WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic emission measurements

  1. Measuring acoustic emissions in an avalanche slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of acoustic emissions are a common technique for monitoring damage and predicting imminent failure of a material. Within natural hazards it has already been used to successfully predict the break-off of a hanging glacier. To explore the applicability of the acoustic emission (AE) technique for avalanche prediction, we installed two acoustic sensors (with 30 kHz and 60 kHz resonance frequency) in an avalanche prone slope at the Mittelgrat in the Parsenn ski area above Davos, Switzerland. The slope is north-east facing, frequently wind loaded, and approximately 35° steep. The AE signals - in particular the event energy and waiting time distributions - were compared with slope stability. The latter was determined by observing avalanche activity. The results of two winter's measurements yielded that the exponent β of the inverse cumulative distribution of event energy showed a significant drop (from a value of 3.5 to roughly 2.5) at very unstable conditions, i.e. on the three days during our measurement periods when spontaneous avalanches released on our study slope.

  2. Acoustic Emissions to Measure Drought-Induced Cavitation in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linus De Roo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emissions are frequently used in material sciences and engineering applications for structural health monitoring. It is known that plants also emit acoustic emissions, and their application in plant sciences is rapidly increasing, especially to investigate drought-induced plant stress. Vulnerability to drought-induced cavitation is a key trait of plant water relations, and contains valuable information about how plants may cope with drought stress. There is, however, no consensus in literature about how this is best measured. Here, we discuss detection of acoustic emissions as a measure for drought-induced cavitation. Past research and the current state of the art are reviewed. We also discuss how the acoustic emission technique can help solve some of the main issues regarding quantification of the degree of cavitation, and how it can contribute to our knowledge about plant behavior during drought stress. So far, crossbreeding in the field of material sciences proved very successful, and we therefore recommend continuing in this direction in future research.

  3. Acoustic emission measurements in petroleum-related rock mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, Tor Erling

    2002-07-01

    Acoustic emission activity in rock has usually been studied in crystalline rock, which reflects that rock mechanics has also mostly been occupied with such rocks in relations to seismology, mining and tunneling. On the other hand, petroleum-related rock mechanics focuses on the behaviour of sedimentary rock. Thus, this thesis presents a general study of acoustic emission activity in sedimentary rock, primarily in sandstone. Chalk, limestone and shale have also been tested, but to much less degree because the AE activity in these materials is low. To simplify the study, pore fluids have not been used. The advent of the personal computer and computerized measuring equipment have made possible new methods both for measuring and analysing acoustic emissions. Consequently, a majority of this work is devoted to the development and implementation of new analysis techniques. A broad range of topics are treated: (1) Quantification of the AE activity level, assuming that the event rate best represents the activity. An algorithm for estimating the event rate and a methodology for objectively describing special changes in the activity e.g., onset determination, are presented. (2) Analysis of AE waveform data. A new method for determining the source energy of an AE event is presented, and it is shown how seismic source theory can be used to analyze even intermediate quality data. Based on these techniques, it is shown that a major part of the measured AE activity originates from a region close to the sensor, not necessarily representing the entire sample. (3) An improved procedure for estimating source locations is presented. The main benefit is a procedure that better handles arrival time data with large errors. Statistical simulations are used to quantify the uncertainties in the locations. The analysis techniques are developed with the application to sedimentary rock in mind, and in two articles, the techniques are used in the study of such materials. The work in the first

  4. Simple discrimination method between False Acoustic Emission and Acoustic Emission revealed by piezoelectric sensors, in Gran Sasso mountain measurements (L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodati, Paolo; Piazza, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    Recently it was shown, studying data acquired with in-situ measurements on the Gran Sasso mountain (Italy), for about ten years, by means of a high sensitivity transducer coupled to the free-end section of a stainless steel rod fixed by cement in a rock-drill hole 10 m high, about 2500 m above sea level, that Acoustic Emission (AE) can be affected by more than 90% False Acoustic Emission (FAE) of an electromagnetic origin. A very simple method to solve the problem of the discrimination between AE events due to elastic waves, from FAE signals, due to electromagnetic noise, both coming from the same ``reception-point,'' is presented. The reliability of the obtained separation is confirmed also by the reported amplitude and time distribution of AE events, typical of fracture dynamics and those of FAE events, similar to those of noise.

  5. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  6. Coupling thermogravimetric and acoustic emission measurements: its application to study the inhibition of catalytic coke deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropital, Francois; Dascotte, Philippe; Marchand, Pierre [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 Avenue Bois Preau, 92952 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Faure, Thierry; Lenain, Jean-Claude; Proust, Alain [Euro Physical Acoustics, 27 Rue Magellan, 94373 Sucy-en-Brie Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to improve the knowledge on the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials, the coupling of several in situ physical analysis methods is a promising way. For this purpose a thermogravimetric balance has been equipped with a specific acoustic emission device in order to continuously measure the mass variation of the corrosion sample and the acoustic emission transient under experimental conditions of temperature and gas phase compositions that are representative of the industrial environments. The catalytic coke deposition condition that is a major problem for the refinery and petrochemical industries, has been studied with such a device. The carbon deposition on reactor walls can induce localised disruption in the process such as heat-transfer reduction and pressure drops. To prevent these perturbations, proper selections of the metallurgical or internal coating compositions of the equipment, or the injection of accurate amount of inhibitors have to be decided. The feasibility of the coupling at high temperature of thermogravimetric and acoustic emission has been demonstrated. This new technique has been applied to study the inhibition of the catalytic coke deposition on pure iron by sulphur additives in the temperature range of 650 deg. C and under different mixed atmospheres of hydrocarbon and hydrogen contents. Good correlation has been obtained between the coking rates measured by thermogravimetric measurements and the intensities of the acoustic emission parameters. (authors)

  7. ACOUSTIC EMISSION ANALYZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Almeida-Pérez

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper appears a solution for acoustic emission analysis commonly known as noise. For the accomplishmentof this work a personal computer is used, besides sensors (microphones and boards designed and built for signalconditioning. These components are part of a virtual instrument used for monitoring the acoustical emission. Themain goal of this work is to develop a virtual instrument that supplies many important data as the result of ananalysis allowing to have information in an easy and friendly way. Moreover this information is very useful forstudying and resolving several situations in planning, production and testing areas.The main characteristics of the virtual instrument are: signal analysis in time, effective power measurement inDecibels (dB, average intensity taken from the principle of paired microphones, as well as the data analysis infrequency. These characteristics are included to handle two information channels.

  8. Acoustic Emission Measurement with Fiber Bragg Gratings for Structure Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Walker, James L.; Russell, Sam; Roth, Don; Mabry, Nehemiah; Wilson, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Structural Health monitoring (SHM) is a way of detecting and assessing damage to large scale structures. Sensors used in SHM for aerospace structures provide real time data on new and propagating damage. One type of sensor that is typically used is an acoustic emission (AE) sensor that detects the acoustic emissions given off from a material cracking or breaking. The use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to provide acoustic emission data for damage detection is studied. In this research, FBG sensors are used to detect acoustic emissions of a material during a tensile test. FBG sensors were placed as a strain sensor (oriented parallel to applied force) and as an AE sensor (oriented perpendicular to applied force). A traditional AE transducer was used to collect AE data to compare with the FBG data. Preliminary results show that AE with FBGs can be a viable alternative to traditional AE sensors.

  9. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has onl...

  10. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  11. Electrical Resistance and Acoustic Emission Measurements for Monitoring the Structural Behavior of CFRP Laminate

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Wei

    2015-07-12

    Electrical resistance and acoustic emission (AE) measurement are jointly used to monitor the degradation in CFRP laminates subjected to tensile tests. The objective of this thesis is to perform a synergertic analysis between a passive and an active methods to better access how these perform when used for Structural Health Moni- toring (SHM). Laminates with three different stacking sequences: [0]4, [02/902]s and [+45/ − 45]2s are subjected to monotonic and cyclic tensile tests. In each laminate, we carefully investigate which mechanisms of degradation can or cannot be detect- ed by each technique. It is shown that most often, that acoustic emission signals start before any electrical detection is possible. This is is explained based on the redundance of the electrical network that makes it less sensitive to localized damages. Based on in depth study of AE signals clustering, a new classification is proposed to recognize the different damage mechanims based on only two parameters: the RA (rise time/amplitude) and the duration of the signal.

  12. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  13. Fiber-optic sensor-based remote acoustic emission measurement of composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengming; Okabe, Yoji; Wu, Qi; Shigeta, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) detection functioning at high temperatures could clarify the damage process in high heat-resistant composites. To achieve the high-temperature AE detection, a remote AE measurement based on a phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating (PS-FBG) sensor with a high sensitivity over a broad bandwidth was proposed. The common optical fibers were made from glass with good heat resistance. Hence, in this method, optical fiber was used as the waveguide to propagate the AE in the composite from a high-temperature environment to the room-temperature environment wherein the PS-FBG was located. Owing to the special AE detection configuration, this method was a new adhesive method for remote measurement (ADRM). The experiment and numerical simulation revealed that the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration demonstrated accurate remote sensing for the AE signals. This was because of the good waveguide system provided by the thin optical fiber and the sensitivity of the PS-FBG sensor to the axial strain in the core of the fiber. Consequently, the remote measurement utilizing the PS-FBG sensor in the ADRM configuration has a high potential for AE detection in high-temperature conditions.

  14. A New Method to Identify Quaternary Moraine:Acoustic Emission Stress Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhizhong; QIAO Yansong; TIAN Jiaorong; WANG Min; LI Mingze; HE Peiyuan; QIAN Fang

    2006-01-01

    How to effectively identify glacial sediments, especially Quaternary moraine, has been in dispute for decades. The traditional methods, e.g., sedimentary and geomorphologic ones, are facing challenge in eastern China where controversial moraine deposits are dominatingly distributed. Here,for the first time, we introduce the acoustic emission (AE) stress measurement, a kind of historical stress measurement, to identify Quaternary moraine. The results demonstrate that it can be employed to reconstruct stress information of glaciation remaining in gravels, and may shed light on the identification of Quaternary moraine in eastern China. First, we measured the AE stress of gravels of glacial origin that are underlying the Xidatan Glacier, eastern Kunlun Mountains in western China.Second, we calculated the stress according to the actual thickness of the glacier. The almost identical stress values suggest that the glacial gravels can memorize and preserve the overlying glacier-derived aplomb stress. And then we introduce this new approach to the controversial moraine in Mount Lushan, eastern China. The results indicate that the stress is attributed to the Quaternary glacier, and the muddy gravels in the controversial moraine in Mount Lushan are moraine deposits but not others.

  15. Indirect measurement of cylinder pressure from diesel engines using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghamry, M.; Steel, J. A.; Reuben, R. L.; Fog, T. L.

    2005-07-01

    Indirect measurement of the cylinder pressure from diesel engines is possible using acoustic emission (AE). A method is demonstrated for a large two-stroke marine diesel engine and a small four-stroke diesel engine, which involves reconstructing the cylinder crank angle domain diagram from the AE generated during the combustion phase. Raw AE was used for modelling and reconstructing the pressure waveform in the time domain but this could not be used to model the pressure rise (compression). To overcome this problem the signal was divided into two sections representing the compression part of the signal and the fuel injection/expansion stroke. The compression part of the pressure signal was reconstructed by using polynomial fitting. An auto-regressive technique was used during the injection/expansion stroke. The rms AE signal is well correlated with the pressure signal in the time and frequency domain and complex cepstrum analysis was used to model the pressure signal for the complete combustion phase (compression, injection and expansion). The main advantage of using cepstral analysis is that the model uses the frequency content of the rms AE signal rather than the energy content of the rms AE signal, which gives an advantage when the signal has lower energy content, during the compression process. By calculating the engine running speed from the rms AE signal and selecting the proper cepstrum model correlated to the combustion rms AE energy content, an analytical algorithm was developed to give a wide range of applicability over the different conditions of engine speed, engine type and load. The pressure reconstructed from both AE and acceleration data are compared. AE has the advantage of a much higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved time resolution and is shown to be better than the acceleration.

  16. Early-age acoustic emission measurements in hydrating cement paste: Evidence for cavitation during solidification due to self-desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Couch, J.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede;

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the acoustic emission activity of cement pastes was investigated during the first day of hydration. Deaired, fresh cement pastes were cast in sealed sample holders designed to minimize friction and restraint. The majority of acoustic emission events occurred in lower water to cemen...

  17. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  18. Acoustic Emission of Deformation Twinning in Magnesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyang Mo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Acoustic Emission of deformation twinning in Magnesium is investigated in this article. Single crystal testing with combined full field deformation measurements, as well as polycrystalline testing inside the scanning electron microscope with simultaneous monitoring of texture evolution and twin nucleation were compared to testing at the laboratory scale with respect to recordings of Acoustic Emission activity. Single crystal testing revealed the formation of layered twin boundaries in areas of strain localization which was accompanied by distinct changes in the acoustic data. Testing inside the microscope directly showed twin nucleation, proliferation and growth as well as associated crystallographic reorientations. A post processing approach of the Acoustic Emission activity revealed the existence of a class of signals that appears in a strain range in which twinning is profuse, as validated by the in situ and ex situ microscopy observations. Features extracted from such activity were cross-correlated both with the available mechanical and microscopy data, as well as with the Acoustic Emission activity recorded at the laboratory scale for similarly prepared specimens. The overall approach demonstrates that the method of Acoustic Emission could provide real time volumetric information related to the activation of deformation twinning in Magnesium alloys, in spite of the complexity of the propagation phenomena, the possible activation of several deformation modes and the challenges posed by the sensing approach itself when applied in this type of materials evaluation approach.

  19. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  20. Traceability of Acoustic Emission measurements for a proposed calibration method - Classification of characteristics and identification using signal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, James

    2015-01-01

    When using Acoustic Emission (AE) technologies, tensile, compressive and shear stress/strain tests can provide a detector for material deformation and dislocations. In this paper improvements are made to standardise calibration techniques for AE against known metrics such as force. AE signatures were evaluated from various calibration energy sources based on the energy from the first harmonic (dominant energy band) [1,2]. The effects of AE against its calibration identity are investigated: where signals are correlated to the average energy and distance of the detected phenomena. In addition, extra tests are investigated in terms of the tensile tests and single grit tests characterising different materials. Necessary translations to the time-frequency domain were necessary when segregating salient features between different material properties. Continuing this work the obtained AE is summarised and evaluated by a Neural Network (NN) regression classification technique which identifies how far the malformation has progressed (in terms of energy/force) during material transformation. Both genetic-fuzzy clustering and tree rule based classifier techniques were used as the second and third classification techniques respectively to verify the NN output giving a weighted three classifier system. The work discussed in this paper looks at both distance and force relationships for various prolonged Acoustic Emission stresses. Later such analysis was realised with different classifier models and finally implemented into the Simulink simulations. Further investigations were made into classifier models for different material interactions in terms of force and distance which add further dimension to this work with different materials based simulation realisations. Within the statistical analysis section there are two varying prolonged stress tests which together offer the mechanical calibration system (automated solenoid and pencil break calibration system). Taking such a

  1. Acoustic emission methodology and application

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarchuk, Zinoviy; Serhiyenko, Oleh

    2017-01-01

    This monograph analyses in detail the physical aspects of the elastic waves radiation during deformation or fracture of materials. I presents the  methodological bases for the practical use of acoustic emission device, and describes the results of theoretical and experimental researches of evaluation of the crack growth resistance of materials, selection of the useful AE signals. The efficiency of this methodology is shown through the diagnostics of various-purpose industrial objects. The authors obtain results of experimental researches with the help of the new methods and facilities.

  2. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  3. Potential of acoustic emissions from three point bending tests as rock failure precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Agioutantis Z.; Kaklis K.; Mavrigiannakis S.; Verigakis M.; Vallianatos F.; Saltas V.

    2016-01-01

    Development of failure in brittle materials is associated with microcracks, which release energy in the form of elastic waves called acoustic emissions. This paper presents results from acoustic emission mea-surements obtained during three point bending tests on Nestos marble under laboratory conditions. Acoustic emission activity was monitored using piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors, and the potential for accurate prediction of rock damage based on acoustic emission data was investigated. Damage local-ization was determined based on acoustic emissions generated from the critically stressed region as scat-tered events at stresses below and close to the strength of the material.

  4. An introduction to acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruby, C. B.

    1987-08-01

    The technique of acoustic emission (AE) uses one or more sensors to 'listen' to a wide range of events that may take place inside a solid material. Depending on the source of this high frequency sound, there are broadly three application areas: structural testing and surveillance, process monitoring and control, and materials characterization. In the first case the source is probably a defect which radiates elastic waves as it grows. Provided these waves are detectable, AE can be used in conjunction with other NDT techniques to assess structural integrity. Advances in deterministic and statistical analysis methods now enable data to be interpreted in greater detail and with more confidence than before. In the second area the acoustic signature of processes is monitored, ranging from for instance the machining of metallic components to the mixing of foodstuffs, and changes correlated with variations in the process, with the potential for feedback and process control. In the third area, AE is used as an additional diagnostic technique for the study of, for instance, fracture, because it gives unique dynamic information on defect growth.

  5. High resolution acoustic measurement system and beam pattern reconstruction method for bat echolocation emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Jason E; Kloepper, Laura N; Warnecke, Michaela; Simmons, James A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the transmit beam patterns emitted by echolocating bats have previously been limited to cross-sectional planes or averaged over multiple signals using sparse microphone arrays. To date, no high-resolution measurements of individual bat transmit beams have been reported in the literature. Recent studies indicate that bats may change the time-frequency structure of their calls depending on the task, and suggest that their beam patterns are more dynamic than previously thought. To investigate beam pattern dynamics in a variety of bat species, a high-density reconfigurable microphone array was designed and constructed using low-cost ultrasonic microphones and custom electronic circuitry. The planar array is 1.83 m wide by 1.42 m tall with microphones positioned on a 2.54 cm square grid. The system can capture up to 228 channels simultaneously at a 500 kHz sampling rate. Beam patterns are reconstructed in azimuth, elevation, and frequency for visualization and further analysis. Validation of the array measurement system and post-processing functions is shown by reconstructing the beam pattern of a transducer with a fixed circular aperture and comparing the result with a theoretical model. To demonstrate the system in use, transmit beam patterns of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, are shown.

  6. Quantifying the Consistency of Wearable Knee Acoustical Emission Measurements During Complex Motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toreyin, Hakan; Jeong, Hyeon Ki; Hersek, Sinan; Teague, Caitlin N; Inan, Omer T

    2016-09-01

    Knee-joint sounds could potentially be used to noninvasively probe the physical and/or physiological changes in the knee associated with rehabilitation following acute injury. In this paper, a system and methods for investigating the consistency of knee-joint sounds during complex motions in silent and loud background settings are presented. The wearable hardware component of the system consists of a microelectromechanical systems microphone and inertial rate sensors interfaced with a field programmable gate array-based real-time processor to capture knee-joint sound and angle information during three types of motion: flexion-extension (FE), sit-to-stand (SS), and walking (W) tasks. The data were post-processed to extract high-frequency and short-duration joint sounds (clicks) with particular waveform signatures. Such clicks were extracted in the presence of three different sources of interference: background, stepping, and rubbing noise. A histogram-vector Vn(→) was generated from the clicks in a motion-cycle n, where the bin range was 10°. The Euclidean distance between a vector and the arithmetic mean Vav(→) of all vectors in a recording normalized by the Vav(→) is used as a consistency metric dn. Measurements from eight healthy subjects performing FE, SS, and W show that the mean (of mean) consistency metric for all subjects during SS (μ [ μ (dn)] = 0.72 in silent, 0.85 in loud) is smaller compared with the FE (μ [ μ (dn)] = 1.02 in silent, 0.95 in loud) and W ( μ [ μ (dn)] = 0.94 in silent, 0.97 in loud) exercises, thereby implying more consistent click-generation during SS compared with the FE and W. Knee-joint sounds from one subject performing FE during five consecutive work-days (μ [ μ (dn) = 0.72) and five different times of a day (μ [ μ (dn) = 0.73) suggests high consistency of the clicks on different days and throughout a day. This work represents the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that joint sound consistency has been

  7. Study of Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of future propulsion systems utilizing advanced composite structures for the storage of cryogenic fuels, such as liquid hydrogen or oxygen, presents many challenges. Economic justification for these structures requires light weight, reusable components with an infrastructure allowing periodic evaluation of structural integrity after enduring demanding stresses during operation. A major focus has been placed on the use of acoustic emission NDE to detect propagating defects, in service, necessitating an extensive study into characterizing the nature of acoustic signal propagation at very low temperatures and developing the methodology of applying AE sensors to monitor cryogenic components. This work addresses the question of sensor performance in the cryogenic environment. Problems involving sensor mounting, spectral response and durability are addressed. The results of this work provides a common point of measure from which sensor selection can be made when testing composite components at cryogenic temperatures.

  8. Acoustics. Noise emitted by machinery and equipment. Measurement of emission sound pressure levels at a work station and at other specified positions. Engineering method in an essentially free field over a reflecting plane

    CERN Document Server

    British Standards Institution. London

    1996-01-01

    Acoustics. Noise emitted by machinery and equipment. Measurement of emission sound pressure levels at a work station and at other specified positions. Engineering method in an essentially free field over a reflecting plane

  9. World Conference on Acoustic Emission 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhanwen; Zhang, Junjiao

    2015-01-01

    This volume collects the papers from the 2013 World Conference on Acoustic Emission in Shanghai. The latest research and applications of Acoustic Emission (AE) are explored, with particular emphasis on detecting and processing of AE signals, development of AE instrument and testing standards, AE of materials, engineering structures and systems, including the processing of collected data and analytical techniques as well as experimental case studies.

  10. Wearable knee health rehabilitation assessment using acoustical emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Caitlin N.; Hersek, Sinan; Conant, Jordan L.; Gilliland, Scott M.; Inan, Omer T.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a novel, wearable sensing system based on miniature piezoelectric contact microphones for measuring the acoustical emissions from the knee during movement. The system consists of two contact microphones, positioned on the medial and lateral sides of the patella, connected to custom, analog pre-amplifier circuits and a microcontroller for digitization and data storage on a secure digital card. Tn addition to the acoustical sensing, the system includes two integrated inertial measurement sensors including accelerometer and gyroscope modalities to enable joint angle calculations; these sensors, with digital outputs, are connected directly to the same microcontroller. The system provides low noise, accurate joint acoustical emission and angle measurements in a wearable form factor and has several hours of battery life.

  11. Characterization of Acoustic Emission Source to Identify Fracture in Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Hardy, "An Approach to Acoustic Emission Signal Analysis," Materials Evaluation, 35, 1977 , pp. 100-106. [5] Hsu, N.N. and F.R. Breckenridge...Measurements," Journal of Applied Mechanics, 53, 1986, pp. 61-68. [17] Mindess , S., "The Fracture Process Zone in Concrete," Toughening Mechanisms in

  12. Acoustic emission-based in-process monitoring of surface generation in robot-assisted polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring of surface generation in the robot-assisted polishing (RAP) was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate ...

  13. Acoustic Emission Based In-process Monitoring in Robot Assisted Polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Bissacco, Giuliano; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) measurements for in-process monitoring in the Robot Assisted Polishing (RAP) process was investigated. Surface roughness measurements require interruption of the process, proper surface cleaning and measurements that sometimes necessitate removal of the...

  14. ACOUSTIC EMISSION MODEL WITH THERMOACTIVATIVE DESTRUCTION OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Filonenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of acoustic emission energy during the composite material machining for termoactivativemodel of acoustic radiation is simulated. The regularities of resultant signals energy parameters change dependingon composite materials machining speed are determined. Obtained regularities with their statistical characteristicsare described. Sensitivity of acoustic emission energy parameters to the change of composite material machiningspeed is shown.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  16. Acoustic Emission Sensing for Maritime Diesel Engine Performance and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    considered: 1. Select an overall diagnostic framework (e.g. permanent or temporary, nature of the system being measured, diagnostic method and sensor ...application. Acoustic emission signals from engine-mounted sensors were able to distinguish load conditions and a failing injector, but large...work that the following is considered: 1. Select an overall diagnostic framework (e.g. permanent or temporary, nature of the system being measured

  17. Embedded and conventional ultrasonic sensors for monitoring acoustic emission during thermal fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is widely used for monitoring pressure vessels, pipes, critical infrastructure, as well as land, sea and air vehicles. It is one of dominant approaches to explore material degradation under fatigue and events leading to material fracture. Addressing a recent interest in structural health monitoring of space vehicles, a need has emerged to evaluate material deterioration due to thermal fatigue during spacecraft atmospheric reentry. Thermal fatigue experiments were conducted, in which aluminum plates were subjected to localized heating and acoustic emission was monitoring by embedded and conventional acoustic emission sensors positioned at various distances from a heat source. At the same time, surface temperature of aluminum plates was monitored using an IR camera. Acoustic emission counts collected by embedded sensors were compared to counts measured with conventional acoustic emission sensors. Both types of sensors show noticeable increase of acoustic emission activity as localized heating source was applied to aluminum plates. Experimental data demonstrate correlation between temperature increase on the surface of the plates and increase in measured acoustic emission activity. It is concluded that under particular conditions, embedded piezoelectric wafer active sensors can be used for acoustic emission monitoring of thermally-induced structural degradation.

  18. Acoustic Emissions (AE) Electrical Systems' Health Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acoustic Emissions (AE) are associated with physical events, such as thermal activity, dielectric breakdown, discharge inception, as well as crack nucleation and...

  19. An acoustic emission study of plastic deformation in polycrystalline aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Frederick, J. R.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission experiments were performed on polycrystalline and single crystal 99.99% aluminum while undergoing tensile deformation. It was found that acoustic emission counts as a function of grain size showed a maximum value at a particular grain size. Furthermore, the slip area associated with this particular grain size corresponded to the threshold level of detectability of single dislocation slip events. The rate of decline in acoustic emission activity as grain size is increased beyond the peak value suggests that grain boundary associated dislocation sources are giving rise to the bulk of the detected acoustic emissions.

  20. Condition Monitoring and Management from Acoustic Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik Bohl

    2005-01-01

    In the following, I will use technical terms without explanation as it gives the freedom to describe the project in a shorter form for those who already know. The thesis is about condition monitoring of large diesel engines from acoustic emission signals. The experiments have been focused...... alignment framework it is shown that non-stationary condition monitoring can be achieved....... on a specific and severe fault called scuffing. The fault is generally assumed to arise from increased interaction between the piston and liner. For generating experimental data destructive tests with no lubrication, oil has been carried out. Focus has been on modeling the normal condition and detecting...

  1. Current situation of the study on Kaiser effect of rock acoustic emission in in-situ stress measurement%声发射Kaiser效应在地应力测量中的应用现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李利峰; 邹正盛; 张庆

    2011-01-01

    Based on periodical literature, the statistics of papers on accoustic emission since recent twenty years were made. The principle and mechanism of acoustic emission, space positioning for the samples were presented.With the theory of elastic mechanics, six direction and four direction methods in space for in-sim measurement using the rock acoustic emission were derived. There are two sampling methods according to the different methods.Influence factors of acoustic emission in in-sim stress measurement, determining method of Kaiser Point and treatment technique for signal and noise were systematically expounded. Two methods which are different from the traditional in-situ measurement are introduced. Problems and research trend of the in-situ stress measurement using acoustic emission were analyzed.%对近20年来岩石声发射测量地应力的研究现状进行了分析,介绍了声发射的原理和机理及试样的空间定位方法.利用弹性力学原理推导了声发射方法测定地应力的空间6向和4向的计算过程,对应有两种常用的取样方式.系统地阐述了影响声发射地应力测量的因素、Kaiser点的确定方法以及信噪处理技术,简单介绍了不同于传统利用声发射测量地应力的另外两种方法.对声发射测量地应力中存在的问题和研究趋势进行了分析.

  2. Emissions & Measurements - Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions and Measurement (EM) research activities performed within the National Risk Management Research Lab NRMRL) of EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) support measurement and laboratory analysis approaches to accurately characterize source emissions, and near sour...

  3. Scanning thermoelectric and acoustic emission dignostic of structural inhomogeneities of thermocouple materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokhorenko V.J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New method for diagnostic of constructional and functional materials by means of thermoelectric and acoustic- emission measurements is proposed. The method allows not only to establish the defect location, but its partial temperature relaxation achieve.

  4. Damage depth estimation on a fatigue loaded composite structure using thermography and acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Winfree, William P.; Horne, Michael R.

    2017-02-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained on a three stringer panel during periodic fatigue loading. The acoustic emission data were mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. Furthermore, sudden changes in thermally measured damage growth related to a previously measured higher energy acoustic emission event are studied to determine damage depth. A thermal model with a periodic flux heat source is presented to determine the relationship between the damage depth and thermal response. The model results are compared to the measured data. Lastly, the practical application and limitations of this technique are discussed.

  5. Acoustic Emission from Breaking a Bamboo Chopstick

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sun-Ting; Wang, Li-Min; Huang, Panpan; Yang, Zhengning; Chang, Chin-De; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic emission from breaking a bamboo chopstick or a bundle of spaghetti is found to exhibit similar behavior as the famous seismic laws of Gutenberg and Richter, Omori, and Båth. By the use of a force-sensing detector, we establish a positive correlation between the statistics of sound intensity and the magnitude of a tremor. We also manage to derive these laws analytically without invoking the concept of a phase transition, self-organized criticality, or fractal. Our model is deterministic and relies on the existence of a structured cross section, either fibrous or layered. This success at explaining the power-law behavior supports the proposal that geometry is sometimes more important than mechanics.

  6. Acoustic emission and released seismic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Gregori

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense crises of crustal stress appear to cross large regions, and to precede by several months the eventual occurrence of some strong earthquake within them. The phenomenon is not linear, and the stress control reflects some wide scale-size rather than local effects. The stress propagation through the crust can be effectively monitored by means of acoustic emission (AE techniques (ultrasounds. The correlation is here investigated between crustal stress crises and the total release of seismic energy within some space domain around the AE recording site. Some clear inferences can be envisaged, although a significant diagnosis of the state of the crust within a given region ought to request arrays of simultaneously operated AE recorders. Some case histories are described dealing with the Italian peninsula and with the Cephallonia Island.

  7. Localization by Acoustic Emission in Transversely Isotropic Slate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Debecker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for localization by acoustic emission in transversely isotropic media is developed and validated. Velocities are experimentally measured and then used to calculate a database of theoretical arrival times for a large number of positions. During an actual test, positions are assigned by comparing measured arrival times with the database's arrival times. The method is applied during load tests on slate samples and compared with visual observations of fractures. The localization method allowed for a good identification of the regions of fracturing at different stages during the test.

  8. Enhanced Acoustic Emission in Relation to the Acoustic Halo Surrounding Active Region 11429

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Chris S; Leka, K D

    2015-01-01

    The use of acoustic holography in the high-frequency $p$-mode spectrum can resolve the source distributions of enhanced acoustic emissions within halo structures surrounding active regions. In doing so, statistical methods can then be applied to ascertain relationships with the magnetic field. This is the focus of this study. The mechanism responsible for the detected enhancement of acoustic sources around solar active regions has not yet been explained. Furthermore the relationship between the magnetic field and enhanced acoustic emission has not yet been comprehensively examined. We have used vector magnetograms from the \\Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to image the magnetic-field properties in the halo. We have studied the acoustic morphology of an active region, with a complex halo and "glories," and we have linked some acoustic properties to the magnetic-field configuration. In particular, we find that acoustic sources are significantly enhanced in reg...

  9. Correlating Inertial Acoustic Cavitation Emissions with Material Erosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, I.; Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.; Frota, M. N.

    The standard ASTM G32-10 concerns the hydrodynamic cavitation erosion resistance of materials by subjecting them to acoustic cavitation generated by a sonotrode. The work reported extends this technique by detecting and monitoring the ultrasonic cavitation, considered responsible for the erosion process, specifically for coupons of aluminium-bronze alloy. The study uses a 65 mm diameter variant of NPL's cavitation sensor, which detects broadband acoustic emissions, and logs acoustic signals generated in the MHz frequency range, using NPL's Cavimeter. Cavitation readings were made throughout the exposure duration, which was carried out at discrete intervals (900 to 3600 s), allowing periodic mass measurements to be made to assess erosion loss under a strict protocol. Cavitation measurements and erosion were compared for different separations of the sonotrode tip from the material under test. The maximum variation associated with measurement of cavitation level was between 2.2% and 3.3% when the separation (λ) between the transducer horn and the specimen increased from 0.5 to 1.0 mm, for a transducer (sonotrode) displacement amplitude of 43.5 μm. Experiments conducted at the same transducer displacement amplitude show that the mass loss of the specimen -a measure of erosion- was 67.0 mg (λ = 0.5 mm) and 66.0 mg (λ = 1.0 mm).

  10. Detection of the deterministic component in acoustic emission signals from mechanically loaded rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilarov, V. L.

    2015-11-01

    Using the Takens theorem, the attractor was reconstructed for amplitudes of acoustic emission signals measured during fracture of granite samples. Systematic features of the temporal behavior of system dynamic characteristics, such as the embedding dimension, fractal dimensions, recurrence plots, and their numerical parameters, were determined. For a preliminarily water-saturated sample, an order-disorder phase transition was detected in the structure of acoustic emission signals.

  11. Acoustic Communications Measurement Systems (ACOMMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Design and develop adaptive signal processing techniques to improve underwater acoustic communications and networking. Phase coherent and incoherent signal...

  12. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  13. Acoustic Emission Beamforming for Detection and Localization of Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua Callen

    The aerospace industry is a constantly evolving field with corporate manufacturers continually utilizing innovative processes and materials. These materials include advanced metallics and composite systems. The exploration and implementation of new materials and structures has prompted the development of numerous structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation techniques for quality assurance purposes and pre- and in-service damage detection. Exploitation of acoustic emission sensors coupled with a beamforming technique provides the potential for creating an effective non-contact and non-invasive monitoring capability for assessing structural integrity. This investigation used an acoustic emission detection device that employs helical arrays of MEMS-based microphones around a high-definition optical camera to provide real-time non-contact monitoring of inspection specimens during testing. The study assessed the feasibility of the sound camera for use in structural health monitoring of composite specimens during tensile testing for detecting onset of damage in addition to nondestructive evaluation of aluminum inspection plates for visualizing stress wave propagation in structures. During composite material monitoring, the sound camera was able to accurately identify the onset and location of damage resulting from large amplitude acoustic feedback mechanisms such as fiber breakage. Damage resulting from smaller acoustic feedback events such as matrix failure was detected but not localized to the degree of accuracy of larger feedback events. Findings suggest that beamforming technology can provide effective non-contact and non-invasive inspection of composite materials, characterizing the onset and the location of damage in an efficient manner. With regards to the nondestructive evaluation of metallic plates, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot measurement. This is a significant improvement over

  14. Measuring System for Interference Optical Fiber Acoustic Emission①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUQizhu; ZHENGShengxuan

    1997-01-01

    A type of interference optical fiber acoustic emission sensor is described.With 10-10 m level resolution,megahertz-level frequency and response time less than 1 μs,this sensor possesses prominent measuring stability and can be used in state supervision and trouble diagnosis.

  15. Development of a MEMS acoustic emission sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Wu, Wei; Wright, Amelia P.

    2007-04-01

    An improved multi-channel MEMS chip for acoustic emission sensing has been designed and fabricated in 2006 to create a device that is smaller in size, superior in sensitivity, and more practical to manufacture than earlier designs. The device, fabricated in the MUMPS process, contains four resonant-type capacitive transducers in the frequency range between 100 kHz and 500 kHz on a chip with an area smaller than 2.5 sq. mm. The completed device, with its circuit board, electronics, housing, and connectors, possesses a square footprint measuring 25 mm x 25 mm. The small footprint is an important attribute for an acoustic emission sensor, because multiple sensors must typically be arrayed around a crack location. Superior sensitivity was achieved by a combination of four factors: the reduction of squeeze film damping, a resonant frequency approximating a rigid body mode rather than a bending mode, a ceramic package providing direct acoustic coupling to the structural medium, and high-gain amplifiers implemented on a small circuit board. Manufacture of the system is more practical because of higher yield (lower unit costs) in the MUMPS fabrication task and because of a printed circuit board matching the pin array of the MEMS chip ceramic package for easy assembly and compactness. The transducers on the MEMS chip incorporate two major mechanical improvements, one involving squeeze film damping and one involving the separation of resonance modes. For equal proportions of hole area to plate area, a triangular layout of etch holes reduces squeeze film damping as compared to the conventional square layout. The effect is modeled analytically, and is verified experimentally by characterization experiments on the new transducers. Structurally, the transducers are plates with spring supports; a rigid plate would be the most sensitive transducer, and bending decreases the sensitivity. In this chip, the structure was designed for an order-of-magnitude separation between the first

  16. Acoustic power measurements of oscillating flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, M.

    1981-01-01

    The acoustic power of an oscillating flame is measured. A turbulent premixed propane/air flame is situated near a pressure antinode of a standing wave in a laboratory combustion chamber. This standing wave is generated by a piston. The fluctuating heat release of the flame will supply acoustic power

  17. Application of acoustic emission to flaw detection in engineering materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehy, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring of structures under operating loads to provide an early warning of possible failure to locate flaws in test specimens subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Test specimens used are mild steel prismatic bars with small holes at different locations. When the test specimen is loaded, acoustic emission data are automatically collected by two acoustic transducers located at opposite sides of the hole and processed by an acoustic emission analyzer. The processed information yields the difference in arrival times at the transducers, which uniquely determines the flaw location. By using this technique, flaws were located to within 8 percent of their true location. The use of acoustic emission in linear location to locate a flaw in a material is demonstrated. It is concluded that this one-dimensional application could be extended to the general flaw location problem through triangulation.

  18. Laser Imaging of Airborne Acoustic Emission by Nonlinear Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, Igor; Döring, Daniel; Busse, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    Strongly nonlinear vibrations of near-surface fractured defects driven by an elastic wave radiate acoustic energy into adjacent air in a wide frequency range. The variations of pressure in the emitted airborne waves change the refractive index of air thus providing an acoustooptic interaction with a collimated laser beam. Such an air-coupled vibrometry (ACV) is proposed for detecting and imaging of acoustic radiation of nonlinear spectral components by cracked defects. The photoelastic relation in air is used to derive induced phase modulation of laser light in the heterodyne interferometer setup. The sensitivity of the scanning ACV to different spatial components of the acoustic radiation is analyzed. The animated airborne emission patterns are visualized for the higher harmonic and frequency mixing fields radiated by planar defects. The results confirm a high localization of the nonlinear acoustic emission around the defects and complicated directivity patterns appreciably different from those observed for fundamental frequencies.

  19. Wavelet analysis of acoustic emission signals from thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Li; ZHOU Yi-chun

    2006-01-01

    The wavelet transform is applied to the analysis of acoustic emission signals collected during tensile test of the ZrO2-8% Y2O3 (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The acoustic emission signals are de-noised using the Daubechies discrete wavelets,and then decomposed into different wavelet levels using the programs developed by the authors. Each level is examined for its specific frequency range. The ratio of energy in different levels to the total energy gives information on the failure modes (coating micro-failures and substrate micro-failures) associated with TBCs system.

  20. Uniaxial compression CT and acoustic emission test on the coal crack propagation destruction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-hong LIU; Yao-dong JIANG; Yi-xin ZHAO; Jie ZHU

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission test and CT scanning are important techniques in the study of coal crack propagation.A uniaxial compression test was performed on coal samples by integrating CT and acoustic emission.The test comparison analyzes the acoustic emission load and CT images for an effective observation on the entire process,from crack propagation to the samples' destruction.The box dimension of the coal samples' acoustic emission series and the CT images were obtained through calculations by using the authors' own program.The results show that the fractal dimension of both the acoustic emission energy and CT image increase rapidly,indicating coal and rock mass has entered a dangerous condition.Hence,measures should be taken to unload the pressure of the coal and rock mass.The test results provide intuitive observation data for the coal meso-damage model.The test contributes to in-depth studies of coal or rock crack propagation mechanisms and provides a theoretical basis for rock burst mechanism.

  1. ACOUSTIC EMISSION (AE) STRESS MEASUREMENTS FOR AN UNDERGROUND MINE FEASIBILITY STUDY IN AUSTRALIA%澳大利亚地下采矿可行性研究中的声发射应力测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Villaescusa Ernesto; Li Jianping; Baird Graham; Seto Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Reliable evaluation of in-situ stress is an important issue for the analysis and design of underground excavations, particularly for evaluating the stability of underground structures to prevent failure or collapse. A low-cost and reliable technique for the estimation of the full stress tensor based on acoustic emission (the Kaiser effect) has been developed at the WA School of Mines over last five years. This paper presents the results for a feasibility study where four AE measurements for an Australian mine have been carried out. The results are compared well with those obtained by the conventional hollow inclusion over-coring method (HI Ceil). The advantages of the AE technique are that it is relatively cheap, non-time consuming and is applicable to in-situ stress measurements at depth in remote regions.

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  3. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGugan, M.; Sørensen, Bent F.; Østergaard, R.;

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material ispresented. The contribution of the acoustic emission...

  4. Acoustic emission partial discharge detection technique applied to fault diagnosis: Case studies of generator transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanker Tangella Bhavani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In power transformers, locating the partial discharge (PD source is as important as identifying it. Acoustic Emission (AE sensing offers a good solution for both PD detection and PD source location identification. In this paper the principle of the AE technique, along with in-situ findings of the online acoustic emission signals captured from partial discharges on a number of Generator Transformers (GT, is discussed. Of the two cases discussed, the first deals with Acoustic Emission Partial Discharge (AEPD tests on two identical transformers, and the second deals with the AEPD measurement of a transformer carried out on different occasions (years. These transformers are from a hydropower station and a thermal power station in India. Tests conducted in identical transformers give the provision for comparing AE signal amplitudes from the two transformers. These case studies also help in comprehending the efficacy of integrating Dissolved Gas is (DGA data with AEPD test results in detecting and locating the PD source.

  5. Towards identifying the dynamics of sliding by acoustic emission and vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchuganov, M. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2016-11-01

    The results of experiments with high load and sliding speed sliding conditions on tribologically mated pairs such as steel 1045/steel 1045 (test 1), steel 1045/basalt (test 2) and Hadfield steel/basalt (test 3) have been carried out in order to identify their response in terms of the acoustic emission and vibration signals. The steel to rock and rock to steel transfer has been revealed by examining the worn surfaces of both steel and rock samples with the use of laser scanning microscopy. The AE signal characteristics have been determined for the tribological pairs studied. The dynamics of sliding has been evaluated by measuring the vibration accelerations. Relationship between wear mode and either acoustic emission signal or vibration signal has been established. The minimal vibration oscillations amplitude and acoustic emission signal energy have been found out in sliding Hadfield steel/basalt pair.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maria De Rosa, Alessandro Dell'Era, Mauro Pasquali, Carlo Santulli and Fabrizio Sarasini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements.

  7. Emission rate measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckat, S.

    1980-09-01

    The development and application of an emission rate measuring device for gaseous components is explored. The device contains absorption fluid from a supply container that moistens a cylindrical paper sleeve. A newer model is provided with a direct current motor requiring less electricity than an older model. The hose pump is modified to avoid changing it and the filter sleeve is fastened more securely to the distributor head. Application of the measuring devices is discussed, particularly at the Cologne Cathedral, where damage to the stone is observed.

  8. Measuring Norwegian dialect distances using acoustic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, Wilbert; Johnson, Keith; Gooskens, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Levenshtein distance has become a popular tool for measuring linguistic dialect distances, and has been applied to Irish Gaelic, Dutch, German and other dialect groups. The method, in the current state of the art, depends upon phonetic transcriptions, even when acoustic differences are used the numb

  9. Force Measurements in Vibration and Acoustic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, T. D.

    1996-01-01

    The advent of triaxial, piezoelectric force gages and the associated signal processing is a precursor to several dynamics testing innovations. This new technology is applicable to spacecraft programs that JPL manages. An application of force measurement is force limiting (when testing spacecraft in random vibration tests). Base-drive and acoustic modal testing is a potential application.

  10. Acoustical measurements in ancient Roman theatres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnetani, Andrea; Fausti, Patrizio; Pompoli, Roberto; Prodi, Nicola

    2001-05-01

    The Greek and Roman theatres are among the most precious and spectacular items of cultural heritage in the Mediterranean countries. The theatres are famous not only for their impressive architecture, but also for the acoustic qualities. For this reason it is important to consider these theatres as an acoustical heritage and to study their sound field. Within the activities of the ERATO (identification Evaluation and Revival of the Acoustical heritage of ancient Theatres and Odea) project, acoustical measurements were taken in well-preserved ancient Roman theatres at Aspendos (Turkey) and Jerash (Jordan). Roman theatres have an impressive stage building that forms a back wall in the orchestra area, and it was found that, from the analysis of the acoustical parameters, the reverberation time (e.g., 1.7 s at middle frequencies in the theatre of Aspendos) is quite long compared not only with other open-space theatres but also with closed spaces. Contrary to modern halls the clarity is high and this fact, together with a low sound level in most of the seats, gives the sound field a unique character.

  11. Monitoring corrosion in prestressed concrete beams using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Mangual, Jesé; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul H.; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Early detection of corrosion can help reduce the cost of maintenance and extend the service life of structures. Acoustic emission (AE) sensing has proven to be a promising method for early detection of corrosion in reinforced concrete members. A test program is presented composed of four medium-scale prestressed concrete T-beams. Three of the beams have a length of 16 ft. 4 in. (4.98 m), and one is 9 ft. 8 in. (2.95 m). In order to corrode the specimens a 3% NaCl solution was prepared, which is representative of sea salt concentration. The beams were subjected to wet-dry cycles to accelerate the corrosion process. Two of the specimens were pre-cracked prior to conditioning in order to examine the effect of crack presence. AE data was recorded continuously while half-cell potential measurements and corrosion rate by Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) were measured daily. Corrosion current was also being acquired constantly to monitor any change in the concrete resistivity. Results indicate that the onset of corrosion may be identified using AE features, and were corroborated with measurements obtained from electrochemical techniques. Corroded areas were located using source triangulation. The results indicate that cracked specimens showed corrosion activity prior to un-cracked specimens and experienced higher corrosion rates. The level of corrosion was determined using corrosion rate results. Intensity analysis was used to link the corrosion rate and level to AE data.

  12. Fracture of fiber-reinforced composites analyzed via acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Nadia S; Oweis, Yara G; Altarawneh, Sandra K

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of composite resins using a three-point bending test and acoustic emission (AE) analysis. Three groups of specimens (n=15) were prepared: non-reinforced BelleGlass HP composite (NRC), unidirectional (UFRC) and multidirectional (MFRC) fiber-reinforced groups which respectively incorporated unidirectional Stick and multidirectional StickNet fibers. Specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine while an AE system was used to detect audible signals. Initial fracture strengths and AE amplitudes were significantly lower than those at final fracture in all groups (pcomposite resin materials and the monitoring of acoustic signals revealed significant information regarding the fracture process.

  13. Acoustic emission measurements to identify cracks in the vicinity of a pressurized borehole in saline rock; Schallemissionsmessungen zur Verfolgung von Rissbildung in der Umgebung einer druckbeaufschlagten Bohrung im Salzgestein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manthei, G.; Eisenblaetter, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Materialpruefung und Geophysik, Bad Nauheim (Germany); Popp, T. [Institut fuer Gebirgsmechanik, Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In a research project funded by Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz at Salzgitter ('Untersuchungen zur Barriereintegritaet im Hinblick auf das Ein-Endlager-Konzept'), acoustic emission measurements were made for a period of two years at Bernburg salt mine with the intention to detect cracking initiated by gas pressure and localise it in the vicinity of a borehole in a sealed compartment which was filled in several stages with high-pressure gas. Automatic in-situ location of the acoustic emission events showed that microcracks are induced by convergence; those sections will be imaged that face the probe array. There are sites in the immediate vicinity of the injection borehole where events are recorded every once a while but which do not correlate with the pressure load. While there was a significant pressure drop at maximum pressure of 154 bar, the pressure drop was not fast enough to induce clear acoustic emissions as in fast frac tests, i.e. it is most probably not caused by macroscopic cracking but rather from 'aseismic' permeation processes on a microscopic scale. [German] In einem vom Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz in Salzgitter gefoerderten Forschungsprojekt mit dem Titel 'Untersuchungen zur Barriereintegritaet im Hinblick auf das Ein-Endlager-Konzept' wurden ueber einen Zeitraum von zwei Jahren Schallemissionsmessungen im Salzbergwerk Bernburg durchgefuehrt. Ziel dieser Messung war die Detektion einer moeglichen gasdruckinduzierten Rissbildung und deren Lokalisierung im Bereich um ein Bohrloch, das in einem abgeschotteten Bereich stufenweise mit Gas unter hohem Druck beaufschlagt wurde. Die automatische In-situ-Ortung der Schallemissionsereignisse am Versuchsort zeigt, dass waehrend des Beobachtungszeitraumes infolge von Konvergenz (durch Gebirgsdruck bedingte Hohlraumverformung) an den Streckenkonturen Mikrorisse entstehen und dadurch die Teile der Streckenkonturen, die der Aufnehmeranordnung zugewandt sind, abgebildet werden. In der

  14. Real-Time Source Classification with an Waveform Parameter Filtering of Acoustic Emission Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Hyun; Park, Jae Ha; Ahn, Bong Young [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    The acoustic emission(AE) technique is a well established method to carry out structural health monitoring(SHM) of large structures. However, the real-time monitoring of the crack growth in the roller coaster support structures is not easy since the vehicle operation produces very large noise as well as crack growth. In this investigation, we present the waveform parameter filtering method to classify acoustic sources in real-time. This method filtrates only the AE hits by the target acoustic source as passing hits in a specific parameter band. According to various acoustic sources, the waveform parameters were measured and analyzed to verify the present filtering method. Also, the AE system employing the waveform parameter filter was manufactured and applied to the roller coaster support structure in an actual amusement park

  15. Measuring Acoustic Wave Transit Time in Furnace Based on Active Acoustic Source Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Luo; Feng Tian; Xiao-Ping Sun

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurement of transit time for acoustic wave between two sensors installed on two sides of a furnace is a key to implementing the temperature field measurement technique based on acoustical method. A new method for measuring transit time of acoustic wave based on active acoustic source signal is proposed in this paper, which includes the followings: the time when the acoustic source signal arrives at the two sensors is measured first; then, the difference of two arriving time arguments is computed, thereby we get the transit time of the acoustic wave between two sensors installed on the two sides of the furnace. Avoiding the restriction on acoustic source signal and background noise, the new method can get the transit time of acoustic wave with higher precision and stronger ability of resisting noise interference.

  16. Photo-acoustic tomography in a rotating measurement setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Guillaume; Moradifam, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) aims to leverage the photo-acoustic coupling between optical absorption of light sources and ultrasound (US) emission to obtain high contrast reconstructions of optical parameters with the high resolution of sonic waves. Quantitative PAT often involves a two-step procedure: first the map of sonic emission is reconstructed from US boundary measurements; and second optical properties of biological tissues are evaluated. We consider here a practical measurement setting in which such a separation does not apply. We assume that the optical source and an array of ultrasonic transducers are mounted on a rotating frame (in two or three dimensions) so that the light source rotates at the same time as the US measurements are acquired. As a consequence, we no longer have the option to reconstruct a map of sonic emission corresponding to a given optical illumination. We propose here a framework where the two steps are combined into one and an absorption map is directly reconstructed from the available US measurements.

  17. Structural tests using a MEMS acoustic emission sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Irving J.; Greve, David W.; Ozevin, Didem; Hay, D. Robert; Hay, Thomas R.; Pessiki, Stephen P.; Tyson, Nathan L.

    2006-03-01

    In a collaborative project at Lehigh and Carnegie Mellon, a MEMS acoustic emission sensor was designed and fabricated as a suite of six resonant-type capacitive transducers in the frequency range between 100 and 500 kHz. Characterization studies showed good comparisons between predicted and experimental electro-mechanical behavior. Acoustic emission events, simulated experimentally in steel ball impact and in pencil lead break tests, were detected and source localization was demonstrated. In this paper we describe the application of the MEMS device in structural testing, both in laboratory and in field applications. We discuss our findings regarding housing and mounting (acoustic coupling) of the MEMS device with its supporting electronics, and we then report the results of structural testing. In all tests, the MEMS transducers were used in parallel with commercial acoustic emission sensors, which thereby serve as a benchmark and permit a direct observation of MEMS device functionality. All tests involved steel structures, with particular interest in propagation of existing cracks or flaws. A series of four laboratory tests were performed on beam specimens fabricated from two segments (Grade 50 steel) with a full penetration weld (E70T-4 electrode material) at midspan. That weld region was notched, an initial fatigue crack was induced, and the specimens were then instrumented with one commercial transducer and with one MEMS device; data was recorded from five individual transducers on the MEMS device. Under a four-point bending test, the beam displayed both inelastic behavior and crack propagation, including load drops associated with crack instability. The MEMS transducers detected all instability events as well as many or most of the acoustic emissions occurring during plasticity and stable crack growth. The MEMS transducers were less sensitive than the commercial transducer, and did not detect as many events, but the normalized cumulative burst count obtained

  18. Analysis of acoustic emission data for bearings subject to unbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapinder Sawhney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE is an effective nondestructive method for investigating the behavior of materials under stress. In recent decades, AE applications in structural health monitoring have been extended to other areas such as rotating machineries and cutting tools. This research investigates the application of acoustic emission data for unbalance analysis and detection in rotary systems. The AE parameter of interest in this study is a discrete variable that covers the significance of count, duration and amplitude of AE signals. A statistical model based on Zero-Inflated Poisson (ZIP regression is proposed to handle over-dispersion and excess zeros of the counting data. The ZIP model indicates that faulty bearings can generate more transient wave in the AE waveform. Control charts can easily detect the faulty bearing using the parameters of the ZIP model. Categorical data analysis based on generalized linear models (GLM is also presented. The results demonstrate the significance of the couple unbalance.

  19. Employing Acoustic Emission for Monitoring Oil Film Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mba

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The major purpose of a gear lubricant is to provide adequate oil film thickness to reduce and prevent gear tooth surface failures. Real time monitoring for gear failures is important in order to predict and prevent unexpected failures which would have a negative impact on the efficiency, performance and safety of the gearbox. This paper presents experimental results on the influence of specific oil film thickness on Acoustic Emission (AE activity for operational helical gears. Variation in film thickness during operations was achieved by spraying liquid nitrogen onto the rotating gear wheel. The experimental results demonstrated a clear relationship between the root mean square (r.m.s value of the AE signal and the specific film thickness. The findings demonstrate the potential of Acoustic Emission technology to quantify lubrication regimes on operational gears.

  20. Acoustic vs Interferometric Measurements of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arechiga, R. O.; Erives, H.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Stanley, M. A.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Edens, H. E.; Lapierre, J. L.; Stock, M.; Jensen, D.; Morris, K.

    2015-12-01

    During the summer of 2015 we acquired acoustic and RF data on severalflashes from thunderstorms over Fort Morgan CO. and Langmuir Laboratoryin the Magdalena mountains of central New Mexico. The acoustic arrayswere located at a distance of roughly 150 m from the interferometers.Lightning mapping array and slow antenna data were also obtained. Theacoustic arrays consist of arrays of five audio-range and six infrasoundmicrophones operating at 50 KHz and 1 KHz respectively. The lightninginterferometer at Fort Morgan CO. consists of three flat-plate, 13" diameterantennas at the vertices of an equilateral 50 m per side triangle. Theinterferometer at Langmuir Laboratory consists of three 13" dishes separatedby about 15 m. Both interferometers, operating at 180 Megasamples persecond, use the analysis software and digitizer hardware pioneered byStanley, Stock et al. The high data rate allows for excellent spatialresolution of high speed (and typically high current) processes such asK-changes, return strokes and dart-leaders. In previous studies, we haveshown the usefulness of acoustic recordings to locate thunder sources aswell as infrasound pulses from lightning. This work will present acomparison of Acoustic and Interferometric measurements from lightning,using some interesting flashes, including a positive cloud to ground,that occurred in these campaigns.

  1. Acoustic emission and shape memory effect in the martensitic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekala, S; Ananthakrishna, G

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic emission signals are known to exhibit a high degree of reproducibility in time and show correlations with the growth and shrinkage of martensite domains when athermal martensites are subjected to repeated thermal cycling in a restricted temperature range. We show that a recently introduced two dimensional model for the martensitic transformation mimics these features. We also show that these features are related to the shape memory effect where near full reversal of morphological features are seen under these thermal cycling conditions.

  2. Fault growth and acoustic emissions in confined granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, David A.; Byerlee, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The failure process in a brittle granite was studied by using acoustic emission techniques to obtain three dimensional locations of the microfracturing events. During a creep experiment the nucleation of faulting coincided with the onset of tertiary creep, but the development of the fault could not be followed because the failure occurred catastrophically. A technique has been developed that enables the failure process to be stabilized by controlling the axial stress to maintain a constant acoustic emission rate. As a result the post-failure stress-strain curve has been followed quasi-statically, extending to hours the fault growth process that normally would occur violently in a fraction of a second. The results from the rate-controlled experiments show that the fault plane nucleated at a point on the sample surface after the stress-strain curve reached its peak. Before nucleation, the microcrack growth was distributed throughout the sample. The fault plane then grew outward from the nucleation site and was accompanied by a gradual drop in stress. Acoustic emission locations showed that the fault propagated as a fracture front (process zone) with dimensions of 1 to 3 cm. As the fracture front passed by a given fixed point on the fault plane, the subsequent acoustic emission would drop. When growth was allowed to progress until the fault bisected the sample, the stress dropped to the frictional strength. These observations are in accord with the behavior predicted by Rudnicki and Rice's bifurcation analysis but conflict with experiments used to infer that shear localization would occur in brittle rock while the material is still hardening.

  3. An acoustic mode measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppa, P. D.

    1984-10-01

    Turbomachinery noise propagates in aircraft jet engine ducts in a complicated manner. Measurement of this propagation is useful both to identify source mechanisms and to design efficient linings. A practical method of making these measurements has been developed, using linear arrays of equally spaced microphones mounted flush with the duct wall. Circumferential or axial arrays are analyzed by spatial Fourier transform, giving sound level as a function of spinning order or axial wavenumber respectively. Complex demodulation is used to acquire data in a modest bandwidth around a high frequency of interest. A joint NASA/Boeing test of the system used 32 microphones in a JT15D turbofan engine inlet. A 400-Hz bandwidth centered at blade passage frequency and at half blade passage frequency was studied. The theoretically predicted modes were clearly seen at blade passage frequency; broadband noise at half blade passage frequency was biased towards modes corotating with the fan. Interference between similar modes was not a significant problem. A lining design study indicated a 15 percent improvement in lining efficiency was possible when mode data were used, for this particular engine. The technique has proven reliable and useful for source diagnostics and lining design.

  4. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea-Manuela Zelenyak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing.

  5. MEMS acoustic emission transducers designed with high aspect ratio geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, H.; Ozevin, D.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, micro-electro-mechanic systems (MEMS) acoustic emission (AE) transducers are manufactured using an electroplating technique. The transducers use a capacitance change as their transduction principle, and are tuned to the range 50-200 kHz. Through the electroplating technique, a thick metal layer (20 μm nickel + 0.5 μm gold) is used to form a freely moving microstructure layer. The presence of the gold layer reduces the potential corrosion of the nickel layer. A dielectric layer is deposited between the two electrodes, thus preventing the stiction phenomenon. The transducers have a measured quality factor in the range 15-30 at atmospheric pressure and are functional without vacuum packaging. The transducers are characterized using electrical and mechanical tests to identify the capacitance, resonance frequency and damping. Ultrasonic wave generation using a Q-switched laser shows the directivity of the transducer sensitivity. The comparison of the MEMS transducers with similar frequency piezoelectric transducers shows that the MEMS AE transducers have better response characteristics and sensitivity at the resonance frequency and well-defined waveform signatures (rise time and decay time) due to pure resonance behavior in the out-of-plane direction. The transducers are sensitive to a unique wave direction, which can be utilized to increase the accuracy of source localization by selecting the correct wave velocity at the structures.

  6. Dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission from alkali halide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Chandra; Anubha S Gour; Vivek K Chandra; Yuvraj Patil

    2004-06-01

    The present paper reports the dislocation unpinning model of acoustic emission (AE) from alkali halide crystals. Equations are derived for the strain dependence of the transient AE pulse rate, peak value of the AE pulse rate and the total number of AE pulse emitted. It is found that the AE pulse rate should be maximum for a particular strain of the crystals. The peak value of the AE pulse rate should depend on the volume and strain rate of the crystals, and also on the pinning time of dislocations. Since the pinning time of dislocations decreases with increasing strain rate, the AE pulse rate should be weakly dependent on the strain rate of the crystals. The total number of AE should increase linearly with deformation and then it should attain a saturation value for the large deformation. By measuring the strain dependence of the AE pulse rate at a fixed strain rate, the time constant $_{\\text{s}}$ for surface annihilation of dislocations and the pinning time $_{\\text{p}}$ of the dislocations can be determined. A good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results related to the AE from alkali halide crystals.

  7. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  8. Assessment of corrosion rate in prestressed concrete with acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) sensing was employed to assess the rate of corrosion of steel strands in small scale concrete block specimens. The corrosion process was accelerated in a laboratory environment using a potentiostat to supply a constant potential difference with a 3% NaCl solution as the electrolyte. The embedded prestressing steel strand served as the anode, and a copper plate served as the cathode. Corrosion rate, half-cell potential measurements, and AE activity were recorded continuously throughout each test and examined to assess the development of corrosion and its rate. At the end of each test the steel strands were cleaned and re-weighed to determine the mass loss and evaluate it vis-á-vis the AE data. The initiation and propagation phases of corrosion were correlated with the percentage mass loss of steel and the acquired AE signals. Results indicate that AE monitoring may be a useful aid in the detection and differentiation of the steel deterioration phases, and estimation of the locations of corroded areas.

  9. Acoustic emission analysis of tooth-composite interfacial debonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, N Y; Ferracane, J L; Lee, I B

    2013-01-01

    This study detected tooth-composite interfacial debonding during composite restoration by means of acoustic emission (AE) analysis and investigated the effects of composite properties and adhesives on AE characteristics. The polymerization shrinkage, peak shrinkage rate, flexural modulus, and shrinkage stress of a methacrylate-based universal hybrid, a flowable, and a silorane-based composite were measured. Class I cavities on 49 extracted premolars were restored with 1 of the 3 composites and 1 of the following adhesives: 2 etch-and-rinse adhesives, 2 self-etch adhesives, and an adhesive for the silorane-based composite. AE analysis was done for 2,000 sec during light-curing. The silorane-based composite exhibited the lowest shrinkage (rate), the longest time to peak shrinkage rate, the lowest shrinkage stress, and the fewest AE events. AE events were detected immediately after the beginning of light-curing in most composite-adhesive combinations, but not until 40 sec after light-curing began for the silorane-based composite. AE events were concentrated at the initial stage of curing in self-etch adhesives compared with etch-and-rinse adhesives. Reducing the shrinkage (rate) of composites resulted in reduced shrinkage stress and less debonding, as evidenced by fewer AE events. AE is an effective technique for monitoring, in real time, the debonding kinetics at the tooth-composite interface.

  10. Acoustic measurement of potato cannon velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, M; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This article describes measurement of potato cannon velocity with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. The potato's flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato velocity is simply the flight distance divided by the flight time.

  11. ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENTS BUBBLES IN BIOLOGICAL TIESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAHINE Georges L.; TANGUAY Michel; LORAINE Greg

    2009-01-01

    An acoustic based instrument,the ABS Acoustic Bubble Spectrometer(R)(C)(ABS),was investigated for the detection and quantification of bubbles in biological media.These include viscoelastic media(blood),materials of varying density(bone in tissue),non-homogenous distribution of bubbles(intravenous bubbly flow),and bubbles migrating in tissue(decompression sickness,DCS).The performance of the ABS was demonstrated in a series of laboratory experiments.Validation of the code was performed using a viscoelastic polymer solution,Polyox,in which the bubble size distribution and void fraction were determined by ABS measurements and with image analysis of high speed videos.These tests showed that the accuracy of the ABS was not significantly affected by viscoelasticity for bubbles smaller than 200 microns.The ABS detection and measurement of non-homogenous bubble distributions was demonstrated using a bubbly flow through a simulated vein surrounded by tissue.The scatter of acoustic signals due to bones in the acoustic pathway was also investigated.These in-vitro experiments were done using meat(beef)as a tissue simulant.Decompression experiments were done using beef meat which was held underwater at high pressure(9.9 atm)then rapidly decompressed.Bubble size distributions and void fraction calculations in these experiments were then validated using image analysis of high speed video.In addition,preliminary experiments were performed with the US Navy Medical Research Center,demonstrating the utility of the modified ABS system in detecting the evolution of bubbles in swine undergoing decompression sickness(DCS).These results indicate that the ABS may be used to detect and quantify the evolution of bubbles in-vivo and aid in the monitoring of DCS.

  12. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Capel, P. J. S.; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Porte, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic...... signals and THz electromagnetic radiation signals demonstrates that transient strain generation in InGaN/GaN MQWs is correlatedwith electromagnetic THz generation, and both types of emission find their origin in ultrafast dynamical screening of the built-in piezoelectric field in the MQWs. The measured...... spectral intensity of the detected Brillouin signal corresponds to a maximum strain amplitude of generated acoustic pulses of 2%. This value coincides with the static lattice-mismatch-induced strain in In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN, demonstrating the total release of static strain in MQWs via impulsive THz acoustic...

  13. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  14. Variation of solar acoustic emission and its relation to phase of the solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruizhu; Zhao, Junwei

    2016-05-01

    Solar acoustic emission is closely related to solar convection and photospheric magnetic field. Variation of acoustic emission and its relation to the phase of solar cycles are important to understand dynamics of solar cycles and excitation of acoustic waves. In this work we use 6 years of SDO/HMI Dopplergram data to study acoustic emissions of the whole sun and of the quiet-sun regions, respectively, in multiple acoustic frequency bands. We show the variation of acoustic emission from May 2010 to April 2016, covering half of the solar cycle 24, and analyze its correlation with the solar activity level indexed by daily sunspot number and total magnetic flux. Results show that the correlation between the whole-Sun acoustic emission and the solar activity level is strongly negative for low frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 mHz, but strongly positive for high frequencies between 4.5 and 6.0 mHz. For high frequencies, the acoustic emission excess in sunspot halos overwhelms the emission deficiency in sunspot umbrae and penumbrae. The correlation between the acoustic emission in quiet regions and the solar activity level is negative for 2.5-4.0 mHz and positive for 4.0-5.5 mHz. This shows that the solar background acoustic power, with active regions excluded, also varies during a solar cycle, implying the excitation frequencies or depths are highly related to the solar magnetic field.

  15. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in South Pole ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J.A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S.W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J.L.B.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J.J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J.K.; Becker, K.H.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D.J.; Bohm, C.; Boser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D.F.; D'Agostino, M.V.; Danninger, M.; Clercq, C. De; Demirors, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; DeYoung, T.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J.P.; Duvoort, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Engdegard, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P.A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A.R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M.M.; Fox, B.D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glusenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J.A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Gross, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R.M.; Gurtner, M.; Gustafsson, L.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G.C.; Hoffman, K.D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Lafebre, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) and a retrievable transmitter deployed in holes drilled for the IceCube experiment, we have measured the attenuation of acoustic signals by South Pole ice at depths between 190 m and 500 m. Three data sets, using different acoustic sources, have been

  16. Acoustic emissions correlated with hydration of Saguaro Cactus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, L. J.; Rowe, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    For some years it has been demonstrated that hardwood trees produce acoustic emissions during periods of drought, which arise from cavitation in the xylem as water is withdrawn. These emissions not only provide insights into the fluid transport behavior within these trees, but also the degree to which cavitation can proceed before inevitable tree mortality. Such studies can have significant impact on our understanding of forest die-off in the face of climate change. Plant mortality is not limited to woody trees, however, and it is not only the coniferous and deciduous forests whose response to climate and rainfall changes are important. In the desert Southwest we observe changes to survival rates of numerous species of flora. One of the most conspicuous of these plants is the iconic Saguaro Cactus (Carnegiea gigantean). These behemoths of the Sonoran Desert are very sensitive to small perturbations in their environment. Specifically, during the summer monsoon season when the cacti become well-hydrated, they can absorb hundreds of gallons of water within a very short time frame. We have obtained a juvenile saguaro on which we are conducting experiments to monitor acoustic emissions during hydration and dessication cycles. We will report on our observations obtained using piezoelectric ceramic accelerometers whose signals are digitized up to 44 Khz and recorded during hydration.

  17. Acoustic emissions for particle sizing of powders through signal processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastari, A.; Cristalli, C.; Morlacchi, R.; Pomponi, E. [Loccioni Group (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    The present work introduces an innovative method for measuring particle size distribution of an airborne powder, based on the application of signal processing techniques to the acoustic emission signals produced by the impacts of the powder with specific metallic surfaces. The basic idea of the proposed methodology lies on the identification of the unknown relation between the acquired acoustic emission signals and the powder particle size distribution, by means of a multi-step procedure. In the first step, wavelet packet decomposition is used to extract useful features from the acoustic emission signals: the dimensionality of feature space is further reduced through multivariate data analysis techniques. As a final step, a neural network is properly trained to map the feature vector into the particle size distribution. The proposed solution has several advantages, such as low cost and low invasiveness which allow the system based on this technique to be easily integrated in pre-existing plants. It has been successfully applied to the PSD measurement of coal powder produced by grinding mills in a coal-fired power station, and the experimental results are reported in the paper. The measurement principle can also be applied to different particle sizing applications, whenever a solid powder is carried in air or in other gases.

  18. Monitoring of Robot Assisted Polishing through parameters of acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarev, Ruslan; Top, Søren; Bilberg, Arne

    , the duration of each process stage and predict the end of process in a precise and unmanned way. This paper presents and analyses the utilization of acoustic emission for generation of control signals in the stone polishing process for achieving these control objectives in an industrial set-up prototype........ The determination of the point in time to change a polishing media or stop the process is needed for computer controlled functional surface generation. During the last years, several research works have been done in order to build grinding/polishing monitoring systems to determine process characteristics...

  19. Standard practice for acoustic emission examination of cast iron yankee and steam heated paper dryers

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for carrying out acoustic emission (AE) examinations of Yankee and Steam Heated Paper Dryers (SHPD) of the type to make tissue, paper, and paperboard products. 1.2 This practice requires pressurization to levels used during normal operation. The pressurization medium may be high temperature steam, air, or gas. The dryer is also subjected to significant stresses during the heating up and cooling down periods of operation. Acoustic Emission data maybe collected during these time periods but this testing is beyond the scope of this document. 1.3 The AE measurements are used to detect, as well as, localize emission sources. Other methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) may be used to further evaluate the significance of acoustic emission sources. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine th...

  20. Acoustic emissions in granular structures under gravitational destabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirot, J.-L.; Le Gonidec, Y.; Kergosien, B.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we perform experiments in an acoustic tank to record acoustic emissions (AEs) occurring when a granular medium is submitted to a gravitational destabilization. The granular medium is composed of monodisperse glass beads filling a box which can be inclined from α=0° up to the avalanche threshold angle α0=28°. To respect quasi-static conditions, the angle increases by steps less than 3°/mn. An omnidirectional hydrophone records the continuous acoustic field in the bead structure until the avalanche occurs. We compare the results for different experimental configurations, in particular for dry and water saturated granular media, but also for different bead diameters (d=8, 3 and 0.3 mm) in order to span the viscosity range of the granular structure. We show that the AE signatures strongly depend on the viscosity parameter, which can be related to the Stokes number and the fluid/solid density ratio. The transition from a viscous to an inertial dynamic of the granular structure is discussed, based on these experimental results.

  1. Acoustic CT system for temperature distribution measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinji Ohyama; Toyofumi Oga; Kazuo Oshima; Junya Takayama

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a measurement method for crosssectional temperature distribution is addressed. A novel method based on an acoustic CT technique is proposed. Specifically,the temperature distributions are estimated using the time of flight data of several ultrasonic propagation paths. The times of the flight data contain both temperature and wind effect,and the method to select only temperature component is introduced. A filtered back projection method is applied to reconstruct the temperature distributions from the time of flight data. An experimental system was designed and fabricated to realize simultaneous temperature and wind velocity distribution measurements. Through this system,the effectiveness of the proposed measurement method is confirmed.

  2. Noninvasive fluid property measurements using acoustic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbush, Michael; Chow, Humphrey; Chiao, James; Rose, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    The properties of a fluid are normally determined using invasive methods. These methods may lead to possibly contaminating or consuming the sample. When only very small amounts of a valuable sample exist, noninvasive measurement methods are preferred. The properties of fluids can then be used to deduce additional properties based on known relationships. In one case, the surface tension of a fluid may be used to determine the concentration of a fluid. The authors describe a measurement technique involving excitation of the surface of the fluid and the measurement of its response. An acoustic wave is used to both excite and monitor the surface of the liquid. This technique is used to determine the concentration of DMSO and water in solution, and the result determines the amount of fluid needed to deliver an accurate amount of solute in solution.

  3. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Mario Bilmes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation"' triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  4. Natural and laser-induced cavitation in corn stems: On the mechanisms of acoustic emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, E; Bilmes, G M; 10.4279/PIP.040003

    2012-01-01

    Water in plant xylem is often superheated, and therefore in a meta-stable state. Under certain conditions, it may suddenly turn from the liquid to the vapor state. This cavitation process produces acoustic emissions. We report the measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) produced by natural and induced cavitation in corn stems. We induced cavitation and UAE in vivo, in well controlled and reproducible experiments, by irradiating the bare stem of the plants with a continuous-wave laser beam. By tracing the source of UAE, we were able to detect absorption and frequency filtering of the UAE propagating through the stem. This technique allows the unique possibility of studying localized embolism of plant conduits, and thus to test hypotheses on the hydraulic architecture of plants. Based on our results, we postulate that the source of UAE is a transient "cavity oscillation" triggered by the disruptive effect of cavitation inception.

  5. Oscillating load-induced acoustic emission in laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Alexander; Lockner, David A.; Stroganova, S.; Stanchits, S.; Smirnov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of acoustic emission (AE) were studied. A pre-fractured cylinder of granite was loaded in a triaxial machine at 160 MPa confining pressure until stick-slip events occurred. The experiments were conducted at a constant strain rate of 10−7 s−1 that was modulated by small-amplitude sinusoidal oscillations with periods of 175 and 570 seconds. Amplitude of the oscillations was a few percent of the total load and was intended to simulate periodic loading observed in nature (e.g., earth tides or other sources). An ultrasonic acquisition system with 13 piezosensors recorded acoustic emissions that were generated during deformation of the sample. We observed a correlation between AE response and sinusoidal loading. The effect was more pronounced for higher frequency of the modulating force. A time-space spectral analysis for a “point” process was used to investigate details of the periodic AE components. The main result of the study was the correlation of oscillations of acoustic activity synchronized with the applied oscillating load. The intensity of the correlated AE activity was most pronounced in the “aftershock” sequences that followed large-amplitude AE events. We suggest that this is due to the higher strain-sensitivity of the failure area when the sample is in a transient, unstable mode. We also found that the synchronization of AE activity with the oscillating external load nearly disappeared in the period immediately after the stick-slip events and gradually recovered with further loading.

  6. Acoustic emission of retrofitted fiber-wrapped columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Echary, Hazem; Mirmiran, Amir

    1998-03-01

    In recent years, fiber-wrapping technique has become increasingly popular for retrofitting of existing bridge pier columns in seismic zones. By the way of confinement, the external jacket enhances strength, ductility and shear performance of the column. However, since state of the concrete core is not visible from outside of the jacket, it is of great necessity to develop proper non-destructive methods to evaluate structural integrity of the column. Extensive research on FRP-confined concrete at the University of Central Florida has shown that failure of such hybrid columns is often accompanied by considerable audible and sub-audible noise, making acoustic emission (AE) a viable NDE technique for retrofitted columns. Acoustic emission from fiber-wrapped concrete specimens were monitored. A total of 24 concrete specimens with two types of construction (bonded and unbonded) and four different number of layers (1, 3, 5 and 7) were tested under uniaxial compression. All specimens were made of S-glass fabric and polyester resin with a core diameter of 6' and a length of 12'. Some of the specimens were subjected to cycles of loading and unloading to examine the presence of the Kaiser and the Felicity effects. A 4-channel AEDSP-32/16 (Mistras-2001) machine from Physical Acoustics Corp. was used for the experiments. Results indicate that AE energy and the number of AE counts can both be good representatives for the response of confined concrete. Further, plots of AE energy versus load follows the same bilinear trend that has been observed in the stress-strain response of such specimens. Finally, Felicity effect was observed in all composite specimens.

  7. FRP/steel composite damage acoustic emission monitoring and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Chen, Zhi

    2015-04-01

    FRP is a new material with good mechanical properties, such as high strength of extension, low density, good corrosion resistance and anti-fatigue. FRP and steel composite has gotten a wide range of applications in civil engineering because of its good performance. As the FRP/steel composite get more and more widely used, the monitor of its damage is also getting more important. To monitor this composite, acoustic emission (AE) is a good choice. In this study, we prepare four identical specimens to conduct our test. During the testing process, the AE character parameters and mechanics properties were obtained. Damaged properties of FRP/steel composite were analyzed through acoustic emission (AE) signals. By the growing trend of AE accumulated energy, the severity of the damage made on FRP/steel composite was estimated. The AE sentry function has been successfully used to study damage progression and fracture emerge release rate of composite laminates. This technique combines the cumulative AE energy with strain energy of the material rather than analyzes the AE information and mechanical separately.

  8. Experimental Investigations into the Effects of Lithology on Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhu Tian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to study how lithology affects acoustic emissions (AE, a series of tunnel rock burst simulation experiments, monitored by acoustic emission instruments, were conducted on granite, marble and basalt. By analyzing the characteristic parameters, this study found that AE events occur more frequently during the rock burst process on granite and basalt. Marble remains dormant until 75% of the loading time before the peak, at which point, cracks develop rapidly and AE events dramatically increase. During the rock burst process, the AE energy release demonstrates that low energy is released in the incubation phase and robust energy is released during the later phase. Before the rock burst occurs, increased in the heterogeneity index Cv values of the AE event are subject to lithology. The Cv values of granite and basalt have an increase of about 0.2-0.4, while marble shows an increase of 1.0-1.2. The heterogeneity index Cv value of an AE event is in line with the rock burst process.

  9. Characterization of corrosion damage in prestressed concrete using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangual, Jesé; ElBatanouny, Mohamed K.; Vélez, William; Ziehl, Paul; Matta, Fabio; González, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    The corrosion of reinforced concrete structures is a major issue from both a structural safety and maintenance management point of view. Early detection of the internal degradation process provides the owner with sufficient options to develop a plan of action. An accelerated corrosion test was conducted in a small scale concrete specimen reinforced with a 0.5 inch (13 mm) diameter prestressing strand to investigate the correlation between corrosion rate and acoustic emission (AE). Corrosion was accelerated in the laboratory by supplying anodic current via a rectifier while continuously monitoring acoustic emission activity. Results were correlated with traditional electrochemical techniques such as half-cell potential and linear polarization. The location of the active corrosion activity was found through a location algorithm based on time of flight of the stress waves. Intensity analysis was used to plot the relative significance of the damage states present in the specimen and a preliminary grading chart is presented. Results indicate that AE may be a useful non-intrusive technique for the detection and quantification of corrosion damage.

  10. Time-sensitivity of the Kaiser effect of acoustic emission in limestone and its application to measurements of in-situ stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Yan; Qi Zili; Chen Mian; Zhang Guangqing; Xu Guangqiang

    2009-01-01

    Measuring in-situ stress by using the Kaiser effect in rocks has such advantages as time-efficiency, low cost and little limitation, but the precision of the method is dependent on rock properties and delay time of the measurement.In this paper, experiments on the Kaiser effect in limestones were performed, and it was found that the limestones had good ability to retain a memory of their recent stress history and high time-sensitivity.The longer the experiment was delayed from the extraction of the stone, the larger the Felicity ratio was.As the Felicity ratio approached 1, significant Kaiser effect was observed.In-situ stress should be determined by the limestone measurements when the delay time was 40-120 days.Finally, the in-situ stress in a limestone formation could be successfully measured in practice.

  11. Fatigue crack monitoring with coupled piezoelectric film acoustic emission sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changjiang

    Fatigue-induced cracking is a commonly seen problem in civil infrastructures reaching their original design life. A number of high-profile accidents have been reported in the past that involved fatigue damage in structures. Such incidences often happen without prior warnings due to lack of proper crack monitoring technique. In order to detect and monitor the fatigue crack, acoustic emission (AE) technique, has been receiving growing interests recently. AE can provide continuous and real-time monitoring data on damage progression in structures. Piezoelectric film AE sensor measures stress-wave induced strain in ultrasonic frequency range and its feasibility for AE signal monitoring has been demonstrated recently. However, extensive work in AE monitoring system development based on piezoelectric film AE sensor and sensor characterization on full-scale structures with fatigue cracks, have not been done. A lack of theoretical formulations for understanding the AE signals also hinders the use of piezoelectric film AE sensors. Additionally, crack detection and source localization with AE signals is a very important area yet to be explored for this new type of AE sensor. This dissertation presents the results of both analytical and experimental study on the signal characteristics of surface stress-wave induced AE strain signals measured by piezoelectric film AE sensors in near-field and an AE source localization method based on sensor couple theory. Based on moment tensor theory, generalized expression for AE strain signal is formulated. A special case involving the response of piezoelectric film AE sensor to surface load is also studied, which could potentially be used for sensor calibration of this type of sensor. A new concept of sensor couple theory based AE source localization technique is proposed and validated with both simulated and experimental data from fatigue test and field monitoring. Two series of fatigue tests were conducted to perform fatigue crack

  12. Measurement of acoustical characteristics of mosques in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Adel A.

    2003-03-01

    The study of mosque acoustics, with regard to acoustical characteristics, sound quality for speech intelligibility, and other applicable acoustic criteria, has been largely neglected. In this study a background as to why mosques are designed as they are and how mosque design is influenced by worship considerations is given. In the study the acoustical characteristics of typically constructed contemporary mosques in Saudi Arabia have been investigated, employing a well-known impulse response. Extensive field measurements were taken in 21 representative mosques of different sizes and architectural features in order to characterize their acoustical quality and to identify the impact of air conditioning, ceiling fans, and sound reinforcement systems on their acoustics. Objective room-acoustic indicators such as reverberation time (RT) and clarity (C50) were measured. Background noise (BN) was assessed with and without the operation of air conditioning and fans. The speech transmission index (STI) was also evaluated with and without the operation of existing sound reinforcement systems. The existence of acoustical deficiencies was confirmed and quantified. The study, in addition to describing mosque acoustics, compares design goals to results obtained in practice and suggests acoustical target values for mosque design. The results show that acoustical quality in the investigated mosques deviates from optimum conditions when unoccupied, but is much better in the occupied condition.

  13. Diagnostic System of Wireless Acoustic Emission Signal Transfer for Monitoring Oil-and-Gas Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skalsky, V.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of diagnostic 8-channel system for wireless transfer of acoustic emission information during monitoring the objects of long operation is revealed. The results of the development of algorithmic software for hardware system and personal computer, which performs system control and post-processing of acoustic emission information. are presented. The basic specifications of the system are described.

  14. Deciphering acoustic emission signals in drought stressed branches: the missing link between source and sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidewei L Vergeynst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available When drought occurs in plants, acoustic emission signals can be detected, but the actual causes of these signals are still unknown. By analyzing the waveforms of the measured signals, it should however be possible to trace the characteristics of the acoustic emission source and get information about the underlying physiological processes. A problem encountered during this analysis is that the waveform changes significantly from source to sensor and lack of knowledge on wave propagation impedes research progress made in this field. We used finite element modeling and the well-known pencil lead break source to investigate wave propagation in a branch. A cylindrical rod of polyvinyl chloride was first used to identify the theoretical propagation modes. Two wave propagation modes could be distinguished and we used the finite element model to interpret their behavior in terms of source position for both the PVC rod and a wooden rod. Both wave propagation modes were also identified in drying-induced signals from woody branches, and we used the obtained insights to provide recommendations for further acoustic emission research in plant science.

  15. Glacier studies on the basis of acoustic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Epifanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of glacier ice flow studies using the method of acoustic emission (AE in frequency range from 15 Hz to 20 kHz has been considered. A portable acoustic line system has been developed and a number of methodological issues (mounting of acoustic sensors into glacial ice, their location, reliability of acoustic coupling, etc. have been solved. Acoustic studies of glacial ice have been performed; rock fall effect, ice cracking and ice movement on bedrock have been simulated. Correspondences of AE parameters to specific sources have been identified. The results of acoustic studies on Aldegondabreen (Spitsbergen, Central Tuyuksu and Molodezhny glaciers (northern Tien Shan have been summarized. The dependence of the adhesive strength of ice with smooth substrate (serpentenite on the shear rate has been considered; the effect of tor-shaped obstacle on shear force has been estimated. It is shown that the acoustic effects at cohesive ice failure on obstacles are similar to the observed natural acoustic vibrations generated in glaciers from distant sources. The results might be applied in development of the mobile ice lab and system for remote acoustic monitoring the processes in the bottom layers of glaciers.

  16. Outdoor Synthetic Aperture Acoustic Ground Target Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    1341 (2003). [11] C. A. Dimarzio, T. Shi, F. J. Blonigen et al., “ Laser -Induced Acoustic Landmine Detection,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society...High Frequency A/S Coupling For Ap Buried Landmine Detection Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers,” Proc. SPIE 5415(1), 35-41 (2004). [16] Bishop, S... Dolphin Echolocation Clicks For Target Discrimination,” The Journal Of The Acoustical Society Of America 124(1), 657-666 (2008). [20] Y. Nakamura

  17. Identification of Acoustic-Vibratory System by Acoustic Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuzo Iwatsubo

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for reducing ill-conditioning in a class of identification problems is proposed. The key point of the method is that the identified vibration of the sound source is expressed as a superposition of vibration modes. The mathematical property of the coefficient matrix, the practical error expanding ratio, and the stochastic error expanding ratio are investigated in a numerical example. The mode-superposition method is shown to be an effective tool for acoustic-vibratory inverse analysis.

  18. An Investigation of the Effects of Metallurgical and/or Testing Variables on the Acoustic Emission from Crystalline Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    precipitate strengths. For easy cross slip systems, ACOUSTIC EMISSION including 7075 aluminium , 6061 aluminium , 2219 It is unlikely that the motion of a...peak was observed in JBK-75 and Noise was subtracted from the measured rms acoustic 6061 aluminium , but not in KHB or 7075 aluminium . Small emission...and100-150 A thick. The formation of0’ results in softening of the alloy. Above - 275°C 0’ is converted into heights for JBK-75 and 6061 aluminium as

  19. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios. G. Aggelis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the acoustic emission (AE activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis. The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure.

  20. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  1. ANALYSIS OF CHIP FORMATION DURING HARD TURNING THROUGH ACOUSTIC EMISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Neslušan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analysis of chip formation and related aspects of the chip formation during turning hardened steel 100Cr6. The paper draws a comparison of some aspects of the chip formation between turning annealed and hardened roll bearing steel. The results of the analysis show that there is the formation of a segmented chip in the case of hard turning. Frequency of segmentation is very high. A conventional piezoelectric dynamometer limits the frequency response to about 3.5 kHz. On the other hand, the frequency of process fluctuation may by obtained by using accelerometers or acoustic emission. This paper reports about the dynamic character of cutting process when hard turning and correlation among the calculated segmentation frequencies and the experimental analysis.

  2. Quality Testing of Gaseous Helium Pressure Vessels by Acoustic Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Barranco-Luque, M; Hervé, C; Margaroli, C; Sergo, V

    1998-01-01

    The resistance of pressure equipment is currently tested, before commissioning or at periodic maintenance, by means of normal pressure tests. Defects occurring inside materials during the execution of these tests or not seen by usual non-destructive techniques can remain as undetected potential sources of failure . The acoustic emission (AE) technique can detect and monitor the evolution of such failures. Industrial-size helium cryogenic systems employ cryogens often stored in gaseous form under pressure at ambient temperature. Standard initial and periodic pressure testing imposes operational constraints which other complementary testing methods, such as AE, could significantly alleviate. Recent reception testing of 250 m3 GHe storage vessels with a design pressure of 2.2 MPa for the LEP and LHC cryogenic systems has implemented AE with the above-mentioned aims.

  3. An efficient closed-form solution for acoustic emission source location in three-dimensional structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibing Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an efficient closed-form solution (ECS for acoustic emission(AE source location in three-dimensional structures using time difference of arrival (TDOA measurements from N receivers, N ≥ 6. The nonlinear location equations of TDOA are simplified to linear equations. The unique analytical solution of AE sources for unknown velocity system is obtained by solving the linear equations. The proposed ECS method successfully solved the problems of location errors resulting from measured deviations of velocity as well as the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods.

  4. An efficient closed-form solution for acoustic emission source location in three-dimensional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xibing [School of Resources and Safety Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Dong, Longjun, E-mail: csudlj@163.com [School of Resources and Safety Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Australian Centre for Geomechanics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009 (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents an efficient closed-form solution (ECS) for acoustic emission(AE) source location in three-dimensional structures using time difference of arrival (TDOA) measurements from N receivers, N ≥ 6. The nonlinear location equations of TDOA are simplified to linear equations. The unique analytical solution of AE sources for unknown velocity system is obtained by solving the linear equations. The proposed ECS method successfully solved the problems of location errors resulting from measured deviations of velocity as well as the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods.

  5. Efeito da estimulação acústica contralateral nas medidas temporais das emissões otoacústicas Effect of contralateral acoustic stimulation in temporal measures of otoacoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Nogueira Leme

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar o nível de resposta e o tempo de latência das emissões otoacústicas sem e com apresentação de ruído contralateral. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 30 indivíduos, com idade entre 18 e 30 anos, sem queixas auditivas e com presença de emissões otoacústicas por produto de distorção. Analisou-se o nível de resposta e latência das emissões otoacústicas por meio do programa Latencygram, com e sem apresentação de ruído contralateral tipo "White noise". RESULTADOS: houve diminuição significante nos níveis de resposta das emissões otoacústicas com apresentação de ruído contralateral, confirmando o efeito de supressão relacionado com a ação do sistema eferente; contudo, não houve diferença significante nos valores de latência das emissões otoacústicas. CONCLUSÃO: o sistema eferente atua apenas na modulação dos níveis de resposta das emissões otoacústicas, contudo não interfere nas medidas temporais das mesmas.PURPOSE: compare the otoacoustic emissions response level and latency in two situations: with and without contralateral competitive noise. METHODS: thirty individuals between eighteen and thirty-year-old, with no auditory complaints and presence of otoacoustic distortion product emissions were evaluated. The latency and the response level of otoacoustic emissions was evaluated using the Latencygram program. The test was performed in two different situations: with and without contralateral competitive white noise. RESULTS: the results demonstrated a significant reduction in otoacoustic emissions response levels with contralateral noise, proving the otoacoustic suppression effect associated with olivocochlear efferent system action. However, there was no significant difference in otoacoustic emissions latency. CONCLUSION: the efferent system may act only in otoacoustic emissions response level modulation but it does not interfere in otoacoustic emissions latency.

  6. Imaging FTIR emissivity measurement method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Edward M.; Nichols, C. Spencer; Lane, Sarah E.; Prussing, Keith F.; Cathcart, J. Michael

    2013-09-01

    Though many materials behave approximately as greybodies across the long-wave infrared (LWIR) waveband, certain important infrared (IR) scene modeling materials such as brick and galvanized steel exhibit more complex optical properties1. Accurately describing how non-greybody materials interact relies critically on the accurate incorporation of the emissive and reflective properties of the in-scene materials. Typically, measured values are obtained and used. When measured using a non-imaging spectrometer, a given material's spectral emissivity requires more than one collection episode, as both the sample under test and a standard must be measured separately. In the interval between episodes changes in environment degrade emissivity measurement accuracy. While repeating and averaging measurements of the standard and sample helps mitigate such effects, a simultaneous measurement of both can ensure identical environmental conditions during the measurement process, thus reducing inaccuracies and delivering a temporally accurate determination of background or `down-welling' radiation. We report on a method for minimizing temporal inaccuracies in sample emissivity measurements. Using a LWIR hyperspectral imager, a Telops Hyper-Cam2, an approach permitting hundreds of simultaneous, calibrated spectral radiance measurements of the sample under test as well as a diffuse gold standard is described. In addition, we describe the data reduction technique to exploit these measurements. Following development of the reported method, spectral reflectance data from 10 samples of various materials of interest were collected. These data are presented along with comments on how such data will enhance the fidelity of computer models of IR scenes.

  7. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  8. Correlation of acoustic emissions associated with effects from diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Stanley

    2007-12-01

    This research has investigated the correlation of acoustic emissions with associated contrast-mediated ultrasound bio-effects. The hypothesis that motivated this study was that during exposure with ultrasound, the cavitation occurring in tissue emits acoustical signals, which if correlated with specific bio-effects, could provide a way to monitor the potential bio-effects of exposure. A good bio-effects indicator would find immediate use in research on drug and gene delivery, and could have clinical application in avoiding bio-effects in diagnosis. Studies conducted to test the hypothesis involved investigation of (i) the influence of pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and number of exposures on cell damage, (ii) the effect of total exposure duration and pulse-to-pulse bubble distribution on acoustic emissions and corresponding cell damage, and (iii) the translation of in vitro effects to an in situ environment. Exposures were primarily conducted at a peak rarefactional pressure of 2 MPa, 2.25 MHz insonating frequency and pulse length of 46 cycles. PRFs of 1-, 10-, 100-, 500-, and 1000 Hz were compared. High speed photography (2000 fps) was employed for the investigation of pulse-to-pulse bubble distribution while intravital microscopy was used for in situ studies. A strong correlation was observed between acoustic emissions and bio-effects with the availability of bubbles of resonant size serving as a key link between the two. It was observed that total exposure duration may play an important role in cell damage. Damage increased with increasing total exposure duration from 0 ms to 100 ms with a plateau at above 100 ms. These results were consistent for all studies. There is, therefore, an implication that manipulating these parameters may allow for measurement and control of the extent of bioeffects. Moreover, the correlation of acoustic emission and extravasation observed in in situ studies reveals that cumulative function of the relative integrated power spectrum

  9. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Acoustic emission and ultrasonic monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haycox, Jon; Pettitt, Will; Young, R. Paul [Applied Seismology Consultants Ltd., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the results from acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic monitoring of the Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment (APSE) at SKB's Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Sweden. The APSE is being undertaken to demonstrate the current capability to predict spalling in a fractured rock mass using numerical modelling techniques, and to demonstrate the effect of backfill and confining pressure on the propagation of micro-cracks in rock adjacent to deposition holes within a repository. An ultrasonic acquisition system has provided acoustic emission and ultrasonic survey monitoring throughout the various phases of the experiment. Results from the entire data set are provided with this document so that they can be effectively compared to several numerical modelling studies, and to mechanical and thermal measurements conducted around the pillar volume, in an 'integrated analysis' performed by SKB staff. This document provides an in-depth summary of the AE and ultrasonic survey results for future reference. The pillar has been produced by excavating two 1.8 m diameter deposition holes 1 m apart. These were bored in 0.8 m steps using a Tunnel Boring Machine specially adapted for vertical drilling. The first deposition hole was drilled in December 2003. Preceding this a period of background monitoring was performed so as to obtain a datum for the results. The hole was then confined to 0.7 MPa internal over pressure using a specially designed water-filled bladder. The second deposition hole was excavated in March 2004. Heating of the pillar was performed over a two month period between ending in July 2004, when the confined deposition hole was slowly depressurised. Immediately after depressurisation the pillar was allowed to cool with cessation of monitoring occurring a month later. A total of 36,676 AE triggers were recorded over the reporting period between 13th October 2003 and 14th July 2004. Of these 15,198 have produced AE locations. The AE data set

  10. Acoustic Emission Analysis of Damage Progression in Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Cyclic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Damage evolution of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EBVD-PVD) ZrO2-7 wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under thermal cyclic conditions was monitored using an acoustic emission (AE) technique. The coatings were heated using a laser heat flux technique that yields a high reproducibility in thermal loading. Along with AE, real-time thermal conductivity measurements were also taken using infrared thermography. Tests were performed on samples with induced stress concentrations, as well as calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate (CMAS) exposure, for comparison of damage mechanisms and AE response to the baseline (as-produced) coating. Analysis of acoustic waveforms was used to investigate damage development by comparing when events occurred, AE event frequency, energy content and location. The test results have shown that AE accumulation correlates well with thermal conductivity changes and that AE waveform analysis could be a valuable tool for monitoring coating degradation and provide insight on specific damage mechanisms.

  11. Acoustic emission evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge beam with graphite composite laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dan E.; Shen, H. Warren; Finlayson, Richard D.

    2001-07-01

    A test was recently conducted on August 1, 2000 at the FHwA Non-Destructive Evaluation Validation Center, sponsored by The New York State DOT, to evaluate a graphite composite laminate as an effective form of retrofit for reinforced concrete bridge beam. One portion of this testing utilized Acoustic Emission Monitoring for Evaluation of the beam under test. Loading was applied to this beam using a two-point loading scheme at FHwA's facility. This load was applied in several incremental loadings until the failure of the graphite composite laminate took place. Each loading culminated by either visual crack location or large audible emissions from the beam. Between tests external cracks were located visually and highlighted and the graphite epoxy was checked for delamination. Acoustic Emission data was collected to locate cracking areas of the structure during the loading cycles. To collect this Acoustic Emission data, FHwA and NYSDOT utilized a Local Area Monitor, an Acoustic Emission instrument developed in a cooperative effort between FHwA and Physical Acoustics Corporation. Eight Acoustic Emission sensors were attached to the structure, with four on each side, in a symmetrical fashion. As testing progressed and culminated with beam failure, Acoustic Emission data was gathered and correlated against time and test load. This paper will discuss the analysis of this test data.

  12. Emissivity measurements on aeronautical alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, L. del, E-mail: leire.del-campo@cnrs-orleans.f [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Perez-Saez, R.B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.e [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Gonzalez-Fernandez, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Esquisabel, X.; Fernandez, I. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Planta de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Bizkaia (Spain); Gonzalez-Martin, P. [Industria de Turbo Propulsores, S.A., Parque empresarial San Fernando, Avda. Castilla 2, 28830 San Fernando de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Tello, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia (Spain); Instituto de Sintesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-01-21

    The emissivity of three Ni and Co based aeronautical alloys is analyzed in this paper. These alloys are employed in high temperature environments whenever good corrosion resistance, high temperature resistance and high strength are essential. Thus, apart from the aeronautical industry, these alloys are also used in other technological applications, as for example, aerospace, nuclear reactors, and tooling. The results in this paper extend the emissivity data for these alloys available in the literature. Emissivity dependence on the radiation wavelength (2-22 {mu}m), sample temperature (200-650 {sup o}C) and emission angle (0-85{sup o}) has been investigated. In addition, the effect of surface finish and oxidation has also been taken into consideration. The data in this paper have several applications, as temperature measurement of a target by pyrometry, low observability of airplanes and thermal radiation heat transfer simulation in airplane nozzles or furnaces.

  13. An Analytical Solution for Acoustic Emission Source Location for Known P Wave Velocity System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longjun Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical solution for acoustic emission source location using time difference of arrival (TDOA measurements from N receivers, N⩾5. The nonlinear location equations for TDOA are simplified to linear equations, and the direct analytical solution is obtained by solving the linear equations. There are not calculations of square roots in solution equations. The method solved the problems of the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by the calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods. Simulations are included to study the algorithms' performance and compare with the existing technique.

  14. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Peter

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  15. Evaluation of acoustic shock induced early hearing loss with audiometer and distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acoustic shock injury has been described as a permanent injury to the auditory system either due to daily noise dose of in excess of 85 decibels or very loud impulse sound reputed to be in excess of 120 decibels and acoustic incidents. This study was performed to compare the results of audiogram and the newer diagnostic method distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) parameters due to acoustic shock injury in call center professionals working in a noisy environment and pr...

  16. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  17. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  18. Standard practice for examination of fiberglass reinforced plastic fan blades using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) fan blades of the type used in industrial cooling towers and heat exchangers. 1.2 This practice uses simulated service loading to determine structural integrity. 1.3 This practice will detect sources of acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. 1.4 This practice applies to examinations of new and in-service fan blades. 1.5 This practice is limited to fan blades of FRP construction, with length (hub centerline to tip) of less than 3 m [10 ft], and with fiberglass content greater than 15 % by weight. 1.6 AE measurements are used to detect emission sources. Other nondestructive examination (NDE) methods may be used to evaluate the significance of AE sources. Procedures for other NDE methods are beyond the scope of this practice. 1.7 Units—The values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as sta...

  19. Acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetric experiments dedicated to high temperature corrosion studies on metallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serris, Eric; Al Haj, Omar; Peres, Veronique; Cournil, Michel [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne (France); Kittel, Jean; Grosjean, Francois; Ropital, Francois [IFP Energies nouvelles, BP3 rond-point de l' echangeur de Solaize (France)

    2014-11-01

    High temperature corrosion of metallic alloys (like iron, nickel, zirconium alloys) can damage equipment of many industrial fields (refinery, petrochemical, nuclear..). Acoustic emission (AE) is an interesting method owing to its sensitivity and its non-destructive aspect to quantify the level of damage in use of these alloys under various environmental conditions. High temperature corrosive phenomena create stresses in the materials; the relaxation by cracks of these stresses can be recorded and analyzed using the AE system. The goal of our study is to establish an acoustic signals database which assigns the acoustic signals to the specific corrosion phenomena. For this purpose, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is coupled with acoustic emission (AE) devices. The oxidation of a zirconium alloy, zircaloy-4, is first studied using thermogravimetric experiment coupled to acoustic emission analysis at 900 C. An inward zirconium oxide scale, preliminary dense, then porous, grow during the isothermal isobaric step. The kinetic rate increases significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration occurs with an increase of acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts are recorded after the kinetic transition. Acoustic emission signals are also observed during the cooling of the sample. AE numerical treatments (using wavelet transform) completed by SEM microscopy characterizations allows us to distinguish the different populations of cracks. Metal dusting represents also a severe form of corrosive degradation of metal alloy. Iron metal dusting corrosion is studied by AE coupled with TGA at 650 C under C{sub 4}H{sub 10} + H{sub 2} + He atmosphere. Acoustic emission signals are detected after a significant increase of the sample mass.

  20. ?Smart COPVs? - Continued Successful Development of JSC IR&D Acoustic Emissions (AE) SHM Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and apply promising quantitative pass/fail criteria to CPV using acoustic emission (AE) and lay the foundation for continued development of an automated...

  1. Acoustic Emission, b-values and Foliation Plane Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehizadeh, Mahdi; Nasseri, Mohammad H.; Ye, Sheng; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    The b-value and D-value are two parameters related to size and distance distribution of earthquakes. There are many different factors affecting b-value such as stress state, thermal gradients, focal mechanism and heterogeneity. For example, the literature shows that the b-value changes systematically with respect to the focal mechanism. In laboratory experiments, foliation planes introduce a weakness in samples and can be considered as a potential for rupture or pre-existing faults, so they may exhibit similar relationships. The D-value defines the degree of clustering of earthquakes and would be expected to have a defined relationship with respect to the anisotropy. Using a unique facility in the Rock Fracture Dynamics laboratory at the University of Toronto, three sets of polyaxial experiments have been performed on cubic samples with foliation planes systematically oriented at different angles to the principal stress direction. During these tests, samples were loaded under controlled true-triaxial stress conditions until they failed or had severe damage and acoustic emission events were recorded using 18 sensors around the samples. The paper describes how the combination of stress state and foliation planes affects the b-value and D-value under laboratory conditions.

  2. Acoustic Emission Parameters of Three Gorges Sandstone during Shear Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental investigation of sandstone samples from the Three Gorges during shear failure was conducted using acoustic emission (AE and direct shear tests. The AE count rate, cumulative AE count, AE energy, and amplitude of the sandstone samples were determined. Then, the relationships among the AE signals and shearing behaviors of the samples were analyzed in order to detect micro-crack initiation and propagation and reflect shear failure. The results indicated that both the shear strength and displacement exhibited a logarithmic relationship with the displacement rate at peak levels of stress. In addition, the various characteristics of the AE signals were apparent in various situations. The AE signals corresponded with the shear stress under different displacement rates. As the displacement rate increased, the amount of accumulative damage to each specimen decreased, while the AE energy peaked earlier and more significantly. The cumulative AE count primarily increased during the post-peak period. Furthermore, the AE count rate and amplitude exhibited two peaks during the peak shear stress period due to crack coalescence and rock bridge breakage. These isolated cracks later formed larger fractures and eventually caused ruptures.

  3. Acoustic Emission Technique Applied in Textiles Mechanical Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios-Soberanis Carlos Rolando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The common textile architecture/geometry are woven, braided, knitted, stitch boded, and Z-pinned. Fibres in textile form exhibit good out-of-plane properties and good fatigue and impact resistance, additionally, they have better dimensional stability and conformability. Besides the nature of the textile, the architecture has a great role in the mechanical behaviour and mechanisms of damage in textiles, therefore damage mechanisms and mechanical performance in structural applications textiles have been a major concern. Mechanical damage occurs to a large extent during the service lifetime consequently it is vital to understand the material mechanical behaviour by identifying its mechanisms of failure such as onset of damage, crack generation and propagation. In this work, textiles of different architecture were used to manufacture epoxy based composites in order to study failure events under tensile load by using acoustic emission technique which is a powerful characterization tool due to its link between AE data and fracture mechanics, which makes this relation a very useful from the engineering point of view.

  4. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals using WaveletTransformation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Subba Rao

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE monitoring is carried out during proof pressure testing of pressurevessels to find the occurrence of any crack growth-related phenomenon. While carrying out AEmonitoring, it is often found that the background noise is very high. Along with the noise, thesignal includes various phenomena related to crack growth, rubbing of fasteners, leaks, etc. Dueto the presence of noise, it becomes difficult to identify signature of the original signals related to the above phenomenon. Through various filtering/ thresholding techniques, it was found that the original signals were getting filtered out along with noise. Wavelet transformation technique is found to be more appropriate to analyse the AE signals under such situations. Wavelet transformation technique is used to de-noise the AE data. The de-noised signal is classified to identify a signature based on the type of phenomena.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.559-564, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1677

  5. Use of Macro Fibre Composite Transducers as Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Eaton

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The need for ever lighter and more efficient aerospace structures and components has led to continuous optimization pushing the limits of structural performance. In order to ensure continued safe operation during long term service it is desirable to develop a structural health monitoring (SHM system. Acoustic emission (AE offers great potential for real time global monitoring of aerospace structures, however currently available commercial sensors have limitations in size, weight and adaptability to complex structures. This work investigates the potential use of macro-fibre composite (MFC film transducers as AE sensors. Due to the inhomogeneous make-up of MFC transducers their directional dependency was examined and found to have limited effect on signal feature data. However, signal cross-correlations revealed a strong directional dependency. The sensitivity and signal attenuation with distance of MFC sensors were compared with those of commercially available sensors. Although noticeably less sensitive than the commercial sensors, the MFC sensors still had an acceptable operating range. Furthermore, a series of compressive carbon fiber coupon tests were monitored in parallel using both an MFC sensor and a commercially available sensor for comparison. The results showed good agreement of AE trends recorded by both sensors.

  6. Modal acoustic emission source determination in silicon carbide matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, G. N.

    2000-05-01

    Modal acoustic emission has been used to monitor damage accumulation in woven silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites during tensile testing. There are several potential sources of damage in these systems including transverse matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interphase debonding and sliding, longitudinal cracks in between plies, and fiber breakage. In the past, it has been shown that modal AE is excellent at detecting when damage occurs and subsides, where the damage occurs along the length of the sample, and the loss in material stiffness as a consequence of damage accumulation. The next step is to determine the extent that modal AE can be used to identify specific physical sources. This study will discuss the status of this aim for this composite system. Individual events were analyzed and correlated to specific sources based on the characteristics of the received waveforms, e.g., frequency spectrum and energy, and when the event occurred during the stress-history of the tensile test. Post-test microstructural examination of the test specimens enabled some correlation between specific types of AE events and damage sources.

  7. Structural health condition monitoring of rails using acoustic emission techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Pinar

    In-service rails can develop several types of structural defects due to fatigue and wear caused by rolling stock passing over them. Most rail defects will develop gradually over time thus permitting inspection engineers to detect them in time before final failure occurs. In the UK, certain types of severe rail defects such as tache ovales, require the fitting of emergency clamps and the imposing of an Emergency Speed Restriction (ESR) until the defects are removed. Acoustic emission (AE) techniques can be applied for the detection and continuous monitoring of defect growth therefore removing the need of imposing strict ESRs. The work reported herewith aims to develop a sound methodology for the application of AE in order to detect and subsequently monitor damage evolution in rails. To validate the potential of the AE technique, tests have been carried out under laboratory conditions on three and four-point bending samples manufactured from 260 grade rail steel. Further tests, simulating the background noise conditions caused by passing rolling stock have been carried out using special experimental setups. The crack growth events have been simulated using a pencil tip break..

  8. A New Acoustic Emission Sensor Based Gear Fault Detection Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junda Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce wind energy costs, prognostics and health management (PHM of wind turbine is needed to ensure the reliability and availability of wind turbines. A gearbox is an important component of a wind turbine. Therefore, developing effective gearbox fault detection tools is important to the PHM of wind turbine. In this paper, a new acoustic emission (AE sensor based gear fault detection approach is presented. This approach combines a heterodyne based frequency reduction technique with time synchronous average (TSA and spectrum kurtosis (SK to process AE sensor signals and extract features as condition indictors for gear fault detection. Heterodyne technique commonly used in communication is first employed to preprocess the AE signals before sampling. By heterodyning, the AE signal frequency is down shifted from several hundred kHz to below 50 kHz. This reduced AE signal sampling rate is comparable to that of vibration signals. The presented approach is validated using seeded gear tooth crack fault tests on a notational split torque gearbox. The approach presented in this paper is physics based and the validation results have showed that it could effectively detect the gear faults.

  9. DETECTION OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES IN 9975 PACKAGES USING ACOUSTIC EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, D.

    2013-03-04

    This report documents the initial feasibility tests performed using a commercial acoustic emission instrument for the purpose of detecting beetles in Department of Energy 9975 shipping packages. The device selected for this testing was a commercial handheld instrument and probe developed for the detection of termites, weevils, beetles and other insect infestations in wooden structures, trees, plants and soil. The results of two rounds of testing are presented. The first tests were performed by the vendor using only the hand-held instrument’s indications and real-time operator analysis of the audio signal content. The second tests included hands-free positioning of the instrument probe and post-collection analysis of the recorded audio signal content including audio background comparisons. The test results indicate that the system is promising for detecting the presence of drugstore beetles, however, additional work would be needed to improve the ease of detection and to automate the signal processing to eliminate the need for human interpretation. Mechanisms for hands-free positioning of the probe and audio background discrimination are also necessary for reliable detection and to reduce potential operator dose in radiation environments.

  10. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capel, P. J. S.; Turchinovich, D.; Porte, H. P.; Lahmann, S.; Rossow, U.; Hangleiter, A.; Dijkhuis, J. I.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic signals and THz electromagnetic radiation signals demonstrates that transient strain generation in InGaN/GaN MQWs is correlated with electromagnetic THz generation, and both types of emission find their origin in ultrafast dynamical screening of the built-in piezoelectric field in the MQWs. The measured spectral intensity of the detected Brillouin signal corresponds to a maximum strain amplitude of generated acoustic pulses of 2%. This value coincides with the static lattice-mismatch-induced strain in In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN, demonstrating the total release of static strain in MQWs via impulsive THz acoustic emission. This confirms the ultrafast dynamical screening mechanism in MQWs as a highly efficient method for impulsive strain generation.

  11. Detecting and identifying damage in sandwich polymer composite by using acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGugan, M.; Soerensen, Bent F.; Oestergaard, R.; Bech, T.

    2006-12-15

    Acoustic emission is a useful monitoring tool for extracting extra information during mechanical testing of polymer composite sandwich materials. The study of fracture mechanics within test specimens extracted from wind turbine blade material is presented. The contribution of the acoustic emission monitoring technique in defining different failure modes identified during the testing is discussed. The development of in-situ structural monitoring and control systems is considered. (au)

  12. Phenomenological Description of Acoustic Emission Processes Occurring During High-Pressure Sand Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martín, Jordi; Muñoz-Ibáñez, Andrea; Grande-García, Elisa; Rodríguez-Cedrún, Borja

    2016-04-01

    Compaction, pore collapse and grain crushing have a significant impact over the hydrodynamic properties of sand formations. The assessment of the crushing stress threshold constitutes valuable information in order to assess the behavior of these formations provided that it can be conveniently identified. Because of the inherent complexities of the direct observation of sand crushing, different authors have developed several indirect methods, being acoustic emission a promising one. However, previous researches have evidenced that there are different processes triggering acoustic emissions which need to be carefully accounted. Worth mentioning among them are grain bearing, grain to container friction, intergranular friction and crushing. The work presented here addresses this purpose. A broadband acoustic emission sensor (PA MicroHF200) connected to a high-speed data acquisition system and control software (AeWIN for PCI1 2.10) has been attached to a steel ram and used to monitor the different processes occurring during the oedometric compaction of uniform quartz sand up to an axial load of about 110 MPa and constant temperature. Load was stepwise applied using a servocontrolled hydraulic press acting at a constant load rate. Axial strain was simultaneously measured with the aid of a LDT device. Counts, energy, event duration, rise time and amplitude were recorded along each experiment and after completion selected waveforms were transformed from the time to the frequency domain via FFT transform. Additional simplified tests were performed in order to isolate the frequency characteristics of the dominant processes occurring during sand compaction. Our results show that, from simple tests, it is possible to determine process-dependent frequency components. When considering more complex experiments, many of the studied processes overlap but it is still possible to identify when a particular one dominates as well as the likely onset of crushing.

  13. Monitoring of martensite formation during welding by means of acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohemen, S.M.C. van; Hermans, M.J.M.; Ouden, G. den [Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-11-21

    The martensitic transformation during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of steel 42CrMo4 has been studied using the acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique. Welds were produced under static conditions (spot welding) and under stationary conditions (travelling arc welding). After spot welding, the root mean square (RMS) value of the continuous acoustic emission was measured, revealing a peak that reflects the evolution of martensite formation during cooling of the spot weld. The RMS value was also measured during travelling arc welding at different heat inputs and corrected for the noise of the welding process to obtain the RMS value due to martensite formation. After welding, optical metallography was carried out to quantify the amount of martensite formed during cooling of the weld. An analysis of the results shows that the squared RMS value is proportional to the volume rate of martensite formation during welding, which is consistent with theory and in good agreement with the results obtained in the case of spot welding. The obtained results suggest that AE can be applied as a real time monitoring technique for the detection of martensite formation during steel welding. (author)

  14. Assessment of copper resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in nitrite solutions by means of joint analysis of acoustic emission measurements, deformation diagrams, qualitative and quantitative fractography, and non-linear fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanzhin, V.G.; Nikulin, S.A. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    A study of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper in 0.1M NaNO{sub 2} aqueous solution is presented. The fracture kinetics was monitored by measuring the acoustic emission (AE) signals. Macro- and micro-fractography analysis, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was employed to investigate the fracture mechanisms. Estimates of stress intensity factor, KI, and J-integral were derived in order to assess the resistance of copper to stress corrosion cracking. Two kinds of SCC tests under continuous circulation of the corrosive solution were employed in the present study: 1. Constant extension rate (2x10{sup -6}/s) tests on pre-cracked, middle tension (MT) panel specimens. 2. Tests on pre-cracked, compact tension (CT) specimens at a fixed (by a fixing bolt) opening of the crack walls ({delta} = 0.3 mm, K{sub i} = 27 MPax{radical}m). The time base for these tests was about two months. After the completion of the SCC test, the CT specimen was additionally tested, under a constant-rate (0.02 mm/s) off-center extension. In the both kinds of tests, the SCC fracture kinetics is found to exhibit two typical stages: Stage 1: SCC initiation stage (after a certain incubation period, T{sub i}, measured to be T{sub i} {approx_equal} 3-4 hours for MT specimens under constant extension, the corresponding stress was {sigma} {approx_equal} 40-70 MPa, and T{sub i} {approx_equal} 200 hours for CT specimens under a fixed crack wall opening). Stage 2: Active fracture process (SCC macro-fracture) distinguished by strong AE pulses (which are registered after time T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 8 hours for MT specimens and T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 800 hours for CT specimens). Fractography analysis has shown that the zone of SCC fracture in MT specimens extends to approximately 1,500 {mu}m. A 400-700 {mu}m deep zone of brittle transgranular fracture, which included small areas showing characteristic SCC 'striations', was observed adjacent to the fatigue pre-crack area. At higher

  15. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations.

  16. Sensoring fusion data from the optic and acoustic emissions of electric arcs in the GMAW-S process for welding quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  17. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eber Huanca Cayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  18. Effect of aluminium in propellant composition on acoustic emission parameters (Short Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rm. Muthiah

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The study reports the variation in acoustic emission signals acquired during combustion of typical propellants with varying aluminium and ammonium perchlorate content. It was observed that when propellant strands having the same composition undergo combustion under similar conditions, they produce consistent acoustic emission signals. To study the effect of variation of aluminium content in the propellant composition on the acoustic emission produced during combustion, the aluminium content was varied from 6 per cent to 18 per cent in a HTPB-based composite propellant with 86 per cent solid loading. Experiments were carried out with propellant strands under the same conditions for a comparative study. Acoustic emission parameters, such as peak amplitude, ring-down counts, average frequency, hits and energy were studied as functions of time. Among these parameters, only energy ring-down counts and frequency varied significantly with aluminium content. The effect of cumulative values of energy, frequency and ring-down counts, the effect of burn rate and theoretical specific impulse against the aluminium percentage variation, and the variation of specific impulse against acoustic energy can all be correlated. The clear trend is indicative of possible prediction of propellant performance parameter like specific impulse from acoustic emission parameters.

  19. The use of acoustic emission for bearing condition monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, A W; Quiney, Z [Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Ganji, A; Murray, B, E-mail: a.w.lees@swansea.ac.uk, E-mail: z.quiney.294103@swansea.ac.uk, E-mail: ali.ganji@skf.com [SKF Engineering and Research Centre, Kelvinbaan 16, 3439 MT Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-07-19

    This paper reports research currently in progress at Swansea University in collaboration with SKF Engineering and Research Centre as part of a continuing investigation into high frequency Acoustic Emission. The primary concerns are experimentally producing subsurface cracks, the type of which would occur in a service failure of a ball bearing, within a steel ball and to closely monitor the properties of this AE from crack initiation to the formation of a ball on the ball surface. It is worth noting that there is evidence that the frequency content of the AE changes during this period, although this has yet to be proved consistent or even fully explained. Conclusive evidence could lead to a system which detects such cracks in a bearing operating in real life conditions, advantageous for many reasons including safety, downtime and maintenance and associated costs. The results from two experimental procedures are presented, one of which loads a single ball held stationary in a test rig to induce subsurface cracks, which are in turn detected by a pair of broadband AE sensors and recorded via a Labview based software system. This approach not only allows detailed analysis of the AE waveforms but also approximate AE source location from the time difference between two sensors. The second experimental procedure details an adaptation of a four-ball lubricant tester in an attempt to produce naturally occurring subsurface cracks from rolling contact whilst minimising the AE arising from surface wear. This thought behind this experiment is reinforced with 3D computational modelling of the rotating system.

  20. Visualization of stress wave propagation via air-coupled acoustic emission sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Joshua C.; Lee, Gil-Yong; Yang, Jinkyu; Kim, Youngkey; Kim, Sungchan

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing stress waves propagating in plates using air-coupled acoustic emission sensors. Specifically, we employ a device that embeds arrays of microphones around an optical lens in a helical pattern. By implementing a beamforming technique, this remote sensing system allows us to record wave propagation events in situ via a single-shot and full-field measurement. This is a significant improvement over the conventional wave propagation tracking approaches based on laser doppler vibrometry or digital image correlation techniques. In this paper, we focus on demonstrating the feasibility and efficacy of this air-coupled acoustic emission technique by using large metallic plates exposed to external impacts. The visualization results of stress wave propagation will be shown under various impact scenarios. The proposed technique can be used to characterize and localize damage by detecting the attenuation, reflection, and scattering of stress waves that occurs at damage locations. This can ultimately lead to the development of new structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation methods for identifying hidden cracks or delaminations in metallic or composite plate structures, simultaneously negating the need for mounted contact sensors.

  1. A combined complex electrical impedance and acoustic emission study in limestone samples under uniaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, V.; Fitilis, I.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, complex electrical impedance measurements in the frequency range of 10 mHz to 1 MHz were carried out in conjunction with acoustic emission monitoring in limestone samples subjected to linear and stepped-like uniaxial loading, up to ultimate failure. Cole-Cole plots of the complex impedance during the stepped loading of limestone have been used to discriminate the contributions of grains interior, grain boundaries and electrode polarization effects to the overall electrical behavior. The latter is well-described with an equivalent-circuit model which comprises components of constant phase elements and resistances in parallel connection. Electrical conductivity increases upon uniaxial loading giving rise to negative values of effective activation volume. This is a strong experimental evidence for the generation of transient electric signals recorded prior to seismic events and may be attributed to charge transfer (proton conduction) due to cracks generation and propagation as a result of the applied stress. The time-series of ac-conductivity at two distinct frequencies (10 kHz, 200 kHz) during linear loading of limestone samples exhibits a strong correlation with the acoustic emission activity obeying the same general self-similar law for critical phenomena that has been reported for the energy release before materials fracture.

  2. Acoustic emission technique for monitoring the pyrolysis of composites for process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, B R; Yen, C E

    2008-11-01

    Carbonization is the first step in the heat and pressure treatment (pyrolysis) of composites in preparing carbon-carbon parts. These find many uses, including aircraft brakes, rocket nozzles and medical implants. This paper describes the acoustic emissions (AE) from various stages of the manufacturing process of carbon-carbon composites. This process involves carbonization at a high temperature and this results in both thermal expansion and volume change (due to pyrolysis in which a sacrificial polymer matrix is converted to carbon). Importantly the resultant matrix is porous and has a network of small intra-lamina cracks. The formation of these microcracks produces AE and this paper describes how this observation can be used to monitor (and eventually control) the manufacturing process. The aim is to speed up manufacture, which is currently time-consuming. The first section of the paper describes the design of unimodal waveguides to enable the AE to propagate to a cool environment where a transducer can be located. The second part of the paper describes various experimental observations of AE under a range of process conditions. In particular, this paper presents a technique based on detecting acoustic emissions and (1) uses wire waveguides to monitor parts within the autoclave to 800 degrees C, (2) monitors microcracking during pyrolysis, (3) uses a four-level threshold to distinguish between low- and high-amplitude cracking events, (4) recognizes the occurrence of harmful delaminations, and (5) guides the control of the heating rate for optimum efficiency of the pyrolysis process. In addition, supporting data are presented of in situ measurements of porosity, weight loss, cross-ply shrinkage, and mass spectroscopy of gases emitted. The process evolution is illustrated by the use of interrupted manufacturing cycle micrographs obtained by optical, scanning acoustic (SAM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopy. The technique promotes in-process monitoring and

  3. A Study on the Evaluation of Valve Leak Rates Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Sun Ki; Shon, Seok Man; Lee, Wook Ryun; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yong Jae; Choo, Kee Young [Hana Evertech Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, two types of valve(a 3 1/2 inch glove valve for 600 psi steam and a 4 inch ball valve water ) leak tests using three different leak path and numerous leak rates were performed in order to analyze acoustic emission properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound amplitude increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were plotted versus peak acoustic amplitudes recorded within those two narrow frequency bands on each spectral plot. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak acoustic amplitude were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. The large amount of data collected also allowed a grief investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leakage rates, pressure differentials and transducers on the acoustic amplitude spectra. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the acoustic emission method for monitoring of leak was feasible.

  4. Acoustic Emission Determination of Deformation Mechanisms Leading to Failure of Naval Alloys. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    Emission Laser Beam Interferometer HY80 , 100, 130 Steels Mechanical Deformation Nondestructive Evaluation 2. ABSTRACT (Conetnue an rovere eli if necoo y...publication, J. Applied Phys.). 43. A. Peterlin, B.B. Djordjvic, J.C. Murphy, R.E. Green, "Acoustic Emission During Craze Forma- tion in Polymers

  5. Acoustic sensor for remote measuring of pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataev V. F.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with sensors based on delay lines on surface acoustic waves (SAW, having a receiving-emitting and a reflective interdigital transducers (IDT. The dependence of the reflection coefficient of SAW on type and intensity of the load was studied. The authors propose a composite delay line in which the phase of the reflection coefficient depends on the pressure. Pressure leads to a shift of the reflective IDT relative to the transceiver, because they are located on different substrates. The paper also presents functional diagrams of the interrogator.

  6. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Al Haj; Véronique, Peres; Eric, Serris; François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital; Michel, Cournil

    2015-06-01

    Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO2 layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and not in the dense zirconia layer after 5 h of oxidation.

  7. Dynamic behaviour of magneto-acoustic emission in a grain-oriented steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupakov, A.; Perevertov, O.; Landa, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magneto-acoustic emission (MAE) in a grain-oriented electrical steel is measured in a wide range of the magnetizing frequencies fmag = 0.5 - 100 Hz at the controllable sinusoidal/triangular waveforms of the magnetic induction B(t). Magnetic field is measured directly by a Hall sensor positioned on the steel surface. Intensity of the MAE signal (rms value) follows a loss separation formula a√{fmag } +bfmag + c and reveals a linear relationship with the hysteresis loss. Number of the MAE individual pulses drops with the magnetizing frequency hyperbolically. Shape of the induction waveform at the fixed magnetizing amplitude and frequency has no visible impact on the above-mentioned behaviour. However, rms profiles of the MAE signal are driven by the field rate of change dH / dt . Integration of the MAE profiles allows to evaluate the hysteresis coercive field.

  8. Evaluation of PTCa/PEKK composite sensors for acoustic emission detection

    CERN Document Server

    Marin-Franch, P

    2002-01-01

    This thesis reports for the first time the fabrication and characterisation of novel electroactive ceramic/polymer composite films of calcium modified lead titanate (PTCa) and poly (ether ketone ketone). Composite sensors with different concentrations of ceramic were fabricated using a hot pressing technique. The PTCa ceramic was treated using titanate coupling agent in order to improve sample quality. Dielectric measurements have been performed to study sample characteristics. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of the composites have been measured and the mixed connectivity cube model used to determine the relative amounts of 0-3 and 1-3 connectivity. The advantages and limitations of the model have been discussed. Additionally, some mechanical properties of the composites have been assessed to study their potential ability to detect acoustic emission (AE) in carbon fibre reinforced composites (CFRC). The composite sensors were placed on and inserted into different panels in order to compare their abi...

  9. Acoustic emissions in rock deformation experiments under micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisato, Nicola; Goodfellow, Sebastian D.; Moulas, Evangelos; Di Toro, Giulio; Young, Paul; Grasselli, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The study of acoustic emissions (AE) generated by rocks undergoing deformation has become, in the last decades, one of the most powerful tools for boosting our understanding of the mechanisms which are responsible for rock failures. AE are elastic waves emitted by the local failure of micro- or milli-metric portions of the tested specimen. At the same time, X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) has become an affordable, reliable and powerful tool for imaging the internal structure of rock samples. In particular, micro-CT coupled with a deformation apparatus offers the unique opportunity for observing, without perturbing, the sample while the deformation and the formation of internal structures, such as shear bands, is ongoing. Here we present some preliminary results gathered with an innovative apparatus formed by the X-ray transparent pressure vessel called ERDμ equipped with AE sensors, an AE acquisition system and a micro-CT apparatus available at the University of Toronto. The experiment was performed on a 12 mm diameter 36 mm long porous glass sample which was cut on a 60 deg inclined plane (i.e. saw-cut sample). Etna basaltic sand with size ~1 mm was placed between the two inclined faces forming an inclined fault zone with ~2 mm thickness. The sample assembly was jacketed with a polyefin shrink tube and two AE sensors were glued onto the glass samples above and below the fault zone. The sample was then enclosed in the pressure vessel and confined with compressed air up to 3 MPa. A third AE sensor was placed outside the vessel. The sample was saturated with water and AE were generated by varying the fluid and confining pressure or the vertical force, causing deformations concentrated in the fault zone. Mechanical data and AE traces were collected throughout the entire experiment which lasted ~24 hours. At the same time multiple micro-CT 3D datasets and 2D movie-radiographies were collected, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the deformed sample at

  10. On acoustic intensity measurements in the presence of mean flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical analysis demonstrates that the technique of measuring acoustic intensity by means of cross correlation between nearby microphones cannot, in general, be extended to situations in which there is mean flow. However, it may be possible to use this technique to measure intensities in ducts with mean flow at frequencies below their cutoff frequencies.

  11. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuo, C.W.; Veltin, J.; McLaughlin, D.K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and t

  12. Relationship between geometric welding parameters and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arc in GMAW-S process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Huanca Cayo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Show the relationship between geometric characteristics of the weld bead and the optical-acoustic emissions from electric arc during welding in the GMAW-S process.Design/methodology/approach: Bead on plate welding experiments was carried out setting different process parameters. Every welding parameter group was set aiming to reach a high stability level what guarantee a geometrical uniformity in the weld beads. In each experiment was simultaneously acquired arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emissions; from them were computed parameters as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate. It was used a tri-dimensional LASER scanner for to acquire geometrical information from the weld beads surface as width and height of the bead. Depth penetration was measured from sectional cross cutting of weld beads.Findings: Previous analysis showed that the arc emission parameters reach a stationary state with different characteristic for each experiment group which means that there is some correlation level between them. Posterior analysis showed that from infrared parameter is possible to monitoring external weld bead geometry and principally its penetration depth. From acoustic parameter is possible to monitoring principally the external weld bead geometry. Therefore is concluded that there is a close relation between the arc emissions and the weld bead geometry and that them could be used to measuring the welding geometrical parameters.Research limitations/implications: After analysis it was noticed that the infrared sensing has a better performance than acoustic sensing in the depth penetration monitoring. Infrared sensing also sources some information about external geometric parameters that in conjunction with the acoustic sensing is possible to have reliable information about weld bead geometry. This method of sensing geometric parameters could be applied in other welding processes, but is necessary to have

  13. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  14. A joint fatigue - creep deterioration model for masonry with acoustic emission based damage assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Tomor, Adrienn K.; Verstrynge, Els

    2013-01-01

    The paper investigates the long-term fatigue and creep deterioration processes in historical brick masonry. Based on two independent laboratory test series, the relationship between stress level and life expectancy was considered for fatigue and creep loading in the form of SN type models. The process of deterioration was investigated with the help of acoustic emission technique to identify stages and characteristics of the damage accumulation process. Based on the test data and acoustic emis...

  15. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amami, Souhail [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)], E-mail: souhail.amami@utc.fr; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  16. Diagnostics of glass fiber reinforced polymers and comparative analysis of their fabrication techniques with the use of acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkov, O. V.; Bryansky, A. A.; Panin, S. V.; Zaikov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    Strength properties of the glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP) fabricated by vacuum and vacuum autoclave molding techniques were analyzed. Measurements of porosity of the GFRP parts manufactured by various molding techniques were conducted with the help of optical microscopy. On the basis of experimental data obtained by means of acoustic emission hardware/software setup, the technique for running diagnostics and forecasting the bearing capacity of polymeric composite materials based on the result of three-point bending tests has been developed. The operation principle of the technique is underlined by the evaluation of the power function index change which takes place on the dependence of the total acoustic emission counts versus the loading stress.

  17. In situ high temperature oxidation analysis of Zircaloy-4 using acoustic emission coupled with thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, Al Haj [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Véronique, Peres, E-mail: peres@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Eric, Serris [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France); François, Grosjean; Jean, Kittel; François, Ropital [IFP Energies nouvelles, Rond-point de l’échangeur de Solaize BP3, 69360 Solaize (France); Michel, Cournil [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS:UMR 5307, LGF, 42023 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thermogravimetry associated to acoustic emission (AE) improves knowledge on the corrosion of metals at high temperature. • Kinetic transition is detected under air oxidation tests at 900 °C of Zircaloy-4 by a change in the rate of mass gain and by the AE activity. • AE analysis is complementary to characterizations of post mortem oxidized samples. • AE allows us to distinguish the cracks which occur during the Zircaloy-4 oxidation from the cracks which arise during the cooling of the samples. - Abstract: Zircaloy-4 oxidation behavior at high temperature (900 °C), which can be reached in case of severe accidental situations in nuclear pressurised water reactor, was studied using acoustic emission analysis coupled with thermogravimetry. Two different atmospheres were used to study the oxidation of Zircaloy-4: (a) helium and pure oxygen, (b) helium and oxygen combined with slight addition of air. The experiments with 20% of oxygen confirm the dependence on oxygen anions diffusion in the oxide scale. Under a mixture of oxygen and air in helium, an acceleration of the corrosion was observed due to the detrimental effect of nitrogen. The kinetic rate increased significantly after a kinetic transition (breakaway). This acceleration was accompanied by an acoustic emission activity. Most of the acoustic emission bursts were recorded after the kinetic transition (post-transition) or during the cooling of the sample. The characteristic features of the acoustic emission signals appear to be correlated with the different populations of cracks and their occurrence in the ZrO{sub 2} layer or in the α-Zr(O) layer. Acoustic events were recorded during the isothermal dwell time at high temperature under air. They were associated with large cracks in the zirconia porous layer. Acoustic events were also recorded during cooling after oxidation tests both under air or oxygen. For the latter, cracks were observed in the oxygen enriched zirconium metal phase and

  18. Directional spectral emissivity measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Nesim (Inventor); Pandey, Dhirendra K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus and process for determining the emissivity of a test specimen including an integrated sphere having two concentric walls with a coolant circulating therebetween, and disposed within a chamber which may be under ambient, vacuum or inert gas conditions. A reference sample is disposed within the sphere with a monochromatic light source in optical alignment therewith. A pyrometer is in optical alignment with the test sample for obtaining continuous test sample temperature measurements during a test. An arcuate slit port is provided through the spaced concentric walls of the integrating sphere with a movable monochromatic light source extending through and movable along the arcuate slit port. A detector system extends through the integrating sphere for continuously detecting an integrated signal indicative of all radiation within its field of view, as a function of the emissivity of the test specimen at various temperatures and various angle position of the monochromatic light source. A furnace for heating the test sample to approximately 3000 K. and control mechanism for transferring the heated sample from the furnace to the test sample port in the integrating sphere is also contained within the chamber.

  19. Acoustic Liner Drag: Measurements on Novel Facesheet Perforate Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Jones, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in characterization of the aerodynamic drag of acoustic liners has increased in the past several years. This paper details experiments in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube to quantify the relative drag of several perforate-over-honeycomb liner configurations at flow speeds of centerline flow Mach number equals 0.3 and 0.5. Various perforate geometries and orientations are investigated to determine their resistance factors using a static pressure drop approach. Comparison of these resistance factors gives a relative measurement of liner drag. For these same flow conditions, acoustic measurements are performed with tonal excitation from 400 to 3000 hertz at source sound pressure levels of 140 and 150 decibels. Educed impedance and attenuation spectra are used to determine the impact of variations in perforate geometry on acoustic performance.

  20. Reverberation chamber and its verification for acoustic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drabek Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverberation rooms are useful for measurement of the acoustic quantities of machines that operate in long cycles, however, current reverberation chamber design practices often lead to known issues with reproducibility and repeatability of measured data. The problem is that construction process of these laboratories is performed according to the relevant standards requirements which are mainly focused on the volume of the room or on the absorption coefficient value of the boundary surfaces. Nevertheless, the inner-laboratory reproducibility of acoustic data is very difficult to achieve even when these diffusivity quantifiers are satisfied. This paper presents a verification process of an acoustic laboratory which proportions, shape and construction material of boundary surfaces are not in compliance with standards in every detail.

  1. Measurement of thin films using very long acoustic wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Clement, G T; Adachi, H; Kamakura, T

    2013-01-01

    A procedure for measuring material thickness by means of necessarily-long acoustic wavelengths is examined. The approach utilizes a temporal phase lag caused by the impulse time of wave momentum transferred through a thin layer that is much denser than its surrounding medium. In air, it is predicted that solid or liquid layers below approximately 1/2000 of the acoustic wavelength will exhibit a phase shift with an arctangent functional dependence on thickness and layer density. The effect is verified for thin films on the scale of 10 microns using audible frequency sound (7 kHz). Soap films as thin as 100 nm are then measured using 40 kHz air ultrasound. The method's potential for imaging applications is demonstrated by combining the approach with near-field holography, resulting in reconstructions with sub-wavelength resolution in both the depth and lateral directions. Potential implications at very high and very low acoustic frequencies are discussed.

  2. Initiation of acoustic emission in fluid-saturated sandstone samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, V. B.; Patonin, A. V.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Potanina, M. G.; Smirnov, V. B.; Stroganova, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    A rock behavior experiment with uniaxial compression revealed the effect of acoustic activity in loaded fluid-saturated Berea sandstone samples in response to an electric current. It is established that it is substantially intensified in periods of the current impact and decreases after its cut-off. The current impact also results in a growth of radial deformation indicating an increase in the sample volume. The effect of acoustic activation increases in response to increased heat emitted by the electric current during its flow through the sample, which allows the discovered effect to be explained by initiation of its destruction due to thermal expansion of the fluid in rock interstices and fissures.

  3. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal by Fractal Theory in Aluminum Alloy Spot Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The relation between acoustic emission signal and nugget during aluminum alloy spot welding was investigated in order to evaluate spot welding quality. Due to the nonlinearity of the signals, fractal theory was utilized to quantitatively describe the characteristics of the signals instead of classical Euclidean geometry which cannot describe the acoustic emission signal accurately. Through experiments and computing, the box counting dimension is found distinct from other acoustic emission signals and is a better approach to discriminating weld nugget stages. Results show that fractal dimensions increase from 1.51 to 1.78,and they are related to nugget areas added from non-fusion to over-heated nugget.And the box counting dimension can effectively evaluate the quality of the nugget in the spot welding and can be applied with current, displace, and other spot welding parameters.

  4. Identification of acoustic emission signal in aluminum alloys spot welding based on fractal theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic emission signal of aluminum alloys spot welding includes the information of forming nugget and is one of the important parameters in the quality control. Due to the nonlinearity of the signals, classic Euclidean geometry can not be applied to depict exactly. The fractal theory is implemented to quantitatively describe the characteristics of the acoustic emission signals. The experiment and calculation results show that the box counting dimension of acoustic emission signal, between 1 and 2, are distinctive from different nugget areas in AC spot welding. It is proved that box counting dimension is an effective characteristic parameter to evaluate spot welding quality. In addition, fractal theory can also be applied in other spot welding parameters, such as voltage, current, electrode force and so on, for the purpose of recognizing the spot welding quality.

  5. Acoustic emission characterization of fracture toughness for fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Hui, E-mail: phdhuimei@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710072 (China); Sun, Yuyao; Zhang, Lidong; Wang, Hongqin; Cheng, Laifei [Science and Technology on Thermostructure Composite Materials Laboratory, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2013-01-10

    The fracture toughness of a carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite was investigated relating to classical critical stress intensity factor K{sub IC}, work of fracture, and acoustic emission energy. The K{sub IC} was obtained by the single edge notch beam method and the work of fracture was calculated using the featured area under the load-displacement curves. The K{sub IC}, work of fracture, and acoustic emission energy were compared for the composites before and after heat treatment and then analyzed associated with toughening microstructures of fiber pullout. It indicates that the work of fracture and acoustic emission energy can be more suitable to reflect the toughness rather than the traditional K{sub IC}, which has certain limitation for the fracture toughness characterization of the crack tolerant fiber ceramic composites.

  6. Surface roughness evaluation based on acoustic emission signals in robot assisted polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Marín, Marta María; Teti, Roberto; Rubio, Eva María

    2014-11-14

    The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE) signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state.

  7. Surface Roughness Evaluation Based on Acoustic Emission Signals in Robot Assisted Polishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz de Agustina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The polishing process is the most common technology used in applications where a high level of surface quality is demanded. The automation of polishing processes is especially difficult due to the high level of skill and dexterity that is required. Much of this difficulty arises because of the lack of reliable data on the effect of the polishing parameters on the resulting surface roughness. An experimental study was developed to evaluate the surface roughness obtained during Robot Assisted Polishing processes by the analysis of acoustic emission signals in the frequency domain. The aim is to find out a trend of a feature or features calculated from the acoustic emission signals detected along the process. Such an evaluation was made with the objective of collecting valuable information for the establishment of the end point detection of polishing process. As a main conclusion, it can be affirmed that acoustic emission (AE signals can be considered useful to monitor the polishing process state.

  8. Acoustic emission technique based rubbing identification for Rotor-bearing systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Rubbing is the frequent and dangerous fault in the rotating machine, and efficient identi-fication of the rubbing is a hot research subject in the field of fault diagnosis. In this paper, a newrubbing identification method is proposed, which is based on the acoustic emission technique. Inthis method, the acoustic emission signal of the rubbing in the multi-support rotor-bearing systemis acquired by the acoustic emission sensor, and then the continuous wavelet transform is utilizedto analyze this signal. Based on the rubbing mechanism, the frequency feature of the multiple fre-quency relation in the instantaneous frequency wave is extracted as the rubbing identification fea-ture. The experimental results prove that the proposed method is efficient and feasible.

  9. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  10. Evaluation of acoustic shock induced early hearing loss with audiometer and distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Vinodh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acoustic shock injury has been described as a permanent injury to the auditory system either due to daily noise dose of in excess of 85 decibels or very loud impulse sound reputed to be in excess of 120 decibels and acoustic incidents. This study was performed to compare the results of audiogram and the newer diagnostic method distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs parameters due to acoustic shock injury in call center professionals working in a noisy environment and prone to acoustic injury. Materials and Methods: Hearing functions of 340 subjects were first assessed with pure tone audiometry and then DPOAEs results were compared among acoustic shock exposed subjects with normal audiogram and those with abnormal audiogram. Results: Out of 340 acoustic shock exposed subjects 304 were normal on audiometric testing and 34 had abnormal audiograms. Subsequently on DPOAE testing out of 304 acoustic shock exposed subjects with normal audiogram 125 failed and 181 passed. Conclusions: This study showed that DPOAEs are more sensitive than audiometry to detect pre-symptomatic inner ear damage. It may play a role as screening and monitoring test for acoustic shock-exposed workers.

  11. Deformation, acoustic emission and ultrasound velocity during fatigue tests on paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hæggström E.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the evolution of mechanical properties of paper samples during cyclic experiments. The issue is to look at the sample-to-sample variation, and we try to predict the number of loading cycles to failure. We used two concurrent methods to obtain the deformation: the strain was calculated from vertical displacement measured by laser interferometer sensor, as well as, computed by digital image correlation technique from pictures taken each 2s by a camera. Acoustic emission of fracture was also recorded, and an active ultrasonic wave method using piezoelectric transducers is used to follow the viscoelastic behaviour of each sample. We found that a sharp final increase of different variables like deformation, strain rate and fluctuations, are signs of an imminent rupture of the paper. Moreover looking at the evolution of these quantities during the first cycle only is already an indicator about the lifetime of the sample.

  12. Acoustic Emission Assessment of Impending Fracture in a Cyclically Loading Structural Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Rastegaev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Using the advanced acoustic emission (AE technique, we address the problem of early identification of crack initiation and growth in ductile structural steels under cyclic loading. The notched 9MnSi5 steel specimens with weld joints were fatigue tested at room and lower temperatures with concurrent AE measurements. Detection of AE in ductile materials where fatigue crack initiation and propagation is mediated by local dislocation behavior ahead of the notch or crack tip is challenging because of an extremely low amplitude of the AE signal. With account of this issue, two new practically oriented criteria for recognition of different stages of fatigue are proposed on the basis of AE data: (1 a power spectrum-based criterion and (2 a pattern recognition-based criterion utilizing modern clustering algorithms. The applicability of both criteria is verified using obtained AE data. A good correspondence between AE outcomes and experimental observations of the fatigue behavior was obtained and is discussed.

  13. Detection of Delamination in Composite Beams Using Broadband Acoustic Emission Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, A. C.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Jiang, Y. P.

    1996-01-01

    Delamination in composite structure may be caused by imperfections introduced during the manufacturing process or by impact loads by foreign objects during the operational life. There are some nondestructive evaluation methods to detect delamination in composite structures such as x-radiography, ultrasonic testing, and thermal/infrared inspection. These methods are expensive and hard to use for on line detection. Acoustic emission testing can monitor the material under test even under the presence of noise generated under load. It has been used extensively in proof-testing of fiberglass pressure vessels and beams. In the present work, experimental studies are conducted to investigate the use of broadband acoustic emission signatures to detect delaminations in composite beams. Glass/epoxy beam specimens with full width, prescribed delamination sizes of 2 inches and 4 inches are investigated. The prescribed delamination is produced by inserting Teflon film between laminae during the fabrication of composite laminate. The objectives of this research is to develop a method for predicting delamination size and location in laminated composite beams by combining smart materials concept and broadband AE analysis techniques. More specifically, a piezoceramic (PZT) patch is bonded on the surface of composite beams and used as a pulser. The piezoceramic patch simulates the AE wave source as a 3 cycles, 50KHz, burst sine wave. One broadband AE sensor is fixed near the PZT patch to measure the AE wave near the AE source. A second broadband AE sensor, which is used as a receiver, is scanned along the composite beams at 0.25 inch step to measure propagation of AE wave along the composite beams. The acquired AE waveform is digitized and processed. Signal strength, signal energy, cross-correlation of AE waveforms, and tracking of specific cycle of AE waveforms are used to detect delamination size and location.

  14. Medidas imitanciométricas em crianças com ausência de emissões otoacústicas Acoustic immittance in children without otoacoustic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Emilia Linares

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Partindo da hipótese de que alterações da função de orelha média possam prejudicar a captação das EOAs, é possível que a ausência destas, em lactentes, esteja associada a discretas alterações timpanométricas. OBJETIVO: Verificar a associação entre resposta de EOAT e alteração imitanciométrica com a sonda de 226Hz em lactentes. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte contemporânea com corte transversal. Foram avaliados 20 lactentes com ausência de EOAT (grupo pesquisa e 101 lactentes com presença de EOAT (grupo comparação, com idades variando entre o nascimento e oito meses. Os lactentes foram submetidos a: timpanometria; pesquisa dos limiares de reflexo acústico contralateral com estímulos de 0,5k, 1k, 2k, 4kHz e ruído de faixa larga; emissões otoacústicas (transiente e por produtos de distorção. O potencial evocado auditivo de tronco encefálico para pesquisa do limiar de resposta foi realizado no grupo pesquisa. RESULTADOS: Observou-se diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos (pConsidering the hypothesis that middle ear changes can impair the recording of otoacoustic emissions, it is possible that absent otoacoustic emissions in infants could be associated with a light tympanometric change. AIM: To study the association between transient otoacoustic emissions and changes in acoustic immittance measurements with 226Hz probe tone in neonates. METHODS: Cross-sectional contemporary cohort study. 20 infants with no transient otoacoustic emissions (study group and 101 infants with transient otoacoustic emissions (control group, with ages ranged from birth to eight months, were assessed. Infants were submitted to: admittance tympanometry; contralateral acoustic reflex threshold with stimulus of 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz and broad band noise; transient and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. The auditory brain response was used to study the threshold in neonates without transient otoacoustic emissions. RESULTS

  15. Acoustic emission localization on ship hull structures using a deep learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgoulas, George; Kappatos, Vassilios; Nikolakopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high dimension......In this paper, deep belief networks were used for localization of acoustic emission events on ship hull structures. In order to avoid complex and time consuming implementations, the proposed approach uses a simple feature extraction module, which significantly reduces the extremely high...

  16. Thick-film acoustic emission sensors for use in structurally integrated condition-monitoring applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, Andrew J; Dorey, Robert A; Mba, David

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring the condition of complex engineering structures is an important aspect of modern engineering, eliminating unnecessary work and enabling planned maintenance, preventing failure. Acoustic emissions (AE) testing is one method of implementing continuous nondestructive structural health monitoring. A novel thick-film (17.6 μm) AE sensor is presented. Lead zirconate titanate thick films were fabricated using a powder/sol composite ink deposition technique and mechanically patterned to form a discrete thick-film piezoelectric AE sensor. The thick-film sensor was benchmarked against a commercial AE device and was found to exhibit comparable responses to simulated acoustic emissions.

  17. Acoustic Emission Determination of Deformation Mechanisms Leading to Failure of Naval Alloys. Phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    boundaries; formation and growth of twins, crazes , microcracks, I t i4 2 Fig. 1. Typical acoustic emission waveforms as detected with piezoelectric transducers...captured on the Nicolet. Materials presently available for testing are 6Ak 4V and 6AZ 2Cb lTa lMo titanium alloys; HY80 , HY100 and HY 130 steel; 2024...Djordjevic, J. C. Murphy, and R. E. Green, Jr., "Acoustic Emission During Craze Formation in Polymers (submitted for publication in J. AppI. Phys.). 32. W

  18. Advances in non-invasive measures of vocal acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBlance, G R; Steckol, K F; Cooper, M H

    1991-10-01

    Objective assessment of vocal pitch, loudness, and quality is a crucial adjunct to endoscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of vocal pathology. Historically, this assessment was made through subjective, perceptual measures that were questionable in terms of validity and reliability. Recent advances in electronic technology now permit objective analysis of the acoustic characteristics of voice. Kay Elemetric's Visi-Pitch, DSP 5500 Digital Spectrograph, and Nasometer are representative of these new instruments and are used as illustrations in the discussion of the assessment of speech acoustics.

  19. Tethered acoustic doppler current profiler platforms for measuring streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmel, Michael S.; Stewart, James A.; Morlock, Scott E.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey tested and refined tethered-platform designs for measuring streamflow. Platform specifications were developed, radio-modem telemetry of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data and potential platform-hull sources were investigated, and hulls were tested and evaluated.

  20. A Comparative Study of Two Acoustic Measures of Hypernasality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Adam P.; Ibrahim, Hasherah M.; Reilly, Sheena; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare 2 quantitative acoustic measures of nasality in children with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and healthy controls using formalized perceptual assessment as a guide. Method: Fifty participants (23 children with CLP and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls) aged between 4 and 12 years produced a variety of…

  1. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Capel, P.J.S.; Turchinovich, D.; Porte, H.P.; Lahmann, S.; Rossow, U.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic signals

  2. Acoustic impedances of ear canals measured by impedance tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciric, Dejan; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2007-01-01

    During hearing sensitivity tests, the sound field is commonly generated by an earphone placed on a subject ear. One of the factors that can affect the sound transmission in the ear is the acoustic impedance of the ear canal. Its importance is related to the contribution of other elements involved...... in the transmission such as the earphone impedance. In order to determine the acoustic impedances of human ear canals, the standardized method for measurement of complex impedances used for the measurement of the audiometric earphone impedances is applied. It is based on the transfer function between two microphone...... locations in an impedance tube. The end of the tube representing the measurement plane is placed at the ear canal entrance. Thus, the impedance seen from the entrance inward is measured on 25 subjects. Most subjects participated in the previous measurement of the ratio between the pressures at the open...

  3. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, José A; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Hook, Simon J; Baldridge, Alice; Ibañez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 microm with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  4. Broadband acoustic scattering measurements of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucaro, J A; Houston, B H; Saniga, M; Dragonette, L R; Yoder, T; Dey, S; Kraus, L; Carin, L

    2008-02-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for detection and identification of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO) by exploiting their structural acoustic response, we carried out broadband monostatic scattering measurements over a full 360 degrees on UXO's (two mortar rounds, an artillery shell, and a rocket warhead) and false targets (a cinder block and a large rock). The measurement band, 1-140 kHz, includes a low frequency structural acoustics region in which the wavelengths are comparable to or larger than the target characteristic dimensions. In general, there are aspects that provide relatively high target strength levels ( approximately -10 to -15 dB), and from our experience the targets should be detectable in this structural acoustics band in most acoustic environments. The rigid body scattering was also calculated for one UXO in order to highlight the measured scattering features involving elastic responses. The broadband scattering data should be able to support feature-based separation of UXO versus false targets and identification of various classes of UXO as well.

  5. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  6. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jeremiah D. [Physics Department, Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio 45504 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  7. Real-time structural integrity monitoring using a passive quadrature demodulated, localised Michelson optical fibre interferometer capable of simultaneous strain and acoustic emission sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapanes, Edward

    1991-12-01

    A Michelson Fiber optic sensor (MFOS) is described for in-situ strain and vibration monitoring as well as acoustic emission detection in composite material structures. The phase sensitive fiber optic sensor is localized, all-fiber, and intrinsic. The MFOS was successfully embedded in Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/epoxy thermosets as well as graphite/PEEK thermoplastic in order to perform local strain and vibration measurements at the lamina level. A technique allowing acoustic emission detection in parallel with strain and vibration monitoring is illustrated.

  8. Measurement of acoustic attenuation in workrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger

    1997-01-01

    in the stationary sound field produced by an omnidirectional sound source in the room. The project has shown that there is a need for a new alternative measuring method - the results based on the classical reverberation time measurements do not agree sufficiently well with the actual equivalent absorption areas...... in the rooms. But it has not been possible within the project to establish and verify an alternative method based on a simple measurement in the stationary sound field.......Experimental work has been done in nine halls with volumes ranging from 693 to 123.978 cubic metres. The equivalent absorption area has been determined from absorption coefficients of the surfaces, calculated from reverberation time measurements and estimated from sound pressure level measurements...

  9. Emissivity measurement of high-emissivity black paint at CENAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas G, D., E-mail: dcardena@cenam.mx [Centro Nacional de Metrologia, Km 4.5 Carretera a los Cues, El Marques, 76246 Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    To measure the temperature of the surface of an opaque object by radiation thermometry, it is necessary to know its surface emissivity. High emissivity black paint can be applied to the inner walls of a cavity to be used as a blackbody radiator. It can also be applied to some highly reflecting metals so that their temperature can be estimated by radiation thermometry. In this work, it is described the emissivity measurement of high-emissivity black paint that has been used for the two applications described above. The average emissivity of the measured paint in the 8 to 14 micrometers wavelength range was estimated as 0.972 ± 0.012. The results obtained may be of use for those using the paint at temperatures from 50 to 150 grades C. (Author)

  10. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  11. Energy Based Acoustic Measurement Senors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research focuses on fully developing energy density sensors that will yield a significant benefit both for measurements of interest to NASA, as well as for...

  12. Acoustic emission localization in plates with dispersion and reverberations using sparse PZT sensors in passive mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelli, Alessandro; De Marchi, Luca; Marzani, Alessandro; Speciale, Nicolò

    2012-02-01

    A strategy for the localization of acoustic emissions (AE) in plates with dispersion and reverberation is proposed. The procedure exploits signals received in passive mode by sparse conventional piezoelectric transducers and a three-step processing framework. The first step consists in a signal dispersion compensation procedure, which is achieved by means of the warped frequency transform. The second step concerns the estimation of the differences in arrival time (TDOA) of the acoustic emission at the sensors. Complexities related to reflections and plate resonances are overcome via a wavelet decomposition of cross-correlating signals where the mother function is designed by a synthetic warped cross-signal. The magnitude of the wavelet coefficients in the warped distance-frequency domain, in fact, precisely reveals the TDOA of an acoustic emission at two sensors. Finally, in the last step the TDOA data are exploited to locate the acoustic emission source through hyperbolic positioning. The proposed procedure is tested with a passive network of three/four piezo-sensors located symmetrically and asymmetrically with respect to the plate edges. The experimentally estimated AE locations are close to those theoretically predicted by the Cramèr-Rao lower bound.

  13. Based on optical fiber Michelson interferometer for acoustic emission detection experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yijun; Qu, Dandan; Deng, Hu

    2013-08-01

    A type of Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors acoustic emission sensor is proposed in the article to detect the vibrations produced by ultrasonic waves propagating in a solid body. Two optical fiber loop reflectors are equivalent to the sensing arm and the reference arm instead of traditional Michelson interferometer end reflecter Theoretical analyses indicate that the sensitivity of the system has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy. The best operating point of optical fiber sensor is fixed by theoretical derivation and simulation of computer, and the signal frequency which is detected by the sensor is the frequency of input signal. PZT (Piezoelectric Ceramic) is powered by signal generator as known ultrasonic source, The Polarization controller is used to make the reflected light interference,The fiber length is changed by adjusting the DC voltage on the PZT with the fiber loop to make the sensor system response that ΔΦ is closed to π/2. the signal basis frequency detected by the sensor is the frequency of the input signal. Then impacts the surface of the marble slab with home-made mechanical acoustic emission source. And detect it. and then the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal is obtained by Fourier technique. The experimental results indicate that the system can identify the frequency characteristic of acoustic emission signal, and it can be also used to detect the surface feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating in material structure.

  14. Advanced Computing Methods for Knowledge Discovery and Prognosis in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has gained significant popularity in the last decade. This growing interest, coupled with new sensing technologies, has resulted in an overwhelming amount of data in need of management and useful interpretation. Acoustic emission (AE) testing has been particularly fraught by the problem of growing data and is…

  15. A study of the mechanical properties of highly porous ceramics using acoustic emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aué, J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the results of indirect tensile tests on highly porous ceramics are presented. A relation between the mechanical strength of the highly porous ceramic materials and Acoustic Emission (AE) has been established. We have shown that the amplitude distribution of the AE events depends on th

  16. Temperature effects on an acoustic emission based SHM system - Applied to composite materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargalui, A.; Martinez, M.J.; Zarouchas, D.; Pant, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on understanding the effect of temperature variations and the position of the piezoelectric sensors with respect to fiber orientation angle, as it relates to acoustic emission wave velocity in composite structures. A hybrid panel consisting of Unidirectional Carbon Fiber (UDCF) co

  17. A System for Acoustic Field Measurement Employing Cartesian Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczodrak Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A system setup for measurements of acoustic field, together with the results of 3D visualisations of acoustic energy flow are presented in the paper. Spatial sampling of the field is performed by a Cartesian robot. Automatization of the measurement process is achieved with the use of a specialized control system. The method is based on measuring the sound pressure (scalar and particle velocity(vector quantities. The aim of the system is to collect data with a high precision and repeatability. The system is employed for measurements of acoustic energy flow in the proximity of an artificial head in an anechoic chamber. In the measurement setup an algorithm for generation of the probe movement path is included. The algorithm finds the optimum path of the robot movement, taking into account a given 3D object shape present in the measurement space. The results are presented for two cases, first without any obstacle and the other - with an artificial head in the sound field.

  18. DEMON Acoustic Ship Signature Measurements in an Urban Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil Woo Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection, classification, and tracking of small vessels are important tasks for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification, and tracking. This paper presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise DEMON acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship spectra and were measured at distances up to 7 km. The combination of cross-correlation and methods allowed separation of the acoustic signatures of ships in busy urban environments.

  19. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers noncontacting ultrasonic measurements using EMATS

    CERN Document Server

    Hirao, Masahiko

    2017-01-01

    This second edition provides comprehensive information on electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs), from the theory and physical principles of EMATs to the construction of systems and their applications to scientific and industrial ultrasonic measurements on materials. The original version has been complemented with selected ideas on ultrasonic measurement that have emerged since the first edition was released. The book is divided into four parts: PART I offers a self-contained description of the basic elements of coupling mechanisms along with the practical designing of EMATs for various purposes. Several implementations to compensate for EMATs’ low transfer efficiency are provided, along with useful tips on how to make an EMAT. PART II describes the principle of electromagnetic acoustic resonance (EMAR), which makes the most of EMATs’ contactless nature and is the most successful amplification mechanism for precise measurements of velocity and attenuation. PART III applies EMAR to studying physical ...

  20. An effective sensor for tool wear monitoring in face milling: Acoustic emission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M T Mathew; P Srinivasa Pai; L A Rocha

    2008-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) has been widely used for monitoring manufacturing processes particularly those involving metal cutting. Monitoring the condition of the cutting tool in the machining process is very important since tool condition will affect the part size, quality and an unexpected tool failure may damage the tool, work-piece and sometimes the machine tool itself. AE can be effectively used for tool condition monitoring applications because the emissions from process changes like tool wear, chip formation i.e. plastic deformation, etc. can be directly related to the mechanics of the process. Also AE can very effectively respond to changes like tool fracture, tool chipping, etc. when compared to cutting force and since the frequency range is much higher than that of machine vibrations and environmental noises, a relatively uncontaminated signal can be obtained. AE signal analysis was applied for sensing tool wear in face milling operations. Cutting tests were carried out on a vertical milling machine. Tests were carried out for a given cutting condition, using single insert, two inserts (adjacent and opposite) and three inserts in the cutter. AE signal parameters like ring down count and rms voltage were measured and were correlated with flank wear values (VB max). The results of this investigation indicate that AE can be effectively used for monitoring tool wear in face milling operations.

  1. Investigation of correlation of LF power modulation of light in natural and artificial illumination situations and acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeberg, Florian P.; Gutzmann, Holger L.; Weyer, Cornelia; Weiß, Jürgen; Dörfler, Joachim; Hahlweg, Cornelius F.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper is a follow up of a paper presented in 2013 at the Novel Optical Systems conference in the session on Optics and Music. It is derived from an ongoing study on the human perception of combined optical and acoustical periodical stimuli. Originating from problems concerning artificial illumination and certain machinery with coherent optical and acoustical emissions there are effects to be observed which are interesting in the context of occupational medicine. It seems, that acoustic stimuli in the frequency range of the flicker fusion and below might lead to unexpected perceptible effects beyond those of the single stimuli. The effect of infrasound stimuli as a whole body perception seems to be boosted. Because of the difficulties in evaluation of physical and psychological effects of such coherent stimuli in a first step we question if such coherence is perceivable at all. Further, the problem of modulation of optical signals by acoustical signal is concerned. A catalogue of scenarios and 'effects to look for' including measurement concepts is presented and discussed.

  2. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Van Capel, P.J.S.; Turchinovich, D.; Porte, H.P.; Lahmann, S.; Rossow, U.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic signals and THz electromagnetic radiation signals demonstrates that transient strain generation in InGaN/GaN MQWs is correlated with electromagnetic THz generation, and both types of emission find their o...

  3. Correlated terahertz acoustic and electromagnetic emission in dynamically screened InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Van Capel, P.J.S.; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Porte, Henrik; Lahmann, S.; Rossow, U.; Hangleiter, A.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate acoustic and electromagnetic emission from optically excited strained piezoelectric In0.2Ga0.8N/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), using optical pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved Brillouin scattering, and THz emission spectroscopy. A direct comparison of detected acoustic signals and THz electromagnetic radiation signals demonstrates that transient strain generation in InGaN/GaN MQWs is correlatedwith electromagnetic THz generation, and both types of emission find their or...

  4. Acoustic property measurements in a photoacoustic imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemink, René G. H.; Manohar, Srirang; Slump, Cornelis H.; van der Heijden, Ferdi; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2007-07-01

    Photoacoustics is a hybrid imaging technique that combines the contrast available to optical imaging with the resolution that is possessed by ultrasound imaging. The technique is based on generating ultrasound from absorbing structures in tissue using pulsed light. In photoacoustic (PA) computerized tomography (CT) imaging, reconstruction of the optical absorption in a subject, is performed for example by filtered backprojection. The backprojection is performed along circular paths in image space instead of along straight lines as in X-ray CT imaging. To achieve this, the speed-of-sound through the subject is usually assumed constant. An unsuitable speed-of-sound can degrade resolution and contrast. We discuss here a method of actually measuring the speed-of- sound distribution using ultrasound transmission through the subject under photoacoustic investigation. This is achieved in a simple approach that does not require any additional ultrasound transmitter. The method uses a passive element (carbon fiber) that is placed in the imager in the path of the illumination which generates ultrasound by the photoacoustic effect and behaves as an ultrasound source. Measuring the time-of-flight of this ultrasound transient by the same detector used for conventional photoacoustics, allows a speed-of-sound image to be reconstructed. This concept is validated on phantoms.

  5. Emissivity Measurements of Additively Manufactured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Robert Vaughn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reid, Robert Stowers [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baker, Andrew M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lucero, Briana [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bernardin, John David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    The emissivity of common 3D printing materials such as ABS and PLA were measured using a reflectivity meter and have the measured value of approximately 0.92. Adding a conductive material to the filament appears to cause a decrease in the emissivity of the surface. The angular dependence of the emissivity and the apparent temperature was measured using a FLIR infrared camera showing that the emissivity does not change much for shallow angles less than 40 angular degrees, and drops off dramatically after 70 angular degrees.

  6. Atypical prosody in Asperger syndrome: perceptual and acoustic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipe, Marisa G; Frota, Sónia; Castro, São Luís; Vicente, Selene G

    2014-08-01

    It is known that individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) may show no problems with regard to what is said (e.g., lexical content) but tend to have difficulties in how utterances are produced, i.e., they may show prosodic impairments. In the present study, we focus on the use of prosodic features to express grammatical meaning. Specifically, we explored the sentence type difference between statements and questions that is conveyed by intonation, using perceptual and acoustic measurements. Children aged 8 and 9 years with AS (n = 12) were matched according to age and nonverbal intelligence with typically developing peers (n = 17). Although children with AS could produce categorically accurate prosodic patterns, their prosodic contours were perceived as odd by adult listeners, and acoustic measurements showed alterations in duration and pitch. Additionally, children with AS had greater variability in fundamental frequency contours compared to typically developing peers.

  7. Acoustic Emission Detection of Macro-Cracks on Engraving Tool Steel Inserts during the Injection Molding Cycle Using PZT Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Hančič

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved monitoring system for the failure detection of engraving tool steel inserts during the injection molding cycle. This system uses acoustic emission PZT sensors mounted through acoustic waveguides on the engraving insert. We were thus able to clearly distinguish the defect through measured AE signals. Two engraving tool steel inserts were tested during the production of standard test specimens, each under the same processing conditions. By closely comparing the captured AE signals on both engraving inserts during the filling and packing stages, we were able to detect the presence of macro-cracks on one engraving insert. Gabor wavelet analysis was used for closer examination of the captured AE signals’ peak amplitudes during the filling and packing stages. The obtained results revealed that such a system could be used successfully as an improved tool for monitoring the integrity of an injection molding process.

  8. Atypical Prosody in Asperger Syndrome: Perceptual and Acoustic Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa G. Filipe; Frota, Sónia; Castro, São Luís; Vicente, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) may show no problems with regard to what is said (e.g., lexical content) but tend to have difficulties in how utterances are produced, i.e., they may show prosodic impairments. In the present study, we focus on the use of prosodic features to express grammatical meaning. Specifically, we explored the sentence type difference between statements and questions that is conveyed by intonation, using perceptual and acoustic measurements. Chil...

  9. A Bayesian Approach for Localization of Acoustic Emission Source in Plate-Like Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Bayesian approach for localizing acoustic emission (AE source in plate-like structures with consideration of uncertainties from modeling error and measurement noise. A PZT sensor network is deployed to monitor and acquire AE wave signals released by possible damage. By using continuous wavelet transform (CWT, the time-of-flight (TOF information of the AE wave signals is extracted and measured. With a theoretical TOF model, a Bayesian parameter identification procedure is developed to obtain the AE source location and the wave velocity at a specific frequency simultaneously and meanwhile quantify their uncertainties. It is based on Bayes’ theorem that the posterior distributions of the parameters about the AE source location and the wave velocity are obtained by relating their priors and the likelihood of the measured time difference data. A Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm is employed to draw samples to approximate the posteriors. Also, a data fusion scheme is performed to fuse results identified at multiple frequencies to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty of the final localization results. Experimental studies on a stiffened aluminum panel with simulated AE events by pensile lead breaks (PLBs are conducted to validate the proposed Bayesian AE source localization approach.

  10. Design of a piezoelectric transducer cylindrical phase modulator for simulating acoustic emission signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Cunfu; HANG Lijun; WU Bin

    2007-01-01

    To conveniently carry out the pipeline leak experiment in a laboratory,leak acoustic signals are simulated by using the converse piezoelectric effect of a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) cylindrical phase modulator.On the basis of the piezoelectric equations and electromechanical equivalence principle,the transfer function of a PZT cylindrical phase modulator is delivered.A PZT cylindrical phase modulator is designed,and the numerical simulation is conducted.Results prove that the PZT cylindrical phase modulator can effectively simulate leak acoustic emission signals when the frequency is lower than 25 KHz.

  11. Acoustic Emission Behavior of Early Age Concrete Monitored by Embedded Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Qin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE is capable of monitoring the cracking activities inside materials. In this study, embedded sensors were employed to monitor the AE behavior of early age concrete. Type 1–3 cement-based piezoelectric composites, which had lower mechanical quality factor and acoustic impedance, were fabricated and used to make sensors. Sensors made of the composites illustrated broadband frequency response. In a laboratory, the cracking of early age concrete was monitored to recognize different hydration stages. The sensors were also embedded in a mass concrete foundation to localize the temperature gradient cracks.

  12. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  13. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didenkulov, Igor, E-mail: din@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov str., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay, E-mail: nikvas@rf.unn.ru [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin ave., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  14. Survey of emissivity measurement by radiometric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honner, M; Honnerová, P

    2015-02-01

    A survey of the state of the art in the field of spectral directional emissivity measurements by using radiometric methods is presented. Individual quantity types such as spectral, band, or total emissivity are defined. Principles of emissivity measurement by various methods (direct and indirect, and calorimetric and radiometric) are discussed. The paper is focused on direct radiometric methods. An overview of experimental setups is provided, including the design of individual parts such as the applied reference sources of radiation, systems of sample clamping and heating, detection systems, methods for the determination of surface temperature, and procedures for emissivity evaluation.

  15. Determining low-frequency source location from acoustic phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Travis L.; Frisk, George V.

    2002-11-01

    For low-frequency cw sound sources in shallow water, the time rate-of-change of the measured acoustic phase is well approximated by the time rate-of-change of the source-receiver separation distance. An algorithm for determining a locus of possible source locations based on this idea has been developed. The locus has the general form of a hyperbola, which can be used to provide a bearing estimation at long ranges, and an estimate of source location at short ranges. The algorithm uses only acoustic phase data and receiver geometry as input, and can be used even when the source frequency is slightly unstable and/or imprecisely known. The algorithm has been applied to data from low-frequency experiments (20-300 Hz), both for stable and unstable source frequencies, and shown to perform well. [Work supported by ONR and WHOI Academic Programs Office.

  16. Measurement of Fugitive Dust Emissions and Visible Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Herbert C.

    The method of measuring fugitive dust emission utilized by the Texas Air Control Board is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The measuring procedure, precautions, expected results, and legal acceptance of the method are…

  17. A Novel Acoustic Emission Fiber Optic Sensor Based on a Single Mode Optical Fiber Coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rongsheng; LIAO Yanbiao; ZHENG Gangtie; LIU Tongyu; Gerard Franklyn Fernando

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, on the use of a fused-taper single mode optical fiber coupler as a sensing element for the detection of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound. When an acoustic wave impinges on the mode-coupling region of a coupler, the coupling coefficient is modulated via the photo-elastic effect. Therefore, the transfer function of the coupler is modulated by an acoustic wave. The sensitivity of the sensor at 140 kHz was approximately 5.2 mV/Pa and the noise floor was 1 Pa. The bandwidth of the sensor was up to several hundred kHz. This AE sensor exhibits significant advantage compared with interferometer-based AE sensors.

  18. A New Fault Location Approach for Acoustic Emission Techniques in Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Quiterio Gómez Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The renewable energy industry is undergoing continuous improvement and development worldwide, wind energy being one of the most relevant renewable energies. This industry requires high levels of reliability, availability, maintainability and safety (RAMS for wind turbines. The blades are critical components in wind turbines. The objective of this research work is focused on the fault detection and diagnosis (FDD of the wind turbine blades. The FDD approach is composed of a robust condition monitoring system (CMS and a novel signal processing method. CMS collects and analyses the data from different non-destructive tests based on acoustic emission. The acoustic emission signals are collected applying macro-fiber composite (MFC sensors to detect and locate cracks on the surface of the blades. Three MFC sensors are set in a section of a wind turbine blade. The acoustic emission signals are generated by breaking a pencil lead in the blade surface. This method is used to simulate the acoustic emission due to a breakdown of the composite fibers. The breakdown generates a set of mechanical waves that are collected by the MFC sensors. A graphical method is employed to obtain a system of non-linear equations that will be used for locating the emission source. This work demonstrates that a fiber breakage in the wind turbine blade can be detected and located by using only three low cost sensors. It allows the detection of potential failures at an early stages, and it can also reduce corrective maintenance tasks and downtimes and increase the RAMS of the wind turbine.

  19. Classification of alkali-silica reaction and corrosion distress using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Marwa; ElBatanouny, Mohamed; Serrato, Michael; Dixon, Kenneth; Larosche, Carl; Ziehl, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulates approximately 100 commercial nuclear power reactor facilities that contribute about 20% of the total electric energy produced in the United States. Half of these reactor facilities are over 30 years old and are approaching their original design service life. Due to economic and durability considerations, significant portions of many of the facilities were constructed with reinforced concrete, including the containment facilities, cooling towers, and foundations. While most of these concrete facilities have performed exceptionally well throughout their initial expected service life, some are beginning to exhibit different forms of concrete deterioration. In this study, acoustic emission (AE) is used to monitor two main concrete deterioration mechanisms; alkali-silica reaction (ASR) distress and corrosion of reinforcing steel. An accelerated ASR test was conducted where specimens were continuously monitored with AE. The results show that AE can detect and classify damage due to ASR distress in the specimens. AE was also used to remotely monitor active corrosion regions in a reactor facility. AE monitoring of accelerated corrosion testing was also conducted on a concrete block specimen cut from a similar reactor building. Electrochemical measurements were conducted to correlate AE activity to quantifiable corrosion measurements and to enhance capabilities for service life prediction.

  20. Determination of the elastic modulus of snow via acoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Bastian; van Herwijnen, Alec; Löwe, Henning

    2016-04-01

    The elastic modulus of snow is a key quantity from the viewpoint of avalanche research and forecasting, snow engineering or materials science in general. Since it is a fundamental property, many measurements have been reported in the literature. Due to differences in measurement methods, there is a lot of variation in the reported values. Especially values derived via computer tomography (CT) based numerical calculations using finite element methods are not corresponding to the results of other methods. The central issue is that CT based moduli are purely elastic whereas other methods may include viscoelastic deformation. In order to avoid this discrepancy we derived the elastic modulus of snow via wave propagation measurements and compared our results with CT based calculations. We measured the arrival times of acoustic pulses propagating through the snow samples to determine the P-wave velocity and in turn derive the elastic modulus along the direction of wave propagation. We performed a series of laboratory experiments to derive the P-wave modulus of snow in relation to density. The P-wave modulus ranged from 10 to 280 MPa for a snow density between 150 and 370 kg/m^3;. The moduli derived from the acoustic measurements correlated well with the CT-based values and both exhibited a power law trend over the entire density range. Encouraged by these results we used the acoustic method to investigate the temporal evolution of the elastic modulus. The rate of increase was very close to values mentioned in literature on the sintering rate of snow. Overall, our results are a first but important step towards a new measurement method to attain the elastic properties of snow.

  1. Acoustic, electromagnetic, neutron emissions from fracture and earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Manuello, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the relevant consequences of recently discovered and interdisciplinary phenomena, triggered by local mechanical instabilities. In particular, it looks at emissions from nano-scale mechanical instabilities such as fracture, turbulence, buckling and cavitation, focussing on vibrations at the TeraHertz frequency and Piezonuclear reactions. Future applications for this work could include earthquake precursors, climate change, energy production, and cellular biology. A series of fracture experiments on natural rocks demonstrates that the TeraHertz vibrations are able to induce fission reactions on medium weight elements accompanied by neutron emissions. The same phenomenon appears to have occurred in several different situations, particularly in the chemical evolution of the Earth and Solar System, through seismicity (rocky planets) and storms (gaseous planets). As the authors explore, these phenomena can also explain puzzles related to the history of our planet, like the ocean formation or th...

  2. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  3. Waveform Based Acoustic Emission Detection and Location of Matrix Cracking in Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of damage mechanisms in a material or structure under load produces transient acoustic waves. These acoustic waves are known as acoustic emission (AE). In composites they can be caused by a variety of sources including matrix cracking, fiber breakage, and delamination. AE signals can be detected and analyzed to determine the location of the acoustic source by triangulation. Attempts are also made to analyze the signals to determine the type and severity of the damage mechanism. AE monitoring has been widely used for both laboratory studies of materials, and for testing the integrity of structures in the field. In this work, an advanced, waveform based AE system was used in a study of transverse matrix cracking in cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates. This AE system featured broad band, high fidelity sensors, and high capture rate digital acquisition and storage of acoustic signals. In addition, analysis techniques based on plate wave propagation models were employed. These features provided superior source location and noise rejection capabilities.

  4. Shallow-water acoustic tomography from angle measurements instead of travel-time measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulanier, Florian; Nicolas, Barbara; Mars, Jérôme I; Roux, Philippe; Brossier, Romain

    2013-10-01

    For shallow-water waveguides and mid-frequency broadband acoustic signals, ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) is based on the multi-path aspect of wave propagation. Using arrays in emission and reception and advanced array processing, every acoustic arrival can be isolated and matched to an eigenray that is defined not only by its travel time but also by its launch and reception angles. Classically, OAT uses travel-time variations to retrieve sound-speed perturbations; this assumes very accurate source-to-receiver clock synchronization. This letter uses numerical simulations to demonstrate that launch-and-reception-angle tomography gives similar results to travel-time tomography without the same requirement for high-precision synchronization.

  5. Monitoring of Acoustic Emissions Within Geothermal Areas in Iceland: A new Tool for Geothermal Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsdóttir, B.; Gudmundsson, O.

    2007-12-01

    With increased emphasis on geothermal development new exploration methods are needed in order to improve general understanding of geothermal reservoirs, characterize their extent and assess the potential for sustainable power production. Monitoring of acoustic emissions within geothermal areas may provide a new tool to evaluate the spatial extent of geothermal fields and model rock-fluid interactions. Three-dimensional seismic data have been used to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of noise within several high-temperature geothermal fields in Iceland. Seismic noise in the 4-6 Hz range within the Svartsengi field can be attributed to steam hydraulics and pressure oscillations within the geothermal reservoirs. Seismic noise surveys compliment electrical resistivity soundings and TEM-surveys by providing information pertinent to the current geothermal activity and extent of steam fields within the uppermost crust of the geothermal reservoir. Information related to acoustic emissions can thus help define targets for future wells.

  6. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  7. Study of electromagnetic and acoustic emission in creep experiments of water-containing rock samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hong-wen; ZHANG Zhong-yu; XU Guo-an

    2008-01-01

    Based on biaxial shear creep tests conducted on rock samples with different water contents, we present the results of our study on the regularities of electromagnetic and acoustic emission during the process of creep experiments in which we have ana-lyzed the contribution of water to the occurrence of electromagnetic radiation. The result shows that in the creep-fracturing course of rock samples, when the water content increases, the initial frequency and amplitude of electromagnetic and acoustic emission also increases, but at a decreasing growth rate caused by loading stress. This can be used as a criterion for the long-term stability of rock masses under conditions of repeated inundation and discharge of water.

  8. Remote structural health monitoring with serially multiplexed fiber optic acoustic emission sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Development and testing of a serially multiplexed fiber optic sensor system is described. The sensor differs from conventional fiber optic acoustic systems, as it is capable of sensing AE emissions at several points along the length of a single fiber. Multiplexing provides for single channel detection of cracks and their locations in large structural systems. An algorithm was developed for signal recognition and tagging of the AE waveforms for detection of crack locations. Laboratory experiments on plain concrete beams and post-tensioned FRP tendons were performed to evaluate the crack detection capability of the sensor system. The acoustic emission sensor was able to detect initiation, growth and location of the cracks in concrete as well as in the FRP tendons. The AE system is potentially suitable for applications involving health monitoring of structures following an earthquake.

  9. Effects of Specimen Height on the Acoustic Emission Rate Value ‘a’ for Cement Mortar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; HU Hongxiang; LU Guijuan; CHEN Shijie; LIU Shaojun; WANG Yao

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the size effect on the AE rate ‘a’ value, three kinds of mix ratios were set up by different particle sizes and water cement ratios, 45 cement mortar specimens with ifve different heights were tested under axial compression. And the whole damage processes were monitored by full-digital acoustic emission acquisition system, followed by an analysis of mechanical behavior and AE activity. The experimental results show that the height of the cement specimen has signiifcant effects on the compressive strength and the acoustic emission rate ‘a’ value, but a slight effect on the accumulated AE hits number, which is analyzed from aspects of failure process of cement mortar specimens.

  10. Acoustic emission monitoring of unstable damage growth in CFRP composites under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills-Dadson, B.; Tran, D.; Asamene, K.; Whitlow, T.; Sundaresan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Composite structural members experience extensive and complex damage that accumulate in a relatively steady pace as the structure is quasi-statically loaded. This damage progression which starts as matrix cracks, delaminations, and random fiber breaks, turns unstable when groups of adjacent fibers, ranging from four to ten fibers fail together, after about 85% of ultimate strength, as reported in the literature. Identifying this critical damage that precedes the final fracture has been difficult even in laboratory specimens. There is little consensus on successful use of AE signals to differentiate failure modes. The inability of AE patterns to identify failure modes is likely caused by the limited frequency bandwidth of available AE sensors, and the high attenuation seen in AE signals particularly in the frequency range likely to be associated with fiber fractures. As a part of this study new acoustic emission sensors capable of measuring frequencies to 2 MHz were developed. In addition, composite specimens were instrumented with sufficient number of sensors to capture high frequency signals before they are attenuated. Unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic carbon-epoxy composite tensile specimens were monitored while they were statically loaded to failure. Distinctly different signals corresponding to the three failure modes could be observed. High frequency acoustic emission signals with frequencies well in excess of 1MHz, mostly seen in the last 20% of the loading cycle. Signals with frequencies in the range of 300 kHz to 700 kHz and duration of the order of 50 microseconds, were observed in cross ply and quasi-isotropic specimens, and are believed to be from matrix cracks. Fewer events with frequencies below 300 kHz and duration that exceeded about 200 microseconds are believed to be from delaminations. An important observation in this study is the appearance of groups of near identical waveforms, which are believed to be from clusters of adjacent

  11. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Multicell Reinforced Concrete Box Girders Subjected to Torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Marya Bagherifaez; Arash Behnia; Abeer Aqeel Majeed; Chai Hwa Kian

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) box girders are a common structural member for road bridges in modern construction. The hollow cross-section of a box girder is ideal in carrying eccentric loads or torques introduced by skew supports. This study employed acoustic emission (AE) monitoring on multicell RC box girder specimens subjected to laboratory-based torsion loading. Three multicell box girder specimens with different cross-sections were tested. The aim is to acquire AE analysis data indicative fo...

  12. Initial Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Multi-bay Box Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) HWB Multi-Bay Test Article were conducted during the second quarter of 2015 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This report documents the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests along with an initial analysis of the data. A more detailed analysis will be presented in future publications.

  13. Study of Acoustic Emission and Mechanical Characteristics of Coal Samples under Different Loading Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huamin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of loading rate on mechanical properties and acoustic emission characteristics of coal samples, collected from Sanjiaohe Colliery, the uniaxial compression tests are carried out under various levels of loading rates, including 0.001 mm/s, 0.002 mm/s, and 0.005 mm/s, respectively, using AE-win E1.86 acoustic emission instrument and RMT-150C rock mechanics test system. The results indicate that the loading rate has a strong impact on peak stress and peak strain of coal samples, but the effect of loading rate on elasticity modulus of coal samples is relatively small. When the loading rate increases from 0.001 mm/s to 0.002 mm/s, the peak stress increases from 22.67 MPa to 24.99 MPa, the incremental percentage is 10.23%, and under the same condition the peak strain increases from 0.006191 to 0.007411 and the incremental percentage is 19.71%. Similarly, when the loading rate increases from 0.002 mm/s to 0.005 mm/s, the peak stress increases from 24.99 MPa to 28.01 MPa, the incremental percentage is 12.08%, the peak strain increases from 0.007411 to 0.008203, and the incremental percentage is 10.69%. The relationship between acoustic emission and loading rate presents a positive correlation, and the negative correlation relation has been determined between acoustic emission cumulative counts and loading rate during the rupture process of coal samples.

  14. Fatigue Damage Monitoring in 304L Steel Specimens by an Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ould-Amer Ammar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to clarify fatigue crack initiation and propagation mechanisms in 304L austenitic stainless steel under different total-strain-amplitudes. A complete process from crack initiation and propagation was recorded by using the acoustic emission method in one hand, and replica method in another hand. The effect of strain amplitude on fatigue crack growth was investigated and a new representation of various fatigue curves associated to various levels of fatigue damage is proposed.

  15. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Kevlar Composite Over Wrapped Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurization and failure tests of small Kevlar/epoxy COPV bottles were conducted during 2006 and 2007 by Texas Research Institute Austin, Inc., at TRI facilities. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. Results of some of the tests indicate a possibility that AE can be used to track the stress-rupture degradation of COPV vessels.

  16. Acoustic emission characteristics on microscopic damage behavior of carbon fiber sheet reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun

    2002-05-01

    In this study, a three-point bend test has been carried out to understand the damage progress and the micro-failure mechanism of carbon fiber sheet (CFS) reinforced concretes. For these purposes, four kinds of specimens were used; unreinforced concrete, steel bar reinforced concrete, CFS reinforced concrete, and concrete reinforced by both steel bar and CFS. Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was used to evaluate the characteristics of damage progress and the failure mechanism of the specimens.

  17. Measuring sound absorption: considerations on the measurement of the active acoustic power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, E.R.; Wijnant, Y.H.; Boer, de A.

    2014-01-01

    Using a local plane wave assumption, one can determine the normal incidence sound absorption coefficient of a surface by measuring the acoustic pressure and the particle velocity normal to that surface. As the measurement surface lies in front of the material surface, the measured active and inciden

  18. Soil emissivity and reflectance spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrino, Jose A.; Mattar, Cristian; Pardo, Pablo; Jimenez-Munoz, Juan C.; Hook, Simon J.; Baldridge, Alice; Ibanez, Rafael

    2009-07-01

    We present an analysis of the laboratory reflectance and emissivity spectra of 11 soil samples collected on different field campaigns carried out over a diverse suite of test sites in Europe, North Africa, and South America from 2002 to 2008. Hemispherical reflectance spectra were measured from 2.0 to 14 {mu}m with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) was used to determine the mineralogical phases of the soil samples. Emissivity spectra were obtained from the hemispherical reflectance measurements using Kirchhoff's law and compared with in situ radiance measurements obtained with a CIMEL Electronique CE312-2 thermal radiometer and converted to emissivity using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. The CIMEL has five narrow bands at approximately the same positions as the ASTER. Results show a root mean square error typically below 0.015 between laboratory emissivity measurements and emissivity measurements derived from the field radiometer.

  19. Classification Identification of Acoustic Emission Signals from Underground Metal Mine Rock by ICIMF Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Zuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the drawback that fuzzy classifier was sensitive to noises and outliers, Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm was developed, in which bilateral Gaussian membership function parameters were set as constraint conditions and the indexes of fuzzy classification effectiveness and number of correct samples of fuzzy classification as the subgoal of fitness function. Moreover, Iris database was used for simulation experiment, classification, and recognition of acoustic emission signals and interference signals from stope wall rock of underground metal mines. The results showed that Mamdani fuzzy classifier based on improved chaos immune algorithm could effectively improve the prediction accuracy of classification of data sets with noises and outliers and the classification accuracy of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines was 90.00%. It was obvious that the improved chaos immune Mamdani fuzzy (ICIMF classifier was useful for accurate diagnosis of acoustic emission signal and interference signal from stope wall rock of underground metal mines.

  20. Health monitoring of Ceramic Matrix Composites from waveform-based analysis of Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maillet Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs are anticipated for use in the hot section of aircraft engines. Their implementation requires the understanding of the various damage modes that are involved and their relation to life expectancy. Acoustic Emission (AE has been shown to be an efficient technique for monitoring damage evolution in CMCs. However, only a waveform-based analysis of AE can offer the possibility to validate and precisely examine the recorded AE data with a view to damage localization and identification. The present work fully integrates wave initiation, propagation and acquisition in the analysis of Acoustic Emission waveforms recorded at various sensors, therefore providing more reliable information to assess the relation between Acoustic Emission and damage modes. The procedure allows selecting AE events originating from damage, accurate determination of their location as well as the characterization of effects of propagation on the recorded waveforms. This approach was developed using AE data recorded during tensile tests on carbon/carbon composites. It was then applied to melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC composites.

  1. Acoustic Emission Technique, an Overview as a Characterization Tool in Materials Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Ríos-Soberanis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the mechanical behavior of a composite during its service life, it is important to evaluate its mechanical response under different types of external stresses by studying the initiation and development of cracks and the effects induced by damage and degradation. The onset of damage is related to the structural integrity of the component and its fatigue life. For this, among other reasons, non-destructive techniques such as acoustic emission(AE have been widely used nowadays for composite materials haracterization. This method has demonstrated excellent results on detecting and identifying initiations sites, cracking propagation and fracture mechanisms of polymer matrix composite and ceramic materials. This paper focuses on commenting the importance of the acoustic emission technique as a unique tool for characterizing mechanical parameters in response to external stresses and degradation processes by reviewing previous investigations carried out by the author as participant. Acoustic emission was employed to monitor the micro-failure mechanisms in composites in relation to the stress level in real-time during the tests carried out. Some results obtained from different analysis are discussed to support the significance of using AE, technique that will be increasingly employed in the composite materials field due to its several lternatives for understanding the mechanical behavior; therefore, the objective of this manuscript is to involve the benefits andadvantages of AE in the characterization of materials.

  2. An Approach to Acoustic Emission Technique Applications to Evaluate Damage Mechanisms in Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rios-Soberanis C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission technique is a versatile method for characterization in materials science. It is considered to be a “passive” non-destructive method since damage can be only evaluated when de defects are being developed during the test which, at the end of the day, it is considered an advantage because failure mechanisms and damage process can be monitored and identified during the load history. When a failure mechanism is activated due to a discontinuity in the material such as crack propagation, part of the total strain energy is dissipated as an elastic waves that propagate from the damage source through the medium. Therefore, this released energy can be detected by piezoelectric sensors that perceive the emitted signal from the damage notation site by the surface dynamic movement and convert it in an electrical response. Acoustic emission signals can be correlated with the onset of damage process occurring in the tested materials and also to de diverse failure mechanisms such as matrix cracking, interface damage, fiber fracture, etc. This paper proposes to discuss our information and results on acoustic emission materials characterization undertaken on different types of materials.

  3. Research on acoustic emission in-service inspection for large above-ground storage tank floors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingchun Lin; Yewei Kang; Min Xiong; Juan Zheng; Dongjie Tan [Petrochina Pipeline R and Center, Langfang (China)

    2009-07-01

    Much manpower is needed and a lot of materials are wasted when the floor of large above-ground storage tank (AST) is inspected with conventional methods which need to shut down the tank, then to empty and clean it before inspection. Due to the disadvantages of that, an in-service inspection method using acoustic emission (AE) technology is presented. By this mean the rational inspection plan and integrity evaluation of tank floors can be constructed. First, specific inspection steps are established based on the acoustic emission principle for large AST's floors and the practical condition of AST in order to acquire the AE corrosion data. Second, analysis method of acoustic emission dataset is studied. Finally, maintenance proposes are provided based on results of analysis for the corrosion status of the tank floors. In order to evaluate the performance of our method, an in-service field inspection is practiced on product oil tank with a volume of 5000 cubic meters. Then a traditional inspection procedure using magnetic flux leakage (MFL) technology is followed up. Comparative analysis of the results of the two inspection methods shows that there is consistency in localizing the position of corrosion between them. The feasibility of in-service inspection of AST's floors with AE is demonstrated. (author)

  4. Nonlinear Kalman Filtering for acoustic emission source localization in anisotropic panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan Niri, E; Farhidzadeh, A; Salamone, S

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear Kalman Filtering is an established field in applied probability and control systems, which plays an important role in many practical applications from target tracking to weather and climate prediction. However, its application for acoustic emission (AE) source localization has been very limited. In this paper, two well-known nonlinear Kalman Filtering algorithms are presented to estimate the location of AE sources in anisotropic panels: the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). These algorithms are applied to two cases: velocity profile known (CASE I) and velocity profile unknown (CASE II). The algorithms are compared with a more traditional nonlinear least squares method. Experimental tests are carried out on a carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel instrumented with a sparse array of piezoelectric transducers to validate the proposed approaches. AE sources are simulated using an instrumented miniature impulse hammer. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithms, two metrics are used: (1) accuracy of the AE source localization and (2) computational cost. Furthermore, it is shown that both EKF and UKF can provide a confidence interval of the estimated AE source location and can account for uncertainty in time of flight measurements.

  5. Toward a probabilistic acoustic emission source location algorithm: A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Thomas; Straub, Daniel; Higgins, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) are stress waves initiated by sudden strain releases within a solid body. These can be caused by internal mechanisms such as crack opening or propagation, crushing, or rubbing of crack surfaces. One application for the AE technique in the field of Structural Engineering is Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). With piezo-electric sensors mounted to the surface of the structure, stress waves can be detected, recorded, and stored for later analysis. An important step in quantitative AE analysis is the estimation of the stress wave source locations. Commonly, source location results are presented in a rather deterministic manner as spatial and temporal points, excluding information about uncertainties and errors. Due to variability in the material properties and uncertainty in the mathematical model, measures of uncertainty are needed beyond best-fit point solutions for source locations. This paper introduces a novel holistic framework for the development of a probabilistic source location algorithm. Bayesian analysis methods with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation are employed where all source location parameters are described with posterior probability density functions (PDFs). The proposed methodology is applied to an example employing data collected from a realistic section of a reinforced concrete bridge column. The selected approach is general and has the advantage that it can be extended and refined efficiently. Results are discussed and future steps to improve the algorithm are suggested.

  6. Determination of Initial Crack Strength of Silicon Die Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Chi; Su, Yen-Fu; Yang, Shin-Yueh; Liang, Steven Y.; Chiang, Kuo-Ning

    2015-07-01

    The current market demand for high-efficiency, high-performance, small-sized electronic products has focused attention on the use of three-dimensional (3D) integrated circuits (IC) in the design of electronic packaging. Silicon wafers can be ground and polished to reduce their thickness and increase the chip stacking density. However, microcracks can result from the thinning and stacking process or during use of an electronic device over time; therefore, estimation of the cracking strength is an important issue in 3D IC packaging. This research combined the ball breaker test (BBT) with an acoustic emission (AE) system to measure the allowable force on a silicon die. To estimate the initial crack strength of a silicon die, the BBT was combined with finite-element (FE) analysis. The AE system can detect the initial crack and the subsequent bulk failure of the silicon die individually, thus avoiding overestimation of the die strength. In addition, the results of the modified ball breaker test showed that edge chipping did not affect the silicon die strength. However, the failure force and silicon die strength were reduced as the surface roughness of the test specimen increased. Thus, surface roughness must be controlled in the BBT to prevent underestimation of the silicon die strength.

  7. Intensity of noise in the classroom and analysis of acoustic emissions in schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Filho, Nelson de

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise-induced hearing loss is a sensorineural hearing loss, usually bilateral, irreversible and progressive with time of exposure. As the noise made by children in school may be considered detrimental, the study looks of their occurrence in Taubaté's schools. Objective: To determine if students are exposed to noise intensity affecting the cochlea, define the profile of these schoolchildren, demonstrating the occurrence of changes in cochlear activity following exposure to noise in a day of class. Method: Study's way prospective transversal cross sectional cut with 28 elementary school students in the first half of 2009. Questionnaires for assessing preexisting cochlear damage . Evaluation of cochlear function by analysis of acoustic emissions evoked distortion product, made before the students come into class and immediately after the end of these. Measurement of noise inside the classrooms and recreation areas during the interval. Results: 57.1% accused some hearing loss in the examinations before class. By day's end, 04 girls and 03 boys had worsened in relation of the first examination. The noise reached levels higher than recommended at the three class rooms. The largest number of students with worsening, belong to the class room with higher noise level. The noise during the intervals is also excessive. Conclusions: The noise in this school is above the limit. 42.85% of students who had experienced worsening had school performance inadequate. 25% had worse after noise exposure in a school day.

  8. Acoustic emission detection with fiber optical sensors for dry cask storage health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The increasing number, size, and complexity of nuclear facilities deployed worldwide are increasing the need to maintain readiness and develop innovative sensing materials to monitor important to safety structures (ITS). In the past two decades, an extensive sensor technology development has been used for structural health monitoring (SHM). Technologies for the diagnosis and prognosis of a nuclear system, such as dry cask storage system (DCSS), can improve verification of the health of the structure that can eventually reduce the likelihood of inadvertently failure of a component. Fiber optical sensors have emerged as one of the major SHM technologies developed particularly for temperature and strain measurements. This paper presents the development of optical equipment that is suitable for ultrasonic guided wave detection for active SHM in the MHz range. An experimental study of using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as acoustic emission (AE) sensors was performed on steel blocks. FBG have the advantage of being durable, lightweight, and easily embeddable into composite structures as well as being immune to electromagnetic interference and optically multiplexed. The temperature effect on the FBG sensors was also studied. A multi-channel FBG system was developed and compared with piezoelectric based AE system. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  9. Gearbox tooth cut fault diagnostics using acoustic emission and vibration sensors--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yongzhi; He, David; Yoon, Jae; Van Hecke, Brandon; Bechhoefer, Eric; Zhu, Junda

    2014-01-14

    In recent years, acoustic emission (AE) sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  10. Gearbox Tooth Cut Fault Diagnostics Using Acoustic Emission and Vibration Sensors — A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongzhi Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, acoustic emission (AE sensors and AE-based techniques have been developed and tested for gearbox fault diagnosis. In general, AE-based techniques require much higher sampling rates than vibration analysis-based techniques for gearbox fault diagnosis. Therefore, it is questionable whether an AE-based technique would give a better or at least the same performance as the vibration analysis-based techniques using the same sampling rate. To answer the question, this paper presents a comparative study for gearbox tooth damage level diagnostics using AE and vibration measurements, the first known attempt to compare the gearbox fault diagnostic performance of AE- and vibration analysis-based approaches using the same sampling rate. Partial tooth cut faults are seeded in a gearbox test rig and experimentally tested in a laboratory. Results have shown that the AE-based approach has the potential to differentiate gear tooth damage levels in comparison with the vibration-based approach. While vibration signals are easily affected by mechanical resonance, the AE signals show more stable performance.

  11. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Busca, Nicolás G; Carithers, William; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Delubac, Timothée; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Goff, J -M Le; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A; Gott, J Richard; Gunn, James E; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Ho, Shirley; Honscheid, Klaus; Howlett, Cullan; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco S; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lee, Khee-Gan; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; McBride, Cameron K; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Pâris, Isabelle; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Reid, Beth; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G; Samushia, Lado; Santos, Ricardo Tanausú Génova; Scóccola, Claudia G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin; Simmons, Audrey; Skibba, Ramin A; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Wake, David A; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; Wood-Vasey, W M; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2014-01-01

    We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data. We take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Ly-alpha forest (LyaF) in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III. BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy, and in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Combining BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a 1.7% measurement of $H_0=67.3 \\pm1.1$ km/s/Mpc. This measurement assumes standard pre-recombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat LCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For open LCDM, our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields $\\Omega_m=0.301 \\pm 0.008$ and curvature $\\Omega_k=-0.003 \\pm ...

  12. On-road particle number measurements using a portable emission measurement system (PEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallus, Jens; Kirchner, Ulf; Vogt, Rainer; Börensen, Christoph; Benter, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    In this study the on-road particle number (PN) performance of a Euro-5 direct-injection (DI) gasoline passenger car was investigated. PN emissions were measured using the prototype of a portable emission measurement system (PEMS). PN PEMS correlations with chassis dynamometer tests show a good agreement with a chassis dynamometer set-up down to emissions in the range of 1·1010 #/km. Parallel on-line soot measurements by a photo acoustic soot sensor (PASS) were applied as independent measurement technique and indicate a good on-road performance for the PN-PEMS. PN-to-soot ratios were 1.3·1012 #/mg, which was comparable for both test cell and on-road measurements. During on-road trips different driving styles as well as different road types were investigated. Comparisons to the world harmonized light-duty test cycle (WLTC) 5.3 and to European field operational test (euroFOT) data indicate the PEMS trips to be representative for normal driving. Driving situations in varying traffic seem to be a major contributor to a high test-to-test variability of PN emissions. However, there is a trend to increasing PN emissions with more severe driving styles. A cold start effect is clearly visible for PN, especially at low ambient temperatures down to 8 °C.

  13. Multi reflection of Lamb wave emission in an acoustic waveguide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-02-27

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid-liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  14. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonhard Michael Reindl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  15. Measurement of stiffness of standing trees and felled logs using acoustics: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Mathew; Bradley, Stuart

    2016-02-01

    This paper provides a review on the use of acoustics to measure stiffness of standing trees, stems, and logs. An outline is given of the properties of wood and how these are related to stiffness and acoustic velocity throughout the tree. Factors are described that influence the speed of sound in wood, including the different types of acoustic waves which propagate in tree stems and lumber. Acoustic tools and techniques that have been used to measure the stiffness of wood are reviewed. The reasons for a systematic difference between direct and acoustic measurements of stiffness for standing trees, and methods for correction, are discussed. Other techniques, which have been used in addition to acoustics to try to improve stiffness measurements, are also briefly described. Also reviewed are studies which have used acoustic tools to investigate factors that influence the stiffness of trees. These factors include different silvicultural practices, geographic and environmental conditions, and genetics.

  16. Two-temperature method for measuring emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    Spectral emissivity can be uniquely determined from radiance measurements if the object can be observed at two different temperatures. The advantage of this approach is that the spectral emissivity is determined without a priori assumptions about spectral shape. Because the different temperatures are obtained by observing the scene at two times in the diurnal cycle (optimally after midday and midnight), the method assumes that emissivity is temporally invariant. This is valid for rocks and dry soils, not well established for vegetation, and not true when changes in soil moisture occur between the measurements. Accurate image registration and satisfactory signal:noise are critical factors that limit extensive use of this method. ?? 1992.

  17. Relationship between electromagnetic and acoustic emissions during plastic deformation of gamma-irradiated LiF monocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjicontis, V.; Mavromatou, C.; Mastrogiannis, D. [Department of Solid State Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, TK 157 84, Athens (Greece); Antsygina, T. N.; Chishko, K. A. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, 47 Lenin Ave., 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2011-07-15

    Simultaneous measurements of acoustic emissions (AE) and electromagnetic emissions (EME) during plastic deformation and destruction under uniaxial compression along <001> direction are made on LiF monocrystals after gamma irradiation by {sup 60}Co source. The irradiation doses are 1, 2, and 10 Mrad. The EME measurements in the radio-frequency range are carried out using two types of electromagnetic sensors: (i) a simple electrical stub antenna and (ii) a toroidal inductance coil. Two checking experiments on unirradiated crystals are performed as the starting point to discover the effect of gamma irradiation on acoustic and electromagnetic emissive ability of plastically deformed ionic crystals. Unirradiated LiF monocrystals demonstrate high-intensive EME at easy glide and work hardening stages, as well as at the fracture during destruction of the sample. At radiation doses more than {approx}1 Mrad, in the active loading stage the EME of LiF monocrystals vanishes, except few individual electromagnetic pulses (only at 1 and 2 Mrad doses), which are time correlated with well-defined drop-jumps on the loading diagram and therefore can be associated with macroscopic crack openings. Moderate electromagnetic activity in irradiated crystals occurs only in the final stage of deformation at the complete fracture of the sample. Thus, after gamma irradiation the formation of polarization currents due to dynamic interaction between charged vacancies and moving dislocations is suppressed, and only EME connected with the redistribution of the free charge on the crack branches is observed. Acoustic emission diagrams of low-irradiated LiF are typical for the work hardening stage in crystals containing a great amount of strong point stoppers. At larger irradiation doses the AE diagram displays quite different behavior at low- and high-loading regions with a sharp boundary between them. The low-loading region shows poor AE activity, which changes sharply into high-active burst

  18. Utilization of old vibro-acoustic measuring equipment to grasp basic concepts of vibration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darula, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to show that even old vibro-acoustic (analog) equipment can be used as a very suitable teaching equipment to grasp basic principles of measurements in an era, when measurement equipments are more-or-less treated as ‘black-boxes’, i.e. the user cannot see directly how...

  19. 一种新的声发射时差定位方法%A New Location Method for Acoustic Emission TDOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于洋; 王赛

    2015-01-01

    基于声发射信号具有与语音信号相似的非线性和非平稳性的特点,结合语音信号端点检测原理,将谱熵能量积引入声发射信号到达时间的测量中,以此计算出声发射信号的到达时间,进而由时差计算声发射源的位置. 在实验中,构造声发射源面定位实验,并通过数学方法消除速度参量,使定位结果仅与到达时间有直接关系. 以此计算声发射源坐标,该方法有效提高了定位精度,其中相对定位误差最大为2 .49%.%Basing on acoustic emission signals' nonlinearity and non-stationary characteristics similar to the voice signals and combining with the principle of voice signals' endpoint detection, the spectral entropy-energy product was introduced into TDOA measurement of the acoustic emission signals to locate the acoustic emission source.Under laboratory conditions, locating the acoustic emission source ' s line orientation and eliminating the velocity parameters through mathematical methods can make the location result only relating to the arrival time and the acoustic emission source coordinate can be determined.This method can effectively improve the location accuracy along with the maximum relative positioning error of 2.49%.

  20. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  1. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Wen Kuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. However, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small- and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  2. Acoustic measurements of models of military style supersonic nozzle jets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Wen Kuo; Jérémy Veltin; Dennis K. McLaughlin

    2014-01-01

    Modern military aircraft jet engines are designed with variable-geometry nozzles to provide optimal thrust in different operating conditions, depending on the flight envelope. How-ever, acoustic measurements for such nozzles are scarce, due to the cost involved in making full-scale measurements and the lack of details about the exact geometries of these nozzles. Thus the present effort at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in partnership with GE Aviation and the NASA Glenn Research Center is aiming to study and characterize the acoustic field produced by supersonic jets issuing from converging-diverging military style nozzles, and to identify and test promising noise reduction techniques. An equally important objective is to develop methodology for using data obtained from small-and moderate-scale experiments to reliably predict the full-scale engine noise. The experimental results presented show reasonable agreement between small-scale and medium-scale jets, as well as between heated jets and heat-simulated ones.

  3. Acoustic Emission Based Surveillance System for Prediction of Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    material were changed to polished Delrin and the sample was secured at support blocks with orthodontic elastics the compounding noise coming from contacts...rapid and concluded in failure (Phase III in Fig. 2B). Fig. 1- Three-point bending setup: Samples were held on the bottom supports with orthodontic ...extensometer was used to measure the displacement (Epsilon Tech. Corp.). Data secured from the mechanical testing system was processed to extract

  4. Navy Vehicles: Acoustic Emission Related to Nondestructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-12

    High-Temperature Deformation," Gordon Conference on Physical Metalurgy , Plymouth, New Hampshire, 20-25 June 1983. (Invited) 28. Ono, K., Imai, K...State, and ZIP Code) Physics Division Code 1112 Arlington, VA 22217-5000 9. PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER N00014-81-K0011 10...measurement and (2) characterization of AE signals and correlation of the characteristics with physical causes. We have contributed significant

  5. Extruded Bread Classification on the Basis of Acoustic Emission Signal With Application of Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świetlicka, Izabela; Muszyński, Siemowit; Marzec, Agata

    2015-04-01

    The presented work covers the problem of developing a method of extruded bread classification with the application of artificial neural networks. Extruded flat graham, corn, and rye breads differening in water activity were used. The breads were subjected to the compression test with simultaneous registration of acoustic signal. The amplitude-time records were analyzed both in time and frequency domains. Acoustic emission signal parameters: single energy, counts, amplitude, and duration acoustic emission were determined for the breads in four water activities: initial (0.362 for rye, 0.377 for corn, and 0.371 for graham bread), 0.432, 0.529, and 0.648. For classification and the clustering process, radial basis function, and self-organizing maps (Kohonen network) were used. Artificial neural networks were examined with respect to their ability to classify or to cluster samples according to the bread type, water activity value, and both of them. The best examination results were achieved by the radial basis function network in classification according to water activity (88%), while the self-organizing maps network yielded 81% during bread type clustering.

  6. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests.

  7. An ex vivo study of the correlation between acoustic emission and microvascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Stanley; Cooper, Michol A; Bull, Joseph L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Miller, Douglas L

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an ex vivo examination of correlation between acoustic emission and tissue damage. Intravital microscopy was employed in conjunction with ultrasound exposure in cremaster muscle of male Wistar rats. Definity microbubbles were administered intravenously through the tail vein (80microL.kg(-1).min(-1)infusion rate) with the aid of a syringe pump. For the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) study, exposures were performed at four locations of the cremaster at a PRF of 1000, 500, 100 and 10Hz (one location per PRF per rat). The 100-pulse exposures were implemented at a peak rarefactional pressure (P(r)) of 2MPa, frequency of 2.25MHz with 46 cycle pulses. For the pressure amplitude threshold study, 100-pulse exposures (46 cycle pulses) were conducted at various peak rarefactional pressures from 0.5MPa to 2MPa at a frequency of 2.25MHz and PRF of 100Hz. Photomicrographs were captured before and 2-min postexposure. On a pulse-to-pulse basis, the 10Hz acoustic emission was considerably higher and more sustained than those at other PRFs (1000, 500, and 100Hz) (pCRIPS; R(2)=0.75). No visible damage was present at P(r) or =1.0MPa and it increased with increasing acoustic pressure.

  8. A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Hongwei; YAO; Lei; ZHAO; Hong; ZHANG; Jichuan; XUE; Zhaohong

    2006-01-01

    A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials is presented.The dynamic mechanical parameters of materials are first measured by using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Apparatus(DMTA) at low frequencies,usually less than 100 Hz; then based on the Principles of Time-Temperature Super position (TTS),these parameters are extended to the frequency range that acousticians are concerned about,usually from hundreds to thousands of hertz; finally the extended dynamic mechanical parameters are transformed into acoustic parameters with the help of acoustic measurement and inverse analysis.To test the feasibility and accuracy,we measure a kind of rubber sample in DMTA and acquire the basic acoustic parameters of the sample by using this method.While applying the basic parameters to calculating characteristics of the sample in acoustic pipe,a reasonable agreement of sound absorption coefficients is obtained between the calculations and measurements in the acoustic pipe.

  9. Instrumentation Suite for Acoustic Propagation Measurements in Complex Shallow Water Environments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Obtain at-sea measurements to test theoretical and modeling predictions of acoustic propagation in dynamic, inhomogeneous, and nonisotropic shallow water...

  10. Supersonic Relative Velocity Effect on the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul; Seljak, Uros

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of supersonic relative velocities between baryons and dark matter, recently shown to arise generically at high redshift, on baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at low redshift. The amplitude of the relative velocity effect at low redshift is model-dependent, but can be parameterized by using an unknown bias. We find that if unaccounted, the relative velocity effect can shift the BAO peak position and bias estimates of the dark energy equation-of-state due to its non-smooth, out-of-phase oscillation structure around the BAO scale. Fortunately, the relative velocity effect can be easily modeled in constraining cosmological parameters without substantially inflating the error budget. We also demonstrate that the presence of the relative velocity effect gives rise to a unique signature in the galaxy bispectrum, which can be utilized to isolate this effect. Future dark energy surveys can accurately measure the relative velocity effect and subtract it from the power spectrum a...

  11. Online monitoring of Accessories for Underground Electrical Installations through Acoustics Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casals-Torrens P.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic waves caused by Partial Discharges inside the dielectric materials, can be detected by acoustic emission (AE sensors and analyzed in the time domain. The experimental results presented, show the online detection capability of these sensors in the environment near a cable accessory, such as a splice or terminal. The AE sensors are immune to electromagnetic interference and constitute a detection method non-intrusive and non-destructive, which ensures a galvanic decoupling with respect to electric networks, this technique of partial discharge detection can be applied as a test method for preventive or predictive maintenance (condition-based maintenance to equipments or facilities of medium and high voltage in service and represents an alternative method to electrical detection systems, conventional or not, that continue to rely on the detection of current pulses. This paper presents characterization tests of the sensors AE through comparative tests of partial discharge on accessories for underground power cables.

  12. Separating medial olivocochlear from acoustic reflex effects on transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in unanesthetized mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingyue; Cheatham, Mary Ann; Siegel, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Descending neural pathways in the mammalian auditory system are believed to modulate the function of the peripheral auditory system [3, 8, 10]. These pathways include the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent innervation to the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) and the acoustic reflex pathways mediating middle ear muscle (MEM) contractions. The MOC effects can be monitored noninvasively using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) [5, 6], which are acoustic byproducts of cochlear function [7]. In this study, we applied a sensitive method to determine when and to what degree contralateral MEM suppression contaminated MOC efferent effects on TEOAEs in unanesthetized mice. The lowest contralateral broadband noise evoking MEM contractions varied across animals. Examples of potential MOC-mediated TEOAE suppression with contralateral noise below MEM contraction thresholds were seen, but this behavior did not occur in the majority of cases.

  13. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Weiß, Matthias; Reichert, Thorsten; Finley, Jonathan J; Wixforth, Achim; Kaniber, Michael; Krenner, Hubert J

    2016-01-01

    A coupled quantum dot--nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a $f_{\\rm SAW}\\simeq800\\,\\mathrm{MHz}$ surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function $g^{(2)}$. All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of $g^{(2)}$, demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system. The implemented scheme can be directly extended to strongly coupled systems and acoustically drives non-adiabatic entangling quantum gates based on Landau-Zener transitions.

  14. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  15. Acoustic measurements above a plate carrying Lamb waves

    CERN Document Server

    Talberg, Andreas Sørbrøden

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a set of acoustic measurements conducted on the Statoil funded Behind Casing Logging Set-Up, designed by SINTEF Petroleum Research to resemble an oil well casing. A set of simple simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics were also conducted and the results compared with the measurements. The experiments consists of measuring the pressure wave radiated of a set of Lamb waves propagating in a 3 mm thick steel plate, using the so called pitch-catch method. The Lamb waves were excited by a broadband piezoelectric immersion transducer with center frequency of 1 MHz. Through measurements and analysis the group velocity of the fastest mode in the plate was found to be 3138.5 m/s. Measuring the wave radiated into the water in a grid consisting of 8x33 measuring points, the spreading of the plate wave normal to the direction of propagation was investigated. Comparing the point where the amplitude had decreased 50 % relative to the amplitude measured at the axis pointing straight forward from the tran...

  16. Field scale measurements of NH3 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Ammann, Christof; Kuhn, Uwe; Sintermann, Jörg; Lehuger, Simon; Gärtner, Andrea; Hirschberger, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    The uncertainty in the ammonia emissions after application of organic manure contributes to a large extent to the overall uncertainties of the nitrogen budget of managed grassland systems (Ammann et al., 2009). Due to the sticky nature of the ammonia molecule and the variability of the emission fluxes the experimental determination is still a major challenge and a wide spread range of emission factors can be found in the literature. We report on two field experiments performed in August 2009 at the NitroEurope site in Oensingen, Switzerland. The ammonia emission flux after liquid manure application was investigated simultaneously by various micrometeorological methods: (1) a mass balance approach measuring the horizontal advection flux with open-path FTIR sensors (Gärtner et al., 2008), (2) aerodynamic gradient methods, and (3) eddy covariance measurements based on a novel fast ammonia analyser. Due to the sequential application of the manure and the fast decrease of the ammonia volatilisation, detailed footprint calculations (Neftel et al., 2008) and corrections with a high temporal resolution were crucial for obtaining representative emission fluxes. The plausibility of flux measurements has been evaluated with back trajectories simulations (WindTrax, Flesch et al., 2009). The results of all applied flux measurement methods confirmed the low emission levels found earlier by Spirig et al. (2009). A comparison of the field observations with results of process oriented models showed considerable differences in the temporal course of the ammonia emission indicating the need for improvements of the models. References: Ammann, C., Spirig, C., Leifeld, J. and Neftel, A.: Assessment of the nitrogen and carbon budget of two managed temperate grassland fields, Agric. Ecosyst. Environ., 133, 150-162, 2009. Flesch, T.K., Harper, L.A., Desjardins, R.L., Gao, Z., and Crenna, B.: Multi-Source Emission Determination Using an Inverse-Dispersion Technique. Boundary-Layer Meteorol

  17. Prediction and Measurement of the Vibration and Acoustic Radiation of Panels Subjected to Acoustic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Interior noise and sonic fatigue are important issues in the development and design of advanced subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Conventional aircraft typically employ passive treatments, such as constrained layer damping and acoustic absorption materials, to reduce the structural response and resulting acoustic levels in the aircraft interior. These techniques require significant addition of mass and only attenuate relatively high frequency noise transmitted through the fuselage. Although structural acoustic coupling is in general very important in the study of aircraft fuselage interior noise, analysis of noise transmission through a panel supported in an infinite rigid baffle (separating two semi-infinite acoustic domains) can be useful in evaluating the effects of active/adaptive materials, complex loading, etc. Recent work has been aimed at developing adaptive and/or active methods of controlling the structural acoustic response of panels to reduce the transmitted noise1. A finite element formulation was recently developed to study the dynamic response of shape memory alloy (SMA) hybrid composite panels (conventional composite panel with embedded SMA fibers) subject to combined acoustic and thermal loads2. Further analysis has been performed to predict the far-field acoustic radiation using the finite element dynamic panel response prediction3. The purpose of the present work is to validate the panel vibration and acoustic radiation prediction methods with baseline experimental results obtained from an isotropic panel, without the effect of SMA.

  18. Application of acoustic doppler velocimeters for streamflow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) principally has used Price AA and Price pygmy mechanical current meters for measurement of discharge. New technologies have resulted in the introduction of alternatives to the Price meters. One alternative, the FlowTracker acoustic Doppler velocimeter, was designed by SonTek/YSI to make streamflow measurements in wadeable conditions. The device measures a point velocity and can be used with standard midsection method algorithms to compute streamflow. The USGS collected 55 quality-assurance measurements with the FlowTracker at 43 different USGS streamflow-gaging stations across the United States, with mean depths from 0.05to0.67m, mean velocities from 13 to 60 cm/s, and discharges from 0.02 to 12.4m3/s. These measurements were compared with Price mechanical current meter measurements. Analysis of the comparisons shows that the FlowTracker discharges were not statistically different from the Price meter discharges at a 95% confidence level. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  19. Detection of bond failure in the anchorage zone of reinforced concrete beams via acoustic emission monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouhussien, Ahmed A.; Hassan, Assem A. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) monitoring was utilised to identify the onset of bond failure in reinforced concrete beams. Beam anchorage specimens were designed and tested to fail in bond in the anchorage zone. The specimens included four 250 × 250 × 1500 mm beams with four variable bonded lengths (100, 200, 300, and 400 mm). Meanwhile, an additional 250 × 250 × 2440 mm beam, with 200 mm bonded length, was tested to investigate the influence of sensor location on the identification of bond damage. All beams were tested under four-point loading setup and continuously monitored using three distributed AE sensors. These attached sensors were exploited to record AE signals resulting from both cracking and bond deterioration until failure. The variations in the number of AE hits and cumulative signal strength (CSS) versus test time were evaluated to achieve early detection of crack growth and bar slippage. In addition, AE intensity analysis was performed on signal strength of collected AE signals to develop two additional parameters: historic index (H (t)) and severity (S r). The analysis of these AE parameters enabled an early detection of both first cracks (at almost the mid-span of the beam) and bar slip in either of the anchorage zones at the beams’ end before their visual observation, regardless of sensor location. The results also demonstrated a clear correlation between the damage level in terms of crack development/measured free end bar slip and AE parameters (number of hits, CSS, H(t), and S r).

  20. Surface Acoustic Wave Vibration Sensors for Measuring Aircraft Flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Under NASA's Advanced Air Vehicles Program the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is investigating flutter effects on aeroelastic wings. To support that work a new method for measuring vibrations due to flutter has been developed. The method employs low power Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors. To demonstrate the ability of the SAW sensor to detect flutter vibrations the sensors were attached to a Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel which was vibrated at six frequencies from 1Hz to 50Hz. The SAW data was compared to accelerometer data and was found to resemble sine waves and match each other closely. The SAW module design and results from the tests are presented here.

  1. Precise measurement technique for the stable acoustic cavitation bubble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei; CHEN Weizhong; LIU Yanan; GAO Xianxian; JIANG Lian; XU Junfeng; ZHU Yifei

    2005-01-01

    Based on the periodic oscillation of the stable acoustic cavitation bubble, we present a precise measurement technique for the bubble evolution. This technique comprises the lighting engineering of pulsing laser beam whose phase can be digitally shifted, and the long distance microphotographics. We used a laser, an acousto-optic modulator, a pulse generator, and a long distance microscope. The evolution of a levitated bubble can be directly shown by a series of bubble's images at different phases. Numerical simulation in the framework of the Rayleigh-Plesset bubble dynamics well supported the experimental result, and the ambient radius of the bubble, an important parameter related to the mass of the gas inside the bubble, was obtained at the same time.

  2. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  3. Measurement of the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter for Biological Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Wesley Nelson

    In vitro measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter are presented for several biological media. With these measurements it is possible to predict the distortion of a finite amplitude wave in biological tissues of current diagnostic and research interest. The measurement method is based on the finite amplitude distortion of a sine wave that is emmitted by a piston source. The growth of the second harmonic component of this wave is measured by a piston receiver which is coaxial with and has the same size as the source. The experimental measurements and theory are compared in order to determine the nonlinearity parameter. The density, sound speed, and attenuation for the medium are determined in order to make this comparison. The theory developed for this study accounts for the influence of both diffraction and attenuation on the experimental measurements. The effects of dispersion, tissue inhomogeneity and gas bubbles within the excised tissues are studied. To test the measurement method, experimental results are compared with established values for the nonlinearity parameter of distilled water, ethylene glycol and glycerol. The agreement between these values suggests that the measurement uncertainty is (+OR-) 5% for liquids and (+OR-) 10% for solid tissues. Measurements are presented for dog blood and bovine serum albumen as a function of concentration. The nonlinearity parameters for liver, kidney and spleen are reported for both human and canine tissues. The values for the fresh tissues displayed little variation (6.8 to 7.8). Measurements for fixed, normal and cirrhotic tissues indicated that the nonlinearity parameter does not depend strongly on pathology. However, the values for fixed tissues were somewhat higher than those of the fresh tissues.

  4. Mechanical degradation of cross-ply laminates monitored by acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paipetis, A.; Xyrafa, M.; Barkoula, N. M.; Matikas, T. E.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2011-04-01

    This study deals with the investigation of cross ply composites failure by acoustic emission (AE). Broadband AE sensors monitor the different sources of failure in coupons of this material during a tensile loading-unloading test. The cumulative number of AE activity, and other qualitative indices based on the shape of the waves, were well correlated to the sustained load. AE parameters indicate the shift of failure mechanisms within the composite as the load increases. The ultimate goal is a methodology based on NDT techniques for real time characterization of the degradation and identification of the fracture stage of advanced composite materials.

  5. Couple analyzing the acoustic emission characters from hard composite rock fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingping Lai; Linhai Wang; Meifeng Cai

    2004-01-01

    Rock mass is fractured media. Its fracture is a nonlinear process. The accumulation of acoustic emission (AE) is closely related to the degree of damage. The dynamics problem is simply described based on the non-equilibrium statistical theory of crack evolvement, trying to use the hybrid analysis of the statistical theory and scan electron microscopy (SEM), the characters of AE sig nals from rock damage in a mined-out area is synthetically analyzed and evaluated. These provide an evidence to reverse deduce and accurately infer the position of rock fracture for dynamical hazard control.

  6. Time reverse modeling of acoustic emissions in a reinforced concrete beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocur, Georg Karl; Saenger, Erik H; Grosse, Christian U; Vogel, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The time reverse modeling (TRM) is applied for signal-based acoustic emission (AE) analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. TRM uses signals obtained from physical experiments as input. The signals are re-emitted numerically into a structure in a time-reversed manner, where the wavefronts interfere and appear as dominant concentrations of energy at the origin of the AE. The experimental and numerical results presented for selected AE signals confirm that TRM is capable of localizing AE activity in RC caused by concrete cracking. The accuracy of the TRM results is corroborated by three-dimensional crack distributions obtained from X-ray computed tomography images.

  7. Damage accumulation in cyclically-loaded glass-ceramic matrix composites monitored by acoustic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, D G; Dassios, K G; Kordatos, E Z; Matikas, T E

    2013-01-01

    Barium osumilite (BMAS) ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE) sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  8. Damage Accumulation in Cyclically-Loaded Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites Monitored by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Aggelis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium osumilite (BMAS ceramic matrix composites reinforced with SiC-Tyranno fibers are tested in a cyclic loading protocol. Broadband acoustic emission (AE sensors are used for monitoring the occurrence of different possible damage mechanisms. Improved use of AE indices is proposed by excluding low-severity signals based on waveform parameters, rather than only threshold criteria. The application of such improvements enhances the accuracy of the indices as accumulated damage descriptors. RA-value, duration, and signal energy follow the extension cycles indicating moments of maximum or minimum strain, while the frequency content of the AE signals proves very sensitive to the pull-out mechanism.

  9. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  10. Deconvolution of acoustic emissions for source localization using time reverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocur, Georg Karl

    2017-01-01

    Impact experiments on small-scale slabs made of concrete and aluminum were carried out. Wave motion radiated from the epicenter of the impact was recorded as voltage signals by resonant piezoelectric transducers. Numerical simulations of the elastic wave propagation are performed to simulate the physical experiments. The Hertz theory of contact is applied to estimate the force impulse, which is subsequently used for the numerical simulation. Displacements at the transducer positions are calculated numerically. A deconvolution function is obtained by comparing the physical (voltage signal) and the numerical (calculated displacement) experiments. Acoustic emission signals due to pencil-lead breaks are recorded, deconvolved and applied for localization using time reverse modeling.

  11. Quantitative Acoustic Emission Fatigue Crack Characterization in Structural Steel and Weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adutwum Marfo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue crack growth characteristics of structural steel and weld connections are analyzed using quantitative acoustic emission (AE technique. This was experimentally investigated by three-point bending testing of specimens under low cycle constant amplitude loading using the wavelet packet analysis. The crack growth sequence, that is, initiation, crack propagation, and fracture, is extracted from their corresponding frequency feature bands, respectively. The results obtained proved to be superior to qualitative AE analysis and the traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics for fatigue crack characterization in structural steel and welds.

  12. Evaluating Acoustic Emission Signals as an in situ process monitoring technique for Selective Laser Melting (SLM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Karl A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, Jim V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guss, Gabe [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mathews, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-14

    In situ real-time monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process has significant implications for the AM community. The ability to adjust the SLM process parameters during a build (in real-time) can save time, money and eliminate expensive material waste. Having a feedback loop in the process would allow the system to potentially ‘fix’ problem regions before a next powder layer is added. In this study we have investigated acoustic emission (AE) phenomena generated during the SLM process, and evaluated the results in terms of a single process parameter, of an in situ process monitoring technique.

  13. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Girard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  14. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Girard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a custom acoustic emission (AE monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  15. Acoustic measurements of F-16 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-16 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-16 aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-16 aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB, but were increased over that measured during ground run up. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment.

  16. Damage characterization of thermal barrier coatings by acoustic emission and thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nies, Daniel; Rehmer, Birgit; Skrotzki, Birgit [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Vassen, Robert [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Thermal barrier coatings allow increasing the operating temperature and efficiency of land-, sea-, or air-based turbines. As failure of the coating may result in serious damage of the turbine, reliable estimation of its lifetime is essential. To assess the lifetime, cyclic tests are conceived to combine thermal loading by heating the surface of the coating with laser irradiation and nondestructive methods for damage determination. Using laser irradiation allows a high reproducibility of the thermal load. The temperature of the sample surface during thermal loading is determined by an infrared-camera which also enables the possibility to detect damage in the coating via thermography. Additionally, four acoustic sensors, attached to the experimental setup, are used to detect damage in the sample and determine the source of acoustic events. Results of acoustic emission correlate well with thermographic images that visualize the formation and evolution of damage through delaminations in the samples. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Acoustic emission generated during the gas sorption-desorption process in coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yankun; Wang Enyuan; Xiao Dong; Li Zhonghui; Liu Jie; Gan Lijia

    2012-01-01

    An experimental system for monitoring the acoustic signals generated in coal during gas sorption and/or desorption was designed and the acoustic signals were observed under different gas pressures.The experimental results show that signals generated by the coal during gas adsorption are attenuated over time.Also,the signals are not continuous but are impulsive.The intensity of the signals generated during gas desorption is far smaller than that observed during adsorption.The signal seen during desorption remains essentially stable.Cycles of sorption and desorption cause acoustic emission signals that exhibit a memory effect,which depends upon the maximum gas pressure the sample was exposed to in earlier cycles.Lower pressures in subsequent cycles,compared to the maximum adsorption pressure in previous cycles,cause both the energy and impulse frequency to be lower than previously.On the contrary,a gas adsorption pressure that exceeds the maximum pressure seen by the sample during earlier cycles causes both the energy and impulse frequency to be high.

  18. Postoperative improvement in acoustic rhinometry measurements after septoplasty correlates with long-term satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, N M; Frisch, Thomas; von Buchwald, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Not much is known about long-term satisfaction of septoplasty. Our goal was to compare pre- and postoperative acoustic rhinometry measurements with satisfaction 11 years after surgery.......Not much is known about long-term satisfaction of septoplasty. Our goal was to compare pre- and postoperative acoustic rhinometry measurements with satisfaction 11 years after surgery....

  19. Modelling and Measurements of MAST Neutron Emission

    OpenAIRE

    Klimek, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of neutron emission from a fusion plasma can provide a wealth of information on the underlying temporal, spatial and energy distributions of reacting ions and how they are affected by a wide range of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) instabilities. This thesis focuses on the interpretation of the experimental measurements recorded by neutron flux monitors with and without spectroscopic capabilities installed on the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST). In particular, the temporally and...

  20. Early shell crack detection technique using acoustic emission energy parameter blast furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Sang Bum [RECTUSON Co.,Ltd., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Dong Myung; Yang, Bo Suk [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Blast furnaces are crucial equipment for steel production. A typical furnace risks unexpected accidents caused by contraction and expansion of the walls under an environment of high temperature and pressure. In this study, an acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system was tested for evaluating the large-scale structural health of a blast furnace. Based on the growth of shell cracks with the emission of high energy levels, severe damage can be detected by monitoring increases in the AE energy parameter. Using this monitoring system, steel mill operators can establish a maintenance period, in which actual shell cracks can be verified by cross-checking the UT. From this study, we expect that AE systems permit early fault detection for structural health monitoring by establishing evaluation criteria based on the severity of shell cracking.

  1. An acoustic emission study of cutting bauxite refractory ceramics by abrasive water jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momber, A. W.; Mohan, R. S.; Kovacevic, R.

    1999-08-01

    This article discusses the material removal process in bauxite refractory ceramics cut by abrasive water jets. Several parameters of the process were changed during the experiments. The experiments were monitored online by the acoustic emission (AE) technique. It was found that AE signals are able to sense the material removal process as well as the machining performances very reliably. Unsteady material removal mode consisting of matrix removal and intergranular fracture was very well represented in the AE signals by an unsteady time dependent signal type characterized by burst emissions and a frequency domain signal associated with a twin-peak shape. The particular characteristics of the signal depend on the energy involved in the process.

  2. Monitoring of the production quality of fibre-reinforced pressure vessels using acoustic emission testing; Ueberwachung der Fertigungsqualitaet von Faserverbund-Druckbehaeltern mittels Schallemissionspruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffner, Eric; Gregor, Christian; Bohse, Juergen [BAM Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The investigation aimed at the validation of a test method for ensuring the production quality of reinforced-fibre pressure vessels in real fabrication conditions. The method is based on characteristics and permissible limiting values derived from acoustic emission curves during the first pressure test. The method had already been tested successfully on reinforced-fibre pressure vessels with metal liners and had been patented. With the current investigations, the possibility of detection fabrication defects in carbon fibre / glass fibre hybrid pressure vessels with polymer liners was evaluated. For this, fibre-reinforced pressure vessels were monitored by acoustic emission measurement during the first hydraulic pressure test; this test is commonly used for quality assurance of this type of pressure vessel, although without acoustic emission testing. Acoustic emission curves were registered for pressure vessels of a serial production, and the mean characteristics and their scatter were determined as reference values. These were compared with the acoustic emission curves of selectively induced fabrication defects. Fabrication defects are defects that may occur in serial production and are difficult or impossible to detect by conventional quality assurance methods. All investigated pressure vessel were then subject to stress until failure (leakage, bursting). This made it possible to verify the real influence of fabrication defects on the burst pressure and/or the fatigue characteristics of the pressure vessels and to assess the validity of acoustic emission testing. [German] Ziel der Untersuchung ist die Validierung einer Pruefmethodik zur Sicherung der Fertigungsqualitaet von Faserverbund - Druckbehaeltern unter realen Fertigungsbedingungen. Das Verfahren basiert auf Merkmalen und zulaessigen Grenzwerten, die aus Schallemissionsverlaeufen bei der Erstdruckpruefung abgeleitet werden [1]. Die Methodik konnte zuvor bereits erfolgreich an Faserverbund - Druckbehaeltern

  3. Contralateral acoustic suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions: Activation of the medial olivocochlear system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komazec Zoran

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Medial olivocochlear pathway represents the final part of efferent acoustic pathway which comes from the superior olivary complex ending at outer hair cells. Activation of medial olivocochlear system (MOCS alters the cochlear output decreasing the travelling wave within cochlea. Stimulation of MOCS provides protection against moderate levels of noise, encoding noise signals as well as selecting hearing attention. Activation of MOCS can be performed using contralateral acoustic stimulation. The principal result of presentation of contralateral acoustic stimulation during screening of transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE is an attenuation of the TEOAE amplitude. Thirty-eight ears were examined in this study: twenty-eight ears from 14 normal-hearing adults and 10 patients with unilateral deafness. Healthy subjects were exposed to contralateral broad-band noise of various intensities (40, 30, 20 and 10 dB SL, as well as 30 dB SL pure tone stimulation (1 kHz and 4 kHz. A decrease of TEOAE amplitudes during contralateral stimulation with 40 and 30 dB SL broad-band noise and pure tones was established. This effect was a result of MOCS activation. A greater intensity of contralateral stimulation evoked greater decrease of TEOAE amplitude; stimulation with broad-band noise caused greater attenuation than with pure tone stimulation. Contralateral stimulation of deaf ears in the group with unilateral deafness was also performed. Statistically significant difference between TEOAE amplitude before and during contralateral stimulation was not established. This circumstance explains that activation of MOCS and consequent reduction of outer hair cells motility is very possibly caused by contralateral acoustic stimulation. Apart from studying physiological significance of efferent auditory system, results of this and similar studies can be used for production of hearing aids improving speech discrimination in noisy environment.

  4. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5μs, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2μs, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200μm diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales.

  5. Acoustic Measurements of an Uninstalled Spacecraft Cabin Ventilation Fan Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Brown, Clifford A.; Shook, Tony D.; Winkel, James; Kolacz, John S.; Podboy, Devin M.; Loew, Raymond A.; Mirecki, Julius H.

    2012-01-01

    Sound pressure measurements were recorded for a prototype of a spacecraft cabin ventilation fan in a test in the NASA Glenn Acoustical Testing Laboratory. The axial fan is approximately 0.089 m (3.50 in.) in diameter and 0.223 m (9.00 in.) long and has nine rotor blades and eleven stator vanes. At design point of 12,000 rpm, the fan was predicted to produce a flow rate of 0.709 cu m/s (150 cfm) and a total pressure rise of 925 Pa (3.72 in. of water) at 12,000 rpm. While the fan was designed to be part of a ducted atmospheric revitalization system, no attempt was made to throttle the flow or simulate the installed configuration during this test. The fan was operated at six speeds from 6,000 to 13,500 rpm. A 13-microphone traversing array was used to collect sound pressure measurements along two horizontal planes parallel to the flow direction, two vertical planes upstream of the fan inlet and two vertical planes downstream of the fan exhaust. Measurements indicate that sound at blade passing frequency harmonics contribute significantly to the overall audible noise produced by the fan at free delivery conditions.

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Measurements of Concentration Distributions in Acoustic Focusing Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K A; Fisher, K; Jung, B; Ness, K; Mariella Jr., R P

    2008-06-16

    We describe a modeling approach to capture the particle motion within an acoustic focusing microfluidic device. Our approach combines finite element models for the acoustic forces with analytical models for the fluid motion and uses these force fields to calculate the particle motion in a Brownian dynamics simulation. We compare results for the model with experimental measurements of the focusing efficiency within a microfabricated device. The results show good qualitative agreement over a range of acoustic driving voltages and particle sizes.

  7. The current status of measurement standards for acoustics and vibration at Inmetro

    OpenAIRE

    Ripper, Gustavo Palmeira; Hoffmann, Walter Erico

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The Division of Acoustics and Vibration (DIAVI) of INMETRO establishes, validates and maintains the Brazilian national measurement standards used for the realization of the units of physical quantities related to the field of acoustics and vibration. The basic vibration quantity realized by DIAVI is translational acceleration, from which the other motion quantities, i.e., velocity and displacement can be derived. Acoustical physical quantities include sound pressure and sound power...

  8. Fault diagnosis of reciprocating compressor valve with the method integrating acoustic emission signal and simulated valve motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuefei; Xue, Chuang; Jia, Xiaohan; Peng, Xueyuan

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a method of diagnosing faults in reciprocating compressor valves using the acoustic emission signal coupled with the simulated valve motion. The actual working condition of a valve can be obtained by analyzing the acoustic emission signal in the crank angle domain and the valve movement can be predicted by simulating the valve motion. The exact opening and closing locations of a normal valve, provided by the simulated valve motion, can be used as references for the valve fault diagnosis. The typical valve faults are diagnosed to validate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method. The experimental results indicate that this method can easily distinguish the normal valve, valve flutter and valve delayed closing conditions. The characteristic locations of the opening and closing of the suction and discharge valves can be clearly identified in the waveform of the acoustic emission signal and the simulated valve motion.

  9. Infrared Emissivity Measurements of Building and Civil Engineering Materials: A New Device for Measuring Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchau, Jean-Pierre; Marchetti, Mario; Ibos, Laurent; Dumoulin, Jean; Feuillet, Vincent; Candau, Yves

    2014-10-01

    The knowledge of the infrared emissivity of materials used in buildings and civil engineering structures is useful for two specific approaches. First, quantitative diagnosis of buildings or civil engineering infrastructures by infrared thermography requires emissivity values in the spectral bandwidth of the camera used for measurements, in order to obtain accurate surface temperatures; for instance, emissivity in the band III domain is required when using cameras with uncooled detectors (such as micro-bolometer arrays). Second, setting up accurate thermal balances by numerical modeling requires the total emissivity value for a large wavelength domain; this is, for instance, the case for computing the road surface temperature to predict ice occurrence. Furthermore, periodical surveys of emissivity variations due to aging or soiling of surfaces could be useful in many situations such as thermal mapping of roads or building insulation diagnosis. The use of portable emissivity measurement devices is required for that purpose. A device using an indirect measurement method was previously developed in our lab; the method uses measurement of the reflectivity from a modulated IR source and requires calibration with a highly reflective surface. However, that device uses a low-frequency, thermal modulation well adapted to laboratory measurements but unfit for fast and in situ measurements. Therefore, a new, portable system which retains the principle of an indirect measurement but uses a faster-frequency, mechanical modulation more appropriate to outdoor measurements was developed. Both devices allow measurements in the broad m to m) and narrow m to m) bands. Experiments were performed on a large number of materials commonly used in buildings and civil engineering structures. The final objective of this work is to build a database of emissivity of these materials. A comparison of laboratory and on-site measurements of emissivity values obtained in both spectral bands will be

  10. Damage Modes Recognition and Hilbert-Huang Transform Analyses of CFRP Laminates Utilizing Acoustic Emission Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    WenQin, Han; Ying, Luo; AiJun, Gu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination of acoustic emission (AE) signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. To gain a deeper understanding of the initiation, growth and evolution of the different types of damage, four types of specimens for different lay-ups and orientations and three types of specimens for interlaminar toughness tests are subjected to tensile test along with acoustic emission monitoring. AE signals have been collected and post-processed, the statistical results show that the peak frequency of AE signal can distinguish various damage modes effectively. After a AE signal were decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method, it may separate and extract all damage modes included in this AE signal apart from damage mode corresponding to the peak frequency. Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) of AE signals can clearly illustrate the frequency distribution of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) components in time-scale in different damage stages, and can calculate accurate instantaneous frequency for damage modes recognition to help understanding the damage process.

  11. Acoustic emission-based condition monitoring methods: Review and application for low speed slew bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesarendra, Wahyu; Kosasih, Buyung; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Zhu, Hongtao; Moodie, Craig A. S.; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an acoustic emission-based method for the condition monitoring of low speed reversible slew bearings. Several acoustic emission (AE) hit parameters as the monitoring parameters for the detection of impending failure of slew bearings are reviewed first. The review focuses on: (1) the application of AE in typical rolling element bearings running at different speed classifications, i.e. high speed (>600 rpm), low speed (10-600 rpm) and very low speed (<10 rpm); (2) the commonly used AE hit parameters in rolling element bearings and (3) AE signal processing, feature extraction and pattern recognition methods. In the experiment, impending failure of the slew bearing was detected by the AE hit parameters after the new bearing had run continuously for approximately 15 months. The slew bearing was then dismantled and the evidence of the early defect was analysed. Based on the result, we propose a feature extraction method of the AE waveform signal using the largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) algorithm and demonstrate that the LLE feature can detect the sign of failure earlier than the AE hit parameters with improved prediction of the progressive trend of the defect.

  12. Monitoring and Failure Analysis of Corroded Bridge Cables under Fatigue Loading Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.

  13. Monitoring and failure analysis of corroded bridge cables under fatigue loading using acoustic emission sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Ou, Jinping; Lan, Chengming; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Cables play an important role in cable-stayed systems, but are vulnerable to corrosion and fatigue damage. There is a dearth of studies on the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cable. In the present study, the acoustic emission (AE) technology is adopted to monitor the fatigue damage evolution process. First, the relationship between stress and strain is determined through a tensile test for corroded and non-corroded steel wires. Results show that the mechanical performance of corroded cables is changed considerably. The AE characteristic parameters for fatigue damage are then established. AE energy cumulative parameters can accurately describe the fatigue damage evolution of corroded cables. The failure modes in each phase as well as the type of acoustic emission source are determined based on the results of scanning electron microscopy. The waveform characteristics, damage types, and frequency distribution of the corroded cable at different damage phases are collected. Finally, the number of broken wires and breakage time of the cables are determined according to the variation in the margin index.

  14. Experimental analysis of crack evolution in concrete by the acoustic emission technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saliba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fracture process zone (FPZ was investigated on unnotched and notched beams with different notch depths. Three point bending tests were realized on plain concrete under crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD control. Crack growth was monitored by applying the acoustic emission (AE technique. In order to improve our understanding of the FPZ, the width and length of the FPZ were followed based on the AE source locations maps and several AE parameters were studied during the entire loading process. The bvalue analysis, defined as the log-linear slope of the frequency-magnitude distribution of acoustic emissions, was also carried out to describe quantitatively the influence of the relative notch depth on the fracture process. The results show that the number of AE hits increased with the decrease of the relative notch depth and an important AE energy dissipation was observed at the crack initiation in unnotched beams. In addition, the relative notch depth influenced the AE characteristics, the process of crack propagation, and the brittleness of concrete.

  15. The Sound Emission Board of the KM3NeT Acoustic Positioning System

    CERN Document Server

    Llorens, C D; Sogorb, T; Bou--Cabo, M; Martínez-Mora, J A; Larosa, G; Adrián-Martínez, S

    2012-01-01

    We describe the sound emission board proposed for installation in the acoustic positioning system of the future KM3NeT underwater neutrino telescope. The KM3NeT European consortium aims to build a multi-cubic kilometre underwater neutrino telescope in the deep Mediterranean Sea. In this kind of telescope the mechanical structures holding the optical sensors, which detect the Cherenkov radiation produced by muons emanating from neutrino interactions, are not completely rigid and can move up to dozens of meters in undersea currents. Knowledge of the position of the optical sensors to an accuracy of about 10 cm is needed for adequate muon track reconstruction. A positioning system based on the acoustic triangulation of sound transit time differences between fixed seabed emitters and receiving hydrophones attached to the kilometre-scale vertical flexible structures carrying the optical sensors is being developed. In this paper, we describe the sound emission board developed in the framework of KM3NeT project, whi...

  16. Damage detection on polymeric matrix composite materials by using acoustic emission technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cauich–Cupul

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the mechanical behaviour of a composite during its service life, it is important to study the initiation and development of cracks and its effects induced by degradation. The onset of damage is related to the structural integrity of the component and its fatigue life. For this, among other reasons, non–destructive techniques have been widely used nowadays in composite materials characterization such as acoustic emission (AE. This method has demonstrated excellent results on detecting and identifying initiations sites, cracking propagation and fracture mechanisms of polymer matrix composite materials. At the same time, mechanical behaviour has been related intimately to the reinforcement architecture. The goal of this paper is to remark the importance of acoustic emission technique as a unique tool for characterising mechanical parameters in response to external stresses and degradation processes. Some results obtained from different analysis are discussed to support the significance of using AE, technique that will be increased continuously in the composite materials field due to its several alternatives for understanding the mechanical behaviour, therefore the objective of this manuscript is to involve the benefits and advantages of AE in the materials characterization.

  17. Determination of bearing steel heat treatment with the use of the acoustic emission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Z. Woźniak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A study on the control of an extremely important stage of the martensitic-bainitic austempering and obtaining the M-B structure in the 100CrMnSi6-4 steel with the use of the acoustic emission (AE has been undertaken. In order to enrich retained austenite with carbon,steels are austempered at appropriately low temperatures. A martensitic transformation, resulting from diffusionless and displacive transformation is associated with significant AE signs. The strain energy produced during growth due to the shape change is reduced by plastic deformation. Predominant source of (AE is the movement of dislocations in order to relieve internal stresses.The heat treatment was performed in a modern, purpose-constructed device which simultaneously records acoustic emission effects. The signals were recorded with the use of an AE analyzer 20–800 kHz, and they were received by means of a broadband piezoelectric transducer with the use of a specialist card with a sampling frequency of 1200 kHz. The results regarding a correlation of austempering temperature and the maximum number of AE events and dilatometric results have been presented. This parameter can be used for precise Ms temperatureestimation. Basing on microstructural investigations, it has been found that previously formed martensite with midrib morphology alsoaccelerates the bainitic transformation.

  18. Determination of bearing steel heat treatment with the use of the acoustic emission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Z. Wozniak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A study on the control of an extremely important stage of the martensitic-bainitic austempering and obtaining the M-B structure in the 100CrMnSi6-4 steel with the use of the acoustic emission (AE has been undertaken. In order to enrich retained austenite with carbon, steels are austempered at appropriately low temperatures. A martensitic transformation, resulting from diffusionless and displacive transformation is associated with significant AE signs. The strain energy produced during growth due to the shape change is reduced by plastic deformation. Predominant source of (AE is the movement of dislocations in order to relieve internal stresses.The heat treatment was performed in a modern, purpose-constructed device which simultaneously records acoustic emission effects. The signals were recorded with the use of an AE analyzer 20–800 kHz, and they were received by means of a broadband piezoelectric transducer with the use of a specialist card with a sampling frequency of 1200 kHz. The results regarding a correlation of austempering temperature and the maximum number of AE events and dilatometric results have been presented. This parameter can be used for precise Ms temperature estimation. Basing on microstructural investigations, it has been found that previously formed martensite with midrib morphology also accelerates the bainitic transformation.

  19. Robust Clustering of Acoustic Emission Signals Using Neural Networks and Signal Subspace Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Zhiqiang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission-based techniques are being used for the nondestructive inspection of mechanical systems. For reliable automatic fault monitoring related to the generation and propagation of cracks, it is important to identify the transient crack-related signals in the presence of strong time-varying noise and other interference. A prominent difficulty is the inability to differentiate events due to crack growth from noise of various origins. This work presents a novel algorithm for automatic clustering and separation of acoustic emission (AE events based on multiple features extracted from the experimental data. The algorithm consists of two steps. In the first step, the noise is separated from the events of interest and subsequently removed using a combination of covariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA, and differential time delay estimates. The second step processes the remaining data using a self-organizing map (SOM neural network, which outputs the noise and AE signals into separate neurons. To improve the efficiency of classification, the short-time Fourier transform (STFT is applied to retain the time-frequency features of the remaining events, reducing the dimension of the data. The algorithm is verified with two sets of data, and a correct classification ratio over 95% is achieved.

  20. Combined optical fiber interferometric sensors for the detection of acoustic emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-jun; MU Lin-lin; LIU Jun-feng; YU Xiao-tao

    2008-01-01

    A type of combined optical fiber interferometric acoustic emission sensor is proposed.The sensor can be independent on the laser source and make light interference by matching the lengths of two arms,so it can be used to monitor the health of large structure.Theoretical analyses indicate that the system can be equivalent to the Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors,and its sensitivity has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy.PZT is powered by DC regulator to control the operating point of the system,so the system can accurately detect feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating on the surface of solid.The amplitude and the frequency of feeble vibration signal are obtained by detecting the output light intensity of intefferometer and using Fourier transform technique.The results indicate that the system can be used to detect the acoustic emission signals by the frequency characteristics.

  1. Standard practice for examination of Gas-Filled filament-wound composite pressure vessels using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examination of filament-wound composite pressure vessels, for example, the type used for fuel tanks in vehicles which use natural gas fuel. 1.2 This practice requires pressurization to a level equal to or greater than what is encountered in normal use. The tanks' pressurization history must be known in order to use this practice. Pressurization medium may be gas or liquid. 1.3 This practice is limited to vessels designed for less than 690 bar [10,000 psi] maximum allowable working pressure and water volume less than 1 m3 or 1000 L [35.4 ft3]. 1.4 AE measurements are used to detect emission sources. Other nondestructive examination (NDE) methods may be used to gain additional insight into the emission source. Procedures for other NDE methods are beyond the scope of this practice. 1.5 This practice applies to examination of new and in-service filament-wound composite pressure vessels. 1.6 This practice applies to examinations conducted at amb...

  2. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y. [University Montpellier, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); CNRS, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F. [CEA, DEN, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  3. Acoustic measurements of a liquefied cohesive sediment bed under waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, R.; Groposo, V.; Pedocchi, F.

    2014-04-01

    In this article the response of a cohesive sediment deposit under the action of water waves is studied with the help of laboratory experiments and an analytical model. Under the same regular wave condition three different bed responses were observed depending on the degree of consolidation of the deposit: no bed motion, bed motion of the upper layer after the action of the first waves, and massive bed motion after several waves. The kinematic of the upper 3 cm of the deposit were measured with an ultrasound acoustic profiler, while the pore-water pressure inside the bed was simultaneously measured using several pore pressure sensors. A poro-elastic model was developed to interpret the experimental observations. The model showed that the amplitude of the shear stress increased down into the bed. Then it is possible that the lower layers of the deposit experience plastic deformations, while the upper layers present just elastic deformations. Since plastic deformations in the lower layers are necessary for pore pressure build-up, the analytical model was used to interpret the experimental results and to state that liquefaction of a self consolidated cohesive sediment bed would only occur if the bed yield stress falls within the range defined by the amplitude of the shear stress inside the bed.

  4. Research on the influence and correction method of depth scanning error to the underwater acoustic image measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Jidan; ZHAI Chunpin; WANGYilin; HUI Junying

    2011-01-01

    The technology of underwater acoustic image measurement was a passive locating method with high precision in near field. To improve the precision of underwater acoustic image measurement, the influence of the depth scan error was analyzed and the correcti

  5. PROGRESS OF ACOUSTIC WAVE TECHNIQUE AND ITS APPLICATION IN UNDERGROUND PRESSURE MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周楚良; 李新元; 张晓龙

    1994-01-01

    This paper carries out the experiment study on the correlation between full stress-strain process of rock samples and the acoustic parameter change of rock by using the measurement system of KS acoustic wave data processing device. On the spot, the stability of surrounding rock is studied by means of experiments on the relationship between the change process (from elastic to plastic failure zone) in surrounding rock of roadway and the change law of acoustic parameters of rock. These acoustic parameters include wave amplitude, spectral amplitude, spectrum area, spectral density, wave velocity and attenuation coefficient etc.

  6. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  7. The Belt voice: Acoustical measurements and esthetic correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounous, Barry Urban

    This dissertation explores the esthetic attributes of the Belt voice through spectral acoustical analysis. The process of understanding the nature and safe practice of Belt is just beginning, whereas the understanding of classical singing is well established. The unique nature of the Belt sound provides difficulties for voice teachers attempting to evaluate the quality and appropriateness of a particular sound or performance. This study attempts to provide answers to the question "does Belt conform to a set of measurable esthetic standards?" In answering this question, this paper expands on a previous study of the esthetic attributes of the classical baritone voice (see "Vocal Beauty", NATS Journal 51,1) which also drew some tentative conclusions about the Belt voice but which had an inadequate sample pool of subjects from which to draw. Further, this study demonstrates that it is possible to scientifically investigate the realm of musical esthetics in the singing voice. It is possible to go beyond the "a trained voice compared to an untrained voice" paradigm when evaluating quantitative vocal parameters and actually investigate what truly beautiful voices do. There are functions of sound energy (measured in dB) transference which may affect the nervous system in predictable ways and which can be measured and associated with esthetics. This study does not show consistency in measurements for absolute beauty (taste) even among belt teachers and researchers but does show some markers with varying degrees of importance which may point to a difference between our cognitive learned response to singing and our emotional, more visceral response to sounds. The markers which are significant in determining vocal beauty are: (1) Vibrancy-Characteristics of vibrato including speed, width, and consistency (low variability). (2) Spectral makeup-Ratio of partial strength above the fundamental to the fundamental. (3) Activity of the voice-The quantity of energy being produced. (4

  8. Acoustic measurements of F-15 aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-15 aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that no potential sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-15 aircraft structure during operation in the hush house. However, since these acoustic levels were increased over those measuring during run up on a concrete pad, it is recommended that F-15 equipment qualification levels be checked. The data indicated that the noise field within the hush house is diffuse and that the acoustical energy in the hangar area is radiated from the region between the engine exhaust and the hush house muffler front edge toward the forward part of the hangar.

  9. Experimental study of ultra-thin films mechanical integrity by combined nanoindentation and nano-acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zihou

    Advancement of interconnect technology has imposed significant challenge on interface characterization and reliability for blurred interfaces between layers. There is a need for material properties and these miniaturized length scales and assessment of reliability; including the intrinsic film fracture toughness and the interfacial fracture toughness. The nano-meter range of film thicknesses currently employed, impose significant challenges on evaluating these physical quantities and thereby impose significant challenge on the design cycle. In this study we attempted to use a combined nano-indentation and nano-acoustic emission to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the failure modes in ultra-thin blanket films on Si substrates or stakes of different characteristics. We have performed and analyzed an exhaustive group of testes that cove many diverge combination of film-substrate combination, provided by both Intel and IBM. When the force-indentation depth curve shows excursion, a direct measure of the total energy release rate is estimated. The collected acoustic emission signal is then used to partition the total energy into two segments, one associated with the cohesive fracture toughness of the film and the other is for the adhesive fracture toughness of the interface. The acoustic emission signal is analyzed in both the time and frequency domain to achieve such energy division. In particular, the signal time domain analysis for signal skewness, time of arrival and total energy content are employed with the proper signal to noise ratio. In the frequency domain, an expansive group of acoustic emission signals are utilized to construct the details of the power spectral density. A bank of band-pass filters are designed to sort the individual signals to those associated with adhesive interlayer cracking, cohesive channel cracking, or other system induced noise. The attenuation time and the energy content within each spectral frequency were the key elements

  10. Acoustic Measurements for Determination of the Materials Damping Using A Sound Source Localisation System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. G(o)ken; J. Swiostek; H. Hurdelbrink; U. Keil

    2013-01-01

    Noise measurements are especially a problem when the object under investigation is largely dimensioned and can only be measured from the distance.To obtain information about the location of noise generation,a measurement technique which makes sound visible in order to introduce further specific technical measures is advantageous.The question is if the time dependence of the signal got from such a non touching and non destructive acoustic method has the potential to calculate the materials damping from.Using a small sound source localization system (MicroflownTM probe),specimens of magnesium alloys with different grain sizes obtained by hydrostatic extrusion were investigated.It has been demonstrated that the fine grained microstructure led to a lower damping and its dependence on the strain was reduced.In this context,acoustic measurements by a sound source localisation system which makes materials characterization possible could be used as a quality tool to detect changes in highly stressed components.This approach allows to promote a selective substitution of conventional materials by more innovative ones.The offshore sector is considered to be a field of application:Wind turbines produce noise emission which stems mainly from turbulences at the tips of the rotor blades and vibrations of components inside the nacelle (e.g.gearbox,generator,…).If the vibration amplitudes are too high,microcracks of components can lead to failure over the long term.The monitoring of microstructural changes using a larger type of a sound source localisation system is considered as an innovative technical approach with respect to maintenance activities.

  11. Statistical relations among architectural features and objective acoustical measurements of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian; Siebein, G. W.; Chiang, W.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical analysis of architectural features and detailed objective acoustical measurements made in eight concert halls and several multi-use rooms in their concert configuration will be presented. A method for evaluating the architectural features of rooms that affect their acoustical...

  12. Imaging of acoustic attenuation and speed of sound maps using photoacoustic measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, G.H.; Manohar, S.; Purwar, Y.; Slump, C.H.; Heijden, van der F.; Leeuwen, van T.G.; McAleavey, S.A.; D'Hooge, J.

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an upcoming medical imaging modality with the potential of imaging both optical and acoustic properties of objects. We present a measurement system and outline reconstruction methods to image both speed of sound and acoustic attenuation distributions of an object using only

  13. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-09-24

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, Au{sub 50.5}Cd{sub 49.5}, and Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup single}{sub 31.2}, and the polycrystalline sample Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup poly}{sub 31.2}. Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of

  14. Acoustic resonances in HID lamps: model and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, John [Philips Lighting BV, Lightlabs, Mathildelaan 1, 5600 JM Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baumann, Bernd; Wolff, Marcus [Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Institute for Physical Sensors, Berliner Tor 21, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Bhosle, Sounil [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Valdivia Barrientos, Ricardo, E-mail: john.hirsch@philips.co [National Nuclear Research Institute, Highway Mexico-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, CP 52750 (Mexico)

    2010-06-16

    A finite element model including plasma simulation is used to calculate the amplitude of acoustic resonances in HID lamps in a 2D axisymmetric geometry. Simulation results are presented for different operation parameters and are compared with experimental data.

  15. Effects of Various Architectural Parameters on Six Room Acoustical Measures in Auditoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wei-Hwa

    The effects of architectural parameters on six room acoustical measures were investigated by means of correlation analyses, factor analyses and multiple regression analyses based on data taken in twenty halls. Architectural parameters were used to estimate acoustical measures taken at individual locations within each room as well as the averages and standard deviations of all measured values in the rooms. The six acoustical measures were Early Decay Time (EDT10), Clarity Index (C80), Overall Level (G), Bass Ratio based on Early Decay Time (BR(EDT)), Treble Ratio based on Early Decay Time (TR(EDT)), and Early Inter-aural Cross Correlation (IACC80). A comprehensive method of quantifying various architectural characteristics of rooms was developed to define a large number of architectural parameters that were hypothesized to effect the acoustical measurements made in the rooms. This study quantitatively confirmed many of the principles used in the design of concert halls and auditoria. Three groups of room architectural parameters such as the parameters associated with the depth of diffusing surfaces were significantly correlated with the hall standard deviations of most of the acoustical measures. Significant differences of statistical relations among architectural parameters and receiver specific acoustical measures were found between a group of music halls and a group of lecture halls. For example, architectural parameters such as the relative distance from the receiver to the overhead ceiling increased the percentage of the variance of acoustical measures that was explained by Barron's revised theory from approximately 70% to 80% only when data were taken in the group of music halls. This study revealed the major architectural parameters which have strong relations with individual acoustical measures forming the basis for a more quantitative method for advancing the theoretical design of concert halls and other auditoria. The results of this study provide

  16. Simultaneous investigation of thermal, acoustic, and magnetic emission during martensitic transformation in single-crystalline Ni2MnGa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, László Z.; Daróczi, Lajos; Szabó, Sándor; Beke, Dezső L.

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous thermal, acoustic, and magnetic emission (AE and ME) measurements during thermally induced martensitic transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals demonstrate that all three types of the above noises display many coincident peaks and the same start and finish temperatures. The amplitude and energy distribution functions for AE and ME avalanches satisfy power-law behavior, corresponding to the symmetry of the martensite. At zero external magnetic field asymmetry in the exponents was obtained: their value was larger for heating than for cooling. Application of constant, external magnetic fields (up to B =722 mT) leads to the disappearance of the above asymmetry, due to the decrease of the multiplicity of the martensite variants. Time correlations (i.e., the existence of nonhomogeneous temporal processes) within AE as well as ME emission events are demonstrated by deviations from the uncorrelated behavior on probability distributions of waiting times as well as of a sequence of number of events. It is shown that the above functions collapse on universal master curves for cooling and heating as well as for AE and ME noises. The analysis of the existence of temporal correlations between AE and ME events revealed that at short times the acoustic signals show a time delay relative to the magnetic one, due to the time necessary for the propagation of the ultrasound. At intermediate times, as expected, the magnetic signal is delayed, i.e., the magnetic domain rearrangement followed the steps of structural transformation. At much longer times the deviation from an uncorrelated (Poisson-type) behavior is attributed to the nonhomogeneity of the avalanche statistics.

  17. Measuring Baryon Acoustic Oscillations from the clustering of voids

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Yu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Tao, Charling

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the necessary methodology to optimally measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal, from voids based on galaxy redshift catalogues. To this end, we study the dependency of the BAO signal on the population of voids classified by their sizes. We find for the first time the characteristic features of the correlation function of voids including the first robust detection of BAOs in mock galaxy catalogues. These show an anti-correlation around the scale corresponding to the smallest size of voids in the sample (the void exclusion effect), and dips at both sides of the BAO peak, which can be used to determine the significance of the BAO signal without any priori model. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that there is a scale dependent bias for different populations of voids depending on the radius, with the peculiar property that the void population with the largest BAO significance corresponds to tracers with approximately zero bias on the largest scales. We further investigate the meth...

  18. Measuring soot particles from automotive exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Hanspeter; Lüönd, Felix; Schlatter, Jürg; Auderset, Kevin; Jordan-Gerkens, Anke; Nowak, Andreas; Ebert, Volker; Buhr, Egbert; Klein, Tobias; Tuch, Thomas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Mamakos, Athanasios; Riccobono, Francesco; Discher, Kai; Högström, Richard; Yli-Ojanperä, Jaakko; Quincey, Paul

    2014-08-01

    The European Metrology Research Programme participating countries and the European Union jointly fund a three year project to address the need of the automotive industry for a metrological sound base for exhaust measurements. The collaborative work on particle emissions involves five European National Metrology Institutes, the Tampere University of Technology, the Joint Research Centre for Energy and Transport and the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research. On one hand, a particle number and size standard for soot particles is aimed for. Eventually this will allow the partners to provide accurate and comparable calibrations of measurement instruments for the type approval of Euro 5b and Euro 6 vehicles. Calibration aerosols of combustion particles, silver and graphite proof partially suitable. Yet, a consensus choice together with instrument manufactures is pending as the aerosol choice considerably affects the number concentration measurement. Furthermore, the consortium issued consistent requirements for novel measuring instruments foreseen to replace today's opacimeters in regulatory periodic emission controls of soot and compared them with European legislative requirements. Four partners are conducting a metrological validation of prototype measurement instruments. The novel instruments base on light scattering, electrical, ionisation chamber and diffusion charging sensors and will be tested at low and high particle concentrations. Results shall allow manufacturers to further improve their instruments to comply with legal requirements.

  19. Measuring soot particles from automotive exhaust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Metrology Research Programme participating countries and the European Union jointly fund a three year project to address the need of the automotive industry for a metrological sound base for exhaust measurements. The collaborative work on particle emissions involves five European National Metrology Institutes, the Tampere University of Technology, the Joint Research Centre for Energy and Transport and the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research. On one hand, a particle number and size standard for soot particles is aimed for. Eventually this will allow the partners to provide accurate and comparable calibrations of measurement instruments for the type approval of Euro 5b and Euro 6 vehicles. Calibration aerosols of combustion particles, silver and graphite proof partially suitable. Yet, a consensus choice together with instrument manufactures is pending as the aerosol choice considerably affects the number concentration measurement. Furthermore, the consortium issued consistent requirements for novel measuring instruments foreseen to replace today’s opacimeters in regulatory periodic emission controls of soot and compared them with European legislative requirements. Four partners are conducting a metrological validation of prototype measurement instruments. The novel instruments base on light scattering, electrical, ionisation chamber and diffusion charging sensors and will be tested at low and high particle concentrations. Results shall allow manufacturers to further improve their instruments to comply with legal requirements.

  20. Comparing SO2 Emissions to Seismic and Acoustic Records: the Value and Limitations of the new UV Camera Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, M. P.; Waite, G. P.; Nadeau, P. A.; Watson, I. M.

    2008-12-01

    SO2 emission measurements are an important component of monitoring volcanic eruption processes. Owing mainly to limitations in the temporal resolution of measurements, the goal of merging a gas flux record with other geophysical datasets (seismic, acoustic) with the aim of investigating subsurface processes has been elusive. In recent years, ground-based, ultraviolet (UV) digital cameras have improved upon previous methods of SO2 observation by capturing a large portion of the plume in one measurement- a single image. The UV digital camera can record at up to 1Hz, producing a data set that is more comparable with other monitoring techniques, allowing for a more precise record of SO2 flux, and directly providing the plume speed. Many monitoring advantages are gained by using this technique, but the accuracy and limitations require thorough investigation. The effect of some user-controlled parameters, include image exposure length, the diameter of the lens aperture, the regularity of calibration cell imaging, and the use of the single or paired bandpass filters, are addressed in this study. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to clarify methodological consequences and quantify accuracy. Digital images of calibration cells were collected under varying observational conditions, and SO2 retrieval results from a coal power plant plume were compared to direct sampling measurements. The results indicate that the UV camera retrieval compares favorably with direct sampling methods; that careful attention must be paid to exposure times; and that there is some latitude in the calibration cell conversion technique. A multi-instrument field campaign was undertaken at Pacaya volcano, Guatemala to relate complementary high-temporal-resolution datasets. Between January 5 and January 9, 2008 SO2 flux was recorded at Pacaya using the UV camera. These measurements were coincident with recordings from a temporary network of five broadband seismometers and five low

  1. Fatigue crack growth monitoring of idealized gearbox spline component using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Ozevin, Didem; Hardman, William; Kessler, Seth; Timmons, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. The acoustic emission (AE) method is a direct way of detecting active flaws; however, the method suffers from the influence of background noise and location/sensor based pattern recognition method. It is important to identify the source mechanism and adapt it to different test conditions and sensors. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method in a laboratory environment. The test sample has the major details of the spline component on a flattened geometry. The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges strategically positions on the structure. The fatigue test characteristics are 4 Hz frequency and 0.1 as the ratio of minimum to maximum loading in tensile regime. It is observed that there are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The frequency spectra of continuous emissions and burst emissions are compared to understand the difference of sudden crack growth and gradual crack growth. The predicted crack growth rate is compared with the AE data using the cumulative AE events at the notch tip. The source mechanism of sudden crack growth is obtained solving the inverse mathematical problem from output signal to input signal. The spline component of gearbox structure is a non-redundant element that requires early detection of flaws for preventing catastrophic failures. In this paper, the fatigue crack growth of a notched and flattened gearbox spline component is monitored using the AE method The AE data is continuously collected together with strain gauges. There are significant amount of continuous emissions released from the notch tip due to the formation of plastic deformation and slow crack growth. The source mechanism of

  2. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongzhi; Pang, Fufei; Liu, Huanhuan; Cheng, Jiajing; Lv, Longbao; Zhang, Xiaobei; Chen, Na; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-11-30

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD) of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa ) . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  3. A Fiber-Optic Sensor for Acoustic Emission Detection in a High Voltage Cable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongzhi Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed and demonstrated a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor for detecting acoustic emission generated from the partial discharge (PD of the accessories of a high-voltage cable system. The developed sensor head is integrated with a compact and relatively high sensitivity cylindrical elastomer. Such a sensor has a broadband frequency response and a relatively high sensitivity in a harsh environment under a high-voltage electric field. The design and fabrication of the sensor head integrated with the cylindrical elastomer is described, and a series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the sensing performance. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensitivity of our developed sensor for acoustic detection of partial discharges is 1.7 rad / ( m ⋅ Pa . A high frequency response up to 150 kHz is achieved. Moreover, the relatively high sensitivity for the detection of PD is verified in both the laboratory environment and gas insulated switchgear. The obtained results show the great potential application of a Michelson interferometer-based fiber sensor integrated with a cylindrical elastomer for in-situ monitoring high-voltage cable accessories for safety work.

  4. Preliminary studies for monitoring erosion in pipelines by the acoustic emission technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiboni, G.B. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais; Marquardt, T.A.S; SantaMaria, V.A.R.; Silva, C.H. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present some applications of Acoustic Emission (AE), which is a powerful technique for nondestructive testing in Tribology, treated here as tests of friction, wear by contact fatigue, wear by slip and wear by erosion. In this work a special attention is given to solid particle erosion and hydro-abrasive erosion, problems found in almost every pipeline that lead to local loss of material and eventually rupture of the line. The technique of AE can be used as an efficient online tool when, primarily, to monitor tribological aspects such as the rate of wear of materials, as well as detect the spread of flaws in them. In wear by erosion, specifically, the parameters of RMS and acoustic energy are capable of correlation with the type of mechanism for removal of material. As a preliminary goal, erosive tests were performed with gas (air) without erosive particles, monitored by AE, varying the surface of the samples and the internal diameter the nozzle, taking the differences in signs of AE. Correlation between parameters of RMS and amplitude were noticed with the variables of the tests, such as roughness and fluid velocity. The RMS parameter showed a exponential correction with the fluid velocity, however the amplitude signals had a linear behavior. The knowledge of these parameters is essential for the development of a system that is able to quantify the wear rate of a pipeline without taking it out of operation. (author)

  5. Fatigue and fracture assessment of cracks in steel elements using acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Navid; Metrovich, Brian; Nanni, Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Single edge notches provide a very well defined load and fatigue crack size and shape environment for estimation of the stress intensity factor K, which is not found in welded elements. ASTM SE(T) specimens do not appear to provide ideal boundary conditions for proper recording of acoustic wave propagation and crack growth behavior observed in steel bridges, but do provide standard fatigue crack growth rate data. A modified versions of the SE(T) specimen has been examined to provide small scale specimens with improved acoustic emission(AE) characteristics while still maintaining accuracy of fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) versus stress intensity factor (ΔK). The specimens intend to represent a steel beam flange subjected to pure tension, with a surface crack growing transverse to a uniform stress field. Fatigue test is conducted at low R ratio. Analytical and numerical studies of stress intensity factor are developed for single edge notch test specimens consistent with the experimental program. ABAQUS finite element software is utilized for stress analysis of crack tips. Analytical, experimental and numerical analysis were compared to assess the abilities of AE to capture a growing crack.

  6. Satellite measurements of formaldehyde from shipping emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marbach

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available International shipping is recognized as a pollution source of growing importance, in particular in the remote marine boundary layer. Nitrogen dioxide originating from ship emissions has previously been detected in satellite measurements. This study presents the first satellite measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO linked to shipping emissions as derived from observations made by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME instrument.

    We analyzed enhanced HCHO tropospheric columns from shipping emissions over the Indian Ocean between Sri Lanka and Sumatra. This region offers good conditions in term of plume detection with the GOME instrument as all ship tracks follow a single narrow track in the same east-west direction as used for the GOME pixel scanning. The HCHO signal alone is weak but could be clearly seen in the high-pass filtered data. The line of enhanced HCHO in the Indian Ocean as seen in the 7-year composite of cloud free GOME observations clearly coincides with the distinct ship track corridor from Sri Lanka to Indonesia. The observed mean HCHO column enhancement over this shipping route is about 2.0×1015 molec/cm2.

    The observed HCHO pattern also agrees qualitatively well with results from the coupled earth system model ECHAM5/MESSy applied to atmospheric chemistry (EMAC. However, the modelled HCHO values over the ship corridor are two times lower than in the GOME high-pass filtered data. This might indicate that the used emission inventories are too low and/or that the in-plume chemistry taking place in the narrow path of the shipping lanes are not well represented at the rather coarse model resolution.

  7. Measuring Turbulence from Moored Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters. A Manual to Quantifying Inflow at Tidal Energy Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thomson, Jim [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Talbert, Joe [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); DeKlerk, Alex [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology for measuring hub height inflow turbulence using moored acoustic Doppler velocimiters (ADVs). This approach is motivated by the shortcomings of alternatives. For example, remote velocity measurements (i.e., from acoustic Doppler profilers) lack sufficient precision for device simulation, and rigid tower-mounted measurements are very expensive and technically challenging in the tidal environment. Moorings offer a low-cost, site-adaptable and robust deployment platform, and ADVs provide the necessary precision to accurately quantify turbulence.

  8. The Basic Study on the Method of Acoustic Emission Signal Processing for the Failure Detection in the NPP Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jae Seong; Lee, Bo Young [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung; Kwag, No Gwon [SAEAN, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The thermal fatigue crack(TFC) is one of the life-limiting mechanisms at the nuclear power plant operating conditions. In order to evaluate the structural integrity, various non-destructive test methods such as radiographic test, ultrasonic test and eddy current are used in the industrial field. However, these methods have restrictions that defect detection is possible after the crack growth. For this reason, acoustic emission testing(AET) is becoming one of powerful inspection methods, because AET has an advantage that possible to monitor the structure continuously. Generally, every mechanism that affects the integrity of the structure or equipment is a source of acoustic emission signal. Therefore the noise filtering is one of the major works to the almost AET researchers. In this study, acoustic emission signal was collected from the pipes which were in the successive thermal fatigue cycles. The data were filtered based on the results from previous experiments. Through the data analysis, the signal characteristics to distinguish the effective signal from the noises for the TFC were proven as the waveform difference. The experiment results provide preliminary information for the acoustic emission technique to the continuous monitoring of the structure failure detection

  9. FBG-based ultrasonic wave detection and acoustic emission linear location system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming-shun; Sui, Qing-mei; Jia, Lei; Peng, Peng; Cao, Yuqiang

    2012-05-01

    The ultrasonic (US) wave detection and an acoustic emission (AE) linear location system are proposed, which employ fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as US wave sensors. In the theoretical analysis, the FBG sensor response to longitudinal US wave is investigated. The result indicates that the FBG wavelength can be modulated as static case when the grating length is much shorter than US wavelength. The experimental results of standard sinusoidal and spindle wave test agree well with the generated signal. Further research using two FBGs for realizing linear location is also achieved. The maximum linear location error is obtained as less than 5 mm. FBG-based US wave sensor and AE linear location provide useful tools for specific requirements.

  10. Microstructure-Sensitive Investigation of Fracture Using Acoustic Emission Coupled With Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Brian; Cabal, Mike; Vanniamparambiland, Prashanth A.; Leser, William; Hochhalter, Jacob; Kontsos, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring is proposed to investigate microstructure-sensitive fatigue and fracture of metals. The coupling between quasi in situ microscopy with actual in situ nondestructive evaluation falls into the ICME framework and the idea of quantitative data-driven characterization of material behavior. To validate the use of AE monitoring inside the SEM chamber, Aluminum 2024-B sharp notch specimen were tested both inside and outside the microscope using a small scale mechanical testing device. Subsequently, the same type of specimen was tested inside the SEM chamber. Load data were correlated with both AE information and observations of microcracks around grain boundaries as well as secondary cracks, voids, and slip bands. The preliminary results are in excellent agreement with similar findings at the mesoscale. Extensions of the application of this novel technique are discussed.

  11. Valve Fault Diagnosis in Internal Combustion Engines Using Acoustic Emission and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Jafari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the potential of acoustic emission (AE technique to detect valve damage in internal combustion engines. The cylinder head of a spark-ignited engine was used as the experimental setup. The effect of three types of valve damage (clearance, semicrack, and notch on valve leakage was investigated. The experimental results showed that AE is an effective method to detect damage and the type of damage in valves in both of the time and frequency domains. An artificial neural network was trained based on time domain analysis using AE parametric features (AErms, count, absolute AE energy, maximum signal amplitude, and average signal level. The network consisted of five, six, and five nodes in the input, hidden, and output layers, respectively. The results of the trained system showed that the AE technique could be used to identify the type of damage and its location.

  12. FBG-based ultrasonic wave detection and acoustic emission linear location system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ming-shun; SUI Qing-mei; JIA Lei; PENG Peng; CAO Yu-qiang

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonic (US) wave detection and an acoustic emission (AE) linear location system are proposed,which employ fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as US wave sensors.In the theoretical analysis,the FBG sensor response to longitudinal US wave is investigated.The result indicates that the FBG wavelength can be modulated as static case when the grating length is much shorter than US wavelength.The experimental results of standard sinusoidal and spindle wave test agree well with the generated signal.Further research using two FBGs for realizing linear location is also achieved.The maximumlinear location error is obtained as less than 5 mm.FBG-based US wave sensor and AE linear location provide useful tools for specific requirements.

  13. Extensive characterization of seismic laws in acoustic emissions of crumpled plastic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leandro S.; Lenzi, Ervin K.; Mendes, Renio S.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.

    2016-06-01

    Statistical similarities between earthquakes and other systems that emit cracking noises have been explored in diverse contexts, ranging from materials science to financial and social systems. Such analogies give promise of a unified and universal theory for describing the complex responses of those systems. There are, however, very few attempts to simultaneously characterize the most fundamental seismic laws in such systems. Here we present a complete description of the Gutenberg-Richter law, the recurrence times, Omori's law, the productivity law, and Båth's law for the acoustic emissions that occur in the relaxation process of uncrumpling thin plastic sheets. Our results show that these laws also appear in this phenomenon, but (for most cases) with different parameters from those reported for earthquakes and fracture experiments. This study thus contributes to elucidate the parallel between seismic laws and cracking noises in uncrumpling processes, revealing striking qualitative similarities but also showing that these processes display unique features.

  14. Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Microscopic Investigation of Cracks in ERCuNi Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A corrosion resistant CuNi cladding was deposited on SM45C (equivalent to AI5I1045) substrate by DC inverse arcwelding. During the welding process, a three channel acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system was applied to detectthe crack signals generating from both the cladding process and after cladding. Characteristics of the welding cracksignal and noise signal had been analyzed systematically. Based on the record time of the signal, the solidificationcrack and delayed crack were distinguished. By two-dimensional AE source location, the crack position was located,and then investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the AE system could detect thewelding crack with high sensitivity and the two-dimensional source location could accurately determine the crackposition. Microstructures of the cladding and heat affected zone (HAZ) were examined. Dendrites in the claddingand coarse grains in the HAZ were found.

  15. Laser cleaning of steam generator tubing based on acoustic emission technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Su-xia; Luo, Ji-jun; Shen, Tao; Li, Ru-song [Xi' an Hi-Tech Institute, Xi' an (China)

    2015-12-15

    As a physical method, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect. The experimental apparatus for laser cleaning of heat tubes in the steam generator was designed according to the results of theoretical analysis. There are two conclusions; one is that laser cleaning technology is attached importance to traditional methods. Which has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes. The other is that the acoustic emission signal includes lots of information on the laser cleaning process, which can be used as real-time monitoring in laser cleaning processes. When the laser acts for 350 s, 100 % contaminants of heat tubes is cleaned off, and the sensor only receives weak AE signal at that time.

  16. Classification of acoustic emission signals using wavelets and Random Forests : Application to localized corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizet, N.; Godin, N.; Tang, J.; Maillet, E.; Fregonese, M.; Normand, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to propose a novel approach to classify acoustic emission (AE) signals deriving from corrosion experiments, even if embedded into a noisy environment. To validate this new methodology, synthetic data are first used throughout an in-depth analysis, comparing Random Forests (RF) to the k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) algorithm. Moreover, a new evaluation tool called the alter-class matrix (ACM) is introduced to simulate different degrees of uncertainty on labeled data for supervised classification. Then, tests on real cases involving noise and crevice corrosion are conducted, by preprocessing the waveforms including wavelet denoising and extracting a rich set of features as input of the RF algorithm. To this end, a software called RF-CAM has been developed. Results show that this approach is very efficient on ground truth data and is also very promising on real data, especially for its reliability, performance and speed, which are serious criteria for the chemical industry.

  17. Feasibility of using acoustic emission to determine in-process tool wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was evaluated for its ability to predict and recognize failure of cutting tools during machining processes when the cutting tool rotates and the workpiece is stationary. AE output was evaluated with a simple algorithm. AE was able to detect drill failure when the transducer was mounted on the workpiece holding fixture. Drill failure was recognized as size was reduced to 0.0003 in. diameter. The ability to predict failure was reduced with drill size, drill material elasticity, and tool coating. AE output for the turning process on a lathe was compared to turning tool insert wear. The turning tool must have sufficient wear to produce a detectable change in AE output to predict insert failure.

  18. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  19. Rock burst proneness prediction by acoustic emission test during rock deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志镇; 高峰; 尚晓吉

    2014-01-01

    Rock burst is a severe disaster in mining and underground engineering, and it is important to predict the rock burst risk for minimizing the loss during the constructing process. The rock burst proneness was connected with the acoustic emission (AE) parameter in this work, which contributes to predicting the rock burst risk using AE technique. Primarily, a rock burst proneness index is proposed, and it just depends on the heterogeneous degree of rock material. Then, the quantificational formula between the value of rock burst proneness index and the accumulative AE counts in rock sample under uniaxial compression with axial strain increases is developed. Finally, three kinds of rock samples, i.e., granite, limestone and sandstone are tested about variation of the accumulative AE counts under uniaxial compression, and the test data are fitted well with the theoretic formula.

  20. Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission signals in carbon fiber reinforced polymer panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamene, Kassahun; Hudson, Larry; Sundaresan, Mannur

    2015-05-01

    Influence of attenuation on acoustic emission (AE) signals in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) crossply and quasi-isotropic panels is examined in this paper. Attenuation coefficients of the fundamental antisymmetric (A0) and symmetric (S0) wave modes were determined experimentally along different directions for the two types of CFRP panels. In the frequency range from 100 kHz to 500 kHz, the A0 mode undergoes significantly greater changes due to material related attenuation compared to the S0 mode. Moderate to strong changes in the attenuation levels were noted with propagation directions. Such mode and frequency dependent attenuation introduces major changes in the characteristics of AE signals depending on the position of the AE sensor relative to the source. Results from finite element simulations of a microscopic damage event in the composite laminates are used to illustrate attenuation related changes in modal and frequency components of AE signals.

  1. Effect of hydrogen attack on acoustic emission behavior of low carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of hydrogen attack degree on acoustic emission (AE) behavior of low carbon steel during tensiling, specimens made of low carbon steel was exposed to hydrogen gas of 18 MPa at 450 and 500℃ for 240, 480 and 720 h respectively. Experimental results show that with increase of the hydrogen attack degree, the totally AE activity decreases during tensiling. In addition, the count of AE signals with high amplitude for the specimens with hydrogen attack keeps a constant which is less than that without hydrogen attack. It is concluded that AE signals originate in the specimens with hydrogen attack from intergranular fracture induced by methane blisterings or/and microcracks on grain boundaries.

  2. Studies of Elastic Waves in Ethylene Propylene Rubber Using Acoustic Emission Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Masanori; Sakoda, Tatsuya; Otsubo, Masahisa; Akaiwa, Shigeru; Iki, Masatoshi; Nakano, Shigeharu

    The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between lowering of the insulation performance of cross-linked polyethylene (CV) cable and partial discharges (PDs) followed by the dielectric breakdown and to establish a diagnostic technique using an acoustic emission (AE) sensor. In this study, we focused on characterization of AE signals detected from ethylene propylene rubbers (EPRs) used as insulating materials of CV cables. Elastic waves with various frequencies were added to the surface of the EPR, and then characteristics of the detected AE signals due to the elastic waves propagated in the EPR were evaluated. We showed characteristics of Lamb waves whose low frequency components around 100 kHz were large and their small attenuation characteristics.

  3. Extensive Characterization of Seismic Laws in Acoustic Emissions of Crumpled Plastic Sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Leandro S; Mendes, Renio S; Ribeiro, Haroldo V

    2016-01-01

    Statistical similarities between earthquakes and other systems that emit cracking noises have been explored in diverse contexts, ranging from materials science to financial and social systems. Such analogies give promise of a unified and universal theory for describing the complex responses of those systems. There are, however, very few attempts to simultaneously characterize the most fundamental seismic laws in such systems. Here we present a complete description of the Gutenberg-Richter law, the recurrence times, Omori's law, the productivity law, and Bath's law for the acoustic emissions that happen in the relaxation process of uncrumpling thin plastic sheets. Our results show that these laws also appear in this phenomenon, but (for most cases) with different parameters from those reported for earthquakes and fracture experiments. This study thus contributes to elucidate the parallel between seismic laws and cracking noises in uncrumpling processes, revealing striking qualitative similarities but also show...

  4. Acoustic emission detection of 316L stainless steel welded joints during intergranular corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-yu Chai; Quan Duan; Wen-jie Bai; Zao-xiao Zhang; Xu-meng Xie

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes acoustic emission (AE) signals during the intergranular corrosion (IGC) process of 316L stainless steel welded joints under different welding currents in boiling nitric acid. IGC generates several AE signals with high AE activity. The AE tech-nique could hardly distinguish IGC in stainless steel welded joints with different welding heat inputs. However, AE signals can effectively distinguish IGC characteristics in different corrosion stages. The IGC resistance of a heat-affected zone is lower than that of a weld zone. The initiation and rapid corrosion stages can be distinguished using AE results and microstructural analysis. Moreover, energy count rate and am-plitude are considered to be ideal parameters for characterizing different IGC processes. Two types of signals are detected in the rapid corro-sion stage. It can be concluded that grain boundary corrosion and grain separation are the AE sources of type 1 and type 2, respectively.

  5. Acoustic emission localization based on FBG sensing network and SVR algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Yaozhang; Zhao, Xiuxia; Hou, Dianli; Jiang, Mingshun

    2017-03-01

    In practical application, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) structures are easy to appear all sorts of invisible damages. So the damages should be timely located and detected for the safety of CFPR structures. In this paper, an acoustic emission (AE) localization system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing network and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed for damage localization. AE signals, which are caused by damage, are acquired by high speed FBG interrogation. According to the Shannon wavelet transform, time differences between AE signals are extracted for localization algorithm based on SVR. According to the SVR model, the coordinate of AE source can be accurately predicted without wave velocity. The FBG system and localization algorithm are verified on a 500 mm×500 mm×2 mm CFRP plate. The experimental results show that the average error of localization system is 2.8 mm and the training time is 0.07 s.

  6. Use of Acoustic Emission to Monitor Progressive Damage Accumulation in Kevlar (R) 49 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jess M.; Saulsberry, Regor L.; Andrade, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during intermittent load hold tensile testing of epoxy impregnated Kevlar(Registeres TradeMark) 49 (K/Ep) composite strands were analyzed to monitor progressive damage during the approach to tensile failure. Insight into the progressive damage of K/Ep strands was gained by monitoring AE event rate and energy. Source location based on energy attenuation and arrival time data was used to discern between significant AE attributable to microstructural damage and spurious AE attributable to noise. One of the significant findings was the observation of increasing violation of the Kaiser effect (Felicity ratio < 1.0) with damage accumulation. The efficacy of three different intermittent load hold stress schedules that allowed the Felicity ratio to be determined analytically is discussed.

  7. A framework for the damage evaluation of acoustic emission signals through Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusano, Giulio; Lamonaca, Francesco; Tomasello, Riccardo; Garescì, Francesca; Corte, Aurelio La; Carnì, Domenico Luca; Carpentieri, Mario; Grimaldi, Domenico; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) is a powerful and potential nondestructive testing method for structural monitoring in civil engineering. Here, we show how systematic investigation of crack phenomena based on AE data can be significantly improved by the use of advanced signal processing techniques. Such data are a fundamental source of information that can be used as the basis for evaluating the status of the material, thereby paving the way for a new frontier of innovation made by data-enabled analytics. In this article, we propose a framework based on the Hilbert-Huang Transform for the evaluation of material damages that (i) facilitates the systematic employment of both established and promising analysis criteria, and (ii) provides unsupervised tools to achieve an accurate classification of the fracture type, the discrimination between longitudinal (P-) and traversal (S-) waves related to an AE event. The experimental validation shows promising results for a reliable assessment of the health status through the monitoring of civil infrastructures.

  8. Acoustic emission localization based on FBG sensing network and SVR algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Yaozhang; Zhao, Xiuxia; Hou, Dianli; Jiang, Mingshun

    2016-11-01

    In practical application, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) structures are easy to appear all sorts of invisible damages. So the damages should be timely located and detected for the safety of CFPR structures. In this paper, an acoustic emission (AE) localization system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing network and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed for damage localization. AE signals, which are caused by damage, are acquired by high speed FBG interrogation. According to the Shannon wavelet transform, time differences between AE signals are extracted for localization algorithm based on SVR. According to the SVR model, the coordinate of AE source can be accurately predicted without wave velocity. The FBG system and localization algorithm are verified on a 500 mm×500 mm×2 mm CFRP plate. The experimental results show that the average error of localization system is 2.8 mm and the training time is 0.07 s.

  9. Acoustic Emission Signal Recognition of Different Rocks Using Wavelet Transform and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of rocks generate acoustic emission (AE signals with various frequencies and amplitudes. How to determine rock types by their AE characteristics in field monitoring is also useful to understand their mechanical behaviors. Different types of rock specimens (granulite, granite, limestone, and siltstone were subjected to uniaxial compression until failure, and their AE signals were recorded during their fracturing process. The wavelet transform was used to decompose the AE signals, and the artificial neural network (ANN was established to recognize the rock types and noise (artificial knock noise and electrical noise. The results show that different rocks had different rupture features and AE characteristics. The wavelet transform provided a powerful method to acquire the basic characteristics of the rock AE and the environmental noises, such as the energy spectrum and the peak frequency, and the ANN was proved to be a good method to recognize AE signals from different types of rocks and the environmental noises.

  10. Evaluation of corrosion damage of aluminum alloy using acoustic emission testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Rongsheng; FU Gangqiang

    2004-01-01

    Current studies are aiming at monitoring corrosion damage of aircraft main structures by using acoustic emission (AE) technique and at supplying useful data for determining calendar life of the aircraft. The characteristics of AE signals produced during accelerating corrosion process are described, and methods for evaluating corrosion damages and determining remaining life of main structures of aircraft using AE testing are outlined. Experimental results have shown that AE technique can detect corrosion damage of aluminum alloy much earlier than conventional non-destructive testing means, such as ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. Relationship between corrosion damage and AE parameters was obtained through investigating corrosion damage extent and changes of AE signals during accelerating corrosion test, and showing that AE technique can be used to detect early corrosion, investigating corrosion developing trend, and in monitoring and evaluating corrosion damages.

  11. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals During Laser Spot Welding of SS304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seounghwan; Ahn, Suneung; Park, Changsoon

    2014-03-01

    In this article, an in-process monitoring scheme for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser spot welding (LSW) is presented. Acoustic emission (AE) was selected for the feedback signal, and the AE data during LSW were sampled and analyzed for varying process conditions such as laser power and pulse duration. In the analysis, possible AE generation sources such as melting and solidification mechanism during welding were investigated using both the time- and frequency-domain signal processings. The results, which show close relationships between LSW and AE signals, were adopted in the feature (input) selection of a back-propagation artificial neural network, to predict the weldability of stainless steel sheets. Processed outputs agree well with LSW experimental data, which confirms the usefulness of the proposed scheme.

  12. Size Differentiation Of A Continuous Stream Of Particles Using Acoustic Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsugbe, E.; Starr, A.; Foote, P.; Ruiz-Carcel, C.; Jennions, I.

    2016-11-01

    Procter and Gamble (P&G) require an online system that can monitor the particle size distribution of their washing powder mixing process. This would enable the process to take a closed loop form which would enable process optimisation to take place in real time. Acoustic Emission (AE) was selected as the sensing method due to its non-invasive nature and primary sensitivity to frequencies which particle events emanate. This work details the results of the first experiment carried out in this research project. This experiment involved the use of AE to distinguish between the sizes of sieved polyethylene particle (53-250microns) and glass beads (150-600microns) which were dispensed on a target plate using a funnel. By conducting a threshold analysis of the impact peaks in the signal, the sizes of the particles could be distinguished and a signal feature was found which could be directly linked to the sizes of the particles.

  13. The application of the acoustic emission technique to stone decay by sodium sulphate in laboratory tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossi, C. M.

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission was monitored during salt crystallisation cycles in order to study the mechanisms of rock deterioration by sodium sulphate in laboratory tests. Some porous carbonate stones used in Spanish monuments (Cathedral of Oviedo, Murcia and Seo Vella of Lérida were selected for this study. The acoustic emission detected during the different stages of the cycles (immersion, drying and cooling was interpreted to be the result of the salt behaviour inside the stone. The use of this technique has confirmed that this behaviour depends on salt characteristics (solubility, hydration state and polymorphism of anhydrous sodium sulphate and stone porosity and pore network.

    Para determinar los mecanismos de deterioro de las rocas debidos a la acción del sulfato de sodio, se ha registrado la emisión acústica durante ensayos de cristalización de sales en el laboratorio. Para ello, se han seleccionado tres piedras porosas carbonatadas utilizadas como materiales de construcción en monumentos españoles (Catedrales de Oviedo, Murcia y Seo Vella de Lérida. La emisión acústica detectada durante las diferentes etapas de los ciclos (inmersión, secado y enfriamiento se ha interpretado como debida al comportamiento de la sal en el interior de la piedra. Mediante esta técnica se ha confirmado que este comportamiento depende de las características de la sal (solubilidad, diferentes estados de hidratación y el polimorfismo del sulfato de sodio anhidro y de la porosidad y configuración del sistema poroso de las rocas.

  14. A robust calibration technique for acoustic emission systems based on momentum transfer from a ball drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a technique to estimate the seismic moment of acoustic emissions and other extremely small seismic events. Unlike previous calibration techniques, it does not require modeling of the wave propagation, sensor response, or signal conditioning. Rather, this technique calibrates the recording system as a whole and uses a ball impact as a reference source or empirical Green’s function. To correctly apply this technique, we develop mathematical expressions that link the seismic moment $M_{0}$ of internal seismic sources (i.e., earthquakes and acoustic emissions) to the impulse, or change in momentum $\\Delta p $, of externally applied seismic sources (i.e., meteor impacts or, in this case, ball impact). We find that, at low frequencies, moment and impulse are linked by a constant, which we call the force‐moment‐rate scale factor $C_{F\\dot{M}} = M_{0}/\\Delta p$. This constant is equal to twice the speed of sound in the material from which the seismic sources were generated. Next, we demonstrate the calibration technique on two different experimental rock mechanics facilities. The first example is a saw‐cut cylindrical granite sample that is loaded in a triaxial apparatus at 40 MPa confining pressure. The second example is a 2 m long fault cut in a granite sample and deformed in a large biaxial apparatus at lower stress levels. Using the empirical calibration technique, we are able to determine absolute source parameters including the seismic moment, corner frequency, stress drop, and radiated energy of these magnitude −2.5 to −7 seismic events.

  15. Measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, M.A.; Leonard, J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    In response to concerns regarding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, several industries are looking into new technologies to mitigate GHG production. This paper described the ongoing research regarding composting and its application to the waste management sector. Baseline data has been collected on emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxides, the primary greenhouse gases. Four test trials were performed at a composting facility which involved windrows with: high carbon to nitrogen ratio, turned; high carbon to nitrogen ratio, unturned; low carbon to nitrogen ratio, turned; and, low carbon to nitrogen ratio, unturned. The objective was to verify the hypothesis that high carbon to nitrogen ratio could suppress nitrous oxide emissions due to less available nitrogen for mineralization and subsequent denitrification. Another objective was to confirm if turning the compost promotes an aerobic environment in which methane production is decreased. Concurrent bench-scale composting experiments were conducted to measure and analyze off-gases to evaluate the feasibility of field-scale composting operations.

  16. Avalanche dynamics of structural phase transitions in shape memory alloys by acoustic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Benno

    2009-09-24

    In this work the avalanche dynamics of five shape memory samples has been analyzed by acoustic emission spectroscopy. The acoustic emission spectroscopy is particularly suitable for this analysis as it couples with high sensitivity to small structural changes caused by nucleation processes, interface movements, or variant rearrangements [91]. Owing to its high time resolution it provides a statistical approach to describe the jerky and intermittent character of the avalanche dynamics [20]. Rate-dependent cooling and heating runs have been conducted in order to study time-dependent aspects of the transition dynamics of the single crystals Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, Au{sub 50.5}Cd{sub 49.5}, and Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup single}{sub 31.2}, and the polycrystalline sample Fe{sub 68.8}Pd{sup poly}{sub 31.2}. Moreover, a ferromagnetic Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} single crystal has been studied by temperature cycles under an applied magnetic field and additionally by magnetic-field cycles at a constant temperature in the martensitic phase. All samples analyzed in this work show power law behavior in the acoustic emission features amplitude, energy, and duration, which indicates scale-free behavior. The access to these power law spectra allows an investigation of energy barriers separating the metastable states, which give rise to avalanche transition dynamics. By performing rate-dependent experiments the importance of thermal fluctuations and the impact of martensite respectively twin stabilization processes have been examined. In the case of the Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 23}Ga{sub 25} sample, the magnetic-field-induced variant rearrangement at slow field cycles leads to stronger signals than the rearrangement at quick cycles. This behavior can be explained by twin stabilization processes, which are accompanied by a reduction of the twin boundary mobility. For Ni{sub 63}Al{sub 37}, the combination of relevant thermal fluctuations, different involved time scales, and a high degree of

  17. Effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma with negative equilibrium dust charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Subrata; Ghosh, Uttam; Sarkar, Susmita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves in a complex plasma where equilibrium dust charge is negative. The primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions are Boltzmann distributed, and only dust grains are inertial. Electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions have been neglected with the assumption that electron and ion mean free paths are very large compared to the plasma Debye length. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic dust charge variations have been separately taken into account. In the case of adiabatic dust charge variation, nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves is governed by the KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation, whereas for nonadiabatic dust charge variation, it is governed by the KdV-Burger equation. The solution of the KdV equation gives a dust acoustic soliton, whose amplitude and width depend on the secondary electron yield. Similarly, the KdV-Burger equation provides a dust acoustic shock wave. This dust acoustic shock wave may be monotonic or oscillatory in nature depending on the fact that whether it is dissipation dominated or dispersion dominated. Our analysis shows that secondary electron emission increases nonadiabaticity induced dissipation and consequently increases the monotonicity of the dust acoustic shock wave. Such a dust acoustic shock wave may accelerate charge particles and cause bremsstrahlung radiation in space plasmas whose physical process may be affected by secondary electron emission from dust grains. The effect of the secondary electron emission on the stability of the equilibrium points of the KdV-Burger equation has also been investigated. This equation has two equilibrium points. The trivial equilibrium point with zero potential is a saddle and hence unstable in nature. The nontrivial equilibrium point with constant nonzero potential is a stable node up to a critical value of the wave velocity and a stable focus above it. This critical

  18. Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night-Vision Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles by Jeremy Gaston, Tim Mermagen, and...SUBTITLE Acoustic Measurement and Model Predictions for the Aural Nondetectability of Two Night - Vision Goggles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study evaluates two different night - vision goggles (NVGs) to determine if the devices meet level II

  19. Underwater hybrid near-field acoustical holography based on the measurement of vector hydrophone array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid near-field acoustical holography(NAH) is developed for reconstructing acoustic radiation from a cylindrical source in a complex underwater environment. In hybrid NAH,we combine statistically optimized near-field acoustical holography(SONAH) and broadband acoustical holography from intensity measurements(BAHIM) to reconstruct the underwater cylindrical source field. First,the BAHIM is utilized to regenerate as much acoustic pressures on the hologram surface as necessary,and then the acoustic pressures are taken as input to the formulation implemented numerically by SONAH. The main advantages of this technology are that the complex pressure on the hologram surface can be reconstructed without reference signal,and the measurement array can be smaller than the source,thus the practicability and efficiency of this technology are greatly enhanced. Numerical examples of a cylindrical source are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than conventional NAH. Then,an experiment has been carried out with a vector hydrophone array. The experimental results show the advantage of hybrid NAH in the reconstruction of an acoustic field and the feasibility of using a vector hydrophone array in an underwater NAH measurement,as well as the identification and localization of noise sources.

  20. Experimental facility for the study of acoustic emission registered in the primary circuit components of WWER power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Hovakimyan, T. H.; Yeghoyan, E. A.; Hovhannisyan, H. T.; Mayilyan, D. G.; Petrosyan, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the creation of a facility for the experimental study of a phenomenon of background acoustic emission (AE), which is detected in the main circulation loop (MCL) of WWER power units. The analysis of the operating principle and the design of a primary feed-and-blow down system (FB) deaerator of NPP as the most likely source of continuous acoustic emission is carried out. The experimental facility for the systematic study of a phenomenon of continuous AE is developed. A physical model of a thermal deaerator is designed and constructed. A thermal monitoring system is introduced. An automatic system providing acoustic signal registration in a low frequency (0.03-30 kHz) and high frequency (30-300 kHz) bands and study of its spectral characteristics is designed. Special software for recording and processing of digitized electrical sensor signals is developed. A separate and independent principle of study of the most probable processes responsible for the generation of acoustic emission signals in the deaerator is applied. Trial series of experiments and prechecks of acoustic signals in different modes of the deaerator model are conducted. Compliance of basic technological parameters with operating range of the real deaerator was provided. It is shown that the acoustic signal time-intensity curve has several typical regions. The pilot research showed an impact of various processes that come about during the operation of the deaerator physical model on the intensity of the AE signal. The experimental results suggest that the main sources of generation of the AE signals are the processes of steam condensation, turbulent flow of gas-vapor medium, and water boiling.

  1. Fish Acoustics: Physics-Based Modeling and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    physical scattering mechanisms. To demonstrate this point, the target strength of a canonical gas-filled sphere is computed using a standard...high-frequency sound scattering by swimbladdered fish,” Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 78, pp. 688-700 (1985). 9. Gauss , R. C

  2. Measurements and Simulation Studies of Piezoceramics for Acoustic Particle Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Salomon, K; Graf, K; Hoessl, J; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Katz, U; Lahmann, R; Naumann, C

    2005-01-01

    Calibration sources are an indispensable tool for all detectors. In acoustic particle detection the goal of a calibration source is to mimic neutrino signatures as expected from hadronic cascades. A simple and promising method for the emulation of neutrino signals are piezo ceramics. We will present results of measruements and simulations on these piezo ceramics.

  3. Age effects in the human middle ear: Wideband acoustical measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, M. Patrick; Sanford, Chris A.

    2004-12-01

    Studies that have examined age effects in the human middle ear using either admittance measures at 220 or 660 Hz or multifrequency tympanometry from 200 to 2000 Hz have had conflicting results. Several studies have suggested an increase in admittance with age, while several others have suggested a decrease in admittance with age. A third group of studies found no significant age effect. This study examined 226 Hz tympanometry and wideband energy reflectance and impedance at ambient pressure in a group of 40 young adults and a group of 30 adults with age >=60 years. The groups did not differ in admittance measures of the middle ear at 226 Hz. However, significant age effects were found in wideband energy reflectance and impedance. In particular, in older adults there was a comparative decrease in reflectance from 800 to 2000 Hz but an increase near 4000 Hz. The results suggest a decrease in middle-ear stiffness with age. The findings of this study hold relevance for understanding the aging process in the auditory system, for the establishment of normative data for wideband energy reflectance, for the possibility of a conductive component to presbycusis, and for the interpretation of otoacoustic emission measurements. .

  4. Acoustic emissions from the inner ear and brain stem responses in type 2 diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbari Moghaddam Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Yalda Jabbari MoghaddamDepartment of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the auditory brain stem response (ABR and acoustic emissions of the inner ear (OAE in middle-aged type 2 diabetics.Methods: Fifty type 2 diabetic and nondiabetic patients aged 40–50 years and attending the Tabriz Medical University outpatient clinics were recruited for this study during 2009–2010. All ABR and OAE procedures were implemented by an audiometrist. The relationship between ABR and OAE findings and demographic, laboratory, and clinical characteristics was investigated.Results: Fifty patients (34 female and 16 male of average age 45.7 ± 3.0 years were entered into the study. In the type 2 diabetic group, disordered ABR was found in at least one ear in 8% of cases and disordered OAE was recorded in at least one ear in 16% of cases, with no significant difference between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Mean age, duration of diabetes, serum HbA1c levels, and prevalence of female gender were higher in the diabetic group.Conclusion: According to our findings, the prevalence of ABR and OAE is not significantly different between type 2 diabetics and nondiabetics.Keywords: sensorineural hearing loss, diabetes, auditory brain stem response, otoacoustic emission

  5. Reproducible Data Processing Research for the CABRI R.I.A. experiments Acoustic Emission signal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantera, Laurent [CEA, DEN, CAD/DER/SRES/LPRE, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Issiaka Traore, Oumar [Laboratory of Machanics and Acoustics (LMA) CNRS, 13402 Marseille (France)

    2015-07-01

    The CABRI facility is an experimental nuclear reactor of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) designed to study the behaviour of fuel rods at high burnup under Reactivity Initiated Accident (R.I.A.) conditions such as the scenario of a control rod ejection. During the experimental phase, the behaviour of the fuel element generates acoustic waves which can be detected by two microphones placed upstream and downstream from the test device. Studies carried out on the last fourteen tests showed the interest in carrying out temporal and spectral analyses on these signals by showing the existence of signatures which can be correlated with physical phenomena. We want presently to return to this rich data in order to have a new point of view by applying modern signal processing methods. Such an antecedent works resumption leads to some difficulties. Although all the raw data are accessible in the form of text files, analyses and graphics representations were not clear in reproducing from the former studies since the people who were in charge of the original work have left the laboratory and it is not easy when time passes, even with our own work, to be able to remember the steps of data manipulations and the exact setup. Thus we decided to consolidate the availability of the data and its manipulation in order to provide a robust data processing workflow to the experimentalists before doing any further investigations. To tackle this issue of strong links between data, treatments and the generation of documents, we adopted a Reproducible Research paradigm. We shall first present the tools chosen in our laboratory to implement this workflow and, then we shall describe the global perception carried out to continue the study of the Acoustic Emission signals recorded by the two microphones during the last fourteen CABRI R.I.A. tests. (authors)

  6. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude. 4. Experiences with Modifications of the Acoustic Structuring Test. Research Bulletin. No. 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Kai

    Four new versions of an acoustic structuring test were developed, administered, and analyzed in order to produce better tests and to contribute to better understanding of the abilities measured by these tests. The tests consist of tape recordings of patterns of musical notes played on an electric organ or an acoustic guitar. Item analyses and…

  7. Testing of containers made of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with the aid of acoustic emission analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolitz, K.; Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis as a quasi-nondestructive test method makes it possible to differentiate clearly, in judging the total behavior of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, between critical failure modes (in the case of unidirectional composites fiber fractures) and non-critical failure modes (delamination processes or matrix fractures). A particular advantage is that, for varying pressure demands on the composites, the emitted acoustic pulses can be analyzed with regard to their amplitude distribution. In addition, definite indications as to how the damages occurred can be obtained from the time curves of the emitted acoustic pulses as well as from the particular frequency spectrum. Distinct analogies can be drawn between the various analytical methods with respect to whether the failure modes can be classified as critical or non-critical.

  8. Accuracy of measurement of acoustic rhinometry applied to small experimental animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaise, Toshihiko; Ukai, Kotara; Pedersen, Ole Finn;

    1999-01-01

    Nasal obstruction is one of the major symptoms of allergic rhinitis. In the study of the mechanism of nasal obstruction, experiments on animal are useful. In adult humans, acoustic rhinometry has been used to evaluate nasal obstruction by determining nasal cavity dimensions in terms of cross......-sectional areas as a function of the distance from the nostril. We modified the equipment used on humans to assess dimensions of nasal airway geometry of small experimental animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of measurement of the modified acoustic rhinometry applied to small...... experimental animals using nasal cavity models and guinea pigs. Measurement of the nasal cavity models (made of cylindrical silicone tubes) showed that the acoustic rhinometry estimated 85.5% of actual area and 79.0% of actual volume. In guinea pigs, nasal cavity volume determined by the acoustic rhinometry...

  9. Detecting Acoustic Emissions With/Without Dehydration of Serpentine Outside P-T Field of Conventional Brittle Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H.; Fei, Y.; Silver, P. G.; Green, H. W.

    2005-12-01

    It is currently thought that earthquakes cannot be triggered at depths greater than ~60 km by unassisted brittle failure or frictional sliding, but could be triggered by dehydration embrittlement of hydrous minerals (Raleigh and Paterson, 1965; Green and Houston, 1995; Kirby, 1995; Jung et al., 2004). Using a new multianvil-based system for detecting acoustic emissions with four channels at high pressure and high temperature that was recently developed (Jung et al., 2005), we tested this hypothesis by deforming samples of serpentine. We found that acoustic emissions were detected not only during/after the dehydration of serpentine, but even in the absence of dehydration. These emissions occurred at high pressure and high temperature, and thus outside pressure-temperature field of conventional brittle failure. Backscattered-electron images of microstructures of the post-run specimen revealed fault slip at elevated pressure, with offsets of up to ~500 μm, even without dehydration. Analysis of P-wave travel times from the four sensors confirmed that the acoustic emissions originated from within the specimen during fault slip. These observations suggest that earthquakes can be triggered by slip along a fault containing serpentine at significantly higher pressure and temperature conditions than that previously thought, even without dehydration. They are thus consistent with faulting mechanisms that appeal to dehydration embrittlement, as well as those that rely solely on the rheology of non-dehydrated serpentine.

  10. Identification of a Critical Time with Acoustic Emission Monitoring during Static Fatigue Tests on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Towards Lifetime Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Godin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites are promising candidates for some aeronautic applications that require good thermomechanical behavior over long periods of time. This study focuses on the behavior of a SiCf/[Si-B-C] composite with a self-healing matrix at intermediate temperature under air. Static fatigue experiments were performed below 600 °C and a lifetime diagram is presented. Damage is monitored both by strain measurement and acoustic emission during the static fatigue experiments. Two methods of real-time analysis of associated energy release have been developed. They allow for the identification of a characteristic time that was found to be close to 55% of the measured rupture time. This critical time reflects a critical local energy release assessed by the applicability of the Benioff law. This critical aspect is linked to a damage phase where slow crack growth in fibers is prevailing leading to ultimate fracture of the composite.

  11. Measurement of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter B/A of lossy medium in a focused field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An analytical description for the linear and nonlinear acoustic fields in lossy medium of a focusing source is derived. The relationship of pressure amplitudes at focus for fundamental and the second harmonic waves is discussed. At high linear focusing gain G, a new method using the insert substitution method for measuring the acoustic nonlinear parameter B /A of biological tissues is presented. Results for some biological tissues are experimentally obtained.

  12. Measurement of emissivity of industrial surfaces using a simple method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmeyer, H.

    1988-01-01

    To detect emissivity, the drop in temperature of the sample undergoing radiation exchange with the wall in an evacuated space is measured over a given period. In this manner, emissivities of various synthetic resin lacquers, metals, and metallic coatings were measured. Once the emissivity is known, the same method can be used to detect specific heat and the head condition of gases.

  13. Field Measurements of PCB emissions from Building Surfaces Using a New Portable Emission Test Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nadja; Haven, Rune; Gunnarsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure PCB-emission rates from indoor surfaces on-site in contaminated buildings using a newly developed portable emission test cell. Emission rates were measured from six different surfaces; three untreated surfaces and three remediated surfaces in a contaminated...... Danish elementary school. The emission test cell was capable of measuring widely varying specific emission rates of PCBtotal (8-3357 ng/(m2·h)). Remediated measures were found to reduce the emission rates by more than 96% compared with similar untreated surfaces. Emission rates may be affected...... by the conditions in the test cell (such as clean air and increased air velocity) and thereby potentially be different without the test cell attached to the surface. Still the measured emission rates obtained by using the test cell are valuable for determination of mitigation strategies. Additionally the test cell...

  14. Passive wireless surface acoustic wave sensors for monitoring sequestration sites CO2 emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yizhong [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chyu, Minking [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Qing-Ming [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-02-14

    University of Pittsburgh’s Transducer lab has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient CO2 measuring technologies for geological sequestration sites leakage monitoring. A passive wireless CO2 sensing system based on surface acoustic wave technology and carbon nanotube nanocomposite was developed. Surface acoustic wave device was studied to determine the optimum parameters. Delay line structure was adopted as basic sensor structure. CNT polymer nanocomposite was fabricated and tested under different temperature and strain condition for natural environment impact evaluation. Nanocomposite resistance increased for 5 times under pure strain, while the temperature dependence of resistance for CNT solely was -1375ppm/°C. The overall effect of temperature on nanocomposite resistance was -1000ppm/°C. The gas response of the nanocomposite was about 10% resistance increase under pure CO2 . The sensor frequency change was around 300ppm for pure CO2 . With paralyne packaging, the sensor frequency change from relative humidity of 0% to 100% at room temperature decreased from over 1000ppm to less than 100ppm. The lowest detection limit of the sensor is 1% gas concentration, with 36ppm frequency change. Wireless module was tested and showed over one foot transmission distance at preferred parallel orientation.

  15. Acoustic Measurements of a Large Civil Transport Main Landing Gear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Wisda, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Microphone phased array acoustic measurements of a 26 percent-scale, Boeing 777-200 main landing gear model with and without noise reduction fairings installed were obtained in the anechoic configuration of the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.17 with the latter speed used as the nominal test condition. The fully and partially dressed gear with the truck angle set at 13 degrees toe-up landing configuration were the two most extensively tested configurations, serving as the baselines for comparison purposes. Acoustic measurements were also acquired for the same two baseline configurations with the truck angle set at 0 degrees. In addition, a previously tested noise reducing, toboggan-shaped fairing was re-evaluated extensively to address some of the lingering questions regarding the extent of acoustic benefit achievable with this device. The integrated spectra generated from the acoustic source maps reconfirm, in general terms, the previously reported noise reduction performance of the toboggan fairing as installed on an isolated gear. With the recent improvements to the Virginia Tech tunnel acoustic quality and microphone array capabilities, the present measurements provide an additional, higher quality database to the acoustic information available for this gear model.

  16. Method of characterizing residual stress in ferromagnetic materials using a pulse histogram of acoustic emission signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Min (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Kushnick, Peter W. (Inventor); Grainger, John L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for characterizing residual uniaxial stress in a ferromagnetic test member by distinguishing between residual stresses resulting from positive (tension) forces and negative (compression) forces by using the distinct and known magnetoacoustic (MAC) and a magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) measurement circuit means. A switch permits the selective operation of the respective circuit means.

  17. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

    2002-01-29

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

  18. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Ph.D., Jorge O.

    2002-06-10

    The objective of the project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This will be accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging were linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of cores and theoretical modeling.

  19. Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

    CERN Document Server

    British Standards Institution. London

    1998-01-01

    Acoustics. Measurement of sound insulation in buildings and of building elements. Laboratory measurements of the reduction of transmitted impact noise by floor coverings on a heavyweight standard floor

  20. Mercury Emission Measurement at a CFB Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-02-28

    In response to pending regulation to control mercury emissions in the United States and Canada, several projects have been conducted to perform accurate mass balances at pulverized coal (pc)-fired utilities. Part of the mercury mass balance always includes total gaseous mercury as well as a determination of the speciation of the mercury emissions and a concentration bound to the particulate matter. This information then becomes useful in applying mercury control strategies, since the elemental mercury has traditionally been difficult to control by most technologies. In this instance, oxidation technologies have proven most beneficial for increased capture. Despite many years of mercury measurement and control projects at pc-fired units, far less work has been done on circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) units, which are able to combust a variety of feedstocks, including cofiring coal with biomass. Indeed, these units have proven to be more problematic because it is very difficult to obtain a reliable mercury mass balance. These units tend to have very different temperature profiles than pc-fired utility boilers. The flexibility of CFB units also tends to be an issue when a mercury balance is determined, since the mercury inputs to the system come from the bed material and a variety of fuels, which can have quite variable chemistry, especially for mercury. In addition, as an integral part of the CFB operation, the system employs a feedback loop to circulate the bed material through the combustor and the solids collection system (the primary cyclone), thereby subjecting particulate-bound metals to higher temperatures again. Despite these issues, CFB boilers generally emit very little mercury and show good native capture. The Energy & Environmental Research Center is carrying out this project for Metso Power in order to characterize the fate of mercury across the unit at Rosebud Plant, an industrial user of CFB technology from Metso. Appropriate solids were collected, and

  1. Monotonic tensile behavior analysis of three-dimensional needle-punched woven C/SiC composites by acoustic emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Fang; Laifei Cheng; Litong Zhang; Jingjiang Nie

    2008-01-01

    High toughness and reliable three-dimensional needled C/SiC composites were fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). An approach to analyze the tensile behaviors at room temperature and the damage accumulation of the composites by means of acoustic emission was researched. Also the fracture morphology was examined by S-4700 SEM after tensile tests to prove the damage mechanism. The results indicate that the cumulative energy of acoustic emission (AE) signals can be used to monitor and evaluate the damage evolution in ceramic-matrix composites. The initiation of room-temperature tensile damage in C/SiC composites occurred with the growth of micro-cracks in the matrix at the stress level about 40% of the ultimate fracture stress. The level 70% of the fracture stress could be defined as the critical damage strength.

  2. STUDIES OF ACOUSTIC EMISSION SIGNATURES FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE OF SS 316L WELDED SAMPLES UNDER DYNAMIC LOAD CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. RANGANAYAKULU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE signatures of various weld defects of stainless steel 316L nuclear grade weld material are investigated. The samples are fabricated by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG Welding Method have final dimension of 140 mm x 15 mm x 10 mm. AE signals from weld defects such as Pinhole, Porosity, Lack of Penetration, Lack of Side Fusion and Slag are recorded under dynamic load conditions by specially designed mechanical jig. AE features of the weld defects were attained using Linear Location Technique (LLT. The results from this study concluded that, stress release and structure deformation between the sections in welding area are load conditions major part of Acoustic Emission activity during loading.

  3. Measurement of the acoustic radiation force on a sphere embedded in a soft solid

    CERN Document Server

    Lidon, Pierre; Taberlet, Nicolas; Manneville, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force exerted on a small sphere located at the focus of an ultrasonic beam is measured in a soft gel. It is proved to evolve quadratically with the local amplitude of the acoustic field. Strong oscillations of the local pressure are observed and attributed to an acoustic Fabry-P{\\'e}rot effect between the ultrasonic emitter and the sphere. Taking this effect into account with a simple model, a quantitative link between the radiation force and the acoustic pressure is proposed and compared to theoretical predictions in the absence of dissipation. The discrepancy between experiment and theory suggests that dissipative effects should be taken into account for fully modeling the observations.

  4. Reproducibility experiments on measuring acoustical properties of rigid-frame porous media (round-robin tests).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Bécot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc; Sgard, Franck; Renault, Amélie; Amirouche, Nesrine; Pompoli, Francesco; Prodi, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Pispola, Giulio; Asdrubali, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the results of reproducibility experiments on the interlaboratory characterization of the acoustical properties of three types of consolidated porous media: granulated porous rubber, reticulated foam, and fiberglass. The measurements are conducted in several independent laboratories in Europe and North America. The studied acoustical characteristics are the surface complex acoustic impedance at normal incidence and plane wave absorption coefficient which are determined using the standard impedance tube method. The paper provides detailed procedures related to sample preparation and installation and it discusses the dispersion in the acoustical material property observed between individual material samples and laboratories. The importance of the boundary conditions, homogeneity of the porous material structure, and stability of the adopted signal processing method are highlighted.

  5. Measurement of acoustic field radiated by low frequency power ultrasonic transducer with laser-interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Menglu; GAO Wen; HU Wenxiang

    2000-01-01

    Based on the piezo-optic effect of medium, the refractive index of medium is the function of its density, and so it's also the function of acoustic pressure. Therefore, acoustic pressure in the optical path everywhere can be determined absolutely by laser-interferometric technique and relative distribution of pressure in the middle and far acoustic field, which can be obtained from theory or experiment respectively. Theory and experiment of measurement of pressure in acoustic field with laser-interferometer are introduced. Distribution of pressure radiated by a power ultrasonic transducer is determined by laser interferometric technique.The theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement. The receiving sensitivity of a PVDF (Polyvinylidene fluoride) transducer in free field is also calibrated absolutely due to above results and its sensitivity is -118.5 dB.

  6. Stability monitoring system using acoustic emissions. Sistema de control de la estabilidad basado en la emision acustica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celada Tamames, B.; Varona Eraso, P.; Velasco Trivino, E. (Geocontrol, S.A., Madrid (Spain))

    1989-11-01

    In 1987, the ECSC decided to offer part funding to a research project being carried out by Geocontrol SA concerning the development of a system for monitoring stability by the use of acoustic emissions. The project focuses on predicting instability in coal pillars. The present article describes the first lines of investigation during 1988 and 1989 and the results so far. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  8. Acoustic emission detection of early stages of cracks in rotating gearbox components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dan

    2017-02-01

    Many critical, highly loaded rotating gearbox components have fast crack propagation rates. Early detection of cracks in gearbox is critical to mitigating the risk of catastrophic failure. Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have proven to be capable of continuously monitoring the crack initiation and propagation. Due to the long distance of AE signal propagation from the AE sources to the sensors installed in the housing, the AE signal suffers from severe attenuation and noises. Accurate AE signal classification technology that is capable of extracting the true AE signal out of background noises generated by the surrounding environment of a gearbox is desired. In this paper, an innovative feature extraction and analysis based AE signal classification technology is developed to address this issue. Potential AE signals are first pulled out of the noisy background in real-time through a set of automated AE detection algorithms. Then features including count, energy, duration, amplitude, rise time, amplitude rise time ratio, etc. are extracted and analyzed. Through the comparison and correlation of features extracted from signals recorded by multiple AE sensors, respective feature thresholds are determined to distinguish noises from real AE signal. The classification results are experimentally validated through fatigue tests.

  9. Detecting crack profile in concrete using digital image correlation and acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loukili A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Failure process in concrete structures is usually accompanied by cracking of concrete. Understanding the cracking pattern is very important while studying the failure governing criteria of concrete. The cracking phenomenon in concrete structures is usually complex and involves many microscopic mechanisms caused by material heterogeneity. Since last many years, fracture or damage analysis by experimental examinations of the cement based composites has shown importance to evaluate the cracking and damage behavior of those heterogeneous materials with damage accumulation due to microcracks development ahead of the propagating crack tip; and energy dissipation resulted during the evolution of damage in the structure. The techniques used in those experiments may be the holographic interferometry, the dye penetration, the scanning electron microscopy, the acoustic emission etc. Those methods offer either the images of the material surface to observe micro-features of the concrete with qualitative analysis, or the black-white fringe patterns of the deformation on the specimen surface, from which it is difficult to observe profiles of the damaged materials.

  10. Effect of fiber orientation in uni-directional glass epoxy laminate using acoustic emission monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Arumugam; S. Barath Kumar; C. Santulli; A. Joseph Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) can be used for in situ structural health monitoring of the composite laminates.One of the main issues of AE is to characterize different damage mechanisms from the detected AE signals.In the present work,pure resin and GFRP composites laminates with different stacking sequences such as 0°,90°,angle ply[±45°],cross-ply [0°/90°] are used to trigger different failure mechanisms when subjected to tensile test with AE monitoring.The study of failure mechanisms is facilitated by the choice of different oriented specimens in which one or two such mechanisms predominate.Range of peak frequencies in each orientation is investigated using FFT analysis.Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) enabled calculating the frequency content of each damage mechanism.Randomly selected hits from each range of peak frequencies for the specimens with different orientations subjected to tensile test with AE monitoring are analyzed using short time FFT (STFFT) analysis.STFFT analysis is used to highlight the possible failure mechanism associated with each signal.The predominance of failure modes in each orientation is useful in the study of discrimination of failure modes in composite laminates from AE data.

  11. Research on the Monitoring System of CNC Grinding Process Based on Acoustic Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Zhongxiang; TENG Jiaxu; YANG Junwei; HUO Xiaojing; SHI Xiaojun

    2006-01-01

    Using on-line monitoring during the CNC grinding process, the hazard case such as the crushing of grinding wheel and various safety accidents could be avoided, and the optimum time for dressing and replacing grinding wheel could also be determined, and hence, the service life of the grinding wheel could be prolonged and grinding quality could be improved. To overcome the limitation of some traditional techniques in which some parameters including the grinding power and force, torque and so on were monitored, the acoustic emission (AE) technique, which provides high sensitivity and responding speed, were developed in the present paper. The mechanism of AE during grinding was reviewed. Moreover, a virtual AE monitoring system, which could monitor the grinding state under different working conditions during the grinding, has been developed based on the Virtual Instruments technique. Some experiments were also performed on the internal grinder. The results showed that the AE signals became stronger with increasing the main shaft speed and grinding depth or decreasing the distance between the AE sensor and grinding area.

  12. Comparison of alternatives to amplitude thresholding for onset detection of acoustic emission signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, F.; Gagar, D.; Foote, P.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring can be used to detect the presence of damage as well as determine its location in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. Information on the time difference of the signal generated by the damage event arriving at different sensors in an array is essential in performing localisation. Currently, this is determined using a fixed threshold which is particularly prone to errors when not set to optimal values. This paper presents three new methods for determining the onset of AE signals without the need for a predetermined threshold. The performance of the techniques is evaluated using AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth and compared to the established Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and fixed threshold methods. It was found that the 1D location accuracy of the new methods was within the range of < 1 - 7.1 % of the monitored region compared to 2.7% for the AIC method and a range of 1.8-9.4% for the conventional Fixed Threshold method at different threshold levels.

  13. Influence of geometry on the fracturing behavior of textile reinforced cement monitored by acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, D. G.; Blom, J.; El Kadi, M.; Wastiels, J.

    2014-03-01

    In this work the flexural behavior of textile reinforced cement (TRC) laminate is examined using acoustic emission (AE). The TRC composite is a combination of inorganic phosphate cement (IPC) with randomly distributed glass fibres. IPC has been developed at the "Vrije Universiteit Brussel" and shows a neutral pH meaning that glass fibers are hardly attacked. During bending, stresses lead to the activation of damage mechanisms like matrix cracking, delaminations and fiber pull-out being in succession or overlapping in time. AE records the responses of the damage propagation events and allows the monitoring of the fracture behavior from the onset to the final stage. The effect of the span in three-point bending tests, which is varied to create different stress fields, is targeted. Parameters like duration and frequency reveal information about the mode of the damage sources in relation to the span. Results show that as the span decreases, the dominant damage mode shifts away from bending and acquires more shear characteristics by increasing the interlaminar shearing events.

  14. Application of acoustic emission on the characterization of fracture in textile reinforced cement laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, J; Wastiels, J; Aggelis, D G

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of textile reinforced cementitious (TRC) composites under flexural loading. The main objective is to link specific AE parameters to the fracture mechanisms that are successively dominating the failure of this laminated material. At relatively low load, fracture is initiated by matrix cracking while, at the moment of peak load and thereafter, the fiber pull-out stage is reached. Stress modeling of the material under bending reveals that initiation of shear phenomena can also be activated depending on the shape (curvature) of the plate specimens. Preliminary results show that AE waveform parameters like frequency and energy are changing during loading, following the shift of fracturing mechanisms. Additionally, the AE behavior of specimens with different curvature is very indicative of the stress mode confirming the results of modeling. Moreover, AE source location shows the extent of the fracture process zone and its development in relation to the load. It is seen that AE monitoring yields valuable real time information on the fracture of the material and at the same time supplies valuable feedback to the stress modeling.

  15. Signal Simulation and Experimental Research on Acoustic Emission using LS-DYNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianchao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To calculate sound wave velocity, we performed the Hsu-Nielsen lead break experiment using the ANSYS/LS-DYNA finite element software. First, we identified the key problems in the finite element analysis, such as selecting the exciting force, dividing the grid density, and setting the calculation steps. Second, we established the finite element model of the sound wave transmission in a plate under the lead break simulation. Results revealed not only the transmission characteristics of the sound wave but also the simulation and calculation of the transmission velocity of the longitudinal and transverse waves through the time travel curve of the vibration velocity of the sound wave at various nodes. Finally, the Hsu-Nielsen lead break experiment was implemented. The results of the theoretical calculation and simulation analysis were consistent with the experimental results, thus demonstrating that the research method using the ANSYS/LS-DYNA software to simulate sound wave transmissions in acoustic emission experiments is feasible and effective.

  16. Development of Methodology to Assess the Failure Behaviour of Bamboo Single Fibre by Acoustic Emission Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md. Saiful; Gulshan, Fahmida; Ahsan, Qumrul; Wevers, Martine; Pfeiffer, Helge; van Vuure, Aart-Willem; Osorio, Lina; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used as a tool for detecting, evaluating and for better understanding of the damage mechanism and failure behavior in composites during mechanical loading. Methodology was developed for tensile test of natural fibres (bamboo single fibre). A series of experiments were performed and load drops (one or two) were observed in the load versus time graphs. From the observed AE parameters such as amplitude, energy, duration etc. significant information corresponding to the load drops were found. These AE signals from the load drop occurred from such failure as debonding between two elementary fibre or from join of elementary fibre at edge. The various sources of load at first load drop was not consistent for the different samples (for a particular sample the value is 8 N, stress: 517.51 MPa). Final breaking of fibre corresponded to saturated level AE amplitude of preamplifier (99.9 dB) for all samples. Therefore, it was not possible to determine the exact AE energy value for final breaking. Same methodology was used for tensile test of three single fibres, which gave clear indication of load drop before the final breaking of first and second fibre.

  17. Acoustic emission monitoring of medieval towers considered as sensitive earthquake receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carpinteri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many ancient masonry towers are present in Italian territory. In some cases these structures are at risk on account of the intensity of the stresses they are subjected to due to the high level of regional seismicity. In order to preserve this inestimable cultural heritage, a sound safety assessment should take into account the evolution of damage phenomena. In this connection, acoustic emission (AE monitoring can be highly effective. This study concerns the structural stability of three medieval towers rising in the centre of Alba, a characteristic town in Piedmont (Italy. During the monitoring period a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of these towers and regional seismicity was found. Earthquakes always affect structural stability. Besides that, the towers behaved as sensitive earthquake receptors. Here a method to correlate bursts of AE activity in a masonry building and regional seismicity is proposed. In particular, this method permits to identify the premonitory signals that precede a catastrophic event on a structure, since, in most cases, these warning signs can be captured well in advance.

  18. Fracture Formation Evaluation of Reinforced Concrete Structure Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Panjsetooni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE is an important nondestructive evaluation (NDE technique used in the field of structural engineering for both case local and global monitoring. In this study AE technique with a new approach was employed to investigate the process of fracture formation in reinforced concrete structure. A number of reinforced concrete (RC one story frames were tested under loading cycle and were simultaneously monitored using AE. The AE test data was analyzed using the relaxation ratio and calm and load ratio method. Also, the relaxation ratio was dominated with approaching load to 58% of the ultimate load. In addition three levels of damage using calm and load ratio were distinguished. The trend of relaxation ratio and calm and load ratio method during loading and unloading showed that these methods are strongly sensitive with cracks growth in RC frame specimens and were able to indicate the levels of damage. Also, results showed that AE can be considered as a viable method to predict the remaining service life of reinforced concrete. In addition, with respect to the results obtained from relaxation ratio and, load and calm ratio indicated, a new chart is proposed.

  19. Fractal analysis on the spatial distribution of acoustic emission in the failure process of rock specimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-fu Yuan; Yuan-hui Li

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of acoustic emission (AE) events in the failure process of several rock specimens was acquired us-ing an advanced AE acquiring and analyzing system.The box counting method (BCM) was employed to calculate the fractal dimen-sion (FD) of AE spatial distribution.There is a similar correlation between the fractal dimension and the load strength for different rock specimens.The fractal dimension presents a decreasing trend with the increase of load strength.For the same kind of specimens,their FD values will decrease to the level below a relatively same value when they reach failure.This value can be regarded as the critical value,which implies that the specimen will reach failure soon.The results reflect that it is possible to correlate the damage of rock with a macroscopic parameter,the FD value of AE signals.Furthermore,the FD value can be also used to forecast the final fail-ure of rock.This conclusion allows identifying or predicting the damage in rock with a great advantage over the classic theory and is very crucial for forecasting rockburst or other dynamic disasters in mines.

  20. Acoustic emission monitoring of multicell reinforced concrete box girders subjected to torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherifaez, Marya; Behnia, Arash; Majeed, Abeer Aqeel; Hwa Kian, Chai

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced concrete (RC) box girders are a common structural member for road bridges in modern construction. The hollow cross-section of a box girder is ideal in carrying eccentric loads or torques introduced by skew supports. This study employed acoustic emission (AE) monitoring on multicell RC box girder specimens subjected to laboratory-based torsion loading. Three multicell box girder specimens with different cross-sections were tested. The aim is to acquire AE analysis data indicative for characterizing torsion fracture in the box girders. It was demonstrated through appropriate parametric analysis that the AE technique could be utilized to effectively classify fracture developed in the specimens for describing their mechanical behavior under torsion. AE events localization was presented to illustrate the trend of crack and damage propagation in different stages of fracture. It could be observed that spiral-like patterns of crack were captured through AE damage localization system and damage was quantified successfully in different stages of fracture by using smoothed b-value analysis.

  1. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Multicell Reinforced Concrete Box Girders Subjected to Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marya Bagherifaez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete (RC box girders are a common structural member for road bridges in modern construction. The hollow cross-section of a box girder is ideal in carrying eccentric loads or torques introduced by skew supports. This study employed acoustic emission (AE monitoring on multicell RC box girder specimens subjected to laboratory-based torsion loading. Three multicell box girder specimens with different cross-sections were tested. The aim is to acquire AE analysis data indicative for characterizing torsion fracture in the box girders. It was demonstrated through appropriate parametric analysis that the AE technique could be utilized to effectively classify fracture developed in the specimens for describing their mechanical behavior under torsion. AE events localization was presented to illustrate the trend of crack and damage propagation in different stages of fracture. It could be observed that spiral-like patterns of crack were captured through AE damage localization system and damage was quantified successfully in different stages of fracture by using smoothed b-value analysis.

  2. The Contact State Monitoring for Seal End Faces Based on Acoustic Emission Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the contact state of seal end faces would help the early warning of the seal failure. In the acoustic emission (AE detection for mechanical seal, the main difficulty is to reduce the background noise and to classify the dispersed features. To solve these problems and achieve higher detection rates, a new approach based on genetic particle filter with autoregression (AR-GPF and hypersphere support vector machine (HSSVM is presented. First, AR model is used to build the dynamic state space (DSS of the AE signal, and GPF is used for signal filtering. Then, multiple features are extracted, and a classification model based on HSSVM is constructed for state recognition. In this approach, AR-GPF is an excellent time-domain method for noise reduction, and HSSVM has advantage on those dispersed features. Finally experimental data shows that the proposed method can effectively detect the contact state of the seal end faces and has higher accuracy rates than some other existing methods.

  3. Development of Methodology to Assess the Failure Behaviour of Bamboo Single Fibre by Acoustic Emission Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md. Saiful; Gulshan, Fahmida; Ahsan, Qumrul; Wevers, Martine; Pfeiffer, Helge; van Vuure, Aart-Willem; Osorio, Lina; Verpoest, Ignaas

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was used as a tool for detecting, evaluating and for better understanding of the damage mechanism and failure behavior in composites during mechanical loading. Methodology was developed for tensile test of natural fibres (bamboo single fibre). A series of experiments were performed and load drops (one or two) were observed in the load versus time graphs. From the observed AE parameters such as amplitude, energy, duration etc. significant information corresponding to the load drops were found. These AE signals from the load drop occurred from such failure as debonding between two elementary fibre or from join of elementary fibre at edge. The various sources of load at first load drop was not consistent for the different samples (for a particular sample the value is 8 N, stress: 517.51 MPa). Final breaking of fibre corresponded to saturated level AE amplitude of preamplifier (99.9 dB) for all samples. Therefore, it was not possible to determine the exact AE energy value for final breaking. Same methodology was used for tensile test of three single fibres, which gave clear indication of load drop before the final breaking of first and second fibre.

  4. Investigation of Material Performance Degradation for High-Strength Aluminum Alloy Using Acoustic Emission Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibo Ai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Structural materials damages are always in the form of micro-defects or cracks. Traditional or conventional methods such as micro and macro examination, tensile, bend, impact and hardness tests can be used to detect the micro damage or defects. However, these tests are destructive in nature and not in real-time, thus a non-destructive and real-time monitoring and characterization of the material damage is needed. This study is focused on the application of a non-destructive and real-time acoustic emission (AE method to study material performance degradation of a high-strength aluminum alloy of high-speed train gearbox shell. By applying data relative analysis and interpretation of AE signals, the characteristic parameters of materials performance were achieved and the failure criteria of the characteristic parameters for the material tensile damage process were established. The results show that the AE method and signal analysis can be used to accomplish the non-destructive and real-time detection of the material performance degradation process of the high-strength aluminum alloy. This technique can be extended to other engineering materials.

  5. Analysis and Classification of Acoustic Emission Signals During Wood Drying Using the Principal Component Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ho Yang [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Bok [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    In this study, acoustic emission (AE) signals due to surface cracking and moisture movement in the flat-sawn boards of oak (Quercus Variablilis) during drying under the ambient conditions were analyzed and classified using the principal component analysis. The AE signals corresponding to surface cracking showed higher in peak amplitude and peak frequency, and shorter in rise time than those corresponding to moisture movement. To reduce the multicollinearity among AE features and to extract the significant AE parameters, correlation analysis was performed. Over 99% of the variance of AE parameters could be accounted for by the first to the fourth principal components. The classification feasibility and success rate were investigated in terms of two statistical classifiers having six independent variables (AE parameters) and six principal components. As a result, the statistical classifier having AE parameters showed the success rate of 70.0%. The statistical classifier having principal components showed the success rate of 87.5% which was considerably than that of the statistical classifier having AE parameters

  6. Comprehensive bearing condition monitoring algorithm for incipient fault detection using acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit R. Bhende

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The bearing reliability plays major role in obtaining the desired performance of any machine. A continuous condition monitoring of machine is required in certain applications where failure of machine leads to loss of production, human safety and precision. Machine faults are often linked to the bearing faults. Condition monitoring of machine involves continuous watch on the performance of bearings and predicting the faults of bearing before it cause any adversity. This paper investigates an experimental study to diagnose the fault while bearing is in operation. An acoustic emission technique is used in the experimentation. An algorithm is developed to process various types of signals generated from different bearing defects. The algorithm uses time domain analysis along with combination low frequency analysis technique such as fast Fourier transform and high frequency envelope detection. Two methods have adopted for envelope detection which are Hilbert transform and order analysis. Experimental study is carried out for deep groove ball bearing cage defect. Results show the potential effectiveness of the proposed algorithm to determine presence of fault, exact location and severity of fault.

  7. The evaluation of moisture damage for CFRC pipes in conjunction with acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Su, Yu-Min; Liu, Yanjun; Tia, Mang

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the in-situ serviceability of cellulose fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) pipes using Acoustic Emission (AE). Three-edge-bearing test was conducted on CFRC pipes in the laboratory in accordance with ASTM C497-05. Pipes were saturated in water for various periods of time to simulate the practical field situations of CFRC pipes with different service life exposed to moisture effects. AE sensors and LVDT were installed on pipes detect the damage phases during loading. Both monotonic and cyclic loading modes were conducted on the CFRC pipes. Results showed that the CFRC pipes generally exhibited the nonlinear load-displacement behavior before failure, yet the level of ductility was reduced with longer exposure to moisture condition. AE data were evaluated through two feature signals, that is, intensity analysis and calm ratio analysis. Results showed that AE can detect the onset of damage and the ultimate failure of CFRC pipes. Additionally, the analysis on CFRC pipes subjected to various moisture effects showed different features of AE results. It is found that intensity analysis can distinguish different periods of exposure to moisture and levels of ductility, which make it feasible to monitor the health of CFRC pipes under moisture effects.

  8. Acoustic emission for characterising the crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composites (SHCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, S.C. [Department of Civil Engineering, Stellenbosch University (South Africa); Pirskawetz, S. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany); Zijl, G.P.A.G. van, E-mail: gvanzijl@sun.ac.za [Department of Civil Engineering, Stellenbosch University (South Africa); Schmidt, W. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the analysis of crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composite (SHCC) under tensile and flexural load by using acoustic emission (AE). AE is a non-destructive technique to monitor the development of structural damage due to external forces. The main objective of this research was to characterise the cracking behaviour in SHCC in direct tensile and flexural tests by using AE. A better understanding of the development of microcracks in SHCC will lead to a better understanding of pseudo strain-hardening behaviour of SHCC and its general performance. ARAMIS optical deformation analysis was also used in direct tensile tests to observe crack propagation in SHCC materials. For the direct tensile tests, SHCC specimens were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibre with three different volume percentages (1%, 1.85% and 2.5%). For the flexural test beam specimens, only a fibre dosage of 1.85% was applied. It was found that the application of AE in SHCC can be a good option to analyse the crack growth in the specimens under increasing load, the location of the cracks and most importantly the identification of matrix cracking and fibre rupture or slippage.

  9. Acoustic emission studies for characterization of fatigue crack growth behavior in HSLA steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jalaj; Ahmad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    High strength low alloy (HSLA) steels are a group of low carbon steels and used in oil and gas pipelines, automotive components, offshore structures and shipbuilding. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) characteristics of a HSLA steel have been studied at two different stress ratios (R = 0.3 and 0.5). Acoustic emission (AE) signals generated during the FCG tests have been used to understand the FCG processes. The AE signals were captured by mounting two piezoelectric sensors on compact tension specimens in liner location configuration. The AE generated in stage II of the linear Paris region of FCG has been attributed to the presence of two sub-stages with two different slopes. The AE generated at higher values of stress intensity factor is found to be useful to identify the transition from stage II to stage III of the FCG. AE location analysis has provided support for increased damage at the crack tip for higher stress ratio. The peak stress intensity (Kmax) values at the crack tip have shown good correlation with the transitions from stage IIa to stage IIb and stage II to stage III of the FCG for the two stress ratios.

  10. Applications of Wigner high-order spectra in feature extraction of acoustic emission signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Siwen; Liao Chuanjun; Li Xuejun

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of typical AE signals initiated by mechanical component damages are analyzed. Based on the extracting principle of acoustic emission(AE) signals from damaged components, the paper introduces Wigner high-order spectra to the field of feature extraction and fault diagnosis of AE signals. Some main performances of Wigner bi-nary spectra, Wigner triple spectra and Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) are discussed, including of time-frequency resolution, energy accumulation, reduction of crossing items and noise elimination. Wigncr triple spectra is employed to the fault diagnosis of rolling bearings with AE techniques. The fault features reading from experimental data analysis are clear, accurate and intuitionistic. The validity and accuracy of Wigner high-order spectra methods proposed agree quite well with simulation results. Simulation and research results indicate that wigncr high-order spectra is quite useful for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis in conjunction with AE technique, and has very important research and applica-tion values in feature extraction and faults diagnosis based on AE signals due to mechanical component damages.

  11. Failure of compression molded all-polyolefin composites studied by acoustic emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Z. Halasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at studying the failure behavior of polyolefin-based self-reinforced polymer composites (SRPCs via acoustic emission (AE. Three matrix materials (ethylene octene copolymer (EOC, polypropylene-based thermoplastic elastomer (ePP, random polypropylene copolymer (rPP, and three kinds of reinforcing structures of PP homopolymer (unidirectional (UD, cross-ply (CP and woven fabric (WF were used. SRPCs were produced by compression molding using the film-stacking method. The composites were characterized by mechanical tests combined with in situ assessment of the burst-type AE events. The results showed that rPP matrix and UD reinforcement produced the greatest reinforcement, with a tensile strength more than six times as high as that of the matrix and a Young’s modulus nearly doubled compared to the neat matrix. The number of the detected AE events increased with increasing Young’s modulus of the applied matrices being associated with reduced sound damping. The AE amplitude distributions shows that failure of the SRPC structure produces AE signals in a broad amplitude range, but the highest detected amplitude range can be clearly linked to fiber fractures.

  12. Study of the Tensile Damage of High-Strength Aluminum Alloy by Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Sun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The key material of high-speed train gearbox shells is high-strength aluminum alloy. Material damage is inevitable in the process of servicing. It is of great importance to study material damage for in-service gearboxes of high-speed train. Structural health monitoring methods have been widely used to study material damage in recent years. This study focuses on the application of an acoustic emission (AE method to quantify tensile damage evolution of high-strength aluminum alloy. First, a characteristic parameter was developed to connect AE signals with tensile damage. Second, a tensile damage quantification model was presented based on the relationship between AE counts and tensile behavior to study elastic deformation of tensile damage. Then tensile tests with AE monitoring were employed to collect AE signals and tensile damage data of nine samples. The experimental data were used to quantify tensile damage of high-strength aluminum alloy A356 to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Characteristics of acoustic emission temporal sequences during the failure of a concrete structure under loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包太; LIU; Xinrong; 等

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of acoustic emission(AE)signals given off in the course of the failure of a concrete structure is explored based on the laboratory experiments with concrete specimens.It is observed that the failure of a concrete structure experiences three stages divided by two inflexion points on the AE event curve,which are sequentially no damage,damage initiation and propagation,and major failure stages.In the first stage,existing micro cracks and defects are compacted by loading. but no damage propagated,hence few AE signals are detected,and it appears that there exists a nearly linear relationship between the relative stress and relative strain.In the second stage,the AE event frequency increases implying that micro cracks begin to emerge inside the concrete structure,which is consistent with the damage mechanics.When the load is over 80% of that breaks the structure,i.e.the maximum load,there is a vertical jump on the AE event count curve,which suggests that the failure propagation speeds up.After the second inflexion point,the AE event density increases faster than before,and there is another jump just before breaking,which indicates a quick propagation stage.These findings are valuable for evaluating the damage situations,and for studying and monitoring the dynamic process of the failure behaviors of a concrete structure.

  14. Analyzing excitation forces acting on a plate based on measured acoustic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Zhou, Pan

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study on "seeing" through an elastic structure to uncover the root cause of sound and vibration by using nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) and normal modes expansion. This approach is of generality because vibro-acoustic responses on the surface of a vibrating structure can always be reconstructed, exactly or approximately. With these vibro-acoustic responses, excitation forces acting on the structure can always be determined, analytically or numerically, given any set of boundary conditions. As an example, the explicit formulations for reconstructing time-harmonic excitation forces, including point, line and surface forces, and their arbitrary combinations acting on a rectangular thin plate in vacuum mounted on an infinite baffle are presented. The reason for choosing this example is that the analytic solutions to vibro-acoustic responses are available, and in-depth analyses of results are possible. Results demonstrate that this approach allows one to identify excitation forces based on measured acoustic pressures and reveal their characteristics such as locations, types and amplitudes, as if one could "see" excitation forces acting behind the plate based on acoustic pressure measured on the opposite side. This approach is extendable to general elastic structures, except that in such circumstance numerical results must be sought.

  15. Long-term continuous acoustical suspended-sediment measurements in rivers - Theory, application, bias, and error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.

    2016-05-04

    It is commonly recognized that suspended-sediment concentrations in rivers can change rapidly in time and independently of water discharge during important sediment‑transporting events (for example, during floods); thus, suspended-sediment measurements at closely spaced time intervals are necessary to characterize suspended‑sediment loads. Because the manual collection of sufficient numbers of suspended-sediment samples required to characterize this variability is often time and cost prohibitive, several “surrogate” techniques have been developed for in situ measurements of properties related to suspended-sediment characteristics (for example, turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustics). Herein, we present a new physically based method for the simultaneous measurement of suspended-silt-and-clay concentration, suspended-sand concentration, and suspended‑sand median grain size in rivers, using multi‑frequency arrays of single-frequency side‑looking acoustic-Doppler profilers. The method is strongly grounded in the extensive scientific literature on the incoherent scattering of sound by random suspensions of small particles. In particular, the method takes advantage of theory that relates acoustic frequency, acoustic attenuation, acoustic backscatter, suspended-sediment concentration, and suspended-sediment grain-size distribution. We develop the theory and methods, and demonstrate the application of the method at six study sites on the Colorado River and Rio Grande, where large numbers of suspended-sediment samples have been collected concurrently with acoustic attenuation and backscatter measurements over many years. The method produces acoustical measurements of suspended-silt-and-clay and suspended-sand concentration (in units of mg/L), and acoustical measurements of suspended-sand median grain size (in units of mm) that are generally in good to excellent agreement with concurrent physical measurements of these quantities in the river cross sections at

  16. Quantifying aluminum and semiconductor industry perfluorocarbon emissions from atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jooil; Fraser, Paul J.; Li, Shanlan; Mühle, Jens; Ganesan, Anita L.; Krummel, Paul B.; Steele, L. Paul; Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Park, Mi-Kyung; Arnold, Tim; Harth, Christina M.; Salameh, Peter K.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Kim, Kyung-Ryul

    2014-07-01

    The potent anthropogenic perfluorocarbon greenhouse gases tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and hexafluoroethane (C2F6) are emitted to the atmosphere mainly by the aluminum and semiconductor industries. Global emissions of these perfluorocarbons (PFCs) calculated from atmospheric measurements are significantly greater than expected from reported national and industry-based emission inventories. In this study, in situ measurements of the two PFCs in the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment network are used to show that their emission ratio varies according to the relative regional presence of these two industries, providing an industry-specific emission "signature" to apportion the observed emissions. Our results suggest that underestimated emissions from the global semiconductor industry during 1990-2010, as well as from China's aluminum industry after 2002, account for the observed differences between emissions based on atmospheric measurements and on inventories. These differences are significant despite the large uncertainties in emissions based on the methodologies used by these industries.

  17. Acoustic emission noise from sodium vapour bubble collapsing: detection, interpretation, modelling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentico, G.; Pacilio, V.; Papalia, B.; Taglienti, S.; Tosi, V.

    1982-01-01

    Sodium vapour bubble collapsing is detected by means of piezoelectric accelorometers coupled to the test section via short waveguides. The output analog signal is processed by transforming it into a time series of pulses through the setting of an amplitude threshold and the shaping of a standard pulse (denominated 'event') every time the signal crosses that border. The number of events is counted in adjacent and equal time duration samples and the waiting time distribution between contiguous events is measured. Up to the moment, six kinetic properties have been found for the mentioned time series. They help in setting a stochastic model in which the subministration of energy into a liquid sodium medium induces the formation of vapour bubbles and their consequent collapsing delivers acoustic pulses. Finally, a simulation procedure is carried out: a Polya's urn model is adopted for simulating event sequences with a priori established requisites.

  18. High-Speed Edge Trimming of CFRP and Online Monitoring of Performance of Router Tools Using Acoustic Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangasamy Prakash

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs have found wide-ranging applications in numerous industrial fields such as aerospace, automotive, and shipping industries due to their excellent mechanical properties that lead to enhanced functional performance. In this paper, an experimental study on edge trimming of CFRP was done with various cutting conditions and different geometry of tools such as helical-, fluted-, and burr-type tools. The investigation involves the measurement of cutting forces for the different machining conditions and its effect on the surface quality of the trimmed edges. The modern cutting tools (router tools or burr tools selected for machining CFRPs, have complex geometries in cutting edges and surfaces, and therefore a traditional method of direct tool wear evaluation is not applicable. An acoustic emission (AE sensing was employed for on-line monitoring of the performance of router tools to determine the relationship between AE signal and length of machining for different kinds of geometry of tools. The investigation showed that the router tool with a flat cutting edge has better performance by generating lower cutting force and better surface finish with no delamination on trimmed edges. The mathematical modeling for the prediction of cutting forces was also done using Artificial Neural Network and Regression Analysis.

  19. Pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zefeng Wang; Yongming Hu; Zhou Meng; Ming Ni

    2008-01-01

    A novel pseudo working-point control measurement scheme for the acoustic sensitivity of interferometric fiber-optic hydrophones is described and demonstrated.The measurement principle is introduced in detail.An experimental system,which interrogates an interferometric fiber-optic hydrophone with this method,is designed.The acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of the fiber-optic hydrophone is measured over the frequency range of 20-2500Hz.The measured acoustic sensitivity is about-156.5dB re 1rad/μPa with a fluctuation lower than ±1.2dB,which is in good agreement with the results obtained by the method of phase generated carrier.The experimental results testify the validity of this new method which has the advantages of no electric elements in the sensing head,the simplicity of signal processing,and wide working bandwidth.

  20. Dynamic control of the optical emission from GaN/InGaN nanowire quantum dots by surface acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazić, S., E-mail: lazic.snezana@uam.es; Chernysheva, E.; Meulen, H. P. van der; Calleja Pardo, J. M. [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Instituto “Nicolás Cabrera” and Instituto de Física de Materia Condensada (IFIMAC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gačević, Ž.; Calleja, E. [ISOM-DIE, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    The optical emission of InGaN quantum dots embedded in GaN nanowires is dynamically controlled by a surface acoustic wave (SAW). The emission energy of both the exciton and biexciton lines is modulated over a 1.5 meV range at ∼330 MHz. A small but systematic difference in the exciton and biexciton spectral modulation reveals a linear change of the biexciton binding energy with the SAW amplitude. The present results are relevant for the dynamic control of individual single photon emitters based on nitride semiconductors.

  1. Dynamic control of the optical emission from GaN/InGaN nanowire quantum dots by surface acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, S.; Chernysheva, E.; Gačević, Ž.; van der Meulen, H. P.; Calleja, E.; Calleja Pardo, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The optical emission of InGaN quantum dots embedded in GaN nanowires is dynamically controlled by a surface acoustic wave (SAW). The emission energy of both the exciton and biexciton lines is modulated over a 1.5 meV range at ˜330 MHz. A small but systematic difference in the exciton and biexciton spectral modulation reveals a linear change of the biexciton binding energy with the SAW amplitude. The present results are relevant for the dynamic control of individual single photon emitters based on nitride semiconductors.

  2. Dynamic control of the optical emission from GaN/InGaN nanowire quantum dots by surface acoustic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lazić

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The optical emission of InGaN quantum dots embedded in GaN nanowires is dynamically controlled by a surface acoustic wave (SAW. The emission energy of both the exciton and biexciton lines is modulated over a 1.5 meV range at ∼330 MHz. A small but systematic difference in the exciton and biexciton spectral modulation reveals a linear change of the biexciton binding energy with the SAW amplitude. The present results are relevant for the dynamic control of individual single photon emitters based on nitride semiconductors.

  3. Measurement of a broadband negative index with space-coiling acoustic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A

    2013-04-26

    We report the experimental demonstration of a broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the latter case also agree very well with the refractive index obtained in the one-dimensional measurements and numerical simulations. We expect this labyrinthine metamaterial to become the unit cell of choice for practical acoustic metamaterial devices that require broadband and significantly negative indices of refraction.

  4. Measurement of a Broadband Negative Index with Space-Coiling Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Cummer, Steven A.

    2013-04-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a broadband negative refractive index obtained in a labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial structure. Two different approaches were employed to prove the metamaterial negative index nature: one-dimensional extractions of effective parameters from reflection and transmission measurements and two-dimensional prism-based measurements that convincingly show the transmission angle corresponding to negative refraction. The transmission angles observed in the latter case also agree very well with the refractive index obtained in the one-dimensional measurements and numerical simulations. We expect this labyrinthine metamaterial to become the unit cell of choice for practical acoustic metamaterial devices that require broadband and significantly negative indices of refraction.

  5. Control of deviations and prediction of surface roughness from micro machining of THz waveguides using acoustic emission signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, James M.; Diaz, Fernanda; Geerling, Edgar; Clasing, Matias; Ponce, Vicente; Taylor, Chris; Turner, Sam; Michael, Ernest A.; Patricio Mena, F.; Bronfman, Leonardo

    2017-02-01

    By using acoustic emission (AE) it is possible to control deviations and surface quality during micro milling operations. The method of micro milling is used to manufacture a submillimetre waveguide where micro machining is employed to achieve the required superior finish and geometrical tolerances. Submillimetre waveguide technology is used in deep space signal retrieval where highest detection efficiencies are needed and therefore every possible signal loss in the receiver has to be avoided and stringent tolerances achieved. With a sub-standard surface finish the signals travelling along the waveguides dissipate away faster than with perfect surfaces where the residual roughness becomes comparable with the electromagnetic skin depth. Therefore, the higher the radio frequency the more critical this becomes. The method of time-frequency analysis (STFT) is used to transfer raw AE into more meaningful salient signal features (SF). This information was then correlated against the measured geometrical deviations and, the onset of catastrophic tool wear. Such deviations can be offset from different AE signals (different deviations from subsequent tests) and feedback for a final spring cut ensuring the geometrical accuracies are met. Geometrical differences can impact on the required transfer of AE signals (change in cut off frequencies and diminished SNR at the interface) and therefore errors have to be minimised to within 1 μm. Rules based on both Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Neural Networks (NN) were used to implement a simulation displaying how such a control regime could be used as a real time controller, be it corrective measures (via spring cuts) over several initial machining passes or, with a micron cut introducing a level plain measure for allowing setup corrective measures (similar to a spirit level).

  6. A signal processing approach for enhanced Acoustic Emission data analysis in high activity systems: Application to organic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharrat, M.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Boubakar, M. L.

    2016-03-01

    Structural elements made of Organic Matrix Composites (OMC) under complex loading may suffer from high Acoustic Emission (AE) activity caused by the emergence of different emission sources at high rates with high noise level, which finally engender continuous emissions. The detection of hits in this situation becomes a challenge particularly during fatigue tests. This work suggests an approach based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) denoising applied on signal segments. A particular attention is paid to the adjustment of the denoising parameters based on pencil lead breaks and their influence on the quality of the denoised AE signals. The validation of the proposed approach is performed on a ring-shaped Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) under in-service-like conditions involving continuous emissions with superimposed damage-related transients. It is demonstrated that errors in hit detection are greatly reduced leading to a better identification of the natural damage scenario based on AE signals.

  7. Theory and signal processing of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Weiqing; FENG Lei; WANG Changhong; WANG Yuling; QIU Wei

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model and signal processing of acoustic correlation measurements to estimate current velocity are discussed. The sonar space-time correlation function of vol-ume reverberations within Fraunhofer zone is derived. The function, which is in exponential forms, is the theoretical model of acoustic correlation measurements. The characteristics of the correlation values around the maximum of the amplitude of the correlation function, where most information about current velocity is contained, are primarily analyzed. Localized Least Mean Squares (LLMS) criterion is put forward for velocity estimation. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is adopted as the optimization method. So the systematic sig-nal processing method of acoustic correlation techniques for current velocity measurement is established. A prototype acoustic correlation current profiler (ACCP) underwent several sea trials, the results show that theoretical model approximately coincides with experimental re-sults. Current profiles including the speed and direction from ACCP are compared with those from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The current profiles by both instruments agree reasonably well. Also, the standard deviation of velocity measurement by ACCP is statistically calculated and it is a little larger than predicted value.

  8. The role of acoustic emission in the study of rock fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of faults and shear fracture systems over a broad range of temperature and pressure and for a variety of rock types involves the growth and interaction of microcracks. Acoustic emission (AE), which is produced by rapid microcrack growth, is a ubiquitous phenomenon associated with brittle fracture and has provided a wealth of information regarding the failure process in rock. This paper reviews the successes and limitations of AE studies as applied to the fracture process in rock with emphasis on our ability to predict rock failure. Application of laboratory AE studies to larger scale problems related to the understanding of earthquake processes is also discussed. In this context, laboratory studies can be divided into the following categories. 1) Simple counting of the number of AE events prior to sample failure shows a correlation between AE rate and inelastic strain rate. Additional sorting of events by amplitude has shown that AE events obey the power law frequency-magnitude relation observed for earthquakes. These cumulative event count techniques are being used in conjunction with damage mechanics models to determine how damage accumulates during loading and to predict failure. 2) A second area of research involves the location of hypocenters of AE source events. This technique requires precise arrival time data of AE signals recorded over an array of sensors that are essentially a miniature seismic net. Analysis of the spatial and temporal variation of event hypocenters has improved our understanding of the progression of microcrack growth and clustering leading to rock failure. Recently, fracture nucleation and growth have been studied under conditions of quasi-static fault propagation by controlling stress to maintain constant AE rate. 3) A third area of study involves the analysis of full waveform data as recorded at receiver sites. One aspect of this research has been to determine fault plane solutions of AE source events from first motion

  9. Final Report. Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  10. Final Report: Geothermal dual acoustic tool for measurement of rock stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A. [Perma Works LLC, Pattonville, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  11. Methods of temperature measurement in a radio-acoustic tropospheric sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. TRIVERO

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of the lower troposphere is inferred
    by measuring with a doppler radar the speed of a powerful acoustic wave,
    capable of periodically perturbing the index of refraction of air. Three
    methods for performing these measurements are described.

  12. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  13. Final Report: Geothermal Dual Acoustic Tool for Measurement of Rock Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper outlines the technology need for a rock formation stress measurement in future EGS wells. This paper reports on the results of work undertaken under a Phase I, DOE/SBIR on the feasibility to build an acoustic well logging tool for measuring rock formation stress.

  14. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi Pertilä

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  15. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertilä Pasi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  16. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations with future SKA surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip; Raccanelli, Alvise; Blake, Chris; Ferreira, Pedro G; Santos, Mario G; Schwarz, Dominik J

    2015-01-01

    The imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in large-scale structure can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history, and hence for testing cosmological models. In this article we briefly describe the scientific background to the BAO technique, and forecast the potential of the Phase 1 and 2 SKA telescopes to perform BAO surveys using both galaxy catalogues and intensity mapping, assessing their competitiveness with current and future optical galaxy surveys. We find that a 25,000 sq. deg. intensity mapping survey on a Phase 1 array will preferentially constrain the radial BAO, providing a highly competitive 2% constraint on the expansion rate at z ~ 2. A 30,000 sq. deg. galaxy redshift survey on SKA2 will outperform all other planned experiments for z < 1.4.

  17. Broadband electrostatic acoustic transducer for ultrasonic measurements in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, J H; Heyman, J S; Yost, W T; Torbett, M A; Breazeale, M A

    1979-01-01

    A broadband capacitive electrostatic acoustic transducer (ESAT) has been developed for use in a liquid environment at megahertz frequencies. The ESAT basically consists of a thin conductive membrane stretched over a metallic housing. The membrane functions as the ground plate of a parallel plate capacitor, the other plate being a dc biased electrode recessed approximately 10 mum from the electrically grounded membrane. An ultrasonic wave incident on the membrane varies the membrane-electrode gap spacing and generates an electrical signal proportional to the wave amplitude. The entire assembly is sealed for immersion in a liquid environment. Calibration of the ESAT with incident ultrasonic waves of constant displacement amplitude from 1 to 15 MHz reveals a decrease in signal response with increasing frequency independent of membrane tension. The use of the ESAT as a broadband ultrasonic transducer in liquids with a predictable frequency response is promising.

  18. [Analyses of spectral emissivity in radiation temperature measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tai-Ran; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Zhong, Mao-Hua; Yang, Zang-Jian

    2008-01-01

    The complexity of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces is the key point in the research and applications of radiation temperature measurement, resulting in the difficulty in the achievement of the temperature measurement. In the present paper, based on the discussions of the Taylor expansion, the non-dimension wavelength and the exponent, the authors describe the mathematical expression of the spectral emissivity of actual surfaces, and establish the general spectral emissivity function. Through the fitting of experimental data of the spectral emissivities of different metals at different temperatures, the applicability of the spectral emissivity function is verified which especially becomes the fundamental in the research of primary spectrum pyrometry.

  19. Acoustic measurements of the thermodynamic temperature between the triple point of mercury and 380 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, G.; Gavioso, R. M.; Spagnolo, R.; Marcarino, P.; Merlone, A.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the differences between the Kelvin thermodynamic temperature and the temperature of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 on nine isotherms between the triple point of mercury and 380 K, by means of a primary acoustic thermometer. For the present measurements the standard uncertainty of (T - T90) ranges from 0.9 mK at 234 K to 1.7 mK at 380 K. The experimental method is based on the measurement of the acoustic resonance frequencies of an argon-filled spherical cavity and the microwave resonance frequencies of the same cavity when evacuated. The present results agree within the remarkably small combined uncertainties with both NIST acoustic thermometry ([1] Moldover M R et al 1999 J. Res. Natl Inst. Stand. Technol. 104 11-46 [2] Strouse G F et al 2002 Progress in primary acoustic thermometry at NIST: 273 K to 505 K 8th Temperature Symp. (Chicago, 21-24 October 2002)) and UCL acoustic thermometry ([3] Ewing M B and Trusler J P M 2000 J. Chem. Thermodyn. 32 1229-55) in the overlapping temperature range.

  20. Acoustic power measurement of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer using a pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-03-01

    The acoustic power of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an important parameter that should be measured prior to each treatment to guarantee effective and safe outcomes. A new calibration technique was developed that involves estimating the pressure distribution, calculating the acoustic power using an underwater pressure blast sensor, and compensating the contribution of harmonics to the acoustic power. The output of a clinical extracorporeal HIFU system (center frequency of ~1 MHz, p+ = 2.5-57.2 MPa, p(-) = -1.8 to -13.9 MPa, I(SPPA) = 513-22,940 W/cm(2), -6 dB size of 1.6 × 10 mm: lateral × axial) was measured using this approach and then compared with that obtained using a radiation force balance. Similarities were found between each method at acoustic power ranging from 18.2 W to 912 W with an electrical-to-acoustic conversion efficiency of ~42%. The proposed method has advantages of low weight, smaller size, high sensitivity, quick response, high signal-to-noise ratio (especially at low power output), robust performance, and easy operation of HIFU exposimetry measurement.

  1. Measurement and prediction of enteric methane emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Lal, Rattan; Lakritz, Jeffrey; Ezeji, Thaddeus

    2011-01-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the agricultural sector account for about 25.5% of total global anthropogenic emission. While CO2 receives the most attention as a factor relative to global warming, CH4, N2O and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) also cause significant radiative forcing. With the relative global warming potential of 25 compared with CO2, CH4 is one of the most important GHGs. This article reviews the prediction models, estimation methodology and strategies for reducing enteric CH4 emissions. Emission of CH4 in ruminants differs among developed and developing countries, depending on factors like animal species, breed, pH of rumen fluid, ratio of acetate:propionate, methanogen population, composition of diet and amount of concentrate fed. Among the ruminant animals, cattle contribute the most towards the greenhouse effect through methane emission followed by sheep, goats and buffalos, respectively. The estimated CH4 emission rate per cattle, buffaloe, sheep and goat in developed countries are 150.7, 137, 21.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) respectively. However, the estimated rates in developing countries are significantly lower at 95.9 and 13.7 (g/animal/day) per cattle and sheep, respectively. There exists a strong interest in developing new and improving the existing CH4 prediction models to identify mitigation strategies for reducing the overall CH4 emissions. A synthesis of the available literature suggests that the mechanistic models are superior to empirical models in accurately predicting the CH4 emission from dairy farms. The latest development in prediction model is the integrated farm system model which is a process-based whole-farm simulation technique. Several techniques are used to quantify enteric CH4 emissions starting from whole animal chambers to sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer techniques. The latest technology developed to estimate CH4 more accurately is the micrometeorological mass difference technique. Because the conditions under which

  2. Traveling wave tube measurements for low-frequency properties of underwater acoustic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A traveling wave tube measurement technique for measuring acoustic properties of underwater acoustic materials was developed. Water temperature and pressure environments of the ocean can be simulated in a water-filled tube, and the acoustic parameters of samples of underwater acoustic materials are measured in the range of low-frequency. A tested sample is located at central position of the tube. A pair of projectors is separately located at both ends of the tube. Using an active anechoic technique, the sound wave transmitting the tested sample is hardly reflected by the surface of secondary transducer. So the traveling sound field is built up in the tube. By separately calculating the transfer functions of every pair of double hydrophones in the sound fields from the both sides of the sample, its reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients are obtained. In the measurement system, the inside diameter of the tube is Φ208 mm, the working frequency range is from 100 to 4000 Hz, the maximum pressure is 5 MPa. The reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients of a water layer and a stainless steel layer samples are measured actually and calculated theoretically. The results show that the measured values are in good agreement with the values calculated, and the measurement uncertainty is not greater than 1.5 dB.

  3. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  4. Field Emission Measurements from Niobium Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. BastaniNejad, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, S. Covert, J. Hansknecht, C. Hernandez-Garcia, R. Mammei, M. Poelker

    2011-03-01

    Increasing the operating voltage of a DC high voltage photogun serves to minimize space charge induced emittance growth and thereby preserve electron beam brightness, however, field emission from the photogun cathode electrode can pose significant problems: constant low level field emission degrades vacuum via electron stimulated desorption which in turn reduces photocathode yield through chemical poisoning and/or ion bombardment and high levels of field emission can damage the ceramic insulator. Niobium electrodes (single crystal, large grain and fine grain) were characterized using a DC high voltage field emission test stand at maximum voltage -225kV and electric field gradient > 10MV/m. Niobium electrodes appear to be superior to diamond-paste polished stainless steel electrodes.

  5. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments.

  6. Does There Exist a Relationship Between Acoustic and White-Light Emission in Hard-X ray Solar Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Calvo-Mozo, B.

    2014-12-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed seismicity during some solar flares. One theory associates high-energy electrons and white-light emission with sunquakes. This relationship is based on the back-warming model, where high-energy electrons and their subsequent heating of the photosphere induce acoustic waves in the solar interior. We carried out a correlative study of solar flares with emission in hard-X rays (HXRs) above 50 keV, enhanced white light emission at 6573Å, and acoustic sources. We selected those flares observed by RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) with a considerable flux in the 50-100 and 100-300 keV bands between January 1, 2010 and June 26, 2014. Additionally, we restricted the sample to flares close to disk center where it is observationally easiest to detect a sunquake. We then used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO/HMI) to search for white-light emission and helioseismic signatures. Finally, we calculated a coefficient of correlation for this set of dichotomic observables. We discuss the phenomenological connectivity between these physical quantities and the observational difficulties of detecting seismic signals and white-light radiation with terrestrial and space-borne observations.

  7. Bridging aero-fracture evolution with the characteristics of the acoustic emissions in a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih eTurkaya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The characterization and understanding of rock deformation processes due to fluid flow is a challenging problem with numerous applications. The signature of this problem can be found in Earth Science and Physics, notably with applications in natural hazard understanding, mitigation or forecast (e.g. earthquakes, landslides with hydrological control, volcanic eruptions, or in industrial applications such as hydraulic-fracturing, steam-assisted gravity drainage, CO₂ sequestration operations or soil remediation. Here we investigate the link between the visual deformation and the mechanical wave signals generated due to fluid injection into porous media. In a rectangular Hele-Shaw Cell, side air injection causes burst movement and compaction of grains along with channeling (creation of high permeability channels empty of grains. During the initial compaction and emergence of the main channel, the hydraulic fracturing in the medium generates a large non-impulsive low frequency signal in the frequency range 100 Hz - 10 kHz. When the channel network is established, the relaxation of the surrounding medium causes impulsive aftershock-like events, with high frequency (above 10 kHz acoustic emissions, the rate of which follows an Omori Law. These signals and observations are comparable to seismicity induced by fluid injection. Compared to the data obtained during hydraulic fracturing operations, low frequency seismicity with evolving spectral characteristics have also been observed. An Omori-like decay of microearthquake rates is also often observed after injection shut-in, with a similar exponent p≃0.5 as observed here, where the decay rate of aftershock follows a scaling law dN/dt ∝(t-t₀-p . The physical basis for this modified Omori law is explained by pore pressure diffusion affecting the stress relaxation.

  8. Anatomic and acoustic sexual dimorphism in the sound emission system of Phoenicoprocta capistrata (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Loeches, Laura; Barro, Alejandro; Pérez, Martha; Coro, Frank

    2009-04-01

    Both sexes of Phoenicoprocta capistrata have functional tymbals. The scanning electron microscopy revealed differences in the morphology of these organs in males and females. Male tymbals have a well-developed striated band, constituted by 21 ± 2 regularly arranged striae whereas female tymbals lack a striated band. This type of sexual dimorphism is rare in Arctiidae. The recording of the sound produced by moths held by the wings revealed that while males produced trains of pulses organized in modulation cycles, females produced clicks at low repetition rate following very irregular patterns. Statistically, there are differences between sexes in terms of the duration of pulses, which were 355 ± 24 μs in the case of males and 289 ± 29 μs for females. The spectral characteristics of the pulses also show sexual dimorphism. Male pulses are more tuned ( Q 10 = 5.2 ± 0.5) than female pulses ( Q 10 = 2.7 ± 0.5) and have a higher best frequency (42 ± 1 kHz vs. 29 ± 2 kHz). To our knowledge, this is the first report on an arctiid moth showing sexual dimorphism in tymbal’s anatomy that leads to a best frequency dimorphism. Males produce sound at mating attempts. The sounds recorded during mating are modulation cycles with the same spectral characteristics as those recorded when males are held by the wings. The morphological and acoustic features of female tymbals could indicate a process of degeneration and adaptation to conditions under which the emission of complex patterns is not necessary.

  9. Acoustic emission signals frequency-amplitude characteristics of sandstone after thermal treated under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Biao; Wang, Enyuan; Li, Zenghua; Wang, Xiaoran; Niu, Yue; Kong, Xiangguo

    2017-01-01

    Thermally treated sandstone deformation and fracture produced abundant acoustic emission (AE) signals. The AE signals waveform contained plentiful precursor information of sandstone deformation and fracture behavior. In this paper, uniaxial compression tests of sandstone after different temperature treatments were conducted, the frequency-amplitude characteristics of AE signals were studied, and the main frequency distribution at different stress level was analyzed. The AE signals frequency-amplitude characteristics had great difference after different high temperature treatment. Significant differences existed of the main frequency distribution of AE signals during thermal treated sandstone deformation and fracture. The main frequency band of the largest waveforms proportion was not unchanged after different high temperature treatments. High temperature caused thermal damage to the sandstone, and sandstone deformation and fracture was obvious than the room temperature. The number of AE signals was larger than the room temperature during the initial loading stage. The low frequency AE signals had bigger proportion when the stress was 0.1, and the maximum value of the low frequency amplitude was larger than high frequency signals. With the increase of stress, the low and high frequency AE signals were gradually increase, which indicated that different scales ruptures were broken in sandstone. After high temperature treatment, the number of high frequency AE signals was significantly bigger than the low frequency AE signals during the latter loading stage, this indicates that the small scale rupture rate of recurrence and frequency were more than large scale rupture. The AE ratio reached the maximum during the sandstone instability failure period, and large scale rupture was dominated in the failure process. AE amplitude increase as the loading increases, the deformation and fracture of sandstone was increased gradually. By comparison, the value of the low frequency

  10. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  11. Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Gas-Containing Coal during Loading Dilation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Q. Yin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raw coal was used as the study object in this paper to identify the evolution characteristics of acoustic emission (AE during the dilation process of gas-containing coal. The coal specimens were stored in gas seal devices filled with gas at different pressures (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 MPa for 24 h prior to testing. Then, the specimens were tested in a rock-testing machine, and the deformation and crack fracture patterns were recorded by using strain gauges and an AE system. The axial and volumetric strains–stress curves were analyzed in relation to the AE and the failure mode. Results show that as gas pressure increases, the uniaxial compression strength and elasticity modulus of gas-containing coal decreases, whereas the Poisson’s ratio increases. In all the coal specimens, the dilation initiation stress decreases, and the dilation degree increases. During the dilation process, before the loaded coal specimens reach peak stress, and as the load increases, the changes in the specimens and in the AE energy parameter of specimens can be divided into four phases: crack closure deformation, elastic deformation, stable crack propagation, and unstable crack propagation (dilation process. Across the four phases, the AE energy increases evidently during crack closure and elastic deformation but decreases during stable crack propagation. As the gas pressure increases, the AE signal frequency increases from 4.5 KHz to 8.1 KHz during the dilation process. Thus, the gas presence in coal specimens exerts a significant influence on the closure of sample cracks and dilation damage.

  12. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations with angular two-point correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaniz, Jailson S; Bernui, Armando; Carvalho, Joel C; Benetti, Micol

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) imprinted a characteristic correlation length in the large-scale structure of the universe that can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history. Here, we discuss the application of the angular two-point correlation function, $w(\\theta)$, to a sample of luminous red galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and derive two new measurements of the BAO angular scale at $z = 0.235$ and $z = 0.365$. Since noise and systematics may hinder the identification of the BAO signature in the $w - \\theta$ plane, we also introduce a potential new method to localize the acoustic bump in a model-independent way. We use these new measurements along with previous data to constrain cosmological parameters of dark energy models and to derive a new estimate of the acoustic scale $r_s$.

  13. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  14. Guidelines for Acoustical Measurements Inside Historical Opera Houses: Procedures and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    POMPOLI, ROBERTO; PRODI, NICOLA

    2000-04-01

    The acoustics of Italian historical theatres is to be regarded as a cultural heritage, which is to be preserved and studied. These actions are imperative for handing down the heritage to future generations and to avoid its loss. In this paper, the technical means for scientific quantification of the acoustical heritage are presented in the form of operative guidelines for acoustical measurements inside historical theatres. The document includes the advice of international experts and is being employed during an extended measurement campaign inside renaissance and baroque historical theatres. A relevant part of the paper deals with the experimental validation of the recommendations given in the guidelines, achieved by a dedicated test session inside the Municipal Theatre of Ferrara.

  15. NO2 DOAS Measurements of Traffic Emissions by Chasing Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Lipkowitsch, Ivo; Chan, Ka Lok; Bräu, Melanie; Wenig, Mark

    2016-04-01

    On this poster we present NO2 measurements using a Cavity-Enhanced DOAS on a measurement bus which we used to chase other vehicles to measure their NO2 emissions. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from on-road vehicles have received highly attention recently due to the increasing trend of ambient NOx level. It is particularly important to identify and quantify the direct emission and secondary formation of NO2 contributed by traffic emissions, in order to study the impact to the local air quality. We sampled on-road emissions in different environments and different driving conditions (e.g. urban, highway, different speeds). We analyse the data set in terms of spatial and temporal variability to search for temporal and spatial patterns. We present mean values sorted for different vehicle types, distance to the target car and travelling speeds to provide an emission data base from this measurement study.

  16. Far-infrared emissivity measurements of reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Lange, A. E.; Bock, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    An instrument developed to measure the emissivity of reflective surfaces by comparing the thermal emission of a test sample to that of a reference surface is reported. The instrument can accurately measure the emissivity of mirrors made from lightweight thermally insulating materials such as glass and metallized carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Far infrared measurements at a wavelength of 165 micrometers are reported. The instrument has an absolute accuracy of Delta epsilon = 9 x 10(exp -4) and can reproducibly measure an emissivity of as small as 2 x 10(exp -4) between flat reflective surfaces. The instrument was used to measure mirror samples for balloon-borne and spaceborne experiments. An emissivity of (6.05 +/- 1.24) x 10(exp -3) was measured for gold evaporated on glass, and (6.75 +/- 1.17) x 10(exp -3) for aluminum evaporated on glass.

  17. Effects of Acoustic Emission and Energy Evolution of Rock Specimens Under the Uniaxial Cyclic Loading and Unloading Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingbin; Zhang, Mingwei; Han, Lijun; Pu, Hai; Nie, Taoyi

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of energy accumulation, evolution, and dissipation in uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression of 30 sandstone rock specimens under six different loading rates were explored. Stress-strain relations and acoustic emission characteristics of the deformation and failure of rock specimens were analyzed. The densities and rates of stored energy, elastic energy, and dissipated energy under different loading rates were confirmed, and an effective approach for the equivalent energy surface was presented. The energy evolution of rock deformation and failure were revealed. It turns out that the rock deformation behavior under uniaxial cyclic loading and unloading compression remained almost unchanged compared with that of uniaxial compression. The degree of match between reloading stress-strain curves and previous unloading curves was high, thereby demonstrating the memory function of rock masses. The intensity of acoustic emission fluctuated continually during the entire cyclic process. Emissions significantly increased as the stress exceeded the unloading level. The peak of acoustic emission increased with increasing loading stress level. Relationships between energy density and axial load indicate that the rock mass possesses a certain energy storage limitation. The energy evolution of rock masses is closely related to the axial loading stress, rather than to the axial loading rate. With increasing axial loading stress, stored energy varied most rapidly, followed by that of the elastic energy, then dissipated energy. Energy accumulation dominates prior to the axial load reaching peak strength; thereafter, energy dissipation becomes dominant. The input energy causes the irreversible initiation and extension of microcracks in the rock body. Elastic energy release leads to sudden instability of rock bodies and drives rock damage.

  18. Acoustic model of micro-pressure wave emission from a high-speed train tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, T.

    2017-03-01

    The micro-pressure wave (MPW) radiated from a tunnel portal can, if audible, cause serious problems around tunnel portals in high-speed railways. This has created a need to develop an acoustic model that considers the topography around a radiation portal in order to predict MPWs more accurately and allow for higher speed railways in the future. An acoustic model of MPWs based on linear acoustic theory is developed in this study. First, the directivity of sound sources and the acoustical effect of topography are investigated using a train launcher facility around a portal on infinitely flat ground and with an infinite vertical baffle plate. The validity of linear acoustic theory is then discussed through a comparison of numerical results obtained using the finite difference method (FDM) and experimental results. Finally, an acoustic model is derived that considers sound sources up to the second order and Green's function to represent the directivity and effect of topography, respectively. The results predicted by this acoustic model are shown to be in good agreement with both numerical and experimental results.

  19. Measurement of muonium emission from silica aerogel

    CERN Document Server

    Bakule, P; Contreras, D; Esashi, M; Fujiwara, Y; Fukao, Y; Hirota, S; Iinuma, H; Ishida, K; Iwasaki, M; Kakurai, T; Kanda, S; Kawai, H; Kawamura, N; Marshall, G M; Masuda, H; Matsuda, Y; Mibe, T; Miyake, Y; Okada, S; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Onishi, H; Saito, N; Shimomura, K; Strasser, P; Tabata, M; Tomono, D; Ueno, K; Yokoyama, K; Yoshida, S

    2013-01-01

    Emission of muonium ($\\mu^{+}e^{-}$) atoms from silica aerogel into vacuum was observed. Characteristics of muonium emission were established from silica aerogel samples with densities in the range from 29 mg cm$^{-3}$ to 178 mg cm$^{-3}$. Spectra of muonium decay times correlated with distances from the aerogel surfaces, which are sensitive to the speed distributions, follow general features expected from a diffusion process, while small deviations from a simple room-temperature thermal diffusion model are identified. The parameters of the diffusion process are deduced from the observed yields.

  20. Acoustic measurements of F-4E aircraft operating in hush house, NSN 4920-02-070-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V. R.; Plzak, G. A.; Chinn, J. M.

    1981-09-01

    The primary purpose of this test program was to measure the acoustic environment in the hush house facility located at Kelly Air Force Base, Texas, during operation of the F-4E aircraft to ensure that aircraft structural acoustic design limits were not exceeded. The acoustic measurements showed that sonic fatigue problems are anticipated with the F-4E aircraft aft fuselage structure during operation in the hush house. The measured acoustic levels were less than those measured in an F-4E aircraft water cooled hush house at Hill AFB in the lower frequencies, but were increased over that measured during ground run up on some areas of the aircraft. It was recommended that the acoustic loads measured in this program should be specified in the structural design criteria for aircraft which will be subjected to hush house operation or defining requirements for associated equipment. Recommendations were also made to increase the fatigue life of the aft fuselage.