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Sample records for acoustic desorption combined

  1. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization via VUV-Generating Microplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Kevin; Hodyss, Robert; Fernández, Facundo M.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate the first application of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) as a mass spectrometric method for detecting low-polarity organics. This was accomplished using a Lyman-α (10.2 eV) photon generating microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) microplasma photon source in conjunction with the addition of a gas-phase molecular dopant. This combination provided a soft desorption and a relatively soft ionization technique. Selected compounds analyzed include α-tocopherol, perylene, cholesterol, phenanthrene, phylloquinone, and squalene. Detectable surface concentrations as low as a few pmol per spot sampled were achievable using test molecules. The combination of LIAD and APPI provided a soft desorption and ionization technique that can allow detection of labile, low-polarity, structurally complex molecules over a wide mass range with minimal fragmentation.

  2. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  3. Acoustic emission generated during the gas sorption-desorption process in coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yankun; Wang Enyuan; Xiao Dong; Li Zhonghui; Liu Jie; Gan Lijia

    2012-01-01

    An experimental system for monitoring the acoustic signals generated in coal during gas sorption and/or desorption was designed and the acoustic signals were observed under different gas pressures.The experimental results show that signals generated by the coal during gas adsorption are attenuated over time.Also,the signals are not continuous but are impulsive.The intensity of the signals generated during gas desorption is far smaller than that observed during adsorption.The signal seen during desorption remains essentially stable.Cycles of sorption and desorption cause acoustic emission signals that exhibit a memory effect,which depends upon the maximum gas pressure the sample was exposed to in earlier cycles.Lower pressures in subsequent cycles,compared to the maximum adsorption pressure in previous cycles,cause both the energy and impulse frequency to be lower than previously.On the contrary,a gas adsorption pressure that exceeds the maximum pressure seen by the sample during earlier cycles causes both the energy and impulse frequency to be high.

  4. A combined desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S; Miller, Scott A; Attygalle, Athula B

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H](+) or [M + metal](+) ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies. PMID:21472555

  5. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  6. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho;

    2013-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part. The...... model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated...... studio hall. The proposed model turns out to be promising for acoustic predictions providing a high level of detail and accuracy....

  7. Speaker verification using combined acoustic and EM sensor signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L C; Gable, T J; Holzrichter, J F

    2000-11-10

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantity of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. SOC. Am . 103 ( 1) 622 (1998). By combining the Glottal-EM-Sensor (GEMS) with the Acoustic-signals, we've demonstrated an almost 10 fold reduction in error rates from a speaker verification system experiment under a moderate noisy environment (-10dB).

  8. Combined Photoacoustic-Acoustic Technique for Crack Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Chigarev, N.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear imaging of a crack by combination of a common photoacoustic imaging technique with additional acoustic loading has been performed. Acoustic signals at two different fundamental frequencies were launched in the sample, one photoacoustically through heating of the sample surface by the intensity-modulated scanning laser beam and another by a piezoelectrical transducer. The acoustic signal at mixed frequencies, generated due to system nonlinearity, has been detected by an accelerometer. Different physical mechanisms of the nonlinearity contributing to the contrast in linear and nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of the crack are discussed.

  9. Attenuation Analysis and Acoustic Pressure Levels for Combined Absorptive Mufflers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Vasile

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the pressure-wave propagation in a muffler for an internal combustion engine in case of two combined mufflers geometry. The approach is generally applicable to analyzing the damping of propagation of harmonic pressure waves. The paper purpose is to show finite elements analysis of both inductive and resistive damping in pressure acoustics. The main output is the attenuation and acoustic pressure levels for the frequency range 50 Hz–3000 Hz.

  10. Acoustical comfort of vehicles: A combination of sound and vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuit, Klaus; Schutte-Fortkamp, Brigitte; Fiebig, Andre

    2005-09-01

    As vehicles become more and more quiet, the customer's sensitivity to acoustical comfort increases. The acoustical comfort is not independent of the vibrations the driver can feel in the seat and at the steering. The passenger of a vehicle must be regarded as part of a vibro-acoustic system. Correspondingly, the subjective judgement which passengers make about their impression of levels of acoustic comfort encompasses both sound and vibration. Achievement in this field depends on obtaining knowledge about the interaction between sound and vibration and how these factors impact subjective evaluation. To save time and money prediction tools for the estimation of sound and vibration contributions into the vehicle cabin are very important in order to simulate the final comfort with respect to sound and vibration. Based on the binaural transfer path analysis in combination with the binaural transfer path synthesis a sound and vibration reproduction in a so-called SoundCar can be realized with a very good simulation of a real situation of a car. First research tests completed for the European research project OBELICS (Objective Evaluation of Interior Car Sound) have shown that the use of SoundCar may result in more reliable sound characteristic and quality evaluation.

  11. Mandarin speech perception in combined electric and acoustic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Li

    Full Text Available For deaf individuals with residual low-frequency acoustic hearing, combined use of a cochlear implant (CI and hearing aid (HA typically provides better speech understanding than with either device alone. Because of coarse spectral resolution, CIs do not provide fundamental frequency (F0 information that contributes to understanding of tonal languages such as Mandarin Chinese. The HA can provide good representation of F0 and, depending on the range of aided acoustic hearing, first and second formant (F1 and F2 information. In this study, Mandarin tone, vowel, and consonant recognition in quiet and noise was measured in 12 adult Mandarin-speaking bimodal listeners with the CI-only and with the CI+HA. Tone recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in noise, but not in quiet. Vowel recognition was significantly better with the CI+HA in quiet, but not in noise. There was no significant difference in consonant recognition between the CI-only and the CI+HA in quiet or in noise. There was a wide range in bimodal benefit, with improvements often greater than 20 percentage points in some tests and conditions. The bimodal benefit was compared to CI subjects' HA-aided pure-tone average (PTA thresholds between 250 and 2000 Hz; subjects were divided into two groups: "better" PTA (50 dB HL. The bimodal benefit differed significantly between groups only for consonant recognition. The bimodal benefit for tone recognition in quiet was significantly correlated with CI experience, suggesting that bimodal CI users learn to better combine low-frequency spectro-temporal information from acoustic hearing with temporal envelope information from electric hearing. Given the small number of subjects in this study (n = 12, further research with Chinese bimodal listeners may provide more information regarding the contribution of acoustic and electric hearing to tonal language perception.

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and electrospray ionization combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Staneke, Paul O.; Nibbering, Nico M. M.

    1997-01-01

    During recent years, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) are successfully employed to analyze biomolecules and polymers. In combination with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, high mass resolution and mass measurement accuracy can be achieved to enable the determination of molecular weights and structural characterization of biochemical compounds larger than 10 kDa.

  13. Measurement Combination for Acoustic Source Localization in a Room Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertilä Pasi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of time delay estimation (TDE is well understood and therefore attractive to apply in acoustic source localization (ASL. A time delay between microphones maps into a hyperbola. Furthermore, the likelihoods for different time delays are mapped into a set of weighted nonoverlapping hyperbolae in the spatial domain. Combining TDE functions from several microphone pairs results in a spatial likelihood function (SLF which is a combination of sets of weighted hyperbolae. Traditionally, the maximum SLF point is considered as the source location but is corrupted by reverberation and noise. Particle filters utilize past source information to improve localization performance in such environments. However, uncertainty exists on how to combine the TDE functions. Results from simulated dialogues in various conditions favor TDE combination using intersection-based methods over union. The real-data dialogue results agree with the simulations, showing a 45% RMSE reduction when choosing the intersection over union of TDE functions.

  14. Combined effects of DOM extracted from site soil/compost and biosurfactant on the sorption and desorption of PAHs in a soil-water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The combined DOM and biosurfactant significantly enhanced desorption of PAHs. → Compost DOM exhibited higher desorption enhancement capacity than the soil DOM. → Competition among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant for sorption site determined desorption of PAHs from soil. → Formation of DOM-biosurfactant complex enhance desorption extent of PAHs. - Abstract: The combined effects of DOM and biosurfactant on the sorption/desorption behavior of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in soil water systems were systematically investigated. Two origins of DOMs (extracted from soil and extracted from food waste compost) and an anionic biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) were introduced. The presence of DOM in the aqueous phase could decrease the sorption of PAHs, thus influence their mobility. Desorption enhancement for both PHE and PYR in the system with compost DOM was greater than that in the soil DOM system. This is due to the differences in specific molecular structures and functional groups of two DOMs. With the co-existence of biosurfactant and DOM, partitioning is the predominant process and the desorption extent was much higher than the system with DOM or biosurfactant individually. For PHE, the desorption enhancement of combined DOM and biosurfactant was larger than the sum of DOM or biosurfactant; however desorption enhancement for PYR in the combined system was less than the additive enhancement in two individual system under low PAH concentration. This could be explained as the competition sorption among PAHs, DOM and biosurfactant. The results of this study will help to clarify the transport of petroleum pollutants in the remediation of HOCs-contaminated soils.

  15. A Liquid Injection Field Desorption/Ionization-Electrospray Ionization Combination Source for a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, H. Bernhard; Gross, Jürgen H.

    2011-12-01

    A new type of combination ion source has been devised. It unites two complementary ionization methods, i.e., liquid injection field desorption/ionization (LIFDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). This LIFDI-ESI combination ion source has been constructed for a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The LIFDI-ESI combination ion source can be switched between the LIFDI and ESI modes of operation within 15 min without breaking the vacuum. The source design and its operation are described. LIFDI-FT-ICR spectra of the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)-phosphonium tris(pentafluoroethyl)-trifluorophosphate, polyethylene glycol 600, 2,3,4-tridodecyloxy-benzaldehyde, and [60]fullerene are described.

  16. Hybrid acoustic energy harvesting using combined electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Izhar

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports a novel hybrid acoustic energy harvester. The harvester utilizes both the electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion mechanisms simultaneously to convert the ambient acoustical noise into electrical power for self-powered wireless sensor nodes. The proposed harvester is comprised of a Helmholtz resonator, two magnets mounted on a piezoelectric plate, and a wound coil located under the magnets. The harvester is characterized both under harmonic and real random acoustical excitations. In-lab, under harmonic acoustical excitation at a sound pressure level of 130 dB and frequency of 2.1 kHz, an optimum power of 2.86 μW (at 114 Ω optimum load) is obtained from electromagnetic conversion and 50 μW (at 1000 Ω optimum load) is generated by the piezoelectric harvester's part. Moreover, in real acoustical environment of a domestic electric generator the peak voltages of 40 and 123 mV are produced by the electromagnetic and piezoelectric portions of the acoustic energy harvester. PMID:26931884

  17. Combination of HPLC and 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry for identifying composition of ginseng tinctures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkin, Y N; Makhankov, V V; Uvarova, N L; Bondarenko, P V; Zubarev, R A; Knysh, A N

    1993-03-01

    The 252-Cf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (252-Cf PDMS) determination or confirmation of the ginsenoside saponins has been proposed to investigate the composition of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) peaks of ginseng tinctures and galenic preparations. That ionization technique is well suitable for the analysis of natural mixtures of these saponins. The 252-Cf PD mass spectra of standard ginsenosides Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Re, Rg1, Rd, NG-R2, Z-R1 contain the peaks of two types of ions, namely, molecular adduct ions (MAI) and aglycone ions. By mass the latter may be referred to either protopanaxadiol or protopanaxatriol. The masses of MAI and aglycone ions are determined by the carbohydrate chains. The collected HPLC fractions of P ginseng tincture can be tested for content of ginsenosides. After studying two MAI peaks from the 252-Cf PD mass spectra of the basic ginsenosides, an example of distinction between two galenic preparations from different Panax has been shown. PMID:8352021

  18. Denoising of human speech using combined acoustic and em sensor signal processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L C; Burnett, G C; Holzrichter, J F; Gable, T J

    1999-11-29

    Low Power EM radar-like sensors have made it possible to measure properties of the human speech production system in real-time, without acoustic interference. This greatly enhances the quality and quantify of information for many speech related applications. See Holzrichter, Burnett, Ng, and Lea, J. Acoustic. Soc. Am. 103 (1) 622 (1998). By using combined Glottal-EM- Sensor- and Acoustic-signals, segments of voiced, unvoiced, and no-speech can be reliably defined. Real-time Denoising filters can be constructed to remove noise from the user's corresponding speech signal.

  19. Combining Semantic and Acoustic Features for Valence and Arousal Recognition in Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karadogan, Seliz; Larsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The recognition of affect in speech has attracted a lot of interest recently; especially in the area of cognitive and computer sciences. Most of the previous studies focused on the recognition of basic emotions (such as happiness, sadness and anger) using categorical approach. Recently, the focus...... has been shifting towards dimensional affect recognition based on the idea that emotional states are not independent from one another but related in a systematic manner. In this paper, we design a continuous dimensional speech affect recognition model that combines acoustic and semantic features. We...... show that combining semantic and acoustic information for dimensional speech recognition improves the results. Moreover, we show that valence is better estimated using semantic features while arousal is better estimated using acoustic features....

  20. Combined Acoustic and Pronunciation Modelling for Non-Native Speech Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Bouselmi, Ghazi; Illina, Irina

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present several adaptation methods for non-native speech recognition. We have tested pronunciation modelling, MLLR and MAP non-native pronunciation adaptation and HMM models retraining on the HIWIRE foreign accented English speech database. The ``phonetic confusion'' scheme we have developed consists in associating to each spoken phone several sequences of confused phones. In our experiments, we have used different combinations of acoustic models representing the canonical and the foreign pronunciations: spoken and native models, models adapted to the non-native accent with MAP and MLLR. The joint use of pronunciation modelling and acoustic adaptation led to further improvements in recognition accuracy. The best combination of the above mentioned techniques resulted in a relative word error reduction ranging from 46% to 71%.

  1. Coherent Combination of Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Statistics and Peculiar Velocity Measurements from Redshift Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Yong-Seon

    2010-01-01

    New statistical method is proposed to coherently combine Baryon Acoustic Oscillation statistics (BAO) and peculiar velocity measurements exploiting decomposed density-density and velocity-velocity spectra in real space from the observed redshift distortions in redshift space, 1) to achieve stronger dark energy constraints, \\sigma(w)=0.06 and \\sigma(w_a)=0.20, which are enhanced from BAO or velocity measurements alone, and 2) to cross-check consistency of dark energy constraints from two diffe...

  2. Combined Opto-Acoustical Sensor Modules for KM3NeT

    CERN Document Server

    Enzenhöfer, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    KM3NeT is a future multi-cubic-kilometre water Cherenkov neutrino telescope currently entering a first construction phase. It will be located in the Mediterranean Sea and comprise about 600 vertical structures called detection units. Each of these detection units has a length of several hundred metres and is anchored to the sea bed on one side and held taut by a buoy on the other side. The detection units are thus subject to permanent movement due to sea currents. Modules holding photosensors and additional equipment are equally distributed along the detection units. The relative positions of the photosensors has to be known with an uncertainty below $20\\,$cm in order to achieve the necessary precision for neutrino astronomy. These positions can be determined with an acoustic positioning system: dedicated acoustic emitters located at known positions and acoustic receivers along each detection unit. This article describes the approach to combine an acoustic receiver with the photosensors inside one detection m...

  3. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  4. Adsorption and desorption of U(VI) on functionalized graphene oxides: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yubing; Yang, Shubin; Chen, Yue; Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-04-01

    The adsorption and desorption of U(VI) on graphene oxides (GOs), carboxylated GOs (HOOC-GOs), and reduced GOs (rGOs) were investigated by batch experiments, EXAFS technique, and computational theoretical calculations. Isothermal adsorptions showed that the adsorption capacities of U(VI) were GOs > HOOC-GOs > rGOs, whereas the desorbed amounts of U(VI) were rGOs > GOs > HOOC-GOs by desorption kinetics. According to EXAFS analysis, inner-sphere surface complexation dominated the adsorption of U(VI) on GOs and HOOC-GOs at pH 4.0, whereas outer-sphere surface complexation of U(VI) on rGO was observed at pH 4.0, which was consistent with surface complexation modeling. Based on the theoretical calculations, the binding energy of [G(···)UO2](2+) (8.1 kcal/mol) was significantly lower than those of [HOOC-GOs(···)UO2](2+) (12.1 kcal/mol) and [GOs-O(···)UO2](2+) (10.2 kcal/mol), suggesting the physisorption of UO2(2+) on rGOs. Such high binding energy of [GOs-COO(···)UO2](+) (50.5 kcal/mol) revealed that the desorption of U(VI) from the -COOH groups was much more difficult. This paper highlights the effect of the hydroxyl, epoxy, and carboxyl groups on the adsorption and desorption of U(VI), which plays an important role in designing GOs for the preconcentration and removal of radionuclides in environmental pollution cleanup applications.

  5. NH3 adsorption and decomposition on Ir(110): A combined temperature programmed desorption and high resolution fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption and decomposition of NH3 on Ir(110) has been studied in the temperature range from 80 K to 700 K. By using high-energy resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy it is possible to distinguish chemically different surface species. At low temperature a NH3 multilayer, which desorbs at ∼110 K, was observed. The second layer of NH3 molecules desorbs around 140 K, in a separate desorption peak. Chemisorbed NH3 desorbs in steps from the surface and several desorption peaks are observed between 200 and 400 K. A part of the NH3ad decomposes into NHad between 225 and 300 K. NHad decomposes into Nad between 400 K and 500 K and the hydrogen released in this process immediately desorbs. N2 desorption takes place between 500 and 700 K via Nad combination. The steady state decomposition reaction of NH3 starts at 500 K. The maximum reaction rate is observed between 540 K and 610 K. A model is presented to explain the occurrence of a maximum in the reaction rate. Hydrogenation of Nad below 400 K results in NHad. No NH2ad or NH3ad/NH3 were observed. The hydrogenation of NHad only takes place above 400 K. On the basis of the experimental findings an energy scheme is presented to account for the observations

  6. Music-induced emotions can be predicted from a combination of brain activity and acoustic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Williams, Duncan; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Weaver, James; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2015-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that music can communicate and induce a wide range of emotions in the listener. However, music is a highly-complex audio signal composed of a wide range of complex time- and frequency-varying components. Additionally, music-induced emotions are known to differ greatly between listeners. Therefore, it is not immediately clear what emotions will be induced in a given individual by a piece of music. We attempt to predict the music-induced emotional response in a listener by measuring the activity in the listeners electroencephalogram (EEG). We combine these measures with acoustic descriptors of the music, an approach that allows us to consider music as a complex set of time-varying acoustic features, independently of any specific music theory. Regression models are found which allow us to predict the music-induced emotions of our participants with a correlation between the actual and predicted responses of up to r=0.234,pmusic induced emotions can be predicted by their neural activity and the properties of the music. Given the large amount of noise, non-stationarity, and non-linearity in both EEG and music, this is an encouraging result. Additionally, the combination of measures of brain activity and acoustic features describing the music played to our participants allows us to predict music-induced emotions with significantly higher accuracies than either feature type alone (p<0.01). PMID:26544602

  7. Music-induced emotions can be predicted from a combination of brain activity and acoustic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ian; Williams, Duncan; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Weaver, James; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2015-12-01

    It is widely acknowledged that music can communicate and induce a wide range of emotions in the listener. However, music is a highly-complex audio signal composed of a wide range of complex time- and frequency-varying components. Additionally, music-induced emotions are known to differ greatly between listeners. Therefore, it is not immediately clear what emotions will be induced in a given individual by a piece of music. We attempt to predict the music-induced emotional response in a listener by measuring the activity in the listeners electroencephalogram (EEG). We combine these measures with acoustic descriptors of the music, an approach that allows us to consider music as a complex set of time-varying acoustic features, independently of any specific music theory. Regression models are found which allow us to predict the music-induced emotions of our participants with a correlation between the actual and predicted responses of up to r=0.234,pmusic induced emotions can be predicted by their neural activity and the properties of the music. Given the large amount of noise, non-stationarity, and non-linearity in both EEG and music, this is an encouraging result. Additionally, the combination of measures of brain activity and acoustic features describing the music played to our participants allows us to predict music-induced emotions with significantly higher accuracies than either feature type alone (p<0.01).

  8. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  9. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  10. Combined surface acoustic wave and surface plasmon resonance measurement of collagen and fibrinogen layers

    CERN Document Server

    Friedt, J M; Francis, L; Zhou, C; Campitelli, A; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Denis, Frederic; Francis, Laurent; Zhou, Cheng; Campitelli, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We use an instrument combining optical (surface plasmon resonance) and acoustic (Love mode acoustic wave device) real-time measurements on a same surface for the identification of water content in collagen and fibrinogen protein layers. After calibration of the surface acoustic wave device sensitivity by copper electrodeposition, the bound mass and its physical properties -- density and optical index -- are extracted from the complementary measurement techniques and lead to thickness and water ratio values compatible with the observed signal shifts. Such results are especially usefully for protein layers with a high water content as shown here for collagen on an hydrophobic surface. We obtain the following results: collagen layers include 70+/-20 % water and are 16+/-3 to 19+/-3 nm thick for bulk concentrations ranging from 30 to 300 ug/ml. Fibrinogen layers include 50+/-10 % water for layer thicknesses in the 6+/-1.5 to 13+/-2 nm range when the bulk concentration is in the 46 to 460 ug/ml range.

  11. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubaiyet Iftekharul Haque

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D printing and two-dimensional (2D printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  12. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  13. The Evaluation of Efficacy of the Combination of Acoustic Cavitation and Radiofrequency Lipolysis in Body Sculpturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Dogruk Kacar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: There is widespread use of noninvasive body sculpturing methods with the emerging new technologies in the field of aesthethic dermatology. However scientific data about these methods is limited. In our study the efficacy of the combination of acoustic cavitation and radiofrequency in body sculpturing is retrospectively evaluated. Material and Method: We retrospectively evaluated the patients who underwent body contouring treatment for belly and waist area in Dermatocosmetology unit of Afyon Kocatepe University Hospital between September 2012 and September 2013. The combination of acoustic cavitation and radiofrequency is applied 2 times a week for 10 sessions for body contouring of waist and belly. Before treatment and after each session the height, weight and perimetric measurements are recorded. Patients satisfaction level is assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS between 0 (dissatisfied, no effect and 5 (very satisfied, very effective. Results: The mean age of 15 female patients were 36,4±10,2 (23-52. There were statistically significant difference in weight and perimetric measurements of waist (superior waist, waist circumference, inferior waist between the beginning and end of treatment (respectively, p=0.002 and p=0.001 for the remaining three. Sixty percent of patients described the treatment as satisfactory according to VAS. The remaining were not satisfied although the treatments produced a change. No adverse effects reported other than a transient erythema during treatment. Discussion: Diet and exercise are still the most relevant ways to achieve optimal body shape and tone. Besides it is possible to eliminate excess fat and skin in appropriate patients by body sculpturing methods such as invasive and noninvasive liposuction and lipolysis. We found the combination of acoustic cavitation and radiofrequency effective in body shaping.

  14. Blind equalization of underwater acoustic channel using a combined constant modulus algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng; ZHAO Junwei; LI Hongsheng

    2003-01-01

    A kind of Combined Constant Modulus Algorithm (CCMA) is presented to com-pensate the defects of the Constant Modulus Algorithm (CMA) and the Sign Error CMA(SECMA). And CCMA is applied to the equalization of the underwater acoustic channel(UWAC). Based on the decision of the equalizer's output, its iteration process switches betweenCMA and SECMA automatically. It is more robust than SECMA, and more computationallyefficient than CMA. Therefore, it is very suitable for the recovery of the underwater data trans-mission. The performance of CCMA is proven by computer simulation for the equalization ofthe UWAC.

  15. Unlocking the Potential of High-Throughput Drug Combination Assays Using Acoustic Dispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Grace Ka Yan; Wilson, Stacy; Schmidt, Stephen; Moffat, John G

    2016-02-01

    Assessment of synergistic effects of drug combinations in vitro is a critical part of anticancer drug research. However, the complexities of dosing and analyzing two drugs over the appropriate range of doses have generally led to compromises in experimental design that restrict the quality and robustness of the data. In particular, the use of a single dose response of combined drugs, rather than a full two-way matrix of varying doses, has predominated in higher-throughput studies. Acoustic dispensing unlocks the potential of high-throughput dose matrix analysis. We have developed acoustic dispensing protocols that enable compound synergy assays in a 384-well format. This experimental design is considerably more efficient and flexible with respect to time, reagent usage, and labware than is achievable using traditional serial-dilution approaches. Data analysis tools integrated in Genedata Screener were used to efficiently deconvolute the combination compound mapping scheme and calculate compound potency and synergy metrics. We have applied this workflow to evaluate interactions among drugs targeting different nodes of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in a panel of cancer cell lines. PMID:26160862

  16. Screening of the Binding of Small Molecules to Proteins by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with Protein Microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins.

  17. Screening of the binding of small molecules to proteins by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry combined with protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chenxi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Buqing; He, Dacheng; Na, Na; Ouyang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between bioactive small molecule ligands and proteins is one of the important research areas in proteomics. Herein, a simple and rapid method is established to screen small ligands that bind to proteins. We designed an agarose slide to immobilize different proteins. The protein microarrays were allowed to interact with different small ligands, and after washing, the microarrays were screened by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). This method can be applied to screen specific protein binding ligands and was shown for seven proteins and 34 known ligands for these proteins. In addition, a high-throughput screening was achieved, with the analysis requiring approximately 4 s for one sample spot. We then applied this method to determine the binding between the important protein matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and 88 small compounds. The molecular docking results confirmed the MS results, demonstrating that this method is suitable for the rapid and accurate screening of ligands binding to proteins. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Deconstructing Desorption Electrospray Ionization: Independent Optimization of Desorption and Ionization by Spray Desorption Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Kevin A.; Jain, Shashank; Brandt, William R.; Venter, Andre R.

    2012-11-01

    Spray desorption collection (SDC) and reflective electrospray ionization (RESI) were used to independently study the desorption and ionization processes that together comprise desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). Both processes depend on several instrumental parameters, including the nebulizing gas flow rate, applied potential, and source geometries. Each of these parameters was optimized for desorption, as represented by the results obtained by SDC, and ionization, as represented by the results obtained by RESI. The optimized conditions were then compared to the optimization results for DESI. Our results confirm that optimal conditions for desorption and ionization are different and that in some cases the optimized DESI conditions are a compromise between both sets. The respective results for DESI, RESI, and SDC for each parameter were compared across the methods to draw conclusions about the contribution of each parameter to desorption and ionization separately and then combined within DESI. Our results indicate that desorption efficiency is (1) independent of the applied potential and (2) the impact zone to inlet distance, and that (3) gas pressure settings and (4) sprayer to impact zone distances above optimal for DESI are detrimental to desorption but beneficial for ionization. In addition, possible interpretations for the observed trends are presented.

  19. Combined optical fiber interferometric sensors for the detection of acoustic emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-jun; MU Lin-lin; LIU Jun-feng; YU Xiao-tao

    2008-01-01

    A type of combined optical fiber interferometric acoustic emission sensor is proposed.The sensor can be independent on the laser source and make light interference by matching the lengths of two arms,so it can be used to monitor the health of large structure.Theoretical analyses indicate that the system can be equivalent to the Michelson interferometer with two optical fiber loop reflectors,and its sensitivity has been remarkably increased because of the decrease of the losses of light energy.PZT is powered by DC regulator to control the operating point of the system,so the system can accurately detect feeble vibration which is generated by ultrasonic waves propagating on the surface of solid.The amplitude and the frequency of feeble vibration signal are obtained by detecting the output light intensity of intefferometer and using Fourier transform technique.The results indicate that the system can be used to detect the acoustic emission signals by the frequency characteristics.

  20. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  1. Damage characterization in engineering materials using a combination of optical, acoustic, and thermal techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragazikis, I. K.; Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with the use of complimentary nondestructive methods for the evaluation of damage in engineering materials. The application of digital image correlation (DIC) to engineering materials is a useful tool for accurate, noncontact strain measurement. DIC is a 2D, full-field optical analysis technique based on gray-value digital images to measure deformation, vibration and strain a vast variety of materials. In addition, this technique can be applied from very small to large testing areas and can be used for various tests such as tensile, torsion and bending under static or dynamic loading. In this study, DIC results are benchmarked with other nondestructive techniques such as acoustic emission for damage localization and fracture mode evaluation, and IR thermography for stress field visualization and assessment. The combined use of these three nondestructive methods enables the characterization and classification of damage in materials and structures.

  2. Full skin quantitative optical coherence elastography achieved by combining vibration and surface acoustic wave methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    By combining with the phase sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhS-OCT), vibration and surface acoustic wave (SAW) methods have been reported to provide elastography of skin tissue respectively. However, neither of these two methods can provide the elastography in full skin depth in current systems. This paper presents a feasibility study on an optical coherence elastography method which combines both vibration and SAW in order to give the quantitative mechanical properties of skin tissue with full depth range, including epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat. Experiments are carried out on layered tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo human forearm and palm skin. A ring actuator generates vibration while a line actuator were used to excited SAWs. A PhS-OCT system is employed to provide the ultrahigh sensitive measurement of the generated waves. The experimental results demonstrate that by the combination of vibration and SAW method the full skin bulk mechanical properties can be quantitatively measured and further the elastography can be obtained with a sensing depth from ~0mm to ~4mm. This method is promising to apply in clinics where the quantitative elasticity of localized skin diseases is needed to aid the diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Structure determination of two conotoxins from Conus textile by a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and biochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalume, D E; Stenflo, J; Czerwiec, E;

    2000-01-01

    Two highly modified conotoxins from the mollusc Conus textile, epsilon-TxIX and Gla(1)-TxVI, were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and electrospray mass spectrometry and also by electrospray ionization tandem and triple mass spectrometry in combination with enzymatic...

  4. Cryogenic oxygen jet response to transverse acoustic excitation with the first transverse and the first combined longitudinal-transverse modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardi, J. S.; Oschwald, M.

    2016-07-01

    The intact length of the dense oxygen core from an oxygen-hydrogen shear coaxial rocket injector was measured. The measurements were made in a rectangular rocket combustor with optical access and acoustic forcing. The combustor was operated at chamber pressures of 40 and 60 bar, with either ambient temperature or cryogenic hydrogen. The multielement injection spray is subjected to forced transverse gas oscillations of two different acoustic resonance modes; the first transverse (1T) mode at 4200 Hz and the first combined longitudinal-transverse (1L1T) at 5500 Hz. Intact core length is measured from high-speed shadowgraph imaging. The dependence of intact core length with increasing acoustic amplitude is compared for the two modes of excitation.

  5. Combining COMSOL modeling with acoustic pressure maps to design sono-reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2016-07-01

    Scaled-up and economically viable sonochemical systems are critical for increased use of ultrasound in environmental and chemical processing applications. In this study, computational simulations and acoustic pressure maps were used to design a larger-scale sono-reactor containing a multi-stepped ultrasonic horn. Simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics showed ultrasonic waves emitted from the horn neck and tip, generating multiple regions of high acoustic pressure. The volume of these regions surrounding the horn neck were larger compared with those below the horn tip. The simulated acoustic field was verified by acoustic pressure contour maps generated from hydrophone measurements in a plexiglass box filled with water. These acoustic pressure contour maps revealed an asymmetric and discrete distribution of acoustic pressure due to acoustic cavitation, wave interaction, and water movement by ultrasonic irradiation. The acoustic pressure contour maps were consistent with simulation results in terms of the effective scale of cavitation zones (∼ 10 cm and COMSOL simulations. In this study, verification of simulation results with experiments demonstrates that coupling of COMSOL simulations with hydrophone measurements is a simple, effective and reliable scientific method to evaluate reactor designs of ultrasonic systems. PMID:26964976

  6. Decay of geodesic acoustic modes due to the combined action of phase mixing and Landau damping

    CERN Document Server

    Biancalani, A; Angioni, C; Bottino, A; Zonca, F

    2016-01-01

    Geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) are oscillations of the electric field whose importance in tokamak plasmas is due to their role in the regulation of turbulence. The linear collisionless damping of GAMs is investigated here by means of analytical theory and numerical simulations with the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell code ORB5. The combined effect of the phase mixing and Landau damping is found to quickly redistribute the GAM energy in phase-space, due to the synergy of the finite orbit width of the passing ions and the cascade in wave number given by the phase mixing. When plasma parameters characteristic of realistic tokamak profiles are considered, the GAM decay time is found to be an order of magnitude lower than the decay due to the Landau damping alone, and in some cases of the same order of magnitude of the characteristic GAM drive time due to the nonlinear interaction with an ITG mode. In particular, the radial mode structure evolution in time is investigated here and reproduced quantitatively by ...

  7. To see or not to see: investigating detectability of Ganges River dolphins using a combined visual-acoustic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Nadia I; Gibbons, James M; Turvey, Samuel T; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Ahmed, Benazir; Mahabub, Emile; Smith, Brian D; Jones, Julia P G

    2014-01-01

    Detection of animals during visual surveys is rarely perfect or constant, and failure to account for imperfect detectability affects the accuracy of abundance estimates. Freshwater cetaceans are among the most threatened group of mammals, and visual surveys are a commonly employed method for estimating population size despite concerns over imperfect and unquantified detectability. We used a combined visual-acoustic survey to estimate detectability of Ganges River dolphins (Platanista gangetica gangetica) in four waterways of southern Bangladesh. The combined visual-acoustic survey resulted in consistently higher detectability than a single observer-team visual survey, thereby improving power to detect trends. Visual detectability was particularly low for dolphins close to meanders where these habitat features temporarily block the view of the preceding river surface. This systematic bias in detectability during visual-only surveys may lead researchers to underestimate the importance of heavily meandering river reaches. Although the benefits of acoustic surveys are increasingly recognised for marine cetaceans, they have not been widely used for monitoring abundance of freshwater cetaceans due to perceived costs and technical skill requirements. We show that acoustic surveys are in fact a relatively cost-effective approach for surveying freshwater cetaceans, once it is acknowledged that methods that do not account for imperfect detectability are of limited value for monitoring.

  8. Acoustic oddball during NREM sleep: a combined EEG/fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Czisch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A condition vital for the consolidation and maintenance of sleep is generally reduced responsiveness to external stimuli. Despite this, the sleeper maintains a level of stimulus processing that allows to respond to potentially dangerous environmental signals. The mechanisms that subserve these contradictory functions are only incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using combined EEG/fMRI we investigated the neural substrate of sleep protection by applying an acoustic oddball paradigm during light NREM sleep. Further, we studied the role of evoked K-complexes (KCs, an electroencephalographic hallmark of NREM sleep with a still unknown role for sleep protection. Our main results were: (1 Other than in wakefulness, rare tones did not induce a blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal increase in the auditory pathway but a strong negative BOLD response in motor areas and the amygdala. (2 Stratification of rare tones by the presence of evoked KCs detected activation of the auditory cortex, hippocampus, superior and middle frontal gyri and posterior cingulate only for rare tones followed by a KC. (3 The typical high frontocentral EEG deflections of KCs were not paralleled by a BOLD equivalent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We observed that rare tones lead to transient disengagement of motor and amygdala responses during light NREM sleep. We interpret this as a sleep protective mechanism to delimit motor responses and to reduce the sensitivity of the amygdala towards further incoming stimuli. Evoked KCs are suggested to originate from a brain state with relatively increased stimulus processing, revealing an activity pattern resembling novelty processing as previously reported during wakefulness. The KC itself is not reflected by increased metabolic demand in BOLD based imaging, arguing that evoked KCs result from increased neural synchronicity without altered metabolic demand.

  9. Detection of dead regions in the cochlea: relevance for combined electric and acoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J; Glasberg, Brian; Schlueter, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A dead region is a region in the cochlea where the inner hair cells and/or the auditory neurones are functioning very poorly, if at all. People who are being considered for a combination of a cochlear implant and a hearing aid typically have a dead region in the parts of the cochlea that normally respond to medium and high frequencies, but have some functional hearing at lower frequencies. For such people, it may be useful to determine the edge frequency, f(e), of any dead region. This may be relevant to choosing the most appropriate insertion depth of the electrode array, and to the way that frequencies in the input signal are mapped to acoustic and electric stimulation. It may also be helpful in interpreting the results of research studies. This paper reviews methods for diagnosing dead regions and defining the value of f(e). It is argued that the value of f(e) cannot be determined reliably from the audiogram, although a dead region is likely to be present at a given frequency when the hearing loss at that frequency is 70 dB or more. When a sinusoidal signal is reported as sounding highly distorted or noise-like, a dead region may be present at the signal frequency, but again this is not a reliable indicator. The TEN test is a simple clinical method for diagnosis of dead regions. Where this test gives a positive diagnosis, it is recommended that psychophysical tuning curves be measured to define the value of f(e) more precisely. PMID:19955720

  10. Monitoring N3 dye adsorption and desorption on TiO2 surfaces: a combined QCM-D and XPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayment-Steele, Hannah K; Johnson, Lewis E; Tian, Fangyuan; Dixon, Matthew C; Benz, Lauren; Johal, Malkiat S

    2014-06-25

    Understanding the kinetics of dye adsorption and desorption on semiconductors is crucial for optimizing the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measures adsorbed mass in real time, allowing determination of binding kinetics. In this work, we characterize adsorption of the common RuBipy dye N3 to the native oxide layer of a planar, sputter-coated titanium surface, simulating the TiO2 substrate of a DSSC. We report adsorption equilibrium constants consistent with prior optical measurements of N3 adsorption. Dye binding and surface integrity were also verified by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We further study desorption of the dye from the native oxide layer on the QCM sensors using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), a commonly used industrial desorbant. We find that using TBAOH as a desorbant does not fully regenerate the surface, though little ruthenium or nitrogen is observed by XPS after desorption, suggesting that carboxyl moieties of N3 remain bound. We demonstrate the native oxide layer of a titanium sensor as a valid and readily available planar TiO2 morphology to study dye adsorption and desorption and begin to investigate the mechanism of dye desorption in DSSCs, a system that requires further study. PMID:24848580

  11. Validation of a numerical model of acoustic ceiling combined with TABS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rage, Nils; Kazanci, Ongun Berk; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2016-01-01

    Thermally-Active Building Systems (TABS) have proven to be an energy-efficient and economical cooling and heating solution for commercial buildings. However, acoustic comfort is often jeopardized in such buildings, due to the thermal requirements of the system. More knowledge is required to under...

  12. MOF-5 metal-organic framework as sorbent for in-field sampling and preconcentration in combination with thermal desorption GC/MS for determination of atmospheric formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Gen; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2010-02-15

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are one kind of highly porous crystalline materials, which are constructed by metal-containing inorganic nodes and organic linkers. With large surface area and high thermal stability, MOFs have great potential as sorbents for the preconcentration of trace analytes. However, such application of MOFs to the analysis of real samples has not been reported before. Here we report the utilization of MOF-5 as sorbent for in-field sampling and preconcentration of atmospheric formaldehyde before thermal desorption (TD) GC/MS (TD-GC/MS) determination without the need for any chemical derivatization. MOF-5 gave a 53 and 73 times better concentration effect than Tenax TA (organic polymers) and Carbograph 1TD (graphitized carbon black), respectively, for TD-GC/MS determination of formaldehyde. MOF-5 showed good performance for in-field sampling and preconcentration of formaldehyde from air samples with a relative humidity less than 45%. The collected formaldehyde on MOF-5 sorbent was stable for at least 72 h at room temperature before TD-GC/MS analysis. One tube packed with 300 mg of MOF-5 lasted 200 cycles of adsorption/TD without significant loss of collection efficiency. The breakthrough volume of such a tube was 1.2 L of 28.35 mg m(-3) formaldehyde at a sampling flow rate of 100 mL min(-1). The use of MOF-5 for in-field sampling and preconcentration in combination with TD-GC/MS for the determination of formaldehyde offered a linear range covering 3 orders of magnitude, and a detection limit of 0.6 microg m(-3). The precision for six replicate cycles of in-field sampling and preconcentration for TD-GC/MS determination using one 300 mg MOF-5 packed tube ranged from 2.8% to 5.3%. The tube-to-tube reproducibility of three MOF-5 tubes prepared in parallel was 7.7%. The developed method was applied to analysis of local indoor and outdoor air samples for formaldehyde and validated by the standard method TO-11A of the United States Environmental

  13. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  14. Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Based Topographical Imaging and Nanometer Scale Resolved Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Nikiforov, Maxim [ORNL; Bradshaw, James A [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Nanometer scale proximal probe thermal desorption/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (TD/ESI-MS) was demonstrated for molecular surface sampling of caffeine from a thin film using a 30 nm diameter nano-thermal analysis (nano-TA) probe tip in an atomic force microscope (AFM) coupled via a vapor transfer line and ESI interface to a MS detection platform. Using a probe temperature of 350 C and a spot sampling time of 30 s, conical desorption craters 250 nm in diameter and 100 nm deep were created as shown through subsequent topographical imaging of the surface within the same system. Automated sampling of a 5 x 2 array of spots, with 2 m spacing between spots, and real time selective detection of the desorbed caffeine using tandem mass spectrometry was also demonstrated. Estimated from the crater volume (~2x106 nm3), only about 10 amol (2 fg) of caffeine was liberated from each thermal desorption crater in the thin film. These results illustrate a relatively simple experimental setup and means to acquire in automated fashion sub-micrometer scale spatial sampling resolution and mass spectral detection of materials amenable to TD. The ability to achieve MS-based chemical imaging with 250 nm scale spatial resolution with this system is anticipated.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamic Behavior of a Flexible Structure to Combined External Acoustic and Parametric Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo S. Varoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible structures are frequently subjected to multiple inputs when in the field environment. The accurate determination of the system dynamic response to multiple inputs depends on how much information is available from the excitation sources that act on the system under study. Detailed information include, but are not restricted to appropriate characterization of the excitation sources in terms of their variation in time and in space for the case of distributed loads. Another important aspect related to the excitation sources is how inputs of different nature contribute to the measured dynamic response. A particular and important driving mechanism that can occur in practical situations is the parametric resonance. Another important input that occurs frequently in practice is related to acoustic pressure distributions that is a distributed type of loading. In this paper, detailed theoretical and experimental investigations on the dynamic response of a flexible cantilever beam carrying a tip mass to simultaneously applied external acoustic and parametric excitation signals have been performed. A mathematical model for transverse nonlinear vibration is obtained by employing Lagrange’s equations where important nonlinear effects such as the beam’s curvature and quadratic viscous damping are accounted for in the equation of motion. The beam is driven by two excitation sources, a sinusoidal motion applied to the beam’s fixed end and parallel to its longitudinal axis and a distributed sinusoidal acoustic load applied orthogonally to the beam’s longitudinal axis. The major goal here is to investigate theoretically as well as experimentally the dynamic behavior of the beam-lumped mass system under the action of these two excitation sources. Results from an extensive experimental work show how these two excitation sources interacts for various testing conditions. These experimental results are validated through numerically simulated results

  16. Defining management units for cetaceans by combining genetics, morphology, acoustics and satellite tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Sveegaard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing animal units is essential in biological conservation and requires spatial and temporal identification of such units. Since even neighbouring populations often have different conservation status and face different levels of anthropogenic pressure, detailed knowledge of population structure, seasonal range and overlap with animals from neighbouring populations is required to manage each unit separately. Previous studies on genetic structure and morphologic separation suggests three distinct populations of harbour porpoises with limited geographic overlap in the North Sea (NS, the Belt Sea (BS and the Baltic Proper (BP region. In this study, we aim to identify a management unit for the BS population of harbour porpoises. We use Argos satellite data and genetics from biopsies of tagged harbour porpoises as well as acoustic data from 40 passive acoustic data loggers to determine management areas with the least overlap between populations and thus the least error when abundance and population status is estimated. Discriminant analysis of the satellite tracking data from the BS and NS populations showed that the best fit of the management unit border during the summer months was an east–west line from Denmark to Sweden at latitude 56.95°N. For the border between BS and BP, satellite tracking data indicate a sharp decline in population density at 13.5°E, with 90% of the locations being west of this line. This was supported by the acoustic data with the average daily detection rate being 27.5 times higher west of 13.5°E as compared to east of 13.5°E. By using this novel multidisciplinary approach, we defined a management unit for the BS harbour porpoise population. We recommend that these boundaries are used for future monitoring efforts of this population under the EU directives. The boundaries may also be used for conservation efforts during the summer months, while seasonal movements of harbour porpoises should be considered during

  17. Comparing a phased combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method with other simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marbjerg, Gerd Høy; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho;

    2015-01-01

    and diffuse reflections when simulating the acoustics of small rooms with non-diffuse sound fields, since scattering from walls add to the diffuseness in the room. This room type is often seen in class rooms and offices, as they are often small rectangular rooms with most of the absorption placed...... on the ceiling. Here, PARISM is used for comparisons with other simulation tools and measurements. An empty, rectangular room with a suspended absorbing ceiling is used for the comparisons. It was found that including the phase information in simulations increases the spatial standard deviation, even if only...

  18. Robust Speaker Recognition with Combined Use of Acoustic and Throat Microphone Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahidullah, Md; Gonzalez Hautamäki, Rosa; Thomsen, Dennis Alexander Lehmann;

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy of automatic speaker recognition (ASV) systems degrades severely in the presence of background noise. In this paper, we study the use of additional side information provided by a body-conducted sensor, throat microphone. Throat microphone signal is much less affected by background noise...... of this additional information for both speech activity detection, feature extraction and fusion of the acoustic and throat microphone signals. We collect a pilot database consisting of 38 subjects including both clean and noisy sessions. We carry out speaker verification experiments using Gaussian mixture model...

  19. A combined complex electrical impedance and acoustic emission study in limestone samples under uniaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, V.; Fitilis, I.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, complex electrical impedance measurements in the frequency range of 10 mHz to 1 MHz were carried out in conjunction with acoustic emission monitoring in limestone samples subjected to linear and stepped-like uniaxial loading, up to ultimate failure. Cole-Cole plots of the complex impedance during the stepped loading of limestone have been used to discriminate the contributions of grains interior, grain boundaries and electrode polarization effects to the overall electrical behavior. The latter is well-described with an equivalent-circuit model which comprises components of constant phase elements and resistances in parallel connection. Electrical conductivity increases upon uniaxial loading giving rise to negative values of effective activation volume. This is a strong experimental evidence for the generation of transient electric signals recorded prior to seismic events and may be attributed to charge transfer (proton conduction) due to cracks generation and propagation as a result of the applied stress. The time-series of ac-conductivity at two distinct frequencies (10 kHz, 200 kHz) during linear loading of limestone samples exhibits a strong correlation with the acoustic emission activity obeying the same general self-similar law for critical phenomena that has been reported for the energy release before materials fracture.

  20. Desorption From Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, J F; Viti, S; Williams, D A

    2007-01-01

    The desorption of molecular species from ice mantles back into the gas phase in molecular clouds results from a variety of very poorly understood processes. We have investigated three mechanisms; desorption resulting from H_2 formation on grains, direct cosmic ray heating and cosmic ray induced photodesorption. Whilst qualitative differences exist between these processes (essentially deriving from the assumptions concerning the species-selectivity of the desorption and the assumed threshold adsorption energies, E_t) all three processes are found to be potentially very significant in dark cloud conditions. It is therefore important that all three mechanisms should be considered in studies of molecular clouds in which freeze-out and desorption are believed to be important. Employing a chemical model of a typical static molecular core and using likely estimates for the quantum yields of the three processes we find that desorption by H_2 formation probably dominates over the other two mechanisms. However, the phy...

  1. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size. PMID:20058949

  2. Direct Analysis of Oil Additives by High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Combined with Electrospray Ionization and Desorption Electrospray Ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Turner, Matthew; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2016-02-16

    The analysis of corrosion inhibitors in the presence and absence of an oil matrix is reported using electrospray ionization (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), hyphenated with miniaturized high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry (MS). The target analytes were successfully ionized in solution by ESI and directly from steel surfaces using DESI ambient ionization at levels ≥0.0004% w/w (4 ppm) in oil. Differences in the mass spectral profiles observed for the additive/oil mixture are attributed to differences between the ESI and DESI ionization processes. The use of FAIMS improved selectivity for ESI generated analyte ions through reduction in the chemical noise resulting from the oil matrix. DESI enabled the direct, rapid, native state interrogation of oil samples on steel surfaces without sample pretreatment, and the hyphenation of DESI with the miniaturized FAIMS enhanced the relative analyte responses of the surface-active corrosion inhibitors. PMID:26780580

  3. Experimental study of ultra-thin films mechanical integrity by combined nanoindentation and nano-acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zihou

    Advancement of interconnect technology has imposed significant challenge on interface characterization and reliability for blurred interfaces between layers. There is a need for material properties and these miniaturized length scales and assessment of reliability; including the intrinsic film fracture toughness and the interfacial fracture toughness. The nano-meter range of film thicknesses currently employed, impose significant challenges on evaluating these physical quantities and thereby impose significant challenge on the design cycle. In this study we attempted to use a combined nano-indentation and nano-acoustic emission to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize the failure modes in ultra-thin blanket films on Si substrates or stakes of different characteristics. We have performed and analyzed an exhaustive group of testes that cove many diverge combination of film-substrate combination, provided by both Intel and IBM. When the force-indentation depth curve shows excursion, a direct measure of the total energy release rate is estimated. The collected acoustic emission signal is then used to partition the total energy into two segments, one associated with the cohesive fracture toughness of the film and the other is for the adhesive fracture toughness of the interface. The acoustic emission signal is analyzed in both the time and frequency domain to achieve such energy division. In particular, the signal time domain analysis for signal skewness, time of arrival and total energy content are employed with the proper signal to noise ratio. In the frequency domain, an expansive group of acoustic emission signals are utilized to construct the details of the power spectral density. A bank of band-pass filters are designed to sort the individual signals to those associated with adhesive interlayer cracking, cohesive channel cracking, or other system induced noise. The attenuation time and the energy content within each spectral frequency were the key elements

  4. Detection of bacteria from biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, A.J.; Basile, F.; Furlong, E.; Voorhees, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying specific bacteria from complex biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been developed. The technique employs commercially available magnetic beads coated with polycolonal antibodies raised against specific bacteria and whole cell analysis by MALDI-MS. A suspension of a bacterial mixture is mixed with the immunomagnetic beads specific for the target microorganism. After a short incubation period (20 mins) the bacteria captured by the beads are washed, resuspended in deionized H2O and directly applied onto a MALDI probe. Liquid suspensions containing bacterial mixtures can be screened within 1 h total analysis time. Positive tests result in the production of a fingerprint mass spectrum primarily consisting of protein biomarkers characteristic of the targeted microorganism. Using this procedure, Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated and detected from standard bacterial mixtures and spiked samples of river water, human urine, and chicken blood. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Non-contact test set-up for aeroelasticity in a rotating turbomachine combining a novel acoustic excitation system with tip-timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to trends in aero-design, aeroelasticity becomes increasingly important in modern turbomachines. Design requirements of turbomachines lead to the development of high aspect ratio blades and blade integral disc designs (blisks), which are especially prone to complex modes of vibration. Therefore, experimental investigations yielding high quality data are required for improving the understanding of aeroelastic effects in turbomachines. One possibility to achieve high quality data is to excite and measure blade vibrations in turbomachines. The major requirement for blade excitation and blade vibration measurements is to minimize interference with the aeroelastic effects to be investigated. Thus in this paper, a non-contact—and thus low interference—experimental set-up for exciting and measuring blade vibrations is proposed and shown to work. A novel acoustic system excites rotor blade vibrations, which are measured with an optical tip-timing system. By performing measurements in an axial compressor, the potential of the acoustic excitation method for investigating aeroelastic effects is explored. The basic principle of this method is described and proven through the analysis of blade responses at different acoustic excitation frequencies and at different rotational speeds. To verify the accuracy of the tip-timing system, amplitudes measured by tip-timing are compared with strain gage measurements. They are found to agree well. Two approaches to vary the nodal diameter (ND) of the excited vibration mode by controlling the acoustic excitation are presented. By combining the different excitable acoustic modes with a phase-lag control, each ND of the investigated 30 blade rotor can be excited individually. This feature of the present acoustic excitation system is of great benefit to aeroelastic investigations and represents one of the main advantages over other excitation methods proposed in the past. In future studies, the acoustic excitation method will be used

  6. Impact of rapid identification of Acinetobacter Baumannii via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with antimicrobial stewardship in patients with pneumonia and/or bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzler, Eric; Goff, Debra A; Mangino, Julie E; Reed, Erica E; Wehr, Allison; Bauer, Karri A

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical and economic outcomes of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with stewardship intervention in patients with Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) pneumonia and/or bacteremia. 66 patients were included in the pre-intervention group and 53 in the intervention group. The combination of AB identification via MALDI-TOF MS and ID PharmD intervention significantly reduced the median time to effective therapy compared to conventional identification without intervention [77.7 (95% CI: 73.1-84.8) to 36.6 (95% CI: 25.9-50.9) hours (P timely, effective antimicrobial therapy and is associated with increased clinical cure.

  7. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  8. Laser desorption/vaporization/ionization techniques for matter-wave interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Testing the delocalization of individual massive objects is an exciting experimental challenge of modern quantum physics and substantial progress in matter-wave interferometry with complex particles has led to the establishment of quantum-assisted molecule metrology and advanced investigations at the boundary between the classical and quantum mechanical evolution of very massive objects. New interferometers have led to demonstrations of the quantum wave nature of organic molecules beyond 10 000 amu and even of clusters of molecules. One of the major challenges for future interference experiments with large particles is the production of a neutral and slow molecular beam. We aim at particles with a mass beyond 104 u that should travel with sufficient intensity, low internal temperature and low transverse velocity. Here we present a series of experiments characterizing different laser desorption sources for future quantum interference experiments, the Quantum LIMES (Laser Induced Molecule Evaporation Sources). We describe the matrix-free laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) with subsequent UV/VUV photoionization in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We present mass spectra and velocity distributions of large tailor-made perfluoroalkyl-functionalized molecules as well as more thermo labile biomolecules and we discuss the suitability of LIAD for matter wave interferometry. (author)

  9. Blind Separation of Acoustic Signals Combining SIMO-Model-Based Independent Component Analysis and Binary Masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiekata Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-stage blind source separation (BSS method for convolutive mixtures of speech is proposed, in which a single-input multiple-output (SIMO-model-based independent component analysis (ICA and a new SIMO-model-based binary masking are combined. SIMO-model-based ICA enables us to separate the mixed signals, not into monaural source signals but into SIMO-model-based signals from independent sources in their original form at the microphones. Thus, the separated signals of SIMO-model-based ICA can maintain the spatial qualities of each sound source. Owing to this attractive property, our novel SIMO-model-based binary masking can be applied to efficiently remove the residual interference components after SIMO-model-based ICA. The experimental results reveal that the separation performance can be considerably improved by the proposed method compared with that achieved by conventional BSS methods. In addition, the real-time implementation of the proposed BSS is illustrated.

  10. Evidence of Key Tinnitus-Related Brain Regions Documented by a Unique Combination of Manganese-Enhanced MRI and Acoustic Startle Reflex Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Avril Genene Holt; David Bissig; Najab Mirza; Gary Rajah; Bruce Berkowitz

    2010-01-01

    Animal models continue to improve our understanding of tinnitus pathogenesis and aid in development of new treatments. However, there are no diagnostic biomarkers for tinnitus-related pathophysiology for use in awake, freely moving animals. To address this disparity, two complementary methods were combined to examine reliable tinnitus models (rats repeatedly administered salicylate or exposed to a single noise event): inhibition of acoustic startle and manganese-enhanced MRI. Salicylate-induc...

  11. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  12. Acoustic processing of temporally modulated sounds in infants: evidence from a combined near-infrared spectroscopy and EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eTelkemeyer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Speech perception requires rapid extraction of the linguistic content from the acoustic signal. The ability to efficiently process rapid changes in auditory information is important for decoding speech and thereby crucial during language acquisition. Investigating functional networks of speech perception in infancy might elucidate neuronal ensembles supporting perceptual abilities that gate language acquisition. Interhemispheric specializations for language have been demonstrated in infants. How these asymmetries are shaped by basic temporal acoustic properties is under debate. We recently provided evidence that newborns process non-linguistic sounds sharing temporal features with language in a differential and lateralized fashion. The present study used the same material while measuring brain responses of 6 and 3 month old infants using simultaneous recordings of electroencephalography (EEG and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. NIRS reveals that the lateralization observed in newborns remains constant over the first months of life. While fast acoustic modulations elicit bilateral neuronal activations, slow modulations lead to right-lateralized responses. Additionally, auditory evoked potentials and oscillatory EEG responses show differential responses for fast and slow modulations indicating a sensitivity for temporal acoustic variations. Oscillatory responses reveal an effect of development, that is, 6 but not 3 month old infants show stronger theta-band desynchronization for slowly modulated sounds. Whether this developmental effect is due to increasing fine-grained perception for spectrotemporal sounds in general remains speculative. Our findings support the notion that a more general specialization for acoustic properties can be considered the basis for lateralization of speech perception. The results show that concurrent assessment of vascular based imaging and electrophysiological responses have great potential in the research on language

  13. A new strategy toward Internet of Things: structural health monitoring using a combined fiber optic and acoustic emission wireless sensor platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. D.; Page, C.; Wilson, C. L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates a new low-power structural health monitoring (SHM) strategy where fiber Bragg grating (FBG) rosettes can be used to continuously monitor for changes in a host structure's principal strain direction, suggesting damage and thus enabling the immediate triggering of a higher power acoustic emissions (AE) sensor to provide for better characterization of the damage. Unlike traditional "always on" AE platforms, this strategy has the potential for low power, while the wireless communication between different sensor types supports the Internet of Things (IoT) approach. A combination of fiber-optic sensor rosettes for strain monitoring and a fiber-optic sensor for acoustic emissions monitoring was attached to a sample and used to monitor crack initiation. The results suggest that passive principal strain direction monitoring could be used as a damage initiation trigger for other active sensing elements such as acoustic emissions. In future work, additional AE sensors can be added to provide for damage location; and a strategy where these sensors can be powered on periodically to further establish reliability while preserving an energy efficient scheme can be incorporated.

  14. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  15. Combining Two-Dimensional Diffusion-Ordered Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Imaging Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Analysis in Real-Time Mass Spectrometry for the Integral Investigation of Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyadong, Leonard; Harris, Glenn A.; Balayssac, Stéphane; Galhena, Asiri S.; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert; Parry, R. Mitchell; Wang, May Dongmei; Fernández, Facundo M.; Gilard, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a marked increase in the number of reported cases involving counterfeit medicines in developing and developed countries. Particularly, artesunate-based antimalarial drugs have been targeted, because of their high demand and cost. Counterfeit antimalarials can cause death and can contribute to the growing problem of drug resistance, particularly in southeast Asia. In this study, the complementarity of two-dimensional diffusion-ordered 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D DOSY 1H NMR) with direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART MS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) was assessed for pharmaceutical forensic purposes. Fourteen different artesunate tablets, representative of what can be purchased from informal sources in southeast Asia, were investigated with these techniques. The expected active pharmaceutical ingredient was detected in only five formulations via both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Common organic excipients such as sucrose, lactose, stearate, dextrin, and starch were also detected. The graphical representation of DOSY 1H NMR results proved very useful for establishing similarities among groups of samples, enabling counterfeit drug “chemotyping”. In addition to bulk- and surface-average analyses, spatially resolved information on the surface composition of counterfeit and genuine antimalarial formulations was obtained using DESI MS that was performed in the imaging mode, which enabled one to visualize the homogeneity of both genuine and counterfeit drug samples. Overall, this study suggests that 2D DOSY 1H NMR, combined with ambient MS, comprises a powerful suite of instrumental analysis methodologies for the integral characterization of counterfeit antimalarials. PMID:19453162

  16. Detection of number of sources and DOA stimation based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity using acoustic vector sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of DOA (direction of arrival) estimation of underwater remote targets, a novel subspace-decomposition method based on the cross covariance matrix of the pressure and the particle velocity of acoustic vector sensor arrays (AVSA) was proposed.Whereafter, using spatio-temporal virtual tapped-delay-line, a new eigenvector-based criteria of detection of number of sources and of subspace partition is also presented. The theoretical analysis shows that the new source detection and direction finding method is different from existing AVSA based DOA estimation methods using particle velocity information of acoustic vector sensor (AVS) as an independent array element. It is entirely based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity, has better estimation performance than existing methods in isotropic noise field. Computer simulations with data from lake trials demonstrate, the proposed method is effective and obviously outperforms existing methods in resolution and accuracy in the case of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  17. Wideband high-resolution direction of arrival estimation method based on the pressure-velocity combined processing using the acoustic vector sensor array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xingyu; YANG Desen; ZHAO Chunhui

    2007-01-01

    In order to solve the problem of DOA (Direction of Arrival) estimation of underwater distant wideband targets, a novel coherent signal-subspace method based on the cross spectral matrix of pressure and particle velocity using the Acoustic Vector Sensor Array (AVSA)is proposed in this paper. The proposed method is different from existing AVSA based DOA estimation methods in using particle velocity information of Acoustic Vector Sensor (AVS) as an independent array element. It is entirely based on the combined information processing of pressure and particle velocity, namely, the P-V cross spectrum, has better DOA estimation performance than existing methods in isotropic noise field. By theoretical analysis, both focusing principle and eigendecomposition theory based on the P-V cross spectral matrix are given.At the same time, the corresponding criteria for source number detection is also presented.Computer simulations with data from lake trials demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and obviously outperforms existing methods in resolution and accuracy in the case of low Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR).

  18. An Overview of the Studies on Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation of Auditory System%听觉系统的复合电声刺激研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关添; 朱子俨; 叶大田

    2009-01-01

    探讨了复合电声刺激技术,也称为保护残余听力的电子耳蜗植入术.该技术将声音信号划分为低频和高频两部分,分别采用助听器的放大技术和电子耳蜗语音信号处理技术同时传递给患者,由患者大脑皮层综合两种信息得出最终的声音感知.该技术既可以很好地保留患者的低频残余听力,又可以结合电子耳蜗提供的高频信息提高言语识别能力,取得更理想的听力恢复效果.应用该技术必将扩大电子耳蜗的适应人群,使更多适合电子耳蜗植入的中重度聋患者更好地恢复听觉.%This paper discusses the technology of combined electric and acoustic stimulation (EAS) of the auditory system,which is a new therapy for the patients suffering from severe to profound high-and mid-frequency hearing loss but still having their low-frequency hearing. EAS uses hearing aid and cochlear implant technology together in the same ear. The hearing aid acoustically amplifies at low-frequencies,while the cochlear implant electrically stimulates at mid-and high-frequencies. The inner ear processes acoustic and electric stimuli simultaneously. This technique can provide substantial benefit in speech understanding for individuals with severe high-frequency hearing loss and can maintain their residual lower-frequency acoustic hearing. The study of EAS would significantly enhance the conventional cochlear implant therapy and benefit the patients afflicted with severe to profound hearing loss.

  19. Light-induced atomic desorption: recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotti, E.; Atutov, S. N.; Biancalana, Valerio; Bocci, S.; Burchianti, A.; Marinelli, C.; Nasyrov, K. A.; Pieragnoli, B.; Moi, L.

    2001-04-01

    Light induced atomic desorption (LIAD) is an impressive manifestation of a new class of phenomena involving alkali atoms, dielectric films and light. LIAD consists of a huge emission of alkali atoms (experimentally proved for sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium) from siloxane films when illuminated by laser or ordinary light. Most of the experiments have been performed in glass cells suitably coated by a thin film (of the order of 10 micrometer) either of poly - (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a polymer, or of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCT), a crown molecule. LIAD is a combination of two processes: direct photo-desorption from the surface and diffusion within the siloxane layer. The photo-desorbed atoms are replaced by fresh atoms diffusing to the surface. Moreover, from the experimental data it comes out that the desorbing light increases atomic diffusion and hence the diffusion coefficient. To our knowledge this is the first time that such an effect is clearly observed, measured and discussed: LIAD represents a new class of photo-effects characterized by two simultaneous phenomena due to the light: surface desorption and fastened bulk diffusion.

  20. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  1. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  2. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  3. Evidence of key tinnitus-related brain regions documented by a unique combination of manganese-enhanced MRI and acoustic startle reflex testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Genene Holt

    Full Text Available Animal models continue to improve our understanding of tinnitus pathogenesis and aid in development of new treatments. However, there are no diagnostic biomarkers for tinnitus-related pathophysiology for use in awake, freely moving animals. To address this disparity, two complementary methods were combined to examine reliable tinnitus models (rats repeatedly administered salicylate or exposed to a single noise event: inhibition of acoustic startle and manganese-enhanced MRI. Salicylate-induced tinnitus resulted in wide spread supernormal manganese uptake compared to noise-induced tinnitus. Neither model demonstrated significant differences in the auditory cortex. Only in the dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus (DCIC did both models exhibit supernormal uptake. Therefore, abnormal membrane depolarization in the DCIC appears to be important in tinnitus-mediated activity. Our results provide the foundation for future studies correlating the severity and longevity of tinnitus with hearing loss and neuronal activity in specific brain regions and tools for evaluating treatment efficacy across paradigms.

  4. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  5. A Combined On-Line Acoustic Flowmeter and Fluorocarbon Coolant Mixture Analyzer for The ATLAS Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Bitadze, A; Battistin, M; Berry, S; Bonneau, P; Botelho-Direito, J; DiGirolamo, B; Godlewski, J; Perez-Rodriguez, E; Zwalinski, L; Bousson, N; Hallewell, G; Mathieu, M; Rozanov, A; Boyd, G; Doubek, M; Vacek, V; Vitek, M; Egorov, K; Katunin, S; McMahon, S; Nagai, K

    2011-01-01

    An upgrade to the ATLAS silicon tracker cooling control system may require a change from C3F8 (octafluoro-propane) to a blend containing 10-30% of C2F6 (hexafluoro-ethane) to reduce the evaporation temperature and better protect the silicon from cumulative radiation damage with increasing LHC luminosity. Central to this upgrade is a new acoustic instrument for the real-time measurement of the C3F8/C2F6 mixture ratio and flow. The instrument and its Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) software are described in this paper. The instrument has demonstrated a resolution of 3.10-3 for C3F8/C2F6 mixtures with ~20%C2F6, and flow resolution of 2% of full scale for mass flows up to 30gs-1. In mixtures of widely-differing molecular weight (mw), higher mixture precision is possible: a sensitivity of < 5.10-4 to leaks of C3F8 into the ATLAS pixel detector nitrogen envelope (mw difference 160) has been seen. The instrument has many potential applications, including the analysis of mixtures of hydrocarbons,...

  6. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  7. Neutrino-recoil induced desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear decay induced 37Cl ion desorption from the electron capture decay 37Ar→37Cl+ν is reported for the first time. A mixture of one part 36Ar and ∼5x10-5 parts 37Ar (36/37Ar) is physisorbed on a gold-plated Si wafer kept at 16 K under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The time of flight (TOF) of recoiled 37Cl ions is measured using coincidence techniques. The observed kinetic energy distribution of the 37Cl ions is approximately Gaussian in shape, with a maximum at ∼9.0 eV and a full width at half-maximum of ∼3 eV. Considering the binding energy of physisorbed 37Ar is ∼80 meV, the 9-eV peak energy compares well with that of the gas-phase value, where conservation of the energy and momentum fixes the kinetic energy of 37Cl ions at 9.54 eV. Using a combination of TOF and retarding field energy analysis, the charge states of detected ions for 1 ML (monolayer) of 36/37Ar are determined as 53%+1e, 21%+2e, and 26%+ne, where n≥3. The fraction of decaying 37Ar atoms which emerge from the surface as positive 37Cl ions is found to be 10%. Finally, a strong charge exchange reaction between a 37Cl ion and near-neighbor atoms causes a Coulomb explosion within the multilayers, increasing the kinetic energy of desorbing ions by as much as ∼7 eV

  8. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials; Untersuchung der Mechanismen schwerioneninduzierter Desorption an beschleunigerrelevanten Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-02-22

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  9. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  10. Monomer Adsorption-Desorption Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Jian-Hong; LIN Zhen-Quan; CHEN Xiao-Shuang

    2009-01-01

    We propose an adsorption-desorption model for a deposit growth system, in which the adsorption and desorption of particles coexist. By means of the generalized rate equation we investigate the cluster (island) size distribution in the dynamic equilibrium state. The results show that the evolution behaviour of the system depends crucially on the details of the rate kernels. The cluster size distribution can take the ecale-frse power-law form in some cases, while it grows exponentially with size in other cases.

  11. Using Combined X-ray Computed Tomography and Acoustic Resonance to Understand Supercritical CO2 Behavior in Fractured Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2015-12-01

    Distribution of supercritical (sc) CO2 has a large impact on its flow behavior as well as on the properties of seismic waves used for monitoring. Simultaneous imaging of scCO2 distribution in a rock core using X-ray computed tomography (CT) and measurements of seismic waves in the laboratory can help understand how the distribution evolves as scCO2 invades through rock, and the resulting seismic signatures. To this end, we performed a series of laboratory scCO2 core-flood experiments in intact and fractured anisotropic Carbon Tan sandstone samples. In these experiments, we monitored changes in the CO2 saturation distribution and sonic-frequency acoustic resonances (yielding both seismic velocity and attenuation) over the course of the floods. A short-core resonant bar test system (Split-Hopkinson Resonant Bar Apparatus) custom fit into a long X-ray transparent pressure vessel was used for the seismic measurements, and a modified General Electric medical CT scanner was used to acquire X-ray CT data from which scCO2 saturation distributions were determined. The focus of the experiments was on the impact of single fractures on the scCO2 distribution and the seismic properties. For this reason, we examined several cases including 1. intact, 2. a closely mated fracture along the core axis, 3. a sheared fracture along the core axis (both vertical and horizontal for examining the buoyancy effect), and 4. a sheared fracture perpendicular to the core axis. For the intact and closely mated fractured cores, Young's modulus declined with increasing CO2 saturation, and attenuation increased up to about 15% CO2 saturation after which attenuation declined. For cores having wide axial fractures, the Young's modulus was lower than for the intact and closely mated cases, however did not change much with CO2 pore saturation. Much lower CO2 pore saturations were achieved in these cases. Attenuation increased more rapidly however than for the intact sample. For the core

  12. Data compilation for particle impact desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desorption of gases from solid surfaces by incident electrons, ions and photons is one of the important processes of hydrogen recycling in the controlled thermonuclear reactors. We have surveyed the literature concerning the particle impact desorption published through 1983 and compiled the data on the desorption cross sections and desorption yields with the aid of a computer. This report presents the results obtained for electron stimulated desorption, the desorption cross sections and yields being given in graphs and tables as functions of incident electron energy, surface temperature and gas exposure. (author)

  13. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  14. Investigating the role of combined acoustic-visual feedback in one-dimensional synchronous brain computer interfaces, a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Gaetano D; Mohamed, Armin; McEwan, Alistair L; Bifulco, Paolo; Cesarelli, Mario; Jin, Craig T; Ruffo, Mariano; Tapson, Jonathan; van Schaik, André

    2012-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role when learning to use a brain computer interface (BCI), particularly in the case of synchronous feedback that relies on the interaction subject. In this preliminary study, we investigate the role of combined auditory-visual feedback during synchronous μ rhythm-based BCI sessions to help the subject to remain focused on the selected imaginary task. This new combined feedback, now integrated within the general purpose BCI2000 software, has been tested on eight untrained and three trained subjects during a monodimensional left-right control task. In order to reduce the setup burden and maximize subject comfort, an electroencephalographic device suitable for dry electrodes that required no skin preparation was used. Quality and index of improvement was evaluated based on a personal self-assessment questionnaire from each subject and quantitative data based on subject performance. Results for this preliminary study show that the combined feedback was well tolerated by the subjects and improved performance in 75% of the naïve subjects compared with visual feedback alone. PMID:23152713

  15. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  16. Investigating the role of combined acoustic-visual feedback in one-dimensional synchronous brain computer interfaces, a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargiulo GD

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaetano D Gargiulo,1–3 Armin Mohamed,1 Alistair L McEwan,1 Paolo Bifulco,2 Mario Cesarelli,2 Craig T Jin,1 Mariano Ruffo,2 Jonathan Tapson,3 André van Schaik31School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; 2Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e delle Telecomunicazioni "Federico II" University of Naples, Naples, Italy; 3BENS Laboratory, MARCS Institute, The University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, AustraliaAbstract: Feedback plays an important role when learning to use a brain computer interface (BCI, particularly in the case of synchronous feedback that relies on the interaction subject. In this preliminary study, we investigate the role of combined auditory-visual feedback during synchronous µ rhythm-based BCI sessions to help the subject to remain focused on the selected imaginary task. This new combined feedback, now integrated within the general purpose BCI2000 software, has been tested on eight untrained and three trained subjects during a monodimensional left-right control task. In order to reduce the setup burden and maximize subject comfort, an electroencephalographic device suitable for dry electrodes that required no skin preparation was used. Quality and index of improvement was evaluated based on a personal self-assessment questionnaire from each subject and quantitative data based on subject performance. Results for this preliminary study show that the combined feedback was well tolerated by the subjects and improved performance in 75% of the naïve subjects compared with visual feedback alone.Keywords: brain computer interface, dry electrodes, subject feedback

  17. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  18. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  19. Effect of Ultrasound on Desorption Equilibrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦炜; 原永辉; 戴猷元

    2001-01-01

    Effects of ultrasound on intensification of separation process were investigated through the experiment of desorption equilibrium behavior. Tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) on NKA-X resin and phenol on a solvent impregnated resin, CL-TBP resin, were used for desorption processes. The desorption rate was measured with and without ultrasound. Desorption equilibrium was studied under various ultrasonic power densities or thermal infusion. Results showed that the desorption rate with ultrasound was much higher than that with normal thermal infusion. Both ultrasound and thermal infusion broke the desorption equilibrium existed at room temperature. However, after the systems were cooled down, the amount of solute desorbed in the liquid phase in the presence of ultrasound was much higher than that at the temperature corresponding to the same ultrasound power. It is proved that the initial desorption equilibrium was broken as a result of the spot energy effect of ultrasound.

  20. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  1. Stir-bar-sorptive extraction and liquid desorption combined with large-volume injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for ultra-trace analysis of musk compounds in environmental water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana Rita M; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-03-01

    Stir-bar-sorptive extraction with liquid desorption followed by large-volume injection and capillary gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry in selected ion monitoring acquisition mode (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) has been developed to monitor ultra-traces of four musks (celestolide (ADBI), galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN) and musk ketone (MK)) in environmental water matrices. Instrumental calibration (LVI-GC-MS(SIM)) and experimental conditions that could affect the SBSE-LD efficiency are discussed. Assays performed on 30-mL water samples spiked at 200 ng L(-1) under optimized experimental conditions yielded recoveries ranging from 83.7 ± 8.1% (MK) to 107.6 ± 10.8% (HHCB). Furthermore, the experimental data were in very good agreement with predicted theoretical equilibria described by octanol-water partition coefficients (K (PDMS/W) ≈ K (O/W)). The methodology also showed excellent linear dynamic ranges for the four musks studied, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9961, limits of detection and quantification between 12 and 19 ng L(-1) and between 41 and 62 ng L(-1), respectively, and suitable precision (ultra-trace level, overcoming several disadvantages presented by other sample-preparation techniques. PMID:20049588

  2. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  3. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  4. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  5. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  6. First-principles calculations of helium and neon desorption from cavities in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddin, A Charaf; Pizzagalli, L

    2012-05-01

    Combining density functional theory, the nudged elastic band technique, and the ultradense fluid model, we investigated the desorption process of He and Ne in silicon. Our results show that the internal surfaces of gas-filled bubbles are not a limiting factor during desorption experiments, since the surface reconstruction opens diffusion paths easier than in the bulk. We show that the vibrational contribution to the energy of helium in the bulk has to be considered in order to determine realistic pressures in the bubbles, when comparing experiments and simulations. At the maximum of desorption, an average pressure of 1-2 GPa is computed.

  7. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  8. Study of Desorption Agent for LADS Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaojing; Qin Ruyi; Liu Jinlong

    2003-01-01

    This article refers to the procedure for selection, evaluation and development of the LADS-D desorption agent associated with the LADS-A adsorbent used in the non-hydroprocessing adsorptive desulfurization (LADS) process for FCC naphtha developed by LPEC Refining Research Institute. The LADS-D desorption agent can effectively remove the sulfides adsorbed on the LADS-A adsorbent. The saturated LADS-A adsorbent can be instantly regenerated by the LADS-D desorption agent to recover its adsorption activity. The LADS-D desorption agent can not only effectively remove all impurities adsorbed on the adsorbent, but also has strong ability to dissolve the impurities to keep a stable desorption efficiency of adsorbent to be basically commensurate with fresh adsorbent after extended use.

  9. Desorption of Furfural from Bimetallic Pt-Fe Oxides/Alumina Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Lourdes Dimas-Rivera; Javier Rivera de la Rosa; Carlos J. Lucio-Ortiz; José Antonio De los Reyes Heredia; Virgilio González González; Tomás Hernández

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the desorption of furfural, which is a competitive intermediate during the production of biofuel and valuable aromatic compounds, was studied using pure alumina, as well as alumina impregnated with iron and platinum oxides both individually and in combination, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The bimetallic sample exhibited the lowest desorption percentage for furfural. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging revealed the intimate connection betwe...

  10. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  11. Thermal desorption of ammonia from crystalline forsterite surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Suhasaria, T.; Thrower, J. D.; Zacharias, H.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal desorption of ammonia (NH$_3$) from single crystal forsterite (010) has been investigated using temperature-programmed desorption. The effect of defects on the desorption process has been probed by the use of a rough cut forsterite surface prepared from the cleaved forsterite sample. Several approaches have been used to extract the desorption energy and pre-exponential factor describing the desorption kinetics. In the sub-monolayer coverage regime, the NH$_3$ desorption shows a br...

  12. Integrated Optical, Acoustically Tunable Wavelength Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangen, J.; Herrmann, Harald; Ricken, Raimund; Seibert, Holger; Sohler, Wolfgang; Strake, E.

    1989-12-01

    An integrated optical, acoustically tunable wavelength filter, consisting of a combination of TM-TE converter and integrated polarizer in LiNbO3, is demonstrated. The filter bandwidth is 2.8 nm; the center wavelength can be tuned from λ = 1.45 pm to λ = 1.57 pm by adjusting the driving acoustic frequency. Due to the combined acoustical/optical strip guide structure, used in the mode converter, a very low acoustic drive power of only 9 mW is required.

  13. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hume, W.R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Douglass, G.D. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  14. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  15. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  16. Bentazone adsorption and desorption on agricultural soils

    OpenAIRE

    Boivin, A.; Cherrier, R.; Schiavon, M

    2005-01-01

    Herbicide fate and transport in soils greatly depend upon adsorption-desorption processes. Batch adsorption and desorption experiments were performed with the herbicide bentazone using 13 contrasted agricultural soil samples. Bentazone was found to be weakly sorbed by the different soils, showing average Freundlich adsorption coefficients (Kf) value of 1.4 ± 2.3 mg1 - nf Lnf kg-1. Soil organic matter content did not have a significant effect on bentazone sorption (r2 = 0.12), whereas natural ...

  17. Effect of equilibration time on Pu desorption from goethite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that strongly sorbing ions such as plutonium may become irreversibly bound to mineral surfaces over time which has implications for near- and far-field transport of Pu. Batch adsorption-desorption data were collected as a function of time and pH to study the surface stability of Pu on goethite. Pu(IV) was adsorbed to goethite over the pH range 4.2 to 6.6 for different periods of time (1, 6, 15, 34 and 116 d). Following adsorption, Pu was leached from the mineral surface with desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a complexant capable of effectively competing with the goethite surface for Pu. The amount of Pu desorbed from the goethite was found to vary as a function of the adsorption equilibration time, with less Pu removed from the goethite following longer adsorption periods. This effect was most pronounced at low pH. Logarithmic desorption distribution ratios for each adsorption equilibration time were fit to a pH-dependent model. Model slopes decreased between 1 and 116 d adsorption time, indicating that overall Pu(IV) surface stability on goethite surfaces becomes less dependent on pH with greater adsorption equilibration time. The combination of adsorption and desorption kinetic data suggest that non-redox aging processes affect Pu sorption behavior on goethite.

  18. Thermal desorption of circumstellar and cometary ice analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Doménech, Rafael; Bueno, Juan; Goesmann, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Thermal annealing of interstellar ices takes place in several stages of star formation. Knowledge of this process comes from a combination of astronomical observations and laboratory simulations under astrophysically relevant conditions. For the first time we present the results of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments with pre-cometary ice analogs composed of up to five molecular components: H2 O, CO, CO2, CH3 OH, and NH3 . The experiments were performed with an ultra-high vacuum chamber. A gas line with a novel design allows the controlled preparation of mixtures with up to five molecular components. Volatiles desorbing to the gas phase were monitored using a quadrupole mass spectrometer, while changes in the ice structure and composition were studied by means of infrared spectroscopy. The TPD curves of water ice containing CO, CO2, CH3 OH, and NH3 present desorption peaks at temperatures near those observed in pure ice experiments, volcano desorption peaks after water ice crystallization, and...

  19. Design basis of industrial acoustic separators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappon, H.J.; Keesman, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the process of obtaining a basic design for an industrial scale acoustic separator based on flow characteristics inside the separation chamber, on acoustic analysis within the chamber and calculated particle trajectories combining these two analyses. Adequate criteria for subsequ

  20. An acoustical model based monitoring network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, P.W.; Basten, T.G.H.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the approach for an acoustical model based monitoring network is demonstrated. This network is capable of reconstructing a noise map, based on the combination of measured sound levels and an acoustic model of the area. By pre-calculating the sound attenuation within the network the noi

  1. Synthesis of soluble conducting polymers by acoustic mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Marie C.

    2016-09-13

    A method including combining an aniline monomer, an oxidant, water and an organic solvent; subjecting the combination to acoustic mixing to form an emulsion; and recovering a polyaniliine from the combination. A method including combining a aniline monomer, an oxidant, water and an organic solvent; forming a polyaniline by acoustic mixing the combination; and recovering the polyaniliine from the combination. A method including forming a combination of an aniline monomer, an oxidant, water and an organic solvent in the absence of an emulsifier; acoustic mixing the combination for a time period to form a polyaniline; and recovering a polyaniliine from the combination.

  2. Acoustic concerns related to multi cultural societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    2001-01-01

    Immigration has increased cultural diversity in western societies. The process of integrating immigrants into their host countries can be smoothed if acousticians learn to recognize (1) the acoustic traditions of immigrant cultures and (2) the specific acoustic needs of the new society members. Two...... related projects are discussed. The ``Cahrisma'' project (Conservation of Acoustical Heritage by the Revival and Identification of the Sinan's Mosque Acoustics) is sponsored by the European Commission and carried out in cooperation among researchers in Turkey, Malta, Italy, France, Switzerland......, and Denmark. Its purpose is to combine visual and acoustical concerns in the identification, conservation, and restoration of architectural heritage. It focuses on the famous Turkish mosques of the Osmannic architect Sinan. Some of the acoustic features of these large domed buildings and of muslim liturgy...

  3. Heat-integrated liquid-desorption exchanger (HILDE) for CO2 desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, L.V. van der; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2016-01-01

    A novel type of separating heat exchanger, called a heat-integrated liquid-desorption exchanger (HILDE), applied to a typical CO2 desorption process, has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. Process simulations, hydrodynamic and mass transfer experiments, and a preliminary cost eva

  4. Determination of Surface Exciton Energies by Velocity Resolved Atomic Desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Petr V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2004-08-20

    We have developed a new method for determining surface exciton band energies in alkali halides based on velocity-resolved atomic desorption (VRAD). Using this new method, we predict the surface exciton energies for K1, KBr, KC1, and NaC1 within +0.15 eV. Our data, combined with the available EELS data for alkali fluorides, demonstrate a universal linear correlation with the inverse inter-atomic distance in these materials. The results suggest that surface excitons exist in all alkali halides and their excitation energies can be predicted from the known bulk exciton energies and the obtained correlation plot.

  5. Thermal desorption of PTCDA on Cu(111)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic molecules often show very complex thermal desorption spectra. If there is an ordered structure the activation energy for desorption Edes will decrease for the first few layers because of the decreasing van der Waals interaction of the layers to the substrate. This is especially true for the system 3,4,9,10 perylene-tetracarboxylic-dianhydride on Cu(111). The spectra consist of three different signals which can be attributed to the second layer, the multilayer and a crystal phase. The numerical algorithm sketched in this paper gives a desorption energy of 2.35eV for the second layer and 2.2eV for the multilayer

  6. Desorption of 137Cs+ from mosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLGICA NEDIC

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Mosses are biomonitors that accumulate large amounts of various pollutants, including radionuclides. In this work we investigated the possibility of 137Cs extraction from mosses, as well as the significance of species specificity on the efficiency of 137Cs desorption. Salt and acid solutions were used as extraction media. It was shown that a 5 % solution of both ammonium oxalate and phosphoric acid was able to desorb 81.8 % of 137Cs+ from Homalothecium sericeum, which was 39.9 % more than desorption from water. At the same time, most of the desorbed 137Cs+ was incorporated in crystals that precipitated from the solution. An interspecies difference in respect to 137Cs+ desorption was noticed.

  7. Adsorption and Desorption of Methiopyrsulfuron in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chun-Xian; WANG Jin-Jun; ZHANG Su-Zhi; ZHANG Zhong-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Methiopyrsulfuron is a new low-rate sulfonylurea herbicide for weed control in wheat; however, there is a lack of published information on its behavior in soils. In this study, methiopyrsulfuron adsorption and desorption were measured in seven soils sampled from Heilongjiang, Shandong, Jiangxi, Sichuan, Anhui, and Chongqing provinces of China using a batch equilibrium method. The Freundlich equation was used to described its adsorption and desorption. Adsorption isotherms were nonlinear with the values of Kf-ads, the Freundlich empirical constant indicative of the adsorption capacity,ranging from 0.75 to 2.46, suggesting that little of this herbicide was adsorbed by any of the seven soils. Soil pH and organic matter content (OM) were the main factors influencing adsorption; adsorption was negatively correlated with pH and positively correlated with OM. Methiopyrsulfuron desorption was hysteretic on the soils with high OM content and low pH.

  8. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  9. Electronic Desorption of gas from metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G

    2006-11-02

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  10. STM-Induced Hydrogen Desorption via a Hole Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.;

    1998-01-01

    We report STM-induced desorption of H from Si(100)-H(2 X 1) at negative sample bias. The desorption rate exhibits a power-law dependence on current and a maximum desorption rate at -7 V. The desorption is explained by vibrational heating of H due to inelastic scattering of tunneling holes...... with the Si-H 5 sigma hole resonance. The dependence of desorption rate on current and bias is analyzed using a novel approach for calculating inelastic scattering, which includes the effect of the electric field between tip and sample. We show that the maximum desorption rate at -7 V is due to a maximum...

  11. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Educational Video Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video ... for pre- and post-treatment acoustic neuroma patients. Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic ...

  12. Acoustic cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  13. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  14. Acoustic dispersive prism

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  15. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  16. Quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, M. S.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    A quantum theory of laser-stimulated desorption (LSDE) is presented and critically analyzed. It is shown how LSDE depends on laser-pulse characteristics and surface-lattice dynamics. Predictions of the theory for a Debye model of the lattice dynamics are compared to recent experimental results.

  17. A microsystems enabled field desorption source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertz, Kristin L.; Resnick, Paul James; Schwoebel, Paul R. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Holland, Christopher E. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA); Chichester, David L. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-07-01

    Technologies that have been developed for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been applied to the fabrication of field desorption arrays. These techniques include the use of thick films for enhanced dielectric stand-off, as well as an integrated gate electrode. The increased complexity of MEMS fabrication provides enhanced design flexibility over traditional methods.

  18. Product desorption limitations in selective photocatalytic oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renckens, T.J.A.; Almeida, A.R.; Damen, M.R.; Kreutzer, M.T.; Mul, G.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of photocatalytic processes can be significantly improved if strongly bound products rapidly desorb to free up active sites. This paper deals with the rate of desorption of cyclohexanone, the product of the liquid-phase photo-oxidation of cyclohexane. Dynamic step-response and pulse-respons

  19. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  20. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  1. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  2. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  3. Electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct ambient analysis of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiea, Jentaie; Huang, Min-Zon; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Chi-Yang; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Beech, Iwona; Sunner, Jan

    2005-01-01

    A new method of electrospray-assisted laser desorption/ionization (ELDI) mass spectrometry, which combines laser desorption with post-ionization by electrospray, was applied to rapid analysis of solid materials under ambient conditions. Analytes were desorbed from solid metallic and insulating substrata using a pulsed nitrogen laser. Post-ionization produced high-quality mass spectra characteristic of electrospray, including protein multiple charging. For the first time, mass spectra of intact proteins were obtained using laser desorption without adding a matrix. Bovine cytochrome c and an illicit drug containing methaqualone were chosen in this study to demonstrate the applicability of ELDI to the analysis of proteins and synthetic organic compounds. PMID:16299699

  4. Desorption of Furfural from Bimetallic Pt-Fe Oxides/Alumina Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Lourdes Dimas-Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the desorption of furfural, which is a competitive intermediate during the production of biofuel and valuable aromatic compounds, was studied using pure alumina, as well as alumina impregnated with iron and platinum oxides both individually and in combination, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The bimetallic sample exhibited the lowest desorption percentage for furfural. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM imaging revealed the intimate connection between the iron and platinum oxide species on the alumina support. The mechanism of furfural desorption from the Pt-Fe/Al2O3 0.5%-0.5% sample was determined using physisorbed furfural instead of chemisorbed furfural; this mechanism involved the oxidation of the C=O group on furfural by the catalyst. The oxide nanoparticles on γ-Al2O3 support helped to stabilize the furfural molecule on the surface.

  5. Residence time dependent desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, N.P.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and desorption are simultaneous events during bacterial adhesion to surfaces. although desorption is far less studied than adhesion. Here, desorption of Staphylococcus epidermidis from substratum surfaces is demonstrated to be residence time dependent. Initial desorption rate coefficients w

  6. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  7. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botton, V., E-mail: valery.botton@insa-lyon.fr; Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H. [LMFA, UMR CNRS 5509, Université de Lyon, ECL/INSA Lyon/Univ. Lyon 1, 36 avenue Guy deCollongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Moudjed, B. [LMFA, UMR CNRS 5509, Université de Lyon, ECL/INSA Lyon/Univ. Lyon 1, 36 avenue Guy deCollongue, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); LIEFT, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Garandet, J. P. [LIEFT, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  8. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand

  9. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  10. Solvent-induced desorption of alkanethiol ligands from Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Wei; Cheng, Hao; Yao, Tao; Yang, Lina; Bao, Jie; Huang, Ting; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Yong; Wei, Shiqiang

    2016-06-21

    Removing surfactants from a colloidal metal nanoparticle surface is necessary for their realistic applications, and how they could be stripped is a subject of active investigation. Here, we report a solvent-induced desorption of dodecanethiol ligands from the gold nanoparticle surface, and traced this desorption process using a combination of in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and Raman spectroscopic techniques. In situ analysis results reveal that the solvent exchange of ethanol with tetrahydrofuran (THF) can effectively remove dodecanethiol ligands while keeping the particle morphology unchanged. Upon increasing the THF/ethanol ratio from 0 : 1 to 5 : 1, the surface coverage of thiol on the Au surface is reduced from 0.47 to 0.07, suggesting the depletion of ligands first from the nanoparticle facet sites, then from the edge sites, while the ligands at the corner sites are intact. This work enriches our knowledge on surfactant removal and may pave the way towards preparing surface-clean nanoparticles for practical applications. PMID:27241025

  11. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  12. Sample Desorption/Onization From Mesoporous Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Srinivas; Dattelbaum, Andrew M.

    2005-10-25

    Mesoporous silica is shown to be a sample holder for laser desorption/ionization of mass spectrometry. Supported mesoporous silica was prepared by coating an ethanolic silicate solution having a removable surfactant onto a substrate to produce a self-assembled, ordered, nanocomposite silica thin film. The surfactant was chosen to provide a desired pore size between about 1 nanometer diameter and 50 nanometers diameter. Removal of the surfactant resulted in a mesoporous silica thin film on the substrate. Samples having a molecular weight below 1000, such as C.sub.60 and tryptophan, were adsorbed onto and into the mesoporous silica thin film sample holder and analyzed using laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  13. Mercury compounds characterization by thermal desorption

    OpenAIRE

    Rumayor Villamil, Marta; Díaz Somoano, Mercedes; López Antón, María Antonia; Martínez Tarazona, María Rosa

    2013-01-01

    [EN] The ability to accurately determine metal mercury content and identify different mercury species in solid samples is essential for developing remediation and control strategies. The aim of the present study is to characterize mercury compounds based on thermal desorption. For this purpose a series of samples was prepared and the operational parameters—heating velocity, carrier gas—were optimized. Fifteen commercial mercury compounds were analyzed for use as fingerprints. The results of t...

  14. Plutonium sorption and desorption behavior on bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Tumey, Scott J; Kersting, Annie B

    2015-03-01

    Understanding plutonium (Pu) sorption to, and desorption from, mineral phases is key to understanding its subsurface transport. In this work we study Pu(IV) sorption to industrial grade FEBEX bentonite over the concentration range 10(-7)-10(-16) M to determine if sorption at typical environmental concentrations (≤10(-12) M) is the same as sorption at Pu concentrations used in most laboratory experiments (10(-7)-10(-11) M). Pu(IV) sorption was broadly linear over the 10(-7)-10(-16) M concentration range during the 120 d experimental period; however, it took up to 100 d to reach sorption equilibrium. At concentrations ≥10(-8) M, sorption was likely affected by additional Pu(IV) precipitation/polymerization reactions. The extent of sorption was similar to that previously reported for Pu(IV) sorption to SWy-1 Na-montmorillonite over a narrower range of Pu concentrations (10(-11)-10(-7) M). Sorption experiments with FEBEX bentonite and Pu(V) were also performed across a concentration range of 10(-11)-10(-7) M and over a 10 month period which allowed us to estimate the slow apparent rates of Pu(V) reduction on a smectite-rich clay. Finally, a flow cell experiment with Pu(IV) loaded on FEBEX bentonite demonstrated continued desorption of Pu over a 12 day flow period. Comparison with a desorption experiment performed with SWy-1 montmorillonite showed a strong similarity and suggested the importance of montorillonite phases in controlling Pu sorption/desorption reactions on FEBEX bentonite.

  15. Thermal desorption of ammonia from crystalline forsterite surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Suhasaria, T; Zacharias, H

    2015-01-01

    The thermal desorption of ammonia (NH$_3$) from single crystal forsterite (010) has been investigated using temperature-programmed desorption. The effect of defects on the desorption process has been probed by the use of a rough cut forsterite surface prepared from the cleaved forsterite sample. Several approaches have been used to extract the desorption energy and pre-exponential factor describing the desorption kinetics. In the sub-monolayer coverage regime, the NH$_3$ desorption shows a broad distribution of desorption energies, indicating the presence of different adsorption sites, which results in an apparent coverage-dependent desorption energy. This distribution is sensitive to the surface roughness with the cut forsterite surface displaying a significantly broader distribution of desorption energies compared to the cleaved forsterite surface. The cut forsterite surface exhibits sites with desorption energies up to 62.5 kJ mol$^{-1} $ in comparison to a desorption energy of up to 58.0 kJ mol$^{-1} $ fo...

  16. Lead sorption-desorption from organic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Zaragoza, Victor M; Carrillo, Rogelio; Gutierrez Castorena, Carmen M

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption are mechanisms involved in the reduction of metal mobility and bioavailability in organic materials. Metal release from substrates is controlled by desorption. The capacity of coffee husk and pulp residues, vermicompost and cow manure to adsorb Pb2+ was evaluated. The mechanisms involved in the sorption process were also studied. Organic materials retained high concentrations of lead (up to 36,000 mg L(-1)); however, the mechanisms of sorption varied according to the characteristics of each material: degree of decomposition, pH, cation exchange capacity and percentage of organic matter. Vermicompost and manure removed 98% of the Pb from solution. Lead precipitated in manure and vermicompost, forming lead oxide (PbO) and lead ferrite (PbFe4O7). Adsorption isotherms did not fit to the typical Freundlich and Langmuir equations. Not only specific and non-specific adsorption was observed, but also precipitation and coprecipitation. Lead desorption from vermicompost and cow manure was less than 2%. For remediation of Pb-polluted sites, the application of vermicompost and manure is recommended in places with alkaline soils because Pb precipitation can be induced, whereas coffee pulp residue is recommended for acidic soils where Pb is adsorbed.

  17. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, {Phi}, from 1x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at {Phi} {ge} 1.2x10{sup 21}D/m{sup 2} one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A{sub 1} is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak {sub A}2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew Ways to Give ANA Discussion Forum ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Educational Video ...

  19. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and...

  20. Cystic acoustic neuromas

    OpenAIRE

    Chitkara, Naveen; Chanda, Rakesh; Yadav, S. P. S.; N.K. Sharma

    2002-01-01

    Predominantly cystic acoustic neuromas are rare and they usually present with clinical and radiological features different from their more common solid counterparts. Two cases of cystic acoustic neuromas are reported here.

  1. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ...

  2. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  3. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Patient Surveys Related Links Clinical Trials.gov Health Care Insurance Toolkit Additional Resources ANA Public Webinars © 2016 Acoustic Neuroma Association Acoustic Neuroma Association ® • ...

  4. Unidirectional propagation of designer surface acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jiuyang; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2014-01-01

    We propose an efficient design route to generate unidirectional propagation of the designer surface acoustic waves. The whole system consists of a periodically corrugated rigid plate combining with a pair of asymmetric narrow slits. The directionality of the structure-induced surface waves stems from the destructive interference between the evanescent waves emitted from the double slits. The theoretical prediction is validated well by simulations and experiments. Promising applications can be anticipated, such as in designing compact acoustic circuits.

  5. Acoustic simulation in architecture with parallel algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xinrong; Li, Dan

    2004-03-01

    In allusion to complexity of architecture environment and Real-time simulation of architecture acoustics, a parallel radiosity algorithm was developed. The distribution of sound energy in scene is solved with this method. And then the impulse response between sources and receivers at frequency segment, which are calculated with multi-process, are combined into whole frequency response. The numerical experiment shows that parallel arithmetic can improve the acoustic simulating efficiency of complex scene.

  6. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  7. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  8. Acoustic radiation stress in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the radiation-induced static strains associated with acoustic waves propagating in solids are obtained directly from the virial theorem for an elastic continuum and that the radiation stresses result from combining the virial theorem with the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance. The experimental confirmation of critical theoretical predictions in solids is reported. The implications of the results for the fundamental thermal properties of crystals are addressed.

  9. Current-Driven Hydrogen Desorption from Graphene: Experiment and Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, L.; Pal, Partha P.; Seideman, Tamar; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Guest, Jeffrey R.

    2016-02-04

    Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the graphene/SiC(0001) surface at room temperature was investigated with ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations in order to elucidate the desorption mechanisms and pathways. Two different desorption processes were observed. In the high electron energy regime (4-8 eV), the desorption yield is independent of both voltage and current, which is attributed to the direct electronic excitation of the C-H bond. In the low electron energy regime (2-4 eV), however, the desorption yield exhibits a threshold dependence on voltage, which is explained by the vibrational excitation of the C-H bond via transient ionization induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. The observed current-independence of the desorption yield suggests that the vibrational excitation is a singleelectron process. We also observed that the curvature of graphene dramatically affects hydrogen desorption. Desorption from concave regions was measured to be much more probable than desorption from convex regions in the low electron energy regime (~ 2 eV), as would be expected from the identified desorption mechanism

  10. Acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hua; Qu Shao-Bo; Xu Zhuo; Wang Jia-Fu

    2009-01-01

    By making a comparison between the acoustic equations and the 2-dimensional (2D) Maxwell equations, we obtain the material parameter equations (MPE) for acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks. Both the theoretical results and the numerical results indicate that an elliptical cylindrical cloak can realize perfect acoustic invisibility when the spatial distributions of mass density and bulk modulus are exactly configured according to the proposed equations. The present work is the meaningful exploration of designing acoustic cloaks that are neither sphere nor circular cylinder in shape, and opens up possibilities for making complex and multiplex acoustic cloaks with simple models such as spheres, circular or elliptic cylinders.

  11. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  12. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    , the acoustic streaming flow, and the forces on suspended microparticles. The work is motivated by the application of particle focusing by acoustic radiation forces in medical, environmental and food sciences. Here acoustic streaming is most often unwanted, because it limits the focusability of particles...... work. Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, assuming small acoustic amplitudes, we derived the time-dependent governing equations under adiabatic conditions. The adiabatic first- and second-order equations are solved analytically for the acoustic field between two orthogonally......-of-the-art in the field. Furthermore, the analytical solution for the acoustic streaming in rectangular channels with arbitrary large height-to-width ratios is derived. This accommodates the analytical theory of acoustic streaming to applications within acoustofluidics....

  13. Analyses of vibro-acoustic characteristics for orthogonally stiffened panel based on the plate-beam combined theory%基于板梁组合理论的正交加筋板声振特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金叶青; 庞福振; 姚熊亮; 王献忠

    2012-01-01

    基于板梁组合理论,建立了正交加筋板声透射计算模型,并分析了正交加筋板的声振特性.将加强筋视为平板的动反力及动反力矩,引入到平板振动方程,得到了正交加筋板声振方程;利用空间谐波展开法及虚功原理,得到了正交加筋板透射损失和平均振动速度级表达式.在此基础上,首先研究了单向加筋板的隔声性能,理论结果与已有计算结果取得了很好的一致,验证了模型的有效性;并进一步研究了正交加筋的声振特性.研究表明,正交加筋板对垂直入射声波的隔声效果最好;增大加强筋惯性矩可提高其低频段透射损失;增大加强筋间距可提高正交加筋板的低频段振动响应,却降低了其低频透射损失,总体而言,增大加强筋间距可改善结构的整体隔声性能.%Based on the panel-beam combined theory, a panel-beam theoretical model is established for sound transmission through orthogonally stiffened panel and vibro-acoustic characteristics of the panel are analyzed. The vibro-acoustic equation of the structures was derived by firstly treating the stiffeners as reaction forces and moments on the panel and then inducing them into the vibration equation of the panel. The formulations of Transmission Loss (TL) and mean vibration velocity level for the structures were yielded according to the spatial harmonic expansion method and the virtual work principle. And then the developed model was applied to analyze sound insulation of the stiffened panel in one direction. The validity of the developed model was qualified by comparing those predictions with existing results. The model then employed to investigate the vi-bro-acoustic characteristics of the orthogonally stiffened panel. Results show that the orthogonally stiffened panel is more suitable for the insulation of sound waves with small incidence angle. An enlargement in the moment of inertia of stiffeners increases sound transmission loss in

  14. One sensor acoustic emission localization in plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R; Zwimpfer, F; Dual, J

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic emissions are elastic waves accompanying damage processes and are therefore used for monitoring the health state of structures. Most of the traditional acoustic emission techniques use a trilateration approach requiring at least three sensors on a 2D domain in order to localize sources of acoustic emission events. In this paper, we present a new approach which requires only a single sensor to identify and localize the source of acoustic emissions in a finite plate. The method proposed makes use of the time reversal principle and the dispersive nature of the flexural wave mode in a suitable frequency band. The signal shape of the transverse velocity response contains information about the propagated paths of the incoming elastic waves. This information is made accessible by a numerical time reversal simulation. The effect of dispersion is reversed and the original shape of the flexural wave is restored at the origin of the acoustic emission. The time reversal process is analyzed first for an infinite Mindlin plate, then by a 3D FEM simulation which in combination results in a novel acoustic emission localization process. The process is experimentally verified for different aluminum plates for artificially generated acoustic emissions (Hsu-Nielsen source). Good and reliable localization was achieved for a homogeneous quadratic aluminum plate with only one measurement. PMID:26372509

  15. Enhanced desorption of PCB and trace metal elements (Pb and Cu) from contaminated soils by saponin and EDDS mixed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the simultaneous desorption of trace metal elements and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) from mixed contaminated soil with a novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and biodegradable chelant S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS). Results showed significant promotion and synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS. The maximal desorption of Pb, Cu and PCB were achieved 99.8%, 85.7% and 45.7%, respectively, by addition of 10 mM EDDS and 3000 mg L−1 saponin. The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. The sorption of EDDS and saponin on soil was inhibited by each other. EDDS could enhance the complexation of metals with the saponin micelles and the solubilization capabilities of saponin micelles for PCB. Our study suggests the combination of saponin and EDDS would be a promising alternative for remediation of co-contaminated soils caused by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and metals. -- Highlights: ► A novel combination of biosurfactant saponin and EDDS was used to simultaneously remove mixed contaminations from soil. ► Significant synergy on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with EDDS/saponin. ► The marked interaction between EDDS and saponin contributed to the synergy performance. -- Significant synergistic effect on Pb, Cu and PCB desorption were achieved with the mixed solution of saponin and EDDS

  16. Experimental study on effects of CBM temperature-rising desorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Dong-min; LIN Ya-bing

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of CBM (coal bed methane) temperature-rising desorption,isothermal adsorption/desorption experiments on three ranks (anthracite,coking coal and lignite) of coal at different temperatures were designed based on the traditional CBM decompression desorption.The experimental results indicate that temperature-rising desorption is more effective in high-rank coal,and ever-increasing temperature of high-rank coal reservoir can reduce the negative effects of coal matrix shrinkage in the process of production and improve the permeability of the coal reservoir as well.It is also revealed that the technique of temperature-rising desorption applied in higher-rank coal reservoir can enhance CBM recovery ratio.This study provided theoretical support for the application of temperature-rising desorption technique in practical discharging and mining projects,which can effectively tackle the gas production bottleneck problem.

  17. The effect of selective desorption mechanisms during interstellar ice formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01

    Major components of ices on interstellar grains in molecular clouds - water and carbon oxides - occur at various optical depths. This implies that selective desorption mechanisms are at work. An astrochemical model of a contracting low-mass molecular cloud core is presented. Ice was treated as consisting of the surface and three subsurface layers (sublayers). Photodesorption, reactive desorption, and indirect reactive desorption were investigated. The latter manifests itself through desorption from H+H reaction on grains. Desorption of shallow subsurface species was included. Modeling results suggest the existence of a "photon-dominated ice" during the early phases of core contraction. Subsurface ice is chemically processed by interstellar photons, which produces complex organic molecules. Desorption from the subsurface layer results in high COM gas-phase abundances at Av = 2.4...10mag. This may contribute towards an explanation for COM observations in dark cores. It was found that photodesorption mostly gove...

  18. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  19. Effects of Lateral Diffusion on the Dynamics of Desorption

    OpenAIRE

    Juwono, Tjipto; Hamad, Ibrahim Abou; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2012-01-01

    The adsorbate dynamics during simultaneous action of desorption and lateral adsorbate diffusion is studied in a simple lattice-gas model by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the action of the coverage-conserving diffusion process during the course of the desorption has two distinct, competing effects: a general acceleration of the desorption process, and a coarsening of the adsorbate configuration through Ostwald ripening. The balance between these two effects is governed by t...

  20. Displacement desorption test of coalbed methane and its mechanism exploring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Suian; HUO Yongzhong; YE Jianping; TANG Shuheng; MA Dongmin

    2005-01-01

    Through the test of CH4 displaced by CO2 using the coal sample as the adsorbent, this paper has found the coalbed methane (CBM) displacement desorption phenomenon under the natural conditions and CBM mining conditions. With the help of the adsorption theory of the modern physical chemistry and interfacial chemistry, the CBM competitive adsorption and displacement desorption mechanism are intensively discussed, and a new path for studying the CBM desorption mechanism in the CBM exploitation process is explored.

  1. Substrate-Enhanced Micro Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerodyne Research, Inc. and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst will collaborate to develop laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric analysis of...

  2. Effects of Lateral Diffusion on the Dynamics of Desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Juwono, Tjipto; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2012-01-01

    The adsorbate dynamics during simultaneous action of desorption and lateral adsorbate diffusion is studied in a simple lattice-gas model by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the action of the coverage-conserving diffusion process during the course of the desorption has two distinct, competing effects: a general acceleration of the desorption process, and a coarsening of the adsorbate configuration through Ostwald ripening. The balance between these two effects is governed by the structure of the adsorbate layer at the beginning of the desorption process.

  3. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  4. Desorption of copper from polyvinyl alcohol-immobilized seaweed biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, K.H. [Swinburne Univ. of Technology, Hawthorn, Vic. (Australia). School of Engineering and Science; Hashim, M.A. [Malaya Univ., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    The desorption characteristics of copper on biomass of a marine macroalga, Sargassum baccularia, immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gel beads, were investigated using HCl eluting solutions. Both the extent and the rate of desorption were affected by the pH of the eluent. Nearly 91% of the copper initially adsorbed was released back into an HCl solution at pH 1.0 after 40 min of contact time when apparent desorption equilibrium was achieved. When the pH was raised t0 2.0, about 81% of the bound copper was desorbed within 120 min of contact time. Apparent desorption rate constants were determined using first-order desorption models. Very high concentrations of copper in the eluate could be obtained by using small amounts of the HCl eluent. However, this was achieved at the expense of the desorption efficiency. The PVA-immobilized seaweed biomass beads could be regenerated with HCl solution at pH 1.0 or 2.0 in multiple cycles of copper biosorption-desorption. Following desorption at pH 1.0 in the first cycle, about 55% of the biosorption capacity of the virgin biomass could be reused in subsequent cycles; in the case of desorption at pH 2.0, about 67% of the original uptake capacity was reusable. (orig.)

  5. Double DCO+ rings reveal CO ice desorption in the outer disk around IM Lup

    CERN Document Server

    Oberg, Karin I; Loomis, Ryan; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M; Qi, Chunhua; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Wilner, David J

    2015-01-01

    In a protoplanetary disk, a combination of thermal and non-thermal desorption processes regulate where volatiles are liberated from icy grain mantles into the gas phase. Non-thermal desorption should result in volatile-enriched gas in disk-regions where complete freeze-out is otherwise expected. We present ALMA observations of the disk around the young star IM Lup in 1.4 mm continuum, C18O 2-1, H13CO+ 3-2 and DCO+ 3-2 emission at ~0".5 resolution. The images of these dust and gas tracers are clearly resolved. The DCO+ line exhibits a striking pair of concentric rings of emission that peak at radii of ~0".6 and 2" (~90 and 300 AU, respectively). Based on disk chemistry model comparison, the inner DCO+ ring is associated with the balance of CO freeze-out and thermal desorption due to a radial decrease in disk temperature. The outer DCO+ ring is explained by non-thermal desorption of CO ice in the low-column-density outer disk, repopulating the disk midplane with cold CO gas. The CO gas then reacts with abundant...

  6. New insight into the electrochemical desorption of alkanethiol SAMs on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensa, Evangelina; Vericat, Carolina; Grumelli, Doris; Salvarezza, Roberto C; Park, Sung Hyun; Longo, Gabriel S; Szleifer, Igal; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P

    2012-09-21

    A combination of Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (PMIRRAS) under electrochemical control, Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (ECSTM) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations has been used to shed light on the reductive desorption process of dodecanethiol (C12) and octadecanethiol (C18) SAMs on gold in aqueous electrolytes. Experimental PMIRRAS, ECSTM and MD simulations data for C12 desorption are consistent with formation of randomly distributed micellar aggregates stabilized by Na(+) ions, coexisting with a lying-down phase of molecules. The analysis of pit and Au island coverage before and after desorption is consistent with the thiolate-Au adatoms models. On the other hand, PMIRRAS and MD data for C18 indicate that the desorbed alkanethiolates adopt a Na(+) ion-stabilized bilayer of interdigitated alkanethiolates, with no evidence of lying down molecules. MD simulations also show that both the degree of order and tilt angle of the desorbed alkanethiolates change with the surface charge on the metal, going from bilayers to micelles. These results demonstrate the complexity of the alkanethiol desorption in the presence of water and the fact that chain length and counterions play a key role in a complex structure.

  7. Ambient diode laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry of nonvolatile chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Schilling, Michael; Ahlmann, Norman; Michels, Antje; Hayen, Heiko; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; García-Reyes, Juan F; Franzke, Joachim

    2013-03-19

    In this work, the combined use of desorption by a continuous wave near-infrared diode laser and ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge-based probe (laser desorption dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry (LD-DBDI-MS)) is presented as an ambient ionization method for the mass spectrometric detection of nonvolatile chemicals on surfaces. A separation of desorption and ionization processes could be verified. The use of the diode laser is motivated by its low cost, ease of use, and small size. To achieve an efficient desorption, the glass substrates are coated at the back side with a black point (target point, where the sample is deposited) in order to absorb the energy offered by the diode laser radiation. Subsequent ionization is accomplished by a helium plasmajet generated in the dielectric barrier discharge source. Examples on the application of this approach are shown in both positive and negative ionization modes. A wide variety of multiclass species with low vapor pressure were tested including pesticides, pharmaceuticals and explosives (reserpine, roxithromycin, propazine, prochloraz, spinosad, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, enrofloxacin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, spinosad, cyclo-1,3,5,7-tetramethylene tetranitrate (HMX), and cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene trinitramine (RDX)). A comparative evaluation revealed that the use of the laser is advantageous, compared to just heating the substrate surface. PMID:23419061

  8. Desorption of trihalomethanes in gas liquid contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Updated studies show that gastric cancer is related with the existence of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the drinking water. The trihalomethanes are sub products from the degradation of humic acids and your reaction with chlorine and bromine used like decontaminates. The desorption process is used to eliminate the THMs with air in contact with the water. The experimental design was used in three contactors. The contactors selected were: the bubbling's column, the packed column and the shaken tank without screen. There were selected three variable: initial concentration of THMs, the residence time and the turbulence degree (measured with the Reynolds number). The concentrations were made with a gas chromatograph. The objective of this project is to do a comparison with the gas liquid contactors more used in the industrial level to determinate which ones are the best in the desorption process. The conclusion of the experimental design is that the tank is the equipment with the best capacity to eliminate THMs. Too it includes other techniques to eliminate THMs of the water and your treatment

  9. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  10. Dermatophyte Identification Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Theel, Elitza S.; Hall, Leslie; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Wengenack, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) for the identification of dermatophytes from clinical cultures was compared to that of dermatophyte identification using 28S rRNA gene sequencing. The MALDI Biotyper library (MBL; version 3.0) was used alone and in combination with a supplemented library containing an additional 20 dermatophyte spectra (S-MBL). Acquired spectra were interpreted using both the ma...

  11. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  12. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  13. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  14. Localized acoustic surface modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  15. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  16. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important Points ... Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, ...

  17. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption-desorption are important processes as they regulate movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involvi...

  18. Desorption process of deuterium from zircaloys and their oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamichi, Haruo; Kinoshita, Chiken; Hara, Masahiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    It is well known that hydrogen behavior plays an important role on the oxidation process of zircaloys. We have investigated the desorption process of deuterium from three kinds of zircaloys (Zry-2, Zry-4 and high-Fe and Ni-Zry-2) and their oxides using thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The purpose of the present paper is to get insight into the effect of alloying elements on the desorption behavior of deuterium from the zircaloys and their oxides. We have also performed in-situ observations through TEM for getting the relation between the desorption process and microstructural evolution. The desorption of D{sub 2} implanted by an ion accelerator occurs in two stages; the first and the second stages appear at around 350 K and around 700 K for the metallic zircaloys, respectively. For their oxide films, on the other hand, the desorption rate of D{sub 2} is much higher than that for the metallic zircaloys. It is found that the desorption rate depends strongly on the kind of zircaloys, especially on the concentration of Fe and Ni. From TEM result, it is found that the first desorption stage for the metallic specimens is correlated to the dissolution of the hydrides. (author)

  19. CO and N$_2$ desorption energies from water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Fayolle, Edith C; Loomis, Ryan; Bergner, Jennifer; Graninger, Dawn M; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I

    2015-01-01

    The relative desorption energies of CO and N$_2$ are key to interpretations of observed interstellar CO and N$_2$ abundance patterns, including the well-documented CO and N$_2$H$^+$ anti-correlations in disks, protostars and molecular cloud cores. Based on laboratory experiments on pure CO and N$_2$ ice desorption, the difference between CO and N$_2$ desorption energies is small; the N$_2$-to-CO desorption energy ratio is 0.93$\\pm$0.03. Interstellar ices are not pure, however, and in this study we explore the effect of water ice on the desorption energy ratio of the two molecules. We present temperature programmed desorption experiments of different coverages of $^{13}$CO and $^{15}$N$_2$ on porous and compact amorphous water ices and, for reference, of pure ices. In all experiments, $^{15}$N$_2$ desorption begins a few degrees before the onset of $^{13}$CO desorption. The $^{15}$N$_2$ and $^{13}$CO energy barriers are 770 and 866 K for the pure ices, 1034-1143 K and 1155-1298 K for different sub-monolayer co...

  20. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David; Schwoebel, Paul

    2013-09-17

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  1. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L.; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David

    2016-08-23

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  2. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might be explai......Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...... with surface scattering is presented. Each of the two scattering effects is modeled as frequency dependent functions....

  3. Reconstruction and prediction of multi-source acoustic field with the distributed source boundary point method based nearfield acoustic holography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI; Chuanxing; CHEN; Jian; CHEN; Xinzhao

    2004-01-01

    In a multi-source acoustic field, the actual measured pressure is a scalar sum of pressures from all the sources. The pressure belonging to every source cannot be separated out with the existing techniques. Consequently, routine formulas cannot be used to reconstruct the acoustic source and predict the acoustic field directly. In this paper, a novel theoretical model of reconstruction and prediction of multi-source acoustic field in the distributed source boundary point method (DSBPM) based nearfield acoustic holography (NAH) is established. Three different methods, namely combination method with single surface measurement, combination method with multi-surface measurement and elimination method with multi-surface measurement, are proposed to realize the holographic reconstruction of sources. With these methods, the problem of reconstruction and prediction of acoustic field existing multiple coherent sources synchronously is solved effectively. Using the particular solutions constructed by the DSBPM to establish the vibro-acoustic transfer matrix, the calculation time, calculation precision and calculation stability are improved. These methods are valuable in localizing acoustic source and predicting acoustic field in engineering field.

  4. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  5. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  6. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  7. Desorption and biofiltration for the treatment of residual organic gases evolved in soil decontamination processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barona, A.; Elias, A.; Arias, R.; Acha, E.; Cano, I. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao (Spain)

    2007-11-15

    In order to analyze the combination of a rotary kiln and a biofilter in soil decontamination processes, a previously characterized soil was artificially contaminated with toluene, ethylbenzene or p-xylene. The desorption peak of the three compounds occurred very quickly at 20 C, and consequently, the outlet gas flow from the rotary kiln was initially divided into two different flows. One of them was reduced to a 1/9{sup th} fraction of the total flow to be treated in an independent biofiltration system specially acclimated to each contaminant. The sharp desorption peak observed for the three compounds at the outlet of the kiln involved a very high inlet concentration fed into the biofilters in a very short period of time (shorter than 3 h). Consequently, the removal efficiency for toluene was lower than 70 %. However, the removal efficiencies for ethylbenzene and xylene were always higher than 65 %. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Acoustic Design of Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jacob Ellehauge; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Brunskog, Jonas;

    aggregate (leca) along with a newly developed technology called pearl-chain reinforcement, which is a system for post-tensioning. Here, it is shown how to combine these technologies within a precast super-light slab element, while honoring the requirements of a holistic design. Acoustic experiments...

  9. The structural acoustic properties of stiffened shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luan, Yu

    2008-01-01

    . This is important when a number of stiffened plates are combined in a complicated structure composed of many plates. However, whereas the equivalent plate theory is well established there is no similar established theory for stiffened shells. This paper investigates the mechanical and structural acoustic properties...

  10. Multicarrier Spread Spectrum for Covert Acoustic Communications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walree, P.A. van; Sangfelt, E.; Leus, G.

    2008-01-01

    A multicarrier modulation scheme is presented to achieve the objective of clandestine acoustic communications. The modulation consists of a single bit sequence simultaneously modulated onto multiple carriers. As all bands carry the same symbol stream, they can be adaptively combined with a multichan

  11. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying, E-mail: ying.wu@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-10-03

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating.

  12. 声频共振辅助常规药物治疗突发性聋的临床研究初探%The clnical study of the treatment combined acoustic frequency resonance with conventional medicine on sudden hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡敏; 郭广威; 何玮; 陆源

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the clnical effect of the treatment combined acoustic frequency resonance with conven tional medicine on sudden hearing loss. Methods The treatment effect of 103 patients with sudden hearing loss were analysed retrospectively. All the patients were divided into 3 groups; combined acoustic frequency resonance with conventional medicine 39 patients (42 ears) , combined high pressure oxygen with conventional medicine 36 patients (38 ears) and only conventional medi cine 30 patients (35 ears). Results The effective rate of the treated group combined acoustic frequency resonance with conven tional medicine and the group combined with high pressure oxygen with conventional medicine were 80. 95% , 61. 36% respective ly , which higher than that of treated group only conventional medicine ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion The treatment combined acoustic frequency resonance with conventional medicine on sudden hearing loss can improve the patient's hearing level through improving the internal ear circulation barrier and increase the oxygen quantity of organization.%目的 探讨声频共振辅助常规药物治疗突发性聋的临床疗效.方法 对2008年1月~2010年12月105例(115耳)突发性耳聋患者资料进行回顾性分析.结果 声频共振组及高压氧组总有效率显著高于单纯药物组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);声频共振组及高压氧组比较两者差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 声频共振配合药物的深入渗透,可加速改善耳蜗与周围组织的血液循环,消除炎症,有效的消除致病因素,达到提高听力的目的.在临床上具有推广价值.

  13. Adsorption-Desorption Characteristics of Chlorimuron-Ethyl in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption-desorption characteristics of chlorimuron-ethyl in soils were investigated to provide the basic data for evaluating the safety in field and the risk to water resource. The adsorption-desorption experiment was conducted by the batch equilibration and HPLC techniques; furthermore, data were analyzed with 5 mathematic models to describe the characteristics and mechanism of adsorption-desorption and translocation of the herbicide in soils. The results showed that the adsorption-desorption isotherms of chlorimuron-ethyl fitted for the Freundlich model well, and the physical reaction presents the main contribution during the adsorption-desorption process. The adsorption values (Kads-f) of chlorimuron-ethyl in 8 types of soil ranged from 0.798 to 6.891. The isotherms of 2# (Jiangxi clay) and 3# (Jiangxi sand loam)soils belong to the S-type curve, while the isotherms of another 6 type soils belong to the L-type isotherm. The results of desorption indicated that the hysteresis phenomena appeared during the desorption process, and the hysteresis coefficients(H) of the herbicides in 8 soils varied from 0.259-0.980. Furthermore, Kads-f and desorption values (Kdes-f) increased with the OM (%) and the clay content increasing, while the values decreased with the soils pH increasing. The H values decreased with the OM and the clay content increasing, and increased with the soils pH increasing. It can be concluded that the low adsorption abilities of chlorimuron-ethyl in test soils and un-reversible adsorption existed in the process, which will induce the great translocation of the herbicide after application in field. It can be transported to ground or groundwater causing risk to environments. The physical and chemical properties of soils, including the OM, the clay content, and the pH of soil were the dominating factors during the adsorption-desorption.

  14. Acoustic sniper localization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  15. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; KIRKEGAARD, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to inve...

  16. Thermal desorption of Au from W(001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Blaszczyszyn, R; Godowski, P J

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of Au on W(001) at 450 K up to multilayer structures was investigated. Temperature programmed desorption technique was used in determination of coverage dependent desorption energy (region up to one monolayer). Results were discussed in terms of competitive interactions of Au-Au and Au-W atoms. Simple procedure for prediction of faceting behavior on the interface, basing on the desorption data, was postulated. It was deduced that the Au/W(001) interface should not show faceting tendency after thermal treatment. (author)

  17. Thermal Desorption of Au from W(001) Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyszyn, R.; Chrzanowski, J.; Godowski, P. J.

    2000-12-01

    Adsorption of Au on W(001) at 450 K up to multilayer structures was investigated. Temperature programmed desorption technique was used in determination of coverage dependent desorption energy (region up to one monolayer). Results were discussed in terms of competitive interactions of Au--Au and Au--W atoms. Simple procedure for prediction of faceting behavior on the interface, basing on the desorption data, was postulated. It was deduced that the Au/W(001) interface should not show faceting tendency after thermal treatment.

  18. Temperature programmed desorption of weakly bound adsorbates on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Meling, Artur; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We have performed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to analyze the desorption kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, C2H2, SF6, N2, NO and CO on Au(111). We report desorption activation energies (Edes), which are an excellent proxy for the binding energies. The derived binding energies scale with the polarizability of the molecules, consistent with the conclusion that the surface-adsorbate bonds arise due to dispersion forces. The reported results serve as a benchmark for theories of dispersion force interactions of molecules at metal surfaces.

  19. Underwater Applications of Acoustical Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Mehta

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic technique of acoustical holography. Requirements for recording the acoustical hologram are discussed with its ability for underwater imaging in view. Some practical systems for short-range and medium-range imaging are described. The advantages of acoustical holography over optical imaging, acoustical imaging and sonars are outlined.

  20. 双向凝胶电泳联合 MALDI-TOF/TOF MS 技术探寻狼疮性肾炎的血清标志物%Exploring Serum Protein Biomarkers of Lupus Nephritis by Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Com-bined with Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许嵘; 朱加明; 龚劭敏; 卢泽军; 张慧; 刘少鹏; 丁小强; 钟一红

    2015-01-01

    发病机制。%Objective:To explore the potential serum biomarkers of patients with lupus nephritis(LN)by using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry(MALDI-TOF/TOF MS),so as to lay the foundation for illuminating pathogenesis.Methods:A total of 40 LN patients were divided into two groups,the active LN group and the inactive LN group,with 20 in each.In addition,20 IgA nephritis patients and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled as IgAN group and healthy control group.Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to separate and analyze the serum proteins,and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS was applied to the identification of the differentially expressed pro-teins.Results:A total of fifty differentially expressed proteins were identified.Compared with that in healthy control group,23 differentially expressed proteins were discovered in active LN group and inactive LN group,among which,8 proteins were up-regulated and 1 5 proteins were down-regulated.And 1 8 differentially expressed proteins,compared with IgA nephritis group, were found in active LN group and inactive LN group,including 13 up-regulated proteins and 5 down-regulated proteins.Fur-thermore,the number of up-regulated and down-regulated proteins in active LN group,compared with those in inactive LN group,were 4 and 5,respectively.Among the 50 identified differentially expressed proteins,the expression of serum amyloid protein A(SAA )in active LN group was higher than that in the other groups while the expression of complement component C4A in active LN group was lower than that in the other groups.And the expression of chain B (solution structure of double super helix model)in the inactive LN group was higher than that in the other groups.Compared with that in healthy control group,the expression of vitamin D-binding protein isoform 1 precursor,chain A(crystal structure of uncomplexed vitamin D-binding protein)and chain B (a covalent dimer of transthyretin that affects the

  1. Adsorption and desorption kinetics of carbofuran in acid soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Pateiro-Moure, Miriam; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Simal-Gándara, Jesús; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2011-06-15

    Carbofuran adsorption and desorption were investigated in batch and stirred flow chamber (SFC) tests. The carbofuran adsorption capacity of the soils was found to be low and strongly dependent on their clay and organic carbon contents. Carbofuran sorption was due mainly (>80%) to fast adsorption processes governed by intraparticle diffusion. The adsorption kinetic constant for the pesticide ranged from 0.047 to 0.195 min(-1) and was highly correlated with constant n in the Freundlich equation (r=0.965, Pcarbofuran desorption to be highly variable and negatively correlated with eCEC and the clay content. The SFC tests showed that soil organic carbon (C) plays a key role in the irreversibility of carbofuran adsorption. Carbofuran desorption increased rapidly at C contents below 4%. The desorption kinetic constant for the compound (0.086-0.195 min(-1)) was generally higher than its adsorption kinetic constant; therefore, carbofuran is more rapidly desorbed than it is adsorbed in soil.

  2. ACTIVATION ENERGY OF DESORPTION OF DIBENZOFURAN ON ACTIVATED CARBONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang; LI Zhong; XI Hongxia; LUO Lingai

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of commercial activated carbons, such as Norit RB1, Monolith and Chemviron activated carbons, were used as adsorbents for adsorption of dibenzofuran. The average pore size and specific surface area of these activated carbons were measured. Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiments were conducted to measure the TPD curves of dibenzofuran on the activated carbons, and then the activation energy for desorption of dibenzofuran on the activated carbons was estimated. The results showed that the Chemviron and the Norit RB1 activated carbon maintained higher specific surface area and larger micropore pore volume in comparison with the Monolith activated carbon, and the activation energy for the desorption of dibenzofuran on these two activated carbons was higher than that on the Monolith activated carbon. The smaller the pore of the activated carbon was, the higher the activated energy of dibenzofuran desorption was.

  3. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  4. Acoustic integrated extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross-section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. [1] derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency.

  5. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  6. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  7. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  8. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment Summary Types Of Post-treatment Issues Resources Medical Resources Considerations When Selecting a Healthcare Professional Healthcare ... ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma ...

  9. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  10. An acoustic invisible gateway

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Kan, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The recently-emerged concept of "invisible gateway" with the extraordinary capability to block the waves but allow the passage of other entities has attracted great attentions due to the general interests in illusion devices. However, the possibility to realize such a fascinating phenomenon for acoustic waves has not yet been explored, which should be of paramount significance for acoustical applications but would necessarily involve experimental difficulty. Here we design and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic invisible gateway (AIG) capable of concealing a channel under the detection of sound. Instead of "restoring" a whole block of background medium by using transformation acoustics that inevitably requires complementary or restoring media with extreme parameters, we propose an inherently distinct methodology that only aims at engineering the surface impedance at the "gate" to mimic a rigid "wall" and can be conveniently implemented by decorating meta-structures behind the channel. Such a simple yet ef...

  11. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  12. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J;

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  13. Acoustic surface cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    Zijlstra, Aaldert Geert

    2011-01-01

    Merely the presence of compressible entities, known as bubbles, greatly enriches the physical phenomena encountered when introducing ultrasound in a liquid. Mediated by the response of these bubbles, the otherwise diffuse and relatively low energy density of the acoustic field can induce strong, localized liquid motion, high internal temperatures and pressures as well as secondary acoustic emissions. In turn, these effects give rise to considerable stresses exerted on nearby objects and molec...

  14. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  15. Sorption, Desorption and Diffusion of Tc Under Anaerobic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The sorption and diffusion of Tc on granite under anaerobic conditions were investigated. Influencesof pH values, ferrous minerals(reduced iron powder or magnetite), bentonite, concentration of cations andanion (Fe3+, Fe2+ and CO32-) on the distribution coefficient, Kd, were studied. The sorption mechanism of99Tc on granite was analyzed by the desorption method of adding H2O2 into desorption solvent. Based on

  16. Study on hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen absorption/desorption properties of two U-Mn intermetallic compounds, U{sub 6}Mn and UMn{sub 2}, were investigated. U{sub 6}Mn absorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen desorption pressure of U{sub 6}Mn obtained from this experiment was higher than that of U, which was considered to be the effect of alloying, whereas UMn{sub 2} was not observed to absorb hydrogen up to 50 atm at room temperature. (author)

  17. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  18. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible.

  19. Characterization of Rhodamine Self-Assembled Films Using Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruixia; Na, Na; Jiang, Fubin; Ouyang, Jin

    2013-06-01

    Growth process information and molecular structure identification are very important for characterization of self-assembled films. Here, we explore the possible application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) that provides the assembled information of rhodamine B (Rh B) and rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) films. With the help of lab-made DESI source, two characteristic ions [Rh B]+ and [Rh 123]+ are observed directly in the open environment. To evaluate the reliability of this technique, a comparative study of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and our method is carried out, and the result shows good correlation. According to the signal intensity of characteristic ions, the layer-by-layer adsorption process of dyes can be monitored, and the thicknesses of multilayer films can also be comparatively determined. Combining the high sensitivity, selectivity, and speed of mass spectrometry, the selective adsorption of similar structure molecules under different pH is recognized easily from extracted ion chronograms. The variation trend of dyes signalling intensity with concentration of polyelectrolyte is studied as well, which reflects the effect of surface charge on dyes deposition. Additionally, the desorption area, surface morphology, and thicknesses of multilayer films are investigated using fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Because the desorption area was approximately as small as 2 mm2, the distribution situation of organic dyes in an arbitrary position could be gained rapidly, which means DESI-MS has advantages on in situ analysis.

  20. Sorption and desorption of 1,4-dichlorobenzene on peat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of 1,4-dichlorobenzene (DCB) on peat (>92% organic matter)display large-scale hysteresis and nonlinearity. The magnitude of desorption hysteresis decreases in the order: untreated Pahokee peat (P)>acid treated peat (FP)>humin (TP). The desorption percentages are lower than 28% of the sorbed 1, 4-DCB after desorbing for 6 days. The sorption and desorption isotherms are well fitted to Freundlich equation, whose parameter 1/n ranges from 0.055 to 0.527. Moreover, the parameter 1/n of the desorption isotherm is significantly lower than that of the sorption isotherm, but the parameter IogK increases on contrary to 1/n. The desorption isotherms are very well fitted to Langmuir equation, whose Qm decreases in the order: TP>FP>P.The apparent partition coefficients (Kp) increase with increasing sorption time or decreasing aqueous equilibrium concentration of DCB. And Kp of P is significantly higher than that of FP or TP.

  1. Laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voumard, Pierre; Zenobi, Renato

    1995-10-01

    A complete study on the energy partitioning upon laser-induced thermal desorption of aniline from silica surfaces was undertaken. The measurements include characterization of the aniline-quartz adsorption system using temperature-programmed desorption, the extrapolation of quasiequilibrium desorption temperatures to the regime of laser heating rates on the order of 109-1010 K/s by computational means, measurement of the kinetic energy distributions of desorbing aniline using a pump-probe method, and the determination of internal energies with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. The measurements are compared to calculations of the surface temperature rise and the resulting desorption rates, based on a finite-difference mathematical description of pulsed laser heating. While the surface temperature of laser-heated silica reaches about 600-700 K at the time of desorption, the translational temperature of laser-desorbed aniline was measured to be Tkin=420±60 K, Tvib was 360±60 K, and Trot was 350±100 K. These results are discussed using different models for laser-induced thermal desorption from surfaces.

  2. Calcium lignosulfonate adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Reid B; Bai, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes adsorption and desorption studies carried out with calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) on Berea sandstone. Circulation experiments were performed to determine CLS adsorption isotherms and the effects of CLS concentration, temperature, salinity, brine hardness, and injection rate on adsorption density. Flow-through experiments were performed to assess the reversibility of CLS adsorption and the influence of postflush rate, brine concentration, brine hardness, brine pH, and temperature on the desorption process. Results indicate that CLS adsorption isotherms on Berea sandstone follow the Freundlich isotherm law. The results presented in this paper on the effects of CLS adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone show that: (1) increasing CLS concentration and salinity increases CLS adsorption density; (2) increasing temperature will decrease adsorption density; (3) increasing injection rate of CLS solution will slightly decrease CLS adsorption density; (4) postflush rate and salinity of brine have a large impact on the CLS desorption process; (5) the adsorption and desorption process are not completely reversible; and (5) temperature and pH of the postflush brine have little effect on desorption.

  3. Broadband unidirectional acoustic cloak based on phase gradient metasurfaces with two flat acoustic lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Peng; Wan, Le-Le; Chen, Tian-Ning; Song, Ai-Ling; Wang, Fang

    2016-07-01

    Narrow bandwidth and bulky configuration are the main obstacles for the realization and application of invisible cloaks. In this paper, we present an effective method to achieve broadband and thin acoustic cloak by using an acoustic metasurface (AMS). In order to realize this cloak, we use slitted unit cells to design the AMS due to the advantage of less energy loss, broad operation bandwidth, and subwavelength thickness. According to the hyperboloidal phase profile along the AMS, the incident plane waves can be focused at a designed focal spot by the flat lens. Furthermore, broadband acoustic cloak is obtained by combining two identical flat lenses. The incident plane waves are focused at the center point in between of the two lenses by passing through one lens, and then recovered by passing through the other one. However, they cannot reach the cloaked regions in between of the two lenses. The simulation results can verify the non-detectability effect of the acoustic cloak. Our study results provide an available and simple approach to experimentally achieve the acoustic cloak, which can be used in acoustic non-detectability for large objects.

  4. Dynamic response analysis of an aircraft structure under thermal-acoustic loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, H.; Li, H. B.; Zhang, W.; Wu, Z. Q.; Liu, B. R.

    2016-09-01

    Future hypersonic aircraft will be exposed to extreme combined environments includes large magnitude thermal and acoustic loads. It presents a significant challenge for the integrity of these vehicles. Thermal-acoustic test is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to combined loads. In this research, the numerical simulation process for the thermal acoustic test is presented, and the effects of thermal loads on vibro-acoustic response are investigated. To simulate the radiation heating system, Monte Carlo theory and thermal network theory was used to calculate the temperature distribution. Considering the thermal stress, the high temperature modal parameters are obtained with structural finite element methods. Based on acoustic finite element, modal-based vibro-acoustic analysis is carried out to compute structural responses. These researches are very vital to optimum thermal-acoustic test and structure designs for future hypersonic vehicles structure

  5. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  6. UV–UV hole burning and IR dip spectroscopy of homophenylalanine by laser desorption supersonic jet technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Çarçabal, Pierre [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, CNRS, Université Paris Sud XI, Bâtiment 210, 91405 Orsay (France); Oba, Hikari [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Fujii, Masaaki, E-mail: mfujii@res.titech.ac.jp [Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Homophenylalanine was measured by laser desorption supersonic jet spectroscopy. • Ten conformers were found by UV–UV hole burning spectroscopy. • The observed conformers were assigned by the combination of UV and IR spectra. • Franck–Condon simulations were employed to assign the flexible molecule. - Abstract: Conformer selected electronic and vibrational spectra of homophenylalanine, phenylalanine analogue molecule, were measured by UV–UV hole burning and IR dip spectroscopy combined with laser desorption technique. 10 conformers were found by UV–UV hole burning spectroscopy and their structures were assigned by IR dip and UV absorption spectra with aid of quantum chemical calculations in both S{sub 0} and S{sub 1}. This study shows that the combination of simulated IR and UV spectra is powerful to assign flexible molecules.

  7. 基质辅助激光解吸电离质谱和电喷雾电离质谱在辣根过氧化物酶糖肽结构分析中的应用%Combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of intact glycopeptides from horseradish peroxidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑶函; 晏国全; 周新文; 杨芃原

    2010-01-01

    糖链结构的质谱解析是今后糖蛋白分析中的重要研究内容,其中完整糖肽的分析,由于可以同时获得糖基化位点和对应糖链的结构信息,更具有重要意义和研究前景.本工作对质谱软电离技术在完整糖肽分析中的应用进行了研究,其中包括了基质辅助激光解吸电离(matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization,MALDI)和电喷雾电离(electrospray ionization,ESI)技术.通过平行使用两种串联质谱(tandem mass spectrometry,MS/MS)分析策略:MALDI-MS/MS和ESI-MS/MS对目标糖蛋白--辣根过氧化物酶进行分析,并讨论了其互补性.结果表明,MALDI和ESI技术各有优劣,结合串联质谱分析,可获得糖肽的糖链结构信息;两条路线互补使用,在揭示蛋白质糖基化修饰(位点和结构)的研究中十分必要.

  8. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating establishment...

  9. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Lu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals have been proposed about two decades ago and some important characteristics such as acoustic band structure and negative refraction have stimulated fundamental and practical studies in acoustic materials and devices since then. To carefully engineer a phononic crystal in an acoustic “atom” scale, acoustic metamaterials with their inherent deep subwavelength nature have triggered more exciting investigations on negative bulk modulus and/or negative mass density. Acoustic surface evanescent waves have also been recognized to play key roles to reach acoustic subwavelength imaging and enhanced transmission.

  10. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  11. Nano-localized desorption and time-of-flight mass analysis using solely optical enhancement in the proximity of a scanning tunneling microscope tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Micheletto, Ruggero; Okazaki, Satoshi; Otsuka, Koji

    2003-04-01

    The combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with time-of-flight mass system (TOF-MS) adds new information to STM imaging. In this study, an STM system has been combined with laser excitation and was used for desorption and ionization of surface molecules, without the use of any other external stimulus. Desorbed ions from confined areas were accelerated and detected by a TOF chamber. We demonstrate in this paper that the technique proposed enables desorption of superficial structures within a small area of approximately 5 nm diameter and simultaneous mass spectroscopy of the desorbed atoms.

  12. A new, simple electrostatic-acoustic hybrid levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierke, E. G.; Loeb, H.; Gross, D.

    1990-01-01

    Battelle has developed a hybrid levitator by combining the known single-axis acoustic standing wave levitator with a coaxial DC electric field. The resulting Coulomb forces on the charged liquid or solid sample support its weight and, together with the acoustic force, center the sample. Liquid samples with volumes approximately less than 100 micro-liters are deployed from a syringe reservoir into the acoustic pressure node. The sample is charged using a miniature high voltage power supply (approximately less than 20 kV) connected to the syringe needle. As the electric field, generated by a second miniature power supply, is increased, the acoustic intensity is reduced. The combination of both fields allows stable levitation of samples larger than either single technique could position on the ground. Decreasing the acoustic intensity reduces acoustic convection and sample deformation. Neither the electrostatic nor the acoustic field requires sample position sensing or active control. The levitator, now used for static and dynamic fluid physics investigations on the ground, can be easily modified for space operations.

  13. Wavefront Modulation and Subwavelength Diffractive Acoustics with an Acoustic Metasurface

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality as their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a desig...

  14. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  15. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  16. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  17. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  18. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  19. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  20. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  1. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension. PMID:19418043

  2. Cesium sorption and desorption behavior of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesium sorption and desorption of clay minerals (montmorillonite, beidellite, nontronite, weathered biotite, rectorite and illite) were investigated by consecutive sorption-desorption (CSD) experiments. In batch sorption experiment, two solutions with different Cs concentration 10-3 and 10-7 mol/L) were used. In batch desorption experiments, Cs sorbed samples in sorption experiments were treated 5 times with 1 mol/L ammonium acetate solution. In the case of CSD experiments using 10-3 mol/L Cs solution, the exchangeable cations (Na, Ca, and K) in the clay samples affected to the sorption ratio of Cs, and this effect depended on the type of clay mineral. The desorption ratios of untreated, Na-exchanged and Ca-exchanged weathered biotite ranged from 23 to 33%, while that of other samples was over 80%. In the case of CSD experiments using 10-7 mol/L Cs solution, the sorption ratio of montmorillonite was smaller than that of the other clay samples. In desorption experiments, more than 10-9 mol sorbed Cs remained in 1.0 g of the sample after 5 extraction times. These results indicate that all examined clay samples are able to strongly adsorb Cs with a capacity of more than 10-9 mol/g. (author)

  3. Sorption-desorption behavior of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that are commonly found in commercial and household products. These compounds are considered persistent organic pollutants. In this study, we used 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE-15) as a model compound to elucidate the sorption and desorption behavior of PBDEs in soils. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient (KOC) of BDE-15 was more than three times higher for humin than for bulk soils. However, pronounced desorption hysteresis was obtained mainly for bulk soils. For humin, increasing concentration of sorbed BDE-15 resulted in decreased desorption. Our data illustrate that BDE-15 and probably other PBDEs exhibit high sorption affinity to soils. Moreover, sorption is irreversible and thus PBDEs can potentially accumulate in the topsoil layer. We also suggest that although humin is probably a major sorbent for PBDEs in soils, other humic materials are also responsible for their sequestration. - Highlights: → BDE-15 exhibited pronounced desorption hysteresis. → BDE-15 sowed higher sorption affinity to humin as compared to the bulk soils. → Sequestration of PBDEs depends on soil organic matter constitutes other than humin. - Pronounced desorption hysteresis was observed for BDE-15 in natural soils.

  4. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, M; Dulieu, F

    2014-07-01

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O2) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N2 on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  5. Sorption-desorption dynamics of radiocaesium in organic matter soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study has been carried out on the radiocaesium sorption properties of 25 soils (forest, peat) covering organic matter (OM) contents in the range of 10-97%. Predictions are made for radiocaesium partitioning between micaceous Frayed Edge Sites (FES) and regular exchange sites (RES) on the basis of specific radiocaesium interception potentials of the soil and overall exchange capacity. It is shown that for soils with a very high OM content (>80%), significant fractions are present in a readily reversible form in the OM phase. In soils of low-medium OM content (<40%), only a very minor fraction is present in the OM exchange complex. Experimental findings, based on a desorption screening with a variety of desorption agents are in agreement with these predictions. On the basis of a study of sorption kinetics, some additional tools are available for identifying problem soils. In cases of very high OM content, radiocaesium adsorption is completed within hours demonstrating the involvement of the OM sites. In soils for which interception occurs in the FES, sorption continues to proceed for periods of 2-3 weeks. In conclusion, some examples are presented on radiocaesium desorption using ion exchangers as radiocaesium sinks in promoting desorption. For a peaty soil, near quantitative desorption is accomplished. For forest soils with OM contents in a range of 10-40%, fixation levels of 30-50% are demonstrated

  6. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, M.; Dulieu, F., E-mail: francois.dulieu@obspm.fr [LERMA, Université de Cergy Pontoise et Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8112 du CNRS. 5, mail Gay Lussac, 95031 Cergy Pontoise (France)

    2014-07-07

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article, we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O{sub 2}) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80% at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-adsorbed N{sub 2} on the substrate from 0 to 1.5 ML. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different physical parameters that could play a role in the chemical desorption process: binding energy, enthalpy of formation, and energy transfer from the new molecule to the surface or to other adsorbates.

  7. Sorption-desorption behavior of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olshansky, Yaniv; Polubesova, Tamara [Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Vetter, Walter [Institute of Food Chemistry (170b), University of Hohenheim, Garbenstr. 28, D-70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Chefetz, Benny, E-mail: chefetz@agri.huji.ac.il [Department of Soil and Water Sciences, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-10-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants that are commonly found in commercial and household products. These compounds are considered persistent organic pollutants. In this study, we used 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE-15) as a model compound to elucidate the sorption and desorption behavior of PBDEs in soils. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient (K{sub OC}) of BDE-15 was more than three times higher for humin than for bulk soils. However, pronounced desorption hysteresis was obtained mainly for bulk soils. For humin, increasing concentration of sorbed BDE-15 resulted in decreased desorption. Our data illustrate that BDE-15 and probably other PBDEs exhibit high sorption affinity to soils. Moreover, sorption is irreversible and thus PBDEs can potentially accumulate in the topsoil layer. We also suggest that although humin is probably a major sorbent for PBDEs in soils, other humic materials are also responsible for their sequestration. - Highlights: > BDE-15 exhibited pronounced desorption hysteresis. > BDE-15 sowed higher sorption affinity to humin as compared to the bulk soils. > Sequestration of PBDEs depends on soil organic matter constitutes other than humin. - Pronounced desorption hysteresis was observed for BDE-15 in natural soils.

  8. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  9. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms...... of descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal “acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO work item. This paper...

  10. Strong acoustic wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  11. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  12. Organic and inorganic decomposition products from the thermal desorption of atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brent J.; Zhang, Yaping; Zuo, Xiaochen; Martinez, Raul E.; Walker, Michael J.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    ) component. TAG signal found in the traditional compound elution time period reveals higher correlations with AMS hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) combined with the fraction of OOA that is less oxygenated. Potential to quantify nitrate and sulfate aerosol mass concentrations using the TAG system is explored through analysis of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate standards. While chemical standards display a linear response in the TAG system, redesorptions of the CTD cell following ambient sample analysis show some signal carryover on sulfate and organics, and new desorption methods should be developed to improve throughput. Future standards should be composed of complex organic/inorganic mixtures, similar to what is found in the atmosphere, and perhaps will more accurately account for any aerosol mixture effects on compositional quantification.

  13. Nitrogen Molecule Adsorption on Cationic Tantalum Clusters and Rhodium Clusters and Desorption from Their Nitride Clusters Studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Tawaraya, Yuki; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-06-23

    Adsorption and desorption of N2 molecules onto cationic Ta and Rh clusters in the gas phase were investigated in the temperature range of 300-1000 K by using thermal desorption spectrometry in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For Ta6(+), the first N2 molecule was found to adsorb dissociatively, and it remained adsorbed when Ta6(+)N2 was heated to 1000 K. In contrast, the second and the subsequent N2 molecules adsorbed weakly as a molecular form and were released into the gas phase when heated to 600 K. The difference can be explained in terms of the activation barrier between the molecular and dissociative forms. On the other hand, when Ta clusters were generated in the presence of N2 gas by the laser ablation of a Ta rod, isomeric clusters, TanNm(+), having heat resistivity were formed. For Rh6(+), N2 adsorbed molecularly at 300 K and desorbed totally at 450 K. These results were consistent with the DFT calculations, indicating that the dissociative adsorption of N2 is endothermic. PMID:27276438

  14. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; de Boer; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controller design. The reduced structural model is combined with an acoustic model which uses the radiation mode concept. For a test case consisting of a rectangular plate with one piezo patch the model re...

  15. Acoustic, mechanical and microstructural properties of extruded crisp bread

    OpenAIRE

    Gondek, Ewa; Jakubczyk, Ewa; Herremans, Els; Verlinden, Bert; Hertog, Maarten; Vandendriessche, Thomas; Verboven, Pieter; Antoniuk, Aleksandra; Bongaers, Evi; Estrade, Pascal; Nicolaï, Bart M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the texture and structure of crisp bread obtained with different extrusion parameters. The texture of different crisp bread samples was evaluated using a combination of acoustic and mechanical tests. The advantage of this measurement setup is the feasibility of simultaneous registering of the forceedeformation characteristics, sounds (using an acoustic envelope detector coupled to the texture analyser with a microphone) as well as mechanical vi...

  16. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  17. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  18. Thermal desorption analysis of beryllium tile pieces from JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieces of beryllium tile exposed to a D-D plasma in JET have been studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy. These tiles have a thick layer of redeposited Be-C-O with considerable hydrogen and deuterium present. The samples were heated at a constant rate of 2 C/min. from 100 C to 900 C. Desorption peaks occurred in the range of 140-480 C. There was no significant desorption at temperatures above 600 C. The amount of deuterium detected varied from a low of 8 x 1021/m2 to a high of 2.1 x 1023/m2. In one case, the amount of deuterium in a tile piece was seven times greater than the amount in a neighboring tile piece. Some of the tile pieces in the plasma-exposed region showed surface melting. Despite this, the deuterium yield from one of these pices is >1023/m2. (orig.)

  19. Desorption Mass Spectrometry for Nonvolatile Compounds Using an Ultrasonic Cutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Ahsan; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Chen, Lee Chuin; Usmanov, Dilshadbek T.; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    In this work, desorption of nonvolatile analytes induced by friction was studied. The nonvolatile compounds deposited on the perfluoroalkoxy substrate were gently touched by an ultrasonic cutter oscillating with a frequency of 40 kHz. The desorbed molecules were ionized by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ion source. Efficient desorption of samples such as drugs, pharmaceuticals, amino acids, and explosives was observed. The limits of detection for these compounds were about 1 ng. Many compounds were detected in their protonated forms without undergoing significant fragmentation. When the DBD was off, no ions for the neutral samples could be detected, meaning that only desorption along with little ionization took place by the present technique.

  20. Femtosecond laser pulse induced desorption: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lončarić, Ivor; Alducin, Maite; Saalfrank, Peter; Juaristi, J. Iñaki

    2016-09-01

    In recent simulations of femtosecond laser induced desorption of molecular oxygen from the Ag(110) surface, it has been shown that depending on the properties (depth and electronic environment) of the well in which O2 is adsorbed, the desorption can be either induced dominantly by hot electrons or via excitations of phonons. In this work we explore whether the ratios between the desorption yields from different adsorption wells can be tuned by changing initial surface temperature and laser pulse properties. We show that the initial surface temperature is an important parameter, and that by using low initial surface temperatures the electronically mediated process can be favored. In contrast, laser properties seem to have only a modest influence on the results.

  1. A study of the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Amorim

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the process of desorption of hexavalent chromium, a toxic metal ion, from the marine algae Sargassum sp, following biosorption experiments 2³ factorial design was studied. A technique was applied to three eluents: HCl, H2SO4 and EDTA. Three factors of importance were evaluated: concentration of eluent, the ratio between mass of biosorbent and volume of eluent (S/L and process time. A statistical analysis of the experimental results showed that the three variables evaluated are significant for all three eluents. The models for chromium desorption were validated, as the results agreed well with the observed values. Through use of the response surface methodology, a factorial design based optimization technique; it was possible to identify the most suitable eluent and the interval of values for the process variables that resulted in the most significant desorption of chromium, which is relevant information for work aiming at process optimization.

  2. Desorption Dynamics, Internal Energies and Imaging of Organic Molecules from Surfaces with Laser Desorption and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostko, Oleg; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2011-04-05

    There is enormous interest in visualizing the chemical composition of organic material that comprises our world. A convenient method to obtain molecular information with high spatial resolution is imaging mass spectrometry. However, the internal energy deposited within molecules upon transfer to the gas phase from a surface can lead to increased fragmentation and to complications in analysis of mass spectra. Here it is shown that in laser desorption with postionization by tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, the internal energy gained during laser desorption leads to minimal fragmentation of DNA bases. The internal temperature of laser-desorbed triacontane molecules approaches 670 K, whereas the internal temperature of thymine is 800 K. A synchrotron-based VUV postionization technique for determining translational temperatures reveals that biomolecules have translational temperatures in the range of 216-346 K. The observed low translational temperatures, as well as their decrease with increased desorption laser power is explained by collisional cooling. An example of imaging mass spectrometry on an organic polymer, using laser desorption VUV postionization shows 5 mu m feature details while using a 30 mu m laser spot size and 7 ns duration. Applications of laser desorption postionization to the analysis of cellulose, lignin and humic acids are briefly discussed.

  3. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... acoustic design process and to set up a strategy to develop future programmes. The emphasis is put on the first three out of four phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference...

  4. Optimal Redshift Weighting For Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Fangzhou; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Future baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) surveys will survey very large volumes, covering wide ranges in redshift. We derive a set of redshift weights to compress the information in the redshift direction to a small number of modes. We suggest that such a compression preserves almost all of the signal for most cosmologies, while giving high signal-to-noise measurements for each combination. We present some toy models and simple worked examples. As an intermediate step, we give a precise meani...

  5. Disability evaluation in acoustic blast trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan Raju

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acoustic blast trauma is different from Noise induced hearing loss. Blast trauma can damage the tympanic membrane, ossicles and cochlea singly or in combination. It produces immediate severe hearing loss and may be associated with tinnitus and vestibular symptoms. Hearing loss recovers spontaneously in many cases but may be permanent in 30-55% cases. Thirteen patients working in an explosive manufacturing unit in Andhra Pradesh were exposed to blast trauma at work place. All the...

  6. The study of underwater acoustic communication technology based-on the acoustic vector sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Gang; SANG Enfang

    2007-01-01

    Underwater acoustic (UWA) communication based on an acoustic vector sensor is studied. The method of joint weighted sound pressure and velocity processing is used in phase modulation high-speed UWA communication system combined with coherent demodulation and adaptive equalization algorithm to demodulate and decode. Whereas the sound intensity could be used instead of pressure for frequency decoding in frequency modulation UWA communication system. The results of theory analysis, simulation calculations and lake trials have shown that either in phase modulation or in frequency modulation UWA communication system, the processing gain can be evidently increased, so that the BER (bit error rate) can be effectively reduced and the telemetry distance can be enlarged by using the acoustic vector sensor.

  7. Heavy-Ion-Induced Electronic Desorption of Gas from Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Molvik, A W; Mahner, E; Kireeff Covo, M; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Krämer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2007-01-01

    During heavy-ion operation in several particle accelerators worldwide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion-induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dEe/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  8. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus;

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic concentrat......The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  9. Heavy-ion induced electronic desorption of gas from metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molvik, A W; Kollmus, H; Mahner, E; Covo, M K; Bellachioma, M C; Bender, M; Bieniosek, F M; Hedlund, E; Kramer, A; Kwan, J; Malyshev, O B; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Westenskow, G; Westerberg, L

    2006-12-19

    During heavy ion operation in several particle accelerators world-wide, dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were triggered by lost beam ions that bombarded the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced molecular desorption, observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion beam lifetime and intensity of the accelerator. From dedicated test stand experiments we have discovered that heavy-ion induced gas desorption scales with the electronic energy loss (dE{sub e}/d/dx) of the ions slowing down in matter; but it varies only little with the ion impact angle, unlike electronic sputtering.

  10. Kinetics of desorption of iodine from borehole waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetics of mass transfer during iodine desorption by air from water-salt systems and borehole waters of different composition has been studied. With an aid of laboratory installation with film column and sprinkled walls the region of the process procedure in a wide range of phases, concentrations (aqueous iodine solution, sodium chloride solution) and temperatures is determined. Calculation and experimental values of kinetic parameters are obtained. It follows from the data analysis that the process of iodine desorption is complicated by reversible reaction of complexing, its rate being higher than the rate of mass transfer

  11. Overview literature on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS): basics and its applications in characterizing polymeric materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Jagtap; A H Ambre

    2005-10-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS) is a technique which allows the measurement of molecular mass > 200,000 Daltons by ionization and vapourization without degradation. This technique is useful for the mass analysis of synthetic polymers, which have very low volatility. The basic principles of and its applications for polymer characterization have been discussed in this paper. In addition, the possibilities of combining MALDI MS with chromatographic and other analytical techniques have also been discussed.

  12. Underwater Acoustic Networking Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Otnes, Roald; Casari, Paolo; Goetz, Michael; Husøy, Thor; Nissen, Ivor; Rimstad, Knut; van Walree, Paul; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This literature study presents an overview of underwater acoustic networking. It provides a background and describes the state of the art of all networking facets that are relevant for underwater applications. This report serves both as an introduction to the subject and as a summary of existing protocols, providing support and inspiration for the development of network architectures.

  13. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  14. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...

  15. Portable acoustic myography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bartels, Else Marie

    2013-01-01

    Muscle sound gives a local picture of muscles involved in a particular movement and is independent of electrical signals between nerve and muscle. Sound recording (acoustic myography) is a well-known noninvasive technique that has suffered from not being easily applicable, as well as not being ab...

  16. Holograms for acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  17. 声谐振组合频率调制电路的优化与设计%Circuit design and optimization of combined frequency modulation for acoustic resonance suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德春; 郭颖娜; 程为彬; 田丰

    2013-01-01

    High intensity discharge lamp will bring out acoustic resonance phenomenon at a particular frequency with enough energy. Frequency modulation circuit model with parameter perturbation was established and perturbation modulation of mixed frequency was analyzed in this paper. Circuit parameters were optimized by PWM integrated chip and output ripple voltage of full-wave rectifier to reduce the amplitude of each frequency component and incentive energy. Nonlinear change of modulation frequency prevented ion sound waves from producing standing wave at the fixed frequency point, so as to suppress acoustic resonance. The effectiveness and feasibility of designing circuit model were validated by using simulation analysis both in time domain and frequency domain with Saber software.%针对高强度气体放电灯在特定频率和足够的能量时会产生声谐振现象,建立参数扰动频率调制电路模型,并对组合频率扰动调制进行分析,利用PWM集成芯片和全波整流输出脉动电压,优化设计参数,以减小各频率分量的振幅,降低激励能量;同时使得调制频率非线性变化,防止离子声波在固定频率点上产生驻波,从而达到抑制声谐振目的.应用Saber软件进行时域和频域仿真分析,验证设计电路模型的有效性和可行性.

  18. Nondestructive imaging of shallow buried objects using acoustic computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Waheed A; Stergiopoulos, Stergios; Havelock, David; Grodski, Julius

    2002-05-01

    The nondestructive three-dimensional acoustic tomography concept of the present investigation combines computerized tomography image reconstruction algorithms using acoustic diffracting waves together with depth information to produce a three-dimensional (3D) image of an underground section. The approach illuminates the underground area of interest with acoustic plane waves of frequencies 200-3000 Hz. For each transmitted pulse, the reflected-refracted signals are received by a line array of acoustic sensors located at a diametrically opposite point from the acoustic source line array. For a stratified underground medium and for a given depth, which is represented by a time delay in the received signal, a horizontal tomographic 2D image is reconstructed from the received projections. Integration of the depth dependent sequence of cross-sectional reconstructed images provides a complete three-dimensional overview of the inspected terrain. The method has been tested with an experimental system that consists of a line array of four-acoustic sources, providing plane waves, and a receiving line array of 32-acoustic sensors. The results indicate both the potential and the challenges facing the new methodology. Suggestions are made for improved performance, including an adaptive noise cancellation scheme and a numerical interpolation technique.

  19. Universal characteristic function of an adsorption-desorption process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Chunshan(何春山); FANG; Hai(方海); LI; Zhibing(李志兵)

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic function of the initial order for the adsorption-desorption process is obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The universality of the generalized scaling relation is confirmed by use of the sequential and synchronous dynamic rules. In the off-critical regime, we observe a "finger-print effect"of the initial state.

  20. Nitrate sorption and desorption in biochars from fast pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing the nitrate (NO3-) sorption capacity of Midwestern US soils has the potential to reduce nitrate leaching to ground water and reduce the extent of the hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico. The objective of this study was to determine the sorption and desorption capacity of non-activated and ...

  1. Equilibrium adsorption data from temperature-programmed desorption experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foeth, Frank; Mugge, José; Vaart, van der Rick; Bosch, Hans; Reith, Tom

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a novel method that enables the calculation of a series of adsorption isotherms basically from a single Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiment. The basic idea is to saturate an adsorbent packed in a fixed bed at a certain feed concentration and temperature and to subs

  2. Thermal Desorption of Helium Implanted in Tungsten at RT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGFu; XUZengyu; LIUXiang; CHENJiming; XUYing; N.Yoshida; H.Iwakiri

    2002-01-01

    Tungsten is envisaged as one of the main candidate materials for divertor plate of ITER and future fusion reactors. Due to D-T reaction, PFMs would suffer helium irradiation from plasma additional to the high heat loads. Helium retention and thermal desorption behavior are largely concerned.

  3. Influence of surface coverage on the chemical desorption process

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Minissale

    2014-01-01

    In cold astrophysical environments, some molecules are observed in the gas phase whereas they should have been depleted, frozen on dust grains. In order to solve this problem, astrochemists have proposed that a fraction of molecules synthesized on the surface of dust grains could desorb just after their formation. Recently the chemical desorption process has been demonstrated experimentally, but the key parameters at play have not yet been fully understood. In this article we propose a new procedure to analyze the ratio of di-oxygen and ozone synthesized after O atoms adsorption on oxidized graphite. We demonstrate that the chemical desorption efficiency of the two reaction paths (O+O and O+O$_2$) is different by one order of magnitude. We show the importance of the surface coverage: for the O+O reaction, the chemical desorption efficiency is close to 80 $\\%$ at zero coverage and tends to zero at one monolayer coverage. The coverage dependence of O+O chemical desorption is proved by varying the amount of pre-...

  4. Quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, Mark W.; Roder, Heinrich; Hunsucker, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes the essential characteristics of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), especially as they relate to its applications in quantitative analysis. Approaches to quantification by MALDI-TOF MS are presented and published applications are critically reviewed.

  5. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam degradates in several agricultural soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gonçalves Alonso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Processes regulating pesticide fate in the environment are influenced by the physicochemical properties of pesticides and soils. Sorption and desorption are important processes as they regulate the movement of pesticides in soil. Although sorption-desorption is widely studied for herbicides, studies involving their metabolites in soil are scarce. Sorption and desorption of indaziflam metabolites (indaziflam-triazinediamine (FDAT, indaziflam-triazine-indanone (ITI and indaziflam-carboxilic acid (ICA were investigated in six Brazilian (BRA soils and three United States (USA soils with different physicochemical properties. The Freundlich equation described sorption of the metabolites for all soils (R2 > 0.98; 1/n ~ 1. Sorption order (Kf was ITI > ICA > FDAT. Mean values of Kf,oc were 453, 289, and 81 (BRA and 444, 48, and 48 (USA for metabolites ITI, ICA, and FDAT respectively. Desorption was hysteretic for all metabolites in all soils. These results suggest that these metabolites fall in the classification range of mobile to moderately mobile in soils.

  6. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  7. Organic contaminants in soil, desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the soil matri

  8. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  9. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was evaluated for the detection of proteins ranging in molecular mass from 12 to 66 kDa. Proteins were uniformly deposited on a solid surface without pretreatment and analyzed with a DESI source coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spec...

  10. Synthesis and Hydrogen Desorption Properties of Aluminum Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Wanseop; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Jaeyong

    2016-03-01

    Aluminum hydride (AlH3 or alane) is known to store maximum 10.1 wt.% of hydrogen at relatively low temperature (hydrogen desorption are still not clear. To understand the desorption properties of hydrogen in alane, thermodynamically stable α-AlH3 was synthesized by employing an ethereal reaction method. The dependence of pathways on phase formation and the properties of hydrogen evolution were investigated, and the results were compared with the ones for γ-AlH3. It was found that γ-AlH3 requires 10 degrees C higher than that of γ-AlH3 to form, and its decomposition rate demonstrated enhanced endothermic stabilities. For desorption, all hydrogen atoms of alane evolved under an isothermal condition at 138 degrees C in less than 1 hour, and the sample completely transformed to pure aluminum. Our results show that the total amount of desorbed hydrogen from α-AlH3 exceeded 9.05 wt.%, with a possibility of further increase. Easy synthesis, thermal stability, and a large amount of hydrogen desorption of alane fulfill the requirements for light-weight hydrogen storage materials once the pathway of hydrogen cycling is provided.

  11. Effects of He, D interaction on thermal desorption of He and D2 and microstructural evolution in pure Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Zhang, J.

    2016-10-01

    He and H atoms are produced in (n, α) and (n, p) nuclear reactions. In fusion reactors, energetic T and D, being isotopes of H, and He particles damage the surface materials. To investigate the He-D interaction, Fe, which is a model metal of choice in ferritic stainless steel that is used in fusion reactors, was irradiated separately by He or D2 ions and by combinations of He + D2 or D2 + He ions with the energy of 5 keV. The dose for single-species irradiation and each step of double-species irradiation was 1.0 × 1020 ions/m2. Thermal desorption analysis indicates that, in the case of single ion species irradiation, thermal desorption of D occurs at temperatures below 700 K, while the main thermal desorption of He occurs at 750 K and above 1200 K. The binding energy of He and defects is higher than that of D and defects. In the case of irradiation with combinations of ions species, however, the obtained thermal desorption spectra are the same, although the peak intensities are different, suggesting that the He-D interaction is weak. The sorption of D is more predominant for irradiations with He + D2. On the microstructure level, the irradiated samples exhibited larger voids following combined irradiations compared with those for irradiation with a single ion species after annealing to 1323 K. During the He + D2 irradiation, D atoms are effectively trapped owing to the defects induced by pre-irradiation with He.

  12. A study of tailoring acoustic porous material properties when designing lightweight multilayered vehicle panels

    OpenAIRE

    Lind Nordgren, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    The present work explores the possibilities of adapting poro-elastic lightweight acoustic materials to specific applications. More explicitly, a design approach is presented where finite element based numerical simulations are combined with optimization techniques to improve the dynamic and acoustic properties of lightweight multilayered panels containing poro-elastic acoustic materials. The numerical models are based on Biot theory which uses equivalent fluid/solid models with macroscopic sp...

  13. Multilingual Deep Neural Network based Acoustic Modeling For Rapid Language Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Ngoc Thang; Imseng, David; Povey, Daniel; Motlicek, Petr; Schultz, Tanja; Bourlard, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study on multilingual deep neural network (DNN) based acoustic modeling and its application to new languages. We investigate the effect of phone merging on multilingual DNN in context of rapid language adaptation. Moreover, the combination of multilingual DNNs with Kullback--Leibler divergence based acoustic modeling (KL-HMM) is explored. Using ten different languages from the Globalphone database, our studies reveal that crosslingual acoustic model transfer through mul...

  14. Hierarchical finite element modelling of Biot's equations for vibro-acoustic modelling of layered poroelastic media

    OpenAIRE

    Hörlin, Nils-Erik

    2004-01-01

    This thesis concerns three-dimensional finite element modelling of Biot's equations for elasto-acoustic modelling of wave propagation in layered media including porous elastic materials. The concept of hierarchical (p-version) finite elements are combined with various weak forms of Biot's equations. Computationally efficient methods providing accurate solutions of sound propagation in layered porous media are discussed. The research falls within the areas linear acoustics and numerical acoust...

  15. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460 °C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51 ± 3 and 87 ± 5 kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475 °C and E{sub d} of 110 ± 5 kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585 °C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62 ± 3 and 270 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited

  16. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P. A.; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose; Larsen, K.;

    2008-01-01

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied to ...

  17. Solid-phase extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography with mass selective detection for the determination of drugs in urine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, MWJ; de Zeeuw, RA; Franke, JP; de Jong, GJ

    2003-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was combined with thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis to determine drugs in urine. The extraction was performed inside a fritted GC liner using about 5 mg TENAX that was inserted into the liner on top of the frit. After extraction, the liner was

  18. Natural products in Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) rhizome imaged at the cellular level by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Bhandari, Dhaka Ram; Janfelt, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    The rhizome of Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) was analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging and tandem mass spectrometry imaging. An atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging ion source was combined with an orbital trapping mass spectrometer in order...

  19. High-throughput analysis of drugs in biological fluids by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with thin liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosting, Cecilie; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Hansen, Steen Honore';

    2013-01-01

    Biological fluids such as urine, saliva and whole blood were analyzed for contents of drugs by a new combination of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and thin liquid membrane extraction (TLME). Analytes from the sample were extracted into a thin liquid membrane...

  20. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  1. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  2. An effective absorbing boundary algorithm for acoustical wave propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, Berenger's perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition for electromagnetic waves is introduced as the truncation area of the computational domain to absorb one-dimensional acoustic wave for the scheme of acoustical wave propagator (AWP). To guarantee the efficiency of the AWP algorithm, a regulated propagator matrix is derived in the PML medium.Numerical simulations of a Gaussian wave packet propagating in one-dimensional duct are carried out to illustraze the efficiency of the combination of PML and AWP. Compared with the traditional smoothing truncation windows technique of AWP, this scheme shows high computational accuracy in absorbing acoustic wave when the acoustical wave arrives at the computational edges. Optimal coefficients of the PML configurations are also discussed.

  3. Acoustic dipole radiation model for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yi-Ling; Ma Qing-Yu; Zhang Dong; Xia Rong-Min

    2011-01-01

    An acoustic dipole radiation model for magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction(MAT-MI)is proposed,based on the analyses of one-dimensional tissue vibration,three-dimensional acoustic dipole radiation and acoustic waveform detection with a planar piston transducer.The collected waveforms provide information about the conductivity boundaries in various vibration intensities and phases due to the acoustic dipole radiation pattern.Combined with the simplified back projection algorithm,the conductivity configuration of the measured layer in terms of shape and size can be reconstructed with obvious border stripes.The numerical simulation is performed for a two-layer cylindrical phantom model and it is also verified by the experimental results of MAT-MI for a tissue-like sample phantom.The proposed model suggests a potential application of conductivity differentiation and provides a universal basis for the further study of conductivity reconstruction for MAT-MI.

  4. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  5. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  6. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  7. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.C.; Labonte, B.J.; Duvall, T.L. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity. 10 references.

  8. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  9. The acoustics of snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  10. Acoustic and adsorption properties of submerged wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilde, Calvin Patrick

    Wood is a common material for the manufacture of many products. Submerged wood, in particular, is used in niche markets, such as the creation of musical instruments. An initial study performed on submerged wood from Ootsa Lake, British Columbia, provided results that showed that the wood was not suitable for musical instruments. This thesis re-examined the submerged wood samples. After allowing the wood to age unabated in a laboratory setting, the wood was retested under the hypothesis that the physical acoustic characteristics would improve. It was shown, however, that the acoustic properties became less adequate after being left to sit. The adsorption properties of the submerged wood were examined to show that the submerged wood had a larger accessible area of wood than that of control wood samples. This implied a lower amount of crystalline area within the submerged wood. From the combined adsorption and acoustic data for the submerged wood, relationships between the moisture content and speed of sound were created and combined with previous research to create a proposed model to describe how the speed of sound varies with temperature, moisture content and the moisture content corresponding to complete hydration of sorption sites within the wood.

  11. Liquid Beam Ion Desorption Mass Spectrometry for Evaluating CASSINI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ferdinand; Reviol, Rene; Srama, Ralf; Trieloff, Mario; Postberg, Frank; Abel, Bernd

    2013-04-01

    Saturn's moon Enceladus emits plumes of ice particles from an area near its south pole which are detected and chemically analyzed by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) on board the CASSINI spacecraft. Studying these ice particles provides unique insights into Enceladus geological properties. Technically the CDA is a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which delivers mass spectra of the particles and their fragments. Since interpretation of the available CDA data is particularly challenging we employ a laboratory experiment to imitate experimental conditions in space. Key part of our experimental setup is a micron-sized water beam in high vacuum. This beam is rapidly heated up by an infrared laser pulse, which is tuned to excite the OH-stretch vibration of water molecules. This causes the water beam to dissipate into small droplets, some of which carry a net charge even though the laser energy is well below the molecular ionisation energy. The charged droplets are then analyzed in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. With this experimental setup we successfully simulated the space born ice particles measured at Enceladus. By varying the laser intensity in our experiments, we can vary the amount of energy deposited in the liquid beam, and thus model different particle velocities. Also, variation of solute concentration in the water beam provides valuable information about ice particle composition. Some examples for anorganic solutes studied so far are sodium chloride, ammonia and hydrogen sulfite. A special feature of our experimental technique is that desorption of particles from the liquid beam is particularly soft. This is explained by the fact that all laser energy is absorbed by the water molecules. In this way molecular bonds of solutes stay intact and molecular solutes are transferred into the droplet phase without getting destroyed. This is particularly interesting in the context of analyzing organic compounds - some of which have been detected at Enceladus. Using

  12. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  13. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  14. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, I: Analysis technique and parameter matrices of acoustic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    This paper describes the mathematical formulation, equations, and procedures employed in the development of a comprehensive digital computer program for acoustic simulation and analysis of large and complicated piping systems. The analysis technique used is the transfer matrix method in which the piping system, with or without multiple inputs and outputs, is represented by a combination of discrete acoustic elements interconnected to one another at two stations such that the acoustic pressure and volume velocity at one station are uniquely related to those at the other by a two-by-two parameter matrix. Parameter matrices of 19 acoustic elements are included in this paper. By making use of these parameter matrices and the analysis technique, any complicated practical reciprocating compressor piping system can be modelled or analyzed.

  15. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  16. Latest Trends in Acoustic Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics-based methods offer a powerful tool for sensing applications. Acoustic sensors can be applied in many fields ranging from materials characterization, structural health monitoring, acoustic imaging, defect characterization, etc., to name just a few. A proper selection of the acoustic wave frequency over a wide spectrum that extends from infrasound (<20 Hz up to ultrasound (in the GHz–band, together with a number of different propagating modes, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves, surface waves, plate modes, etc., allow acoustic tools to be successfully applied to the characterization of gaseous, solid and liquid environments. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the research trends in acoustic wave sensing through some cases that are representative of specific applications in different sensing fields.

  17. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  18. Nanostructured silicon surface modifications for as a selective matrix-free laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C W; Lin, C H; Cheng, Y C; Chien, C C; Chang, C C; Chen, W Y

    2012-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry is an established soft ionization method that is widely applied to analyze biomolecules. The UV-absorbing organic matrix is essential for biomolecule ionization; however, it also creates matrix background interference, which results in problematic analyses of biomolecules of less than 700 Da. Therefore, this study investigates hydrophilic, hydrophobic cationic, anionic and immobilized metal ion surface chemical modifications to advance nanostructured silicon mass spectrometry performance (nSi-MS). This investigation provides information required for a possible novel mass spectroscopy that combines surface-enhanced and nanostructured silicon surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for the selective detection of specific compounds of a mixture. PMID:22531330

  19. Acoustical coupling of lizard eardrums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Manley, Geoffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Lizard ears are clear examples of two-input pressure-difference receivers, with up to 40-dB differences in eardrum vibration amplitude in response to ipsi- and contralateral stimulus directions. The directionality is created by acoustical coupling of the eardrums and interaction of the direct...... is caused by the acoustic interaction of the two eardrums. The results can be largely explained by a simple acoustical model based on an electrical analog circuit....

  20. Room acoustic auralization with Ambisonics

    OpenAIRE

    Polack, Jean-Dominique; Leão Figueiredo, Fábio

    2012-01-01

    International audience During the year of 2009, the room acoustics group of the LAM (Équipe Lutheries, Acoustique, Musique de l’Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris) performed a series of acoustical measurements in music halls in Paris. The halls were chosen in regarding their importance to the historic, architectural or acoustic domains. The measured ensemble of fourteen rooms includes quite different architectural designs. The measurements were carri...

  1. Terahertz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz DES) – ‘ALMA in the Lab’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile Auriacombe, Olivier Bruno Jacques; Fraser, Helen; Ellison, Brian; Ioppolo, Sergio; Rea, Simon

    2016-06-01

    ALMA is revolutionising our scope to identify and locate molecules that have been desorbed from ices, particularly complex organic molecules (COMS), which provide a vital link between interstellar and prebiotic chemistry. Explaining the existence of these molecules in star-forming regions relies on an empirical understanding of the chemistry that underpins their formation:- do COMS form predominantly in the solid-phase and then desorb to the gas phase, or do only “smaller” species, radials or ions desorb and then undergo gas-phase chemical reactions to generate larger COMS?-are the rotational state populations in COMS only attributable to equilibrium chemistry, or could their formation mechanisms and desorption processes affect the rotational state occupancy of these molecules, thereby directly tying certain species to solid-state origins?We have developed a novel laboratory method - THz Desorption Emission Spectroscopy (THz-DES) that combines “traditional” laboratory astrophysics high-vacuum ice experiments with a sensitive high-spectral-resolution terahertz total-power heterodyne radiometer 1,2, partially mirroring the spectral range of ALMA band 7 (275– 373 GHz). Ices are grown in situ on a cold-plate, situated in a vacuum cell, then (thermally) desorbed. The sub-mm emission spectra of the resultant gas-phase molecules are detected as a function of time, temperature, or distance from the surface. Our first THz DES results will be shown for pure and binary ice systems including H2O, N2O and CH3OH. They show good correlation with established methods e.g. TPD, with the advantage of exploiting the molecular spectroscopy to unravel surface dynamics, state-occupancy, and unequivocal molecular identification, as well as concurrently measuring desorption barriers and molecular yields. We will extend our technique to a broader frequency range, enabling us to detect radical and ion desorption, to differentiate between A and E populations of CH3OH or ortho

  2. Rate Parameter Distributions for Isobutane Dehydrogenation and Isobutene Dimerization and Desorption over HZSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor C. Brown

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Deconvolution of the evolved isobutene data obtained from temperature-programmed, low-pressure steady-state conversion of isobutane over HZSM-5 has yielded apparent activation energies for isobutane dehydrogenation, isobutene dimerization and desorption. Intrinsic activation energies and associated isobutane collision frequencies are also estimated. A combination of wavelet shrinkage denoising, followed by time-varying flexible least squares of the evolved mass-spectral abundance data over the temperature range 150 to 450 °C, provides accurate, temperature-dependent, apparent rate parameters. Intrinsic activation energies for isobutane dehydrogenation range from 86 to 235.2 kJ mol−1 (average = 150 ± 42 kJ mol−1 for isobutene dimerization from 48.3 to 267 kJ mol−1 (average = 112 ± 74 kJ mol−1 and for isobutene desorption from 64.4 to 97.8 kJ mol−1 (average = 77 ± 12 kJ mol−1. These wide ranges reflect the heterogeneity and acidity of the zeolite surface and structure. Seven distinct locations and sites, including Lewis and Brønsted acid sites can be identified in the profiles. Isobutane collision frequencies range from 10−0.4 to 1022.2 s−1 and are proportional to the accessibility of active sites, within the HZSM-5 micropores or on the external surface.

  3. Cleaning of GaN(anti 2110) surfaces by Ga deposition and desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhr, Simon; Schulz, Christian; Aschenbrenner, Timo; Flege, Jan Ingo; Schmidt, Thomas; Hommel, Detlef; Falta, Jens [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Cleanliness of substrates is a key issue in fabrication of optoelectronic devices since impurities sensitively affect atomic structure, electronic properties and reactivity of the surfaces being the basis of semiconductor devices. One promising cleaning technique concerning especially the removal of oxygen and carbon on polar GaN(0001) surfaces is the deposition of several monolayers of metallic gallium followed by thermal desorption (Schulz et al., pss (c), 6 (2009)). We present first results of the application of this technique to non-polar GaN(anti 2110) surfaces heteroepitaxially grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The cleaning process has been monitored by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements in order to perform a quantitative analysis of the reduction of contaminations and of the surface stoichiometry. In the course of investigation we have developed a cleaning cycle combining thermal degassing and Ga deposition/desorption steps leading to an effective reduction of the contaminants oxygen and carbon. In addition, the impact of the cleaning method on atomic structure and surface roughness has been investigated by low-energy electron diffraction as well as scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  4. Direct protein detection from biological media through electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Hsu, Hsiu-Jung; Lee, Jen-Yih; Jeng, Jingyueh; Shiea, Jentaie

    2006-05-01

    We report here using a novel technology-electrospray-assisted laser desorption ionization (ELDI)/mass spectrometry-for the rapid and sensitive detection of the major proteins that exist in dried biological fluids (e.g., blood, tears, saliva, serum), bacterial cultures, and tissues (e.g., porcine liver and heart) under ambient conditions. This technique required essentially no sample pretreatment. The proteins in the samples were desorbed using a pulsed nitrogen laser without the assistance of an organic matrix. The desorbed protein molecules were then post-ionized through their fusion into the charged solvent droplets produced from the electrospray of an acidic methanol solution; electrospray ionization (ESI) proceeded from the newly formed droplets to generate the ESI-like protein ions. This new ionization approach combines some of the features of electrospray ionization with those of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), that is, sampling of a solid surface with spatial resolution, generating ESI-like mass spectra of the desorbed proteins, and operating under ambient conditions. PMID:16674100

  5. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  6. Mixed solid and cystic acoustic neuroma: MR features and differential diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denys, A. [Service de Neuroradiologie-CIERM Hopital de Bicetre, Univ. de Paris Sud, 78, 94 Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Duvoisin, B. [Service de Neuroradiologie-CIERM Hopital de Bicetre, Univ. de Paris Sud, 78, 94 Kremlin-Bicetre (France)]|[Dept. of Radiodiagnosis, University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Fernandes, J.G. [Service de Neuroradiologie-CIERM Hopital de Bicetre, Univ. de Paris Sud, 78, 94 Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Doyon, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie-CIERM Hopital de Bicetre, Univ. de Paris Sud, 78, 94 Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1991-11-01

    We present a very rare case of combined cystic and solid acoustic neuroma investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This case illustrates the value of MRI in the characterization of tumours in the posterior cranial fossa, particularly acoustic neuromas, and its diagnostic impact in unusual situations. The differential diagnosis of cystic and mixed lesions in the cerebellopontine angle is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Photon- and electron-stimulated desorption from laboratory models of interstellar ice grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, J. D.; Abdulgalil, A. G. M.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Burke, D. J.; Brown, W. A.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. J.; Kendall, P.; Mason, N. J.; Jamme, F.; Fraser, H. J.; Rutten, F. J. M. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH 14 4AS (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London W1CH 0AJ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); SOLEIL Synchrotron, BP 48, L' Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif surf Yvette Cedex (France); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of Strathclyde, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow East, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); School of Pharmacy and iEPSAM, Keele University, Keele ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The nonthermal desorption of water from ice films induced by photon and low energy electron irradiation has been studied under conditions mimicking those found in dense interstellar clouds. Water desorption following photon irradiation at 250 nm relies on the presence of an absorbing species within the H{sub 2}O ice, in this case benzene. Desorption cross sections are obtained and used to derive first order rate coefficients for the desorption processes. Kinetic modeling has been used to compare the efficiencies of these desorption mechanisms with others known to be in operation in dense clouds.

  8. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  9. Desorption and ionization processes in laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis results are reported from a study on the desorption- and ionization process initiated by infra-red laser irradiation (LDMS) or ion bombardment (SIMS) of thin organic sample layers. The study is especially focused on the formation of quasimolecular ions under these conditions. Results of these investigations can be used for a better optimization of the LDMS and SIMS techniques in organic mass spectrometry. First, an overview is given of laser desorption mass spectrometry. Next, the coupling of the laser energy into the organic sample layer is investigated. It is concluded that the laser energy is primarily absorbed by the substrate material and not by the organic overlayer. The formation of quasi-molecular ions, either in the gas phase or in the substrate surface is investigated. The final section reports kinetic energy distributions for ions sputtered from organic solids and liquids. (Auth.)

  10. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  11. Dust as interstellar catalyst I. Quantifying the chemical desorption process

    CERN Document Server

    Minissale, M; Cazaux, S; Hocuk, S

    2015-01-01

    Context. The presence of dust in the interstellar medium has profound consequences on the chemical composition of regions where stars are forming. Recent observations show that many species formed onto dust are populating the gas phase, especially in cold environments where UV and CR induced photons do not account for such processes. Aims. The aim of this paper is to understand and quantify the process that releases solid species into the gas phase, the so-called chemical desorption process, so that an explicit formula can be derived that can be included into astrochemical models. Methods. We present a collection of experimental results of more than 10 reactive systems. For each reaction, different substrates such as oxidized graphite and compact amorphous water ice are used. We derive a formula to reproduce the efficiencies of the chemical desorption process, which considers the equipartition of the energy of newly formed products, followed by classical bounce on the surface. In part II we extend these resul...

  12. Absolute rate of thermal desorption from first-principles simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a technique for computing by first-principles simulation the absolute desorption rate γ of adsorbate molecules from a surface for any coverage and temperature. The technique is valid when the thermal equilibration rate on the surface is faster than γ, and is based on an exact expression for γ in terms of the difference of non-configurational chemical potentials of gas-phase and adsorbed molecules. This difference is expressed in terms of a potential of mean force, which is computed by constrained first-principles molecular dynamics. The technique is applied to D2O on the MgO(001) surface at low coverage, using the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange-correlation energy. Comparisons with experimental temperature programmed desorption data allow an assessment of the accuracy of the GGA for the adsorption of D2O on MgO(001). (letter to the editor)

  13. Superior hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior of Mg thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jianglan; Wang, Yuntao; Xie, Lei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Yang; Li, Xingguo

    Pd-capped Mg films prepared by magnetron sputtering achieved complete dehydrogenation in air at room temperature and behaved as favorable gasochromic switchable mirrors. Their cyclic hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics in air were investigated by using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The overall activation energy was 80 kJ mol -1, while the reaction orders controlling desorption were deduced to be n = 2 at 328 K and n = 1 at lower temperatures by analyzing the transmittance data. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient and the corresponding activation energy were calculated by electrochemical measurements. Mg thin films exhibited the smaller activation energy and remarkable diffusion kinetics at room temperature which implied potential applications in smart windows.

  14. Modeling of a Novel Desorption Cycle by Dielectric Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumja, M.; Ng, K. C.; Yap, C.; Yanagi, H.; Koyama, S.; Saha, B. B.; Chakraborty, A.

    The paper presents an adsorption cycle for cooling using the dielectric heating method for the regeneration process. Conventional adsorption (AD) chillers employs thermally driven processes for desorption and adsorption where the thermal resistances are high, resulting in a relatively low chiller COP. In this paper, dielectric heating is used to irradiate where the microwave power vibrates the dipole structure of the molecules. Owing to the direct method of energy delivery, the heating process is thus efficient, contributing to an increase in the chiller performance and the COPs. We present the modeling and simulations of the adsorption-desorption cycle in an AD chiller, demonstrating a significant improvement in chiller performance by as much as three folds.

  15. Thermal desorption of helium from homogeneously implanted graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, P.; Schroeder, H.

    1991-11-01

    Super-fine grain graphite (FGG) and pyrolytic carbon (PYC) of thicknesses around 200 μm were homogeneously implanted at room temperature with α-particles (0.5 MeV ≤ Eα ≤ 22 MeV). Thermal helium desorption spectrometry in the temperature range from 400 to 1900 K can be described by diffusion kinetics with an activation energy of 1.1 eV in FGG and about 0.75 eV in PYC. Desorption during temperature ramping at a constant rate of 0.83 K/s also shows significant differences of the two graphite species. It is found that in FGG and especially in PYC a considerable fraction of the implanted helium is retained even beyond 1000 K. This is in contrast to results reported after low energy implantations to high doses for various graphite species.

  16. Accounting for adsorption and desorption in Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Maximilien; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    We report a Lattice-Boltzmann scheme that accounts for adsorption and desorption in the calculation of mesoscale dynamical properties of tracers in media of arbitrary complexity. Lattice Boltzmann simulations made it possible to solve numerically the coupled Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics and Nernst-Planck equations of electrokinetics in complex, heterogeneous media. Associated to the moment propagation scheme, it became possible to extract the effective diffusion and dispersion coefficients of tracers, or solutes, of any charge, e.g. in porous media. Nevertheless, the dynamical properties of tracers depend on the tracer-surface affinity, which is not purely electrostatic, but also includes a species-specific contribution. In order to capture this important feature, we introduce specific adsorption and desorption processes in a Lattice-Boltzmann scheme through a modified moment propagation algorithm, in which tracers may adsorb and desorb from surfaces through kinetic reaction rates. The method is ...

  17. Normal mode acoustic intensity flux in Pekeris waveguide and its cross spectra signal processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI Junying; SUN Guocang; ZHAO Anbang

    2009-01-01

    The layered media normal mode theory has been well established in the middle of the last century, but few attentions have been paid to the particle velocity field. The combined descriptions of the pressure field and particle velocity field in Pekeris waveguide, especially the vertical acoustic intensity flux are proposed in this paper. The result of the study shows that both the horizontal and the vertical acoustic intensity flux have active and reactive component because of the interference between the normal modes. When an acoustic vector sensor is placed appropriately, the reactive component of the vertical acoustic intensity flux in low frequency acoustic field can be used to tell the source's specified depth, although it can't transport energy.Then the reactive component of the vertical acoustic intensity flux is of importance for vector signal processing. The pressure and particle velocity cross spectra signal processing algorithm is proposed to distinguish the targets.

  18. Increasing ion sorption and desorption rates of conductive electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaoli, David William; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Tsouris, Costas; Bourcier, William; Campbell, Robert; Mayes, Richard T

    2014-12-30

    An electrolyte system includes a reactor having a pair of electrodes that may sorb ions from an electrolyte. The electrolyte system also includes at least one power supply in electrical communication with the reactor. The at least one power supply may supply a DC signal and an AC signal to the pair of electrodes during sorption of the ions. In addition, the power supply may supply only the AC signal to the pair of electrodes during desorption of the ions.

  19. Equilibrium adsorption data from temperature-programmed desorption experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Foeth, Frank; Mugge, José; Vaart, van der, A.W.; Bosch, Hans; Reith, Tom

    1996-01-01

    This work describes a novel method that enables the calculation of a series of adsorption isotherms basically from a single Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiment. The basic idea is to saturate an adsorbent packed in a fixed bed at a certain feed concentration and temperature and to subsequently increase its temperature linearly with time, while maintaining a constant feed concentration. We measured TPD response curves for carbon dioxide on activated carbon at different heating ra...

  20. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, A.; Fontaine, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Mogne, T. L.; Nevshupa, R.

    2008-03-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H2 and CH4. During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it was

  1. /sup 252/Cf plasma desorption in ion implanted mica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse); Banifatemi, A.; Della-Negra, S.; Le Beyec, Y. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire)

    1983-05-12

    The potential of heavy-ion stimulated desorption of ions (HISD) for investigating ion implantation effects in insulators is outlined, and a very strong enhancement in HISD of ionized species from ion implanted mica is reported. This enhancement, which generates heavy-ion clusters up to mass approximately equal to 500 AMU, grows around a critical fluence of implanted ions, and originates from two distinct types of radiation damage defects.

  2. A FORTRAN program for modeling methane gas desorption from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V. U.

    Coal has a strong affinity for methane gas, and the process of gas adsorption (or desorption) is modeled customarily by empirical relations between the amount of gas adsorbed (or desorbed) and time. In this paper, a new and unified theory formulated to depict the process and mechanism of methane gas transport in coal is presented. The theory is validated by conventional sorption tests on cylindrical cores, and its description coded in FORTRAN is presented.

  3. Desorption, persistence, and leaching of dibenzofuran in European Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, R.; Real Ojeda, Miguel; Hermosín, M. C.; Cornejo, J.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their heterocyclic analogs (hetero-PAHs) represent the predominant chemical classes in many contaminated soils. Despite the fact that hetero-PAHs are more soluble and hence potentially more mobile and bioavailable than similar nonsubstituted compounds, the existing information about the fate of these compounds in the soil environment is limited. In this article, laboratory experiments were designed to assess the desorption, persistence, and leaching...

  4. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  5. Temperature Effect on Boron Adsorption—Desorption Kinetics in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDUANWEI; SHILEI; 等

    1999-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the properties of boron adsorption-desorption in brown-red soil,yellowbrown soil and calcareous alluvial soil of Hubei Province was investigated with the mobile displacement technique.The experimental data of B adsorption-desorption amounts and reaction time at 25 and 40℃ were fitted by the zero-order,first-order and parabolic diffusion kinetic equations.The adsorption process was in conformity with the parabolic diffusion law at both the temperatures,and the values of rate constant of the parabolic diffusion equation in B adsorption were 0.138,0.124 and 0.105 mg kg-1 min-1/2 at 25℃,and 0.147,0.146and 0.135mg kg-1 min1/2 at 40℃ for the brown-red soil,yellow-brown soil,and calcareous alluvial soil,respectively,The relationship between amount of B desorption and reaction time could be well described by the first-order kinetic equation,and the corresponding values of rate constant were 0.0422,0.0563 and 0.0384min-1 at 25℃,and 0.0408,0.0423 and 0.0401min-1 at 40℃ for the brown-red soil,the yellow-brown soil and the calcareous alluvial soil,respectively.Therefore,the desorption process of B might be related to the amount of B adsorbed in soil,The higher th temperature,the lower the amount of B adsorption of the same soil in the same reaction time,The values of the apparent activation energy of B adsorption in the three soils calculated with the rate constants of parabolic diffusion equation were 3.27,8.44 and 12.99 kJ mol-1,respectively,based on the experimental data of B adsorption amounts and reaction time at and 40℃.

  6. Organic contaminants in soil, desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the soil matrix, remediation of polluted sites may be hampered. In this thesis, sorption kinetics of organic contaminants in soil was investigated with emphasis on the influence of natural organic matter on slow...

  7. Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Julia; Heath, Brandi S.; Roach, Patrick J.; Cazares, Lisa H.; Semmes, O. John

    2012-01-03

    We present the first results showing the ambient imaging of biological samples in their native environment using nanospray desorption ionization (nanoDESI) mass spectrometry. NanoDESI is an ambient pressure ionization technique that enables precise control of ionization of molecules from substrates. We demonstrate highly sensitive and robust analysis of tissue samples with high spatial resolution (<12 {mu}m) without sample preparation, which will be essential for applications in clinical diagnostics, drug discovery, molecular biology, and biochemistry.

  8. Experimental study on desorption of soluble matter as influenced by cations in static water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-sheng XU; Li CHEN; Xiao-xia TONG; Xiao-ping CHEN; Ping-cang ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    With variation of drainage basin environments, desorption of soluble matter has become one of the significant erosion processes in rivers. It has a considerable impact on flow and sediment transport, as well as processes of river bed deformation and landform evolution throughout a watershed. In this study, considering influences on sediment movement, especially on cohesive sediment transport, Ca2+ and H+ were chosen as characteristic ions of soluble matter, and the total desorption quantity of Ca2+ and pH value when the desorption equilibrium is reached were employed as two indexes representing the desorption of soluble matter. By means of an indoor experiment, desorption of soluble matter as influenced by cations in static water was investigated. The results show that the total desorption quantity of soluble matter increases with the initial cation concentration until a maximum desorption quantity value is obtained and maintained. The total desorption quantity of soluble matter depends on properties of the specific cations in static water, and the stronger the affinity is between the cation and sediment surface, the higher the total desorption quantity will be. Finally, a strong approximate linear relationship between desorption quantities for different kinds of soluble matters was obtained, which means that variation of pH values can accurately reflect the desorption results of soluble matter.

  9. Experimental study on desorption of soluble matter as influenced by cations in static water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-sheng XU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With variation of drainage basin environments, desorption of soluble matter has become one of the significant erosion processes in rivers. It has a considerable impact on flow and sediment transport, as well as processes of river bed deformation and landform evolution throughout a watershed. In this study, considering influences on sediment movement, especially on cohesive sediment transport, Ca2+ and H+ were chosen as characteristic ions of soluble matter, and the total desorption quantity of Ca2+ and pH value when the desorption equilibrium is reached were employed as two indexes representing the desorption of soluble matter. By means of an indoor experiment, desorption of soluble matter as influenced by cations in static water was investigated. The results show that the total desorption quantity of soluble matter increases with the initial cation concentration until a maximum desorption quantity value is obtained and maintained. The total desorption quantity of soluble matter depends on properties of the specific cations in static water, and the stronger the affinity is between the cation and sediment surface, the higher the total desorption quantity will be. Finally, a strong approximate linear relationship between desorption quantities for different kinds of soluble matters was obtained, which means that variation of pH values can accurately reflect the desorption results of soluble matter.

  10. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  11. Sorption/desorption reversibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils and carbonaceous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guohui

    2008-07-01

    Understanding sorption/desorption is an important prerequisite for the prediction of fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. During the last two decades, numerous studies have reported hysteresis phenomenon for the interaction of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) with natural organic matter (NOM). It manifests as nonsingular sorption/desorption isotherms or different rates for sorption and desorption, where during desorption a higher affinity of a compound on a given sorbent and a longer time scale for release than for sorption is observed. Other studies showed that some of the reported sorption/desorption hysteresis phenomena are due to experimental artifacts, mainly resulting from non-attainment of sorption equilibrium before desorption experiments, which result in 'pseudo-hysteresis'. Except for the hypothesis of sorbent reconfiguration, clear experimental evidence for the physical or chemical mechanisms proposed to lead to hysteresis is still lacking. In this study, sorption/desorption equilibrium and kinetics of phenanthrene sorption/desorption from two soils and three carbonaceous samples were investigated using both batch and column techniques. The main objective of this work was to monitor hysteresis phenomenon by carefully recovering the solute mass in the system and to compare sorption/desorption equilibria and kinetics thermodynamically. Nonsingular isotherms and higher desorption enthalpies as well as increased activation energies with proceeding desorption are expected if significant hysteresis exists. Sorption-desorption cycles were carried out to compare equilibrium isotherms and associated sorption/desorption enthalpies (AeH, isosteric heats). Instead of the traditional decant-and-refill batch method, the experiments were conducted using a newly designed batch protocol, which enables the determination of sorption/desorption isotherms at different temperatures using a closed batch system. This method additionally allows

  12. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  13. Lecture Notes On Acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book mentions string vibration and wave, one-dimension wave and wave equation, characteristic impedance, governing equation of string, and wave energy from string, wave equation of wave and basic physical quantity like one-dimension wave equation, sound unit, sound intensity and energy, sound movement in a surface of discontinuity with transmission loss of sound by partition, and Snell's law, radiation, scatter and diffraction and sound in closed space with Sabine's theory, sound characteristic of closed space and duct acoustics.

  14. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F. G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org [Chevron, Area 52 Technology – ETC, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  15. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  16. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    CERN Document Server

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  17. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. PMID:25601688

  18. Dicyandiamide Sorption-Desorption Behavior on Soils and Peat Humus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-Jun; WU Zhi-Jie; ZHOU Qi-Xing

    2004-01-01

    The sorption-desorption behavior of dicyandiamide (DCD) is an important chemical process that affects DCD fate and mobility in soils. Therefore, this study quantified DCD sorption-desorption on a phaeozem (Mollisol), a burozem (Alfisol), a soil with organic matter-removed and peat humus using the batch-equilibration procedure, and identified soil properties that influenced DCD sorption. The sorption on peat humus was higher than that on the phaeozem and the burozem, with much lower sorption observed on the soil with organic matter-removed, indicating that soil organic matter was the main carrier of DCD sorption. Due to its amphipathic property the DCD molecule sorption on the phaeozem and the burozem decreased as pH increased from about 2 to 5, but a further increase in pH led to a rise in DCD sorption.The DCD desorption hysteretic effect for peat humus was greater than that for the phaeozem and the burozem using 0.01 mol L-1 CaC12 as the background electrolyte, suggesting that the hydrophobic domains of organic matter may play an important role in DCD sorption.

  19. Rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugang Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate the rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal using a shock tube apparatus. Coal specimens are recovered from Colorado at a depth of 610 m. The coal specimens are saturated with the strong sorbing gas CO2 for a certain period and then the rupture disc is suddenly broken on top of the shock tube to generate a shock wave propagating upwards and a rarefaction wave propagating downwards through the specimen. This rapid decompression and desorption has the potential to cause energetic fragmentation in coal. Three types of behaviors in coal after rapid decompression are found, i.e. degassing without fragmentation, horizontal fragmentation, and vertical fragmentation. We speculate that the characteristics of fracture network (e.g. aperture, spacing, orientation and stiffness and gas desorption play a role in this dynamic event as coal can be considered as a dual porosity, dual permeability, dual stiffness sorbing medium. This study has important implications in understanding energetic failure process in underground coal mines such as coal gas outbursts.

  20. Rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shugang Wang a; Derek Elsworth a; Jishan Liu b

    2015-01-01

    In this study, laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate the rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal using a shock tube apparatus. Coal specimens are recovered from Colorado at a depth of 610 m. The coal specimens are saturated with the strong sorbing gas CO2 for a certain period and then the rupture disc is suddenly broken on top of the shock tube to generate a shock wave propagating upwards and a rarefaction wave propagating downwards through the specimen. This rapid decompression and desorption has the potential to cause energetic fragmentation in coal. Three types of behaviors in coal after rapid decompression are found, i.e. degassing without fragmen-tation, horizontal fragmentation, and vertical fragmentation. We speculate that the characteristics of fracture network (e.g. aperture, spacing, orientation and stiffness) and gas desorption play a role in this dynamic event as coal can be considered as a dual porosity, dual permeability, dual stiffness sorbing medium. This study has important implications in understanding energetic failure process in under-ground coal mines such as coal gas outbursts.

  1. Determination of hydrogen in steel by thermal desorption mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergers, K.; Thomas, I.; Flock, J. [ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG, Duisburg (Germany); Camisao de Souza, E. [Physical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, University of Applied Sciences Mannheim (Germany); Mabho, N. [Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Hydrogen embrittlement has been observed since high-strength steels have been produced in the nineteen thirties 1,2. Several different analytical methods have been developed to quantify the total and diffusible hydrogen in steel, but many aspects of hydrogen determination are still to be explored. Purely quantitative determination of hydrogen is not sufficient to fully characterize the steel regarding its resistance against embrittlement. Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometry (TDMS) allows the investigation of hydrogen absorption and desorption mechanisms to characterize hydrogen traps in different kinds of steel microstructures. This provides valuable information for the development of new materials with a higher resistance against hydrogen embrittlement. Additionally, TDMS allows the quantitative determination of very small concentrations of hydrogen (<0.1 {mu}g/g). Such low detection limits cannot be reached with other methods. Due to time-consuming analysis and a rather complex construction, TDMS is usually not applied for hydrogen determination in German steel mills. The present work describes the development of a thermal desorption spectrometer at ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe AG by adapting a compact quadrupole mass spectrometer to a commercially available hot solid extraction analyzer, which has proven to be a simple and efficient solution for the determination of diffusible hydrogen in steel. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Thermal Desorption of Water-Ice in the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, H J; McCoustra, M R S; Williams, D A; Fraser, Helen J.; Collings, Mark P.; Coustra, Martin R.S. Mc; Williams, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Water (H2O) ice is an important solid constituent of many astrophysical environments. To comprehend the role of such ices in the chemistry and evolution of dense molecular clouds and comets, it is necessary to understand the freeze-out, potential surface reactivity, and desorption mechanisms of such molecular systems. Consequently, there is a real need from within the astronomical modelling community for accurate empirical molecular data pertaining to these processes. Here we give the first results of a laboratory programme to provide such data. Measurements of the thermal desorption of H2O ice, under interstellar conditions, are presented. For ice deposited under conditions that realistically mimic those in a dense molecular cloud, the thermal desorption of thin films (~50 molecular layers) is found to occur with zero order kinetics characterised by a surface binding energy, E_{des}, of 5773 +/- 60 K, and a pre-exponential factor, A, of 10^(30 +/- 2) molecules cm^-2 s^-1. These results imply that, in the den...

  3. New perspectives in vacuum high voltage insulation. II. Gas desorption

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, W T

    1998-01-01

    An examination has been made of gas desorption from unbaked electrodes of copper, niobium, aluminum, and titanium subjected to high voltage in vacuum. It has been shown that the gas is composed of water vapor, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide, the usual components of vacuum outgassing, plus an increased yield of hydrogen and light hydrocarbons. The gas desorption was driven by anode conditioning as the voltage was increased between the electrodes. The gas is often desorbed as microdischarges-pulses of a few to hundreds of microseconds-and less frequently in a more continuous manner without the obvious pulsed structure characteristic of microdischarge activity. The quantity of gas released was equivalent to many monolayers and consisted mostly of neutral molecules with an ionic component of a few percent. A very significant observation was that the gas desorption was more dependent on the total voltage between the electrodes than on the electric field. It was not triggered by field-emitted electrons but oft...

  4. Adsorption and desorption of bivalent metals to hematite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Valerie A; Hu, Jinxuan; Engates, Karen E; Shipley, Heather J

    2012-01-01

    The use of commercially prepared hematite nanoparticles (37.0 nm) was studied as an adsorbent in the removal of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) from aqueous solutions. Single-metal adsorption was studied as a function of metal and adsorbent concentrations, whereas binary metal competition was found to be dependent on the molar ratio between the competing metals. Competitive effects indicated that Pb had strong homogenous affinity to the nanohematite surface, and decreased adsorption of Cd, Cu, and Zn occurred when Pb was present in a binary system. Metal adsorption strength to nanohematite at pH 6.0 increased with metal electronegativity: Pb > Cu > Zn ∼ Cd. Equilibrium modeling revealed that the Langmuir-Freundlich composite isotherm adequately described the adsorption and competitive effects of metals to nanohematite, whereas desorption was best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The desorption of metals from nanohematite was found to be pH dependent, with pH 4.0 > pH 6.0 > pH 8.0, and results showed that greater than 65% desorption was achieved at pH 4.0 within three 24-h cycles for all metals.

  5. Internal friction and gas desorption of {C}/{C} composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, H.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1994-09-01

    {C}/{C} composites are the most promising candidates as high heat flux component materials, where temperature dependence of mechanical properties and gas desorption behavior at elevated temperature are important properties. At the beginning, the newly developed internal friction measurement apparatus, which enables the accurate measurement of dynamic elastic properties up to 1373 K along with the measurement of gas desorption behavior, was used. The materials studied were unidirectional (UD) {C}/{C} composites reinforced with mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers, which were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 1473 to 2773 K which produced a variety of graphitized microstructures. Two-dimensional (2D) {C}/{C} composites reinfored with flat woven fabrics of PAN type carbon fibers were also studied. These materials were heat treated at 1873 K. From the temperature spectrum of internal friction of 2D {C}/{C} composites, these internal friction peaks were detected and were related to gas desorption. Also the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UD {C}/{C} composites, negative and positive dependence of Young's modulus were observed reflecting microstructure changes resulting from the heat treatments.

  6. Desorption of CO and O2 interstellar ice analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Acharyya, K; Fraser, H J; Van Dishoeck, E F; Linnartz, H

    2007-01-01

    Solid O2 has been proposed as a possible reservoir for oxygen in dense clouds through freeze-out processes. The aim of this work is to characterize quantitatively the physical processes that are involved in the desorption kinetics of CO-O2 ices by interpreting laboratory temperature programmed desorption (TPD) data. This information is used to simulate the behavior of CO-O2 ices under astrophysical conditions. The TPD spectra have been recorded under ultra high vacuum conditions for pure, layered and mixed morphologies for different thicknesses, temperatures and mixing ratios. An empirical kinetic model is used to interpret the results and to provide input parameters for astrophysical models. Binding energies are determined for different ice morphologies. Independent of the ice morphology, the desorption of O2 is found to follow 0th-order kinetics. Binding energies and temperature-dependent sticking probabilities for CO-CO, O2-O2 and CO-O2 are determined. O2 is slightly less volatile than CO, with binding ene...

  7. The desorptivity model of bulk soil-water evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    Available models of bulk evaporation from a bare-surfaced soil are difficult to apply to field conditions where evaporation is complicated by two main factors: rate-limiting climatic conditions and redistribution of soil moisture following infiltration. Both factors are included in the "desorptivity model', wherein the evaporation rate during the second stage (the soil-limiting stage) of evaporation is related to the desorptivity parameter, A. Analytical approximations for A are presented. The approximations are independent of the surface soil moisture. However, calculations using the approximations indicate that both soil texture and soil moisture content at depth significantly affect A. Because the moisture content at depth decreases in time during redistribution, it follows that the A parameter also changes with time. Consequently, a method to calculate a representative value of A was developed. When applied to field data, the desorptivity model estimated cumulative evaporation well. The model is easy to calculate, but its usefulness is limited because it requires an independent estimate of the time of transition between the first and second stages of evaporation. The model shows that bulk evaporation after the transition to the second stage is largely independent of climatic conditions.

  8. Acoustic Similarity and Dichotic Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Peter

    1978-01-01

    An experiment tests conjectures that right ear advantage (REA) has an auditory origin in competition or interference between acoustically similar stimuli and that feature-sharing effect (FSE) has its origin in assignment of features of phonetically similar stimuli. No effect on the REA for acoustic similarity, and a clear effect of acoustic…

  9. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  10. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  11. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  13. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  14. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  15. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry. PMID:26871188

  16. Acoustics and Hearing

    CERN Document Server

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  17. Acoustic data transmission method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, A.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a method for transmitting time line data through a drillstring having drill pipe sections connected end-to-end by joints from a first location below the surface of the earth to a second location at or near the surface of the earth, the length and cross-sectional area of the drill pipe sections being different from the length and cross-sectional area of the joints. It comprises generating acoustic data signals having a single frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring; transmitting the data signals through the drillstring from either the first location to the second location or from the second location to the first location during a time period prior to the onset of reflective interference caused by the data signals reflecting from along the length of the drillstring, the time period being equal to or less than the time for the data signals to travel three lengths of the drillstring; stopping the transmission of data signals at the onset of the reflective interference and allowing the acoustic signals to substantially attenuate; and detecting the data signals at the respective first or second location.

  18. Ultrafast adsorption and selective desorption of aqueous aromatic dyes by graphene sheets modified by graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yulong; He, Peng; Ding, Guqiao; Peng, Xinsheng

    2016-06-01

    Graphene modified by graphene quantum dots (GQDs) has been employed to remove toxic organic dyes. An excellent removal capacity (497 mg g‑1) and record-breaking adsorption rate (475 mg g‑1 min‑1 at 20 °C) were demonstrated for Rhodamine B. The enhancement in performance by nearly a factor of three compared to that of graphene was ascribed to the greatly increased accessible surface area of graphene in aqueous solution as well as the increase in surface charges with the modification with GQDs. Besides, this unique adsorption behavior of the modified graphene was expanded to other typical toxic aqueous aromatic dyes such as Evans Blue, Methyl Orange, Malachite Green and Rose Bengal. What is more, a unique desorption behavior of dyes was first observed when employing different solvents, which enabled the GQD-modified graphene to be exploited for selective extraction of dyes and recycling of the adsorbent. The adsorption and desorption mechanism were further investigated. Combining high removal capacity, rapid adsorption kinetics, good recyclability and unique selective desorption, GQD-modified graphene has potential applications in both water purification and separation of aromatic dyes.

  19. Validation and application of Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranya, Sandor; Muste, Marian

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a novel methodology to estimate bedload transport in rivers based on an improved bedform tracking procedure. The measurement technique combines components and processing protocols from two contemporary nonintrusive instruments: acoustic and image-based. The bedform mapping is conducted with acoustic surveys while the estimation of the velocity of the bedforms is obtained with processing techniques pertaining to image-based velocimetry. The technique is therefore called Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The implementation of this technique produces a whole-field velocity map associated with the multi-directional bedform movement. Based on the calculated two-dimensional bedform migration velocity field, the bedload transport estimation is done using the Exner equation. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed to validate the AMV based bedload estimation in a laboratory flume at IIHR-Hydroscience & Engineering (IIHR). The bedform migration was analysed at three different flow discharges. Repeated bed geometry mapping, using a multiple transducer array (MTA), provided acoustic maps, which were post-processed with a particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. Bedload transport rates were calculated along longitudinal sections using the streamwise components of the bedform velocity vectors and the measured bedform heights. The bulk transport rates were compared with the results from concurrent direct physical samplings and acceptable agreement was found. As a first field implementation of the AMV an attempt was made to estimate bedload transport for a section of the Ohio river in the United States, where bed geometry maps, resulted by repeated multibeam echo sounder (MBES) surveys, served as input data. Cross-sectional distributions of bedload transport rates from the AMV based method were compared with the ones obtained from another non-intrusive technique (due to the lack of direct samplings), ISSDOTv2, developed by the US Army

  20. A room acoustical computer model for industrial environments - the model and its verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Foged, Hans Torben

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an extension to the traditional room acoustic modelling methods allowing computer modelling of huge machinery in industrial spaces. The program in question is Odeon 3.0 Industrial and Odeon 3.0 Combined which allows the modelling of point sources, surface sources and line...... sources. Combining these three source types it is possible to model huge machinery in an easy and visually clear way. Traditionally room acoustic simulations have been aimed at auditorium acoustics. The aim of the simulations has been to model the room acoustic measuring setup consisting...... of an omnidirectional sound source and a microphone. This allows the comparison of simulated results with the ones measured in real rooms. However when simulating the acoustic environment in industrial rooms, the sound sources are often far from being point like, as they can be distributed over a large space...

  1. Black phosphorus-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds in biofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Mei; Ding, Jun; Yu, Lei; Hussain, Dilshad; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of small molecules by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been a challenging task due to matrix-derived interferences in low m/z region and poor reproducibility of MS signal response. In this study, we developed an approach by applying black phosphorus (BP) as a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) matrix for the quantitative analysis of small molecules for the first time. Black phosphorus-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (BP/ALDI-MS) showed clear background and exhibited superior detection sensitivity toward quaternary ammonium compounds compared to carbon-based materials. By combining stable isotope labeling (SIL) strategy with BP/ALDI-MS (SIL-BP/ALDI-MS), a variety of analytes labeled with quaternary ammonium group were sensitively detected. Moreover, the isotope-labeled forms of analytes also served as internal standards, which broadened the analyte coverage of BP/ALDI-MS and improved the reproducibility of MS signals. Based on these advantages, a reliable method for quantitative analysis of aldehydes from complex biological samples (saliva, urine, and serum) was successfully established. Good linearities were obtained for five aldehydes in the range of 0.1-20.0 μM with correlation coefficients (R (2)) larger than 0.9928. The LODs were found to be 20 to 100 nM. Reproducibility of the method was obtained with intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 10.4 %, and the recoveries in saliva samples ranged from 91.4 to 117.1 %. Taken together, the proposed SIL-BP/ALDI-MS strategy has proved to be a reliable tool for quantitative analysis of aldehydes from complex samples. Graphical Abstract An approach for the determination of small molecules was developed by using black phosphorus (BP) as a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) matrix.

  2. Whole-body Mass Spectrometry Imaging by Infrared Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization (IR-MALDESI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Milad; Bokhart, Mark T; Muddiman, David C

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization sources for mass spectrometry (MS) have been the subject of much interest in the past decade. Matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (MALDESI) is an example of such methods, where features of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) (e.g., pulsed nature of desorption) and electrospray ionization (ESI) (e.g., soft-ionization) are combined. One of the major advantages of MALDESI is its inherent versatility. In MALDESI experiments, an ultraviolet (UV) or infrared (IR) laser can be used to resonantly excite an endogenous or exogenous matrix. The choice of matrix is not analyte dependent, and depends solely on the laser wavelength used for excitation. In IR-MALDESI experiments, a thin layer of ice is deposited on the sample surface as an energy-absorbing matrix. The IR-MALDESI source geometry has been optimized using statistical design of experiments (DOE) for analysis of liquid samples as well as biological tissue specimens. Furthermore, a robust IR-MALDESI imaging source has been developed, where a tunable mid-IR laser is synchronized with a computer controlled XY translational stage and a high resolving power mass spectrometer. A custom graphical user interface (GUI) allows user selection of the repetition rate of the laser, number of shots per voxel, step-size of the sample stage, and the delay between the desorption and scan events for the source. IR-MALDESI has been used in variety of applications such as forensic analysis of fibers and dyes and MSI of biological tissue sections. Distribution of different analytes ranging from endogenous metabolites to exogenous xenobiotics within tissue sections can be measured and quantified using this technique. The protocol presented in this manuscript describes major steps necessary for IR-MALDESI MSI of whole-body tissue sections. PMID:27077488

  3. Two-color laser desorption of nanostructured MgO thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutral magnesium atom emission from nanostructured MgO thin films is induced using two-color nanosecond laser excitation. We find that combined vis/UV excitation, for single-color pulse energies below the desorption threshold, induces neutral Mg-atom emission with hyperthermal kinetic energies in the range of 0.1-0.2 eV. The observed metal atom emission is consistent with a mechanism involving rapid electron transfer to three-coordinated Mg surface sites. The two-color Mg-atom signal is significant only for parallel laser polarizations and temporally overlapped laser pulses indicating that intermediate excited states are short-lived compared to the 5 ns laser pulse duration.

  4. Shotgun Approach for Quantitative Imaging of Phospholipids Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Laskin, Julia

    2014-02-04

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been extensively used for determining spatial distributions of molecules in biological samples, and there is increasing interest in using MSI for quantification. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, or nano-DESI, is an ambient MSI technique where a solvent is used for localized extraction of molecules followed by nanoelectrospray ionization. Doping the nano-DESI solvent with carefully selected standards enables online quantification during MSI experiments. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate this quantification approach can be extended to provide shotgun-like quantification of phospholipids in thin brain tissue sections. Specifically, two phosphatidylcholine (PC) standards were added to the nano-DESI solvent for simultaneous imaging and quantification of 22 PC species observed in nano-DESI MSI. Furthermore, by combining the quantitative data obtained in the individual pixels, we demonstrate quantification of these PC species in seven different regions of a rat brain tissue section.

  5. Acoustics and vibration comfort; Akustik und Schwingungskomfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penne, Filip; Mueller, Torsten [BMW Group, Muenchen (Germany). Akustik und Schwingungskomfort fuer die mittlere und grosse Modellreihe

    2008-11-15

    With the new BMW 7 Series, BMW is continuing its success story in the luxury class. Within the BMW product portfolio, the 7 Series is the pinnacle in terms of vehicle dynamics, fuel consumption and comfort. This unique combination of efficient dynamics on one hand and an extremely convincing level of comfort on the other hand comprises the character of this automobile. Vehicle acoustics and vibration comfort make a significant contribution towards the overall impression of ''sheer driving pleasure''. (orig.)

  6. Acoustic Velocity Data for Clay Bearing Carbonate Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Shogenova, Alla

    1998-01-01

    Two sets of acoustic data on carbonates were combined to span the porosity interval from below 5% to more than 75%: dolomite and limestone of Paleozoic age from Estonia and mixed sediments from the Caribbean. The carbonate content of the samples ranges from less than 50% to 100%, and it was attem...

  7. Relating desorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from harbour sludges to type of organic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heister, K.; Pols, S.; Loch, J. P. G.; Bosma, T.

    2009-04-01

    sodium azide to prevent microbial degradation, all samples showed oscillating concentrations of PAH over time pointing to the presence of anaerobic biodegradation. This also had an impact on the temporal development of pH, DOC and electrical conductivity. However, the concentrations of PAH desorbed were very low; for components with a molecular weight higher than pyrene, no desorption was observed at all. On a percentage basis, more PAH desorbed from the BK sample, even though the BMR sample contained an up to ten times higher amount of PAH. In addition, the organic material of the sludges was characterised by C and N elemental and sugar analysis and 13C CPMAS NMR to see how the type of organic material influenced desorption. It was shown that the two sludges did not differ significantly in the amount but more in the type of organic material. The BK sample contained organic material which was more degraded than the BMR sample. By combining desorption behaviour with organic material characterisation, we will show how the type of organic material influences desorption of PAH from the sediments.

  8. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  9. Acoustic Signal Feature Extraction of Vehicle Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝金辉; 马宝华; 李科杰

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic signal feature extraction is an important part of target recognition. The mechanisms for producing acoustic signals and their propagation are analyzed to extract the features of the radiated noise from different targets. Analysis of the acoustic spectra of typical vehicle targets acquired outdoors shows that the vehicles can be classified based on the acoustic spectra and amplitudes.

  10. Acoustic cavitation movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs on microsecond time scales and micron length scales, yet, it has many macroscopic manifestations. Accordingly, it is often difficult, at least for the author, to form realistic physical descriptions of the specific mechanisms through which it expresses itself in our macroscopic world. For example, there are still many who believe that cavitation erosion is due to the shock wave that is emitted by bubble implosion, rather than the liquid jet created on asymmetric collapse...and they may be right. Over the years, the author has accumulated a number of movies and high-speed photographs of cavitation activity, which he uses to form his own visual references. In the time allotted, he will show a number of these movies and photographs and discuss their relevance to existing technological problems. A limited number of CDs containing the presented materials will be available to interested individuals. [Work supported in part by the NIH, USAMRMC, and the ONR.

  11. Acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian U

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have been studied in civil engineering for a long time. The techniques are recently going to be more and more applied to practical applications and to be standardized in the codes. This is because the increase of aging structures and disastrous damages due to recent earthquakes urgently demand for maintenance and retrofit of civil structures in service for example. It results in the need for the development of advanced and effective inspection techniques. Thus, AE techniques draw a great attention to diagnostic applications and in material testing. The book covers all levels from the description of AE basics for AE beginners (level of a student) to sophisticated AE algorithms and applications to real large-scale structures as well as the observation of the cracking process in laboratory specimen to study fracture processes.

  12. Distributed acoustic sensing for pipeline monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, David; McEwen-King, Magnus [OptaSense, QinetiQ Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Optical fibre is deployed widely across the oil and gas industry. As well as being deployed regularly to provide high bandwidth telecommunications and infrastructure for SCADA it is increasingly being used to sense pressure, temperature and strain along buried pipelines, on subsea pipelines and downhole. In this paper we present results from the latest sensing capability using standard optical fibre to detect acoustic signals along the entire length of a pipeline. In Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) an optical fibre is used for both sensing and telemetry. In this paper we present results from the OptaSense{sup TM} system which has been used to detect third party intervention (TPI) along buried pipelines. In a typical deployment the system is connected to an existing standard single-mode fibre, up to 50km in length, and was used to independently listen to the acoustic / seismic activity at every 10 meter interval. We will show that through the use of advanced array processing of the independent, simultaneously sampled channels it is possible to detect and locate activity within the vicinity of the pipeline and through sophisticated acoustic signal processing to obtain the acoustic signature to classify the type of activity. By combining spare fibre capacity in existing buried fibre optic cables; processing and display techniques commonly found in sonar; and state-of-the-art in fibre-optic distributed acoustic sensing, we will describe the new monitoring capabilities that are available to the pipeline operator. Without the expense of retrofitting sensors to the pipeline, this technology can provide a high performance, rapidly deployable and cost effective method of providing gapless and persistent monitoring of a pipeline. We will show how this approach can be used to detect, classify and locate activity such as; third party interference (including activity indicative of illegal hot tapping); real time tracking of pigs; and leak detection. We will also show how an

  13. A numerically efficient damping model for acoustic resonances in microfluidic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, P., E-mail: hahnp@ethz.ch; Dual, J. [Institute of Mechanical Systems (IMES), Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Tannenstrasse 3, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Bulk acoustic wave devices are typically operated in a resonant state to achieve enhanced acoustic amplitudes and high acoustofluidic forces for the manipulation of microparticles. Among other loss mechanisms related to the structural parts of acoustofluidic devices, damping in the fluidic cavity is a crucial factor that limits the attainable acoustic amplitudes. In the analytical part of this study, we quantify all relevant loss mechanisms related to the fluid inside acoustofluidic micro-devices. Subsequently, a numerical analysis of the time-harmonic visco-acoustic and thermo-visco-acoustic equations is carried out to verify the analytical results for 2D and 3D examples. The damping results are fitted into the framework of classical linear acoustics to set up a numerically efficient device model. For this purpose, all damping effects are combined into an acoustofluidic loss factor. Since some components of the acoustofluidic loss factor depend on the acoustic mode shape in the fluid cavity, we propose a two-step simulation procedure. In the first step, the loss factors are deduced from the simulated mode shape. Subsequently, a second simulation is invoked, taking all losses into account. Owing to its computational efficiency, the presented numerical device model is of great relevance for the simulation of acoustofluidic particle manipulation by means of acoustic radiation forces or acoustic streaming. For the first time, accurate 3D simulations of realistic micro-devices for the quantitative prediction of pressure amplitudes and the related acoustofluidic forces become feasible.

  14. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with Kh2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1), with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedures withCaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1). Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%), and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content. (author)

  15. Glyphosate sorption and desorption in soils with distinct phosphorus levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prata Fábio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of glyphosate by soils occurs due to the inner sphere complex formation with metals of soil oxides, which are related to the soil phosphate adsorption capacity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing rates of phosphorus on sorption and desorption of glyphosate in three soils with different mineralogical attributes. Soils were a Rhodic Kandiudalf, an Anionic Acrudox and a Typic Humaquept. Soil samples were amended with KH2PO4 at equivalent rates of 0; 1,000; 5,000; 20,000 and 50,000 kg ha-1 of P2O5, which are high from the agricultural point of view, but necessary in order to perform sorption and desorption studies. The experimental design consisted of a completely randomized factorial: 2 soils x 5 phosphorus rates and 3 replicates. For the sorption experiments, five glyphosate solutions were employed (0.42; 0.84; 1.68; 3.36 and 6.72 mg L-1, with a 14C radioactivity of 0.233 kBq mL-1. Four steps of the desorption procedure with CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 and one extraction with Mehlich 3 were performed only at one concentration (0.84 mol L-1. Soil samples were afterwards biologically oxidized to establish the radioactive balance. Glyphosate competes with phosphorus for specific sorption sites, but this competition becomes important when phosphorus is present at rates higher than 1,000 mg dm-3. Moreover, a small amount of applied glyphosate was extracted (<10%, and the extraction increased with increasing soil phosphorus content.

  16. Hydrogen desorption properties of hydrogenated UThZr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwarno, Hadi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Ono, Futaba; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio

    1997-08-01

    Hydrogen desorption properties of hydrogenated UThZr alloys of varied compositions were investigated using a hydrogen absorption-desorption experimental system, TG-DTA and DSC analyzers. Isothermal desorption at 900°C of elemental ratio U:Th:Zr:H = 1:1:4:9.5 exhibited that there were two distinct plateau regions identified as ZrH 1.4-ZrH and ThZr 2H 7- x - ThZr 2 systems. TG-DTA and DSC measurements under the temperature range from room temperature to 1000°C have shown that there were three endothermic peaks identified as dehydrogenation reactions of ZrH 2 - x - ZrH and ThZr 2H 7-x. The DTA curve identified the first peak area as the ZrH 1.4-ZrH system, while the DSC curves identified that the second peak is the decomposition of ZrH and the third peak is the decomposition of ThZr 2H 7 - x. It was also shown that both ZrH 2 - x and ThZr 2H 7 - x are more stable in the alloy than the pure ones. Measured enthalpy changes during decomposition of the hydrogenated UThZr alloy are similar to the theoretical calculation. Oxidation during measurement of the U:Th:Zr:H = 2:1:6:13.1 resulted in a different measured enthalpy change and calculation. Isothermal decomposition of the U:Th:Zr:H = 1:1:4:9.5 without any disintegration indicates stability of the alloy against powdering on hydriding-dehydriding cycles. Stability of the samples at high temperature similar to that of UZrH 1.6 for TRIGA fuel can be maintained after the decomposition.

  17. Seismic wave imaging in visco-acoustic media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huazhong; ZHANG Libin; MA Zaitian

    2004-01-01

    Realistic representation of the earth may be achieved by combining the mechanical properties of elastic solids and viscousliquids. That is to say, the amplitude will be attenuated withdifferent frequency and the phase will be changed in the seismicdata acquisition. In the seismic data processing, this effect mustbe compensated. In this paper, we put forward a visco-acoustic wavepropagator which is of better calculating stability and tolerablecalculating cost (little more than an acoustic wave propagator).The quite good compensation effect is demonstrated by thenumerical test results with synthetic seismic data and real data.

  18. DESORPTION OF VOCs FROM POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS UNDER MICROWAVE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)from polymeric adsorbents by microwave was investigated experimentally. Two kinds of organic compounds, benzene and toluene,were separately used as adsorbates in this work. Results showed that the application of microwave to regenerate the polymeric adsorbents not only can get higher regeneration efficiency in comparison with the use of heat regeneration, but also make the temperatures of the fixed beds much lower than that when using the heat regeneratton The weaker the polarity of a polymeric adsorbent, the easier its regeneration was.

  19. SVSCf plasma desorption mass spectrometry: recent advances and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamensky, I.; Craig, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    SVSCf plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS) as utilized in the BIO-ION instruments is described. The sensitivity of the technique is investigated for varying amounts of bovine insulin. The results show accurate mass assignment for pmole amounts of sample. Several methods, currently used for sample preparation in PDMS, are described. Spectra of the antibiotic nisin using two different sample preparation techniques show significant variation. The fragmentation pattern of reduced acetylated maltoheptaose is also presented. The initial results obtained using a new PDMS instrument equipped with variable flight path are shown. The increased resolution is illustrated using the extended flight path to measure the molecular ion region of the maltoheptaose.

  20. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh, E-mail: rakesh@iitrpr.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar-140001 (India); R, Kamal Raj. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur-741246 (India); Kumar, T. J. Dhilip [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar-140001 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  1. Surface oxidation and water desorption of CdS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈正石; 李庆霖; 金振声

    1996-01-01

    The surface oxidation and HP desorption of powder CdS were studied by means of X-ray photoetectron spectroscopy (XPS), quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and in-situ FTIR. The results show that with the changes of surface composition and the elongation of store time of CdS there are four types of H2O thermally desorbed at different temperatures. It has also been found that through high-temperature air treatment for a short time the oxidized surface layer of CdS can prevent O2 and H2O in air from further attacking the inner CdS molecules.

  2. Oxygen Sorption and Desorption Properties of Selected Lanthanum Manganites and Lanthanum Ferrite Manganites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Skou, Eivind M.; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    by X‐ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and BET surface adsorption. Sorbed oxygen could be distinguished from oxygen originating from stoichiometry changes. The results indicated that there is one main site for oxygen sorption/desorption. The amount of sorbed oxygen was monitored over...... time at different temperatures. Furthermore, through data analysis it was shown that the desorption peak associated with oxygen sorption is described well by second‐order desorption kinetics. This indicates that oxygen molecules dissociate upon adsorption and that the rate‐determining step...... for the desorption reaction is a recombination of monatomic oxygen. Typical problems with re‐adsorption in this kind of TPD setup were revealed to be insignificant by using simulations. Finally, different key parameters of sorption and desorption were determined, such as desorption activation energies, density...

  3. Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography, FibroScan®, Forns' index and their combination in the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B, and the impact of inflammatory activity and steatosis on these diagnostic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dao-Ran; Hao, Mei-Na; Li, Cheng; Peng, Ze; Liu, Xia; Wang, Gui-Ping; Ma, An-Lin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the combination of certain serological markers (Forns' index; FI), FibroScan® and acoustic radiation force impulse elastography (ARFI) in the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis B, and to explore the impact of inflammatory activity and steatosis on the accuracy of these diagnostic methods. Eighty‑one patients who had been diagnosed with hepatitis B were recruited and the stage of fibrosis was determined by biopsy. The diagnostic accuracy of FI, FibroScan and ARFI, as well as that of the combination of these methods, was evaluated based on the conformity of the results from these tests with those of biopsies. The effect of concomitant inflammation on diagnostic accuracy was also investigated by dividing the patients into two groups based on the grade of inflammation (GFibroScan (Kruskal‑Wallis; PFibroScan increased the predictive accuracy with a fibrosis stage of S≥2 or cirrhosis. There was a significant correlation between the grade of inflammation and the results obtained using ARFI and FibroScan (Kruskal‑Wallis, PFibroScan and FI, and steatosis (r=‑0.100, P=0.407; r=0.170, P=0.163; and r=0.154, P=0.216, respectively). ARFI was shown to be as effective in the diagnosis of liver fibrosis as FibroScan or FI, and the combination of ARFI or FibroScan with FI may improve the accuracy of diagnosis. The presence of inflammatory activity, but not that of steatosis, may affect the diagnostic accuracy of these methods.

  4. Using acoustic cavitation to enhance chemotherapy of DOX liposomes: experiment in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Dai, Dan-Dan; Lu, Cui-Tao; Lv, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xing; Li, Wen-Feng; Wu, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Kun; Huang, Pin-Tong; Chen, Li-Juan; Lin, Min

    2012-09-01

    Experiments in vitro and in vivo were designed to investigate tumor growth inhibition of chemotherapeutics-loaded liposomes enhanced by acoustic cavitation. Doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (DOX liposomes) were used in experiments to investigate acoustic cavitation mediated effects on cell viability and chemotherapeutic function. The influence of lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation on tumor inhibition was also investigated. Animal experiment was carried out to verify the practicability of this technique in vivo. From experiment results, blank phospholipid-based microbubbles (PBM) combined with ultrasound (US) at intensity below 0.3 W/cm² could produce acoustic cavitation which maintained cell viability at high level. Compared with DOX solution, DOX liposomes combined with acoustic cavitation exerted effective tumor inhibition in vitro and in vivo. The lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation could also enhance the susceptibility of tumor to chemotherapeutic drugs. DOX liposomes could also exert certain tumor inhibition under preliminary acoustic cavitation. Acoustic cavitation could enhance the absorption efficiency of DOX liposomes, which could be used to reduce DOX adverse effect on normal organs in clinical chemotherapy.

  5. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species. PMID:26233026

  6. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  7. Non-invasive photo acoustic approach for human bone diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Helmy, Ahdy; Suryadevara, Vinay Kumar; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher

    2016-12-01

    The existing modalities of bone diagnosis including X-ray and ultrasound may cite drawback in some cases related to health issues and penetration depth, while the ultrasound modality may lack image quality. Photo acoustic approach however, provides light energy to the acoustic wave, enabling it to activate and respond according to the propagating media (which is type of bones in this case). At the same time, a differential temperature change may result in the bio heat response, resulting from the heat absorbed across the multiple materials under study. In this work, we have demonstrated the features of using photo acoustic modality in order to non-invasively diagnose the type of human bones based on their electrical, thermal, and acoustic properties that differentiate the output response of each type. COMSOL software was utilized to combine both acoustic equations and bio heat equations, in order to study both the thermal and acoustic responses through which the differential diagnosis can be obtained. In this study, we solved both the acoustic equation and bio heat equations for four types of bones, bone (cancellous), bone (cortical), bone marrow (red), and bone marrow (yellow). 1 MHz acoustic source frequency was chosen and 10(5) W/m(2) power source was used in the simulation. The simulation tested the dynamic response of the wave over a distance of 5 cm from each side for the source. Near 2.4 cm was detected from simulation from each side of the source with a temperature change of within 0.5 K for various types of bones, citing a promising technique for a practical model to detect the type of bones via the differential temperature as well as the acoustic was response via the multiple materials associated with the human bones (skin and blood). The simulation results suggest that the PA technique may be applied to non-invasive diagnosis for the different types of bones, including cancerous bones. A practical model for detecting both the temperature change via

  8. Site Specificity in Femtosecond Laser Desorption of Neutral H Atoms from Graphite(0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigge, R.; Hoger, T.; Siemer, B.;

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond laser excitation and density functional theory reveal site and vibrational state specificity in neutral atomic hydrogen desorption from graphite induced by multiple electronic transitions. Multimodal velocity distributions witness the participation of ortho and para pair states...... of chemisorbed hydrogen in the desorption process. Very slow velocities of 700 and 400  ms-1 for H and D atoms are associated with the desorption out of the highest vibrational state of a barrierless potential....

  9. Effect of liquid sewage sludge addition on atrazine sorption and desorption by soil

    OpenAIRE

    Celis, R.; E. Barriuso; Houot, S.

    1998-01-01

    Liquid sewage sludge (LSS) addition to soil incorporates both insoluble suspended organic material and large amounts of dissolved organic matter (LSSDOM) which can influence the sorption-desorption behaviour of pestieides by soil constituents. Batch sorption isotherm techniques were used to determine the relative effect of the insoluble and dissolved organic matter from a LSS on the sorption and desorption of the herbicide atrazine by soil. Atrazine sorption and desorption isotherms were obta...

  10. Desorption of metals from Cetraria islandica (L. Ach. Lichen using solutions simulating acid rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čučulović Ana A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Desorption of metals K, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba, Zn, Mn, Cu and Sr from Cetraria islandica (L. with solutions whose composition was similar to that of acid rain, was investigated. Desorption of metals from the lichen was performed by five successive desorption processes. Solution mixtures containing H2SO4, HNO3 and H2SO4-HNO3 were used for desorption. Each solution had three different pH values: 4.61, 5.15 and 5.75, so that the desorptions were performed with nine different solutions successively five times, always using the same solution volume. The investigated metals can be divided into two groups. One group was comprised of K, Ca and Mg, which were desorbed in each of the five desorption processes at all pH values used. The second group included Al, Fe, Zn, Ba, Mn and Sr; these were not desorbed in each individual desorption and not at all pH values, whereas Cu was not desorbed at all under any circumstances. Using the logarithmic dependence of the metal content as a function of the desorption number, it was found that potassium builds two types of links and is connected with weaker links in lichen. Potassium is completely desorbed, 80% in the first desorption, and then gradually in the following desorptions. Other metals are linked with one weaker link (desorption 1-38% and with one very strong link (desorption below the metal detection limit. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009 i br. ON 172019

  11. An anomalous subdiffusion model with fractional derivatives for methane desorption in heterogeneous coal matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Jianhong Kang; Fubao Zhou; Gaobang Ye; Yingke Liu

    2015-01-01

    Methane desorption in coal matrix is one of the fundamental gas transport processes during coalbed methane extraction, the mechanism of which is commonly described by Fickian diffusion theory. Here, an anomalous subdiffusion model with fractional derivatives is developed to explore the methane desorption in coal matrix with a highly heterogeneous pore structure. Numerical simulations reproduce the volume fraction of gas desorbed over the entire timescale of experimental desorption. It is sugg...

  12. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  13. Uncovering Spatial Variation in Acoustic Environments Using Sound Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Jacob R; Myers, Kyle; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Gill, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Animals select and use habitats based on environmental features relevant to their ecology and behavior. For animals that use acoustic communication, the sound environment itself may be a critical feature, yet acoustic characteristics are not commonly measured when describing habitats and as a result, how habitats vary acoustically over space and time is poorly known. Such considerations are timely, given worldwide increases in anthropogenic noise combined with rapidly accumulating evidence that noise hampers the ability of animals to detect and interpret natural sounds. Here, we used microphone arrays to record the sound environment in three terrestrial habitats (forest, prairie, and urban) under ambient conditions and during experimental noise introductions. We mapped sound pressure levels (SPLs) over spatial scales relevant to diverse taxa to explore spatial variation in acoustic habitats and to evaluate the number of microphones needed within arrays to capture this variation under both ambient and noisy conditions. Even at small spatial scales and over relatively short time spans, SPLs varied considerably, especially in forest and urban habitats, suggesting that quantifying and mapping acoustic features could improve habitat descriptions. Subset maps based on input from 4, 8, 12 and 16 microphones differed slightly ( 4 dBA/pixel) from full maps than the remaining subset maps, but maps with input from eight microphones resulted in smaller differences. Thus, acoustic environments varied over small spatial scales and variation could be mapped with input from 4-8 microphones. Mapping sound in different environments will improve understanding of acoustic environments and allow us to explore the influence of spatial variation in sound on animal ecology and behavior. PMID:27467503

  14. Uncovering Spatial Variation in Acoustic Environments Using Sound Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Jacob R.; Myers, Kyle; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Gill, Sharon A.

    2016-01-01

    Animals select and use habitats based on environmental features relevant to their ecology and behavior. For animals that use acoustic communication, the sound environment itself may be a critical feature, yet acoustic characteristics are not commonly measured when describing habitats and as a result, how habitats vary acoustically over space and time is poorly known. Such considerations are timely, given worldwide increases in anthropogenic noise combined with rapidly accumulating evidence that noise hampers the ability of animals to detect and interpret natural sounds. Here, we used microphone arrays to record the sound environment in three terrestrial habitats (forest, prairie, and urban) under ambient conditions and during experimental noise introductions. We mapped sound pressure levels (SPLs) over spatial scales relevant to diverse taxa to explore spatial variation in acoustic habitats and to evaluate the number of microphones needed within arrays to capture this variation under both ambient and noisy conditions. Even at small spatial scales and over relatively short time spans, SPLs varied considerably, especially in forest and urban habitats, suggesting that quantifying and mapping acoustic features could improve habitat descriptions. Subset maps based on input from 4, 8, 12 and 16 microphones differed slightly ( 4 dBA/pixel) from full maps than the remaining subset maps, but maps with input from eight microphones resulted in smaller differences. Thus, acoustic environments varied over small spatial scales and variation could be mapped with input from 4–8 microphones. Mapping sound in different environments will improve understanding of acoustic environments and allow us to explore the influence of spatial variation in sound on animal ecology and behavior. PMID:27467503

  15. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is to fabricate, characterize, and verify performance of a new type of frequency steered acoustic...

  16. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is to develop, fabricate, and characterize a novel frequency steered acoustic transducer (FSAT) for the...

  17. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  18. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  19. Tunable cylindrical shell as an element in acoustic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Titovich, Alexey S

    2014-01-01

    Elastic cylindrical shells are fitted with an internal mechanism which is optimized so that, in the quasi-static regime, the combined system exhibits prescribed effective acoustic properties. The mechanism consists of a central mass supported by an axisymmetric distribution of elastic stiffeners. By appropriate selection of the mass and stiffness of the internal mechanism, the shell's effective acoustic properties (bulk modulus and density) can be tuned as desired. Subsonic flexural waves excited in the shell by the attachment of stiffeners are suppressed by including a sufficiently large number of such stiffeners. Effectiveness of the proposed metamaterial is demonstrated by matching the properties of a thin aluminum shell with a polymer insert to those of water. The scattering cross section in water is nearly zero over a broad range of frequencies at the lower end of the spectrum. By arranging the tuned shells in an array the resulting acoustic metamaterial is capable of steering waves. As an example, a cyl...

  20. Vestibular myogenic and acoustical brainstem evoked potentials in neurological practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Korepina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the inspection of acoustical cortex and brainstem EP in neurologic, otoneurologic and audiologic practice recently start to use so-called vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. It is shown, that at ear stimulation by a loud sound and record of sterno-cleidomastoid contraction is possible to estimate function of the inferior vestibular nerve and vestibulospinal pathways, a sacculo-cervical reflex. In article some methodical and clinical questions of application of these kinds are presented. Combine research acoustic brainstem EP and VEMP allows to confirm effectively lesions of acoustical and vestibular ways at brainstem. The conclusion becomes, that this kind of inspection is important for revealing demielinisation and defeats in vestibulospinal tract, that quite often happens at MS, and at estimation of efficiency of treatment

  1. Measurement of thin films using very long acoustic wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Clement, G T; Adachi, H; Kamakura, T

    2013-01-01

    A procedure for measuring material thickness by means of necessarily-long acoustic wavelengths is examined. The approach utilizes a temporal phase lag caused by the impulse time of wave momentum transferred through a thin layer that is much denser than its surrounding medium. In air, it is predicted that solid or liquid layers below approximately 1/2000 of the acoustic wavelength will exhibit a phase shift with an arctangent functional dependence on thickness and layer density. The effect is verified for thin films on the scale of 10 microns using audible frequency sound (7 kHz). Soap films as thin as 100 nm are then measured using 40 kHz air ultrasound. The method's potential for imaging applications is demonstrated by combining the approach with near-field holography, resulting in reconstructions with sub-wavelength resolution in both the depth and lateral directions. Potential implications at very high and very low acoustic frequencies are discussed.

  2. Computational dynamics of acoustically-driven microsphere systems

    CERN Document Server

    Glosser, Connor A; Dault, Daniel L; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the inter-particle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of non-dissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities, and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation ...

  3. NEAR-FIELD ACOUSTIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR SEMI-FREE ACOUSTIC FIELD BASED ON WAVE SUPERPOSITION APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Weibing; CHEN Jian; YU Fei; CHEN Xinzhao

    2006-01-01

    In the semi-free acoustic field, the actual acoustic pressure at any point is composed of two parts: The direct acoustic pressure and the reflected acoustic pressure. The general acoustic holographic theories and algorithms request that there is only the direct acoustic pressure contained in the pressure at any point on the hologram surface, consequently, they cannot be used to reconstruct acoustic source and predict acoustic field directly. To take the reflected pressure into consideration, near-field acoustic holography for semi-free acoustic field based on wave superposition approach is proposed to realize the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field, and the wave superposition approach is adopted as a holographic transform algorithm. The proposed theory and algorithm are realized and verified with a numerical example,and the drawbacks of the general theories and algorithms in the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field are also demonstrated by this numerical example.

  4. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  5. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  6. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  7. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  8. Moisture Absorption/Desorption Effects on Flexural Property of Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polyester Laminates: Three-Point Bending Test and Coupled Hygro-Mechanical Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Influence of moisture absorption/desorption on the flexural properties of Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP laminates was experimentally investigated under hot/wet aging environments. To characterize mechanical degradation, three-point bending tests were performed following the ASTM test standard (ASTM D790-10A. The flexural properties of dry (0% Mt/M∞, moisture unsaturated (30% Mt/M∞ and 50% Mt/M∞ and moisture saturated (100% Mt/M∞ specimens at both 20 and 40 °C test temperatures were compared. One cycle of moisture absorption-desorption process was considered in this study to investigate the mechanical degradation scale and the permanent damage of GFRP laminates induced by moisture diffusion. Experimental results confirm that the combination of moisture and temperature effects sincerely deteriorates the flexural properties of GFRP laminates, on both strength and stiffness. Furthermore, the reducing percentage of flexural strength is found much larger than that of E-modulus. Unrecoverable losses of E-modulus (15.0% and flexural strength (16.4% for the GFRP laminates experiencing one cycle of moisture absorption/desorption process are evident at the test temperature of 40 °C, but not for the case of 20 °C test temperature. Moreover, a coupled hygro-mechanical Finite Element (FE model was developed to characterize the mechanical behaviors of GFRP laminates at different moisture absorption/desorption stages, and the modeling method was subsequently validated with flexural test results.

  9. Deuterium thermal desorption from vacancy clusters in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabtsev, S.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Zibrov, M.; Shubina, A.; Pisarev, A.

    2016-09-01

    Deuterium interaction with vacancy clusters in tungsten was studied by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A recrystallized W foil was used as a sample, and the vacancy clusters were formed in the bulk by irradiation with 10 keV/D ions to the fluence of 3 × 1019 D/m2 and subsequent annealing at the temperature of 800 K. Then the sample was loaded with deuterium (0.67 keV/D ions with a fluence of 1 × 1019 D/m2), and TDS measurements with varying heating rates β in the range of 0.25-4 K/s were performed. The high temperature peak with the maximum at around 700 K was attributed to deuterium desorption from vacancy clusters and the detrapping energy for this type of defects was determined from the slope of the Arrhenius-like plot ln (β / Tm2) versus 1 /Tm , where Tm is the peak position. The detrapping energy calculated this way is 2.10 ± 0.02 eV.

  10. 5th International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Jennison, Dwight R; Stechel, Ellen B; DIET V; Desorption induced by electronic transitions

    1993-01-01

    This volume in the Springer Series on Surface Sciences presents a recent account of advances in the ever-broadening field of electron-and photon-stimulated sur­ face processes. As in previous volumes, these advances are presented as the proceedings of the International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; the fifth workshop (DIET V) was held in Taos, New Mexico, April 1-4, 1992. It will be abundantly clear to the reader that "DIET" is not restricted to desorption, but has for several years included photochemistry, non-thermal surface modification, exciton self-trapping, and many other phenomena that are induced by electron or photon bombardment. However, most stimulated surface processes do share a common physics: initial electronic excitation, localization of the excitation, and conversion of electronic energy into nuclear kinetic energy. It is the rich variation of this theme which makes the field so interesting and fruitful. We have divided the book into eleven parts in orde...

  11. 2nd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, Dietrich

    1985-01-01

    The second workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions (DIET II) took place October 15-17, 1984, in SchloB Elmau, Bavaria. DIET II, fol­ lowing the great success of DIET I (edited by N. H. Tolk, M. M. Traum, J. C. Tully, T. E. Madey and published in Springer Ser. Chem. Phys. , Vol. 24), again brought together over 60 workers in this exciting field. The "hard co­ re of experts" was essentially the same as in DIET I but the general overlap of participants between the two meetings was small. While DIET I had the function of an exposition of the status of the field DIET II focussed more on new developments. The main emphasis was again on the microscopic under­ standing of DIET but a number of side aspects and the application of DIET ideas to other fields such as sputtering, laser-induced desorption, fractu­ re, erosion, etc. were considered, too. New mechanisms and new refined expe­ rimental techniques were proposed and discussed at the meeting critically but with great enthusiasm. In addition t...

  12. Adsorption and desorption on coals for CO2 sequestration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zuo-tang; FU Zhen-kun; ZHANG Ban-gan; WANG Guo-xiong; RUDOLPH Victor; HUO Li-wen

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide, methane and other gases on coals has been investigated experimentally using representative Zhongliangshan coals. Gas adsorption is one of the major concerns for both CO2 sequestration and methane recovery processes. The experiments were carried out using both single and multi-component mixtures at 25 ℃ and 30 ℃ with the highest pressure of 12 MPa. The coal was under moisture equilibrated conditions. This provides experimental data from which a predictive assessment of CO2 sequestration and/or methane recovery can be conducted. The results show that for pure gasses the CH4 adsorption capacity is higher than the N2 adsorption capacity but lower than the CO2 adsorption capacity. Injection of CO2 or other gases into the coal significantly affects CH4 desorption. This allows the enhancement of CH4 recovery from the coals, thus supplying more clean energy while sequestering significant amounts of CO2 thereby reducing the greenhouse effect from human beings.

  13. Magnesium growth in magnesium deuteride thin films during deuterium desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchetto, R., E-mail: riccardo.checchetto@unitn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Miotello, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Mengucci, P.; Barucca, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Università Politecnica delle Marche, I-60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: ► Highly oriented Pd-capped magnesium deuteride thin films. ► The MgD{sub 2} dissociation was studied at temperatures not exceeding 100 °C. ► The structure of the film samples was analyzed by XRD and TEM. ► The transformation is controlled by the re-growth velocity of the Mg layers. ► The transformation is thermally activated, activation energy value of 1.3 ± 0.1 eV. -- Abstract: Pd- capped nanocrystalline magnesium thin films having columnar structure were deposited on Si substrate by e-gun deposition and submitted to thermal annealing in D{sub 2} atmosphere to promote the metal to deuteride phase transformation. The kinetics of the reverse deuteride to metal transformation was studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) while the structure of the as deposited and transformed samples was analyzed by X-rays diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In Pd- capped MgD{sub 2} thin films the deuteride to metal transformation begins at the interface between un-reacted Mg and transformed MgD{sub 2} layers. The D{sub 2} desorption kinetics is controlled by MgD{sub 2}/Mg interface effects, specifically the re-growth velocity of the Mg layers. The Mg re-growth has thermally activated character and shows an activation energy value of 1.3 ± 0.1 eV.

  14. Thermal desorption of PCBs from contaminated soil with copper dichloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Qi, Zhifu; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Tong; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang

    2015-12-01

    Copper dichloride is an important catalyst both in the dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the formation of PCDD/Fs. The effect of copper dichloride on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) was studied in treated soil and off gas after thermal desorption of PCB-contaminated soil at 300, 400, 500, 600 °C. The presence of copper dichloride clearly enhances thermal desorption by promoting PCBs removal, destruction, and dechlorination. After thermal treatment at 600 °C for 1 h, the removal efficiency and destruction efficiency for PCBs reached 98.1 and 93.9%, respectively. Compared with the positive influence on PCBs, copper dichloride catalyzed large amount of PCDFs formation at 300 °C, with the concentration ratio of 2.35. The effect of CuCl2 on PCDFs formation weakened with the rising temperature since PCDFs destruction became dominant under higher temperature. Different from PCDFs, PCDDs concentration in treated soil and off gas decreased continuously with the increasing temperature.

  15. Hydrocarbon analysis using desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    KAUST Repository

    Jjunju, Fred P M

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of the various petroleum constituents (hydronaphthalenes, thiophenes, alkyl substituted benzenes, pyridines, fluorenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) was achieved under ambient conditions without sample preparation by desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DAPCI). Conditions were chosen for the DAPCI experiments to control whether ionization was by proton or electron transfer. The protonated molecule [M+H]+ and the hydride abstracted [MH]+ form were observed when using an inert gas, typically nitrogen, to direct a lightly ionized plasma generated by corona discharge onto the sample surface in air. The abundant water cluster ions generated in this experiment react with condensed-phase functionalized hydrocarbon model compounds and their mixtures at or near the sample surface. On the other hand, when naphthalene was doped into the DAPCI gas stream, its radical cation served as a charge exchange reagent, yielding molecular radical cations (M+) of the hydrocarbons. This mode of sample ionization provided mass spectra with better signal/noise ratios and without unwanted side-products. It also extended the applicability of DAPCI to petroleum constituents which could not be analyzed through proton transfer (e.g., higher molecular PAHs such as chrysene). The thermochemistry governing the individual ionization processes is discussed and a desorption/ionization mechanism is inferred. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Desorption of biocides from renders modified with acrylate and silicone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Bollmann, Ulla E; Wangler, Timothy P; Bester, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Biocides are used in the building industry to prevent algal, bacterial and fungal growth on polymericrenders and thus to protect buildings. However, these biocides are leached into the environment. To better understand this leaching, the sorption/desorption of biocides in polymeric renders was assessed. In this study the desorption constants of cybutryn, carbendazim, iodocarb, isoproturon, diuron, dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone and tebuconazole towards acrylate and silicone based renders were assessed at different pH values. At pH 9.5 (porewater) the constants for an acrylate based render varied between 8 (isoproturon) and 9634 (iodocarb) and 3750 (dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone), respectively. The values changed drastically with pH value. The results for the silicone based renders were in a similar range and usually the compounds with high sorption constants for one polymer also had high values for the other polymer. Comparison of the octanol water partitioning constants (Kow) with the render/water partitioning constants (Kd) revealed similarities, but no strong correlation. Adding higher amounts of polymer to the render material changed the equilibria for dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone, tebuconazole, cybutryn, carbendazim but not for isoproturon and diuron. PMID:24059976

  17. 3rd International Workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Knotek, Michael

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings are the result of the third international workshop on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions, DIET III, which took place on Shelter Island, NY, May. 20-22, 1987. The work contained in this volume is an excellent summary of the current status of the field and should be a valuable reference text for both "seasoned" researchers and newcomers in the field of DIET. Based on the success of the meeting it seems clear that interest and enthusiasm in the field is strong. It is also apparent, from the many lively discussions during the meeting, that many unanswered questions (and controversies) remain to be solved. It was particularly pleasing to see many new participants from new and rapidly advancing fields, ranging from gas phase dynamics to semiconductor processing. The resulting cross-fertilization from these separate but related fields is playing an important role in helping us understand desorption processes at solid surfaces. In general, the topics covered during the course of the worksh...

  18. Multistage Reactive Transmission-Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kevin C.; Comi, Troy J.; Perry, Richard H.

    2015-09-01

    Elucidating reaction mechanisms is important for advancing many areas of science such as catalyst development. It is often difficult to probe fast reactions at ambient conditions with high temporal resolution. In addition, systems involving reagents that cross-react require analytical methods that can minimize interaction time and specify their order of introduction into the reacting system. Here, we explore the utility of transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI) for reaction monitoring by directing a microdroplet spray towards a series of meshes with micrometer-sized openings coated with reagents, an approach we call multistage reactive TM-DESI (TM n -DESI, where n refers to the number of meshes; n = 2 in this report). Various stages of the reaction are initiated at each mesh surface, generating intermediates and products in microdroplet reaction vessels traveling towards the mass spectrometer. Using this method, we investigated the reactivity of iron porphyrin catalytic hydroxylation of propranolol and other substrates. Our experimental results indicate that TM n -DESI provides the ability to spatially separate reagents and control their order of introduction into the reacting system, thereby minimizing unwanted reactions that lead to catalyst deactivation and degradation products. In addition, comparison with DESI-MS analyses (the Zare and Latour laboratories published results suggesting accessible reaction times desorption/ionization per MS scan, increasing the number of analytes and reactions that can be characterized in a single experiment.

  19. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  20. Prediction of acoustic comfort and acoustic silence in Goan Catholic churches

    OpenAIRE

    Menino A. S. M. P. Tavares; S. Rajagopalan; Satish J. Sharma; António P. O. Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Comfort and Acoustic Silence are determinants of tranquility in a worship space. The results presented here are part of a study that investigates the behaviour of acoustically constituted worship parameters in six Catholic churches (Goa, India). Acoustic comfort is quantified through an Acoustic Comfort Impression Index which measures the net comfort induced through the optimization of the desired subjective acoustic impressions for different types of music and different music source...

  1. Sorption/Desorption Interactions of Plutonium with Montmorillonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, J.; Zavarin, M.; Zhao, P.; Kersting, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    Plutonium (Pu) release to the environment through nuclear weapon development and the nuclear fuel cycle is an unfortunate legacy of the nuclear age. In part due to public health concerns over the risk of Pu contamination of drinking water, predicting the behavior of Pu in both surface and sub-surface water is a topic of continued interest. Typically it was assumed that Pu mobility in groundwater would be severely restricted, as laboratory adsorption studies commonly show that naturally occurring minerals can effectively remove plutonium from solution. However, evidence for the transport of Pu over significant distances at field sites highlights a relative lack of understanding of the fundamental processes controlling plutonium behavior in natural systems. At several field locations, enhanced mobility is due to Pu association with colloidal particles that serve to increase the transport of sorbed contaminants (Kersting et al., 1999; Santschi et al., 2002, Novikov et al., 2006). The ability for mineral colloids to transport Pu is in part controlled by its oxidation state and the rate of plutonium adsorption to, and desorption from, the mineral surface. Previously we have investigated the adsorption affinity of Pu for montmorillonite colloids, finding affinities to be similar over a wide range of Pu concentrations. In the present study we examine the stability of adsorbed Pu on the mineral surface. Pu(IV) at an initial concentration of 10-10 M was pre-equilibrated with montmorillonite in a background electrolyte at pH values of 4, 6 and 8. Following equilibration, aliquots of the suspensions were placed in a flow cell and Pu-free background electrolyte at the relevant pH was passed through the system. Flow rates were varied in order to investigate the kinetics of desorption and hence gain a mechanistic understanding of the desorption process. The flow cell experiments demonstrate that desorption of Pu from the montmorillonite surface cannot be modeled as a simple

  2. Multi-carrier Communications over Time-varying Acoustic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aval, Yashar M.

    Acoustic communication is an enabling technology for many autonomous undersea systems, such as those used for ocean monitoring, offshore oil and gas industry, aquaculture, or port security. There are three main challenges in achieving reliable high-rate underwater communication: the bandwidth of acoustic channels is extremely limited, the propagation delays are long, and the Doppler distortions are more pronounced than those found in wireless radio channels. In this dissertation we focus on assessing the fundamental limitations of acoustic communication, and designing efficient signal processing methods that cam overcome these limitations. We address the fundamental question of acoustic channel capacity (achievable rate) for single-input-multi-output (SIMO) acoustic channels using a per-path Rician fading model, and focusing on two scenarios: narrowband channels where the channel statistics can be approximated as frequency- independent, and wideband channels where the nominal path loss is frequency-dependent. In each scenario, we compare several candidate power allocation techniques, and show that assigning uniform power across all frequencies for the first scenario, and assigning uniform power across a selected frequency-band for the second scenario, are the best practical choices in most cases, because the long propagation delay renders the feedback information outdated for power allocation based on the estimated channel response. We quantify our results using the channel information extracted form the 2010 Mobile Acoustic Communications Experiment (MACE'10). Next, we focus on achieving reliable high-rate communication over underwater acoustic channels. Specifically, we investigate orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) as the state-of-the-art technique for dealing with frequency-selective multipath channels, and propose a class of methods that compensate for the time-variation of the underwater acoustic channel. These methods are based on multiple

  3. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  4. Acoustic Issues in Human Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jonathan B.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is concerned about acute effect of sound on crew performance on International Space Station (ISS), and is developing strategies to assess and reduce acute, chronic, and delayed effects of sound. High noise levels can cause headaches, irritation, fatigue, impaired sleep, headache, and tinnitus and have resulted in an inability to hear alarms. Speech intelligibility may be more impaired for crew understanding non-native language in a noisy environment. No hearing loss occurred, but significant effects on crew performance and communication occurred. Permanent Threshold Shifts (PTS) have not been observed in the US shuttle program. Russian specification for noise in spacecraft is 60 dBA (awake) and 50 dBA (asleep) while the U.S. noise specification on ISS is NC 50 (awake) and NC 40 (asleep) with a 85 dBA hazard limit. Background noise levels of ISS modules have measured 56-69 dBA. Treadmill exercise operations measure 77 dBA. Alarms are required to be 20 dBA above ambient. Hearing protection is recommended when noise exceeds 60 dB 24 hour Leq. Countermeasures include hearing protection and design/ engineering controls. Advanced composite materials with excellent low frequency attenuation properties could be applied as a barrier protection around noisy equipment, or used on personal protective equipment worn by the crew. Hearing protection countermeasures include foam ear inserts, passive muff headsets, and active noise reduction headsets. Oto-acoustic emissions (OAE) could be used to monitor effectiveness of hearing protection countermeasures and tailor hearing protection countermeasures to individual crewmembers. Micro-gravity, vibration, toxic fumes, air quality/composition, stress, temperature, physical exertion or some combination of the above factors may have interacted with moderate long-term noise exposure to cause significant hearing loss. Longitudinal studies will need to address what co-morbidity factors, such as radiation, toxicology, microgravity

  5. Acoustic Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  6. Acoustics of the Intonarumori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2005-04-01

    The Intonarumori were a family of musical instruments invented by the Italian futurist composer and painter Luigi Russolo. Each Intonarumori was made of a wooden parallelepiped sound box, inside which a wheel of different sizes and materials was setting into vibration a catgut or metal string. The pitch of the string was varied by using a lever, while the speed of the wheel was controlled by the performer using a crank. At one end of the string there was a drumhead that transmitted vibrations to the speaker. Unfortunately, all the original Intonarumori were destroyed after a fire during World War II. Since then, researchers have tried to understand the sound production mechanism of such instruments, especially by consulting the patents compiled by Russolo or by reading his book ``The art of noise.'' In this paper we describe the acoustics of the Intonarumori. Based on such description, we propose physical models that simulate such instruments. The intonarumori's string is modeled using a one dimensional waveguide, which is excited either by an impact or a friction model. The body of the instrument is modeled using a 3-D rectangular mesh, while the horn is considered as an omnidirectional radiator.

  7. Efficient estimation of decay parameters in acoustically coupled-spaces using slice sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasa, Tomislav; Xiang, Ning

    2009-09-01

    Room-acoustic energy decay analysis of acoustically coupled-spaces within the Bayesian framework has proven valuable for architectural acoustics applications. This paper describes an efficient algorithm termed slice sampling Monte Carlo (SSMC) for room-acoustic decay parameter estimation within the Bayesian framework. This work combines the SSMC algorithm and a fast search algorithm in order to efficiently determine decay parameters, their uncertainties, and inter-relationships with a minimum amount of required user tuning and interaction. The large variations in the posterior probability density functions over multidimensional parameter spaces imply that an adaptive exploration algorithm such as SSMC can have advantages over the exiting importance sampling Monte Carlo and Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithms. This paper discusses implementation of the SSMC algorithm, its initialization, and convergence using experimental data measured from acoustically coupled-spaces. PMID:19739741

  8. A numerical method for the calculation of dynamic response and acoustic radiation from an underwater structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Joseph, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    An approach combining finite element with boundary element methods is proposed to calculate the elastic vibration and acoustic field radiated from an underwater structure. The FEM software NASTRAN is employed for computation of the structural vibration. An uncoupled boundary element method, based on the potential decomposition technique, is described to determine the acoustic added mass and damping coefficients that result due to fluid loading effects. The acoustic matrices of added mass and damping coefficients are then added to the structural mass and damping matrices, respectively, by the DMAP modules of NASTRAN. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The complex eigenvalue analyses of underwater structure are obtained by NASTRAN solution sequence SOL107. Results obtained from this study suggest that the natural frequencies of underwater structures are only weakly dependent on the acoustic frequency if the acoustic wavelength is roughly twice as large as the maximum structural dimension.

  9. Feasibility of desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to monitor urinary steroid metabolites during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Rejšek, Jan; Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Kauppila, Tiina J; Cvačka, Josef; Kostiainen, Risto

    2015-06-23

    Steroids have important roles in the progress of pregnancy, and their study in maternal urine is a non-invasive method to monitor the steroid metabolome and its possible abnormalities. However, the current screening techniques of choice, namely immunoassays and gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, do not offer means for the rapid and non-targeted multi-analyte studies of large sample sets. In this study, we explore the feasibility of two ambient mass spectrometry methods in steroid fingerprinting. Urine samples from pregnant women were screened by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The urine samples were processed by solid phase extraction for the DESI measurements and by enzymatic hydrolysis and liquid-liquid-extraction for DAPPI. Consequently, steroid glucuronides and sulfates were detected by negative ion mode DESI-HRMS, and free steroids by positive ion mode DAPPI-HRMS. In DESI, signals of eleven steroid metabolite ions were found to increase as the pregnancy proceeded, and in DAPPI ten steroid ions showed at least an order of magnitude increase during pregnancy. In DESI, the increase was seen for ions corresponding to C18 and C21 steroid glucuronides, while DAPPI detected increased excretion of C19 and C21 steroids. Thus both techniques show promise for the steroid marker screening in pregnancy.

  10. Auger decay mechanism in photon-stimulated desorption of ions from surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.C.

    1983-11-01

    Photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of positive ions was studied with synchrotron radiation using an angle-integrating time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Ion yields as functions of photon energy near core levels were measured from condensed gases, alkali fluorides, and other alkali and alkaline earth halides. These results are compared to bulk photoabsorption measurements with emphasis on understanding fundamental desorption mechanisms. The applicability of the Auger decay mechanism, in which ion desorption is strictly proportional to surface absorption, is discussed in detail. The Auger decay model is developed in detail to describe Na/sup +/ and F/sup +/ desorption from NaF following Na(1s) excitation. The major decay pathways of the Na(1s) hole leading to desorption are described and equations for the energetics of ion desorption are developed. Ion desorption spectra of H/sup +/, Li/sup +/, and F/sup +/ are compared to bulk photoabsorption near the F(2s) and Li(1s) edges of LiF. A strong photon beam exposure dependence of ion yields from alkali fluorides is revealed, which may indicate the predominance of metal ion desorption from defect sites. The large role of indirect mechanisms in ion desorption condensed N/sub 2/-O/sub 2/ multilayers is demonstrated and discussed. Ion desorption spectra from several alkali halides and alkaline earth halides are compared to bulk photoabsorption spectra. Relative ion yields from BaF/sub 2/ and a series of alkali halides are discussed in terms of desorption mechanisms.

  11. Focusing of Acoustic Waves through Acoustic Materials with Subwavelength Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Xiao, Bingmu

    2013-05-01

    In this thesis, wave propagation through acoustic materials with subwavelength slits structures is studied. Guided by the findings, acoustic wave focusing is achieved with a specific material design. By using a parameter retrieving method, an effective medium theory for a slab with periodic subwavelength cut-through slits is successfully derived. The theory is based on eigenfunction solutions to the acoustic wave equation. Numerical simulations are implemented by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the two-dimensional acoustic wave equation. The theory provides the effective impedance and refractive index functions for the equivalent medium, which can reproduce the transmission and reflection spectral responses of the original structure. I analytically and numerically investigate both the validity and limitations of the theory, and the influences of material and geometry on the effective spectral responses are studied. Results show that large contrasts in impedance and density are conditions that validate the effective medium theory, and this approximation displays a better accuracy for a thick slab with narrow slits in it. Based on the effective medium theory developed, a design of a at slab with a snake shaped" subwavelength structure is proposed as a means of achieving acoustic focusing. The property of focusing is demonstrated by FDTD simulations. Good agreement is observed between the proposed structure and the equivalent lens pre- dicted by the theory, which leads to robust broadband focusing by a thin at slab.

  12. Acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöner, Michael G; Simon, Ralph; Schöner, Caroline R

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic communication is widespread and well-studied in animals but has been neglected in other organisms such as plants. However, there is growing evidence for acoustic communication in plant-animal interactions. While knowledge about active acoustic signalling in plants (i.e. active sound production) is still in its infancy, research on passive acoustic signalling (i.e. reflection of animal sounds) revealed that bat-dependent plants have adapted to the bats' echolocation systems by providing acoustic reflectors to attract their animal partners. Understanding the proximate mechanisms and ultimate causes of acoustic communication will shed light on an underestimated dimension of information transfer between plants and animals. PMID:27423052

  13. Modelling of acoustic transmission through perforated layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukeš V.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with modeling the acoustic transmission through a perforated interface plane separating two halfspaces occupied by the acoustic medium. We considered the two-scale homogenization limit of the standard acoustic problem imposed in the layer with the perforated periodic structure embedded inside. The homogenized transmission conditions govern the interface discontinuity of the acoustic pressure associated with the two halfspaces and the magnitude of the fictitious transversal acoustic velocity. By numerical examples we illustrate this novel approach of modeling the acoustic impedance of perforated interfaces.

  14. Spherical Kadomtsev–Petviashviliequation for dust acoustic waves with dust size distribution and two-charges-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Annou; S Bahamida; R Annou

    2011-03-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in dusty plasmas with negative as well as positive ions and the combined effects of bounded spherical geometry and the transverse perturbation and the size distribution of dust grains are studied. Using the perturbation method, a spherical Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (SKP) equation that describes the dust acoustic waves is deduced.

  15. Laser desorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of 29-kDa Au:SR cluster compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaff, T Gregory

    2004-11-01

    Positive and negative ions generated by laser-based ionization methods from three gold:thiolate cluster compounds are mass analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The three compounds have similar inorganic core masses ( approximately 29 kDa, approximately 145 Au atoms) but different n-alkanethiolate ligands associated with each cluster compound (Au:SR, R = butane, hexane, dodecane). Irradiation of neat films (laser desorption/ionization) and films generated by dilution of the cluster compounds in an organic acid matrix (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization) with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) produced distinct ion abundances that are relevant to different structural aspects of the cluster compound. Laser desorption/ionization of neat Au:SR compound films produces ions consistent with the inorganic core mass (i.e., devoid of original hydrocarbon content). Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization produces either ions with m/z values consistent with the core mass of the cluster compounds or ions with m/z values consistent with the approximate molecular weight of the cluster compounds, depending on ionization conditions. The ion abundances, and ionization conditions under which they are detected, provide insight into desorption/ionization processes for these unique cluster compounds as well as other analytes typically studied by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. PMID:15516109

  16. Desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out on the desorption of uranium from titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent with acidic eluent by the batch process. The rate of desorption of uranium with acidic eluent depended on temperature, showing an increase as the temperature was raised. But the rate of desorption with acidic eluent was less dependent on temperature than that obtained when mixed eluent of sodium carbonate-sodium hydrogencarbonate was used. The difference of the rate of desorption of uranium in the range of concentration from 0.3 to 0.5N was not found, and the rate of desorption with sulfuric acid was slightly higher than that obtained when hydrochloric acid was used. The amount of dissolved titanium decreased as the ratio of adsorbent to eluent (RAE) was increased. At RAE of 10%, the percentage of dissolved titanium (DTI) was below 0.38% with sulfuric acid, below 0.7% with hydrochloric acid. These values were found to be higher than the ones with the carbonate eluent. The elements except uranium, which were adsorbed on the adsorbent, were eluted simultaneously with acidic eluent. The regeneration of the adsorbent after desorption, therefore, was found to be unnecessary. In a repeated test of adsorption-desorption treatment up to five times, the percentage of uranium adsorbed from natural sea water was approximately constant of 85%. From these results, the application of column process to the desorption of uranium with acidic eluent at room temperature was proposed to be feasible. (author)

  17. Desorption of H atoms from graphite (0001) using XUV free electron laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemer, B.; Olsen, Thomas; Hoger, T.;

    2010-01-01

    The desorption of neutral H atoms from graphite with femtosecond XUV pulses is reported. The velocity distribution of the atoms peaks at extremely low kinetic energies. A DFT-based electron scattering calculation traces this distribution to desorption out of specific adsorption sites on graphite...

  18. [Effects of soil compositions on sorption and desorption behavior of tetrachloroethylene in soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lin; Qiu, Zhao-Fu; He, Long; Dou, Ying; Lü, Shu-Guang; Sui, Qian; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2013-12-01

    Sorption and desorption play an important role in the transport and the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in soil. In order to examine influences of different soil compositions on PCE sorption-desorption, equilibrium batch experiments were carried out using four sorbents (natural soil with 2.23% total organic carbon (TOC), H2O2-treated soil, 375 degrees C-treated soil and 600 degrees C-treated soil) with different initial PCE liquid concentrations (c0). The effects of main parameters (TOC, soft carbon, hard carbon, minerals, c0) on PCE sorption-desorption were investigated. At 16 degrees C, when c0 was increased from 5 to 80 mg x L(-1), the results showed that sorption and desorption isotherms of PCE on four sorbents can be best described by the Freundlich model (r2 > 0.96). The sorption contribution rate of SOM was higher than 60% in natural soil, and hard carbon was the main influencing factor,while the desorption contribution rate of SOM was close to that of minerals in natural soil, and soft carbon accounted for more than 80% in the total desorption contribution rate of SOM. In addition, the higher the c0, the higher the sorption contribution rate of PCE in hard carbon and desorption contribution rate of PCE in soft carbon and minerals were. Moreover, desorption of PCE from four sorbents exhibited hysteresis, and hard carbon played a remarkable role in the hysteresis of natural soil.

  19. Probing the crossover in CO desorption from single crystal to nanoparticulate Ru model catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Shane; Strebel, Christian Ejersbo; Vendelbo, Søren Bastholm;

    2011-01-01

    Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles.......Crossover in CO desorption behavior and nanoscale structure probed with STM from ruthenium single crystals to PVD and mass-selected nanoparticles....

  20. Desorption of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate and phosphate from goethite by different reagents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Y.; Koopal, L.K.; Lui, F.; Huang, Q.; Feng, X.

    2015-01-01

    Inositol phosphates are abundant organic phosphates found widely in the environment. The sorption and desorption of organic phosphate (Po) are important processes in controlling the mobility, bioavailability and fate of phosphorus (P) in soil and sediment. The desorption characteristics of myo-inosi

  1. Kinetic characteristics of coal gas desorption based on the pulsating injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Guanhua; Lin Baiquan; Zhai Cheng; Li Quangui; Peng Shen; Li Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the kinetic characteristics of coal gas desorption based on the pulsating injection (PI), the research experimentally studied the kinetic process of methane desorption in terms of the PI and hydrostatic injection (HI). The results show that the kinetic curves of methane desorption based on PI and HI are consistent with each other, and the diffusion model can best describe the characteristics of meth-ane desorption. Initial velocity, diffusion capacity and ultimate desorption amount of methane desorption after PI are greater than those after HI, and the ultimate desorption amount increases by 16.7-39.7%. Methane decay rate over the time is less than that of the HI. The PI influences the diffusion model param-eters, and it makes the mass transfer Biot number B0i decrease and the mass transfer Fourier series F00 increase. As a result, PI makes the methane diffusion resistance in the coal smaller, methane diffusion rate greater, mass transfer velocity faster and the disturbance range of methane concentration wider than HI. Therefore, the effect of methane desorption based on PI is better than that of HI.

  2. Effects of pH, organic acids, and inorganic ions on lead desorption from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desorption characteristics of lead in two variable charge soils (one developed from Arenaceous rock (RAR) and the other derived from Quaternary red earths (REQ)) were studied, and the effects of pH value, organic acid, and competitive ions were examined. Desorption of Pb2+ decreased from nearly 100.0 to 20.0% within pH 1.0-4.0 in both soils, and then the decrease diminished at pH > 4.0. Organic ligands at relatively low concentrations (≤10-3 mol L-1) slightly inhibited Pb2+ desorption, but enhanced Pb2+ desorption at higher concentrations. In this study, citric acid or acetic acid at higher concentrations (>10-3 mol L-1) had the greatest improvement of Pb2+ desorption, followed by malic acid; and the smallest was oxalic acid. Desorption of the adsorbed Pb2+ increased greatly with increasing concentrations of added Cu2+ or Zn2+. Applied Cu2+ increased Pb2+ desorption more than Zn2+ at the same loading. - The adsorption-desorption process is a basic and important reaction in soils controlling Pb2+ mobility and bioavailability

  3. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.;

    1995-01-01

    Femtosecond-pulse laser desorption is a process in which desorption is driven by a subpicosecond temperature pulse of order 5000 K in the substrate-adsorbate electron system, whose energy is transferred into the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom by a direct coupling mechanism. We presen...

  4. A Contaminant Trap as a Tool for Isolating and Measuring the Desorption Resistant Fraction of Soil Pollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; L. Olsen, Jannik; Gouliarmou, Varvara;

    2011-01-01

    Bioremediation of contaminated soils often leaves a desorption-resistant pollutant fraction behind in the soil, which in the present study was isolated with a combination of diffusive carrier and infinite diffusive sink. Such a diffusive sink was made by casting a composite of silicone and activa......Bioremediation of contaminated soils often leaves a desorption-resistant pollutant fraction behind in the soil, which in the present study was isolated with a combination of diffusive carrier and infinite diffusive sink. Such a diffusive sink was made by casting a composite of silicone...... by exhaustive extraction and compared with a biodegradation experiment. The concentration decline in the first soil was faster in the contaminant trap than in the biodegradation experiment, but the halting of the biodegradation process before reaching the legal threshold level was well indicated...... by the contaminant trap. The PAH concentrations in the second soil hardly decreased in the traps at all, in good agreement with the biodegradation experiment. The PAHs in this soil appeared to be “stuck” by strong sorption. The contaminant trap proved to be a practical approach to the isolation and quantification...

  5. Multidimensional scaling between acoustic and electric stimuli in cochlear implant users with contralateral hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeire, Katrien; Landsberger, David M.; Schleich, Peter; Van de Heyning, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptual relationship between acoustic and electric stimuli presented to CI users with functional contralateral hearing. Fourteen subjects with unilateral profound deafness implanted with a MED-EL CI scaled the perceptual differences between pure tones presented to the acoustic hearing ear and electric biphasic pulse trains presented to the implanted ear. The differences were analyzed with a multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis. Additionally, speech performance in noise was tested using sentence material presented in different spatial configurations while patients listened with both their acoustic hearing and implanted ears. Results of alternating least squares scaling (ALSCAL) analysis consistently demonstrate that a change in place of stimulation is in the same perceptual dimension as a change in acoustic frequency. However, the relative perceptual differences between the acoustic and the electric stimuli varied greatly across subjects. A degree of perceptual separation between acoustic and electric stimulation (quantified by relative dimensional weightings from an INDSCAL analysis) was hypothesized that would indicate a change in perceptual quality, but also be predictive of performance with combined acoustic and electric hearing. Perceptual separation between acoustic and electric stimuli was observed for some subjects. However, no relationship between the degree of perceptual separation and performance was found. PMID:24055624

  6. Piezoelectric surface acoustical phonon amplification in graphene on a GaAs substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, O. A. C.

    2014-06-01

    We study the interaction of Dirac Fermions in monolayer graphene on a GaAs substrate in an applied electric field by the combined action of the extrinsic potential of piezoelectric surface acoustical phonons of GaAs (piezoelectric acoustical (PA)) and of the intrinsic deformation potential of acoustical phonons in graphene (deformation acoustical (DA)). We find that provided the dc field exceeds a threshold value, emission of piezoelectric (PA) and deformation (DA) acoustical phonons can be obtained in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at low and high temperatures. We found that the phonon amplification rate RPA ,DA scales with TBGS -1 (S =PA,DA), TBGS being the Block -Gru¨neisen temperature. In the high-T Block -Gru¨neisen regime, extrinsic PA phonon scattering is suppressed by intrinsic DA phonon scattering, where the ratio RPA/RDA scales with ≈1/√n , n being the carrier concentration. We found that only for carrier concentration n ≤1010cm-2, RPA/RDA>1. In the low-T Block -Gru¨neisen regime, and for n =1010cm-2, the ratio RPA/RDA scales with TBGDA/TBGPA≈7.5 and RPA/RDA>1. In this regime, PA phonon dominates the electron scattering and RPA/RDA<1 otherwise. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as an acoustical phonon amplifier and a frequency-tunable acoustical phonon device.

  7. Sonification of acoustic emission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Manuel; Große, Christian

    2014-05-01

    While loading different specimens, acoustic emissions appear due to micro crack formation or friction of already existing crack edges. These acoustic emissions can be recorded using suitable ultrasonic transducers and transient recorders. The analysis of acoustic emissions can be used to investigate the mechanical behavior of different specimens under load. Our working group has undertaken several experiments, monitored with acoustic emission techniques. Different materials such as natural stone, concrete, wood, steel, carbon composites and bone were investigated. Also the experimental setup has been varied. Fire-spalling experiments on ultrahigh performance concrete and pullout experiments on bonded anchors have been carried out. Furthermore uniaxial compression tests on natural stone and animal bone had been conducted. The analysis tools include not only the counting of events but the analysis of full waveforms. Powerful localization algorithms and automatic onset picking techniques (based on Akaikes Information Criterion) were established to handle the huge amount of data. Up to several thousand events were recorded during experiments of a few minutes. More sophisticated techniques like moment tensor inversion have been established on this relatively small scale as well. Problems are related to the amount of data but also to signal-to-noise quality, boundary conditions (reflections) sensor characteristics and unknown and changing Greens functions of the media. Some of the acoustic emissions recorded during these experiments had been transferred into audio range. The transformation into the audio range was done using Matlab. It is the aim of the sonification to establish a tool that is on one hand able to help controlling the experiment in-situ and probably adjust the load parameters according to the number and intensity of the acoustic emissions. On the other hand sonification can help to improve the understanding of acoustic emission techniques for training

  8. Acoustic constituents of prosodic typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Masahiko

    Different languages sound different, and considerable part of it derives from the typological difference of prosody. Although such difference is often referred to as lexical accent types (stress accent, pitch accent, and tone; e.g. English, Japanese, and Chinese respectively) and rhythm types (stress-, syllable-, and mora-timed rhythms; e.g. English, Spanish, and Japanese respectively), it is unclear whether these types are determined in terms of acoustic properties, The thesis intends to provide a potential basis for the description of prosody in terms of acoustics. It argues for the hypothesis that the source component of the source-filter model (acoustic features) approximately corresponds to prosody (linguistic features) through several experimental-phonetic studies. The study consists of four parts. (1) Preliminary experiment: Perceptual language identification tests were performed using English and Japanese speech samples whose frequency spectral information (i.e. non-source component) is heavily reduced. The results indicated that humans can discriminate languages with such signals. (2) Discussion on the linguistic information that the source component contains: This part constitutes the foundation of the argument of the thesis. Perception tests of consonants with the source signal indicated that the source component carries the information on broad categories of phonemes that contributes to the creation of rhythm. (3) Acoustic analysis: The speech samples of Chinese, English, Japanese, and Spanish, differing in prosodic types, were analyzed. These languages showed difference in acoustic characteristics of the source component. (4) Perceptual experiment: A language identification test for the above four languages was performed using the source signal with its acoustic features parameterized. It revealed that humans can discriminate prosodic types solely with the source features and that the discrimination is easier as acoustic information increases. The

  9. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    CERN Document Server

    Luna, R; Domingo, M; Satorre, M A

    2008-01-01

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  10. Adsorption-desorption noise can be used for improving selectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Vidybida, A K

    2002-01-01

    Small chemical sensors are subjected to adsorption-desorption fluctuations which usually considered as noise contaminating useful signal. Based on temporal properties of this noise, it is shown that it can be made useful if proper processed. Namely, the signal, which characterizes the total amount of adsorbed analyte, should be subjected to a kind of amplitude discrimination (or level crossing discrimination) with certain threshold. When the amount is equal or above the threshold, the result of discrimination is standard dc signal, otherwise it is zero. Analytes are applied at low concentration: the mean adsorbed amount is below the threshold. The threshold is achieved from time to time thanking to the fluctuations. The signal after discrimination is averaged over a time window and used as the output of the whole device. Selectivity of this device is compared with that of its primary adsorbing sites, based on explicit description of the threshold-crossing statistics. It is concluded that the whole sensor may ...

  11. Temperature-programmed desorption for membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketola, R.A.; Grøn, C.; Lauritsen, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a novel technique for analyzing volatile organic compounds in air samples using a solid adsorbent together with temperature-programmed desorption and subsequent detection by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (TPD-MIMS). The new system has the advantage of a fast separation of compounds...... on the strength of the interaction between the individual compound and the adsorbent. The helium stream carries the desorbed compounds to a membrane inlet (90 degrees C) equipped with a thin (25 pm) silicone membrane. The thin membrane and the high temperature of the membrane inlet allows most volatile compounds...... prior to the detection by MIMS. The gaseous sample is simply adsorbed on the adsorbent, which is then rapidly heated from 30 degrees C to 250 degrees C at a rate of 50 degrees C/min, Trapped organic compounds are released from the adsorbent into a helium stream at different temperatures depending...

  12. Study of Thermal Desorption of Helium from Hydrogenated Zirconium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Wei-Ming; WEI Yu-Cheng; SHI Li-Qun

    2006-01-01

    @@ A new method prepared for helium and hydrogen co-containing Zr films is presented to simulate aging metal tritides, in which direct current magnetron sputtering with a He/H/Ar mixture is used. The retained amount and depth profiles of helium and hydrogen are determined by elastic recoil detection analysis. Thermal desorption spectrometry is applied to investigate He thermal release and the effect of hydrogen. It is found that the hightemperature peaks with a large mount of helium release obviously shifted toward lower temperature at high hydrogen concentration, especially at the hydride transformation region, and that the shapes of the release peaks also changed due to the additional hydrogen. However, at the low-temperature releasing region the peak intense decreases when phase transformation takes place. The mechanism of helium thermal release and the effect of hydrogen are also discussed.

  13. Polarization independent, integrated optical, acoustically tunable wavelength filters/switches with tapered acoustical directional coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H.; Schaefer, K.; Sohler, W.

    1994-11-01

    Enhanced sidelobe suppression of the filter characteristics of tunable acousto-optical mode converters in LiNbO3 has been achieved using for the first time tapered acoustical directional couplers. A sidelobe suppression of more than 15.5 dB could be demonstrated in a single stage device. By combining the mode converter with two integrated optical polarization splitters a polarization independent filter/wavelength selective switch has been fabricated with less than 3 dB intrinsic insertion loss, a polarization dependence of less than 1 dB, and a sidelobe suppression exceeding 14 dB.

  14. My 65 years in acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2001-05-01

    My entry into acoustics began as research assistant to Professor F. V. Hunt at Harvard University. I received my doctorate in 1940 and directed the Electro-Acoustic Laboratory at Harvard from October 1940 until September 1945. In 1947, I became a tenured associate professor at MIT, and, with Richard H. Bolt, formed the consulting firm Bolt and Beranek, that later included Robert B. Newman, becoming BBN. My most significant contributions before 1970 were design of wedge-lined anechoic chambers, systemization of noise reduction in ventilation systems, design of the world's largest muffler for the testing of supersonic jet engines at NASA's Lewis Laboratory in Cleveland, speech interference level, NC noise criterion curves, heading New York Port Authority's noise study that resulted in mufflers on jet aircraft, and steep aircraft climb procedures, and publishing books titled, Acoustical Measurements, Acoustics, Noise Reduction, Noise and Vibration Control, and Music, Acoustics and Architecture. As President of BBN, I supervised the formation of the group that built and operated the ARPANET (1969), which, when split in two (using TCP/IP protocol) became the INTERNET (1984). Since then, I have written two books on Concert Halls and Opera Houses and have consulted on four concert halls and an opera house.

  15. Multistage Reactive Transmission-Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kevin C; Comi, Troy J; Perry, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Elucidating reaction mechanisms is important for advancing many areas of science such as catalyst development. It is often difficult to probe fast reactions at ambient conditions with high temporal resolution. In addition, systems involving reagents that cross-react require analytical methods that can minimize interaction time and specify their order of introduction into the reacting system. Here, we explore the utility of transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI) for reaction monitoring by directing a microdroplet spray towards a series of meshes with micrometer-sized openings coated with reagents, an approach we call multistage reactive TM-DESI (TM (n) -DESI, where n refers to the number of meshes; n = 2 in this report). Various stages of the reaction are initiated at each mesh surface, generating intermediates and products in microdroplet reaction vessels traveling towards the mass spectrometer. Using this method, we investigated the reactivity of iron porphyrin catalytic hydroxylation of propranolol and other substrates. Our experimental results indicate that TM (n) -DESI provides the ability to spatially separate reagents and control their order of introduction into the reacting system, thereby minimizing unwanted reactions that lead to catalyst deactivation and degradation products. In addition, comparison with DESI-MS analyses (the Zare and Latour laboratories published results suggesting accessible reaction times <1 ms) of the reduction of dichlorophenolindophenol by L-ascorbic acid suggest that TM (1) -DESI can access reaction times less than 1 ms. Multiple meshes allow sequential stages of desorption/ionization per MS scan, increasing the number of analytes and reactions that can be characterized in a single experiment. PMID:26091888

  16. Contaminant sorption/desorption rates: Implications for groundwater restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely recognized that contaminants sorb appreciably to solids during groundwater treatment. Most early attempts to model the transport of sorbin solutes were restricted by assuming that local equilibrium prevailed with respect to sorption and desorption. More recent evidence from both field and laboratory experiments demonstrates that both sorption and desorption are rate-limited, and that the local equilibrium assumption is untenable as a basis for exact simulation of groundwater transport. The rate limitation can be explained in terms of physical diffusion processes; diffusional mass transfer resistances are believed to exert substantial effects a range of scales: microporous solids, aggregates, and layers. This paper will present data that quantify the magnitude of such diffusional resistances in terms of effective times to achieve equilibrium, and will demonstrate how slow equilibrium influences the performance of aquifer restoration. Roberts et al presented field evidence indicating that sorption equilibrium was not attained during the course of a two year transport experiment conducted at the Borden Ontario field site at a scale of tens of meters. Ball and Roberts showed that the sorption capacity of aquifer material is saturated very slowly, requiring equilibration times on the order of tens days for a moderately strong sorbing compound such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and hundreds of days for a more strongly sorbing compounds, tetrachlorobenzene (TeCB). Special care is required to conduct sorption measurements over such long time periods; as an expedient, the aquifer can be finely ground to expedite the sorption equilibrium measurements. A pore diffusion model applied to the rate data succeeded in interpreting the data consistently

  17. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku, Toyama (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  18. Orbital dynamics of a solar sail accelerated by thermal desorption of coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Ancona, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In this study we considered a solar sail coated with materials that undergo thermal desorption at a specific temperature, as a result of heating by solar radiation at a particular heliocentric distance. Three different scenarios, that only differ in the way the sail approaches the Sun, were analyzed and compared. In every case once the perihelion is reached, the sail coat undergoes thermal desorption. When the desorption process ends, the sail then escapes the Solar System having the conventional acceleration due to solar radiation pressure. Thermal desorption here comes as an additional source of solar sail acceleration beside traditional propulsion systems for extrasolar space exploration. The compared scenarios are the following: i. Hohmann transfer plus thermal desorption. In this scenario the sail would be carried as a payload to the perihelion with a conventional propulsion system by an Hohmann transfer from Earth's orbit to an orbit very close to the Sun (almost at 0.1 AU) and then be deployed there. i...

  19. Equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in Norway spruce during the first and second desorptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Engelund, Emil Tang; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.

    2011-01-01

    It is a commonly accepted notion that the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at a given relative humidity (RH) is highest during initial desorption of green wood due to an irreversible loss of hygroscopicity during the 1st desorption. The basis for this notion is investigated by assessing...... a boundary desorption isotherm. Instead, it becomes an intermediate desorption isotherm starting at the adsorption boundary curve and crossing over to eventually meet the desorption boundary curve. The results also show that vacuum drying at room temperature only gives a modest loss of hygroscopicity...... compared to the green state. Conversely, oven-drying at 103°C results in a more significant loss of hygroscopicity, except for RH above 96% where an increase in EMC surprisingly is seen....

  20. Adsorption, Diffusion and Thermal Desorption Features of Cyclopentane and Cyclohexane in Silicalite-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN, Lin-Hai; SONG, Li-Juan; ZHANG, Xiao-Tong; TANG, Ke; DAI, Zhen-Hua; SUN, Zhao-Lin

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption, diffusion and thermal desorption features of cyclopentane and cyclohexane in silicalite-1 have been investigated using the intelligent gravimetric technique. Both the saturation adsorption loadings and diffusion coefficient of cyclopentane were greater than those of cyclohexane. The diffusivity of cyclopentane was about one order of magnitude greater than that of cyclohexane at the same temperature and initial loading. For cyclopentane, there was only one kind of desorption process at adsorption loadings lower than 4 muc (molecule per unit cell), but two desorption processes appeared at the adsorption loadings higher than 4 muc. While for cyclohexane, one desorption process was found in the whole range of loadings. Both thermal desorption peaks of cyclopentane and cyclohexane moved to higher temperature region with increasing loading.