analysis has enabled detection with high sensitivity of minute leaks in noisy environments. (author)

  17. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-06-01

    TEMPO, selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest-cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 %. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well-proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement

  18. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David; Al-Saadi, Jay; Janz, Scott

    2015-01-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 percent. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will

  19. Real Time Monitoring of Containerless Microreactions in Acoustically Levitated Droplets via Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Elizabeth A; Esen, Cemal; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-09-06

    Direct in-droplet (in stillo) microreaction monitoring using acoustically levitated micro droplets has been achieved by combining acoustic (ultrasonic) levitation for the first time with real time ambient tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acoustic levitation and inherent mixing of microliter volumes of reactants (3 μL droplets), yielding total reaction volumes of 6 μL, supported monitoring the acid-catalyzed degradation reaction of erythromycin A. This reaction was chosen to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of directly monitoring in stillo microreactions via hyphenated acoustic levitation and ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The microreactions took place completely in stillo over 30, 60, and 120 s within the containerless stable central pressure node of an acoustic levitator, thus readily promoting reaction miniaturization. For the evaluation of the miniaturized in stillo reactions, the degradation reactions were also carried out in vials (in vitro) with a total reaction volume of 400 μL. The reacted in vitro mixtures (6 μL total) were similarly introduced into the acoustic levitator prior to ambient ionization MS/MS analysis. The in stillo miniaturized reactions provided immediate real-time snap-shots of the degradation process for more accurate reaction monitoring and used a fraction of the reactants, while the larger scale in vitro reactions only yielded general reaction information.

  20. Acoustic Emission and Damage Characteristics of Granite Subjected to High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE signals can be detected from rocks under the effect of temperature and loading, which can be used to reflect rock damage evolution process and predict rock fracture. In this paper, uniaxial compression tests of granite at high temperatures from 25°C to 1000°C were carried out, and AE signals were monitored simultaneously. The results indicated that AE ring count rate shows the law of “interval burst” and “relatively calm,” which can be explained from the energy point of view. From 25°C to 1000°C, the rock failure mode changes from single splitting failure to multisplitting failure, and then to incomplete shear failure, ideal shear failure, and double shear failure, until complete integral failure. Thermal damage (DT defined by the elastic modulus shows logistic increase with the rise of temperature. Mechanical damage (DM derived by the AE ring count rate can be divided into initial stage, stable stage, accelerated stage, and destructive stage. Total damage (D increases with the rise of strain, which is corresponding to the stress-strain curve at various temperatures. Using AE data, we can further analyze the mechanism of deformation and fracture of rock, which helps to gather useful data for predicting rock stability at high temperatures.

  1. Study of domain depinning during repeated polarization reversal in hard PZT ceramics using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabakar, K; Rao, S P Mallikarjun

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has been studied during repeated polarization reversals (at 50 Hz) in hard PZT-8 ceramics. The AE and hysteresis loop were monitored at regular intervals of electric field (±20 kV cm -1 peak) application till 10 8 cycles. The sample did not fatigue and an increase in saturation polarization (Ps) was observed. AE was observed with zero threshold till 10 5 cycles when the field was increasing in both half cycles of the applied field. The initial increase in AE activity with increasing number of field cycles till 10 5 was explained on the basis of defect dipoles encouraging the 90 deg. domain switches, i.e. domain depinning. The decrease in AE activity, an increase in threshold field for the observed AE and a further increase in Ps after 10 5 cycles were explained based on the changes in the orientation of defect dipoles with respect to Ps due to the applied field cycles. This was found to encourage the 180 0 domain switches but pin the 90 deg. domains. An increase in AE at 10 8 cycles after applying a higher field of ±25 kV cm -1 was found to be mainly due to microcracking

  2. Acoustic emission characteristics of stress corrosion cracks in a type 304 stainless steel tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woong Gi; Bae, Seung Gi; Lee, Bo Young [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seong [Center for Robot Technology and Manufacturing, Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Sik [Dept. of Nuclear Safety Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, Nog Won [Ultrasonic Division, RM910, Byucksan Digital Valley II, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the promising methods for detecting the formation of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) in laboratory tests. This method has the advantage of online inspection. Some studies have been conducted to investigate the characteristics of AE parameters during SCC propagation. However, it is difficult to classify the distinct features of SCC behavior. Because the previous studies were performed on slow strain rate test or compact tension specimens, it is difficult to make certain correlations between AE signals and actual SCC behavior in real tube-type specimens. In this study, the specimen was a AISI 304 stainless steel tube widely applied in the nuclear industry, and an accelerated test was conducted at high temperature and pressure with a corrosive environmental condition. The study result indicated that intense AE signals were mainly detected in the elastic deformation region, and a good correlation was observed between AE activity and crack growth. By contrast, the behavior of accumulated counts was divided into four regions. According to the waveform analysis, a specific waveform pattern was observed during SCC development. It is suggested that AE can be used to detect and monitor SCC initiation and propagation in actual tubes.

  3. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  4. Implementing wavelet packet transform for valve failure detection using vibration and acoustic emission signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, H Y; Ramli, R; Abdullah, M A K

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of reciprocating compressors relies heavily on the health condition of its moving components, most importantly its valves. Previous studies showed good correlation between the dynamic response and the physical condition of the valves. These can be achieved by employing vibration technique which is capable of monitoring the response of the valve, and acoustic emission technique which is capable of detecting the valves' material deformation. However, the relationship/comparison between the two techniques is rarely investigated. In this paper, the two techniques were examined using time-frequency analysis. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) was chosen as the multi-resolution analysis technique over continuous wavelet transform (CWT), and discrete wavelet transform (DWT). This is because WPT could overcome the high computational time and high redundancy problem in CWT and could provide detailed analysis of the high frequency components compared to DWT. The features of both signals can be extracted by evaluating the normalised WPT coefficients for different time window under different valve conditions. By comparing the normalised coefficients over a certain time frame and frequency range, the feature vectors revealing the condition of valves can be constructed. One way analysis of variance was employed on these feature vectors to test the significance of data under different valve conditions. It is believed that AE signals can give a better representation of the valve condition as it can detect both the fluid motion and material deformation of valves as compared to the vibration signals.

  5. Classification of acoustic emission signals for drive systems coupling crack detection in semi-real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godinez, V.; Shu, F.; Finlayson, R.; O'Donnell, B.; Anastasopoulos, A.; Tsimogiannis, A.

    2004-01-01

    Early detection of mechanical failure in helicopter drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. Of these components, couplings are particularly critical. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of designing and developing a reliable, real time monitoring methodology based on Supervised Pattern Recognition (SPR) for early detection of cracks in couplings used in helicopter and engine drive systems. Within this framework, a portable Acoustic Emission (AE) system was used, equipped with a semi-real time SPR software package. Results from AE tests performed in a gearbox-testing bench at different speeds and different torque values are presented. These results indicate that the energy content of different frequency bands in the AE signals power spectra is strongly correlated with the introduction of EDM notches in the main gear. Further tests indicate that a strong shift in the frequency of the AE signals is observed after spalling occurred in the pinion gear. The variation of displacement and velocity between signal classes are discussed as a potential feature in characterizing crack severity. Finally, a scope of the work for optimizing the methodology in detecting and evaluating coupling cracking in real time will be presented. (author)

  6. Investigation of Material Performance Degradation for High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Using Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Ai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural materials damages are always in the form of micro-defects or cracks. Traditional or conventional methods such as micro and macro examination, tensile, bend, impact and hardness tests can be used to detect the micro damage or defects. However, these tests are destructive in nature and not in real-time, thus a non-destructive and real-time monitoring and characterization of the material damage is needed. This study is focused on the application of a non-destructive and real-time acoustic emission (AE method to study material performance degradation of a high-strength aluminum alloy of high-speed train gearbox shell. By applying data relative analysis and interpretation of AE signals, the characteristic parameters of materials performance were achieved and the failure criteria of the characteristic parameters for the material tensile damage process were established. The results show that the AE method and signal analysis can be used to accomplish the non-destructive and real-time detection of the material performance degradation process of the high-strength aluminum alloy. This technique can be extended to other engineering materials.

  7. Leak detection evaluation of boiler tube for power plant using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Chung, Min Hwa; Nam, Ki Woo

    2001-01-01

    Main equipment of thermal power plant, such as boiler and turbine, are designed and manufactured by domestic techniques. And also the automatic control facilities controlling the main equipment are at the applying step of the localization. and many parts of BOP(Balance Of Plant) equipment are utilizing, localized. But because the special equipment monitoring the operation status of the main facilities such as boiler and turbine are still dependent upon foreign technology and especially boiler tube leak detection system is under the initial step of first application to newly-constructed plants and the manufacturing and application are done by foreign techniques mostly, fast localization development is required. Therefore, so as to study and develop boiler tube leak detection system, we performed studying on manufacturing, installation in site, acoustic emission(AE) signal analysis and discrimination etc. As a result of studying on boiler tube leak detection using AE, we conformed that diagnosis for boiler tube and computerized their trend management is possible, and also it is expected to contribute to safe operation of power generation facilities.

  8. Leak Detection in Water-Filled Small-Diameter Polyethylene Pipes by Means of Acoustic Emission Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Martini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of effective strategies to manage leaks represents an essential goal for all utilities involved with drinking water supply in order to reduce water losses affecting urban distribution networks. This study concerns the early detection of leaks occurring in small-diameter customers’ connections to water supply networks. An experimental campaign was carried out in a test bed to investigate the sensitivity of Acoustic Emission (AE monitoring to water leaks. Damages were artificially induced on a polyethylene pipe (length 28 m, outer diameter 32 mm at different distances from an AE transducer. Measurements were performed in both unburied and buried pipe conditions. The analysis permitted the identification of a clear correlation between three monitored parameters (namely total Hits, Cumulative Counts and Cumulative Amplitude and the characteristics of the examined leaks.

  9. On the use of horizontal acoustic doppler profilers for continuous bed shear stress monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of bed shear stress in large river systems may serve to better estimate alluvial sediment transport to the coastal ocean. Here we explore the possibility of using a horizontally deployed acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to monitor bed shear stress, applying a prescribed

  10. Report on Non-invasive acoustic monitoring of D2O concentration Oct 31 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Davis, Eric Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-06

    There is an urgent need for real-time monitoring of the hydrogen /deuterium ratio (H/D) for heavy water production monitoring. Based upon published literature, sound speed is sensitive to the deuterium content of heavy water and can be measured using existing acoustic methods to determine the deuterium concentration in heavy water solutions. We plan to adapt existing non-invasive acoustic techniques (Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry and Gaussian-pulse acoustic technique) for the purpose of quantifying H/D ratios in solution. A successful demonstration will provide an easily implemented, low cost, and non-invasive method for remote and unattended H/D ratio measurements with a resolution of less than 0.2% vol.

  11. Experimental investigation of starting characteristics and wave propagation from a shallow open cavity and its acoustic emission at supersonic speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, S.; Desikan, S. L. N.; Niranjan, Sahoo

    2018-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on a shallow open cavity (L/D = 5) at a supersonic Mach number (M = 1.8) to understand its transient starting characteristics, wave propagation (inside and outside the cavity) during one vortex shedding cycle, and acoustic emission. Starting characteristics and wave propagation were visualized through time resolved schlieren images, while acoustic emissions were captured through unsteady pressure measurements. Results showed a complex shock system during the starting process which includes characteristics of the bifurcated shock system, shock train, flow separation, and shock wave boundary layer interaction. In one vortex shedding cycle, vortex convection from cavity leading edge to cavity trailing edge was observed. Flow features outside the cavity demonstrated the formation and downstream movement of a λ-shock due to the interaction of shock from the cavity leading edge and shock due to vortex and generation of waves on account of shear layer impingement at the cavity trailing edge. On the other hand, interesting wave structures and its propagation were monitored inside the cavity. In one vortex shedding cycle, two waves such as a reflected compression wave from a cavity leading edge in the previous vortex shedding cycle and a compression wave due to the reflection of Mach wave at the cavity trailing edge corner in the current vortex shedding cycle were visualized. The acoustic emission from the cavity indicated that the 2nd to 4th modes/tones are dominant, whereas the 1st mode contains broadband spectrum. In the present studies, the cavity feedback mechanism was demonstrated through a derived parameter coherence coefficient.

  12. Acoustic monitoring of the BOR-60 reactor circulating pump state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, V.N.; Myntsov, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Diagnostics methods for circulation pumps of the experimental BOR-60 fast reactor are described. The results of signal processing during a microcompain, as well as detected anomalies in pump operation in the earth stage are presented. Analysis carried out for an acoustic signal envelope has shown high efficiency of the method. When oscillations of a mechanical shaft are present, the envelope level increases 1.5 times. More detailed investigation is carried out by the analysis of the spectrum of the pump acoustic signal envelope. During abnormal operation there are peaks, corresponding to the circulation frequency, and harmonics multiple of it, in the spectrum. 6 figs

  13. Acoustic emissions of digital data video projectors- Investigating noise sources and their change during product aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael Shane

    2005-09-01

    Acoustic emission testing continues to be a growing part of IT and telecommunication product design, as product noise is increasingly becoming a differentiator in the marketplace. This is especially true for digital/video display companies, such as InFocus Corporation, considering the market shift of these products to the home entertainment consumer as retail prices drop and performance factors increase. Projectors and displays using Digital Light Processing(tm) [DLP(tm)] technology incorporate a device known as a ColorWheel(tm) to generate the colors displayed at each pixel in the image. These ColorWheel(tm) devices spin at very high speeds and can generate high-frequency tones not typically heard in liquid crystal displays and other display technologies. Also, acoustic emission testing typically occurs at the beginning of product life and is a measure of acoustic energy emitted at this point in the lifecycle. Since the product is designed to be used over a long period of time, there is concern as to whether the acoustic emissions change over the lifecycle of the product, whether these changes will result in a level of nuisance to the average customer, and does this nuisance begin to develop prior to the intended lifetime of the product.

  14. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Hoyt, A.E.; Frye, G.C.

    1998-08-18

    The acoustic-wave sensor is disclosed. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol). 3 figs.

  15. Monitoring of diesel engine combustions based on the acoustic source characterisation of the exhaust system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Gu, F.; Gennish, R.; Moore, D. J.; Harris, G.; Ball, A. D.

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic methods are among the most useful techniques for monitoring the condition of machines. However, the influence of background noise is a major issue in implementing this method. This paper introduces an effective monitoring approach to diesel engine combustion based on acoustic one-port source theory and exhaust acoustic measurements. It has been found that the strength, in terms of pressure, of the engine acoustic source is able to provide a more accurate representation of the engine combustion because it is obtained by minimising the reflection effects in the exhaust system. A multi-load acoustic method was then developed to determine the pressure signal when a four-cylinder diesel engine was tested with faults in the fuel injector and exhaust valve. From the experimental results, it is shown that a two-load acoustic method is sufficient to permit the detection and diagnosis of abnormalities in the pressure signal, caused by the faults. This then provides a novel and yet reliable method to achieve condition monitoring of diesel engines even if they operate in high noise environments such as standby power stations and vessel chambers.

  16. Acoustic Emission Signatures of Fatigue Damage in Idealized Bevel Gear Spline for Localized Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In many rotating machinery applications, such as helicopters, the splines of an externally-splined steel shaft that emerges from the gearbox engage with the reverse geometry of an internally splined driven shaft for the delivery of power. The splined section of the shaft is a critical and non-redundant element which is prone to cracking due to complex loading conditions. Thus, early detection of flaws is required to prevent catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE method is a direct way of detecting such active flaws, but its application to detect flaws in a splined shaft in a gearbox is difficult due to the interference of background noise and uncertainty about the effects of the wave propagation path on the received AE signature. Here, to model how AE may detect fault propagation in a hollow cylindrical splined shaft, the splined section is essentially unrolled into a metal plate of the same thickness as the cylinder wall. Spline ridges are cut into this plate, a through-notch is cut perpendicular to the spline to model fatigue crack initiation, and tensile cyclic loading is applied parallel to the spline to propagate the crack. In this paper, the new piezoelectric sensor array is introduced with the purpose of placing them within the gearbox to minimize the wave propagation path. The fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using a new piezoelectric sensor array and conventional sensors in a laboratory environment with the purpose of developing source models and testing the new sensor performance. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positioned on the structure. A significant amount of continuous emission due to the plastic deformation accompanied with the crack growth is observed. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the differences of plastic deformation and sudden crack jump. The

  17. Acoustic emission during the elastic-plastic deformation of low alloy reactor pressure vessel steels. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.; Goddard, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the acoustic emission behaviour of A533B and C-Mn low alloy reactor pressure vessel steels subjected to uniaxial tensile deformation are described. The effects on the emission activity of the rolling plane orientation and the carbide morphology were examined. Detailed discussions are given of the stress dependence of the emission activity below yield and of its recovery by annealing at the stress relief temperature. It is shown that the dominant emission source is the same in both steels and is associated with inclusions, such as MnS, elongated by the rolling process, the carbide morphology being relatively unimportant. A criterion for the occurrence of an emission is obtained which is directly analogous to the general criterion for yielding. It is also shown that a large fraction, at least, of the emission activity arises from a recoverable process such as localized yielding around inclusions or limited inclusion decohesion and not from inclusion fracture. Low activity in C-Mn steel taken from reactor pressure vessels, previously attributed to spheroidization of carbides, is shown to be due to the limited acoustic recovery of these relatively high sulphur content steels when annealed at the stress relief temperature. It is concluded that the limited amplitudes of these emissions during deformation severely restrict their potential application in practice. (Auth.)

  18. A study on the spectrum analyzing of internal leak in valve for power plant using acoustic emission method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Sun Ki; Lee, Jun Shin; Sohn, Seok Man

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the availability of acoustic emission method to the internal leak of the valves at nuclear power plants. The acoustic emission method was applied to the valves at the site, and the background noise was measured for the abnormal plant condition. From the comparison of the background noise data with the experimental results as to relation between leak flow and acoustic signal, the minimum leak flow rates that can be detected by acoustic signal was suggested. When the background levels are higher than the acoustic signal, the method described below was considered that the analysis the remainder among the background noise frequency spectrum and the acoustic signal spectrum become a very useful leak detection method. A few experimental examples of the spectrum analysis that varied the background noise characteristic were given

  19. Suggested guidelines for gas emission monitoring at danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Landfill gas is produced on waste disposal sites receiving organic waste resulting in emission of methane. Regulation requires that the landfill gas is managed in order to reduce emissions, but very few suggestions exist to how the landfill gas management activities are monitored, what requirements...... to the ability of the landfill gas management to reduce the emission should be set up, and how criteria are developed for when the monitoring activities can be terminated. Monitoring procedures are suggested centred on a robust method for measuring the total methane emission from the site, and quantitative...

  20. Listening to the Deep: live monitoring of ocean noise and cetacean acoustic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, M; van der Schaar, M; Zaugg, S; Houégnigan, L; Sánchez, A M; Castell, J V

    2011-01-01

    The development and broad use of passive acoustic monitoring techniques have the potential to help assessing the large-scale influence of artificial noise on marine organisms and ecosystems. Deep-sea observatories have the potential to play a key role in understanding these recent acoustic changes. LIDO (Listening to the Deep Ocean Environment) is an international project that is allowing the real-time long-term monitoring of marine ambient noise as well as marine mammal sounds at cabled and standalone observatories. Here, we present the overall development of the project and the use of passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) techniques to provide the scientific community with real-time data at large spatial and temporal scales. Special attention is given to the extraction and identification of high frequency cetacean echolocation signals given the relevance of detecting target species, e.g. beaked whales, in mitigation processes, e.g. during military exercises. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.