WorldWideScience

Sample records for acoustic absorption peak

  1. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  2. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.C.; Labonte, B.J.; Duvall, T.L. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity. 10 references.

  3. After Acoustic Peaks What's Next in CMB?

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, A R

    2002-01-01

    The advent of high signal-to-noise cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments has allowed detailed studies on the power spectrum of temperature fluctuations. The existence of acoustic oscillations in the anisotropy power spectrum is now established with the detection of the first two, and possibly the third, peaks. Beyond the acoustic peak structure, we consider cosmological and astrophysical information that can be extracted by pushing anisotropy observations to fine angular scales with higher resolution instruments. At small scales, a variety of contributions allow the use of CMB photons as a probe of the large scale structure: we outline possible studies related to understanding detailed physical properties such as the distribution of dark matter, baryons and pressure, and ways to measure the peculiar, transverse and rotational velocities of virialized halos such as galaxy clusters. Beyond the temperature, we consider several useful aspects of the CMB polarization and comment on an ultimate g...

  4. Cosmic Microwave Background Acoustic Peak Locations

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Zhen; Mulroe, Brigid; Narimani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and twelve extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g., that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 degrees out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models vs. numerical calculations. Here we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential tr...

  5. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  6. Absorption boundary conditions for geomertical acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, the absorption coefficients or surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed...... solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. It is concluded that the impedance and random incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials....

  7. Microwave peak absorption frequency of liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN GuangZe; CHEN MingDong

    2008-01-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction is a new effective method which has practical ap-plications in many fields. Microwave heating is one of its physical mechanisms, and it also has the characteristic of selectivity. When the applied microwave fre-quency equals a certain absorption frequency of the material (or specific compo-nent), the material will intensively absorb microwave energy. This is also known as resonant absorption, and the frequency is called the peak absorption frequency which depends on the physical structure of the material. In this work, dynamic hy-drogen bond energy was included in molecular activation energy; with the liquid cell model, the expression of interaction energy between dipolar molecules was derived. The rotational relaxation time was gotten from the Eyring viscosity formula. Then based on the relationship between dielectric dissipation coefficient and re-laxation time, the expression of microwave peak absorption frequency as a func-tion of the material physical structure, rotational inertia and electrical dipole mo-ment of molecules was established. These theoretical formulas were applied to water and benzene, and the calculated results agree fairly well with the experi-mental data. This work can not only deepen the study of the interaction between microwave and material, but also provide a possible guide for the experiment of microwave-assisted extraction.

  8. Microwave peak absorption frequency of liquid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction is a new effective method which has practical ap-plications in many fields. Microwave heating is one of its physical mechanisms,and it also has the characteristic of selectivity. When the applied microwave fre-quency equals a certain absorption frequency of the material (or specific compo-nent),the material will intensively absorb microwave energy. This is also known as resonant absorption,and the frequency is called the peak absorption frequency which depends on the physical structure of the material. In this work,dynamic hy-drogen bond energy was included in molecular activation energy; with the liquid cell model,the expression of interaction energy between dipolar molecules was derived. The rotational relaxation time was gotten from the Eyring viscosity formula. Then based on the relationship between dielectric dissipation coefficient and re-laxation time,the expression of microwave peak absorption frequency as a func-tion of the material physical structure,rotational inertia and electrical dipole mo-ment of molecules was established. These theoretical formulas were applied to water and benzene,and the calculated results agree fairly well with the experi-mental data. This work can not only deepen the study of the interaction between microwave and material,but also provide a possible guide for the experiment of microwave-assisted extraction.

  9. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Zhang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical study on interactions of electrons in graphene with surface acoustic waves (SAWs. We find that owing to momentum and energy conservation laws, the electronic transition accompanied by the SAW absorption cannot be achieved via inter-band transition channels in graphene. For graphene, strong absorption of SAWs can be observed in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at room temperature. The intensity of SAW absorption by graphene depends strongly on temperature and can be adjusted by changing the carrier density. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as frequency-tunable SAW devices.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON NATURAL FIBRES FOR GREEN ACOUSTIC ABSORPTION MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa Abd ALRahman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibre materials are one of the major ways to improve environmental pollution and new materials need to be considered to find the best solutions. This study presents an experimental investigation on pure micro porous materials from two types of fibres: Date Palm Fibre (DPF and Coconut Coir Fibre (CCF. This study was conducted to examine the potential for using these two types of fibres as sound absorbers. To account for the effects of the characteristics of these materials, such as thickness and density, on the acoustic absorption coefficient of a sound absorber, the measurements were conducted in an impedance tube on normal incidence acoustic absorption. The experimental data indicate that two peak values of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient (AAC are 0.98 at 1381.25 Hz-1506.25 Hz for the 40 mm thick sample and the AAC at high frequency for the same thickness is 0.99 at 4521.88-4906.25 Hz; for 20 mm thickness, the peak value is 0.84 at 2606.25-3025 Hz. The AAC of the CCF sample is 0.77 at 2434.38-2543.75 Hz for a 40 mm thickness, but for 20 mm thickness, the value is 0.71 at 4184.38-4575 Hz. The Acoustic Absorption Coefficients (AAC of the two types of materials were increased at all frequencies when the thickness of the sample was increased. The results show that date palm fibre and coconut coir fibre have good acoustic properties at low and high frequencies and can be used as an alternative replacement to conventional products. The comparisons between the two panels show a good potential because they are cheaper and lighter in comparison to asbestos and rock wool industrial materials.

  11. Statistical method for predicting protein absorption peaks in terahertz region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terahertz vibrational spectroscopy has recently been demonstrated as a novel noninvasive technique for the characterization of biological molecules. But the interpretation of the experimentally measured terahertz absorption bands requires robust computational method. In this paper, we present a statistical method for predicting the absorption peak positions of a macromolecule in the terahertz region. The essence of this method is to calculate the absorption spectra of a biological molecule based on multiple short scale molecular dynamics trajectories instead of using a long time scale trajectory. The method was employed to calculate the absorption peak positions of the protein, thioredoxin from Escherichia coli (E.coli), in the range of 10-25 cm-1 to verify the reliability of this statistical method. The predicted absorption peak positions of thioredoxin show good correlation with measured results demonstrating that the proposed method is effective in terahertz absorption spectra modeling. Such approach can be applied to predict characteristic spectral features of biomolecules in the terahertz region. (authors)

  12. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-08-01

    A physically motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  13. The baryon acoustic oscillation peak: a flexible standard ruler

    OpenAIRE

    Roukema, Boudewijn F

    2015-01-01

    For about a decade, the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak at about 105 Mpc/h has provided a standard ruler test of the LCDM cosmological model, a member of the Friedmann--Lemaitre--Robertson--Walker (FLRW) family of cosmological models---according to which comoving space is rigid. However, general relativity does not require comoving space to be rigid. During the virialisation epoch, when the most massive structures form by gravitational collapse, it should be expected that comoving spac...

  14. Is the baryon acoustic oscillation peak a cosmological standard ruler?

    OpenAIRE

    Roukema, Boudewijn F; Buchert, Thomas; Fujii, Hirokazu; Ostrowski, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    In the standard model of cosmology, the Universe is static in comoving coordinates; expansion occurs homogeneously and is represented by a global scale factor. The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak location is a statistical tracer that represents, in the standard model, a fixed comoving-length standard ruler. Recent gravitational collapse should modify the metric, rendering the effective scale factor, and thus the BAO standard ruler, spatially inhomogeneous. Using the Sloan Digital Sky S...

  15. Is the baryon acoustic oscillation peak a cosmological standard ruler?

    CERN Document Server

    Roukema, Boudewijn F; Fujii, Hirokazu; Ostrowski, Jan J

    2016-01-01

    In the standard model of cosmology, the Universe is static in comoving coordinates; expansion occurs homogeneously and is represented by a global scale factor. The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak location is a statistical tracer that represents, in the standard model, a fixed comoving-length standard ruler. Recent gravitational collapse should modify the metric, rendering the effective scale factor, and thus the BAO standard ruler, spatially inhomogeneous. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we show to high significance (P < 0.001) that the spatial compression of the BAO peak location increases as the spatial paths' overlap with superclusters increases. Detailed observational and theoretical calibration of this BAO peak location environment dependence will be needed when interpreting the next decade's cosmological surveys.

  16. The baryon acoustic oscillation peak: a flexible standard ruler

    CERN Document Server

    Roukema, Boudewijn F

    2016-01-01

    For about a decade, the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak at about 105 Mpc/h has provided a standard ruler test of the LCDM cosmological model, a member of the Friedmann--Lemaitre--Robertson--Walker (FLRW) family of cosmological models---according to which comoving space is rigid. However, general relativity does not require comoving space to be rigid. During the virialisation epoch, when the most massive structures form by gravitational collapse, it should be expected that comoving space evolves inhomogeneous curvature as structure grows. The BAO peak standard ruler should also follow this inhomogeneous evolution if the comoving rigidity assumption is false. This "standard" ruler has now been detected to be flexible, as expected under general relativity.

  17. Absorption correction of peak positions for neutron strain measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In angle-dispersive neutron strain scanning the information about residual strain comes from the whole gauge volume that is defined by slits in the incoming and diffracted beams. Since the intensity of the neutron beam decreases with the amount of material it has travelled, neutrons diffracted from different locations within the gauge volume contribute with different intensities to the recorded diffraction peak. This can lead to peak shifts, and thus apparent strains. The magnitude of this peak shift depends mostly on the beam attenuation and the size of the gauge volume, but also on the sample geometry and position of the gauge volume within the sample. The peak shift plays a significant role when the size of the gauge volume becomes large because of peak broadening by the sample. An analytic expression for the peak shift was derived for a simple geometry to evaluate a numerical simulation. The numerical simulation was developed to quantify necessary corrections in detail. The attenuation-induced peak shift was demonstrated by measurements on a strain-free powder sample and the results were compared with the numerical predictions.

  18. Mechanical Parameters Effects on Acoustic Absorption at Polymer Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyes Dib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer foams have acoustic absorption properties that play an important role in reducing noise level. When the skeleton is set to motion, it is necessary to use generalized Biot-Allard model which takes into account the deformation of the skeleton and the fluid and the interactions between them. The aim of this work is to study the quality of acoustic absorption in polyurethane foam and to show the importance of the structural vibration of this foam on the absorption by varying mechanical parameters (Young’s modulus E, Poisson’s coefficient ν, structural damping factor η, and the density ρ1. We calculated the absorption coefficient analytically using classical Biot formulation (us, uf and numerically using Biot mixed formulation (us, p in 3D COMSOL Multiphysics. The obtained results are compared together and show an excellent agreement. Afterwards, we studied the effect of varying each mechanical parameter independently on the absorption in interval of ±20%. The simulations show that these parameters have an influence on the sound absorption around the resonance frequency fr.

  19. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  20. Improving reconstruction of the baryon acoustic peak : the effect of local environment

    OpenAIRE

    Achitouv, Ixandra; Blake, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Precise measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale as a standard ruler in the clustering pattern of large-scale structure is a central goal of current and future galaxy surveys. The BAO peak may be sharpened using the technique of density-field reconstruction, in which the bulk displacements of galaxies are estimated using a Zel'dovitch approximation. We use numerical simulations to demonstrate how the accuracy of this approximation depends strongly on local environment, and ...

  1. Investigation on peak frequency of the microwave absorption for carbonyl iron/epoxy resin composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bochong; Wei Jianqiang; Yang Yong; Wang Tao [Institute of Applied Magnetics, Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li Fashen, E-mail: lifs@lzu.edu.c [Institute of Applied Magnetics, Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Microwave absorbing characteristics of carbonyl iron/epoxy resin composite with various volume concentrations were investigated in 0.1-18 GHz. According to the electromagnetic parameters and thicknesses of the sample, numerical calculation and experiment have demonstrated that the frequency dependence of the microwave absorption comply with the quarter-wavelength ({lambda}/4) matching model that may explain not only the peak frequency but also the number of the peaks. It implies that the quarter-wavelength condition can be successfully applied to understand and predict the peak frequency of the microwave absorption for ferromagnetic metal-based composites. - Research highlights: > The dip in RL complies with the quarter-wavelength condition. > Two dips appear simultaneously when the sample thickness is thicker than the critical thickness t{sub c}{sup 3/4}. > The peak frequency of the dips can be manipulated by changing the sample thickness.

  2. Acoustic excitations in glassy sorbitol and their relation with the fragility and the boson peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruta, B.; Baldi, G.; Scarponi, F.; Fioretto, D.; Giordano, V. M.; Monaco, G.

    2012-12-01

    We report a detailed analysis of the dynamic structure factor of glassy sorbitol by using inelastic X-ray scattering and previously measured light scattering data [B. Ruta, G. Monaco, F. Scarponi, and D. Fioretto, Philos. Mag. 88, 3939 (2008), 10.1080/14786430802317586]. The thus obtained knowledge on the density-density fluctuations at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic length scale has been used to address two debated topics concerning the vibrational properties of glasses. The relation between the acoustic modes and the universal boson peak (BP) appearing in the vibrational density of states of glasses has been investigated, also in relation with some recent theoretical models. Moreover, the connection between the elastic properties of glasses and the slowing down of the structural relaxation process in supercooled liquids has been scrutinized. For what concerns the first issue, it is here shown that the wave vector dependence of the acoustic excitations can be used, in sorbitol, to quantitatively reproduce the shape of the boson peak, supporting the relation between BP and acoustic modes. For what concerns the second issue, a proper study of elasticity over a wide spatial range is shown to be fundamental in order to investigate the relation between elastic properties and the slowing down of the dynamics in the corresponding supercooled liquid phase.

  3. A new optical absorption peak for Au/SiO sub 2 nanocomposite formed by sonochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fu Gan Hua; Gan Yan Jie; Hu Jing Lian

    2003-01-01

    An Au nanoparticle/monolithic mesoporous silica assembly was synthesized by means of ultrasonic irradiation. For this as-prepared Au/silica sample, exposure to ambient air (or ageing) at room temperature (10 deg. C) and subsequent drying at 120 deg. C induce a new optical absorption at 460 nm in addition to the normal surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au nanoparticles. Further drying results in diminishing and even disappearance of this new peak accompanied by enhancement of the normal SPR. Further experiments revealed that the exposure to ambient air for sufficient time at room temperature after irradiation plays a crucial role in the appearance of the new peak after subsequent drying at 120 deg. C. This new optical absorption peak may be associated with Au clusters with size less than 1 nm. (letter to the editor)

  4. Characteristic absorption peak of the human blood measured with differential photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new highly sensitive spectroscopy technique- differential photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is presented in this paper. The blood samples from 3 healthy persons, patients with leukemia, patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), and 40 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were measured by the PAS technique. The normalized, the first order, and the second order differential photoacoustic spectroscopy of the blood were gained. The results show that (ⅰ) weak absorption peaks or shoulder peaks, which could not be found using conventional photoacoustic spectroscopy, were determined by the first order and the second order differential photoacoustic spectroscopy which significantly improve the sensitivity of detection; and (ii) that two characteristic absorption peaks were found at the wavelength of 637 and 664 nm in all persons' blood samples by the differential photoacoustic spectroscopy technique. This experiment concludes that the differential photoacoustic spectroscopy technique is superior to the conventional photoacoustic spectroscopy technique in detecting photoacoustic spectroscopy of biological samples.

  5. A new type of artificial structure to achieve broadband omnidirectional acoustic absorption

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, L.-Y.

    2013-10-18

    We present a design for a two-dimensional omnidirectional acoustic absorber that can achieve 98.6% absorption of acoustic waves in water, forming an effective acoustic black hole. This artificial black hole consists of an absorptive core coated with layers of periodically distributed polymer cylinders embedded in water. Effective medium theory describes the response of the coating layers to the acoustic waves. The polymer parameters can be adjusted, allowing practical fabrication of the absorber. Since the proposed structure does not rely on resonances, it is applicable to broad bandwidths. The design might be extended to a variety of applications.

  6. A new type of artificial structure to achieve broadband omnidirectional acoustic absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yang Zheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a design for a two-dimensional omnidirectional acoustic absorber that can achieve 98.6% absorption of acoustic waves in water, forming an effective acoustic black hole. This artificial black hole consists of an absorptive core coated with layers of periodically distributed polymer cylinders embedded in water. Effective medium theory describes the response of the coating layers to the acoustic waves. The polymer parameters can be adjusted, allowing practical fabrication of the absorber. Since the proposed structure does not rely on resonances, it is applicable to broad bandwidths. The design might be extended to a variety of applications.

  7. THE LIMITING ABSORPTION METHOD FOR A TRANSMISSION PROBLEM IN ACOUSTIC SCATTERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Messaoud SOUILAH

    2006-01-01

    The limiting absorption principle is used to solve the scattering problem of time harmonic acoustic waves by penetrable objects in Sobolev spaces. The method is based on integral representation of the solution using the Green's kernel of the Helmholtz equation.

  8. Absorption and impedance boundary conditions for phased geometrical-acoustics methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-01-01

    developed on which boundary condition produces accurate results. In this study, various boundary conditions in terms of normal, random, and field incidence absorption coefficients and normal incidence surface impedance are used in a phased beam tracing model, and the simulated results are validated......Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, both absorption coefficients and surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been...... with boundary element solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. Effects of the neglect of reflection phase shift are also investigated. It is concluded that the impedance, random incidence, and field incidence absorption boundary conditions produce...

  9. Attenuation Analysis and Acoustic Pressure Levels for Combined Absorptive Mufflers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Vasile

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the pressure-wave propagation in a muffler for an internal combustion engine in case of two combined mufflers geometry. The approach is generally applicable to analyzing the damping of propagation of harmonic pressure waves. The paper purpose is to show finite elements analysis of both inductive and resistive damping in pressure acoustics. The main output is the attenuation and acoustic pressure levels for the frequency range 50 Hz–3000 Hz.

  10. Producing of Impedance Tube for Measurement of Acoustic Absorption Coefficient of Some Sound Absorber Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Golmohammadi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Noise is one of the most important harmful agents in work environment. In spit of industrial improvements, exposure with over permissible limit of noise is counted as one of the health complication of workers. In Iran, do not exact information of the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Iranian manufacturer have not laboratory for measured of sound absorbance of their products, therefore using of sound absorber is limited for noise control in industrial and non industrial constructions. The goal of this study was to design an impedance tube based on pressure method for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient of acoustic materials.Materials & Methods: In this study designing of measuring system and method of calculation of sound absorption based on a available equipment and relatively easy for measurement of the sound absorption coefficient related to ISO10534-1 was performed. Measuring system consist of heavy asbestos tube, a pure tone sound generator, calibrated sound level meter for measuring of some commonly of sound absorber materials was used. Results: In this study sound absorption coefficient of 23 types of available acoustic material in Iran was tested. Reliability of results by three repeat of measurement was tested. Results showed that the standard deviation of sound absorption coefficient of study materials was smaller than .Conclusion: The present study performed a necessary technology of designing and producing of impedance tube for determining of acoustical materials absorption coefficient in Iran.

  11. Stimulated emission and multi-peaked absorption in a four level N-type atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kai; Gu Ying; Gong Qi-Huang

    2007-01-01

    Absorption and refrtion of the inner transition F2 (→) F3 of the closed four level N-type atom have been investigated under a weak field. The outer transitions F1 (→) F3 and F2 (→) F4 are resonantly interacted with drive field with frequency ωc and Rabi frequency Ωc, and saturation field with ωs and Ωs, respectively. For the suitable Rabi frequencies Ωc and Ωs, we obtain the Mollow absorption spectrum of probe field. The reason is that the drive field excites the atom to the upper level F3 and simultaneously the saturation field takes the atom out of the lower level F2, leading to the stimulated emission. Meanwhile, due to the dynamic energy splitting induced by the drive and saturation fields, the two- and four-peaked absorption spectra are observed. At the zero off-resonance detuning of probe field, we also find the transfer of dispersion from negative to positive with an increment of Ωs. Finally, the refractive index enhancement is predicted for a wide spectral region.

  12. THERMAL ABSORPTION AS THE CAUSE OF GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA IN PULSARS AND MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, Wojciech; Rożko, Karolina; Kijak, Jarosław; Melikidze, George I., E-mail: boe@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl [Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Gora, Szafrana 2, 65-516 Zielona Gora (Poland)

    2015-07-20

    We present a model that explains the observed deviation of the spectra of some pulsars and magnetars from the power-law spectra that are seen in the bulk of the pulsar population. Our model is based on the assumption that the observed variety of pulsar spectra can be naturally explained by the thermal free–free absorption that takes place in the surroundings of the pulsars. In this context, the variety of the pulsar spectra can be explained according to the shape, density, and temperature of the absorbing media and the optical path of the line of sight across it. We have put specific emphasis on the case of the radio magnetar SGR J1745–2900 (also known as the Sgr A* magnetar), modeling the rapid variations of the pulsar spectrum after the outburst of 2013 April as due to the free–free absorption of the radio emission in the electron material ejected during the magnetar outburst. The ejecta expands with time and consequently the absorption rate decreases and the shape of the spectrum changes in such a way that the peak frequency shifts toward the lower radio frequencies. In the hypothesis of an absorbing medium, we also discuss the similarity between the spectral behavior of the binary pulsar B1259–63 and the spectral peculiarities of isolated pulsars.

  13. Parametrization of acoustic boundary absorption and dispersion properties in time-domain source/receiver reflection measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hoop, A.T.; Lam, C.H.; Kooij, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form analytic time-domain expressions are obtained for the acoustic pressure associated with the reflection of a monopole point-source excited impulsive acoustic wave by a planar boundary with absorptive and dispersive properties. The acoustic properties of the boundary are modeled as a local

  14. Analogy electromagnetism-acoustics: Validation and application to local impedance active control for sound absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas, Laurent; Furstoss, M.; Galland, Marie-Annick

    1998-01-01

    An analogy between electromagnetism and acoustics is presented in 2D. The propagation of sound in presence of absorbing material is modeled using an open boundary microwave package. Validation is performed through analytical and experimental results. Application to local impedance active control for free field sound absorption is finally described.

  15. Acoustic contributions of a sound absorbing blanket placed in a double panel structure: Absorption Versus Transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Doutres, Olivier; 10.1121/1.3458845

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose a simple tool to estimate the absorption vs. transmission loss contributions of a multilayered blanket unbounded in a double panel structure and thus guide its optimization. The normal incidence airborne sound transmission loss of the double panel structure, without structure-borne connections, is written in terms of three main contributions; (i) sound transmission loss of the panels, (ii) sound transmission loss of the blanket and (iii) sound absorption due to multiple reflections inside the cavity. The method is applied to four different blankets frequently used in automotive and aeronautic applications: a non-symmetric multilayer made of a screen in sandwich between two porous layers and three symmetric porous layers having different pore geometries. It is shown that the absorption behavior of the blanket controls the acoustic behavior of the treatment at low and medium frequencies and its transmission loss at high frequencies. Acoustic treatment having poor sound ...

  16. WE-D-BRF-02: Acoustic Signal From the Bragg Peak for Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S; Assmann, W; Fink, A; Thirolf, P; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Chair for Medical Physics, Munich (Germany); Kellnberger, S; Omar, M; Ntziachristos, V [Technical University Munich, Chair for Biological Imaging, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Center Munich, Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Neuherberg (Germany); Gaebisch, C [Munich University of Applied Science, Institute for Micro- and Nano-technology, Munich (Germany); Moser, M; Dollinger, G [Universitaet der Bundeswehr, Institute for Applied Physics and Instrumentation, Neubiberg (Germany); Sergiadis, G [Signal Processing and Biomedical Technology Unit, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams. Aim of this work is to study the feasibility of determining the ion range with sub-mm accuracy by use of high frequency ultrasonic (US) transducers and to image the Bragg peak by tomography. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity, length and repetition rate. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based US detectors (3.5 MHz and 10 MHz central frequencies). For tomography a 64 channel US detector array was used and moved along the ion track by a remotely controlled motor stage. Results: A clear signal of the Bragg peak was visible for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Range measurements were reproducible within +/− 20 micrometer and agreed well with Geant4 simulations. The tomographic reconstruction does not only allow to measure the ion range but also the beam spot size at the Bragg peak position. Conclusion: Range verification by acoustic means is a promising new technique for treatment modalities where the tumor can be localized by US imaging. Further improvement of sensitivity is required to account for higher attenuation of the US signal in tissue, as well as lower energy density in the Bragg peak in realistic treatment cases due to higher particle energy and larger spot sizes. Nevertheless, the acoustic range verification approach could offer the possibility of combining anatomical US imaging with Bragg Peak imaging in the near future. The work was funded by the DFG cluster of excellence Munich Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  17. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF. Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB, 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  18. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  19. Experiments on hypersonic boundary layer transition on blunt cones with acoustic-absorption coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiplyuk, A.; Lukashevich, S.; Bountin, D.; Maslov, A.; Knaus, H.

    2012-01-01

    The laminar-turbulent transition is studied experimentally on a cone with an acoustic-absorption coating and with different nose bluntness in a high-speed flow. The acoustic-absorption coating is a felt metal sheet with a random microstructure. Experiments were carried out on a 1-meter length 7 degree cone at free-stream Mach number M = 8 and zero angle of attack. Locations of the laminar-turbulent transition are detected using heat flux distributions registered by calorimeter sensors. In addition, boundary layer pulsations are measured by means of ultrafast heat flux sensors. It is shown that the laminar-turbulent transition is caused by the second-mode instability, and the laminar run extends as the bluntness is increased. The porous coating effectively suppresses this instability for all tested bluntness values and 1.3-1.85 times extends the laminar run.

  20. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  1. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  2. Hydrogen Balmer beta: The separation between line peaks for plasma electron density diagnostics and self-absorption test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a diagnostic technique for the measurement of plasma electron number density, Ne, based on the wavelength separation between peaks, ΔλPS, of hydrogen Balmer beta line, Hβ. In favor of the proposed diagnostic technique we demonstrate high sensitivity of ΔλPS on Ne and low sensitivity on plasma elementary processes and plasma parameters that may distort the line profile. These properties of ΔλPS enable reliable Ne plasma diagnostics in the presence of considerable self-absorption. On the basis of available theoretical data tables for the Hβ line profiles, simple Ne=f(ΔλPS) formulas are proposed. Their validity is experimentally confirmed in a low initial pressure pulsed discharge for the Ne range of (0.2–7)⁎1023 m−3. The agreement of the proposed formulas with another diagnostic technique is well within 10%. In addition, the difference in Ne values obtained from peak separation and from the Hβ line width is successfully used as a self-absorption test for line profile. - Highlights: • Separation between peaks of Hβ line proposed for electron density diagnostics. • Derived formulas for peak separations versus electron density. • Formulas tested in high electron density low pressure pulsed arc. • Applications of formulas in optically thick plasmas proven. • Method for hydrogen Balmer beta line self-absorption testing proposed

  3. Objective Dysphonia Measures in the Program Praat: Smoothed Cepstral Peak Prominence and Acoustic Voice Quality Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Maryn; D. Weenink

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A version of the "smoothed cepstral peak prominence" (ie, CPPS) has recently been implemented in the program Praat. The present study therefore estimated the correspondence between the original CPPS from the program SpeechTool and Praat's version of the CPPS. Because the CPPS is the main fac

  4. A Novel Acoustic Sensor Approach to Classify Seeds Based on Sound Absorption Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Green

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A non-destructive and novel in situ acoustic sensor approach based on the sound absorption spectra was developed for identifying and classifying different seed types. The absorption coefficient spectra were determined by using the impedance tube measurement method. Subsequently, a multivariate statistical analysis, i.e., principal component analysis (PCA, was performed as a way to generate a classification of the seeds based on the soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA method. The results show that the sound absorption coefficient spectra of different seed types present characteristic patterns which are highly dependent on seed size and shape. In general, seed particle size and sphericity were inversely related with the absorption coefficient. PCA presented reliable grouping capabilities within the diverse seed types, since the 95% of the total spectral variance was described by the first two principal components. Furthermore, the SIMCA classification model based on the absorption spectra achieved optimal results as 100% of the evaluation samples were correctly classified. This study contains the initial structuring of an innovative method that will present new possibilities in agriculture and industry for classifying and determining physical properties of seeds and other materials.

  5. Acoustic anechoic layers with singly periodic array of scatterers: Computational methods, absorption mechanisms, and optimal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai-Bin; Li, Yue; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Wen, Ji-Hong; Wen, Xi-Sen

    2014-10-01

    The acoustic properties of anechoic layers with a singly periodic array of cylindrical scatterers are investigated. A method combined plane wave expansion and finite element analysis is extended for out-of-plane incidence. The reflection characteristics of the anechoic layers with cavities and locally resonant scatterers are discussed. The backing is a steel plate followed by an air half space. Under this approximate zero transmission backing condition, the reflection reduction is induced by the absorption enhancement. The absorption mechanism is explained by the scattering/absorption cross section of the isolated scatterer. Three types of resonant modes which can induce efficient absorption are revealed. Due to the fact that the frequencies of the resonant modes are related to the size of the scatterers, anechoic layers with scatterers of mixed size can broaden the absorption band. A genetic optimization algorithm is adopted to design the anechoic layer with scatterers of mixed size at a desired frequency band from 2 kHz to 10 kHz for normal incidence, and the influence of the incident angle is also discussed.

  6. Effects of Noise and Absorption on High Frequency Measurements of Acoustic-Backscatter from Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Furusawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative echosounders operating at multiple frequencies (e.g., 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, 333, and 710 kHz are often used to observe fish and zooplankton and identify their species. At frequencies above 100 kHz, the absorption attenuation increases rapidly and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Also, incomplete compensation for the attenuation may result in measurement error. This paper addresses the effects of the attenuation and noise on high frequency measurements of acoustic backscatter from fish. It is shown that measurements of a fish with target strength of −40 dB at 200 m depth are limited by SNR to frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz, absorption coefficients must be matched to local environmental conditions.

  7. Resonance scattering, absorption and off-centre abundance peaks in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, J S

    2006-01-01

    A possible explanation for the central abundance dips found from spatially-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of several groups and clusters of galaxies is resonance scattering. A number of the prominent iron emission lines are resonance lines. We construct a unique spectral model which takes account of resonance scattering for several thousand resonance lines, projection effects, photoelectric absorption, and allows direct spectral fitting. We apply our model to Chandra observations of two clusters with pronounced central abundance dips, Centaurus and Abell 2199. The results show that the effect of resonance scattering on emission from the centre of the cluster can be as much as 30 per cent for the Fe-K resonance lines, and 10 per cent for several Fe-L lines, if turbulence is low. The change to the metallicities obtained by fitting low resolution CCD spectra is at most 10 per cent. Accounting for resonance scattering does not remove the central dip. Allowing for internal absorption within the Centaurus significantl...

  8. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. PMID:25465962

  9. Identification of Material Parameters for the Simulation of Acoustic Absorption of Fouled Sintered Fiber Felts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lippitz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As a reaction to the increasing noise pollution, caused by the expansion of airports close to residential areas, porous trailing edges are investigated to reduce the aeroacoustic noise produced by flow around the airframe. Besides mechanical and acoustical investigations of porous materials, the fouling behavior of promising materials is an important aspect to estimate the performance in long-term use. For this study, two sintered fiber felts were selected for a long-term fouling experiment where the development of the flow resistivity and accumulation of dirt was observed. Based on 3D structural characterizations obtained from X-ray tomography of the initial materials, acoustic models (Biot and Johnson–Champoux–Allard in the frame of the transfer matrix method were applied to the sintered fiber felts. Flow resistivity measurements and the measurements of the absorption coefficient in an impedance tube are the basis for a fouling model for sintered fiber felts. The contribution will conclude with recommendations concerning the modeling of pollution processes of porous materials.

  10. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F. [University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia); Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics (SiFA), The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKinley, B.; Briggs, F. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bernardi, G. [Square Kilometre Array South Africa (SKA SA), Cape Town 7405 (South Africa); Bowman, J. D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E. [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Deshpande, A. A. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Goeke, R., E-mail: s.tingay@curtin.edu.au [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  11. Study on After Peak Acoustic Emission Features of Rock Type Material%峰后岩石类材料的声发射特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐珺; 刘卫群; 费晓东

    2011-01-01

    Based on the acoustic emission test system and the rock acoustic emission theory, the uniaxial compressive tests were made on two different property rock and cement-sand grouts.The mechanics feature curve, the acoustic emission ringing numbers and the acoustic emission accumulated ringing number curve of full three sample failures' processes were obtained.A study in sections on the relationship between the deformation features and stress as well as the tinging number and time was conducted.The study showed that the acoustic emission of the rock type material would be affected by the rock strength, joint fissure and crystal grain hardness.The acoustic emission ringing number of the partial soft rock material at the elasticity and the elastic-plastic stage would be steadily increased in unit time and but when the rock material was near the peak strength, the acoustic emission occurred would be in a relative quiet phenomenon.The activity of the after peak acoustic emission would be mainly affected by the rock strength.The comparison on the acoustic emission features of the different rock failures could provide referen to evealuate the stability of natural and artificial rock projects.%基于声发射试验系统和岩石声发射理论,对2种不同性质的岩石和水泥砂浆进行了单轴压缩试验,得到了3种试样破坏全过程的力学特性曲线、声发射振铃数和累计振铃数曲线,针对其变形特征及应力、振铃数与时间的关系分阶段进行了研究.研究表明:岩石类材料声发射受岩石强度、节理裂隙和晶粒软硬大小等的影响;部分质软岩石类材料在弹性、弹塑性阶段,其单位时间声发射振铃数逐步增加,但在接近强度峰值时出现声发射相对平静现象;峰后声发射活性主要受岩石的强度影响.对比不同岩石的破坏声发射特性,可为天然和人工岩土工程稳定性评估提供参数.

  12. A Correction of Random Incidence Absorption Coefficients for the Angular Distribution of Acoustic Energy under Measurement Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2009-01-01

    tracing method for various room shapes and source positions. The averaged angular distribution is found to be similar to a Gaussian distribution. As a result, an angle-weighted absorption coefficient was proposed by considering the angular energy distribution to improve the agreement between......Most acoustic measurements are based on an assumption of ideal conditions. One such ideal condition is a diffuse and reverberant field. In practice, a perfectly diffuse sound field cannot be achieved in a reverberation chamber. Uneven incident energy density under measurement conditions can cause...... discrepancies between the measured value and the theoretical random incidence absorption coefficient. Therefore the angular distribution of the incident acoustic energy onto an absorber sample should be taken into account. The angular distribution of the incident energy density was simulated using the beam...

  13. The Spectral Variability of the GHz-Peaked Spectrum Radio Source PKS 1718-649 and a Comparison of Absorption Models

    CERN Document Server

    Tingay, S J; Collier, J D; Rees, G; Callingham, J R; Stevens, J; Carretti, E; Wayth, R B; Wong, G F; Trott, C M; McKinley, B; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; Emrich, D; Gaensler, B M; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2014-01-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over three epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ~3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low and high frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free-free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free-free optical depth on our line-of-sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of Active Galactic Nuclei is considered. We find that the ...

  14. Comment on “Hydrogen Balmer beta: The separation between line peaks for plasma electron density diagnostics and self-absorption test”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter, we present a brief comment regarding the recently published paper by Ivković et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2015;154:1–8. Reference is made to previous experimental results to indicate that self absorption must have occurred; however, when carefully considering error propagation, both widths and peak-separation predict electron densities within the error margins. Yet the diagnosis method and the presented details on the use of the hydrogen beta peak separation are viewed as a welcomed contribution in studies of laser-induced plasma. - Highlights: • Balmer series Hβ line for determination of electron density. • Compare FWHM with peak-separation method. • Apply to laser induced plasma characterization. • Comment on self-absorption

  15. On-line spectrophotometric method for monitoring weak residual absorption of CaMoO{sub 4} single crystals near the intrinsic luminescence peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzanov, O. A., E-mail: fedorov-metrology@yandex.ru [OAO Fomos-Materials (Russian Federation); Kanevskii, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Kornoukhov, V. N. [OAO Fomos-Materials (Russian Federation); Nabatov, B. V.; Nabatov, V. V.; Fedorov, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The optical and spectral characteristics of isotopically enriched Czochralski-grown {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} single crystals have been investigated. This material is promising for detecting double neutrinoless {beta} decay. The possibility and the technique of spectrophotometric monitoring of weak residual absorption near the intrinsic luminescence peak of this scintillation material, which is designed for developing new-generation detectors of elementary particles, are considered.

  16. Harbour porpoise acoustic ecology: Nocturnal peak in activity documented by T-PODs in the Great Belt, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Pedersen, Camilla; Tougaard, Jakob; Carstensen, Jacob;

    ). The data showed very high levels of porpoise activity around Sprogø, higher than the reference site, prior to, during and after construction of the wind farm, consistent with the recognition of the area as being of high importance to porpoises. Acoustic indicators of porpoise abundance (porpoise positive...... minutes and waiting time between encounters) did not decrease statistically significant during the construction year. This indicates that any effects of the construction was likely very local around the turbine foundations and working vessels. Results support the notion that construction and operation...... of a small offshore wind farm need not be in conflict with the objectives of a Natura2000 area, given appropriate planning and choice of construction methods. At the stations at Sprogø, data showed pronounced diel variation with a high click activity during night hours (measured as number of click trains...

  17. Visco-thermal effects in acoustic metamaterials: from total transmission to total reflection and high absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Molerón, Miguel; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate visco-thermal effects on the acoustic propagation through metamaterials consisting of rigid slabs with subwavelength slits embedded in air. We demonstrate that this unavoidable loss mechanism is not merely a refinement, but it plays a dominant role in the actual acoustic response of the structure. Specifically, in the case of very narrow slits, the visco-thermal losses avoid completely the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances, leading to 100% reflection. This is exactly opposite to the perfect transmission predicted in the idealised lossless case. Moreover, for a wide range of geometrical parameters, there exists an optimum slit width at which the energy dissipated in the structure can be as high as 50%. This work provides a clear evidence that visco-thermal effects are necessary to describe realistically the acoustic response of locally resonant metamaterials.

  18. Double resonance capacitance spectroscopy (DORCAS): A new experimental technique for assignment of X-ray absorption peaks to surface sites of semiconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, M

    2003-01-01

    As a new microspectroscopy for semiconductor surface analysis using an X-ray beam, double resonance capacitance spectroscopy (DORCAS) is proposed. For a microscopic X-ray absorption measurement, a local capacitance change owing to X-ray induced emission of localized electrons is detected by a microprobe. The applied bias voltage V sub b dependence of the capacitance also provides information on the surface density of state. The resonance of the Fermi energy with a surface level by V sub b control makes possible the selection of the observable surface site in the X-ray absorption measurements, i.e. site-specific spectroscopy. The double resonance of the surface site selection (V sub b resonance) and the resonant X-ray absorption of the selected site (photon energy h nu resonance) enhances the capacitance signal. The DORCAS measurement of the GaAs surface shows correlation peaks at h nu=10.402 keV and V sub b =-0.4 V and h nu=10.429 keV and V sub b =+0.1 V, indicating that these resonant X-ray absorption peaks ...

  19. Theoretical Estimation of the Acoustic Energy Generation and Absorption Caused by Jet Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Iwagami, Sho; Kobayashi, Taizo; Takami, Toshiya

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between the fluid field and acoustic field caused by a jet driven by an acoustic particle velocity field across it, which is the key to understanding the aerodynamic sound generation of flue instruments, such as the recorder, flute, and organ pipe. Howe's energy corollary allows us to estimate the energy transfer between these two fields. For simplicity, we consider the situation such that a free jet is driven by a uniform acoustic particle velocity field across it. We improve the semi-empirical model of the oscillating jet, i.e., exponentially growing jet model, which has been studied in the field of musical acoustics, and introduce a polynomially growing jet model so as to apply Howe's formula to it. It is found that the relative phase between the acoustic oscillation and jet oscillation, which changes with the distance from the flue exit, determines the quantity of the energy transfer between the two fields. The acoustic energy is mainly generated in the downstream area, but it is consumed in the upstream area near the flue exit in driving the jet. This theoretical examination well explains the numerical calculation of Howe's formula for the two-dimensional flue instrument model in our previous work [ext-link ext-link-type="uri" xlink:href="http://doi.org/10.1088/0169-5983/46/6/061411" xlink:type="simple">Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 061411 (2014)ext-link>] as well as the experimental result of Yoshikawa et al. [ext-link ext-link-type="uri" xlink:href="http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsv.2012.01.026" xlink:type="simple">J. Sound Vib. 331, 2558 (2012)ext-link>].

  20. Acoustical study on the impact of sound absorptions, distances of workstations, and height of partitions in open plan offices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Sentagi Sesotya; Al Rochmadi, Nurwachid; Sarwono, R. Sugeng Joko

    2015-09-01

    Low partitions are commonly found in open-plan offices as the boundaries of workstation islands or groups of workstations. This room layout often cause excessive speech intelligibility, which creates work distraction and reduce the quality of speech privacy. Sound absorption, distance between workstations, and height of partitions are factors that were investigated on their impact to the room acoustics condition, referred to ISO 3382-3:2012. Observed room acoustics conditions were speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentrate in work using parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI. Parameters of T30, C50, and RASTI were used to evaluate the speech intelligibility. The level of speech privacy was indicated by parameter of privacy distance (rP). Distraction to concentrate in work was indicated by distraction distance (rD). The results from 2 experimental setups show that sound absorption, distance between workstations, and partitions influenced the level of speech intelligibility, speech privacy, and distraction to concentration at work. The value of C50 decline, by 76.9% and 77.4%, each for scenario A and B. RASTI decline, by 18.7% and 14.8%. Difference in percentage of speech privacy, by 6% and 11%. Difference in percentage of distraction to concentration at work, by 79% and 70%.

  1. Analysis of the acoustic cut-off frequency and high-frequency peaks in six Kepler stars with stochastically excited pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, A.; García, R. A.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Mathur, S.

    2015-11-01

    Gravito-acoustic modes in the Sun and other stars propagate in resonant cavities with a frequency below a given limit known as the cut-off frequency. At higher frequencies, waves are no longer trapped in the stellar interior and become traveller waves. In this article, we study six pulsating solar-like stars at different evolutionary stages observed by the NASA Kepler mission. These high signal-to-noise targets show a peak structure that extends at very high frequencies and are good candidates for studying the transition region between the modes and interference peaks or pseudo-modes. Following the same methodology successfully applied on Sun-as-a-star measurements, we uncover the existence of pseudo-modes in these stars with one or two dominant interference patterns depending on the evolutionary stage of the star. We also infer their cut-off frequency as the midpoint between the last eigenmode and the first peak of the interference patterns. Using ray theory we show that, while the period of one of the interference patterns is very close to half the large separation, the period of the other interference pattern depends on the time phase of mixed waves, thus carrying additional information on the stellar structure and evolution. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Anomalous absorption of bulk shear sagittal acoustic waves in a layered structure with viscous fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Gramotnev, D K; Nieminen, T A; Gramotnev, Dmitri K.; Mather, Melissa L.; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that the absorptivity of bulk shear sagittal waves by an ultra-thin layer of viscous fluid between two different elastic media has a strong maximum (in some cases as good as 100%) at an optimal layer thickness. This thickness is usually much smaller than the penetration depths and lengths of transverse and longitudinal waves in the fluid. The angular dependencies of the absorptivity are demonstrated to have significant and unusual structure near critical angles of incidence. The effect of non-Newtonian properties and non-uniformities of the fluid layer on the absorptivity is also investigated. In particular, it is shown that the absorption in a thin layer of viscous fluid is much more sensitive to non-zero relaxation time(s) in the fluid layer than the absorption at an isolated solid-fluid interface.

  3. Acoustic wave absorption as a probe of dynamical geometrical response of fractional quantum Hall liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    We show that an acoustic crystalline wave gives rise to an effect similar to that of a gravitational wave to an electron gas. Applying this idea to a two-dimensional electron gas in the fractional quantum Hall regime, this allows for experimental study of its intra-Landau level dynamical response in the long-wavelength limit. To study such response we generalize Haldane's geometrical description of fractional quantum Hall states to situations where the external metric is time dependent. We show that such time-dependent metric (generated by acoustic wave) couples to collective modes of the system, including a quadrapolar mode at long wavelength, and magnetoroton at finite wavelength. Energies of these modes can be revealed in spectroscopic measurements, controlled by strain-induced Fermi velocity anisotropy. We argue that such geometrical probe provides a potentially highly useful alternative probe of quantum Hall liquids, in addition to the usual electromagnetic response.

  4. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below.

  5. The convergence fluctuation of light by clusters of galaxies - a cosmological test using the second acoustic peak of the microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Lieu, R

    2004-01-01

    The weak lensing magnification of distant light by clusters of galaxies, assumed to be virialized systems with an NFW density profile, was calculated analytically as a statistical average over a random non-evolving distribution within $z=1$. The effect is exactly cancelled by the Dyer-Roeder beam in between clusters - this conclusion is valid also for an ensemble of spherical clumps of arbitrary density profile. An analytical expression for the variance in the mean magnification is provided, using the general formula from our previous work. The all sky fluctuation in the angular size of the microwave background second acoustic peak, due to the random placement of cluster lenses in the intervening space, is then derived to be $\\approx$ 33 %. Moreover, this standard deviation corresponds to that of a highly skewed magnification distribution, with a long tail extending towards the side of positive magnification, since any negative excursion from the mean cannot cross the hard limit imposed by the Dyer-Roeder emp...

  6. Acoustic power absorption and enhancement generated by slow and fast MHD waves

    CERN Document Server

    Simoniello, R; Garcia, R A; Salabert, D; Jimenez, A; Elsworth, Y; Schunker, H

    2010-01-01

    We used long duration, high quality, unresolved (Sun-as-a star) observations collected by the ground based network BiSON and by the instruments GOLF and VIRGO on board the ESA/NASA SOHO satellite to search for solar-cycle-related changes in mode characteristics in velocity and continuum intensity for the frequency range between 2.5mHz < nu < 6.8mHz. Over the ascending phase of solar cycle 23 we found a suppression in the p-mode amplitudes both in the velocity and intensity data between 2.5mHz Peaks (HIPs) between 5.8mHz

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Measuring D_A and H at z=0.57 from the Baryon Acoustic Peak in the Data Release 9 Spectroscopic Galaxy Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Lauren; Mena Requejo, Olga

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular diameter distance to and Hubble parameter at z = 0.57 from the measurement of the baryon acoustic peak in the correlation of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our analysis is based on a sample from Data Release 9 of 264 283 galaxies over 3275 square degrees in the redshift range 0.43 

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Measuring D_A and H at z=0.57 from the Baryon Acoustic Peak in the Data Release 9 Spectroscopic Galaxy Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Lauren; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bolton, Adam S; Brinkmann, J; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Honscheid, Klaus; Kazin, Eyal A; Kirkby, David; Manera, Marc; McBride, Cameron K; Mena, O; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicolas P; Sanchez, Ariel G; Samushia, Lado; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Strauss, Michael A; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Verde, Licia; Weinberg, David H; Xu, Xiaoying; Yeche, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the angular diameter distance to and Hubble parameter at z=0.57 from the measurement of the baryon acoustic peak in the correlation of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our analysis is based on a sample from Data Release 9 of 264,283 galaxies over 3275 square degrees in the redshift range 0.43acoustic peak position across and along the line of sight in order to measure the cosmological distance scale. We find D_A(0.57) = 1408 +/- 45 Mpc and H(0.57) = 92.9 +/- 7.8 km/s/Mpc for our fiducial value of the sound horizon. These results from the anisotropic fitting are fully consistent with the analysis of the spherically averaged acoustic peak position presented in Anderson et al, 2012. Our distance measurements are a close match to the predictions of the standard cosmological model featuring a cosmological constant and zero spatial curvature.

  9. Acoustic metasurface with hybrid resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guancong; Yang, Min; Xiao, Songwen; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2014-09-01

    An impedance-matched surface has the property that an incident wave generates no reflection. Here we demonstrate that by using a simple construction, an acoustically reflecting surface can acquire hybrid resonances and becomes impedance-matched to airborne sound at tunable frequencies, such that no reflection is generated. Each resonant cell of the metasurface is deep-subwavelength in all its spatial dimensions, with its thickness less than the peak absorption wavelength by two orders of magnitude. As there can be no transmission, the impedance-matched acoustic wave is hence either completely absorbed at one or multiple frequencies, or converted into other form(s) of energy, such as an electrical current. A high acoustic-electrical energy conversion efficiency of 23% is achieved. PMID:24880731

  10. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  11. Quasi-perfect absorption by sub-wavelength acoustic panels in transmission using accumulation of resonances due to slow sound

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Noé; Pagneux, Vincent; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally report sub-wavelength resonant panels for low-frequency quasi-perfect sound absorption including transmission by using the accumulation of cavity resonances due to the slow sound phenomenon. The sub-wavelength panel is composed of periodic horizontal slits loaded by identical Helmholtz resonators (HRs). Due to the presence of the HRs, the propagation inside each slit is strongly dispersive, with near-zero phase velocity close to the resonance of the HRs. In this slow sound regime, the frequencies of the cavity modes inside the slit are down-shifted and the slit behaves as a subwavelength resonator. Moreover, due to strong dispersion, the cavity resonances accumulate at the limit of the bandgap below the resonance frequency of the HRs. Near this accumulation frequency, simultaneously symmetric and antisymmetric quasi-critical coupling can be achieved. In this way, using only monopolar resonators quasi-perfect absorption can be obtained in a material including transmission.

  12. Acoustic and relaxation behaviors of polydimethylsiloxane studied by using brillouin and dielectric spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Wan; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Park, Jaehoon; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-04-01

    The temperature dependences of the acoustic properties and the dielectric relaxation times of polydimethylsiloxane were investigated by using high-resolution Brillouin and broadband dielectric spectroscopies. The longitudinal sound velocity showed a large increase upon approaching the glass transition temperature while the acoustic absorption coefficient exhibited a maximum at ~263 K. Comparison of these results with previous ultrasonic data revealed a substantial frequency dispersion of the acoustic properties of this silicone-based elastomer. The relaxation times derived from the acoustic absorption peaks were consistent with the temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation time of the structural a process, indicating a strong coupling between the acoustic waves and the segmental motions of the main chains.

  13. A practical method for determining γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency considering coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections for the measurement of environmental samples after the Fukushima reactor accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Oba, Yurika; Takada, Momo

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency at positions close to three Ge detectors and at the well port of a well-type detector was developed for measuring environmental volume samples containing 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K. The efficiency was estimated by considering two correction factors: coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections. The coincidence-summing correction for a cascade transition nuclide was estimated by an experimental method involving measuring a sample at the far and close positions of a detector. The derived coincidence-summing correction factors were compared with those of analytical and Monte Carlo simulation methods and good agreements were obtained. Differences in the matrix of the calibration source and the environmental sample resulted in an increase or decrease of the full-energy peak counts due to the self-absorption of γ-rays in the sample. The correction factor was derived as a function of the densities of several matrix materials. The present method was applied to the measurement of environmental samples and also low-level radioactivity measurements of water samples using the well-type detector.

  14. Software for the design of acoustical steam silencers of the reaction-absorption type; Software para el diseno de silenciadores acusticos de vapor del tipo reaccion-absorcion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buendia Dominguez, Eduardo H.; Alvarez Chavez, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    This paper describes the computer program named SILRA, that determines the outline dimensions of an acoustic steam silencer of the reaction-absorption type. These silencers are employed in the geothermoelectric power plants to lower the high levels of pressure and sound caused by the steam discharge to the surrounding atmosphere. The program has the capacity of predicting the noise level generated by the discharge without silencer depending on the emitting source. On SIRLA was successfully coupled the theory described in specialized literature with optimization techniques and experiences acquired in former designs. SIRLA is a powerful tool that allows the designer to optimize the equipment as well as the design time. [Espanol] En este trabajo se describe el programa de computo SILRA, que determina las dimensiones generales de un silenciador acustico de vapor tipo reaccion-absorcion, estos silenciadores se emplean en las centrales geotermoelectricas para abatir los altos niveles de presion de sonido provocados por la descarga del vapor a la atmosfera. El programa tiene la capacidad de predecir el nivel de ruido que genera la descarga sin silenciador, dependiendo de la fuente emisora. En SILRA se acoplaron con exito la teoria descrita en la literatura especializada con tecnicas de optimacion y experiencias adquiridas en disenos anteriores. SILRA es una poderosa herramienta que permite al disenador optimar tanto el equipo como el tiempo de diseno.

  15. 'Peak oil' or 'peak demand'?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reports a workshop which addressed several energy issues like the objectives and constraints of energy mix scenarios, the differences between the approaches in different countries, the cost of new technologies implemented for this purposes, how these technologies will be developed and marketed, which will be the environmental and societal acceptability of these technical choices. Different aspects and issues have been more precisely presented and discussed: the peak oil, development of shale gases and their cost (will non conventional hydrocarbons modify the peak oil and be socially accepted?), energy efficiency (its benefits, its reality in France and other countries, its position in front of the challenge of energy transition), and strategies in the transport sector (challenges for mobility, evolution towards a model of sustainable mobility)

  16. Comparison of Acoustic Characteristics of Date Palm Fibre and Oil Palm Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamyaa Abd ALRahman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated and compared the acoustic characteristics of two natural organic fibres: date palm fibre and oil palm fibre, these materials eligible for acoustical absorption. During the processing stage, both fibre sheets are treated with latex. The two fibres are compressed after latex treatment Circular samples (100 mm in diameter and 28 mm, based on the measurement tube requirements are cut out of the sheets. The density of the date palm fibre sheet is 150 kg/m3 for a 50 mm thickness and 130 kg/m3 for a 30 mm thickness. In contrast, the density of oil palm fibre is 75 kg/m3 for a 50 mm thickness and 65 kg/m3 for a 30 mm thickness. An impedance tube was used to test the thicknesses of both samples based on international standards. The results show that the date palm fibre exhibits two Acoustic Absorption Coefficient (AAC peaks: 0.93 at 1356 Hz and 0.99 at 4200-4353 Hz for the 50-mm-thick sample. In contrast, the 30-mm-thick sample has a single AAC peak of 0.83 at 2381.38-2809.38 Hz. However, the 50-mm-thick oil palm fibre has an AAC peak of 0.75 at 1946.88-2178.13 Hz and the 30-mm-thick oil palm fibre has an acoustic absorption coefficient peak 0.59 at 3225-3712.5 Hz. Thus, the date palm fibre has a higher acoustic absorption coefficient for high and low frequencies than does oil palm fibre. Both fibres are promising for use as sound absorber materials to protect against environmental noise pollution.

  17. The Research of Mineral Spectral Matching Based on Weighted Absorption Peaks%基于吸收峰加权的岩矿光谱匹配方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄婷婷; 韦志辉; 修连存; 吴泽彬

    2011-01-01

    基于高光谱图像的矿物识别主要依赖于矿物的特征光谱曲线,但由于矿物普遍存在的同质多象和类质同象的现象,常常造成矿物识别误差.在矿物的光谱曲线描述中,吸收位置是一个非常重要的特征,它较好地反映了矿物的单个诊断性特征.文章在利用完全波形特征的基础上,加强了单个诊断性特征,提出了一种基于吸收峰加权的预处理技术.利用该技术并结合PMS光谱库(南京地质矿产研究所研制)中的部分数据,从矿物光谱相异性进行区分实验,由于该技术利用了完整的矿物特征信息并突出了重要信息,对矿物有更为全面细致的描述,同时融合了去包络算法,有效地抑制了噪声的影响,与以往主流技术相比提高了矿物识别准确度,拉大了相异矿物间的差异,对研究岩石的内部结构和矿物的种类将有较大贡献.%Hyperspectral image in spectral curve are often used in the field of mineral recognition. However, error recognition may occur because of the polymorphism and isomorphism existing in minerals. The position of absorption peaks play a very important role for the description of spectrum curve, which preferably reflects the single diagnostic feature of mineral. Therefore, Based on using the whole curve's feature, we proposed the preliminary technologies of weighted absorption peaks to enhancing the single diagnostic feature. Using the part of data from the standard spectral library PMS, we has accomplished some experiments based on the dissimilarity of mineral. Because the technology used whole mineral features and highlighted the important features, the description of mineral was more comprehensive and accurate. Meanwhile, the technology applied the continuum removes algorithms to reduce the effects of back noise. Compared with the regular technology, the proposed technology not only improved the accuracy of the mineral identification, but also increased the discrepancy

  18. Dynamic Nonlinear Focal Shift in Amplitude Modulated Moderately Focused Acoustic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Noé; González-Salido, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of the displacement of the position of the pressure, intensity and acoustic radiation force maxima along the axis of focused acoustic beams under increasing driving amplitudes (nonlinear focal shift) is studied for the case of a moderately focused beam excited with continuous and 25 kHz amplitude modulated signals, both in water and tissue. We prove that in amplitude modulated beams the linear and nonlinear propagation effects coexist in a semi-period of modulation, giving place to a complex dynamic behaviour, where the singular points of the beam (peak pressure, rarefaction, intensity and acoustic radiation force) locate at different points on axis as a function of time. These entire phenomena are explained in terms of harmonic generation and absorption during the propagation in a lossy nonlinear medium both, for a continuous and an amplitude modulated beam. One of the possible applications of the acoustic radiation force displacement is the generation of shear waves at different locations by ...

  19. Three-axis acoustic device for levitation of droplets in an open gas stream and its application to examine sulfur dioxide absorption by water droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Terrance L; Budwig, Ralph S

    2007-01-01

    Two acoustic devices to stabilize a droplet in an open gas stream (single-axis and three-axis levitators) have been designed and tested. The gas stream was provided by a jet apparatus with a 64 mm exit diameter and a uniform velocity profile. The acoustic source used was a Langevin vibrator with a concave reflector. The single-axis levitator relied primarily on the radial force from the acoustic field and was shown to be limited because of significant droplet wandering. The three-axis levitator relied on a combination of the axial and radial forces. The three-axis levitator was applied to examine droplet deformation and circulation and to investigate the uptake of SO(2) from the gas stream to the droplet. Droplets ranging in diameters from 2 to 5 mm were levitated in gas streams with velocities up to 9 ms. Droplet wandering was on the order of a half droplet diameter for a 3 mm diameter droplet. Droplet circulation ranged from the predicted Hadamard-Rybczynski pattern to a rotating droplet pattern. Droplet pH over a central volume of the droplet was measured by planar laser induced fluorescence. The results for the decay of droplet pH versus time are in general agreement with published theory and experiments. PMID:17503939

  20. Shape-dependence of transmission, reflection and absorption eigenvalue densities in disordered waveguides with dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Yamilov, A; Sarma, R; Cao, H

    2015-01-01

    The universal bimodal distribution of transmission eigenvalues in lossless diffusive systems un- derpins such celebrated phenomena as universal conductance fluctuations, quantum shot noise in condensed matter physics and enhanced transmission in optics and acoustics. Here, we show that in the presence of absorption, density of the transmission eigenvalues depends on the confinement geometry of scattering media. Furthermore, in an asymmetric waveguide, densities of the reflection and absorption eigenvalues also depend of the side from which the waves are incident. With increas- ing absorpotion, the density of absorption eigenvalues transforms from single-peak to double-peak function. Our findings open a new avenue for coherent control of wave transmission, reflection and absorption in random media.

  1. Vibro-acoustic coupling characteristics of the sandwich structure with absorptive material in external convected fluids%流场中填充吸声材料夹层板结构的声振耦合特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁少武; 史治宇; 李晓松

    2016-01-01

    An equivalent fluid model was employed to characterize the absorption of sound in the sound absorptive material.A vibro-acoustic coupling model was developed for the sound insulation of an sandwich structure filled with sound absorptive material in convected fluids.The performance of sound transmission was analysed by employing the wave method.The analysed influential factors of vibro-acoustic responses include the incident angles and azimuch angles,the velocity and direction of convected flow and the geometrical dimensions of the double panels.The studies show that the insulation of the structure filled with absorptive material instead of air is improved;the larger the thicknesses of the up and low panels and the gap are,the larger the sound transmission loss is;the larger the incident elevation angles and azimuch angles are,the smaller the sound transmission loss is;in the calculation frequency band (0 ~5 000 Hz),the sound transmission loss decreases with the increase of Mach number when the sound is incident in the upstream but increases with the increase of Mach number when the sound is incident in the downstream.%采用等效流体模拟吸声材料,建立了外部流场作用下填充吸声材料夹层板结构的声振耦合模型,应用波动分析方法研究结构中声的透射特性,分析了入射声波入射角和方位角、流场流速和流向、夹层结构几何尺寸等参数对填充吸声材料夹层板结构声振耦合特性的影响。仿真计算表明吸声材料提高了双层板结构的隔声性能;隔声性能随着面板厚度和夹层厚度的增加而提高,随着入射角和方位角的增大而减小;在计算频段内(0~5000 Hz),逆流入射时传声损失随着马赫数的增大而减小,顺流入射时却随着马赫数的增大而增大。

  2. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  3. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  4. Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  5. Peak flow meter (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  6. Forecasting peak ozone levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, R.W.; Layton, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    Box-Jenkins (1970) time series models are used to predict peak afternoon O3 levels. Data sets from three monitoring stations in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, are used in the analysis, one of the stations being inner-city and the others being outer-city. It is found that univariate models using only the peak O3 data-set at a site to predict future peak O3 levels are unsatisfactory. However bivariate models using peak O3 data from one site to predict peak O3 levels at another site yield good results. However it is clear that these results only arise because the O3 is formed in a well mixed layer over the region leading to a high degree of correlation between O3 peaks throughout the region. 15 references.

  7. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  8. Are Bragg Peaks Gaussian?

    OpenAIRE

    Hammouda, Boualem

    2014-01-01

    It is common practice to assume that Bragg scattering peaks have Gaussian shape. The Gaussian shape function is used to perform most instrumental smearing corrections. Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulation, the resolution of a realistic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument is generated reliably. Including a single-crystal sample with large d-spacing, Bragg peaks are produced. Bragg peaks contain contributions from the resolution function and from spread in the sample structure....

  9. Acoustic textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Rajkishore

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the manufacturing and applications of acoustic textiles in various industries. It also includes examples from different industries in which acoustic textiles can be used to absorb noise and help reduce the impact of noise at the workplace. Given the importance of noise reduction in the working environment in several industries, the book offers a valuable guide for companies, educators and researchers involved with acoustic materials.

  10. Room acoustic properties of concert halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1996-01-01

    A large database of values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of concert halls are influenced by their size, shape, and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  11. Peak Experience Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  12. Peak latency prolongation of Ⅴ wave in brainstem auditory evoked potential during intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma surgery%脑干听觉诱发电位的Ⅴ波PL延长在听神经瘤手术监护中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包国庆; 朱沂; 李建新; 杨小朋

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨BAEP的Ⅴ波PL延长在听神经瘤手术中的应用价值. 方法 回顾性分析55例听神经瘤手术患者行BAEP术前检查、术中监护及术后疗效评估,分析Ⅴ波PL延长不同指标的监测结果. 结果 以Ⅴ波PL延长>0.6 ms为标准,脑干或听神经损伤的灵敏度100%,特异度95.3%,误诊率4.7%,漏诊率0%,符合率96.4%.以Ⅴ波PL延长>1.0 ms为标准,灵敏度58.3%,特异度97.7%,误诊率2.3%,漏诊率41.7%,符合率89.1%. 结论 BAEP监护听神经瘤手术中,V波PL延长>0.6 ms有较高的敏感度和特异度,作为术中监护报警指标更合适.%Objective To explore the applied value of peak latency (PL) prolongation of Ⅴ wave in brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) during intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma surgery. Methods The preoperative BAEP examination data,intraoperative monitoring and postoperative evaluation data in 55 patients with acoustic neuroma were retrospectively analyzed; the monitoring results under the circumstance that different degrees of prolongation of PL of Ⅴ wave were chosen were analyzed. Results The PL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >0.6 ms was used as the baseline,the sensitivity of diagnosing the brainstem or acoustic nerve injury was 100%,the specificity was 95.3%,the misdiagnosis rate was 4.7%,the missed diagnosis rate was 0% and the accordance rate was 96.4%.The PL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >1.0 ms was used as the baseline,the sensitivity of diagnosing the brainstem or acoustic nerve injury was 58.3%,the specificity was 97.7%,the misdiagnosis rate was 2.3%,the missed diagnosis rate was 41.7% and the accordance rate was 89.1%. Conclusion It is more suitable that using thePL prolongation of Ⅴ wave >0.6 ms as the baseline,enjoying high sensitivity and specificity,during the intraoperative monitoring of acoustic neuroma.

  13. Pikes Peak, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstein, Craig; Quesenberry, Carol; Davis, John; Jackson, Gene; Scott, Glenn R.; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Swibas, Ed; Carter, Lorna; McKinney, Kevin; Cole, Jim

    2006-01-01

    For 200 years, Pikes Peak has been a symbol of America's Western Frontier--a beacon that drew prospectors during the great 1859-60 Gold Rush to the 'Pikes Peak country,' the scenic destination for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, and an enduring source of pride for cities in the region, the State of Colorado, and the Nation. November 2006 marks the 200th anniversary of the Zebulon M. Pike expedition's first sighting of what has become one of the world's most famous mountains--Pikes Peak. In the decades following that sighting, Pikes Peak became symbolic of America's Western Frontier, embodying the spirit of Native Americans, early explorers, trappers, and traders who traversed the vast uncharted wilderness of the Western Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. High-quality printed paper copies of this poster are available at no cost from Information Services, U.S. Geological Survey (1-888-ASK-USGS).

  14. Peak of Achievement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China’s first inland research station on the highest peak of Antarctic progresses smoothly China will complete the construction of its first inland Antarctic research station at Dome A,the highest polar icecap peak at 4,093 meters above sea level,next year,according to a south pole scientist involved in the project. "The preparatory work for the new sta-

  15. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  16. Development and validation of a MRgHIFU non-invasive tissue acoustic property estimation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sara L; Dillon, Christopher; Odéen, Henrik; Parker, Dennis; Christensen, Douglas; Payne, Allison

    2016-11-01

    MR-guided high-intensity focussed ultrasound (MRgHIFU) non-invasive ablative surgeries have advanced into clinical trials for treating many pathologies and cancers. A remaining challenge of these surgeries is accurately planning and monitoring tissue heating in the face of patient-specific and dynamic acoustic properties of tissues. Currently, non-invasive measurements of acoustic properties have not been implemented in MRgHIFU treatment planning and monitoring procedures. This methods-driven study presents a technique using MR temperature imaging (MRTI) during low-temperature HIFU sonications to non-invasively estimate sample-specific acoustic absorption and speed of sound values in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Using measured thermal properties, specific absorption rate (SAR) patterns are calculated from the MRTI data and compared to simulated SAR patterns iteratively generated via the Hybrid Angular Spectrum (HAS) method. Once the error between the simulated and measured patterns is minimised, the estimated acoustic property values are compared to the true phantom values obtained via an independent technique. The estimated values are then used to simulate temperature profiles in the phantoms, and compared to experimental temperature profiles. This study demonstrates that trends in acoustic absorption and speed of sound can be non-invasively estimated with average errors of 21% and 1%, respectively. Additionally, temperature predictions using the estimated properties on average match within 1.2 °C of the experimental peak temperature rises in the phantoms. The positive results achieved in tissue-mimicking phantoms presented in this study indicate that this technique may be extended to in vivo applications, improving HIFU sonication temperature rise predictions and treatment assessment. PMID:27441427

  17. Acoustic wave detection of chemical species electrokinetically transported within a capillary tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Paul C H; Prasad, Ronald

    2003-06-01

    For the first time, we report the acoustic wave detection of chemical species being transported in a capillary tube to a region where acoustic coupling occurs. The measured parameter was a change in phase, which was originally only attributed to a change in solution density as the analyte passed by the detection region. Accordingly, we report the detection of change in phase as various chemical species (e.g. Cy5 dye, Cy5-derivatized glycine and underivatized glycine) were introduced into and migrated along a capillary tube through electrokinetic processes. To improve detection sensitivity, we modified various experimental parameters, such as run buffer concentration, capillary wall thickness and transducer frequency. Although acoustic wave detection was feasible, the peak width and detection limit were inadequate as compared to conventional detection methods for HPLC or CE. Nevertheless, the effects of various physical and chemical relaxation processes on acoustic wave absorption were discussed, and this has shed some light on explaining some observations, which cannot be explained by density differences alone. Accordingly, the acoustic wave method is suggested to investigate these processes, as studied in ultrasonic relaxation spectroscopy, in a flow system. PMID:12866892

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Protein Concentration by Absorption Peak Integration Method of UV Spectroscopy-Taking Alkaline Phosphatase as an Example%紫外吸收光谱积分法分析蛋白质浓度-以碱性磷酸酶为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱元荣; 吴丰昌; 林樱

    2013-01-01

    利用矿物(针铁矿,蒙脱石)和太湖沉积物吸附碱性磷酸酶(alkaline phosphatase,APase),测定吸附后上清液中剩余碱性磷酸酶浓度时发现其紫外吸收光谱发生了变化,利用传统280 nm处紫外吸收法无法直接准确测定其浓度值.基于对碱性磷酸酶252~305 nm处吸收峰面积积分方法可以消除影响,并准确分析测定碱性磷酸酶浓度.其测定结果与考马斯亮蓝法测定结果进行比较,表明了该方法可以方便,快速和准确地测定此类实验中碱性磷酸酶浓度.同时,该方法还可以扩展至其他蛋白质的定量分析,甚至其他类似实验中,一定程度上克服传统方法应用单波长进行定量分析中存在的易受干扰的缺点.%Adsorption of alkaline phosphatase (APase) on minerals (goethite,montmorillonite) and sediments from Taihu Lake was studied.However,the concentration of alkaline phosphatase in the supernatant cannot be analyzed by the adsorption at 280 nm due to that the UV spectroscopy was changed.Quantitative analysis of alkaline phosphatase in the supernatant by the absorption peak (252~305 nm) integration method of UV spectroscopy was developed.This method determined the concentrations of alkaline phosphatase well.Compared to the results of Bradford,the absorption peak integration method can determine the concentrations of supernatant fast,conveniently,and accurately.This method can also be applied to other protein solution analysis and similar experiments.The drawbacks of traditional single wavelength method (280nm) were overcome to some extent based on the method of absorption peak integration.

  19. Room Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  20. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  1. Battlefield acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2015-01-01

    This book presents all aspects of situational awareness in a battlefield using acoustic signals. It starts by presenting the science behind understanding and interpretation of sound signals. The book then goes on to provide various signal processing techniques used in acoustics to find the direction of sound source, localize gunfire, track vehicles, and detect people. The necessary mathematical background and various classification and fusion techniques are presented. The book contains majority of the things one would need to process acoustic signals for all aspects of situational awareness in one location. The book also presents array theory, which is pivotal in finding the direction of arrival of acoustic signals. In addition, the book presents techniques to fuse the information from multiple homogeneous/heterogeneous sensors for better detection. MATLAB code is provided for majority of the real application, which is a valuable resource in not only understanding the theory but readers, can also use the code...

  2. Acoustics Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fisheries acoustics data are collected from more than 200 sea-days each year aboard the FRV DELAWARE II and FRV ALBATROSS IV (decommissioned) and the FSV Henry B....

  3. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  4. Hale Central Peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    19 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the mountains that make up the central peak region of Hale Crater, located near 35.8oS, 36.5oW. Dark, smooth-surfaced sand dunes are seen to be climbing up the mountainous slopes. The central peak of a crater consists of rock brought up during the impact from below the crater floor. This autumn image is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  5. Peak-interviewet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raalskov, Jesper; Warming-Rasmussen, Bent

    Peak-interviewet er en særlig effektiv metode til at gøre ubevidste menneskelige ressourcer bevidste. Fokuspersonen (den interviewede) interviewes om en selvvalgt, personlig succesoplevelse. Terapeuten/coachen (intervieweren) spørger ind til processen, som ledte hen til denne succes. Herved afdæk...

  6. The Acoustical Properties of Indonesian Hardwood Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisius Rio Mardikanto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The acoustical properties of four Indonesian tropical hardwood species were evaluated in this study. The objectives of this study were to determine acoustical parameters e.g. logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, sound velocity as well as density and wood stiffness; and to evaluate the potential of those species for acoustical purposes. Sonokeling (Dalbergia latifolia, Mahoni (Swietenia mahagony, Acacia (Acacia mangium and Manii wood (Maesopsis eminii were selected in this research. Three different cutting plane patterns of sawn timber (quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn were converted into small specimens. The methods for determining acoustical properties were longitudinal vibration testing and time of flight of ultrasonic wave method. The result showed no significant difference (α=0.05 of acoustical properties in logarithmic decrement, sound absorption, and ultrasonic velocity means on quarter-sawn, flat-sawn, and plain-sawn for all wood species tested. We found that Mahoni and Sonokeling had good acoustical properties of logarithmic decrement, ultrasonic wave velocity, and ratio of wood stiffness to wood density; and is preferred for crafting musical instruments. Acacia and Manii woods are recommended for developing acoustic panels in building construction because those species possess higher sound absorption values.

  7. Semi-active control of piezoelectric coating's underwater sound absorption by combining design of the shunt impedances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Aigen; Li, Qihu

    2015-10-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping technology has been applied in the field of underwater sound absorption in recent years. In order to achieve broadband echo reduction, semi-active control of sound absorption of multi-layered piezoelectric coating by shunt damping is significant. In this paper, a practical method is proposed to control the underwater sound absorption coefficients of piezoelectric coating layers by combining design of the shunt impedance that allows certain sound absorption coefficients at setting frequencies. A one-dimensional electro-acoustic model of the piezoelectric coating and the backing is established based on the Mason equivalent circuit theory. First, the shunt impedance of the coating is derived under the constraint of sound absorption coefficient at one frequency. Then, taking the 1-3 piezoelectric composite coating as an example, the sound absorption properties of the coating shunted to the designed shunt impedance are investigated. Next, on the basis of that, an iterative method for two constrained frequencies and an optimizing algorithm for multiple constrained frequencies are provided for combining design of the shunt impedances. At last, an experimental sample with four piezoelectric material layers is manufactured, of which the sound absorption coefficients are measured in an impedance tube. The experimental results show good agreement with the finite element simulation results. It is proved that a serial R-L circuit can control the peak frequency, maximum and bandwidth of the sound absorption coefficient and the combining R-L circuits shunted to multiple layers can control the sound absorption coefficients at multiple frequencies.

  8. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  9. Acoustic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  10. Opto-acoustic cell permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visuri, S R; Heredia, N

    2000-03-09

    Optically generated acoustic waves have been used to temporarily permeate biological cells. This technique may be useful for enhancing transfection of DNA into cells or enhancing the absorption of locally delivered drugs. A diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at kHz repetition rates was used to produce a series of acoustic pulses. An acoustic wave was formed via thermoelastic expansion by depositing laser radiation into an absorbing dye. Generated pressures were measured with a PVDF hydrophone. The acoustic waves were transmitted to cultured and plated cells. The cell media contained a selection of normally- impermeable fluorescent-labeled dextran dyes. Following treatment with the opto-acoustic technique, cellular incorporation of dyes, up to 40,000 Molecular Weight, was noted. Control cells that did not receive opto-acoustic treatment had unremarkable dye incorporation. Uptake of dye was quantified via fluorescent microscopic analysis. Trypan Blue membrane exclusion assays and fluorescent labeling assays confirmed the vitality of cells following treatment. This method of enhanced drug delivery has the potential to dramatically reduce required drug dosages and associated side effects and enable revolutionary therapies.

  11. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  12. Peak reading detector circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peak reading detector circuit serves for picking up the instants during which peaks of a given polarity occur in sequences of signals in which the extreme values, their time intervals, and the curve shape of the signals vary. The signal sequences appear in measuring the foetal heart beat frequence from amplitude-modulated ultrasonic, electrocardiagram, and blood pressure signals. In order to prevent undesired emission of output signals from, e. g., disturbing intermediate extreme values, the circuit consists of the series connections of a circuit to simulate an ideal diode, a strong unit, a discriminator for the direction of charging current, a time-delay circuit, and an electronic switch lying in the decharging circuit of the storage unit. The time-delay circuit thereby causes storing of a preliminary maximum value being used only after a certain time delay for the emission of the output signal. If a larger extreme value occurs during the delay time the preliminary maximum value is cleared and the delay time starts running anew. (DG/PB)

  13. Acoustics in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J.-P.

    2000-10-01

    With the advent of the first attempt to deliver an acoustic microphone to the Martian surface aboard the failed Mars Polar Lander, there has been growing interests in the development of acoustic sensors to compliment scientific payloads on future spacecraft. Terrestrial scientist have been very successful in using infrasound (sound at frequencies below human detection, detect and monitor atmospheric phenomena related to weather, tornadoes, mountain waves, microbaroms, ionospheric and auroral disturbances, and meteror/fireballs, as well as anthropogenic sources such as aircraft and nuclear explosions. Sounds on Mars at the audible frequencies (20 Hz to 20 kHz) will be severely attenuated due to viscous relaxation and thermal diffusion (collectively referred to as classical attenuation) which will be much more severe in the colder, less dense Martian atmosphere. Molecular relaxation of carbon dioxide will also contribute to the sound absorption in the lower audible frequencies. Since classical attenuation increases as a function of the frequency squared, at low infrasonic frequencies ( < 10 Hz), classical attenuation becomes less significant and sound absorption in the Martian atmosphere becomes more similar to that of the terrestrial atmosphere for the same frequencies. At these longer wavelengths, geometric spreading will dominate as the source of attenuation as the acoustic energy is spread out over an ever increasing spherical wave front. This implies that infrasound (10 to 0.01 Hz) will be a useful frequency range for future acoustic sensors developed for scientific payloads delivered to the Martian surface.

  14. Absorption Spectra of Astaxanthin Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Olsina, Jan; Minofar, Babak; Polivka, Tomas; Mancal, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Carotenoids in hydrated polar solvents form aggregates characterized by dramatic changes in their absorption spectra with respect to monomers. Here we analyze absorption spectra of aggregates of the carotenoid astaxanthin in hydrated dimethylsulfoxide. Depending on water content, two types of aggregates were produced: H-aggregates with absorption maximum around 390 nm, and J-aggregates with red-shifted absorption band peaking at wavelengths >550 nm. The large shifts with respect to absorption maximum of monomeric astaxanthin (470-495 nm depending on solvent) are caused by excitonic interaction between aggregated molecules. We applied molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate structure of astaxanthin dimer in water, and the resulting structure was used as a basis for calculations of absorption spectra. Absorption spectra of astaxanthin aggregates in hydrated dimethylsulfoxide were calculated using molecular exciton model with the resonance interaction energy between astaxanthin monomers constrained by semi-e...

  15. Geyser Peak Cabernet Sauvignon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>年份:2000产地:美国加州Sonoma County售价:$196 Geyser Peak(盖世峰)成立于1880年,是美国军有的过百岁葡萄酒庄。可惜美国酿制葡萄酒的技术在近三四十年才有突破,历史再悠久也没有太多帮助近二十年Geyser Peak就努力改进,希望迎头赶上其它加州新秀的水平,1989年,他们就聘请了澳洲Penfolds酒庄的酿酒师Daryl Groom,让旗下出品多了一份澳洲式的"霎眼娇"风格。2003年,Geyser Peak更在International Wine & Spirit Competition赢得"最佳美国葡萄酒生产商"大奖。

  16. Determination of Acid Dissociation Constant of Methyl Red by Multi-Peaks Gaussian Fitting Method Based on UV-Visible Absorption Spectrum%紫外-可见吸收光谱结合高斯多峰拟合技术测定甲基红酸离解常数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建华; 刘琼; 陈玉苗; 刘兆清; 徐常威

    2012-01-01

    在一定pH值范围内,甲基红(M R)水溶液紫外-可见吸收光谱特征是酸式甲基红(HMR)最大吸收峰(530±15) nm)与碱式甲基红(MR-)最大吸收峰(435±20) nm)叠合在一起.本文用高斯多峰拟合技术实现了HMR和MR-叠合峰的分峰拟合计算.拟合计算输出两个吸收峰的积分面积即峰强度A1和A2,A1和A2之比与MR-和HMR浓度之比.进而计算甲基红水溶液酸离解平衡常数p(K)a.用本方法测量298.15 K时的p(K)a值为476.拟合优度高,拟合度R2、拟合优度(X2)分别达到0.998和10-5以下.深入探讨了表面活性剂十二烷基硫酸钠(SDS)、十六烷基三甲基溴化铵(CTAB)聚集行为对甲基红pKa的影响.与传统分光光度测量方法相比,紫外-可见吸收光谱结合高斯多峰拟合技术结果更可靠,测量步骤和数据处理过程更简单,更具有普适性.%UV-visible electronic absorption spectra of methyl red (MR) aqueous solutions are characterized by the overlap of a principal peak at Amax ((520±15) nm) with a shoulder peak at λmax ((435±20) nm),which are assigned to acidic species (HMR) and basic species of methyl red,respectively.In this study,the spectra and the integrated absorbance of the MR and HMR peaks (denoted A1 and A2,respectively) were interpreted using a new multi-peaks Gaussian fitting method.From the absorbance ratio A1/A2 and the concentration ratio CMR-/CHMR,the average acid dissociation constant (pKa) was determined as 4.76 at 298.15 K.The goodness is high and the values of R2 (degree of fitting) and (X)2 (chi-square test for goodness of fit) were 0.998 and below 10-5,respectively.The effects of aggregation behavior of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetylammonium bromide (CTAB) on pKa were also investigated via this method.The multi-peaks Gaussian fitting method was shown to determine pKa more reliably and simply than traditional spectrophotometdc techniques.

  17. Transfer path based tyre absorption tests

    OpenAIRE

    Tijs, E.; Makwana, B.K.; Peksel, O.; Amarnath, S.K.P.; Bekke, D.A.; Krishnan, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    The development process of a tyre usually involves a combination of simulation and testing techniques focused on characterizing acoustic/aerodynamic and vibrational phenomena. One of the acoustic phenomenon of interest is the absorption of the tyre, which affects the sound radiated. This properties is mainly related to local resonant effects, which can be changed by modifying the geometry of the tyre tread. A procedure is presented to determine the attenuation achieved due to a change in tyre...

  18. Acoustic vibration induced high electromagnetic responses of Fe3O4 nano-hollow spheres in the THz regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein, we investigate the origin of enhanced absorption and complex conductivity of magnetite (Fe3O4) nano-hollow spheres (NHSs) in contrast to its nanoparticles (NPs) configuration in the frequency range 0.4–2.0 THz. The maximum absorption for NHSs and NPs of the same average diameter (∼100 nm) are found to be 246.27 and 48.35 cm−1 at 1.8 THz, respectively. A detailed study suggests that the multiple resonance peaks in the absorption spectra are due to low frequency acoustic vibrational phonon modes of Fe3O4 nanostructures. Moreover, we demonstrate that the magnitude of total absorption can be tailored by varying the shell thickness of NHSs. It is found to increase with increasing shell thickness, and attain a maximum value of 498.5 cm−1 for the NHSs of average diameter 350 nm at 1.8 THz. The invariance of frequency dependent magnetic permeability points out that the absorption is basically due to dielectric loss instead of magnetic loss. The enhanced THz conductivity of Fe3O4 NHSs, as compared to NPs is described in light of thermally activated polaronic hopping which is found to increase with increasing THz absorption. Finally, the size dependent THz conductivity of NHSs confirms its sole dependence on the magnitude of THz absorptivity. (paper)

  19. Airy acoustical-sheet spinner tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-09-01

    The Airy acoustical beam exhibits parabolic propagation and spatial acceleration, meaning that the propagation bending angle continuously increases before the beam trajectory reaches a critical angle where it decays after a propagation distance, without applying any external bending force. As such, it is of particular importance to investigate its properties from the standpoint of acoustical radiation force, spin torque, and particle dynamics theories, in the development of novel particle sorting techniques and acoustically mediated clearing systems. This work investigates these effects on a two-dimensional (2D) circular absorptive structure placed in the field of a nonparaxial Airy "acoustical-sheet" (i.e., finite beam in 2D), for potential applications in surface acoustic waves and acousto-fluidics. Based on the characteristics of the acoustic field, the beam is capable of manipulating the circular cylindrical fluid cross-section and guides it along a transverse or parabolic trajectory. This feature of Airy acoustical beams could lead to a unique characteristic in single-beam acoustical tweezers related to acoustical sieving, filtering, and removal of particles and cells from a section of a small channel. The analysis developed here is based on the description of the nonparaxial Airy beam using the angular spectrum decomposition of plane waves in close association with the partial-wave series expansion method in cylindrical coordinates. The numerical results demonstrate the ability of the nonparaxial Airy acoustical-sheet beam to pull, propel, or accelerate a particle along a parabolic trajectory, in addition to particle confinement in the transverse direction of wave propagation. Negative or positive radiation force and spin torque causing rotation in the clockwise or the anticlockwise direction can occur depending on the nondimensional parameter ka (where k is the wavenumber and a is the radius) and the location of the cylinder in the beam. Applications in

  20. CALCULATION OF ACOUSTIC EFFICIENCY OF PORTABLE ACOUSTIC SCREEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Skvortsov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of influence of life environment adverse factors on physical development and health of population is an actual problem of ecology. The aspects of the most actual problems of the modern world, namely environmental industrial noise pollution are considered in the article. Industrial facilities everywhere have noisy equipment. Noise is a significant factors of negative influenceon people and environment. Combined effects of noise and of other physical pollutions on people may cause amplification of their negative impact. If the noise pollution level from the object in a residential area exceeds the permissible levels (MPL, noise protection measures can be initiated. Today, the most common design decisions for noise protection are sound absorbing construction, noise screens and barriers, acousting housings, soundproff cabins. Many of them are popular, others are less known. The article deals with one of the most wide spread means of noise protection – a portable acoustic screen. The aim of the research is to determine the efficiency of portable acoustic screens. It is shown that the installation of such structures can reduce the average value of the sound level. The authors analyzed acoustic screens as device to reduce noise pollution. The authors offer a potable acoustic screen differing from the used easyness, mobility, minimum price and good sound protective properties. Effectiveness, a sound absorption coefficient and sound conductivity coefficient of a portable acoustic screen are evaluated. The descriptions of the algorithm calculations and the combination of technical solutions have practical originality. The results of the research demonstrate the advantages of the proposed solutions for reducing noise levels in the agro-industrial complex.

  1. Resonant Optical Absorption in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Li-Yuan; CAO Jun-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ We have calculated the intraband photon absorption coefficients of hot two-dimensional electrons interacting with polar-optical phonon modes in quantum wells. The dependence of the photon absorption coefficients on the photon wavelength λ is obtained both by using the quantum mechanical theory and by the balance-equation theory. It is found that the photon absorption spectrum displays a local resonant maximum, corresponding to LO energy, and the absorption peak vanishes with increasing the electronic temperature.

  2. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  3. Particle manipulation with acoustic vortex beam induced by a brass plate with spiral shape structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian; Ke, Manzhu; Li, Weiping; Yang, Qian; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we give direct demonstration of acoustic radiation force and acoustic torque on particles exerted by an acoustic vortex beam, which is realized by an acoustic artificial structure plate instead of traditional transducer arrays. First, the first order acoustic vortex beam, which has the distinctive features of a linear and continuous phase variation from -π to π around its propagation axis and a magnitude null at its core, is obtained through one single acoustic source incident upon a structured brass plate with Archimedean spiral grating engraved on the back surface. Second, annular self-patterning of polystyrene particles with a radius of 90 μm is realized in the gradient field of this acoustic vortex beam. In addition, we further exhibit acoustic angular momentum transfer to an acoustic absorptive matter, which is verified by a millimeter-sized polylactic acid disk self-rotating in water in the acoustic field of the generated vortex beam.

  4. Decoupling approximation design using the peak to peak gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Linear system design for accurate decoupling approximation is examined using the peak to peak gain of the error system. The design problem consists in finding values of system parameters to ensure that this gain is small. For this purpose a computationally inexpensive upper bound on the peak to peak gain, namely the star norm, is minimized using a stochastic method. Examples of the methodology's application to tensegrity structures design are presented. Connections between the accuracy of the approximation, the damping matrix, and the natural frequencies of the system are examined, as well as decoupling in the context of open and closed loop control.

  5. Optical transition radiation in presence of acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, A R; Saharian, A A

    2009-01-01

    Transition radiation from relativistic electrons is investigated in an ultrasonic superlattice excited in a finite thickness plate. In the quasi-classical approximation formulae are derived for the vector potential of the electromagnetic field and for the spectral-angular distribution of the radiation intensity. The acoustic waves generate new resonance peaks in the spectral and angular distribution of the radiation intensity. The heights of the peaks can be tuned by choosing the parameters of the acoustic wave.

  6. Combination of acoustical radiosity and the image source method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutsouris, Georgios I; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho;

    2013-01-01

    A combined model for room acoustic predictions is developed, aiming to treat both diffuse and specular reflections in a unified way. Two established methods are incorporated: acoustical radiosity, accounting for the diffuse part, and the image source method, accounting for the specular part. The...... model is based on conservation of acoustical energy. Losses are taken into account by the energy absorption coefficient, and the diffuse reflections are controlled via the scattering coefficient, which defines the portion of energy that has been diffusely reflected. The way the model is formulated...... studio hall. The proposed model turns out to be promising for acoustic predictions providing a high level of detail and accuracy....

  7. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Educational Video Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Identifying an AN Symptoms Acoustic Neuroma Keywords Educational Video ... for pre- and post-treatment acoustic neuroma patients. Home What is an AN What is an Acoustic ...

  8. Acoustic cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  9. Acoustic telemetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  10. Use of acoustic vortices in acoustic levitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic fields are known to exert forces on the surfaces of objects. These forces are noticeable if the sound pressure is sufficiently high. Two phenomena where acoustic forces are relevant are: i) acoustic levitation, where strong standing waves can hold small objects at certain positions......, counterbalancing their weight, and ii) acoustic vortices, spinning sound fields that can impinge angular momentum and cause rotation of objects. In this contribution, both force-creating sound fields are studied by means of numerical simulations. The Boundary Element Method is employed to this end. The simulation...... of acoustical vortices uses an efficient numerical implementation based on the superposition of two orthogonal sound fields with a delay of 90° between them. It is shown that acoustic levitation and the use of acoustic vortices can be combined to manipulate objects in an efficient and controlled manner without...

  11. Acoustic dispersive prism

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Esfahlani; Sami Karkar; Herve Lissek; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic ...

  12. Nanofibrous Resonant Membrane for Acoustic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kalinová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Because the absorption of lower-frequency sound is problematic with fibrous material made up of coarser fibers, highly efficient sound absorption materials must be developed. The focus of this paper is on the development of a new material with high acoustic absorption characteristics. For low-frequency absorption, structures based upon the resonance principle of nanofibrous layers are employed in which the resonance of some elements allows acoustic energy to be converted into thermal energy. A nanofibrous membrane was produced by an electrostatic spinning process from an aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol and the acoustic characteristics of the material measured. The resonant frequency prediction for the nanofibrous membrane is based on research into its production parameters. The distance between electrodes during the electrostatic spinning process determines the average diameter of the nanofibers, and the outlet velocity of the material determines its area density. The average diameter of nanofibers was measured using the Lucia software package directly from an electron microscope image. The resonant frequency of nanofibrous membranes was determined from the sound absorption coefficient and transmission loss measurement.

  13. An acoustic emission study of plastic deformation in polycrystalline aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Frederick, J. R.; Felbeck, D. K.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission experiments were performed on polycrystalline and single crystal 99.99% aluminum while undergoing tensile deformation. It was found that acoustic emission counts as a function of grain size showed a maximum value at a particular grain size. Furthermore, the slip area associated with this particular grain size corresponded to the threshold level of detectability of single dislocation slip events. The rate of decline in acoustic emission activity as grain size is increased beyond the peak value suggests that grain boundary associated dislocation sources are giving rise to the bulk of the detected acoustic emissions.

  14. Nonlinear acoustics of water-saturated marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1976-01-01

    Interest in the acoustic qualities of water-saturated marine sediments has increased considerably during recent years. The use of sources of high-intensity sound in oil propsecting, in geophysical and geological studies of bottom and subbottom materials and profiles and recently in marine...... archaeology has emphasized the need of information about the nonlinear acoustic qualities of water-saturated marine sediments. While the acoustic experiments and theoretical investigations hitherto performed have concentrated on a determination of the linear acoustic qualities of water-saturated marine...... sediments, their parameters of nonlinear acoustics are still unexplored. The strong absorption, increasing about linearly with frequency, found in most marine sediments and the occurrence of velocity dispersion by some marine sediments restrict the number of nonlinear acoustic test methods traditionally...

  15. Acoustic relaxation of some lead niobium tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Gaafar; Y A Azzam

    2015-02-01

    The longitudinal ultrasonic attenuation in Nb2O5 −(1−)TeO2, 0.1PbO−Nb2O5−(0.9−)TeO2 and 0.2PbO − Nb2O5− (0.8−)TeO2 tellurite glass systems was measured using the pulse echo technique at ultrasonic frequencies 2, 4, 6 and 8 MHz in the temperature range from 150 to 300 K. The absorption curves showed the presence of well-defined broad peaks at various temperatures depending upon the glass composition and operating frequency. The maximum peaks move to higher temperatures with the increase of operating frequency, indicating the presence of some kind of relaxation process. This process has been described as a thermally activated relaxation process, which happens when ultrasonic waves disturb the equilibrium of an atom vibrating in a double-well potential in the glass network structure. Results proved that the average activation energy of the process depends mainly on the modifier content. This dependence was analysed in terms of the loss of standard linear solid type, with low dispersion and a broad distribution of Arrhenius-type relaxation with temperature-independent relaxation strength. The experimental acoustic activation energy has been quantitatively analysed in terms of the number of loss centres (number of oxygen atoms that vibrate in the double-well potential).

  16. Responsive acoustic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Brady; Tamke, Martin; Nielsen, Stig Anton;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic performance is defined by the parameter of reverberation time; however, this does not capture the acoustic experience in some types of open plan spaces. As many working and learning activities now take place in open plan spaces, it is important to be able to understand and design...... for the acoustic conditions of these spaces. This paper describes an experimental research project that studied the design processes necessary to design for sound. A responsive acoustic surface was designed, fabricated and tested. This acoustic surface was designed to create specific sonic effects. The design...... was simulated using custom integrated acoustic software and also using Odeon acoustic analysis software. The research demonstrates a method for designing space- and sound-defining surfaces, defines the concept of acoustic subspace, and suggests some new parameters for defining acoustic subspaces....

  17. Springer Handbook of Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Rossing, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and others. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents spanning: animal acoustics including infrasound and ultrasound, environmental noise control, music and human speech and singing, physiological and psychological acoustics, architectural acoustics, physical and engineering acoustics, signal processing, medical acoustics, and ocean acoustics. This handbook reviews the most important areas of acoustics, with emphasis on current research. The authors of the various chapters are all experts in their fields. Each chapter is richly illustrated with figures and tables. The latest rese...

  18. Acoustic Spatiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon LaBelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of listening can be appreciated as intensely relational, bringing us into contact with surrounding events, bodies and things. Given that sound propagates and expands outwardly, as a set of oscillations from a particular source, listening carries with it a sensual intensity, whereby auditory phenomena deliver intrusive and disruptive as well as soothing and assuring experiences. The physicality characteristic of sound suggests a deeply impressionistic, locational "knowledge structure" – that is, the ways in which listening affords processes of exchange, of being in the world, and from which we extend ourselves. Sound, as physical energy reflecting and absorbing into the materiality around us, and even one's self, provides a rich platform for understanding place and emplacement. Sound is always already a trace of location.Such features of auditory experience give suggestion for what I may call an acoustical paradigm – how sound sets in motion not only the material world but also the flows of the imagination, lending to forces of signification and social structure, and figuring us in relation to each other. The relationality of sound brings us into a steady web of interferences, each of which announces the promise or problematic of being somewhere.

  19. Acoustic Neurinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Faraji Rad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuromas (AN are schwann cell-derived tumors that commonly arise from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve also known as vestibular schwannoma(VS causes unilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo and unsteadiness. In many cases, the tumor size may remain unchanged for many years following diagnosis, which is typically made by MRI. In the majority of cases the tumor is small, leaving the clinician and patient with the options of either serial scanning or active treatment by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR or microneurosurgery. Despite the vast number of published treatment reports, comparative studies are few. The predominant clinical endpoints of AN treatment include tumor control, facial nerve function and hearing preservation. Less focus has been put on symptom relief and health-related quality of life (QOL. It is uncertain if treating a small tumor leaves the patient with a better chance of obtaining relief from future hearing loss, vertigo or tinnitus than by observing it without treatment.   In this paper we review the literature for the natural course, the treatment alternatives and the results of AN. Finally, we present our experience with a management strategy applied for more than 30 years.

  20. SOUND ABSORPTION BEHAVIOR OF ELECTROSPUN POLYACRYLONITRILE NANOFIBROUS MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-fan Xiang; Shuai-xia Tan; Xiao-lan Yu; Yu-hua Long; Xiao-li Zhang; Ning Zhao; Jian Xu

    2011-01-01

    The acoustical damping property of electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous membranes with different thicknesses and porosities was investigated.The sound absorption coefficients were measured using the impedance tube instrument based on ISO10534-2:1998(E).Results indicate that the first resonance absorption frequency of nanofibrous membranes shifts to the lower frequency with the increase of the back cavity or the thickness of membranes.Moreover,the sound absorption performance of the perforated panel can be greatly improved by combination with a thin layer of PAN nanofibrous membrane.Traditional acoustical damping materials (foam,fiber) coated with nanofibrous membranes have better acoustical performance in the low and medium frequency range than that of acoustical materials alone.All of the results demonstrate the PAN nanofibrous membrane is a suitable candidate for noise reduction.

  1. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge of the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion

  2. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.; Ouyang, J. T., E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Liu, Z. W. [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Materials, Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, Beijing 102600 (China); Chen, Q., E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Materials, Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, Beijing 102600 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge of the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion.

  3. Water dimer absorption of visible light

    OpenAIRE

    Hargrove, J

    2007-01-01

    International audience Laboratory measurements of water vapor absorption using cavity ring-down spectroscopy revealed a broad absorption at 405 nm with a quadratic dependence on water monomer concentration, a similar absorption with a linear component at 532 nm, and only linear absorption at 570 nm in the vicinity of water monomer peaks. D2O absorption is weaker and linear at 405 nm. Van't Hoff plots constructed at 405.26 nm suggest that for dimerization, Keq=0.056±0.02 atm?1, ?H°301 K=?16...

  4. Sound Absorption of Locally Resonant Sonic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong-Gang; LIU Yao-Zong; WEN Ji-Hong; YU Dian-Long; WANG Gang; WEN Xi-Sen

    2006-01-01

    @@ The acoustic properties of locally resonant sonic materials with viscosity are theoretically investigated by using the multiple-scattering approach. We find that the absorption of a two-layer slab dominates the wave attenuation in the resonant frequency region under the condition of moderate or high viscous level. The fundamental mechanism operating in local resonance for absorption is investigated for the viability by the mode translation in the scattering process of a single scatterer. Finally the absorption performance in a multi-layer system is discussed.

  5. Doppler peaks from active perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Coulson, D; Ferreira, P; Magueijo, Joao; Albrecht, Andreas; Coulson, David; Ferreira, Pedro

    1995-01-01

    We examine how the qualitative structure of the Doppler peaks in the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave anisotropy depends on the fundamental nature of the perturbations which produced them. The formalism of Hu and Sugiyama is extended to treat models with cosmic defects. We discuss how perturbations can be ``active'' or ``passive'' and ``incoherent'' or ``coherent'', and show how causality and scale invariance play rather different roles in these various cases. We find that the existence of secondary Doppler peaks and the rough placing of the primary peak unambiguously reflect these basic properties.

  6. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  7. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assmann, W., E-mail: walter.assmann@lmu.de; Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K. [Department for Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, Garching 85748 (Germany); Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V. [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging, Technische Universität München and Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, Neuherberg 85764 (Germany); Moser, M.; Dollinger, G. [Institute for Applied Physics and Measurement Technology, Universität der Bundeswehr, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, Neubiberg 85577 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within ±30 μm and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 μm. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound

  8. An Optimisation Approach for Room Acoustics Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Jørgensen, Kristian; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, Lars

    2005-01-01

    This paper discuss on a conceptual level the value of optimisation techniques in architectural acoustics room design from a practical point of view. It is chosen to optimise one objective room acoustics design criterium estimated from the sound field inside the room. The sound field is modeled us...... using the boundary element method where absorption is incorporated. An example is given where the geometry of a room is defined by four design modes. The room geometry is optimised to get a uniform sound pressure....

  9. Multifunctional hybrids for electromagnetic absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynen, I. [Research Center in Micro and Nanoscopic Materials and Electronic Devices, CeRMiN, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Information and Communications Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Microwave Laboratory, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Quievy, N. [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN), Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bailly, C. [Research Center in Micro and Nanoscopic Materials and Electronic Devices, CeRMiN, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN), Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (iMMC), Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Bollen, P. [Information and Communications Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Microwave Laboratory, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN), Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (iMMC), Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Detrembleur, C. [Center for Education and Research on Macromolecules (CERM), University of Liege, Sart-Tilman B6a, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Eggermont, S.; Molenberg, I. [Information and Communications Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Microwave Laboratory, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Thomassin, J.M.; Urbanczyk, L. [Center for Education and Research on Macromolecules (CERM), University of Liege, Sart-Tilman B6a, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > EM absorption requires low dielectric constant and {approx}1 S/m electrical conductivity. > New hybrids were processed with CNT-filled polymer foam inserted in Al honeycomb. > The EM absorption in the GHz range is superior to any known material. > A closed form model is used to guide the design of the hybrid. > The architectured material is light with potential for thermal management. - Abstract: Electromagnetic (EM) interferences are ubiquitous in modern technologies and impact on the reliability of electronic devices and on living cells. Shielding by EM absorption, which is preferable over reflection in certain instances, requires combining a low dielectric constant with high electrical conductivity, which are antagonist properties in the world of materials. A novel class of hybrid materials for EM absorption in the gigahertz range has been developed based on a hierarchical architecture involving a metallic honeycomb filled with a carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer foam. The waveguide characteristics of the honeycomb combined with the performance of the foam lead to unexpectedly large EM power absorption over a wide frequency range, superior to any known material. The peak absorption frequency can be tuned by varying the shape of the honeycomb unit cell. A closed form model of the EM reflection and absorption provides a tool for the optimization of the hybrid. This designed material sets the stage for a new class of sandwich panels combining high EM absorption with mass efficiency, stiffness and thermal management.

  10. Multifunctional hybrids for electromagnetic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → EM absorption requires low dielectric constant and ∼1 S/m electrical conductivity. → New hybrids were processed with CNT-filled polymer foam inserted in Al honeycomb. → The EM absorption in the GHz range is superior to any known material. → A closed form model is used to guide the design of the hybrid. → The architectured material is light with potential for thermal management. - Abstract: Electromagnetic (EM) interferences are ubiquitous in modern technologies and impact on the reliability of electronic devices and on living cells. Shielding by EM absorption, which is preferable over reflection in certain instances, requires combining a low dielectric constant with high electrical conductivity, which are antagonist properties in the world of materials. A novel class of hybrid materials for EM absorption in the gigahertz range has been developed based on a hierarchical architecture involving a metallic honeycomb filled with a carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer foam. The waveguide characteristics of the honeycomb combined with the performance of the foam lead to unexpectedly large EM power absorption over a wide frequency range, superior to any known material. The peak absorption frequency can be tuned by varying the shape of the honeycomb unit cell. A closed form model of the EM reflection and absorption provides a tool for the optimization of the hybrid. This designed material sets the stage for a new class of sandwich panels combining high EM absorption with mass efficiency, stiffness and thermal management.

  11. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  12. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Join/Renew Ways to Give ANA Discussion Forum ... ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma Legacy Society Programs & Services Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Educational Video ...

  13. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and...

  14. Cystic acoustic neuromas

    OpenAIRE

    Chitkara, Naveen; Chanda, Rakesh; Yadav, S. P. S.; N.K. Sharma

    2002-01-01

    Predominantly cystic acoustic neuromas are rare and they usually present with clinical and radiological features different from their more common solid counterparts. Two cases of cystic acoustic neuromas are reported here.

  15. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ... is ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic ...

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  17. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Patient Surveys Related Links Clinical Trials.gov Health Care Insurance Toolkit Additional Resources ANA Public Webinars © 2016 Acoustic Neuroma Association Acoustic Neuroma Association ® • ...

  18. INVESTIGATION ON SOUND ABSORPTION PROPERTIES OF KAPOK FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-fan Xiang; Dong Wang; Hui-chao Liu; Ning Zhao; Jian Xu

    2013-01-01

    Sound absorption properties of natural kapok fibers have been investigated.Kapok fibrous assemblies with different bulk density,thickness,fiber length and orientation were manufactured,and their acoustical performances were evaluated by using an impedance tube instrument.Results show that the kapok fiber has excellent acoustical damping performance due to its natural hollow structure,and the sound absorption coefficients of kapok fibrous assemblies are significantly affected by the bulk density,thickness and arrangement of kapok fibers but less dependent on the fiber length.Compared with assemblies of commercial glass wool and degreasing cotton fibers,the kapok fiber assemblies with the same thickness but much smaller bulk density may have the similar sound absorption coefficients.Theoretical modelling of the acoustical damping performance of kapok fibers shows a good agreement with the experimental data.All the results demonstrate that kapok fiber is a promising light and environment-friendly sound absorption material.

  19. Deep absorption band in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films and solar cells observed by transparent piezoelectric photothermal spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakata, Sho; Atarashi, Akiko [Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Yagi, Masakazu [Kagawa National College of Technology, Mitoyo-shi 769-1192 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    The photo-acoustic spectroscopy (PAS) using a transparent piezoelectric photo-thermal (Tr-PPT) method was carried out on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films (both CIGS/Mo/SLG and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG) and solar cells (ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG). Using the Tr-PPT method, the high background absorption in the below gap region observed in both a microphone and a conventional transducer PAS spectra was strongly reduced. This high background absorption came from the CIGS/Mo interface. This result proves that the Tr-PPT PAS is the surface sensitive method. In the below-band region, a bell-shape deep absorption band has been observed at 0.76 eV, in which a full-width at the half-maximum value was 70-120 meV. This deep absorption band was observed for both CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG and ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG structures. The peak energy of the absorption band was independent of the alloy composition for 0.25≤Ga/III≤0.58. Intensity of the PA signal was negatively correlated to the Na concentration at the CIGS film surface. The origin of the 0.76 eV peak is discussed with relation to native defects such as a Cu-vacancy-related defect (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Peak Oil and other threatening peaks-Chimeras without substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Peak Oil movement has widely spread its message about an impending peak in global oil production, caused by an inadequate resource base. On closer scrutiny, the underlying analysis is inconsistent, void of a theoretical foundation and without support in empirical observations. Global oil resources are huge and expanding, and pose no threat to continuing output growth within an extended time horizon. In contrast, temporary or prolonged supply crunches are indeed plausible, even likely, on account of growing resource nationalism denying access to efficient exploitation of the existing resource wealth.

  1. Ultrasonic Transducer Peak-to-Peak Optical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skarvada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible optical setups for measurement of the peak-to-peak value of an ultrasonic transducer are described in this work. The Michelson interferometer with the calibrated nanopositioner in reference path and laser Doppler vibrometer were used for the basic measurement of vibration displacement. Langevin type of ultrasonic transducer is used for the purposes of Electro-Ultrasonic Nonlinear Spectroscopy (EUNS. Parameters of produced mechanical vibration have to been well known for EUNS. Moreover, a monitoring of mechanical vibration frequency shift with a mass load and sample-transducer coupling is important for EUNS measurement.

  2. Electricity Portfolio Management: Optimal Peak / Off-Peak Allocations

    OpenAIRE

    Huisman, Ronald; Mahieu, Ronald; Schlichter, Felix

    2007-01-01

    textabstractElectricity purchasers manage a portfolio of contracts in order to purchase the expected future electricity consumption profile of a company or a pool of clients. This paper proposes a mean-variance framework to address the concept of structuring the portfolio and focuses on how to allocate optimal positions in peak and off-peak forward contracts. It is shown that the optimal allocations are based on the difference in risk premiums per unit of day-ahead risk as a measure of relati...

  3. Peak Oil and other threatening peaks-Chimeras without substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radetzki, Marian, E-mail: marian@radetzki.bi [Lulea University of Technology (Sweden)

    2010-11-15

    The Peak Oil movement has widely spread its message about an impending peak in global oil production, caused by an inadequate resource base. On closer scrutiny, the underlying analysis is inconsistent, void of a theoretical foundation and without support in empirical observations. Global oil resources are huge and expanding, and pose no threat to continuing output growth within an extended time horizon. In contrast, temporary or prolonged supply crunches are indeed plausible, even likely, on account of growing resource nationalism denying access to efficient exploitation of the existing resource wealth.

  4. Peak Oil and other threatening peaks. Chimeras without substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radetzki, Marian [Luleaa University of Technology (Sweden)

    2010-11-15

    The Peak Oil movement has widely spread its message about an impending peak in global oil production, caused by an inadequate resource base. On closer scrutiny, the underlying analysis is inconsistent, void of a theoretical foundation and without support in empirical observations. Global oil resources are huge and expanding, and pose no threat to continuing output growth within an extended time horizon. In contrast, temporary or prolonged supply crunches are indeed plausible, even likely, on account of growing resource nationalism denying access to efficient exploitation of the existing resource wealth. (author)

  5. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  6. Determining Absorption, Emissivity Reduction, and Local Suppression Coefficients inside Sunspots

    OpenAIRE

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Zhao, Junwei

    2010-01-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves is reduced inside sunspots mainly due to absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression. The coefficients of these power-reduction mechanisms can be determined by comparing time-distance cross-covariances obtained from sunspots and from the quiet Sun. By analyzing 47 active regions observed by SOHO/MDI without using signal filters, we have determined the coefficients of surface absorption, deep absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression....

  7. Check of theory of Brownian motion of a particle through a potential barrier in viscous medium during experimental study of dislocation acoustic relaxation in normal and superconducting niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kramers theory (1940) describing the thermally activated escape of a particle from a potential well in viscous medium is used to interpret the acoustic absorption peak revealed by Kramer and Bauer (1967) in niobium at liquid helium temperatures. It is shown that the experimentally recorded properties of the peak comply with the model of resonance interaction between sound vibrations and the chains of dislocation kinks (particle-like excitation along the dislocation lines). The sound vibrations make the kinks drift diffusively in the second-order Peierls potential relief and experience viscous friction due to the conduction electrons. It turns out that at quite low temperatures niobium develops certain conditions for the kinks, which permit observation of the anomaly predicted by Kramers, i.e. an increase in the particle mobility when the dynamic friction coefficient grows. This fact has been helpful in interpreting one of the most interesting properties of the Kramer-Bauer peak which so far was not quite clear - the displacement of the peak towards low temperatures as niobium experienced the superconducting to normal state transition induced by the magnetic fields. The possibilities of observing quantum diffusion of kinks in acoustic experiments are also discussed briefly

  8. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  9. Photoacoustic tomography in absorbing acoustic media using time reversal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reconstruction of photoacoustic images typically neglects the effect of acoustic absorption on the measured time domain signals. Here, a method to compensate for acoustic absorption in photoacoustic tomography is described. The approach is based on time-reversal image reconstruction and an absorbing equation of state which separately accounts for acoustic absorption and dispersion following a frequency power law. Absorption compensation in the inverse problem is achieved by reversing the absorption proportionality coefficient in sign but leaving the equivalent dispersion parameter unchanged. The reconstruction is regularized by filtering the absorption and dispersion terms in the spatial frequency domain using a Tukey window. This maintains the correct frequency dependence of these parameters within the filter pass band. The method is valid in one, two and three dimensions, and for arbitrary power law absorption parameters. The approach is verified through several numerical experiments. The reconstruction of a carbon fibre phantom and the vasculature in the abdomen of a mouse are also presented. When absorption compensation is included, a general improvement in the image magnitude and resolution is seen, particularly for deeper features

  10. 流场中填充吸声材料夹层板结构与声腔的耦合特性%Performance of Vibro-acoustic Coupling of the Sandwich Structure with Absorptive Material and Cavity in External Convected Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁少武; 史治宇; 李晓松

    2016-01-01

    采用等效流体模拟吸声材料,建立外部流场作用下填充吸声材料夹层板结构与封闭空间声场的声振耦合模型,应用波动分析方法研究结构的声透射性能,分析入射声波入射角和方位角、流场流速和流向、夹层板几何尺寸和声腔深度等参数对填充吸声材料夹层板结构声振耦合特性的影响。计算分析表明吸声材料提高了结构的隔声性能;结构的隔声性能随着面板厚度和夹层厚度的增加而提高,且“板-等效流体-板”共振频率向低频移动;随着入射角、方位角、马赫数和空腔深度的变化改变了结构的隔声性能,驻波衰减频率和驻波共振频率随入射角和方位角的增大向高频移动,随空腔深度的增加向低频移动,顺流入射时随马赫数的增加向低频移动,而逆流入射时则移向高频。%An equivalent fluid model is employed to characterize the absorption of sound in the sound absorptive material. A vibro-acoustic coupling model of the sandwich structure with absorptive material and cavity in convected fluids is developed. The performance of sound transmission is obtained by employing the wave approach. The effects factors of vibro-acoustic responses which were researched include incident elevation angles and azimuch angles, the velocity and direction of convected flow, the geometrical dimensions of the double panels and the depth of the cavity. Studies have shown that the insulation of an structure with absorption than air is improved; sound transmission loss increases with the thickness of the up and low panel and the gap increase and the panel- equivalent fluid-panel resonance shift to lower frequencies; the parametric variation of incident elevation angles and azimuch angles, Mach number and the depth of the cavity changed the performance of sound Transmission of the structure; standing-wave attenuation frequency and standing-wave resonance frequency shift to higher

  11. Acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hua; Qu Shao-Bo; Xu Zhuo; Wang Jia-Fu

    2009-01-01

    By making a comparison between the acoustic equations and the 2-dimensional (2D) Maxwell equations, we obtain the material parameter equations (MPE) for acoustic elliptical cylindrical cloaks. Both the theoretical results and the numerical results indicate that an elliptical cylindrical cloak can realize perfect acoustic invisibility when the spatial distributions of mass density and bulk modulus are exactly configured according to the proposed equations. The present work is the meaningful exploration of designing acoustic cloaks that are neither sphere nor circular cylinder in shape, and opens up possibilities for making complex and multiplex acoustic cloaks with simple models such as spheres, circular or elliptic cylinders.

  12. On the amplification of acoustic phonons in carbon nanotube

    OpenAIRE

    Dompreh, K. A.; Mensah, N. G.; Sakyi-Arthur, D.; Mensah, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of acoustic phonons amplification in Carbon Nanotubes (CNT). The phenomenon is via Cerenkov emission (CE) of acoustic phonons using intraband transitions proposed by Mensah et. al.,~\\cite{1} in Semiconductor Superlattices (SSL) and confirmed in ~\\cite{2}. From this, an asymmetric graph of $\\Gamma^{CNT}$ on $\\frac{V_d}{V_s}$ and $\\Omega\\tau$ were obtained where amplification ($\\Gamma_{amp}^{CNT}$) $>>$ absorption ($\\Gamma_{abs}^{CNT}$). The ratio, $\\frac{\\vert \\G...

  13. Peaked Traveling Wave Solutions to a Generalized Novikov Equation with Cubic and Quadratic Nonlinearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Camassa-Holm equation, Degasperis—Procesi equation and Novikov equation are the three typical integrable evolution equations admitting peaked solitons. In this paper, a generalized Novikov equation with cubic and quadratic nonlinearities is studied, which is regarded as a generalization of these three well-known studied equations. It is shown that this equation admits single peaked traveling wave solutions, periodic peaked traveling wave solutions, and multi-peaked traveling wave solutions. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  14. ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS NEWS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremmel, Neil; Struck, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    American National Standards (ANSI Standards) developed by Accredited Standards Committees S1, S2, S3, S3/SC 1, and S12 in the areas of acoustics, mechanical vibration and shock, bioacoustics, animal bioacoustics, and noise, respectively, are published by the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). In addition to these standards, ASA publishes a catalog of Acoustical American National Standards. To receive a copy of the latest Standards catalog, please contact Neil Stremmel.Comments are welcomed on all material in Acoustical Standards News.This Acoustical Standards News section in JASA, as well as the National Catalog of Acoustical Standards and other information on the Standards Program of the Acoustical Society of America, are available via the ASA home page: http://acousticalsociety.org. PMID:27475185

  15. Acoustic streaming in microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Peter Muller

    , the acoustic streaming flow, and the forces on suspended microparticles. The work is motivated by the application of particle focusing by acoustic radiation forces in medical, environmental and food sciences. Here acoustic streaming is most often unwanted, because it limits the focusability of particles...... work. Based on first- and second-order perturbation theory, assuming small acoustic amplitudes, we derived the time-dependent governing equations under adiabatic conditions. The adiabatic first- and second-order equations are solved analytically for the acoustic field between two orthogonally......-of-the-art in the field. Furthermore, the analytical solution for the acoustic streaming in rectangular channels with arbitrary large height-to-width ratios is derived. This accommodates the analytical theory of acoustic streaming to applications within acoustofluidics....

  16. Uncertainty of input data for room acoustic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Although many room acoustic simulation models have been well established, simulation results will never be accurate with inaccurate and uncertain input data. This study addresses inappropriateness and uncertainty of input data for room acoustic simulations. Firstly, the random incidence absorption......, the current measurement techniques produce uncertain input data. For example, Sabine absorption coefficients according to ISO 354 measured in reverberation chambers have a poor reproducibility. The same happens for sound scattering and transmission, which depend greatly on the test chamber. This study...... summarizes potential advanced absorption measurement techniques that can improve the quality of input data for room acoustic simulations. Lastly, plenty of uncertain input data are copied from unreliable sources. Software developers and users should be careful when spreading such uncertain input data. More...

  17. Hubbert's Peak -- A Physicist's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Oil, as used in agriculture and transportation, is the lifeblood of modern society. It is finite in quantity and will someday be exhausted. In 1956, Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on the finite nature of oil and its production peak and depletion. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. Central to these analyses are estimates of total ``oil in place'' obtained from engineering studies of oil reservoirs as this quantity determines the area under the Hubbert's Peak. Knowing the production history and the total oil in place allows us to make estimates of reserves, and therefore future oil availability. We will then examine reserves data for various countries, in particular OPEC countries, and see if these data tell us anything about the future availability of oil. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  18. 水气含量对基于QEPAS甲烷气体探测性能的影响%Impact of Water on Quartz Enhanced Photo-Acoustic Absorption Spectroscopy Methane Senor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙善文; 易红明; 王贵师; 汪磊; 谈图; 刘锟; 高晓明

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of measurement is affected by the variation of water vapor concentration when a quartz enhanced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is used for real-time trace-gas monitoring. A QEPAS based methane sensor is developed at 1.653 pern and the influence of water vapor on the performances of QEPAS methane sensor including second harmonic signal, resonance frequency, Q factor are investigated experimentally. Measurements are carried out under different absolute humidities which are obtained by bubbling method combined with hygrometer at atmosphere pressure. The results suggest that the water vapor could impact both on relaxation time of methane and the parameters of quarts tuning fork in practical application. The smallest detective mass concentration of the sensor is found to be about 0.57 mg/m3 at different atmosphere pressures with an absolute humidity of 2.34%.%由于气体的湿度对分子振动弛豫有着较大的影响,利用石英音叉增强型光声光谱(QEPAS)技术作为甲烷气体传感,在实际应用中,空气的水气浓度变化将会使光声测量气体浓度的信号强度发生变化.实验中采用鼓泡法结合湿度计来改变探测气体中的湿度,测量了常压下1.653μm波长处甲烷的二次谐波信号,系统地研究了探测气体中水气浓度的变化对石英音叉Q值、共振频率f0等参数的影响.实验结果表明,水气对基于QEPAS技术甲烷气体传感器的实际应用有着很大的影响,主要表现在甲烷分子振动弛豫和探测系统性能两个方面.当实际大气中绝对湿度为2.34%时,获得的系统最小可探测质量浓度为0.57mg/m3.

  19. Selective optical generation of a coherent acoustic nanocavity mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Winter, M. F.; Rozas, G.; Jusserand, B.; Perrin, B.; Fainstein, A.; Vaccaro, P. O.; Saravanan, S.

    2007-04-01

    We report the first experimental evidence of selective generation of a confined acoustic mode in a Ga0.85In0.15As nanocavity enclosed by two Ga0.85In0.15As/AlAs phonon Bragg mirrors. Femtosecond pump-probe experiments reveal the generation of a cavity mode within the acoustic mini-gap of the mirrors, in addition to their folded acoustic modes. Selective generation of the confined mode alone is achievable for certain energies below the absorption of the quantum wells in the phonon mirrors. These energies are experimentally identified with the cavity spacer electronic transitions. The amplitude of the acoustic nanocavity mode can be controlled by detuning the excitation from the spacer transitions. The present work finds a direct interest in the seek of monochromatic MHz-THz acoustic sources.

  20. Discriminate Modelling of Peak and Off-Peak Motorway Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim Mohammed Alhassan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traffic theory is concerned with the movement of discrete objects in real time over a finite network in 2 Dimensions. It is compatible with or dependent on fundamental diagram of traffic. Without question traffic flow is an essential quantitative parameter that is used in planning, designs and roadway improvements.  Road capacity is significant because it is an important indicator of road performance and can point road managers in the right road maintenance and traffic management direction. In this paper four direct empirical capacity measurement methods have been considered. To test the efficacy of each method, data for peak period, off-peak and transition to peak have been used. The headway and the volume methods lack predictive capability and are suitable only for current assessment of flow rates.  The product limit method is weak in its predictive capability in view of the arbitrariness in the selection of the capacity value. It is also an extreme value method; hence not all volume data can be used with this method. The fundamental diagram method has good predictive capability and furnishes capacity values consistent with the standard of the facility. Unlike other methods, it does not rely on bottleneck conditions to deliver the capacity value.  The paper concluded that each method is uniquely suited to prevailing conditions and can be so employed.

  1. Flow Induced Acoustic Resonance in In-line Tube Banks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiromitsu Hamakawa; Tohru Fukano; Eiichi Nishida; Yoshikazu Satou

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper the attention is focused on the relation between vortex shedding phenomena and acoustic resonance which occurred in the two-dimensional model of boiler. There were tube banks with in-line arrangement for small tube pitch ratio. We measured the sound pressure level, the phase delay of acoustic pressures, the spectrum of velocity fluctuation and the gap velocity. As a result, we found two peak frequencies of sound pressure level with different Strouhal numbers St, mainly about 0.26 and 0.52. The noise of St=0.26 was the resonance of transverse mode and St=0.52 was longitudinal mode. The vortex shedding of St=0.15 was generated inside the tube banks without acoustic resonance. As gap velocity increased, we observed that the peak level of spectrum was weak and broad-banded. The onset velocity of the acoustic resonance of longitudinal mode was lower than that of transverse mode.

  2. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  3. Measuring nonlocal Lagrangian peak bias

    CERN Document Server

    Biagetti, Matteo; Desjacques, Vincent; Paranjape, Aseem

    2013-01-01

    In the Lagrangian approach to halo clustering, nonlocal bias can be generated either in the initial conditions or by the subsequent gravitational motions. Here, we investigate nonlocal Lagrangian bias contributions involving gradients of the linear density field, for which we have predictions from the excursion set peak formalism. We reformulate this approach in order to explicitly take into account the variable describing the crossing of the collapse barrier. This enables us to write down a bias expansion which includes all the bias terms, including the nonlocal ones. Having checked that the model furnishes a reasonable fit to the halo mass function, we extend the 1-point cross-correlation technique of Musso, Paranjape & Sheth (2012) to bias contributions that are chi-squared distributed. We validate the method with numerical realizations of peaks of Gaussian random fields before applying it to N-body simulations. We focus on the lowest (quadratic) order nonlocal bias factors predicted by the excursion s...

  4. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon. PMID:16400712

  5. Causality and the Doppler Peaks

    OpenAIRE

    Turok, Neil

    1996-01-01

    Could cosmic structure have formed by the action of causal physics within the standard hot big bang, or was a prior period of inflation required? Recently there has been some discussion of whether causal sources could reproduce the pattern of Doppler peaks of the standard scale-invariant adiabatic theory. This paper gives a rigorous definition of causality, and a causal decomposition of a general source. I present an example of a simple causal source which mimics the standard adiabatic theory...

  6. Exposure to seismic survey alters blue whale acoustic communication

    OpenAIRE

    Di Iorio, Lucia; Clark, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to perceive biologically important sounds is critical to marine mammals, and acoustic disturbance through human-generated noise can interfere with their natural functions. Sounds from seismic surveys are intense and have peak frequency bands overlapping those used by baleen whales, but evidence of interference with baleen whale acoustic communication is sparse. Here we investigated whether blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) changed their vocal behaviour during a seismic survey th...

  7. Distribution of Acoustic Power Spectra for an Isolated Helicopter Fuselage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusyumov A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The broadband aerodynamic noise can be studied, assuming isotropic flow, turbulence and decay. Proudman’s approach allows practical calculations of noise based on CFD solutions of RANS or URANS equations at the stage of post processing and analysis of the solution. Another aspect is the broadband acoustic spectrum and the distribution of acoustic power over a range of frequencies. The acoustic energy spectrum distribution in isotropic turbulence is non monotonic and has a maximum at a certain value of Strouhal number. In the present work the value of acoustic power peak frequency is determined using a prescribed form of acoustic energy spectrum distribution presented in papers by S. Sarkar and M. Y. Hussaini and by G. M. Lilley. CFD modelling of the flow around isolated helicopter fuselage model was considered using the HMB CFD code and the RANS equations.

  8. Springer handbook of acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Acoustics, the science of sound, has developed into a broad interdisciplinary field encompassing the academic disciplines of physics, engineering, psychology, speech, audiology, music, architecture, physiology, neuroscience, and electronics. The Springer Handbook of Acoustics is also in his 2nd edition an unparalleled modern handbook reflecting this richly interdisciplinary nature edited by one of the acknowledged masters in the field, Thomas Rossing. Researchers and students benefit from the comprehensive contents. This new edition of the Handbook features over 11 revised and expanded chapters, new illustrations, and 2 new chapters covering microphone arrays  and acoustic emission.  Updated chapters contain the latest research and applications in, e.g. sound propagation in the atmosphere, nonlinear acoustics in fluids, building and concert hall acoustics, signal processing, psychoacoustics, computer music, animal bioacousics, sound intensity, modal acoustics as well as new chapters on microphone arrays an...

  9. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  10. Drivers of peak sales for pharmaceutical brands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Marc; Leeflang, Peter S. H.; Verhoef, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Peak sales are an important metric in the pharmaceutical industry. Specifically, managers are focused on the height-of-peak-sales and the time required achieving peak sales. We analyze how order of entry and quality affect the level of peak sales and the time-to-peak-sales of pharmaceutical brands.

  11. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  12. Shallow Water Acoustic Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports experimental research where high-frequency acoustic scattering and surface vibration measurements of fluid-loaded and non-fluid-loaded structures...

  13. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  14. Handbook of Engineering Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Möser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the physical background of engineering acoustics, focusing on empirically obtained engineering experience as well as on measurement techniques and engineering methods for prognostics. Its goal is not only to describe the state of art of engineering acoustics but also to give practical help to engineers in order to solve acoustic problems. It deals with the origin, the transmission and the methods of the abating different kinds of air-borne and structure-borne sounds caused by various mechanisms – from traffic to machinery and flow-induced sound. In addition the modern aspects of room and building acoustics, as well as psychoacoustics and active noise control, are covered.

  15. Localized acoustic surface modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  16. Localized Acoustic Surface Modes

    KAUST Repository

    Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-08-04

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes (ASMs). We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  17. Effect of Granule Sizes on Acoustic Properties of Protein-Based Silica Aerogel Composites via Novel Inferential Transmission Loss Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Sachithanadam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic properties of the silica aerogel (SA granules of various sizes from 0.50 to 3.35 mm, distributed into six groups of nominal sizes and measured via a two-microphone impedance tube, are presented. The absorption coefficients of the SA granules were evaluated at ultra- to super-low frequency range from 50–1600 Hz. It was observed that nominal SA granules with sizes of 1.2 mm (AG2 and 1.7 mm (AG3 displayed the best absorption coefficients. When tested with granules filled at 5 cm depth, AG2 and AG3 absorption coefficients peaked at 980 Hz with values of 0.86 and 0.81, respectively. A novel approach to measure transmission loss (TL by using “inferential” principle is presented. This novel method, named “Inferential Transmission Loss Method” (InTLM, revealed that the average TL, TLavg for both AG2 and AG3 SA granules was 14.83 dB and 15.35 dB, respectively. Gelatin silica aerogels doped with sodium dodecyl sulfate (GSA–SDS composites comprising of 1.2 mm (GSA–AG2 and 1.7 mm (GSA–AG3 granules of various configurations were fabricated and evaluated for absorption coefficients and TL with known traditional acoustic panels. The results showed that GSA–AG3 had a better absorption coefficient over other configurations for the same corresponding thickness reaching the peak of 0.6 from 1300 to 1450 Hz with TLavg between 10.7 and 20.3 decibels. The four-layered GSA–AG2 and GSA–AG3 composites showed exceptionally high absorption from 500 to 800 Hz suitable for narrow band applications. Lastly, the “InTLM” was matched with the sound meter measurements, with high accuracy between 0.3 and 3.2 dB for low-frequency testing (50–1600 Hz.

  18. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  19. Spatial peak-load pricing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, M. Soledad; Serra, Pablo [Universidad de Chile, Dept. of Industrial Engineering, Santiago (Chile)

    2007-03-15

    This article extends the traditional electricity peak-load pricing model to include transmission costs. In the context of a two-node, two-technology electric power system, where suppliers face inelastic demand, we show that when the marginal plant is located at the energy-importing center, generators located away from that center should pay the marginal capacity transmission cost; otherwise, consumers should bear this cost through capacity payments. Since electric power transmission is a natural monopoly, marginal-cost pricing does not fully cover costs. We propose distributing the revenue deficit among users in proportion to the surplus they derive from the service priced at marginal cost. (Author)

  20. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  1. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important Points ... Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular schwannoma, ...

  2. Normal-incidence sound absorption measurements by means of a small cabin

    OpenAIRE

    Vivolo, Marianna; PLUYMERS, Bert; Vandepitte, Dirk; Desmet, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Vibro-acoustic characterization of structural and non-structural components has become extremely important in several technology fields. Knowledge of acoustic Transmission Loss, coupled vibro-acoustic behaviour and sound absorption properties of innovative materials and layouts represents a crucial step in the optimization of product and process design. Amongst others, automotive industries have loudly raised the need for practical and efficient techniques to investigate these properties in t...

  3. Predicting Acoustics in Class Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Lynge; Rindel, Jens Holger

    2005-01-01

    Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might be explai......Typical class rooms have fairly simple geometries, even so room acoustics in this type of room is difficult to predict using today's room acoustic computer modeling software. The reasons why acoustics of class rooms are harder to predict than acoustics of complicated concert halls might...... with surface scattering is presented. Each of the two scattering effects is modeled as frequency dependent functions....

  4. The underwater acoustic signature of a nuclear explosion at the ocean surface. Interim technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bache, T.C.; Barker, T.G.; Brown, M.G.; Pyatt, K.D.; Swanger, H.J.

    1980-07-01

    The gross spectral character and duration of the acoustic wave signature of a nuclear explosion near the ocean surface is estimated by constructing theoretical pressure-time histories, using models for the explosion and wave propagation. The explosion is assumed to have a yield of 1 KT and the nominal range is 6600 km. The frequencies of interest are rather low, 50 Hz and less, so absorption is small and the estimates of spectral character and duration essentially decouple. The spectrum depends almost entirely on the source characteristics and the duration is controlled by characteristics of the travel path. The airblast-induced pressure loading on the ocean surface dominates the source, with the acoustic waves from direct coupling into the water being relatively small. At large distances, the spectrum for 1 KT peaks near 20 Hz and is band-limited between 5 and 50 Hz. For different energy yields these frequencies scale with the cube-root of the yield. Different assumptions about the (laterally homogeneous) oceanic sound profile lead to differing estimates for the signal duration. Values of 20 to 60 seconds seem most reasonable.

  5. Lightweight acoustic treatments for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naify, Christina Jeanne

    2011-12-01

    acoustic response. Acoustic metamaterials with negative dynamic mass density have been shown to demonstrate a significant (5x) increase in TL over mass law predictions for a narrow band (100Hz) at low frequencies (100--1000Hz). The peak TL frequency can be tuned to specific values by varying the membrane and mass properties. TL magnitude as a function of frequency was measured for variations of the mass magnitude and membrane tension using an impedance tube setup. The dynamic properties of membranes constructed from different materials and thicknesses were measured and compared to the results of coupled field acoustic-structural finite element analysis (FEA) modeling to understand the role of tension and element quality factor. To better comprehend the mechanism(s) responsible for the TL peak, a laser vibrometer was used to map the out-of-plane dynamic response of the structure under acoustic loading at discrete frequencies. Negative dynamic mass was experimentally demonstrated at the peak TL frequency. The scale-up of the acoustic metamaterial structure was explored by examining the behavior of multiple elements arranged in arrays. Single membranes were stretched over rigid frame supports and masses were attached to the center of each divided cell. TL behavior was measured for multiple configurations with different magnitudes of mass distributed across each of the cell membranes in the array resulting in a multi-peak TL profile. To better understand scale-up issues, the effect of the frame structure compliance was evaluated, and more compliant frames resulted in a reduction in TL peak frequency bandwidth. In addition, displacement measurements of frames and membranes were performed using a laser vibrometer. The measured TL of the multi-celled structure was compared with TL behavior predicted by FEA to understand the role of non-uniform mass distribution and frame compliance. TL of membrane-type LRAM with added ring masses was analyzed using both finite element analysis

  6. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  7. Acoustic Signals and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The Handbook of Signal Processing in Acoustics will compile the techniques and applications of signal processing as they are used in the many varied areas of Acoustics. The Handbook will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of signal processing in acoustics. Each Section of the Handbook...... will present topics on signal processing which are important in a specific area of acoustics. These will be of interest to specialists in these areas because they will be presented from their technical perspective, rather than a generic engineering approach to signal processing. Non-specialists, or specialists...... from different areas, will find the self-contained chapters accessible and will be interested in the similarities and differences between the approaches and techniques used in different areas of acoustics....

  8. Ocean acoustic hurricane classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Joshua D; Makris, Nicholas C

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical evidence are combined to show that underwater acoustic sensing techniques may be valuable for measuring the wind speed and determining the destructive power of a hurricane. This is done by first developing a model for the acoustic intensity and mutual intensity in an ocean waveguide due to a hurricane and then determining the relationship between local wind speed and underwater acoustic intensity. From this it is shown that it should be feasible to accurately measure the local wind speed and classify the destructive power of a hurricane if its eye wall passes directly over a single underwater acoustic sensor. The potential advantages and disadvantages of the proposed acoustic method are weighed against those of currently employed techniques. PMID:16454274

  9. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  10. Computational Ocean Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Finn B; Porter, Michael B; Schmidt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the computer has played an increasingly pivotal role in the field of ocean acoustics. Faster and less expensive than actual ocean experiments, and capable of accommodating the full complexity of the acoustic problem, numerical models are now standard research tools in ocean laboratories. The progress made in computational ocean acoustics over the last thirty years is summed up in this authoritative and innovatively illustrated new text. Written by some of the field's pioneers, all Fellows of the Acoustical Society of America, Computational Ocean Acoustics presents the latest numerical techniques for solving the wave equation in heterogeneous fluid–solid media. The authors discuss various computational schemes in detail, emphasizing the importance of theoretical foundations that lead directly to numerical implementations for real ocean environments. To further clarify the presentation, the fundamental propagation features of the techniques are illustrated in color. Computational Ocean A...

  11. Acoustic trapping of active matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Sho C; De Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John F

    2016-01-01

    Confinement of living microorganisms and self-propelled particles by an external trap provides a means of analysing the motion and behaviour of active systems. Developing a tweezer with a trapping radius large compared with the swimmers' size and run length has been an experimental challenge, as standard optical traps are too weak. Here we report the novel use of an acoustic tweezer to confine self-propelled particles in two dimensions over distances large compared with the swimmers' run length. We develop a near-harmonic trap to demonstrate the crossover from weak confinement, where the probability density is Boltzmann-like, to strong confinement, where the density is peaked along the perimeter. At high concentrations the swimmers crystallize into a close-packed structure, which subsequently 'explodes' as a travelling wave when the tweezer is turned off. The swimmers' confined motion provides a measurement of the swim pressure, a unique mechanical pressure exerted by self-propelled bodies. PMID:26961816

  12. The acoustic cut-off frequency of the Sun and the solar magnetic activity cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, A; Palle, P L

    2011-01-01

    The acoustic cut-off frequency -the highest frequency for acoustic solar eigenmodes- is an important parameter of the solar atmosphere as it determines the upper boundary of the p-mode resonant cavities. At frequencies beyond this value, acoustic disturbances are no longer trapped but traveling waves. Interference amongst them give rise to higher-frequency peaks -the pseudomodes- in the solar acoustic spectrum. The pseudomodes are shifted slightly in frequency with respect to p modes making possible the use of pseudomodes to determine the acoustic cut-off frequency. Using data from GOLF and VIRGO instruments on board the SOHO spacecraft, we calculate the acoustic cut-off frequency using the coherence function between both the velocity and intensity sets of data. By using data gathered by these instruments during the entire lifetime of the mission (1996 till the present), a variation in the acoustic cut-off frequency with the solar magnetic activity cycle is found.

  13. Acoustic estimation of suspended sediment concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱维庆; 朱敏; 周忠来; 潘锋; 霍其增; 张向军

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the acoustic estimation of suspended sediment concentration is discussed and two estimation methods of suspended sediment concentration are presented. The first method is curve fitting method, in which, according to the acoustic backscattering theory we assume that the fit-ting factor K1 (r) between the concentration M(r) obtained by acoustic observation and the concentra-tion M0(r) obtained by sampling water is a high order power function of distance r. Using least-square algorithm, we can determine the coefficients of the high order power function by minimizing the differ-ence between M(r) and M0(r) in the whole water profile. To the absorption coefficient of sound due to the suspension in water we do not give constraint in the first method. The second method is recur-sive fitting method, in which we take M0(r) as the conditions of initialization and decision and give ra-tional constraints to some parameters. The recursive process is stable. We analyzed the two methods with a lot of experimental data. The analytical results show that the estimate error of the first method is less than that of the second method and the latter can not only estimate the concentration of suspended sediment but also give the absorption coefficient of sound. Good results have been obtained with the two methods.

  14. High Resolution X-ray-Induced Acoustic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Tang, Shanshan; Ahmad, Moiz; Xing, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Absorption based CT imaging has been an invaluable tool in medical diagnosis, biology, and materials science. However, CT requires a large set of projection data and high radiation dose to achieve superior image quality. In this letter, we report a new imaging modality, X-ray Induced Acoustic Tomography (XACT), which takes advantages of high sensitivity to X-ray absorption and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. A single projection X-ray exposure is sufficient to generate acoustic signals in 3D space because the X-ray generated acoustic waves are of a spherical nature and propagate in all directions from their point of generation. We demonstrate the successful reconstruction of gold fiducial markers with a spatial resolution of about 350 μm. XACT reveals a new imaging mechanism and provides uncharted opportunities for structural determination with X-ray.

  15. Low-frequency tunable acoustic absorber based on split tube resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Fu, Caixing; Li, Xin; Meng, Yan; Gao, Yibo; Tian, Jingxuan; Wang, Li; Huang, Yingzhou; Yang, Zhiyu; Wen, Weijia

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a high-efficiency tunable acoustic absorber for low frequencies (acoustic absorber is based on split tube resonators and could reach high-efficiency absorption at tunable resonance frequency with wavelength in air at least 30 times larger than its total thickness in simulations and experiments. The resonance frequency and high-efficiency absorption of the absorber are robust under oblique incidence even at large angles. The absorber could have potential applications for acoustic engineering due to its high structural stability, ease of fabrication, subwavelength thickness, and robust high-efficiency.

  16. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Pai; Xiao, Bingmu; Wu, Ying, E-mail: ying.wu@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-10-03

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry–Perot resonance. - Highlights: • Expression of transmission coefficient of an acoustic grating with curled slits. • Non-dispersive and tunable effective medium parameters for the acoustic grating. • A flat acoustic focusing lens with gradient index by using the acoustic grating.

  17. Effect of food on absorption of lomefloxacin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, W. D.; Dickinson, R G; Eadie, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Twelve subjects participated in an open-label, single-dose, balanced three-way crossover study in which the absorptions of lomefloxacin were compared following (i) an overnight fast, (ii) a carbohydrate meal, and (iii) a high-fat meal. The time to peak concentration of lomefloxacin was delayed, but peak concentration in plasma and amount of drug absorbed were unchanged following both meals.

  18. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  19. Transient absorption microscopy studies of single metal and semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Paul; Sajini-Devadas, Mary; Hartland, Gregory V.

    2015-08-01

    Transient absorption microscopy is an experimental technique that allows nanomaterials to be studied with ultrafast time resolution and diffraction limited spatial resolution. This paper describes recent results from using transient absorption microscopy to investigate energy relaxation processes in single metal and semiconductor nanowires. The processes that have been examined include charge carrier trapping in semiconductor nanostructures, the motion of surface plasmon polaritons in metal nanowires, and the damping of the acoustic breathing modes of metal nanowires by high viscosity solvents.

  20. Acoustic metasurface-based perfect absorber with deep subwavelength thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine M.

    2016-02-01

    Conventional acoustic absorbers are used to have a structure with a thickness comparable to the working wavelength, resulting in major obstacles in real applications in low frequency range. We present a metasurface-based perfect absorber capable of achieving the total absorption of acoustic wave in an extremely low frequency region. The metasurface possessing a deep subwavelength thickness down to a feature size of ˜ λ / 223 is composed of a perforated plate and a coiled coplanar air chamber. Simulations based on fully coupled acoustic with thermodynamic equations and theoretical impedance analysis are utilized to reveal the underlying physics and the acoustic performances, showing an excellent agreement. Our realization should have an high impact on amount of applications due to the extremely thin thickness, easy fabrication, and high efficiency of the proposed structure.

  1. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  2. Acoustic sniper localization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  3. Grazing incidence modeling of a metamaterial-inspired dual-resonance acoustic liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Benjamin S.

    2014-03-01

    To reduce the noise emitted by commercial aircraft turbofan engines, the inlet and aft nacelle ducts are lined with acoustic absorbing structures called acoustic liners. Traditionally, these structures consist of a perforated facesheet bonded on top of a honeycomb core. These traditional perforate over honeycomb core (POHC) liners create an absorption spectra where the maximum absorption occurs at a frequency that is dictated by the depth of the honeycomb core; which acts as a quarter-wave resonator. Recent advances in turbofan engine design have increased the need for thin acoustic liners that are effective at low frequencies. One design that has been developed uses an acoustic metamaterial architecture to improve the low frequency absorption. Specifically, the liner consists of an array of Helmholtz resonators separated by quarter-wave volumes to create a dual-resonance acoustic liner. While previous work investigated the acoustic behavior under normal incidence, this paper outlines the modeling and predicted transmission loss and absorption of a dual-resonance acoustic metamaterial when subjected to grazing incidence sound.

  4. Neurofeedback training for peak performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Graczyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]aim[/b]. One of the applications of the Neurofeedback methodology is peak performance in sport. The protocols of the neurofeedback are usually based on an assessment of the spectral parameters of spontaneous EEG in resting state conditions. The aim of the paper was to study whether the intensive neurofeedback training of a well-functioning Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport, could change the brain functioning reflected in changes in spontaneous EEG and event related potentials (ERPs. [b]case study[/b]. The case is presented of an Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport. He wanted to resume his activities by means of neurofeedback training. His QEEG/ERP parameters were assessed before and after 4 intensive sessions of neurotherapy. Dramatic and statistically significant changes that could not be explained by error measurement were observed in the patient. [b]conclusion[/b]. Neurofeedback training in the subject under study increased the amplitude of the monitoring component of ERPs generated in the anterior cingulate cortex, accompanied by an increase in beta activity over the medial prefrontal cortex. Taking these changes together, it can be concluded that that even a few sessions of neurofeedback in a high performance brain can significantly activate the prefrontal cortical areas associated with increasing confidence in sport performance.

  5. Establishment of peak bone mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Stefano; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2003-03-01

    Among the main areas of progress in osteoporosis research during the last decade or so are the general recognition that this condition, which is the cause of so much pain in the elderly population, has its antecedents in childhood and the identification of the structural basis accounting for much of the differences in bone strength among humans. Nevertheless, current understanding of the bone mineral accrual process is far from complete. The search for genes that regulate bone mass acquisition is ongoing, and current results are not sufficient to identify subjects at risk. However, there is solid evidence that BMD measurements can be helpful for the selection of subjects that presumably would benefit from preventive interventions. The questions regarding the type of preventive interventions, their magnitude, and duration remain unanswered. Carefully designed controlled trials are needed. Nevertheless, previous experience indicates that weight-bearing activity and possibly calcium supplements are beneficial if they are begun during childhood and preferably before the onset of puberty. Modification of unhealthy lifestyles and increments in exercise or calcium assumption are logical interventions that should be implemented to improve bone mass gains in all children and adolescents who are at risk of failing to achieve an optimal peak bone mass. PMID:12699292

  6. Peak Detection Using Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Daoud

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new work based-wavelet transform is designed to o vercome one of the main drawbacks that found in the present new technologies. Orthogonal Frequency Divi sion Multiplexing (OFDMis proposed in the literature to enhance the multimedia resolution. Ho wever, the high peak power (PAPR values will obstr uct such achievements. Therefore, a new proposition is found in this work, making use of the wavelet transforms methods, and it is divided into three ma in stages; de-noising stage, thresholding stage and then the replacement stage. In order to check the system stages validity; a mat hematical model has been built and its checked afte r using a MATLAB simulation. A simulated bit error ra te (BER achievement will be compared with our previously published work, where an enhancement fro m 8×10 -1 to be 5×10 -1 is achieved. Moreover, these results will be compared to the work found in the l iterature, where we have accomplished around 27% PAPR extra reduction. As a result, the BER performance has been improved for the same bandwidth occupancy. Moreover and due to the de-noise stage, the verification rate ha s been improved to reach 81%. This is in addition t o the noise immunity enhancement.

  7. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; KIRKEGAARD, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to inve...

  8. Underwater Applications of Acoustical Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Mehta

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic technique of acoustical holography. Requirements for recording the acoustical hologram are discussed with its ability for underwater imaging in view. Some practical systems for short-range and medium-range imaging are described. The advantages of acoustical holography over optical imaging, acoustical imaging and sonars are outlined.

  9. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids. PMID:27633351

  10. Viscoelastic properties and efficient acoustic damping in confined polymer nano-layers at GHz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettich, Mike; Jacob, Karl; Ristow, Oliver; Schubert, Martin; Bruchhausen, Axel; Gusev, Vitalyi; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the viscoelastic properties of confined molecular nano-layers by time resolved optical pump-probe measurements. Access to the elastic properties is provided by the damping time of acoustic eigenmodes of thin metal films deposited on the molecular nano-layers which show a strong dependence on the molecular layer thickness and on the acoustic eigen-mode frequencies. An analytical model including the viscoelastic properties of the molecular layer allows us to obtain the longitudinal sound velocity as well as the acoustic absorption coefficient of the layer. Our experiments and theoretical analysis indicate for the first time that the molecular nano-layers are much more viscous than elastic in the investigated frequency range from 50 to 120 GHz and thus show pronounced acoustic absorption. The longitudinal acoustic wavenumber has nearly equal real and imaginary parts, both increasing proportional to the square root of the frequency. Thus, both acoustic velocity and acoustic absorption are proportional to the square root of frequency and the propagation of compressional/dilatational acoustic waves in the investigated nano-layers is of the diffusional type, similar to the propagation of shear waves in viscous liquids and thermal waves in solids. PMID:27633351

  11. Electric modulation of optical absorption in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    We have calculated the effect of an external electric field on the intersubband optical absorption of a nanowire subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field and Rashba effect. The absorption peaks due to optical transitions that are forbidden in the absence of the intersubband coupling experience strong amplitude modulation. This effect is quadratic in electric fields applied along the direction of quantum confinement or perpendicularly to tune the Rashba parameter. The electric field also induces frequency modulation in the associated spectrum. On the other hand, transitions that are normally allowed show, to a large extent, a parallel band effect, and accordingly they are responsible for strong optical absorption.

  12. Water dimer absorption of visible light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hargrove

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory measurements of water vapor absorption using cavity ring-down spectroscopy revealed a broad absorption at 405 nm with a quadratic dependence on water monomer concentration, a similar absorption with a linear component at 532 nm, and only linear absorption at 570 nm in the vicinity of water monomer peaks. D2O absorption is weaker and linear at 405 nm. Van't Hoff plots constructed at 405.26 nm suggest that for dimerization, Keq=0.056±0.02 atm−1, ΔH°301 K=−16.6±2 kJ mol−1 and ΔS°301 K=−80±10 J mol−1 K−1. This transition peaks at 409.5 nm, could be attributed to the 8th overtone of water dimer and the 532 nm absorption to the 6th overtone. It is possible that some lower overtones previously searched for are less enhanced. These absorptions could increase water vapor feed back calculations leading to higher global temperature projections with currently projected greenhouse gas levels or greater cooling from greenhouse gas reductions.

  13. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography. PMID:26723303

  14. Acoustic integrated extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross-section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. [1] derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency.

  15. Autonomous Acoustic Receiver System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Collects underwater acoustic data and oceanographic data. Data are recorded onboard an ocean buoy and can be telemetered to a remote ship or shore station...

  16. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  17. Acoustic Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An acoustic igniter eliminates the need to use electrical energy to drive spark systems to initiate combustion in liquid-propellant rockets. It does not involve the...

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment Summary Types Of Post-treatment Issues Resources Medical Resources Considerations When Selecting a Healthcare Professional Healthcare ... ANA? Mission Statement Board of Directors ANA Staff Medical Advisory Board News ANA Annual Reports Acoustic Neuroma ...

  19. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  20. An acoustic invisible gateway

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Kan, Wei-Wei; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The recently-emerged concept of "invisible gateway" with the extraordinary capability to block the waves but allow the passage of other entities has attracted great attentions due to the general interests in illusion devices. However, the possibility to realize such a fascinating phenomenon for acoustic waves has not yet been explored, which should be of paramount significance for acoustical applications but would necessarily involve experimental difficulty. Here we design and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic invisible gateway (AIG) capable of concealing a channel under the detection of sound. Instead of "restoring" a whole block of background medium by using transformation acoustics that inevitably requires complementary or restoring media with extreme parameters, we propose an inherently distinct methodology that only aims at engineering the surface impedance at the "gate" to mimic a rigid "wall" and can be conveniently implemented by decorating meta-structures behind the channel. Such a simple yet ef...

  1. Principles of musical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, William M

    2013-01-01

    Principles of Musical Acoustics focuses on the basic principles in the science and technology of music. Musical examples and specific musical instruments demonstrate the principles. The book begins with a study of vibrations and waves, in that order. These topics constitute the basic physical properties of sound, one of two pillars supporting the science of musical acoustics. The second pillar is the human element, the physiological and psychological aspects of acoustical science. The perceptual topics include loudness, pitch, tone color, and localization of sound. With these two pillars in place, it is possible to go in a variety of directions. The book treats in turn, the topics of room acoustics, audio both analog and digital, broadcasting, and speech. It ends with chapters on the traditional musical instruments, organized by family. The mathematical level of this book assumes that the reader is familiar with elementary algebra. Trigonometric functions, logarithms and powers also appear in the book, but co...

  2. A modified diffusion equation for room-acoustic predication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yun; Xiang, Ning

    2007-06-01

    This letter presents a modified diffusion model using an Eyring absorption coefficient to predict the reverberation time and sound pressure distributions in enclosures. While the original diffusion model [Ollendorff, Acustica 21, 236-245 (1969); J. Picaut et al., Acustica 83, 614-621 (1997); Valeau et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 1504-1513 (2006)] usually has good performance for low absorption, the modified diffusion model yields more satisfactory results for both low and high absorption. Comparisons among the modified model, the original model, a geometrical-acoustics model, and several well-established theories in terms of reverberation times and sound pressure level distributions, indicate significantly improved prediction accuracy by the modification. PMID:17552680

  3. Anal acoustic reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Peter J; Klarskov, Niels; Telford, Karen J;

    2011-01-01

    Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis.......Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new technique of assessing anal sphincter function. Five new variables reflecting anal canal function are measured: the opening and closing pressure, the opening and closing elastance, and hysteresis....

  4. Acoustic surface cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    Zijlstra, Aaldert Geert

    2011-01-01

    Merely the presence of compressible entities, known as bubbles, greatly enriches the physical phenomena encountered when introducing ultrasound in a liquid. Mediated by the response of these bubbles, the otherwise diffuse and relatively low energy density of the acoustic field can induce strong, localized liquid motion, high internal temperatures and pressures as well as secondary acoustic emissions. In turn, these effects give rise to considerable stresses exerted on nearby objects and molec...

  5. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications. PMID:25418084

  6. An acoustic metasurface design for wave motion conversion of longitudinal waves to transverse waves using topology optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Y.; Yamada, T.; Otomori, M.; Izui, K.; Nishiwaki, S.

    2015-11-01

    This letter presents an acoustic metasurface that converts longitudinal acoustic waves into transverse elastic waves in an acoustic-elastic coupled system. Metasurface configurations are obtained by a level set-based topology optimization method, and we describe the mechanism that changes the direction of the wave motion. Numerical examples of 2D problems with prescribed frequencies of incident acoustic waves are provided, and transverse elastic wave amplitudes are maximized by manipulating the propagation of the acoustic waves. Frequency analysis reveals that each of the different metasurface designs obtained for different wavelengths of incident waves provides peak response at the target frequency.

  7. The C IV Forest as a Probe of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Pieri, Matthew M

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent successes in measuring baryon acoustic oscillations in quasar absorption using the Lyman-alpha (Ly-alpha) transition, I explore the possibility of using the 1548 Ang transition of triply-ionized carbon (C IV) as a tracer. While the Ly-alpha forest is a more sensitive tracer of intergalactic gas, it is limited by the fact that it can only be measured in the optical window at redshifts z > 2. Quasars are challenging to identify and observe at these high-redshifts, but the C IV forest can be probed down to redshifts z = 1.3, taking full advantage of the peak in the redshift distribution of quasars that can be targeted with high efficiency. I explore the strength of the C IV absorption signal and show that the absorbing population on the red side of the Ly-alpha emission line is dominated by C IV. As a consequence, I argue that forthcoming surveys will have a sufficient increase in quasar number density to offset the lower sensitivity of the C IV forest and provide competitive precision using b...

  8. Influence of Composition of Sm2O3-Containing Rare Earth Glass on Its Absorption Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qitu; Wang Tingwei; Meng Xianfeng; Shan Xiaobing; Xu Zhongzi

    2005-01-01

    Borosilicate glass with high rare earth content was fabricated by traditional method. The influence of glass compositions and rare earth content on absorption spectra was examined and discussed. With increasing Sm2O3 content, the intensity of characteristic absorption peak is increased and the absorption peak is broadened. With increasing of the ratios of SiO2/B2O3 and Al2O3/SiO2, the broadening degree of absorption peak is increased. The experimental results provide basis for making special optical glasses which have the characteristics of high absorption for special wavelength laser and high transparence for visible light.

  9. Optical transition radiation in presence of acoustic waves for an oblique incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, A R; Saharian, A A

    2011-01-01

    Forward transition radiation is considered in an ultrasonic superlattice excited in a finite thickness plate under oblique incidence of relativistic electrons. We investigate the influence of acoustic waves on both the intensity and polarization of the radiation. In the quasi-classical approximation, formulas are derived for the vector potential of the electromagnetic field and for the spectral-angular distribution of the radiation intensity. It is shown that the acoustic waves generate new resonance peaks in the spectral and angular distributions. The heights and the location of the peaks can be controlled by choosing the parameters of the acoustic wave. The numerical examples are given for a plate of fused quartz.

  10. A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Hongwei; YAO; Lei; ZHAO; Hong; ZHANG; Jichuan; XUE; Zhaohong

    2006-01-01

    A mixed method for measuring low-frequency acoustic properties of macromolecular materials is presented.The dynamic mechanical parameters of materials are first measured by using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Apparatus(DMTA) at low frequencies,usually less than 100 Hz; then based on the Principles of Time-Temperature Super position (TTS),these parameters are extended to the frequency range that acousticians are concerned about,usually from hundreds to thousands of hertz; finally the extended dynamic mechanical parameters are transformed into acoustic parameters with the help of acoustic measurement and inverse analysis.To test the feasibility and accuracy,we measure a kind of rubber sample in DMTA and acquire the basic acoustic parameters of the sample by using this method.While applying the basic parameters to calculating characteristics of the sample in acoustic pipe,a reasonable agreement of sound absorption coefficients is obtained between the calculations and measurements in the acoustic pipe.

  11. Use of Acoustic Emission During Scratch Testing for Understanding Adhesion Behavior of Aluminum Nitride Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Mishra, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, acoustic emission during scratch testing of the aluminum nitride coatings formed on stainless steel substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering was analyzed to assess the coating failure. The AlN coatings were formed under the variation of substrate temperature, substrate bias potential, and discharge power. The coatings deposited in the temperature range of 100 to 400 °C showed peak acoustic emission less than 1.5%, indicating ductile nature of the coating. However, for coatings formed with substrate negative bias potential of 20 to 50 V, numerous sharp acoustic bursts with maximum emission approaching 80% were observed, indicating brittle nature of the coatings with large number of defects present. The shift in the intensity of the first major acoustic peak toward higher load, with the increasing bias potential, confirmed improved adhesion of the coating. Also, the higher discharge power resulted in increased acoustic emission.

  12. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atlas Peak. 9.140 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.140 Atlas Peak. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Atlas Peak.”...

  13. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  14. Acoustic vector sensor signal processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guiqing; LI Qihu; ZHANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic vector sensor simultaneously, colocately and directly measures orthogonal components of particle velocity as well as pressure at single point in acoustic field so that is possible to improve performance of traditional underwater acoustic measurement devices or detection systems and extends new ideas for solving practical underwater acoustic engineering problems. Although acoustic vector sensor history of appearing in underwater acoustic area is no long, but with huge and potential military demands, acoustic vector sensor has strong development trend in last decade, it is evolving into a one of important underwater acoustic technology. Under this background, we try to review recent progress in study on acoustic vector sensor signal processing, such as signal detection, DOA estimation, beamforming, and so on.

  15. Acoustic black holes: recent developments in the theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor

    2014-08-01

    Acoustic black holes are relatively new physical objects that have been introduced and investigated mainly during the last decade. They can absorb almost 100% of the incident wave energy, and this makes them very attractive for such traditional engineering applications as vibration damping in different engineering structures and sound absorption in gases and liquids. They also could be useful for some ultrasonic devices using Lamb wave propagation to provide anechoic termination for such waves. So far, acoustic black holes have been investigated mainly for flexural waves in thin plates, for which the required gradual changes in local wave velocity with distance can be easily achieved by changing the plates' local thickness. The present paper provides a brief review of the theory of acoustic black holes, including their comparison with optic black holes introduced about five years ago. Review is also given of the recent experimental work carried out at Loughborough University on damping structural vibrations using the acoustic black hole effect. This is followed by the discussion on potential applications of the acoustic black hole effect for sound absorption in air.

  16. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered. PMID:26780959

  17. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Diana S; Miller-Klein, Erik T

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation) and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient's bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s' standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013) with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  18. Acoustic assessment of speech privacy curtains in two nursing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Pope

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals have complex soundscapes that create challenges to patient care. Extraneous noise and high reverberation rates impair speech intelligibility, which leads to raised voices. In an unintended spiral, the increasing noise may result in diminished speech privacy, as people speak loudly to be heard over the din. The products available to improve hospital soundscapes include construction materials that absorb sound (acoustic ceiling tiles, carpet, wall insulation and reduce reverberation rates. Enhanced privacy curtains are now available and offer potential for a relatively simple way to improve speech privacy and speech intelligibility by absorbing sound at the hospital patient′s bedside. Acoustic assessments were performed over 2 days on two nursing units with a similar design in the same hospital. One unit was built with the 1970s′ standard hospital construction and the other was newly refurbished (2013 with sound-absorbing features. In addition, we determined the effect of an enhanced privacy curtain versus standard privacy curtains using acoustic measures of speech privacy and speech intelligibility indexes. Privacy curtains provided auditory protection for the patients. In general, that protection was increased by the use of enhanced privacy curtains. On an average, the enhanced curtain improved sound absorption from 20% to 30%; however, there was considerable variability, depending on the configuration of the rooms tested. Enhanced privacy curtains provide measureable improvement to the acoustics of patient rooms but cannot overcome larger acoustic design issues. To shorten reverberation time, additional absorption, and compact and more fragmented nursing unit floor plate shapes should be considered.

  19. Acoustic black holes: recent developments in the theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor

    2014-08-01

    Acoustic black holes are relatively new physical objects that have been introduced and investigated mainly during the last decade. They can absorb almost 100% of the incident wave energy, and this makes them very attractive for such traditional engineering applications as vibration damping in different engineering structures and sound absorption in gases and liquids. They also could be useful for some ultrasonic devices using Lamb wave propagation to provide anechoic termination for such waves. So far, acoustic black holes have been investigated mainly for flexural waves in thin plates, for which the required gradual changes in local wave velocity with distance can be easily achieved by changing the plates' local thickness. The present paper provides a brief review of the theory of acoustic black holes, including their comparison with optic black holes introduced about five years ago. Review is also given of the recent experimental work carried out at Loughborough University on damping structural vibrations using the acoustic black hole effect. This is followed by the discussion on potential applications of the acoustic black hole effect for sound absorption in air. PMID:25073137

  20. Absorption spectra of AA-stacked graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, C W; Lee, S H; Chen, S C; Lin, M F [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Shyu, F L, E-mail: fl.shyu@msa.hinet.ne, E-mail: mflin@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Physics, ROC Military Academy, 830 Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-15

    AA-stacked graphite shows strong anisotropy in geometric structures and velocity matrix elements. However, the absorption spectra are isotropic for the polarization vector on the graphene plane. The spectra exhibit one prominent plateau at middle energy and one shoulder structure at lower energy. These structures directly reflect the unique geometric and band structures and provide sufficient information for experimental fitting of the intralayer and interlayer atomic interactions. On the other hand, monolayer graphene shows a sharp absorption peak but no shoulder structure; AA-stacked bilayer graphene has two absorption peaks at middle energy and abruptly vanishes at lower energy. Furthermore, the isotropic features are expected to exist in other graphene-related systems. The calculated results and the predicted atomic interactions could be verified by optical measurements.

  1. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Malara, P; Giorgini, A; Avino, S; De Natale, P; Gagliardi, G

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption. We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot-ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy...

  2. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  3. Terahertz Saturable Absorption in Superconducting Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Keiser, George R; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    We present a superconducting metamaterial saturable absorber at terahertz frequencies. The absorber consists of an array of split ring resonators (SRRs) etched from a 100nm YBaCu3O7 (YBCO) film. A polyimide spacer layer and gold ground plane are deposited above the SRRs, creating a reflecting perfect absorber. Increasing either the temperature or incident electric field (E) decreases the superconducting condensate density and corresponding kinetic inductance of the SRRs. This alters the impedance matching in the metamaterial, reducing the peak absorption. At low electric fields, the absorption was optimized near 80% at T=10K and decreased to 20% at T=70K. For E=40kV/cm and T=10K, the peak absorption was 70% decreasing to 40% at 200kV/cm, corresponding to a modulation of 43%.

  4. Acoustic comfort in eating establishments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, David; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The subjective concept of acoustic comfort in eating establishments has been investigated in this study. The goal was to develop a predictive model for the acoustic comfort, by means of simple objective parameters, while also examining which other subjective acoustic parameters could help explain...... the feeling of acoustic comfort. Through several layers of anal ysis, acoustic comfort was found to be rather complex, and could not be explained entirely by common subjective parameters such as annoyance, intelligibility or privacy. A predictive model for the mean acoustic comfort for an eating establishment...

  5. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Lu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phononic crystals have been proposed about two decades ago and some important characteristics such as acoustic band structure and negative refraction have stimulated fundamental and practical studies in acoustic materials and devices since then. To carefully engineer a phononic crystal in an acoustic “atom” scale, acoustic metamaterials with their inherent deep subwavelength nature have triggered more exciting investigations on negative bulk modulus and/or negative mass density. Acoustic surface evanescent waves have also been recognized to play key roles to reach acoustic subwavelength imaging and enhanced transmission.

  6. Optical absorption of charged excitons in semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnow, Troels Frimodt; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Cornean, Horia

    2012-01-01

    In this article we examine the absorption coefficient of charged excitons in carbon nanotubes. We investigate the temperature and damping dependence of the absorption spectra. We show that the trion peak in the spectrum is asymmetric for temperatures greater than approximately 1 K whereas...

  7. On the trail of double peak hydrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Hissler, Christophe; Gourdol, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Juilleret, Jérôme; François Iffly, Jean; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    A double peak hydrograph features two peaks as a response to a unique rainfall pulse. The first peak occurs at the same time or shortly after the precipitation has started and it corresponds to a fast catchment response to precipitation. The delayed peak normally starts during the recession of the first peak, when the precipitation has already ceased. Double peak hydrographs may occur for various reasons. They can occur (i) in large catchments when lag times in tributary responses are large, (ii) in urban catchments where the first peak is often caused by direct surface runoff on impervious land cover, and the delayed peak to slower subsurface flow, and (iii) in non-urban catchments, where the first and the delayed discharge peaks are explained by different runoff mechanisms (e.g. overland flow, subsurface flow and/or deep groundwater flow) that have different response times. Here we focus on the third case, as a formal description of the different hydrological mechanisms explaining these complex hydrological dynamics across catchments with diverse physiographic characteristics is still needed. Based on a review of studies documenting double peak events we have established a formal classification of catchments presenting double peak events based on their regolith structure (geological substratum and/or its weathered products). We describe the different hydrological mechanisms that trigger these complex hydrological dynamics across each catchment type. We then use hydrometric time series of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture and groundwater levels collected in the Weierbach (0.46 km2) headwater catchment (Luxembourg) to better understand double peak hydrograph generation. Specifically, we aim to find out (1) if the generation of a double peak hydrograph is a threshold process, (2) if the hysteretic relationships between storage and discharge are consistent during single and double peak hydrographs, and (3) if different functional landscape units (the hillslopes

  8. Taking advantage of acoustic inhomogeneities in photoacoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Anabela; Handschin, Charles; Riedinger, Christophe; Piasecki, Julien; Mensah, Serge; Litman, Amélie; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic offers promising perspectives in probing and imaging subsurface optically absorbing structures in biological tissues. The optical uence absorbed is partly dissipated into heat accompanied with microdilatations that generate acoustic pressure waves, the intensity which is related to the amount of fluuence absorbed. Hence the photoacoustic signal measured offers access, at least potentially, to a local monitoring of the absorption coefficient, in 3D if tomographic measurements are considered. However, due to both the diffusing and absorbing nature of the surrounding tissues, the major part of the uence is deposited locally at the periphery of the tissue, generating an intense acoustic pressure wave that may hide relevant photoacoustic signals. Experimental strategies have been developed in order to measure exclusively the photoacoustic waves generated by the structure of interest (orthogonal illumination and detection). Temporal or more sophisticated filters (wavelets) can also be applied. However, the measurement of this primary acoustic wave carries a lot of information about the acoustically inhomogeneous nature of the medium. We propose a protocol that includes the processing of this primary intense acoustic wave, leading to the quantification of the surrounding medium sound speed, and, if appropriate to an acoustical parametric image of the heterogeneities. This information is then included as prior knowledge in the photoacoustic reconstruction scheme to improve the localization and quantification.

  9. Stone Comminution Correlates with the Average Peak Pressure Incident on a Stone during Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, N; P Zhong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the roles of lithotripter shock wave (LSW) parameters and cavitation in stone comminution, a series of in vitro fragmentation experiments have been conducted in water and 1,3-butanediol (a cavitation-suppressive fluid) at a variety of acoustic field positions of an electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter. Using field mapping data and integrated parameters averaged over a circular stone holder area (Rh = 7 mm), close logarithmic correlations between the average peak pressure (P+...

  10. Wavefront Modulation and Subwavelength Diffractive Acoustics with an Acoustic Metasurface

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality as their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a desig...

  11. ACOUSTICS IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOELLE, LESLIE L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS WAS--(1) TO COMPILE A CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY, INCLUDING MOST OF THOSE PUBLICATIONS ON ARCHITECTURAL ACOUSTICS, PUBLISHED IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND GERMAN WHICH CAN SUPPLY A USEFUL AND UP-TO-DATE SOURCE OF INFORMATION FOR THOSE ENCOUNTERING ANY ARCHITECTURAL-ACOUSTIC DESIGN…

  12. Practical acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is intended for non-destructive testing (NDT) technicians who want to learn practical acoustic emission testing based on level 1 of ISO 9712 (Non-destructive testing – Qualification and certification of personnel) criteria. The essential aspects of ISO/DIS 18436-6 (Condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines – Requirements for training and certification of personnel, Part 6: Acoustic Emission) are explained, and readers can deepen their understanding with the help of practice exercises. This work presents the guiding principles of acoustic emission measurement, signal processing, algorithms for source location, measurement devices, applicability of testing methods, and measurement cases to support not only researchers in this field but also and especially NDT technicians.

  13. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  14. Acoustics waves and oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of acoustics presented in a logical and lucid style Physical principles discussed with mathematical formulations Importance of ultrasonic waves highlighted Dispersion of ultrasonic waves in viscous liquids explained This book presents the theory of waves and oscillations and various applications of acoustics in a logical and simple form. The physical principles have been explained with necessary mathematical formulation and supported by experimental layout wherever possible. Incorporating the classical view point all aspects of acoustic waves and oscillations have been discussed together with detailed elaboration of modern technological applications of sound. A separate chapter on ultrasonics emphasizes the importance of this branch of science in fundamental and applied research. In this edition a new chapter ''Hypersonic Velocity in Viscous Liquids as revealed from Brillouin Spectra'' has been added. The book is expected to present to its readers a comprehensive presentation of the subject matter...

  15. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  16. A Century of Acoustic Metrology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect.......The development in acoustic measurement technique over the last century is reviewed with special emphasis on the metrological aspect....

  17. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  18. D-xylose absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  19. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Papazoglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy.

  20. Densitometry By Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    "Static" and "dynamic" methods developed for measuring mass density of acoustically levitated solid particle or liquid drop. "Static" method, unknown density of sample found by comparison with another sample of known density. "Dynamic" method practiced with or without gravitational field. Advantages over conventional density-measuring techniques: sample does not have to make contact with container or other solid surface, size and shape of samples do not affect measurement significantly, sound field does not have to be know in detail, and sample can be smaller than microliter. Detailed knowledge of acoustic field not necessary.

  1. Acoustic classification of dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardi, Umberto; Rasmussen, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    insulation performance, national schemes for sound classification of dwellings have been developed in several European countries. These schemes define acoustic classes according to different levels of sound insulation. Due to the lack of coordination among countries, a significant diversity in terms...... of descriptors, number of classes, and class intervals occurred between national schemes. However, a proposal “acoustic classification scheme for dwellings” has been developed recently in the European COST Action TU0901 with 32 member countries. This proposal has been accepted as an ISO work item. This paper...

  2. Strong acoustic wave action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  3. Structural Acoustics and Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    This structural chapter is devoted to vibrations of structures and to their coupling with the acoustic field. Depending on the context, the radiated sound can be judged as desirable, as is mostly the case for musical instruments, or undesirable, like noise generated by machinery. In architectural acoustics, one main goal is to limit the transmission of sound through walls. In the automobile industry, the engineers have to control the noise generated inside and outside the passenger compartment. This can be achieved by means of passive or active damping. In general, there is a strong need for quieter products and better sound quality generated by the structures in our daily environment.

  4. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, John Peter

    Shoddy fibres or "Shoddies" are a mixture of post-consumer and post-industrial fibres diverted from textile waste streams and recycled into their raw fibre form. They have found widespread use as a raw material for manufacturing sound absorbers that include, but are not limited to: automotive, architectural and home appliance applications. The purpose of this project is to develop a simple acoustic model to describe the acoustic behaviour of sound absorbers composed primarily of Shoddy fibres. The model requires knowledge of the material's bulk density only. To date, these materials have not been the focus of much published research and acoustical designers must rely on models that were developed for other materials or are overly complex. For modelling purposes, an equivalent fluid approach is chosen to balance complexity and accuracy. In deriving the proposed model, several popular equivalent fluid models are selected and the required input parameters for each model identified. The models are: the model of Delaney and Bazley, two models by Miki, the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Champoux and Allard and the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Lafarge. Characterization testing is carried out on sets of Shoddy absorbers produced using three different manufacturing methods. The measured properties are open porosity, tortuosity, airflow resistivity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the static thermal permeability. Empirical relationships between model parameters and bulk density are then derived and used to populate the selected models. This yields several 'simplified' models with bulk density as the only parameter. The most accurate model is then selected by comparing each model's prediction to the results of normal incidence sound absorption tests. The model of Johnson-Lafarge populated with the empirical relations is the most accurate model over the range of frequencies considered (approx. 300 Hz - 4000 Hz

  5. The Origin of Weak Lensing Convergence Peaks

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Weak lensing convergence peaks are a promising tool to probe nonlinear structure evolution at late times, providing additional cosmological information beyond second-order statistics. Previous theoretical and observational studies have shown that the cosmological constraints on $\\Omega_m$ and $\\sigma_8$ are improved by a factor of up to ~ 2 when peak counts and second-order statistics are combined, compared to using the latter alone. We study the origin of lensing peaks using observational da...

  6. Variable-Position Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Stoneburner, J. D.; Jacobi, N.; Wang, T. G.

    1983-01-01

    Method of acoustic levitation supports objects at positions other than acoustic nodes. Acoustic force is varied so it balances gravitational (or other) force, thereby maintaining object at any position within equilibrium range. Levitation method applicable to containerless processing. Such objects as table-tennis balls, hollow plastic spheres, and balsa-wood spheres levitated in laboratory by new method.

  7. Origin of weak lensing convergence peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Weak lensing convergence peaks are a promising tool to probe nonlinear structure evolution at late times, providing additional cosmological information beyond second-order statistics. Previous theoretical and observational studies have shown that the cosmological constraints on Ωm and σ8 are improved by a factor of up to ≈2 when peak counts and second-order statistics are combined, compared to using the latter alone. We study the origin of lensing peaks using observational data from the 154 deg2 Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. We found that while high peaks (with height κ >3.5 σκ , where σκ is the rms of the convergence κ ) are typically due to one single massive halo of ≈1 015M⊙ , low peaks (κ ≲σκ ) are associated with constellations of 2-8 smaller halos (≲1 013M⊙ ). In addition, halos responsible for forming low peaks are found to be significantly offset from the line of sight towards the peak center (impact parameter ≳ their virial radii), compared with ≈0.25 virial radii for halos linked with high peaks, hinting that low peaks are more immune to baryonic processes whose impact is confined to the inner regions of the dark matter halos. Our findings are in good agreement with results from the simulation work by Yang et al. [Phys. Rev. D 84, 043529 (2011)].

  8. The geomorphic structure of the runoff peak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rigon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a theoretical framework to investigate the core dependence of peak flows on the geomorphic properties of river basins. Based on the theory of transport by travel times, and simple hydrodynamic characterization of floods, this new framework invokes the linearity and invariance of the hydrologic response to provide analytical and semi-analytical expressions for peak flow, time to peak, and area contributing to the peak runoff. These results are obtained for the case of constant-intensity hyetograph using the Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF curves to estimate extreme flow values as a function of the rainfall return period. Results show that, with constant-intensity hyetographs, the time-to-peak is greater than rainfall duration and usually shorter than the basin concentration time. Moreover, the critical storm duration is shown to be independent of rainfall return period as well as the area contributing to the flow peak. The same results are found when the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion are accounted for. Further, it is shown that, when the effects of hydrodynamic dispersion are negligible, the basin area contributing to the peak discharge does not depend on the channel velocity, but is a geomorphic propriety of the basin. As an example this framework is applied to three watersheds. In particular, the runoff peak, the critical rainfall durations and the time to peak are calculated for all links within a network to assess how they increase with basin area.

  9. Hybrid acoustic energy harvesting using combined electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farid Ullah; Izhar

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports a novel hybrid acoustic energy harvester. The harvester utilizes both the electromagnetic and piezoelectric conversion mechanisms simultaneously to convert the ambient acoustical noise into electrical power for self-powered wireless sensor nodes. The proposed harvester is comprised of a Helmholtz resonator, two magnets mounted on a piezoelectric plate, and a wound coil located under the magnets. The harvester is characterized both under harmonic and real random acoustical excitations. In-lab, under harmonic acoustical excitation at a sound pressure level of 130 dB and frequency of 2.1 kHz, an optimum power of 2.86 μW (at 114 Ω optimum load) is obtained from electromagnetic conversion and 50 μW (at 1000 Ω optimum load) is generated by the piezoelectric harvester's part. Moreover, in real acoustical environment of a domestic electric generator the peak voltages of 40 and 123 mV are produced by the electromagnetic and piezoelectric portions of the acoustic energy harvester. PMID:26931884

  10. Acoustic properties of aluminium foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, L. E.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses normal incidence sound absorption by aluminium foam manufactured with powder metallurgy technology. Aluminium foams with different surface morphologies were obtained by varying the type of precursor and adding filler materials during the foaming process. The sound absorption coefficients found for these aluminium foams were compared to the coefficient for commercial foams marketed under the name ALPORAS. The effect of foam thickness on the absorption coefficient was studied for each sample prepared. The combination of good acoustic and mechanical properties makes aluminium foams particularly attractive products. The study included an analysis of the effect of 2-, 5- and 10-cm air gaps on the sound absorption coefficient. The results showed that such gaps, which are routinely used in construction to reduce the reverberation period in indoor premises, raised the low frequency absorption coefficient significantly. This increase was found to depend on aluminium foam density and thickness and the depth of the air gap. In this same line, we have investigated the absorption coefficient of the aluminium foams combined with a mineral fiber panel.Se presenta un estudio del coeficiente de absorción acústica a incidencia normal de espumas de aluminio fabricadas mediante la técnica pulvimetalúrgica. Se fabricaron espumas de aluminio de distinta morfología superficial variando el tipo de precursor y usando materiales de relleno durante el proceso de espumación. Se muestra un estudio comparativo del coeficiente de absorción acústica de las espumas de aluminio fabricadas y las espumas comerciales conocidas como ALPORAS. Para cada muestra fabricada se estudió la influencia del espesor sobre el valor del coeficiente de absorción.El atractivo de las espumas de aluminio radica en que en ellas se combinan interesantes propiedades acústicas y mecánicas. Se analizó el efecto de una cámara de aire de 2, 5 y 10 cm de anchura sobre el

  11. From Architectural Acoustics to Acoustical Architecture Using Computer Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Marie Due; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2005-01-01

    Architectural acoustics design has in the past been based on simple design rules. However, with a growing complexity in architectural acoustics and the emergence of room acoustic simulation programmes with considerable potential, it is now possible to subjectively analyse and evaluate acoustic...... properties prior to the actual construction of a building. With the right tools applied, acoustic design can become an integral part of the architectural design process. The aim of this paper is to investigate the field of application that an acoustic simulation programme can have during an architectural...... acoustic design process and to set up a strategy to develop future programmes. The emphasis is put on the first three out of four phases in the working process of the architect and a case study is carried out in which each phase is represented by typical results ? as exemplified with reference...

  12. Electromagnetic energy harvester for harvesting acoustic energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FARID U KHAN; IZHAR

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports a suspended coil, electromagnetic acoustic energy harvester (AEH) for extracting acoustical energy. The developed AEH comprises Helmholtz resonator (HR), a wound coil bonded to a flexible membrane and a permanent magnet placed in a magnet holder. The harvester’s performance is analyzed under different sound pressure levels (SPLs) both in laboratory and in real environment. In laboratory, when connected to 50 &Omega load resistance and subjected to an SPL of 100 dB, the AEH generated a peak load voltage of 198.7 mV at the resonant frequency of 319 Hz. When working under the optimum load resistance, the AEH generated an optimum load power of 789.65 &muv. In real environment, the developed AEH produced a maximum voltage of25 mV when exposed to the acoustic noise of a motorcycle and generated an optimum voltage of 60 mV when it is placed in the surroundings of a domestic electrical generator.

  13. Underwater Acoustic Networking Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Otnes, Roald; Casari, Paolo; Goetz, Michael; Husøy, Thor; Nissen, Ivor; Rimstad, Knut; van Walree, Paul; Zorzi, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This literature study presents an overview of underwater acoustic networking. It provides a background and describes the state of the art of all networking facets that are relevant for underwater applications. This report serves both as an introduction to the subject and as a summary of existing protocols, providing support and inspiration for the development of network architectures.

  14. Evoked acoustic emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, C; Parbo, J; Johnsen, N J;

    1985-01-01

    Stimulated acoustic emissions were recorded in response to tonal stimuli at 60 dB p.e. SPL in a small group of normal-hearing adults. Power spectral analysis reveals that the evoked activity from each ear contains energy in preferential frequency bands and the change of stimulus frequency has only...

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    The work of this project is concerned with the simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and topology optimization of SAW devices. SAWs are elastic vibrations that propagate along a material surface and are extensively used in electromechanical filters and resonators in telecommunication. A new...

  16. Portable acoustic myography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bartels, Else Marie

    2013-01-01

    Muscle sound gives a local picture of muscles involved in a particular movement and is independent of electrical signals between nerve and muscle. Sound recording (acoustic myography) is a well-known noninvasive technique that has suffered from not being easily applicable, as well as not being ab...

  17. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  18. Holograms for acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melde, Kai; Mark, Andrew G.; Qiu, Tian; Fischer, Peer

    2016-09-01

    Holographic techniques are fundamental to applications such as volumetric displays, high-density data storage and optical tweezers that require spatial control of intricate optical or acoustic fields within a three-dimensional volume. The basis of holography is spatial storage of the phase and/or amplitude profile of the desired wavefront in a manner that allows that wavefront to be reconstructed by interference when the hologram is illuminated with a suitable coherent source. Modern computer-generated holography skips the process of recording a hologram from a physical scene, and instead calculates the required phase profile before rendering it for reconstruction. In ultrasound applications, the phase profile is typically generated by discrete and independently driven ultrasound sources; however, these can only be used in small numbers, which limits the complexity or degrees of freedom that can be attained in the wavefront. Here we introduce monolithic acoustic holograms, which can reconstruct diffraction-limited acoustic pressure fields and thus arbitrary ultrasound beams. We use rapid fabrication to craft the holograms and achieve reconstruction degrees of freedom two orders of magnitude higher than commercial phased array sources. The technique is inexpensive, appropriate for both transmission and reflection elements, and scales well to higher information content, larger aperture size and higher power. The complex three-dimensional pressure and phase distributions produced by these acoustic holograms allow us to demonstrate new approaches to controlled ultrasonic manipulation of solids in water, and of liquids and solids in air. We expect that acoustic holograms will enable new capabilities in beam-steering and the contactless transfer of power, improve medical imaging, and drive new applications of ultrasound.

  19. The Boson peak in supercooled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G M; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line TW. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih. PMID:23771033

  20. Multiscale peak alignment for chromatographic datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Lu, Hong-Mei; Tan, Bin-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Na; Ferro, Miguel

    2012-02-01

    Chromatography has been extensively applied in many fields, such as metabolomics and quality control of herbal medicines. Preprocessing, especially peak alignment, is a time-consuming task prior to the extraction of useful information from the datasets by chemometrics and statistics. To accurately and rapidly align shift peaks among one-dimensional chromatograms, multiscale peak alignment (MSPA) is presented in this research. Peaks of each chromatogram were detected based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and aligned against a reference chromatogram from large to small scale gradually, and the aligning procedure is accelerated by fast Fourier transform cross correlation. The presented method was compared with two widely used alignment methods on chromatographic dataset, which demonstrates that MSPA can preserve the shapes of peaks and has an excellent speed during alignment. Furthermore, MSPA method is robust and not sensitive to noise and baseline. MSPA was implemented and is available at http://code.google.com/p/mspa. PMID:22222564

  1. The thermophysical properties of gases determined using an annular acoustic resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Buxton, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    A novel annular acoustic resonator was constructed for measurements of the speed of sound in gases at pressures below 1 MPa. The resonator was designed to allow measurements of the speed and absorption of sound at low pressure in gases with large bulk viscosities. Measurements in propene, for which the speed of sound is known, served to characterise the geometry of the resonator and provide a test of the acoustic model for the system. A detailed description of the resonator whi...

  2. Microwave Absorption in Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming-Hai; HU Xi-Wei; WU Qin-Chong; YU Guo-Yang

    2000-01-01

    The microwave power absorption in electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor was investigated with a twodimensional hybrid-code. Simulation results indicated that there are two typical power deposition profiles over the entire parameter region: (1) microwave power deposition peaks on the axis and decreases in radial direction,(2) microwave power deposition has its maximum at some radial position, i.e., a hollow distribution. The spatial distribution of electron temperature resembles always to the microwave power absorption profile. The dependence of plasma parameter on the gas pressure is discussed also.

  3. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cummer, Steven A. ; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales....... The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create......-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview...

  4. Multiscale peak detection in wavelet space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Tong, Xia; Peng, Ying; Ma, Pan; Zhang, Ming-Jin; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-12-01

    Accurate peak detection is essential for analyzing high-throughput datasets generated by analytical instruments. Derivatives with noise reduction and matched filtration are frequently used, but they are sensitive to baseline variations, random noise and deviations in the peak shape. A continuous wavelet transform (CWT)-based method is more practical and popular in this situation, which can increase the accuracy and reliability by identifying peaks across scales in wavelet space and implicitly removing noise as well as the baseline. However, its computational load is relatively high and the estimated features of peaks may not be accurate in the case of peaks that are overlapping, dense or weak. In this study, we present multi-scale peak detection (MSPD) by taking full advantage of additional information in wavelet space including ridges, valleys, and zero-crossings. It can achieve a high accuracy by thresholding each detected peak with the maximum of its ridge. It has been comprehensively evaluated with MALDI-TOF spectra in proteomics, the CAMDA 2006 SELDI dataset as well as the Romanian database of Raman spectra, which is particularly suitable for detecting peaks in high-throughput analytical signals. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that MSPD can detect more true peaks while keeping the false discovery rate lower than MassSpecWavelet and MALDIquant methods. Superior results in Raman spectra suggest that MSPD seems to be a more universal method for peak detection. MSPD has been designed and implemented efficiently in Python and Cython. It is available as an open source package at . PMID:26514234

  5. Double-peak emission of hot electrons generated by femtosecond laser interaction with solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double-peak emission of hot electrons has been observed in the interaction of a 60-fs, 125-mJ, 800-nm, p-polarized laser pulse with Al targets. One peak in the specular direction is due to the reflected laser light, which excites a plasma wave to accelerate electrons. The other peak, which is more consistent with theories of Y. Sentoku et al. [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2855 (1999)] and H. Ruhl et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett 82, 743 (1999)], is produced by the resonance absorption at approximately 15 deg. from the target normal

  6. A measurement at the first acoustic peak of the CMB with the 33 GHz interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, D L; Melhuish, S J; Watson, R A; Davies, R D; Rebolo, R; Davis, R J; Gutíerrez, C M; Macias-Perez, J F

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results from the Jodrell Bank-IAC two-element 33 GHz interferometer operated with an element separation of 32.9 wavelengths and hence sensitive to 1 deg scale structure on the sky. The level of CMB fluctuations, assuming a flat CMB spatial power spectrum over the range of multipoles l = 208 +- 18, was found using a likelihood analysis to be \\Delta T_l = 63^{+7}_{-6} mu K at the 68% confidence limit, after the subtraction of the contribution of monitored point sources. Other possible foreground contributions have been assessed and are expected to have negligible impact on this result.

  7. Interacting photon-baryon fluid, warm dark matter, and the first acoustic peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabris, Julio C.; Velasquez-Toribio, Alan M.; Zimdahl, Winfried [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Shapiro, Ilya L. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Departamento de Fisica-ICE, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15

    The Reduced Relativistic Gas (RRG) model was introduced by A. Sakharov in 1965 for deriving the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. It was recently reinvented by some of us to achieve an interpolation between the radiation and dust epochs in the evolution of the Universe. This model circumvents the complicated structure of the Boltzmann-Einstein system of equations and admits a transparent description of warm-dark-matter effects. It is extended here to include, on a phenomenological basis, an out-of-equilibrium interaction between radiation and baryons which is supposed to account for relevant aspects of pre-recombination physics in a simplified manner. Furthermore, we use the tight-coupling approximation to explore the influence of both this interaction and of the RRG warmness parameter on the anisotropy spectrum of the CMB. The predictions of the model are very similar to those of the ΛCDM model if both the interaction and the dark-matter warmness parameters are of the order of 10{sup -4} or smaller. As far as the warmness parameter is concerned, this is in good agreement with previous estimations on the basis of results from structure formation. (orig.)

  8. Interacting photon-baryon fluid, warm dark matter and the first acoustic peak

    CERN Document Server

    Fabris, Julio C; Zimdahl, Winfried; Shapiro, Ilya L

    2013-01-01

    The Reduced Relativistic Gas (RRG) model was introduced by A. Sakharov in 1965 for deriving the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. It was recently reinvented by some of us to achieve an interpolation between the radiation and dust epochs in the evolution of the Universe. This model circumvents the complicated structure of the Boltzmann-Einstein system of equations and admits a transparent description of warm-dark-matter effects. It is extended here to include, on a phenomenological basis, an out-of-equilibrium interaction between radiation and baryons which is supposed to account for relevant aspects of pre-recombination physics in a simplified manner. Furthermore, we use the tight-coupling approximation to explore the influence of both this interaction and of the RRG warmness parameter on the anisotropy spectrum of the CMB. The predictions of the model are very similar to those of the {\\Lambda}CDM model if both the interaction and the dark-matter warmness parameters are of the order of $10^{-4}$ or ...

  9. Sustainable Absorption Panels from Agricultural Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail F.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise has become a serious environmental problem and there are demands for alternative sustainable materials which capable to reduce the noise level at various frequency ranges. Therefore, the aim of this research is to study the potential of turning the agricultural waste and waste paper into a sound absorption panel. For the purpose of this study, combination of two materials was under studied; coconut coir fibre from agriculture waste and shredded waste paper from the office. There were two main objective of the research; first is to develop absorption panels from coconut coir powder that available locally with a combination of shredded paper at different percentage of mixture. Second objective is to identify the absorption rate of the panels. The study encompasses the fabrication of the particle board using the coconut husk powder mix with shredded waste paper and using the gypsum powder as the binder for the two materials. Four acoustic panels of size 0.5m x 0.5m and 0.012 m thick were fabricated with different mix ratio; 25% of coconut coir powder mixed with 75% of shredded waste papers for sample 1, 50% both of the material for sample 2, 75% of coconut coir powder mixed with 25% of shredded waste paper for sample 3, and lastly 100% of coconut coir powder for sample 4. The absorption coefficient of the panels was tested in a reverberation chamber and in accordance with ISO 354:1985 standards. Based on the results, sample 1 gave the highest absorption coefficient compared to sample 2, 3 and 4. It can be concluded that the acoustic panel made from a mixture of 25% coconut coir powder with 75% shredded waste paper provided higher absorption coefficient compared to the performance of the other samples. This might be caused by the size of the coir powder which is very small, creating less void space in between the panel and thus causing it to absorb less sound. Since sound absorption is very much affected by the availability of void space of

  10. 3D Single-port Labyrinthine Acoustic Metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a 3D single-port labyrinthine acoustic metamaterial. By using curled perforations with one end closed and with appropriate loss inside, the proposed metamaterial can perfectly absorb airborne sounds in a low frequency band. Both the position and width of the band can be tuned flexibly. A tradeoff is uncovered between the relative absorption bandwidth and thickness of the metamaterial. When the relative absorption bandwidth is as high as 51%, the requirement of deep subwavelength thickness (0.07{\\lambda}) can still be satisfied.

  11. Variability of calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in calcium absorption was estimated in three groups of normal subjects in whom Ca absorption was measured by standard isotopic-tracer methods at interstudy intervals ranging from 1 to 4 mo. Fifty absorption tests were performed in 22 subjects. Each was done in the morning after an overnight fast with an identical standard breakfast containing a Ca load of approximately 250 mg. Individual fractional absorption values were normalized to permit pooling of the data. The coefficient of variation (CVs) for absorption for the three groups ranged from 10.57 to 12.79% with the size of the CV increasing with interstudy duration. One other published study presenting replicate absorption values was analyzed in a similar fashion and was found to have a CV of absorption of 9.78%. From these data we estimate that when the standard double-isotope method is used to measure Ca absorption there is approximately 10% variability around any given absorption value within an individual human subject and that roughly two-thirds of this represents real biological variability in absorption

  12. Simple model of photo acoustic system for greenhouse effect

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuhara, Akiko; Ogawa, Naohisa

    2010-01-01

    The simple theoretical basis for photo acoustic (PA) system for studying infrared absorption properties of greenhouse gases is constructed. The amplitude of sound observed in PA depends on the modulation frequency of light pulse. Its dependence can be explained by our simple model. According to this model, sound signal has higher harmonics. The theory and experiment are compared in third and fifth harmonics by spectrum analysis. The theory has the analogy with electric circuits. This analogy helps students for understanding the PA system.

  13. Transient absorption and laser output of YAG : Nd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvapil, Jiří; Kvapil, Jos; Kubelka, J.; Kubeček, V.

    1981-06-01

    YAG : Nd grown under 98% Ar 2% H2 protective atmosphere free of nitrogen or hydrocarbons showed after UV irradiation broad absorption peaked at ˜1·9×104 cm-1 which disappeared relatively slowly at room temperature. It was more intensive in oxygen treated samples than in those annealed in hydrogsn. Transient absorption suppresses laser output by the increase of absorption at 0·94×104 cm-1 (1064 nm) and, particularly in CW mode, by the anomalous rod deformation. YAG : Nd containing Fe ions (≲2·10-4 wt%) showed no transient absorption.

  14. The Origin of Weak Lensing Convergence Peaks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Weak lensing convergence peaks are a promising tool to probe nonlinear structure evolution at late times, providing additional cosmological information beyond second-order statistics. Previous theoretical and observational studies have shown that the cosmological constraints on $\\Omega_m$ and $\\sigma_8$ are improved by a factor of up to ~ 2 when peak counts and second-order statistics are combined, compared to using the latter alone. We study the origin of lensing peaks using observational data from the 154 deg$^2$ Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. We found that while high peaks (with height $\\kappa$ >3.5 $\\sigma_\\kappa$, where $\\sigma_\\kappa$ is the r.m.s. of the convergence $\\kappa$) are typically due to one single massive halo of ~$10^{15}M_\\odot$, low peaks ($\\kappa$ ~ their virial radii), compared with ~0.25 virial radii for halos linked with high peaks, hinting that low peaks are more immune to baryonic processes whose impact is confined to the inner regions of the dark matter halos. Our fi...

  15. Do dark matter halos explain lensing peaks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla Matilla, José Manuel; Haiman, Zoltán; Hsu, Daniel; Gupta, Arushi; Petri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated a recently proposed halo-based model, Camelus, for predicting weak-lensing peak counts, and compared its results over a collection of 162 cosmologies with those from N-body simulations. While counts from both models agree for peaks with S /N >1 (where S /N is the ratio of the peak height to the r.m.s. shape noise), we find ≈50 % fewer counts for peaks near S /N =0 and significantly higher counts in the negative S /N tail. Adding shape noise reduces the differences to within 20% for all cosmologies. We also found larger covariances that are more sensitive to cosmological parameters. As a result, credibility regions in the {Ωm,σ8} are ≈30 % larger. Even though the credible contours are commensurate, each model draws its predictive power from different types of peaks. Low peaks, especially those with 2 3 ). Our results confirm the importance of using a cosmology-dependent covariance with at least a 14% improvement in parameter constraints. We identified the covariance estimation as the main driver behind differences in inference, and suggest possible ways to make Camelus even more useful as a highly accurate peak count emulator.

  16. Cosmological Information in Weak Lensing Peaks

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Sheng; Lim, Eugene A; Haiman, Zoltan; May, Morgan

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the number counts of convergence peaks N(kappa) in weak lensing (WL) maps, expected from large forthcoming surveys, can be a useful probe of cosmology. We follow up on this finding, and use a suite of WL convergence maps, obtained from ray-tracing N-body simulations, to study (i) the physical origin of WL peaks with different heights, and (ii) whether the peaks contain information beyond the convergence power spectrum P_ell. In agreement with earlier work, we find that high peaks (with amplitudes >~ 3.5 sigma, where sigma is the r.m.s. of the convergence kappa) are typically dominated by a single massive halo. In contrast, medium-height peaks (~0.5-1.5 sigma) cannot be attributed to a single collapsed dark matter halo, and are instead created by the projection of multiple (typically, 4-8) halos along the line of sight, and by random galaxy shape noise. Nevertheless, these peaks dominate the sensitivity to the cosmological parameters w, sigma_8, and Omega_m. We find that the peak...

  17. Experimental study of the acoustic characteristics of micro-perforated functional absorbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiqing; SONG Yongmin; SHENG Shengwo

    2005-01-01

    Micro-perforated panels have been widely used as fiber-free acoustical material for decades in the form of wall or ceiling covering with some air space behind. This paper presents the test study on the acoustical characteristics of two different types of functional absorbers,panel type and tube type, constructed with micro-perforated metal or PVC (polyvinyl chloride) sheets. Acoustical measurements of such functional absorbers in reverberation chamber demonstrate the merit of good absorption as expected. They are not only cost effective in construction and installation, but also appealing esthetically for architectural interior design.

  18. Looking for High Energy Peaked Blazars

    OpenAIRE

    Costamante, L.; Ghisellini, G.; Celotti, A.; Giommi, P.; Padovani, P.; Tagliaferri, G.; Wolter, A.; Chiaberge, M.; Fossati, G; Pian, E.; L. Maraschi(INAF National Institute for Astrophysics, I-00136 Rome, Italy); Tavecchio, F.; Treves, A.

    2000-01-01

    Blazars can be classified on the basis of their overall Spectral Energy Distribution (SED). BL Lac objects are usually divided in LBL or HBL (Low or High energy peaked BL Lacs), according to the peak frequency of the synchrotron emission, if in the optical or UV-soft-X band respectively. FSRQs instead are characterized by synchrotron peaks mainly at IR-optical frequencies, similarly to LBLs. Here we report on recent BeppoSAX observations which are unveiling the high energy branch of the range...

  19. Phase Transition in Acoustic Localization in a Soft Medium Permeated with Air Bubbles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bin; ZOU Xin-Ye; CHENG Jian-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Propagation of an acoustic wave in a soft medium permeated with air bubbles is theoretically investigated by using a self-consistent approach. The soft medium is assumed to be viscoelastic to estimate the effect of acoustic absorption on the acoustic localization in such a medium. The oscillation phases of bubbles are examined by employing a phase diagram method. A collective oscillation of the bubbles is observed once the acoustic localization occurs, which is known as a phenomenon of 'phase transition', and such a phenomenon persists as we manually increase the viscosity factor of the soft medium. Therefore it is proven that the phenomenon of phase transition may serve as a unique criterion to effectively identify acoustic localization in a bubbly soft medium even in the presence of viscosity, and the directions of the phase vectors help to determine the extent of localization. This is of practical significance for experimental research studying the acoustic localization in such a medium, for which the presence of viscosity generally causes great ambiguity in distinguishing the effects of localization and acoustic absorption.

  20. Fibre lasers for photo-acoustic gas spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsad, Norhana; Stewart, George

    2011-05-01

    We report here on the use of fiber lasers for recovery of gas absorption line shapes by photo-acoustic spectroscopy. We demonstrate the principle of operation using an erbium-doped fiber, stabilized using a length of un-pumped doped fibre as a saturable absorber. Intensity modulation of the laser output for phase sensitive detection is performed by modulation of the pump current while the wavelength is scanned through the absorption line by a PZT on a fibre Bragg grating. This avoids the distortions that arise in recovered signals due to simultaneous wavelength and intensity modulation, as is the case with conventional DFB diode lasers. Furthermore, the near zero off-line signals with photo-acoustic spectroscopy means that high modulation indices can be used with simple intensity modulation of the fiber laser output. The modulation frequency is set to the acoustic resonance frequency of the gas cell and measurements are made on the P17 absorption line of acetylene at 1535.39nm showing good agreement with the theoretical line-shape profile.

  1. Peak load arrangements : Assessment of Nordel guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-07-01

    Two Nordic countries, Sweden and Finland, have legislation that empowers the TSO to acquire designated peak load resources to mitigate the risk for shortage situations during the winter. In Denmark, the system operator procures resources to maintain a satisfactory level of security of supply. In Norway the TSO has set up a Regulation Power Option Market (RKOM) to secure a satisfactory level of operational reserves at all times, also in winter with high load demand. Only the arrangements in Finland and Sweden fall under the heading of Peak Load Arrangements defined in Nordel Guidelines. NordREG has been invited by the Electricity Market Group (EMG) to evaluate Nordel's proposal for 'Guidelines for transitional Peak Load Arrangements'. The EMG has also financed a study made by EC Group to support NordREG in the evaluation of the proposal. The study has been taken into account in NordREG's evaluation. In parallel to the EMG task, the Swedish regulator, the Energy Markets Inspectorate, has been given the task by the Swedish government to investigate a long term solution of the peak load issue. The Swedish and Finnish TSOs have together with Nord Pool Spot worked on finding a harmonized solution for activation of the peak load reserves in the market. An agreement accepted by the relevant authorities was reached in early January 2009, and the arrangement has been implemented since 19th January 2009. NordREG views that the proposed Nordel guidelines have served as a starting point for the presently agreed procedure. However, NordREG does not see any need to further develop the Nordel guidelines for peak load arrangements. NordREG agrees with Nordel that the market should be designed to solve peak load problems through proper incentives to market players. NordREG presumes that the relevant authorities in each country will take decisions on the need for any peak load arrangement to ensure security of supply. NordREG proposes that such decisions should be

  2. Infrared laboratory absorbance spectra of olivine: using classical dispersion analysis to extract peak parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, K. M.; Dijkstra, C.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Speck, A. K.

    2010-07-01

    Laboratory measurements quantifying the effect of Fe substituting for Mg in olivine are needed to distinguish compositional from temperature, grain size and grain shape effects in observational data. To address this need, we study room temperature absorption spectra of a large suite of olivines evenly spaced across Mg and Fe compositions. We apply the principle that classical dispersion theory may be used to determine peak positions as well as peak widths, strengths and possibly optical function (n(λ) and k(λ)) estimates from absorption spectra of thin film samples of these olivines and two additional isotropic and anisotropic minerals with varying hardness and numbers of spectral bands. For olivine, we find that this method provides good estimates of peak position and that accounting for asymmetric peak shapes in this way increases the error on full width at half-maximum and oscillator strengths. Values from classical dispersion fits better match published n and k derived from reflectivity of single crystals when the dust proxy is soft and the thickness of the sample is independently constrained. Electronic data and peak parameter trends for the laboratory olivine absorption spectra and the viability of the extracted n and k are discussed with regard to astronomy.

  3. Flat acoustic lens by acoustic grating with curled slits

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Pai

    2014-10-01

    We design a flat sub-wavelength lens that can focus acoustic wave. We analytically study the transmission through an acoustic grating with curled slits, which can serve as a material with tunable impedance and refractive index for acoustic waves. The effective parameters rely on the geometry of the slits and are independent of frequency. A flat acoustic focusing lens by such acoustic grating with gradient effective refractive index is designed. The focusing effect is clearly observed in simulations and well predicted by the theory. We demonstrate that despite the large impedance mismatch between the acoustic lens and the matrix, the intensity at the focal point is still high due to Fabry-Perot resonance.

  4. Acoustic energy harvesting based on a planar acoustic metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shuibao; Oudich, Mourad; Li, Yong; Assouar, Badreddine

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically report on an innovative and practical acoustic energy harvester based on a defected acoustic metamaterial (AMM) with piezoelectric material. The idea is to create suitable resonant defects in an AMM to confine the strain energy originating from an acoustic incidence. This scavenged energy is converted into electrical energy by attaching a structured piezoelectric material into the defect area of the AMM. We show an acoustic energy harvester based on a meta-structure capable of producing electrical power from an acoustic pressure. Numerical simulations are provided to analyze and elucidate the principles and the performances of the proposed system. A maximum output voltage of 1.3 V and a power density of 0.54 μW/cm3 are obtained at a frequency of 2257.5 Hz. The proposed concept should have broad applications on energy harvesting as well as on low-frequency sound isolation, since this system acts as both acoustic insulator and energy harvester.

  5. Acoustics Discipline Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envia, Edmane; Thomas, Russell

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Annual Review, a summary of the progress made in 2007 in acoustics research under the Subsonic Fixed Wing project is given. The presentation describes highlights from in-house and external activities including partnerships and NRA-funded research with industry and academia. Brief progress reports from all acoustics Phase 1 NRAs are also included as are outlines of the planned activities for 2008 and all Phase 2 NRAs. N+1 and N+2 technology paths outlined for Subsonic Fixed Wing noise targets. NRA Round 1 progressing with focus on prediction method advancement. NRA Round 2 initiating work focused on N+2 technology, prediction methods, and validation. Excellent partnerships in progress supporting N+1 technology targets and providing key data sets.

  6. Acoustic Tractor Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démoré, Christine E. M.; Dahl, Patrick M.; Yang, Zhengyi; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy; MacDonald, Michael P.; Spalding, Gabriel C.

    2014-05-01

    Negative radiation forces act opposite to the direction of propagation, or net momentum, of a beam but have previously been challenging to definitively demonstrate. We report an experimental acoustic tractor beam generated by an ultrasonic array operating on macroscopic targets (>1 cm) to demonstrate the negative radiation forces and to map out regimes over which they dominate, which we compare to simulations. The result and the geometrically simple configuration show that the effect is due to nonconservative forces, produced by redirection of a momentum flux from the angled sides of a target and not by conservative forces from a potential energy gradient. Use of a simple acoustic setup provides an easily understood illustration of the negative radiation pressure concept for tractor beams and demonstrates continuous attraction towards the source, against a net momentum flux in the system.

  7. Peak Vegetation Growth 2004 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 2004 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  8. Peak Vegetation Growth 1994 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1994 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  9. Peak Vegetation Growth 1995 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1995 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  10. Peak Vegetation Growth 1990 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1990 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  11. Peak Vegetation Growth 1993 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1993 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  12. Peak Vegetation Growth 2002 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 2002 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  13. Peak Vegetation Growth 1997 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1997 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  14. Peak Vegetation Growth 1999 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1999 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  15. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  16. Peak Vegetation Growth 1991 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1991 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  17. Peak Vegetation Growth 1996 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is a grid map of 1996 peak vegetation growth for Alaska and the conterminous United States. The nominal spatial resolution is 1 kilometer and the map...

  18. Tectonics, Climate and Earth's highest peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Jörg; Prasicek, Günther; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Prominent peaks characterized by high relief and steep slopes are among the most spectacular morphological features on Earth. In collisional orogens they result from the interplay of tectonically driven crustal thickening and climatically induced destruction of overthickened crust by erosional surface processes. The glacial buzz-saw hypothesis proposes a superior status of climate in limiting mountain relief and peak altitude due to glacial erosion. It implies that peak altitude declines with duration of glacial occupation, i.e., towards high latitudes. This is in strong contrast with high peaks existing in high latitude mountain ranges (e.g. Mt. St. Elias range) and the idea of peak uplift due to isostatic compensation of spatially variable erosional unloading an over-thickened orogenic crust. In this study we investigate landscape dissection, crustal thickness and vertical strain rates in tectonically active mountain ranges to evaluate the influence of erosion on (latitudinal) variations in peak altitude. We analyze the spatial distribution of serval thousand prominent peaks on Earth extracted from the global ETOPO1 digital elevation model with a novel numerical tool. We compare this dataset to crustal thickness, thickening rate (vertical strain rate) and mean elevation. We use the ratios of mean elevation to peak elevation (landscape dissection) and peak elevation to crustal thickness (long-term impact of erosion on crustal thickness) as indicators for the influence of erosional surface processes on peak uplift and the vertical strain rate as a proxy for the mechanical state of the orogen. Our analysis reveals that crustal thickness and peak elevation correlate well in orogens that have reached a mechanically limited state (vertical strain rate near zero) where plate convergence is already balanced by lateral extrusion and gravitational collapse and plateaus are formed. On the Tibetan Plateau crustal thickness serves to predict peak elevation up to an altitude

  19. Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health for Lupus Patients Bone Health and Anorexia Nervosa Partner Resources Screening Tests and Immunizations Guidelines for ... calcium. Physical Activity. Girls and boys and young adults who exercise regularly generally achieve greater peak bone ...

  20. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yichen

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method.

  1. Helping System Engineers Bridge the Peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungta, Neha; Tkachuk, Oksana; Person, Suzette; Biatek, Jason; Whalen, Michael W.; Castle, Joseph; Castle, JosephGundy-Burlet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In our experience at NASA, system engineers generally follow the Twin Peaks approach when developing safety-critical systems. However, iterations between the peaks require considerable manual, and in some cases duplicate, effort. A significant part of the manual effort stems from the fact that requirements are written in English natural language rather than a formal notation. In this work, we propose an approach that enables system engineers to leverage formal requirements and automated test generation to streamline iterations, effectively "bridging the peaks". The key to the approach is a formal language notation that a) system engineers are comfortable with, b) is supported by a family of automated V&V tools, and c) is semantically rich enough to describe the requirements of interest. We believe the combination of formalizing requirements and providing tool support to automate the iterations will lead to a more efficient Twin Peaks implementation at NASA.

  2. Acoustic emission source modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hora P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the acoustic emission (AE source modeling by means of FEM system COMSOL Multiphysics. The following types of sources are used: the spatially concentrated force and the double forces (dipole. The pulse excitation is studied in both cases. As a material is used steel. The computed displacements are compared with the exact analytical solution of point sources under consideration.

  3. The acoustics of snoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevernagie, Dirk; Aarts, Ronald M; De Meyer, Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Snoring is a prevalent disorder affecting 20-40% of the general population. The mechanism of snoring is vibration of anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. Flutter of the soft palate accounts for the harsh aspect of the snoring sound. Natural or drug-induced sleep is required for its appearance. Snoring is subject to many influences such as body position, sleep stage, route of breathing and the presence or absence of sleep-disordered breathing. Its presentation may be variable within or between nights. While snoring is generally perceived as a social nuisance, rating of its noisiness is subjective and, therefore, inconsistent. Objective assessment of snoring is important to evaluate the effect of treatment interventions. Moreover, snoring carries information relating to the site and degree of obstruction of the upper airway. If evidence for monolevel snoring at the site of the soft palate is provided, the patient may benefit from palatal surgery. These considerations have inspired researchers to scrutinize the acoustic characteristics of snoring events. Similarly to speech, snoring is produced in the vocal tract. Because of this analogy, existing techniques for speech analysis have been applied to evaluate snoring sounds. It appears that the pitch of the snoring sound is in the low-frequency range (noise-like', and has scattered energy content in the higher spectral sub-bands (>500 Hz). To evaluate acoustic properties of snoring, sleep nasendoscopy is often performed. Recent evidence suggests that the acoustic quality of snoring is markedly different in drug-induced sleep as compared with natural sleep. Most often, palatal surgery alters sound characteristics of snoring, but is no cure for this disorder. It is uncertain whether the perceived improvement after palatal surgery, as judged by the bed partner, is due to an altered sound spectrum. Whether some acoustic aspects of snoring, such as changes in pitch, have predictive value for the presence of

  4. Electroacoustic absorbers: bridging the gap between shunt loudspeakers and active sound absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissek, Hervé; Boulandet, Romain; Fleury, Romain

    2011-05-01

    The acoustic impedance at the diaphragm of an electroacoustic transducer can be varied using a range of basic electrical control strategies, amongst which are electrical shunt circuits. These passive shunt techniques are compared to active acoustic feedback techniques for controlling the acoustic impedance of an electroacoustic transducer. The formulation of feedback-based acoustic impedance control reveals formal analogies with shunt strategies, and highlights an original method for synthesizing electric networks ("shunts") with positive or negative components, bridging the gap between passive and active acoustic impedance control. This paper describes the theory unifying all these passive and active acoustic impedance control strategies, introducing the concept of electroacoustic absorbers. The equivalence between shunts and active control is first formalized through the introduction of a one-degree-of-freedom acoustic resonator accounting for both electric shunts and acoustic feedbacks. Conversely, electric networks mimicking the performances of active feedback techniques are introduced, identifying shunts with active impedance control. Simulated acoustic performances are presented, with an emphasis on formal analogies between the different control techniques. Examples of electric shunts are proposed for active sound absorption. Experimental assessments are then presented, and the paper concludes with a general discussion on the concept and potential improvements.

  5. Electroacoustic absorbers: bridging the gap between shunt loudspeakers and active sound absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissek, Hervé; Boulandet, Romain; Fleury, Romain

    2011-05-01

    The acoustic impedance at the diaphragm of an electroacoustic transducer can be varied using a range of basic electrical control strategies, amongst which are electrical shunt circuits. These passive shunt techniques are compared to active acoustic feedback techniques for controlling the acoustic impedance of an electroacoustic transducer. The formulation of feedback-based acoustic impedance control reveals formal analogies with shunt strategies, and highlights an original method for synthesizing electric networks ("shunts") with positive or negative components, bridging the gap between passive and active acoustic impedance control. This paper describes the theory unifying all these passive and active acoustic impedance control strategies, introducing the concept of electroacoustic absorbers. The equivalence between shunts and active control is first formalized through the introduction of a one-degree-of-freedom acoustic resonator accounting for both electric shunts and acoustic feedbacks. Conversely, electric networks mimicking the performances of active feedback techniques are introduced, identifying shunts with active impedance control. Simulated acoustic performances are presented, with an emphasis on formal analogies between the different control techniques. Examples of electric shunts are proposed for active sound absorption. Experimental assessments are then presented, and the paper concludes with a general discussion on the concept and potential improvements. PMID:21568400

  6. Influence of the Dielectric Medium on the Carbonyl Infrared Absorption Peak of Acetylferrocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. López-Linares

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The solvent effect on the position of the carbonyl vibrational stretching ofacetylferrocene in aprotic media was studied in this work. The solvent-induced shifts in thisorganometallic compound were interpreted in terms of the alternative reaction field model(SCRF-MO proposed by Kolling. In contrast to the established trends for carbonyl groupsin organic systems, the results suggest that the continuum models for the reaction field arenot adequate and that the influence of dipolarity-polarizability described by aninhomogeneous coupling function θ (ε L(n 2 that assumes optical dielectric saturation isresponsible for the carbonyl band shift and, there is empirical evidence that the effect offield-induced intermolecular interaction on band shift, interpreted in terms of the van derWaals forces from the solvent, have a important contribution to this phenomena.

  7. Peaking Capacity in Restructured Power Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Doorman, Gerard

    2000-01-01

    The theme of this thesis is the supply of capacity during peak demand in restructured power systems. There are a number of reasons why there is uncertainty about whether an enegyonly electricity market (where generators are only paid for the energy produced) is able to ensure uninterrupted supply during peak load conditions.Much of the public debate in Europe has been about the present surplus generation capacity. However, in a truly competitive environment, it is hard to believe that seldom ...

  8. Forward-peaked scattering of polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Julia P; Kim, Arnold D

    2014-11-15

    Polarized light propagation in a multiple scattering medium is governed by the vector radiative transfer equation. We analyze the vector radiative transfer equation in asymptotic limit of forward-peaked scattering and derive an approximate system of equations for the Stokes parameters, which we call the vector Fokker-Planck approximation. The vector Fokker-Planck approximation provides valuable insight into several outstanding issues regarding the forward-peaked scattering of polarized light such as the polarization memory phenomenon. PMID:25490484

  9. Comparison of five portable peak flow meters

    OpenAIRE

    Glaucia Nency Takara; Gualberto Ruas; Bruna Varanda Pessoa; Luciana Kawakami Jamami; Valéria Amorim Pires Di Lorenzo; Mauricio Jamami

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the measurements of spirometric peak expiratory flow (PEF) from five different PEF meters and to determine if their values are in agreement. Inaccurate equipment may result in incorrect diagnoses of asthma and inappropriate treatments. METHODS: Sixty-eight healthy, sedentary and insufficiently active subjects, aged from 19 to 40 years, performed PEF measurements using Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® peak flow meters. The highest value record...

  10. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  11. Acoustics, computers and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchard, James J.

    2003-10-01

    The human ear has created a high standard for the requirements of acoustical measurements. The transient nature of most acoustical signals has limited the success of traditional volt meters. Professor Hixson's pioneering work in electroacoustical measurements at ARL and The University of Texas helped set the stage for modern computer-based measurements. The tremendous performance of modern PCs and extensive libraries of signal processing functions in virtual instrumentation application software has revolutionized the way acoustical measurements are made. Today's analog to digital converters have up to 24 bits of resolution with a dynamic range of over 120 dB and a single PC processor can process 112 channels of FFTs at 4 kHz in real time. Wavelet technology further extends the capabilities for analyzing transients. The tools available for measurements in speech, electroacoustics, noise, and vibration represent some of the most advanced measurement tools available. During the last 50 years, Professor Hixson has helped drive this revolution from simple oscilloscope measurements to the modern high performance computer-based measurements.

  12. Study on Sound Absorption Properties of Coconut Coir Fibre Reinforced Composite with Added Recycled Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahzan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Sound pollutions have become worsen and creating concerns for many peoples. Conventionally, expensive sound absorption materials are employed to control noise disturbances. However, recent developments on natural fibres have created interest for researchers especially for acoustics application purposes. This paper investigates the viability of coconut coir added with recycled rubber to be implemented as sound absorption panel. The composite is constructed at prescribed percentages of fillers and polyurethane as resin. The two-microphone method was applied to obtain the acoustic properties of the samples. The samples were also tested for physical properties such as density and porosity, as well as the microstructures. The results demonstrate good acoustics performances and highlight the potential of the coconut coir reinforced with recycled rubber as the sound absorption panel.

  13. Do dark matter halos explain lensing peaks?

    CERN Document Server

    Matilla, José Manuel Zorrilla; Hsu, Daniel; Gupta, Arushi; Petri, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a recently proposed halo-based model, Camelus, for predicting weak-lensing peak counts, and compared its results over a collection of 162 cosmologies with those from N-body simulations. While counts from both models agree for peaks with $\\mathcal{S/N}>1$ (where $\\mathcal{S/N}$ is the ratio of the peak height to the r.m.s. shape noise), we find $\\approx 50\\%$ fewer counts for peaks near $\\mathcal{S/N}=0$ and significantly higher counts in the negative $\\mathcal{S/N}$ tail. Adding shape noise reduces the differences to within $20\\%$ for all cosmologies. We also found larger covariances that are more sensitive to cosmological parameters. As a result, credibility regions in the $\\{\\Omega_m, \\sigma_8\\}$ are $\\approx 30\\%$ larger. Even though the credible contours are commensurate, each model draws its predictive power from different types of peaks. Low peaks, especially those with $23)$. Our results confirm the importance of using a cosmology-dependent covariance with at least a 14\\% improveme...

  14. Analysis of Acoustic Spectra Reflecting Ion Transport Processes in Glassy Electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Jamnicky

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of acoustic spectra in ion conductive glasses wiht different composition can reflect the basic features of the relaxation and transport processes of the mobile ions. It was found that the temeperature responses of all acoustic spectra are very similar and the relaxation peaks associated with ion transport depend on the galsss composition. Experimental and theoretical aspects of acoustic attenuation measurements in ion conductive glasses of the system Cul-CuBr-Cu2O-P2O5 are reviewed. Theoretical studies of acoustic spectra due to the ionic hopping motion and relaxation processes connected with the mobility of Cu+ conductive ions are compared with experimental results and some attempts to fit the acoustic attenuation spectra are accomplished.

  15. Sound absorption performance of natural fibers and their composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG WeiDong; LI Yan

    2012-01-01

    This research aimed to study the sound absorption properties of natural fibers and their reinforced composites.Sound absorption coefficients of three types of natural fibers,i.e.,ramie,flax and jute fibers and their composites were measured by the two-microphone transfer function technique in the impedance tube.The results were compared with synthetic fibers and their composites.It was found that both natural fibers and their composites had superior capability of noise reduction.The multi-scale and hollow lumen structures of natural fibers contributed to the high sound absorption performance.Moreover,the sound absorption properties of these natural fibers were also calculated by the Delany-Bazley and Garai-Pompoli models.They showed good agreement with the experimental data.It was concluded that multi-functional composite materials can be made by natural fibers so that both the mechanical and acoustical functions can be achieved.

  16. A high absorption coefficient DL-MPP imitating owl skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Zhao, Zhan; Kong, Deyi; Wu, Shaohua; Du, Lidong; Fang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a high absorption coefficient micro-perforated panel (MPP) imitating owl skin structure for acoustic noise reduction. Compared to the traditional micro-perforated panel, this device has two unique characteristics-simulating the owl skin structure, its radius of perforated apertures even can be as small as 55μ, and its material is silicon and fabricated by micro-electrical mechanical system (MEMS) technology; So that its absorption coefficients of acoustic noise for normal incidence sound wave whose frequencies arrange from 1.5 kHz to 6.0 kHz are all above 0.8 which is the owl's hunts sensitivity frequency band. Double leaf MPP fabricated by MEMS technology is an absolutely bionic success in functional-imitation.

  17. Fundamentals of Shallow Water Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Katsnelson, Boris; Lynch, James

    2012-01-01

    Shallow water acoustics (SWA), the study of how low and medium frequency sound propagates and scatters on the continental shelves of the world's oceans, has both technical interest and a large number of practical applications. Technically, shallow water poses an interesting medium for the study of acoustic scattering, inverse theory, and propagation physics in a complicated oceanic waveguide. Practically, shallow water acoustics has interest for geophysical exploration, marine mammal studies, and naval applications. Additionally, one notes the very interdisciplinary nature of shallow water acoustics, including acoustical physics, physical oceanography, marine geology, and marine biology. In this specialized volume, the authors, all of whom have extensive at-sea experience in U.S. and Russian research efforts, have tried to summarize the main experimental, theoretical, and computational results in shallow water acoustics, with an emphasis on providing physical insight into the topics presented.

  18. Latest Trends in Acoustic Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics-based methods offer a powerful tool for sensing applications. Acoustic sensors can be applied in many fields ranging from materials characterization, structural health monitoring, acoustic imaging, defect characterization, etc., to name just a few. A proper selection of the acoustic wave frequency over a wide spectrum that extends from infrasound (<20 Hz up to ultrasound (in the GHz–band, together with a number of different propagating modes, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves, surface waves, plate modes, etc., allow acoustic tools to be successfully applied to the characterization of gaseous, solid and liquid environments. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the research trends in acoustic wave sensing through some cases that are representative of specific applications in different sensing fields.

  19. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  20. Origin of the first sharp diffraction peak in glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, Cristina; Carini, Giuseppe; González, Miguel; D'Angelo, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    Although glasses have been largely used for a wide variety of technological applications, much of their underlying structure and dynamical properties remain puzzling. We present a detailed investigation of the intermediate-range structure of a series of alkaline borate glasses carried out by performing neutron diffraction measurements. We propose that the first sharp diffraction peak of glasses arises from the periodicity of the boundaries of voids in a random network and explain its compositional and pressure dependence. In this framework, the planar section of a void is an n -membered ring of all-side vertex sharing basic structural units. Furthermore, we suggest that thermally activated relaxations responsible for the ultrasonic absorption in borate glasses stem from transverse motions of atoms bridging structural units confining voids.

  1. Acoustical coupling of lizard eardrums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Manley, Geoffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Lizard ears are clear examples of two-input pressure-difference receivers, with up to 40-dB differences in eardrum vibration amplitude in response to ipsi- and contralateral stimulus directions. The directionality is created by acoustical coupling of the eardrums and interaction of the direct...... is caused by the acoustic interaction of the two eardrums. The results can be largely explained by a simple acoustical model based on an electrical analog circuit....

  2. Room acoustic auralization with Ambisonics

    OpenAIRE

    Polack, Jean-Dominique; Leão Figueiredo, Fábio

    2012-01-01

    International audience During the year of 2009, the room acoustics group of the LAM (Équipe Lutheries, Acoustique, Musique de l’Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris) performed a series of acoustical measurements in music halls in Paris. The halls were chosen in regarding their importance to the historic, architectural or acoustic domains. The measured ensemble of fourteen rooms includes quite different architectural designs. The measurements were carri...

  3. Optimization of input parameters of acoustic-transfection for the intracellular delivery of macromolecules using FRET-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Wang, Yingxiao; Shung, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic-transfection technique has been developed for the first time. We have developed acoustic-transfection by integrating a high frequency ultrasonic transducer and a fluorescence microscope. High frequency ultrasound with the center frequency over 150 MHz can focus acoustic sound field into a confined area with the diameter of 10 μm or less. This focusing capability was used to perturb lipid bilayer of cell membrane to induce intracellular delivery of macromolecules. Single cell level imaging was performed to investigate the behavior of a targeted single-cell after acoustic-transfection. FRET-based Ca2+ biosensor was used to monitor intracellular concentration of Ca2+ after acoustic-transfection and the fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide (PI) was used to observe influx of PI molecules. We changed peak-to-peak voltages and pulse duration to optimize the input parameters of an acoustic pulse. Input parameters that can induce strong perturbations on cell membrane were found and size dependent intracellular delivery of macromolecules was explored. To increase the amount of delivered molecules by acoustic-transfection, we applied several acoustic pulses and the intensity of PI fluorescence increased step wise. Finally, optimized input parameters of acoustic-transfection system were used to deliver pMax-E2F1 plasmid and GFP expression 24 hours after the intracellular delivery was confirmed using HeLa cells.

  4. Nutrition and magnesium absorption.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true magnesium abs

  5. Surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, J. R.; Atkinson, P.; Bremner, S. P.; Sfigakis, F.; Kataoka, M.; Anderson, D.; Jones, G. A. C.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ward, M. B.; Norman, C. E.; Shields, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    The authors report surface-acoustic-wave-driven luminescence from a lateral p-n junction formed by molecular beam epitaxy regrowth of a modulation doped GaAs /AlGaAs quantum well on a patterned GaAs substrate. Surface-acoustic-wave-driven transport is demonstrated by peaks in the electrical current and light emission from the GaAs quantum well at the resonant frequency of the transducer. This type of junction offers high carrier mobility and scalability. The demonstration of surface-acoustic-wave luminescence is a significant step towards single-photon applications in quantum computation and quantum cryptography.

  6. Feature extraction from time domain acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Christine; Goldman, Geoffrey H.

    2014-06-01

    The U.S. Army is interested in developing algorithms to classify weapons systems fire based on their acoustic signatures. To support this effort, an algorithm was developed to extract features from acoustic signatures of weapons systems fire and applied to over 1300 signatures. The algorithm filtered the data using standard techniques then estimated the amplitude and time of the first five peaks and troughs and the location of the zero crossing in the waveform. The results were stored in Excel spreadsheets. The results are being used to develop and test acoustic classifier algorithms.

  7. CdTe Nanowires studied by Transient Absorption Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuno M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient absorption measurements were performed on single CdTe nanowires. The traces show fast decays that were assigned to charge carrier trapping at surface states. The observed power dependence suggests the existence of a trap-filling mechanism. Acoustic phonon modes were also observed, which were assigned to breathing modes of the nanowires. Both the fundamental breathing mode and the first overtone were observed, and the dephasing times provide information about how the nanowires interact with their environment.

  8. A Study on the Evaluation of Valve Leak Rates Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Guk; Lee, Jun Shin; Lee, Sun Ki; Shon, Seok Man; Lee, Wook Ryun; Kim, Tae Ryong [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yong Jae; Choo, Kee Young [Hana Evertech Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study is to estimate the feasibility of acoustic emission method for the internal leak from the valves. In this study, two types of valve(a 3 1/2 inch glove valve for 600 psi steam and a 4 inch ball valve water ) leak tests using three different leak path and numerous leak rates were performed in order to analyze acoustic emission properties when leaks arise in valve seat. As a result of leak test for specimens simulated valve seat, we conformed that leak sound amplitude increased in proportion to the increase of leak rate, and leak rates were plotted versus peak acoustic amplitudes recorded within those two narrow frequency bands on each spectral plot. The resulting plots of leak rate versus peak acoustic amplitude were the primary basis for determining the feasibility of quantifying leak acoustically. The large amount of data collected also allowed a grief investigation of the effects of different leak paths, leakage rates, pressure differentials and transducers on the acoustic amplitude spectra. From the experimental results, it was suggested that the acoustic emission method for monitoring of leak was feasible.

  9. Ion-acoustic solitons in multispecies spatially inhomogeneous plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarsem Singh Gill; Harvinder Kaur; Nareshpal Singh Saini

    2006-06-01

    Ion-acoustic solitons are investigated in the spatially inhomogeneous plasma having electrons-positrons and ions. The soliton characteristics are described by Korteweg-de Vries equation which has an additional term. The density and temperature of different species play an important role for the amplitude and width of the solitons. Numerical calculations show only the possibility of compressive solitons. Further, analytical results predict that the peak amplitude of soliton decreases with the decrease of density gradient. Soliton characteristics like peak amplitude and width are substantially different from those based on KdV theory for homogeneous plasmas.

  10. Combined Environment Acoustic Chamber (CEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The CEAC imposes combined acoustic, thermal and mechanical loads on aerospace structures. The CEAC is employed to measure structural response and determine...

  11. Electric peak power forecasting by year 2025

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak power demand in Kuwait up to the year 2025 was predicted using an artificial neural network (ANN) model. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of air conditioning (A/C) units on long-term power demand. Five socio-economic factors were selected as inputs for the simulation: (1) gross national product, (2) population, (3) number of buildings, (4) imports of A/C units, and (5) index of industrial production. The study used socio-economic data from 1978 to 2000. Historical data of the first 10 years of the studied time period were used to train the ANN. The electrical network was then simulated to forecast peak power for the following 11 years. The calculated error was then used for years in which power consumption data were not available. The study demonstrated that average peak power rates increased by 4100 MW every 5 years. Various scenarios related to changes in population, the number of buildings, and the quantity of A/C units were then modelled to estimate long-term peak power demand. Results of the study demonstrated that population had the strongest impact on future power demand, while the number of buildings had the smallest impact. It was concluded that peak power growth can be controlled through the use of different immigration policies, increased A/C efficiency, and the use of vertical housing. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  12. Using acoustic cavitation to enhance chemotherapy of DOX liposomes: experiment in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Dai, Dan-Dan; Lu, Cui-Tao; Lv, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xing; Li, Wen-Feng; Wu, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Kun; Huang, Pin-Tong; Chen, Li-Juan; Lin, Min

    2012-09-01

    Experiments in vitro and in vivo were designed to investigate tumor growth inhibition of chemotherapeutics-loaded liposomes enhanced by acoustic cavitation. Doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (DOX liposomes) were used in experiments to investigate acoustic cavitation mediated effects on cell viability and chemotherapeutic function. The influence of lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation on tumor inhibition was also investigated. Animal experiment was carried out to verify the practicability of this technique in vivo. From experiment results, blank phospholipid-based microbubbles (PBM) combined with ultrasound (US) at intensity below 0.3 W/cm² could produce acoustic cavitation which maintained cell viability at high level. Compared with DOX solution, DOX liposomes combined with acoustic cavitation exerted effective tumor inhibition in vitro and in vivo. The lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation could also enhance the susceptibility of tumor to chemotherapeutic drugs. DOX liposomes could also exert certain tumor inhibition under preliminary acoustic cavitation. Acoustic cavitation could enhance the absorption efficiency of DOX liposomes, which could be used to reduce DOX adverse effect on normal organs in clinical chemotherapy.

  13. On using peak amplitude and rise time for AE source characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Majeed; C R L Murthy

    2002-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) signals, which are electrical version of acoustic emissions, are usually analysed using a set of signal parameters. The major objective of signal analysis is to study the characteristics of the sources of emissions. Peak amplitude $(P_a)$ and rise time $(R_t)$ are two such parameters used for source characterization. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the efficiency of $P_a$ and $R_t$ to classify and characterize AE sources by modelling the input stress pulse and transducer. Analytical expressions obtained for $P_a$ and $R_t$ clearly indicate their use and efficiency for source characterization. It is believed that these results may be of use to investigators in areas like control systems and signal processing also.

  14. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side...

  15. Paleomagnetism of the Becker Peak stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B. A.; Housen, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of plutonic rocks, although subject to uncertainty due to lack of paleohorizontal control, can provide important constrains of patterns of regional deformation, and can play a role in evaluation of tectonic models and reconstructions. Many plutonic rocks of the Cascades have been well-studied via paleomagnetism, but there are many that lack robust data sets. One such pluton, the Beckler Peak stock, is a late Cretaceous tonalitic stock, with biotite and amphibole K-Ar ages of 93 to 82 Ma (Engels and Crowder, 1971, Yeats and Engels, 1971). The Beckler Peak stock is considered to be a companion body to the larger Mt. Stuart Batholith, but is separated from the Mt. Stuart Batholith by the Evergreen Fault. For this study five paleomagnetic sites were sampled from the Beckler Peak stock near Skykomish, Washington. After low temperature and thermal demagnetization site means were calculated for the four sites where at least two samples survived demagnetization. Unblocking temperatures were indicative of magnetite and hematite as the carriers of remanence. Two of the site means were disregarded due to anomalous directions likely due to sites being from very large slump blocks. The two acceptable site means, along with a Beckler Peak stock site mean from Beck and Noson (1972) and another from Housen et al. (2003) give a stock-wide mean of D = 3.8°, I = 41.9°, k = 32.9, and α95 = 16.2°. This direction is consistent with mean directions for the Mount Stuart batholith determined by Beck and Noson (1972), Beck et al. (1981), and Housen et al. (2003). This directional consistency supports an association between the Beckler Peak stock and the Mt. Stuart Batholith, or at least that these two plutonic bodies were emplaced in the same structural block, and that any post-magnetization deformation (such as rotation and/or tilt associated with the Evergreen Fault) between the Beckler Peak stock and the Mt. Stuart Batholith was minor.

  16. Acoustic Mechanical Feedthroughs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Walkemeyer, Phillip; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic motors can have problems when operating in extreme environments. In addition, if one needs to do mechanical work outside a structure, electrical feedthroughs are required to transport the electric power to drive the motor. In this paper, we present designs for driving rotary and linear motors by pumping stress waves across a structure or barrier. We accomplish this by designing a piezoelectric actuator on one side of the structure and a resonance structure that is matched to the piezoelectric resonance of the actuator on the other side. Typically, piezoelectric motors can be designed with high torques and lower speeds without the need for gears. One can also use other actuation materials such as electrostrictive, or magnetostrictive materials in a benign environment and transmit the power in acoustic form as a stress wave and actuate mechanisms that are external to the benign environment. This technology removes the need to perforate a structure and allows work to be done directly on the other side of a structure without the use of electrical feedthroughs, which can weaken the structure, pipe, or vessel. Acoustic energy is pumped as a stress wave at a set frequency or range of frequencies to produce rotary or linear motion in a structure. This method of transferring useful mechanical work across solid barriers by pumping acoustic energy through a resonant structure features the ability to transfer work (rotary or linear motion) across pressure or thermal barriers, or in a sterile environment, without generating contaminants. Reflectors in the wall of barriers can be designed to enhance the efficiency of the energy/power transmission. The method features the ability to produce a bi-directional driving mechanism using higher-mode resonances. There are a variety of applications where the presence of a motor is complicated by thermal or chemical environments that would be hostile to the motor components and reduce life and, in some instances, not be

  17. MOSES AND DENNISON PEAK ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Lipton, David A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was conducted in the Moses and Dennison Peak Roadless Areas, southeastern Sierra Nevada, California. One area within the Moses Roadless Area is classified as having substantiated mineral-resource potential for small base-metal skarn deposits. Additionally, geochemical data indicate probable potential for small base-metal skarn deposits from one locality within Dennison Peak Roadless Area and for small tungsten skarn deposits from a region within Moses Roadless Area. The geologic setting precludes the presence of energy resources.

  18. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  19. Lecture Notes On Acoustics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book mentions string vibration and wave, one-dimension wave and wave equation, characteristic impedance, governing equation of string, and wave energy from string, wave equation of wave and basic physical quantity like one-dimension wave equation, sound unit, sound intensity and energy, sound movement in a surface of discontinuity with transmission loss of sound by partition, and Snell's law, radiation, scatter and diffraction and sound in closed space with Sabine's theory, sound characteristic of closed space and duct acoustics.

  20. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitri, F. G., E-mail: F.G.Mitri@ieee.org [Chevron, Area 52 Technology – ETC, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  1. Dynamic acoustic tractor beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulling a sphere and vibrating it around an equilibrium position by amplitude-modulation in the near-field of a single finite circular piston transducer is theoretically demonstrated. Conditions are found where a fluid hexane sphere (with arbitrary radius) chosen as an example, centered on the axis of progressive propagating waves and submerged in non-viscous water, experiences an attractive (steady) force pulling it towards the transducer, as well as an oscillatory force forcing it to vibrate back-and-forth. Numerical predictions for the dynamic force illustrate the theory and suggest an innovative method in designing dynamic acoustical tractor beams.

  2. CMB observations in LTB universes: Part I: Matching peak positions in the CMB spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Sasaki, Misao

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic peaks in the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background in spherically symmetric inhomogeneous cosmological models are studied. At the photon-baryon decoupling epoch, the universe may be assumed to be dominated by non-relativistic matter, and thus we may treat radiation as a test field in the universe filled with dust which is described by the Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) solution. First, we give an LTB model whose distance-redshift relation agrees with to that of the concordance $\\Lambda$CDM model in the whole redshift domain and which is well approximated by the Einstein-de Sitter universe at and before decoupling. We determine the decoupling epoch in this LTB universe by Gamow's criterion and then calculate the positions of acoustic peaks. Thus obtained results are not consistent with the WMAP data. However, we find that one can fit the peak positions by appropriately modifying the LTB model, namely, by allowing the deviation of the distance-redshift relation from that of the concordance $\\Lambd...

  3. CMB observations in LTB universes: Part I. Matching peak positions in the CMB spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Nakao, Ken-ichi; Sasaki, Misao

    2010-07-01

    Acoustic peaks in the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background in spherically symmetric inhomogeneous cosmological models are studied. At the photon-baryon decoupling epoch, the universe may be assumed to be dominated by non-relativistic matter, and thus we may treat radiation as a test field in the universe filled with dust which is described by the Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) solution. First, we give an LTB model whose distance-redshift relation agrees with that of the concordance ΛCDM model in the whole redshift domain and which is well approximated by the Einstein-de Sitter universe at and before decoupling. We determine the decoupling epoch in this LTB universe by Gamow's criterion and then calculate the positions of acoustic peaks. Thus obtained results are not consistent with the WMAP data. However, we find that one can fit the peak positions by appropriately modifying the LTB model, namely, by allowing the deviation of the distance-redshift relation from that of the concordance ΛCDM model at z > 2 where no observational data are available at present. Thus there is still a possibility of explaining the apparent accelerated expansion of the universe by inhomogeneity without resorting to dark energy if we abandon the Copernican principle. Even if we do not take this extreme attitude, it also suggests that local, isotropic inhomogeneities around us may seriously affect the determination of the density contents of the universe unless the possible existence of such inhomogeneities is properly taken into account.

  4. Excitonic Absorption of Semiconductor Nanorings under Terahertz Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tong-Yi; ZHAO Wei; ZHU Shao-Lan

    2005-01-01

    @@ The optical absorption of GaAs nanorings (NRs) under a dc electric field and a terahertz (THz) ac electric field applied in the plane containing the NRs is investigated theoretically. The NRs may enclose some magnetic flux in the presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the NRs plane. Numerical calculation shows that the excitonic effects are essential to correctly describe the optical absorption in NRs. The applied lateral THz electric field, as well as the dc field leads to reduction, broadening and splitting of the exciton peak. In contrast to the presence of a dc field, significant optical absorption peak arises below the zero-field bandgap in the presence of a THz electric field at a certain frequency. The optical absorption spectrum depends evidently on the frequency and amplitude of the applied THz field and on the magnetic flux threading the NRs. This promises potential applications of NRs for magneto-optical and THz electro-optical sensing.

  5. Acoustical study of classical Peking Opera singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Johan; Gu, Lide; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Ping

    2012-03-01

    Acoustic characteristics of classical opera singing differ considerably between the Western and the Chinese cultures. Singers in the classical Peking opera tradition specialize on one out of a limited number of standard roles. Audio and electroglottograph signals were recorded for four performers of the Old Man role and three performers of the Colorful Face role. Recordings were made of the singers' speech and when they sang recitatives and songs from their roles. Sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, and spectrum characteristics were analyzed. Histograms showing the distribution of fundamental frequency showed marked peaks for the songs, suggesting a scale tone structure. Some of the intervals between these peaks were similar to those used in Western music. Vibrato rate was about 3.5Hz, that is, considerably slower than in Western classical singing. Spectra of vibrato-free tones contained unbroken series of harmonic partials sometimes reaching up to 17 000Hz. Long-term-average spectrum (LTAS) curves showed no trace of a singer's formant cluster. However, the Colorful Face role singers' LTAS showed a marked peak near 3300Hz, somewhat similar to that found in Western pop music singers. The mean LTAS spectrum slope between 700 and 6000Hz decreased by about 0.2dB/octave per dB of equivalent sound level. PMID:21621380

  6. Tunable absorption in heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metallic film and Fibonacci fractal photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Jie; Du, Gui-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the anomalous optical properties of heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metal film and a truncated Fibonacci fractal photonic crystal. It is found that one or multiple highly reflected peaks, even enhanced transmission narrowband, can be realized in the near-complete absorption broadband, where the photonic crystals are selected with various Fibonacci sequences or a given sequence as the basic unit. These properties are significant to design important reflection or transmission optical devices in the visible and near-infrared ranges.

  7. Using Classical Dispersion Analysis to Extract Peak Parameters, Optical Constants from IR Lab Absorbance Spectra: Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Karly M.; Dijkstra, C. R.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Speck, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory measurements quantifying the effect of Fe substituting for Mg in olivine are needed to distinguish compositional from temperature effects in observational data. Because most olivine samples are too small to acquire reflectivity data used to obtain the optical functions n(λ) and k(λ) needed for radiative transfer models, we apply the principle that classical dispersion theory may be used to determine peak positions, widths, strengths, and n and k estimates from absorption spectra of thin film samples. We study room temperature absorption spectra of a large suite of olivines evenly spaced across Mg and Fe compositions, and isotropic and anisotropic minerals with varying hardness and numbers of spectral bands. For olivine, adding accounting for asymmetric peak shapes does not substantially alter estimates of peak position but increases the error on FWHM and oscillator strengths. Values from classical dispersion fits match published n and k derived from reflectivity (better agreement in k) when the dust proxy is soft and the thickness of the sample is independently constrained. Electronic data and peak parameter trends for the laboratory olivine absorption spectra and the viability of the extracted n and k are discussed with regard to astronomy.

  8. Seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of TOC content in shallow marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Arthur Ayres; Mota, Bruno Bourguignon; Belem, André Luiz; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza; Capilla, Ramsés

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic remote sensing is a highly effective tool for exploring the seafloor of both deep and shallow marine settings. Indeed, the acoustic response depends on several physicochemical factors such as sediment grain size, bulk density, water content, and mineralogy. The objective of the present study is to assess the suitability of seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of total organic carbon (TOC) content in shallow marine sediments, based on data collected in the Cabo Frio mud belt in an upwelling zone off southeastern Brazil. These comprise records of P-wave velocity (V P) along 680 km of high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys, combined with analyses of grain size, wet bulk density, absolute water content and TOC content for four piston-cores. TOC contents of sediments from 13 box-cores served to validate the methodology. The results show well-defined positive correlations between TOC content and mean grain size (phi scale) as well as absolute water content, and negative correlations with V P, wet bulk density, and acoustic impedance. These relationships yield a regression equation by which TOC content can be satisfactorily predicted on the basis of acoustic impedance for this region: y = - 4.84 ln(x) + 40.04. Indeed, the derived TOC contents differ by only 5% from those determined by geochemical analysis. After appropriate calibration, acoustic impedance can thus be conveniently used as a predictor of large-scale spatial distributions of organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. This not only contributes to optimizing scientific project objectives, but also enhances the cost-effectiveness of marine surveys by greatly reducing the ship time commonly required for grid sampling.

  9. Seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of TOC content in shallow marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Arthur Ayres; Mota, Bruno Bourguignon; Belem, André Luiz; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza; Capilla, Ramsés

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic remote sensing is a highly effective tool for exploring the seafloor of both deep and shallow marine settings. Indeed, the acoustic response depends on several physicochemical factors such as sediment grain size, bulk density, water content, and mineralogy. The objective of the present study is to assess the suitability of seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of total organic carbon (TOC) content in shallow marine sediments, based on data collected in the Cabo Frio mud belt in an upwelling zone off southeastern Brazil. These comprise records of P-wave velocity ( V P) along 680 km of high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys, combined with analyses of grain size, wet bulk density, absolute water content and TOC content for four piston-cores. TOC contents of sediments from 13 box-cores served to validate the methodology. The results show well-defined positive correlations between TOC content and mean grain size (phi scale) as well as absolute water content, and negative correlations with V P, wet bulk density, and acoustic impedance. These relationships yield a regression equation by which TOC content can be satisfactorily predicted on the basis of acoustic impedance for this region: y = - 4.84 ln( x) + 40.04. Indeed, the derived TOC contents differ by only 5% from those determined by geochemical analysis. After appropriate calibration, acoustic impedance can thus be conveniently used as a predictor of large-scale spatial distributions of organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. This not only contributes to optimizing scientific project objectives, but also enhances the cost-effectiveness of marine surveys by greatly reducing the ship time commonly required for grid sampling.

  10. Possible temperature effects computed for acoustic microscopy used for living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawska, T; Wójcik, J; Filipczyński, L

    2004-01-01

    Imaging of living cells or tissues at a microscopic resolution, where GHz frequencies are used, provides a foundation for many new biological applications. The possible temperature increase causing a destructive influence on the living cells should be then avoided. However, there is no information on possible local temperature increases at these very high frequencies where, due to strongly focused ultrasonic beams, nonlinear propagation effects occur. Acoustic parameters of living cells were assumed to be close to those of water; therefore, the power density of heat sources in a water medium was determined as a basic quantity. Hence, the numerical solution of temperature distributions at the frequency of 1 GHz was computed for high and low powers generated by the transducer equal to 0.32 W and 0.002 W. In the first case, typical nonlinear propagation effects were demonstrated and, in the second one, propagation was almost linear. The focal temperature increase obtained in water equaled 14 degrees C for the highest possible theoretical repetition frequency of fr = 10 MHz and for the thermal insulation at the sapphire lens-water boundary. Simultaneously, the scanning velocity of the tested object was assumed to be incomparably low in respect to the acoustic beam velocity. The maximum temperature increase in water occurred exactly at this boundary, being equal there to 20 degrees C. It was shown that, first of all, the very high absorption of water was significant for the temperature distribution in the investigated region, suppressing the focal temperature peaks. Because the temperature increases are proportional to the repetition frequency, so for example, at its practical value of fr = 0.1 MHz, all temperature increases will be 100 times lower than listed above. For the low transducer power of 0.002 W, the corresponding temperature increases were about 140 times lower than those for the high power of 0.32 W. The presented solutions are devoted mainly to the

  11. Acoustic Similarity and Dichotic Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Peter

    1978-01-01

    An experiment tests conjectures that right ear advantage (REA) has an auditory origin in competition or interference between acoustically similar stimuli and that feature-sharing effect (FSE) has its origin in assignment of features of phonetically similar stimuli. No effect on the REA for acoustic similarity, and a clear effect of acoustic…

  12. Acoustic Center or Time Origin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staffeldt, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the acoustic center in relation to measurements of loudspeaker polar data. Also, it presents the related concept time origin and discusses the deviation that appears between positions of the acoustic center found by wavefront based and time based measuring methods....

  13. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  14. Propagation of Ion Acoustic Perturbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered.......Equations describing the propagation of ion acoustic perturbations are considered, using the assumption that the electrons are Boltzman distributed and isothermal at all times. Quasi-neutrality is also considered....

  15. Comments on metal oxide surge arresters surges energy absorption capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.L.B. [Escola Federal de Engenharia de Itajuba, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Zanetta, L.C. Jr. [E. Politecnica Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents an approach to determine the energy absorption capacity of metal oxide surge arrester resistors. The proposed approach deals with the discharge current peak versus discharge current time relation. A testing method and a statistical evaluation are proposed. After determining the discharge current withstanding limit of the tested metal oxide resistors, the prospective energy absorption capacity limit is computed. Finally, comments on the obtained results are presented.

  16. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  17. Some Phenomenological Aspects of the Peak Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Howard S.; Bartlett, Iris

    1976-01-01

    This article relates the psychological dynamics of "peak experiences" to two concepts, intentionality and paradoxical intention, within the philosophical orientation of phenomenology. A review of early philosophical theories of self (Kant and Hume) is presented and compared with the experiential emphasis found in the phenomenology of Husserl.…

  18. Real estate price peaks: a comparative overview

    CERN Document Server

    Röhner, B M

    2006-01-01

    First, we emphasize that the real estate price peaks which are currently under way in many industrialized countries (one important exception is Japan) share many of the characteristics of previous historical price peaks. In particular, we show that: (i) In the present episode real price increases are, at least for now, of the same order of magnitude as in previous episodes, typically of the order of 80 percent to 100 percent. (ii) Historically, price peaks turned out to be symmetrical with respect to the peak; soft landing, i.e. an upgoing phase followed by a plateau, has rarely (if ever) been observed. (iii) The inflated demand is mainly boosted by investors and high-income buyers. (iv) In the present as well as in previous episodes, the main engines in the upgoing phase have been the hot markets which developed in major cities such as London, Los Angeles, New York, Paris, San Francisco or Sydney. In our conclusion, we propose a prediction for real estate prices in the West of the United States over the peri...

  19. Facility Location with Double-peaked Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filos-Ratsikas, Aris; Li, Minming; Zhang, Jie;

    2015-01-01

    ; this makes the problem essentially more challenging. As our main contribution, we present a simple truthful-in-expectation mechanism that achieves an approximation ratio of 1+b=c for both the social and the maximum, cost, where b is the distance of the agent from the peak and c is the minimum cost of...

  20. MEMS Based Acoustic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheplak, Mark (Inventor); Nishida, Toshikaza (Inventor); Humphreys, William M. (Inventor); Arnold, David P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention described and shown in the specification aid drawings include a combination responsive to an acoustic wave that can be utilized as a dynamic pressure sensor. In one embodiment of the present invention, the combination has a substrate having a first surface and an opposite second surface, a microphone positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having an input and a first output and a second output, wherein the input receives a biased voltage, and the microphone generates an output signal responsive to the acoustic wave between the first output and the second output. The combination further has an amplifier positioned on the first surface of the substrate and having a first input and a second input and an output, wherein the first input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the first output of the microphone and the second input of the amplifier is electrically coupled to the second output of the microphone for receiving the output sinual from the microphone. The amplifier is spaced from the microphone with a separation smaller than 0.5 mm.

  1. Acoustics and Hearing

    CERN Document Server

    Damaske, Peter

    2008-01-01

    When one listens to music at home, one would like to have an acoustic impression close to that of being in the concert hall. Until recently this meant elaborate multi-channelled sound systems with 5 or more speakers. But head-related stereophony achieves the surround-sound effect in living rooms with only two loudspeakers. By virtue of their slight directivity as well as an electronic filter the limitations previously common to two-speaker systems can be overcome and this holds for any arbitrary two-channel recording. The book also investigates the question of how a wide and diffuse sound image can arise in concert halls and shows that the quality of concert halls decisively depends on diffuse sound images arising in the onset of reverberation. For this purpose a strong onset of reverberation is modified in an anechoic chamber by electroacoustic means. Acoustics and Hearing proposes ideas concerning signal processing in the auditory system that explain the measured results and the resultant sound effects plea...

  2. Acoustic data transmission method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, A.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a method for transmitting time line data through a drillstring having drill pipe sections connected end-to-end by joints from a first location below the surface of the earth to a second location at or near the surface of the earth, the length and cross-sectional area of the drill pipe sections being different from the length and cross-sectional area of the joints. It comprises generating acoustic data signals having a single frequency content in at least one passband of the drillstring; transmitting the data signals through the drillstring from either the first location to the second location or from the second location to the first location during a time period prior to the onset of reflective interference caused by the data signals reflecting from along the length of the drillstring, the time period being equal to or less than the time for the data signals to travel three lengths of the drillstring; stopping the transmission of data signals at the onset of the reflective interference and allowing the acoustic signals to substantially attenuate; and detecting the data signals at the respective first or second location.

  3. Prediction of sound absorption in rigid porous media with the lattice Boltzmann method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, sound absorption phenomena associated with the viscous shear stress within rigid porous media is investigated with a simple isothermal lattice Boltzmann BGK model. Simulations are conducted for different macroscopic material properties such as sample thickness and porosity and the results are compared with the exact analytical solution for materials with slit-like structure in terms of acoustic impedance and sound absorption coefficient. The numerical results agree very well with the exact solution, particularly for the sound absorption coefficient. The small deviations found in the low frequency limit for the real part of the acoustic impedance are attributed to the ratio between the thicknesses of the slit and the viscous boundary layer. The results suggest that the lattice Boltzmann method can be a very compelling numerical tool for simulating viscous sound absorption phenomena in the time domain, particularly due to its computational simplicity when compared to traditional continuum based techniques. (paper)

  4. Revisiting Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Araújo, Ana Luiza Lara; Ulhøi, John Parm; Lettl, Christopher

    Absorptive capacity has mostly been perceived as a 'passive' outcome of R&D investments. Recently, however, a growing interest into its 'proactive' potentials has emerged. This paper taps into this development and proposes a dynamic model for conceptualizing the determinants of the complementary...... learning processes of absorptive capacity, which comprise combinative and adaptive capabilities. Drawing on survey data (n=169), the study concludes that combinative capabilities primarily enhance transformative and exploratory learning processes, while adaptive capabilities strengthen all three learning...

  5. Energy Properties of Ion Acoustic Waves in Stable and Unstable Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1979-01-01

    acoustic waves that are growing or damped in space the time average of the sum of the potential and the kinetic energy density is independent of position. Energy absorption spectra in particle velocity space are calculated; they are relatively broad and complicated functions. This shows that plasma ions...

  6. Recent multi-purpose hall designs in Denmark with physically variable acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes two recent Danish multi-purpose hall designs, in which acoustic variability has been accomplished in different ways: through variable absorption and variable volume, respectively. The different approaches were chosen in order to insure that not only reverberation time (T...

  7. Architectural Acoustics in Residences for Adults with Mental Retardation and Its Relation to Perceived Homelikeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Mark; Roper, Todd; Feurer, Irene; Thompson, Travis

    1999-01-01

    Acoustical characteristics of 18 residences for people with mental retardation were evaluated and compared to ratings of room photographs for apparent homelikeness. Reverberation times in living and dining rooms were negatively correlated with mean homelikeness ratings. High reverberation rates were the result of insufficient sound absorption by…

  8. Microstructure and optical absorption of Au-MgF2 nanoparticle cermet films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Zhao-Qi; Cai Qi; Song Xue-Ping

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and optical absorption of Au-MgF2 nanoparticle cermet films with different Au contents are studied.The microstructural analysis shows that the films are mainly composed of the amorphous MgF2 matrix with embedded fcc Au nanoparticles with a mean size of 9.8-21.4nm.Spectral analysis suggests that the surface plasma resonance (SPR) absorption peak of Au particles appears at λ=492-537nm.With increasing Au content,absorption peak intensity increases,profile narrows and location redshifts.Theoretical absorption spectra are calculated based on Maxwell-Garnett theory and compared with experimental spectra.

  9. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  10. Effects of spontaneously induced coherence on absorption of a ladder-type atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hong-Mei; Gong Shang-Qing; Sun Zhen-Rong; Li Ru-Xin; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of spontaneously induced coherence on absorption properties in a nearly equispaced three-level ladder-type system driven by two coherent fields. It find that the absorption properties of this system with the probe field applied on the lower transition can be significantly modified if this coherence is optimized. In the case of small spontaneous decay rate in the upper excited state, it finds that such coherence does not destroy the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Nevertheless, the absorption peak on both sides of zero detuning and the linewidth of absorption line become larger and narrower than those in the case corresponding to the effects of spontaneously induced coherence; while in the case of large decay rate, it finds that, instead of EIT with low resonant absorption, a sharp absorption peak at resonance appears. That is, electromagnetically induced absorption in the nearly equispaced ladder-type system can occur due to such coherent effects.

  11. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect.

  12. Computer simulations in room acoustics: concepts and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorländer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Geometrical acoustics are used as a standard model for room acoustic design and consulting. Research on room acoustic simulation focuses on a more accurate modeling of propagation effects such as diffraction and other wave effects in rooms, and on scattering. Much progress was made in this field so that wave models also (for example, the boundary element method and the finite differences in time domain) can now be used for higher frequencies. The concepts and implementations of room simulation methods are briefly reviewed. After all, simulations in architectural acoustics are indeed powerful tools, but their reliability depends on the skills of the operator who has to create an adequate polygon model and has to choose the correct input data of boundary conditions such as absorption and scattering. Very little is known about the uncertainty of this input data. With the theory of error propagation of uncertainties it can be shown that prediction of reverberation times with accuracy better than the just noticeable difference requires input data in a quality which is not available from reverberation room measurements. PMID:23463991

  13. Acoustic evaluation and adjustment of an open-plan office through architectural design and noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, Carolina Reich Marcon; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2012-11-01

    Arranging office space into a single open room offers advantages in terms of easy exchange of information and interaction among coworkers, but reduces privacy and acoustic comfort. Thus, the purpose of this work was to evaluate the acoustic quality of a real open-plan office and to propose changes in the room to improve the acoustic conditioning of this office. The computational model of the office under study was calibrated based on RT and STI measurements. Predictions were made of the RT and STI, which generated the radius of distraction r(D), and the rate of spatial decay of sound pressure levels per distance doubling DL(2) in the real conditions of the office and after modifications of the room. The insertion of dividers between work stations and an increase in the ceiling's sound absorption improved the acoustic conditions in the office under study.

  14. Photo-acoustic imaging of coronary arteries with polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Broadway, Christian; Lamela, Horacio;

    2014-01-01

    less blood to flow through the arteries hence the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. Worse, a plaque can suddenly rupture. As a result, blood clot over the rapture and suddenly cut off the hearts’ blood supply, causing permanent heart dama ge or stroke [1]. Photo-acoustic imaging...... is useful for detection of plaques for prevention of rupture of vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques in the arteries can be distinguished using photo-acoustic imaging based on lipid accumulation with different characteristics of optical absorption. The basic principle of this imaging technique...... relies on exposing lipids to a laser capable of inducing photo-acoustic effect and a sensor affected by the induced pressure. Polymer optical fibre Bragg grating and Fabry-Perot sensors will be developed for detection of photo-acoustic signal in collaboration of Optoelectronics and Laser technology group...

  15. Acoustic evaluation and adjustment of an open-plan office through architectural design and noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, Carolina Reich Marcon; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2012-11-01

    Arranging office space into a single open room offers advantages in terms of easy exchange of information and interaction among coworkers, but reduces privacy and acoustic comfort. Thus, the purpose of this work was to evaluate the acoustic quality of a real open-plan office and to propose changes in the room to improve the acoustic conditioning of this office. The computational model of the office under study was calibrated based on RT and STI measurements. Predictions were made of the RT and STI, which generated the radius of distraction r(D), and the rate of spatial decay of sound pressure levels per distance doubling DL(2) in the real conditions of the office and after modifications of the room. The insertion of dividers between work stations and an increase in the ceiling's sound absorption improved the acoustic conditions in the office under study. PMID:22507599

  16. Gaussian peaks decomposing of simple liquids’ RDF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟民; 边秀房; 秦敬玉; 张林; 叶以富

    1999-01-01

    According to feasibility of Gaussian peaks decomposing distribution function (DF) 4πrρ(r), radial distribution function (RDF) 4πr~2ρ(r) of simple liquids also is possibly decomposed into Gaussian peaks with r in the size of several atoms. Experimental structure parameters of pure liquid Al and Si were obtained by θ-θ X-ray diffraction measurements and following data processing. Based on Gaussian decomposing liquid aluminun’s DF 4πrρ(r), liquid aluminum and silicon’s radial distribution function (RDF) 4πr~2ρ(r), it is shown that RDF of simple liquids is able to be decomposed in Gaussian function, compared with decomposing of DF, supplying more physical meaning and better indicating the short range order of liquids, whicb draws a clearer structure picture of simple liquids.

  17. Peak oil, food systems, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Roni A; Parker, Cindy L; Kirschenmann, Frederick L; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all.

  18. Reference values for the peak expiratory flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljuština-Pribić Radmila

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Peak expiratory flow (PEF is an important screening method for investigation and follow-up of the pulmonary function. Since reading the obtained PEF results requires reference values, the aim of this study was to establish normal values for PEF in our adolescent population. Material and methods The investigation included 1154 healthy teenagers aged from 15 to 19 years using a peak flow meter Harlow, Essex CM 2 ED. Detailed explanations, purpose of investigation and function demonstrations were done prior to testing. Results were statistically analyzed. Results Obtained results showed an increase of PEF values with age and body height in both sexes. Elevation of PEF was more significant in boys; high correlation was found in regard to age and height in boys and moderate correlation in girls. Discussion and conclusion Regression equations for sex, age and height were made after measurements and data analysis. PEF values can be easily calculated knowing one's age and height.

  19. The Doppler peaks from a generic defect

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J

    1996-01-01

    We investigate which of the exotic Doppler peak features found for textures and cosmic strings are generic novelties pertaining to defects. We find that the ``out of phase'' texture signature is an accident. Generic defects, when they generate a secondary peak structure similar to inflation, apply to it an additive shift. It is not necessary for this shift to be ``out of phase''. We also show which factors are responsible for the absence of secondary oscillations found for cosmic strings. Within this general analysis we finally consider the conditions under which topological defects and inflation can be confused. It is argued that only \\Omega=1 inflation and a defect with a horizon size coherence length have a chance to be confused. Any other inflationary or defect model always differ distinctly. (To appear in the proceedings of the XXXIth Moriond meeting, ``Microwave Background Anisotropies'')

  20. The accuracy of portable peak flow meters.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M. R.; Dickinson, S A; Hitchings, D J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is now commonly used in the diagnosis and management of asthma. It is essential for PEF meters to have a linear response in order to obtain an unbiased measurement of PEF variability. As the accuracy and linearity of portable PEF meters have not been rigorously tested in recent years this aspect of their performance has been investigated. METHODS: The response of several portable PEF meters was tested with absolute standards of flow ge...

  1. Commodity hydrogen from off-peak electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, K.; Biederman, N.; Konopka, A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the use of off-peak electrical power as an energy source for the electrolytic production of hydrogen. The present industrial uses for hydrogen are examined to determine if hydrogen produced in this fashion would be competitive with the industry's onsite production or existing hydrogen prices. The paper presents a technical and economic feasibility analysis of the various components required and of the operation of the system as a whole including production, transmission, storage, and markets.

  2. Power peakings in mixed TRIGA cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka [Reactor Physics Division, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si; Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Division, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-09-15

    Modern Monte-Carlo codes (e.g. MCNP) allow calculation of the power density distribution in 3D geometry assuming detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. The power density distribution (and its maximum value-the peaking) can be calculated 'point-wise' with the resolution of approximately 1 mm. Results of the detailed power density distribution calculated by MCNP are presented for 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor, assuming various realistic and hypothetical core-loading patterns with focus on the mixed cores. Combinations of 8.5 w/o, 12 w/o, 20 w/o and 30 w/o low-enriched (20%) fresh TRIGA fuel rods are systematically treated in the mixed cores. The power peaking factor value and position strongly depends on the core configuration. Power peakings are usually found in fuel rods with higher uranium content especially if they are inserted near the core centre. The results are conservative and can be applied in planning realistic mixed core-loading patterns.

  3. Power Peaking Factors in Mixed TRIGA cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka; Ravnik, Matjaz [' Jozef Stefan' Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-10-29

    Modern Monte-Carlo codes (e.g. MCNP) allow calculation of the power density distribution in 3-D geometry assuming detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. The power density distribution (and its maximum value - the peaking) can be calculated 'point-wise' with the resolution of approximately 1 mm. Results of the detailed power density distribution calculated by MCNP are presented for 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor, assuming various realistic and hypothetical core loading patterns with focus on the mixed cores. Combinations of 8.5 w/o, 12 w/o, 20 w/o and 30 w/o low enriched (20 %) fresh TRIGA fuel rods are systematically treated in the mixed cores. The power peaking factor value and position strongly depends on the core configuration. Power peaking are usually found in fuel rods with higher uranium content especially if they are inserted near the core centre. The results are conservative and can be applied in planning realistic mixed core loading patterns. (authors)

  4. METing SUSY on the Z peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Vives, O. [Universitat de Valencia, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot (Spain); Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Parc Cientific U.V., IFIC, Paterna (Spain); Mitsou, V.A.; Romero, E. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Parc Cientific U.V., IFIC, Paterna (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    Recently the ATLAS experiment announced a 3 σ excess at the Z-peak consisting of 29 pairs of leptons together with two or more jets, E{sub T}{sup miss} > 225 GeV and HT > 600 GeV, to be compared with 10.6 ± 3.2 expected lepton pairs in the Standard Model. No excess outside the Z-peak was observed. By trying to explain this signal with SUSY we find that only relatively light gluinos, m{sub g} or similar 400 GeV decaying predominantly to Z-boson plus a light gravitino, such that nearly every gluino produces at least one Z-boson in its decay chain, could reproduce the excess. We construct an explicit general gauge mediation model able to reproduce the observed signal overcoming all the experimental limits. Needless to say, more sophisticated models could also reproduce the signal, however, any model would have to exhibit the following features: light gluinos, or heavy particles with a strong production cross section, producing at least one Z-boson in its decay chain. The implications of our findings for the Run II at LHC with the scaling on the Z peak, as well as for the direct search of gluinos and other SUSY particles, are pointed out. (orig.)

  5. Revisiting Twomey's approximation for peak supersaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Shipway

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Twomey's seminal 1959 paper provided lower and upper bound approximations to the estimation of peak supersaturation within an updraft and thus provides the first closed expression for the number of nucleated cloud droplets. The form of this approximation is simple, but provides a surprisingly good estimate and has subsequently been employed in more sophisticated treatments of nucleation parametrization. In the current paper, we revisit the lower bound approximation of Twomey and make a small adjustment which can be used to obtain a more accurate calculation of peak supersaturation under all potential aerosol loadings and thermodynamic conditions. In order to make full use of this improved approximation, the underlying integro-differential equation for supersaturation evolution and the condition for calculating peak supersaturation are examined. A simple rearrangement of the algebra allows for an expression to be written down which can then be solved with a single lookup table with only one independent variable for an underlying lognormal aerosol population. Multimode aerosol with only N different dispersion characteristics require only N of these one-dimensional lookup tables. No additional information is required in the lookup table to deal with additional chemical, physical or thermodynamic properties. The resulting implementation provides a relatively simple, yet computationally cheap and very accurate physically-based parametrization of droplet nucleation for use in climate and NWP models.

  6. [Fast spectral modeling based on Voigt peaks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-rong; Dai, Lian-kui

    2012-03-01

    Indirect hard modeling (IHM) is a recently introduced method for quantitative spectral analysis, which was applied to the analysis of nonlinear relation between mixture spectrum and component concentration. In addition, IHM is an effectual technology for the analysis of components of mixture with molecular interactions and strongly overlapping bands. Before the establishment of regression model, IHM needs to model the measured spectrum as a sum of Voigt peaks. The precision of the spectral model has immediate impact on the accuracy of the regression model. A spectrum often includes dozens or even hundreds of Voigt peaks, which mean that spectral modeling is a optimization problem with high dimensionality in fact. So, large operation overhead is needed and the solution would not be numerically unique due to the ill-condition of the optimization problem. An improved spectral modeling method is presented in the present paper, which reduces the dimensionality of optimization problem by determining the overlapped peaks in spectrum. Experimental results show that the spectral modeling based on the new method is more accurate and needs much shorter running time than conventional method. PMID:22582612

  7. Uncertainty in peak cooling load calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez-Munoz, Fernando; Cejudo-Lopez, Jose M.; Carrillo-Andres, Antonio [Grupo de Energetica, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Calle Dr. Ortiz Ramos, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Peak cooling loads are usually calculated at early stages of the building project, when large uncertainties affect the input data. Uncertainties arise from a variety of sources like the lack of information, random components and the approximate nature of the building mathematical model. Unfortunately, these uncertainties are normally large enough to make the result of the calculation very dependent on starting assumptions about the value of input data. HVAC engineers deal with uncertainties through worst-case scenarios and/or safety factors. In this paper, a new approach is proposed based on stochastic simulation methods. Uncertainty bands are applied to the input data and propagated through the building model in order to determine their impact on the peak cooling load. The result of this calculation is a probability distribution that quantifies the whole range of possible peak loads and the probability of each interval. The stochastic solution is compared with the conventional one, and a global sensitivity analysis is undertaken to identify the most important uncertainties. (author)

  8. An alternative interpretation for cosmic ray peaks

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Doojin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative mechanism based upon dark matter (DM) interpretation for anomalous peak signatures in cosmic ray measurements, assuming an extended dark sector with two DM species. This is contrasted with previous effort to explain various line-like cosmic-ray excesses in the context of DM models where the relevant DM candidate directly annihilates into Standard Model (SM) particles. The heavier DM is assumed to annihilate to an on-shell intermediate state. As the simplest choice, it decays directly into the lighter DM along with an unstable particle which in turn decays to a pair of SM states corresponding to the interesting cosmic anomaly. We show that a sharp continuum energy peak can be readily generated under the proposed DM scenario, depending on dark sector particle mass spectra. Remarkably, such a peak is robustly identified as half the mass of the unstable particle. Furthermore, other underlying mass parameters are analytically related to the shape of energy spectrum. We apply this idea to ...

  9. Ten Reasons to Take Peak Oil Seriously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Brecha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Forty years ago, the results of modeling, as presented in The Limits to Growth, reinvigorated a discussion about exponentially growing consumption of natural resources, ranging from metals to fossil fuels to atmospheric capacity, and how such consumption could not continue far into the future. Fifteen years earlier, M. King Hubbert had made the projection that petroleum production in the continental United States would likely reach a maximum around 1970, followed by a world production maximum a few decades later. The debate about “peak oil”, as it has come to be called, is accompanied by some of the same vociferous denials, myths and ideological polemicizing that have surrounded later representations of The Limits to Growth. In this review, we present several lines of evidence as to why arguments for a near-term peak in world conventional oil production should be taken seriously—both in the sense that there is strong evidence for peak oil and in the sense that being societally unprepared for declining oil production will have serious consequences.

  10. Acoustic Signal Feature Extraction of Vehicle Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝金辉; 马宝华; 李科杰

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic signal feature extraction is an important part of target recognition. The mechanisms for producing acoustic signals and their propagation are analyzed to extract the features of the radiated noise from different targets. Analysis of the acoustic spectra of typical vehicle targets acquired outdoors shows that the vehicles can be classified based on the acoustic spectra and amplitudes.

  11. Nanoarchitecture in the black wings of Troides magellanus: a natural case of absorption enhancement in photonic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Herman, Aline; Deparis, Olivier; Simonis, Priscilla; Vigneron, Jean Pol

    2013-01-01

    The birdwings butterfly Troides magellanus possesses interesting properties for light and thermal radiation management. The black wings of the male exhibit strong (98%) absorption of visible light as well as two strong absorption peaks in the infrared both due to chitin. These peaks are located in the spectral region where the black body emits at 313K. The study of absorption enhancement in this butterfly could be helpful to design highly absorbent biomimetic materials. Observations of the wings using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) reveal that the scales covering the wings are deeply nanostructured. A periodic three-dimensional (3D) model of the scale nanoarchitecture is elaborated and used for numerical transfer-matrix simulations of the absorption spectrum. The complex refractive index of the wing material is approximated by a multi-oscillator Lorentz model, leading to a broad absorption in the visible range as well as two peaks in the infrared. The absorption peak intensities turn out to be dependent...

  12. Acoustic cavitation movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs on microsecond time scales and micron length scales, yet, it has many macroscopic manifestations. Accordingly, it is often difficult, at least for the author, to form realistic physical descriptions of the specific mechanisms through which it expresses itself in our macroscopic world. For example, there are still many who believe that cavitation erosion is due to the shock wave that is emitted by bubble implosion, rather than the liquid jet created on asymmetric collapse...and they may be right. Over the years, the author has accumulated a number of movies and high-speed photographs of cavitation activity, which he uses to form his own visual references. In the time allotted, he will show a number of these movies and photographs and discuss their relevance to existing technological problems. A limited number of CDs containing the presented materials will be available to interested individuals. [Work supported in part by the NIH, USAMRMC, and the ONR.

  13. Acoustic emission testing

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian U

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) techniques have been studied in civil engineering for a long time. The techniques are recently going to be more and more applied to practical applications and to be standardized in the codes. This is because the increase of aging structures and disastrous damages due to recent earthquakes urgently demand for maintenance and retrofit of civil structures in service for example. It results in the need for the development of advanced and effective inspection techniques. Thus, AE techniques draw a great attention to diagnostic applications and in material testing. The book covers all levels from the description of AE basics for AE beginners (level of a student) to sophisticated AE algorithms and applications to real large-scale structures as well as the observation of the cracking process in laboratory specimen to study fracture processes.

  14. Low level optical absorption measurements on organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stella, M.; Rojas, F.; Escarre, J.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona. Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Voz, C.; Puigdollers, J.; Fonrodona, M. [Micro and Nano Technology Group (MNT), Dept. d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, C/Jordi Girona 1-3, Campus Nord - Modul C4, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-06-15

    The optical absorption of n-type (C{sub 60} and PTCDA) and p-type (CuPc and pentacene) organic semiconductors is investigated by optical transmission and photothermal deflection spectroscopy. The usual absorption bands related to HOMO-LUMO transitions are observed in the high absorption region of transmission spectra. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy also evidences exponential absorption shoulders with characteristic energies 47meV for CuPc, 38meV for pentacene, 50 meV for PTCDA and 87meV for C{sub 60}. In addition, broad bands in the low absorption level are observed for C{sub 60} and PTCDA. These bands have been attributed to contamination due to air exposure. On the other hand, in CuPc a clear absorption peak at 1.12eV is observed with smaller features at 1.04eV, 1.20eV and 1.33eV. These peaks are attributed to transitions between the Pc levels of CuPc ions. Finally, the optical absorption expected in blends of organic semiconductors is estimated by an effective media approximation. (author)

  15. Infrared absorption of human breast tissues in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chenglin [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Zhang Yuan [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yan Xiaohui [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang Xinyi [Department of Physics, Surface Physics Laboratory (National Key laboratory), Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China) and Shanghai Research Center of Acupuncture and Meridian, Pudong, Shanghai 201203 (China)]. E-mail: xy-zhang@fudan.edu.cn; Li Chengxiang [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Yang Wentao [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shi Daren [Cancer Hospital, Medical Center, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2006-07-15

    The spectral characteristics of human breast tissues in normal status and during different cancerous stages have been investigated by synchrotron radiation based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) absorption spectroscopy. Thanks to the excellent synchrotron radiation infrared (IR) source, higher resolving power is achieved in SR-FTIR absorption spectra than in conventional IR absorption measurements. Obvious variations in IR absorption spectrum of breast tissues were found as they change from healthy to diseased, or say in progression to cancer. On the other hand, some specific absorption peaks were found in breast cancer tissues by SR-FTIR spectroscopic methods. These spectral characteristics of breast tissue may help us in early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  16. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  17. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  18. Use of acoustic monitoring system for debris flow discharge evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgaro, A. G.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2003-04-01

    In 1997 an automated system for monitoring of debris flows has been installed in the Acquabona channel Dolomites, Italy. Induction geophones, with a specific frequency of 10 Hz, measure the amplitude of vertical ground vibrations generated by the passage of a flowing mass along the channel. Continuous acoustic logs and ultrasonic hydrograph recorded at the lower-channel measurement station for the debris flow of August 17, 1998, show a striking correspondence. This correspondence, already observed in different flow sites, is represented by the best fit between flow depth and flow sensor amplitude. Average front velocity for surges, calculated from the signal peak time shift and the distance between the sensors along the flow path, range between 2.00 and 7.7 m/s. As the ultrasonic sensor provides a way to measure the variation of the flow section area with the flow depth, the debris flow peak discharge may be estimated; obtained values of debris flow peak discharge range from 4 and 30 m3/s. Volumes were calculated by integrating instantaneous discharges through the hydrograph and by integrating the geophone log (acoustic flux). Volumes of 13700 m3 and 15500 m3 have been respectively obtained. The slight difference between the two values may result from the fact that acoustic records: i) are sensitive to the high frequencies, typical of the debris flow tails; ii) sum up the contributions sent by the whole flowing mass, while the ecometer detect the flow depth at every time at only one section. As a consequence the rising of the whole geophone log gives a higher value at the integration result. This only acoustic system can give a reasonably proxy for discharge and total volumes involved, which are among the most important parameters for debris flow hazard assessment and planning countermeasures. This methodology can be used in other debris flow sites if they are calibrated by the acoustic characterization of debris, obtained by both seismic surveys and SPT tests, and

  19. Clinical investigation on gastric oxalate absorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志强; 叶章群; 曾令启; 杨为民

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the stomach role in exogenous oxalate absorption.Methods The kinetic variation of urinary oxalate excretion (mg/min) in 10 healthy adults and 8 patients who underwent total gastrectomy was investigated before and after an oral spinach oxalate load. The bioavailability of the oxalate load in the healthy adults was calculated and compared with that in the patients.Results The oxalate content in the oral spinach load was 2567-2670 mg. The urinary oxalate excretion (mg/min) in the 10 healthy adults increased significantly 20 minutes after loading (this increase was compared against their basic oxalate excretion level of 0.0331±0.0203). Further observations after loading include: a first peak of oxalate excretion 40 minutes after loading; an oxalate excretion level double that of the basic level after 60 minutes (0.0732±0.0294) and a second peak appearing at 3 hours (P<0.01). A "first peak" (0.063%±0.062%) was not in any of the patients who underwent a total gastrectomy. Furthermore, a bioavailability of oxalate, which was 50% lower than that in the healthy subjects, appeared 60 minutes after loading (0.098%±0.071%, P<0.01). Conclusions The stomach is a powerful oxalate absorption organ under normal physiological conditions. Further investigation on the relationship between stomach dysfunction and urinary calcium oxalate formation is needed.

  20. Central cooling: absorptive chillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J.E.

    1977-08-01

    This technology evaluation covers commercially available single-effect, lithium-bromide absorption chillers ranging in nominal cooling capacities of 3 to 1,660 tons and double-effect lithium-bromide chillers from 385 to 1,060 tons. The nominal COP measured at operating conditions of 12 psig input steam for the single-effect machine, 85/sup 0/ entering condenser water, and 44/sup 0/F exiting chilled-water, ranges from 0.6 to 0.65. The nominal COP for the double-effect machine varies from 1.0 to 1.15 with 144 psig entering steam. Data are provided to estimate absorption-chiller performance at off-nominal operating conditions. The part-load performance curves along with cost estimating functions help the system design engineer select absorption equipment for a particular application based on life-cycle costs. Several suggestions are offered which may be useful for interfacing an absorption chiller with the remaining Integrated Community Energy System. The ammonia-water absorption chillers are not considered to be readily available technology for ICES application; therefore, performance and cost data on them are not included in this evaluation.

  1. Will peak oil accelerate carbon dioxide emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J.; Cao, L.

    2008-12-01

    The relative scarcity of oil suggests that oil production is peaking and will decline thereafter. Some have suggested that this represents an opportunity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, in the absence of constraints on carbon dioxide emission, "peak oil" may drive a shift towards increased reliance on coal as a primary energy source. Because coal per unit energy, in the absence of carbon capture and disposal, releases more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than oil, "peak oil" may lead to an acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions. We will never run out of oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce, prices will rise and therefore consumption will diminish. As prices rise, other primary energy sources will become increasingly competitive with oil. The developed world uses oil primarily as a source of transportation fuels. The developing world uses oil primarily for heat and power, but the trend is towards increasing reliance on oil for transportation. Liquid fuels, including petroleum derivatives such as gasoline and diesel fuel, are attractive as transportation fuels because of their relative abundance of energy per unit mass and volume. Such considerations are especially important for the air transport industry. Today, there is little that can compete with petroleum-derived transportation fuels. Future CO2 emissions from the transportation sector largely depend on what replaces oil as a source of fuel. Some have suggested that biomass-derived ethanol, hydrogen, or electricity could play this role. Each of these potential substitutes has its own drawbacks (e.g., low power density per unit area in the case of biomass, low power density per unit volume in the case of hydrogen, and low power density per unit mass in the case of battery storage). Thus, it is entirely likely that liquefaction of coal could become the primary means by which transportation fuels are produced. Since the burning of coal produces more CO2 per unit energy than does the burning of

  2. Very High Temperature Sound Absorption Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase I demonstrated experimentally a very high temperature acoustically absorbing coating for ducted acoustics applications. High temperature survivability at 3500...

  3. Development of an analytical solution of modified Biot's equations for the optimization of lightweight acoustic protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanfoud, Jamil; Ali Hamdi, Mohamed; Becot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc

    2009-02-01

    During lift-off, space launchers are submitted to high-level of acoustic loads, which may damage sensitive equipments. A special acoustic absorber has been previously integrated inside the fairing of space launchers to protect the payload. A new research project has been launched to develop a low cost fairing acoustic protection system using optimized layers of porous materials covered by a thin layer of fabric. An analytical model is used for the analysis of acoustic wave propagation within the multilayer porous media. Results have been validated by impedance tube measurements. A parametric study has been conducted to determine optimal mechanical and acoustical properties of the acoustic protection under dimensional thickness constraints. The effect of the mounting conditions has been studied. Results reveal the importance of the lateral constraints on the absorption coefficient particularly in the low frequency range. A transmission study has been carried out, where the fairing structure has been simulated by a limp mass layer. The transmission loss and noise reduction factors have been computed using Biot's theory and the local acoustic impedance approximation to represent the porous layer effect. Comparisons between the two models show the frequency domains for which the local impedance model is valid. PMID:19206863

  4. Experimental study of acoustic damping induced by gas-liquid scheme injectors in a combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hak Soon; Sohn, Chae Hoon [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    In a liquid rocket engine, acoustic damping induced by gas-liquid scheme injectors is studied experimentally for combustion stability by adopting linear acoustic test. In the previous work, it has been found that gas-liquid scheme injector can play a significant role in acoustic damping or absorption when it is tuned finely. Based on this finding, acoustic-damping characteristics of multi-injectors are intensively investigated. From the experimental data, it is found that acoustic oscillations are almost damped out by multi-injectors when they have the tuning length proposed in the previous study. The length corresponds to a half wavelength of the first longitudinal overtone mode traveling inside the injector with the acoustic frequency intended for damping in the chamber. But, new injector-coupled acoustic modes show up in the chamber with the injectors of the tuning length although the target mode is nearly damped out. And, appreciable frequency shift is always observed except for the case of the worst tuned injector. Accordingly, it is proposed that the tuning length is adjusted to have the shorter length than a half wavelength when these phenomena are considered

  5. Transport composite fuselage technology: Impact dynamics and acoustic transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. C.; Balena, F. J.; Labarge, W. L.; Pei, G.; Pitman, W. A.; Wittlin, G.

    1986-01-01

    A program was performed to develop and demonstrate the impact dynamics and acoustic transmission technology for a composite fuselage which meets the design requirements of a 1990 large transport aircraft without substantial weight and cost penalties. The program developed the analytical methodology for the prediction of acoustic transmission behavior of advanced composite stiffened shell structures. The methodology predicted that the interior noise level in a composite fuselage due to turbulent boundary layer will be less than in a comparable aluminum fuselage. The verification of these analyses will be performed by NASA Langley Research Center using a composite fuselage shell fabricated by filament winding. The program also developed analytical methodology for the prediction of the impact dynamics behavior of lower fuselage structure constructed with composite materials. Development tests were performed to demonstrate that the composite structure designed to the same operating load requirement can have at least the same energy absorption capability as aluminum structure.

  6. Acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cascades in ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeser, S.

    2006-12-08

    Current underwater optical neutrino telescopes are designed to detect neutrinos from astrophysical sources with energies in the TeV range. Due to the low fluxes and small cross sections, no high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin have been observed so far. Only the Cherenkov neutrino detectors on the km{sup 3} scale that are currently under construction will have the necessary volume to observe these rare interactions. For the guaranteed source of neutrinos from interactions of the ultra-high energy cosmic at EeV energies rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background, event rates of only one per year are expected in these experiments. To measure the flux and verify the predicted cross sections of these cosmogenic neutrinos, an observed volume of the order of 100 km{sup 3} will be necessary, that will not be feasible with existing detection techniques. Alternative methods are required to build a detector on these scales. One promising idea is to record the acoustic waves generated in hadronic or electromagnetic cascades following the neutrino interaction. The higher amplitudes of the sonic signal and the large expected absorption length of sound favour South Polar ice instead of sea water as a medium. The prerequisites for an estimate of the potential of such a detector are suitable acoustic sensors, a verification of the model of thermo-acoustic sound generation and a determination of the acoustic properties of the ice. In a theoretical derivation the mechanism of thermo-elastic excitation of acoustic waves was shown to be equivalent for isotropic solids and liquids. Following a detailed analysis of the existing knowledge a simulation study of a hybrid optical-radio-acoustic detector has been performed. Ultrasonic sensors dedicated to in-ice application were developed and have been used to record acoustic signals from intense proton and laser beams in water and ice. With the obtained experience, the hitherto largest array of acoustic sensors and

  7. Acoustic detection of ultra-high energy cascades in ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current underwater optical neutrino telescopes are designed to detect neutrinos from astrophysical sources with energies in the TeV range. Due to the low fluxes and small cross sections, no high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin have been observed so far. Only the Cherenkov neutrino detectors on the km3 scale that are currently under construction will have the necessary volume to observe these rare interactions. For the guaranteed source of neutrinos from interactions of the ultra-high energy cosmic at EeV energies rays with the ambient cosmic microwave background, event rates of only one per year are expected in these experiments. To measure the flux and verify the predicted cross sections of these cosmogenic neutrinos, an observed volume of the order of 100 km3 will be necessary, that will not be feasible with existing detection techniques. Alternative methods are required to build a detector on these scales. One promising idea is to record the acoustic waves generated in hadronic or electromagnetic cascades following the neutrino interaction. The higher amplitudes of the sonic signal and the large expected absorption length of sound favour South Polar ice instead of sea water as a medium. The prerequisites for an estimate of the potential of such a detector are suitable acoustic sensors, a verification of the model of thermo-acoustic sound generation and a determination of the acoustic properties of the ice. In a theoretical derivation the mechanism of thermo-elastic excitation of acoustic waves was shown to be equivalent for isotropic solids and liquids. Following a detailed analysis of the existing knowledge a simulation study of a hybrid optical-radio-acoustic detector has been performed. Ultrasonic sensors dedicated to in-ice application were developed and have been used to record acoustic signals from intense proton and laser beams in water and ice. With the obtained experience, the hitherto largest array of acoustic sensors and transmitters was

  8. Peak-shifting in real-time time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorse, Makenzie R; Habenicht, Bradley F; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-10-13

    In recent years, the development and application of real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) has gained momentum as a computationally efficient method for modeling electron dynamics and properties that require going beyond a linear response of the electron density. However, the RT-TDDFT method within the adiabatic approximation can unphysically shift absorption peaks throughout the electron dynamics. Here, we investigate the origin of these time-dependent resonances observed in RT-TDDFT spectra. Using both exact exchange and hybrid exchange-correlation approximate functionals, adiabatic RT-TDDFT gives time-dependent absorption spectra in which the peaks shift in energy as populations of the excited states fluctuate, while exact wave function methods yield peaks that are constant in energy but vary in intensity. The magnitude of the RT-TDDFT peak shift depends on the frequency and intensity of the applied field, in line with previous studies, but it oscillates as a function of time-dependent molecular orbital populations, consistent with a time-dependent superposition electron density. For the first time, we provide a rationale for the direction and magnitude of the time-dependent peak shifts based on the molecular electronic structure. For three small molecules, H2, HeH(+), and LiH, we give contrasting examples of peak-shifting to both higher and lower energies. The shifting is explained as coupled one-electron transitions to a higher and a lower lying state. Whether the peak shifts to higher or lower energies depends on the relative energetics of these one-electron transitions. PMID:26574268

  9. Sound transmission of an active acoustic structure with porous materials based on the (u,p) formulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ying; CHEN Ke'an; M. A. Galland; C. Batifol

    2012-01-01

    A method based on the combination of the (u,p) formulation and finite element method was applied to calcu~ati~g the acoust~cM performance of a double-wall active acoustic structure with porous materials. The (u, p) formulation based on the displacement in solid phase and the pressure in fluid phase was developed to investigate the sound propagation in porous materials. The acoustic performance of the double-wM1 active acoustic structure having porous materials was calculated and the measurement was taken. The numerical results matched well with the measured data. More than 10 dB transmission loss of the double-wall active acoustic structure can be improved in the resonance frequency with active control, and its absorption coefficient is up to 0.6 over 500 Hz. The relative error between the prediction and measurement is less than 5% at the resonance frequency of the porous materials.

  10. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm−1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol

  11. Percutaneous absorption from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous absorption from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin absorption from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the absorption of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703

  12. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy debris flow monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Galgaro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys.

  13. Acoustic module of the Acquabona (Italy) debris flow monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgaro, A.; Tecca, P. R.; Genevois, R.; Deganutti, A. M.

    2005-02-01

    Monitoring of debris flows aimed to the assessment of their physical parameters is very important both for theoretical and practical purposes. Peak discharge and total volume of debris flows are crucial for designing effective countermeasures in many populated mountain areas where losses of lives and property damage could be avoided. This study quantifies the relationship between flow depth, acoustic amplitude of debris flow induced ground vibrations and front velocity in the experimental catchment of Acquabona, Eastern Dolomites, Italy. The analysis of data brought about the results described in the following. Debris flow depth and amplitude of the flow-induced ground vibrations show a good positive correlation. Estimation of both mean front velocity and peak discharge can be simply obtained monitoring the ground vibrations, through geophones installed close to the flow channel; the total volume of debris flow can be so directly estimated from the integral of the ground vibrations using a regression line. The application of acoustic technique to debris flow monitoring seems to be of the outmost relevance in risk reduction policies and in the correct management of the territory. Moreover this estimation is possible in other catchments producing debris flows of similar characteristics by means of their acoustic characterisation through quick and simple field tests (Standard Penetration Tests and seismic refraction surveys).

  14. Effects of subsampling of passive acoustic recordings on acoustic metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomisch, Karolin; Boebel, Olaf; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Samaran, Flore; Van Parijs, Sofie; Van Opzeeland, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring is an important tool in marine mammal studies. However, logistics and finances frequently constrain the number and servicing schedules of acoustic recorders, requiring a trade-off between deployment periods and sampling continuity, i.e., the implementation of a subsampling scheme. Optimizing such schemes to each project's specific research questions is desirable. This study investigates the impact of subsampling on the accuracy of two common metrics, acoustic presence and call rate, for different vocalization patterns (regimes) of baleen whales: (1) variable vocal activity, (2) vocalizations organized in song bouts, and (3) vocal activity with diel patterns. To this end, above metrics are compared for continuous and subsampled data subject to different sampling strategies, covering duty cycles between 50% and 2%. The results show that a reduction of the duty cycle impacts negatively on the accuracy of both acoustic presence and call rate estimates. For a given duty cycle, frequent short listening periods improve accuracy of daily acoustic presence estimates over few long listening periods. Overall, subsampling effects are most pronounced for low and/or temporally clustered vocal activity. These findings illustrate the importance of informed decisions when applying subsampling strategies to passive acoustic recordings or analyses for a given target species. PMID:26233026

  15. Effect of cavities inside tube banks on acoustic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamakawa, Hiromitsu; Miyagi, Hidenobu; Nishida, Eiichi

    2010-02-01

    In the present paper the attention is focused on the effect of small cavities inside in-line tube banks on acoustic resonance which occurred in the two-dimensional model of boiler. We measured the sound pressure level, the amplitude and the phase delay of acoustic pressures and the gap velocity. As a result, we found many peak frequencies of sound pressure level with different Strouhal numbers, mainly about S t =0.15, 0.26 and 0.52. The variation of SPL for S t =0.26, 0.52 components in the tube banks with cavities was the same as the result of no cavities. The existence of cavities inside in-line tube banks caused the resonance of S t =0.15. And the acoustic resonance of the first mode in the transverse direction was generated if the small cavities existed inside the tube banks. This resonance was not generated from the tube banks of no cavities. The resonance onset velocity in the transverse mode was fairly slower than that of no cavities. It was easy to generate acoustic resonance when there were small cavities inside in-line tube banks.

  16. Acoustic analyses of diadochokinesis in fluent and stuttering children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Staróbole Juste

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to acoustically compare the performance of children who do and do not stutter on diadochokinesis tasks in terms of syllable duration, syllable periods, and peak intensity. METHODS: In this case-control study, acoustical analyses were performed on 26 children who stutter and 20 agedmatched normally fluent children (both groups stratified into preschoolers and school-aged children during a diadochokinesis task: the repetition of articulatory segments through a task testing the ability to alternate movements. Speech fluency was assessed using the Fluency Profile and the Stuttering Severity Instrument. RESULTS: The children who stutter and those who do not did not significantly differ in terms of the acoustic patterns they produced in the diadochokinesis tasks. Significant differences were demonstrated between age groups independent of speech fluency. Overall, the preschoolers performed poorer. These results indicate that the observed differences are related to speech-motor age development and not to stuttering itself. CONCLUSIONS: Acoustic studies demonstrate that speech segment durations are most variable, both within and between subjects, during childhood and then gradually decrease to adult levels by the age of eleven to thirteen years. One possible explanation for the results of the present study is that children who stutter presented higher coefficients of variation to exploit the motor equivalence to achieve accurate sound production (i.e., the absence of speech disruptions.

  17. Acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos in South Pole ice

    CERN Document Server

    Vandenbroucke, Justin

    2012-01-01

    When high-energy particles interact in dense media to produce a particle shower, most of the shower energy is deposited in the medium as heat. This causes the medium to expand locally and emit a shock wave with a medium-dependent peak frequency on the order of 10 kHz. In South Pole ice in particular, the elastic properties of the medium have been theorized to provide good coupling of particle energy to acoustic energy. The acoustic attenuation length has been theorized to be several km, which could enable a sparsely instrumented large-volume detector to search for rare signals from high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. We simulated a hybrid optical/radio/acoustic extension to the IceCube array, specifically intended to detect cosmogenic (GZK) neutrinos with multiple methods simultaneously in order to achieve high confidence in a discovered signal and to measure angular, temporal, and spectral distributions of GZK neutrinos. This work motivated the design, deployment, and operation of the South Pole Acoustic Te...

  18. A New Statistic for Analyzing Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, X; Padmanabhan, N; Eisenstein, D; Eckel, J; Mehta, K; Metchnik, M; Pinto, P; Seo, H -J

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new statistic omega_l for measuring and analyzing large-scale structure and particularly the baryon acoustic oscillations. omega_l is a band-filtered, configuration space statistic that is easily implemented and has advantages over the traditional power spectrum and correlation function estimators. Unlike these estimators, omega_l can localize most of the acoustic information into a single dip at the acoustic scale while also avoiding sensitivity to the poorly constrained large scale power (i.e., the integral constraint) through the use of a localized and compensated filter. It is also sensitive to anisotropic clustering through pair counting and does not require any binning. We measure the shift in the acoustic peak due to nonlinear effects using the monopole omega_0 derived from subsampled dark matter catalogues as well as from mock galaxy catalogues created via halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling. All of these are drawn from 44 realizations of 1024^3 particle dark matter simulations ...

  19. Experimental and Numerical Procedures of a Sonar Platform with a Sound Absorption Wedge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danzhu Yu; Xiongliang Yao; Shaoshi Dai

    2011-01-01

    Experiments involving a sonar platform with a sound absorption wedge were carried out for the purpose of obtaining the low frequency acoustic characteristics.Acoustic characteristics of a sonar platform model with a sound absorption wedge were measured,and the effects of different wedge laid areas on platform acoustic characteristic were tested.Vibration acceleration and self-noise caused by model vibration were measured in four conditions:0%,36%,60%,and 100% of wedge laid area when the sonar platform was under a single frequency excitation force.An experiment was performed to validate a corresponding numerical calculation.The numerical vibration characteristics of platform area were calculated by the finite element method,and self-noise caused by the vibration in it was predicted by an experiential formula.The conclusions prove that the numerical calculation method can partially replace the experimental process for obtaining vibration and sound characteristics.

  20. Hybrid optical and acoustic force based sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahoney, Paul; Brodie, Graham W.; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Cochran, Sandy; Spalding, Gabriel C.; MacDonald, Michael P.

    2014-09-01

    We report the combined use of optical sorting and acoustic levitation to give particle sorting. Differing sizes of microparticles are sorted optically both with and without the aid of acoustic levitation, and the results compared to show that the use of acoustic trapping can increase sorting efficiency. The use of a transparent ultrasonic transducer is also shown to streamline the integration of optics and acoustics. We also demonstrate the balance of optical radiation pressure and acoustic levitation to achieve vertical sorting.

  1. Aerosol light absorption and its measurement: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light absorption by aerosols contributes to solar radiative forcing through absorption of solar radiation and heating of the absorbing aerosol layer. Besides the direct radiative effect, the heating can evaporate clouds and change the atmospheric dynamics. Aerosol light absorption in the atmosphere is dominated by black carbon (BC) with additional, significant contributions from the still poorly understood brown carbon and from mineral dust. Sources of these absorbing aerosols include biomass burning and other combustion processes and dust entrainment. For particles much smaller than the wavelength of incident light, absorption is proportional to the particle volume and mass. Absorption can be calculated with Mie theory for spherical particles and with more complicated numerical methods for other particle shapes. The quantitative measurement of aerosol light absorption is still a challenge. Simple, commonly used filter measurements are prone to measurement artifacts due to particle concentration and modification of particle and filter morphology upon particle deposition, optical interaction of deposited particles and filter medium, and poor angular integration of light scattered by deposited particles. In situ methods measure particle absorption with the particles in their natural suspended state and therefore are not prone to effects related to particle deposition and concentration on filters. Photoacoustic and refractive index-based measurements rely on the heating of particles during light absorption, which, for power-modulated light sources, causes an acoustic signal and modulation of the refractive index in the air surrounding the particles that can be quantified with a microphone and an interferometer, respectively. These methods may suffer from some interference due to light-induced particle evaporation. Laser-induced incandescence also monitors particle heating upon absorption, but heats absorbing particles to much higher temperatures to quantify BC mass

  2. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is to fabricate, characterize, and verify performance of a new type of frequency steered acoustic...

  3. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is to develop, fabricate, and characterize a novel frequency steered acoustic transducer (FSAT) for the...

  4. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  5. Cryogenic Acoustic Suppression Testing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed project will explore and test the feasibility and effectiveness of using a cryogenic fluid (liquid nitrogen) to facilitate acoustic suppression in a...

  6. Second Harmonic Generation and Confined Acoustic Phonons in HighlyExcited Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Hee; Wittenberg, Joshua S.; Banin, Uri; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2006-03-30

    The photo-induced enhancement of second harmonic generation, and the effect of nanocrystal shape and pump intensity on confined acoustic phonons in semiconductor nanocrystals, has been investigated with time-resolved scattering and absorption measurements. The second harmonic signal showed a sublinear increase of the second order susceptibility with respect to the pump pulse energy, indicating a reduction of the effective one-electron second-order nonlinearity with increasing electron-hole density in the nanocrystals. The coherent acoustic phonons in spherical and rod-shaped semiconductor nanocrystals were detected in a time-resolved absorption measurement. Both nanocrystal morphologies exhibited oscillatory modulation of the absorption cross section, the frequency of which corresponded to their coherent radial breathing modes. The amplitude of the oscillation also increased with the level of photoexcitation, suggesting an increase in the amplitude of the lattice displacement as well.

  7. Exciton absorption in narrow armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monozon, B. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-11-01

    We develop an analytical approach to the exciton optical absorption for narrow gap armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNR). We focus on the regime of dominant size quantization in combination with the attractive electron-hole interaction. An adiabatic separation of slow and fast motions leads via the two-body Dirac equation to the isolated and coupled subband approximations. Discrete and continuous exciton states are in general coupled and form quasi-Rydberg series of purely discrete and resonance type character. The corresponding oscillator strengths and widths are derived. We show that the exciton peaks are blue-shifted, become broader and increase in magnitude upon narrowing the ribbon. At the edge of a subband the singularity related to the 1D density of states is transformed into finite absorption via the presence of the exciton. Our analytical results are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods including numerical approaches. Estimates of the expected experimental values are provided for realistic AGNR.

  8. Modelling absorption and photoluminescence of TPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vragovic, Igor [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada and Inst. Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: igor.vragovic@ua.es; Calzado, Eva M.; Diaz Garcia, Maria A.; Himcinschi, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Gisslen, L.; Scholz, R. [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    We analyse the optical spectra of N,N{sup '}-diphenyl-N,N{sup '}-bis(3-methyl-phenyl)-(1,1{sup '}-biphenyl)-4,4{sup '}-diamine (TPD) doped polystyrene films. The aim of the present paper is to give a microscopic interpretation of the significant Stokes shift between absorption and photoluminescence, which makes this material suitable for stimulated emission. The optimized geometric structures and energies of a neutral TPD monomer in ground and excited states are obtained by ab initio calculations using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory. The results indicate that the second distinct peak observed in absorption may arise either from a group of higher electronic transitions of the monomer or from the lowest optical transitions of a TPD dimer.

  9. NEAR-FIELD ACOUSTIC HOLOGRAPHY FOR SEMI-FREE ACOUSTIC FIELD BASED ON WAVE SUPERPOSITION APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Weibing; CHEN Jian; YU Fei; CHEN Xinzhao

    2006-01-01

    In the semi-free acoustic field, the actual acoustic pressure at any point is composed of two parts: The direct acoustic pressure and the reflected acoustic pressure. The general acoustic holographic theories and algorithms request that there is only the direct acoustic pressure contained in the pressure at any point on the hologram surface, consequently, they cannot be used to reconstruct acoustic source and predict acoustic field directly. To take the reflected pressure into consideration, near-field acoustic holography for semi-free acoustic field based on wave superposition approach is proposed to realize the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field, and the wave superposition approach is adopted as a holographic transform algorithm. The proposed theory and algorithm are realized and verified with a numerical example,and the drawbacks of the general theories and algorithms in the holographic reconstruction and prediction of the semi-free acoustic field are also demonstrated by this numerical example.

  10. Particle creation by peak electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Gitman, D M

    2016-01-01

    The particle creation by the so-called peak electric field is considered. The latter field is a combination of two exponential parts, one exponentially-increasing and another exponentially-decreasing. We find exact solutions of the Dirac equation with the field under consideration with appropriate asymptotic conditions and calculate all the characteristics of particle creation effect, in particular, differential mean numbers of created particle, total number of created particles, and the probability for a vacuum to remain a vacuum. Characteristic asymptotic regimes are discussed in detail and a comparison with the pure asymptotically decaying field is considered.

  11. Probable Values of Current Solar Cycle Peak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Silbergleit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of multiple linear regression method applied to solar cycles 4 to 23 using lagged values of smoothed monthly mean sunspot numbers as independent variables is presented. According to that, the amplitude of current solar cycle 24 is estimated providing a quantitative prediction result. Our adjustment shows that the current cycle would have a sunspot peak less than the biggest one observed during the cycle 19 giving an additional support to the declination in solar activity which is currently happening.

  12. LARAMIE PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Weisner, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, most of the Laramie Peak Wilderness study area in Wyoming was concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Only three small areas in the northern part, one extending outside the study area to Esterbrook, were found to have probable mineral-resource potential for copper and lead. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil-fuel resources in the study area. There are no surface indications that geothermal energy could be developed within or near the study area.

  13. Peak oil, economic growth, and wildlife conservation

    CERN Document Server

    Gates, J Edward; Czech, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The proposed book focuses on one of the most important issues affecting humankind in this century - Peak Oil or the declining availability of abundant, cheap energy-and its effects on our industrialized economy and wildlife conservation. Energy will be one of the defining issues of the 21st Century directly affecting wildlife conservation wherever energy extraction is a primary economic activity and indirectly through deepening economic recessions. Since cheap, abundant energy has been at the core of our industrial society, and has resulted in the technological advancements we enjoy today, the

  14. Derivative polynomials and permutations by numbers of interior peaks and left peaks

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Shi-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Derivative polynomials in two variables are defined by repeated differentiation of the tangent and secant functions. We establish the connections between the coefficients of these derivative polynomials and the numbers of interior and left peaks over the symmetric group. Properties of the generating functions for the numbers of interior and left peaks over the symmetric group, including recurrence relations, generating functions and real-rootedness, are studied.

  15. Acoustic Rectification in Dispersive Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the shapes of acoustic radiation-induced static strain and displacement pulses (rectified acoustic pulses) are defined locally by the energy density of the generating waveform. Dispersive properties are introduced analytically by assuming that the rectified pulses are functionally dependent on a phase factor that includes both dispersive and nonlinear terms. The dispersion causes an evolutionary change in the shape of the energy density profile that leads to the generation of solitons experimentally observed in fused silica.

  16. Simplified Rotation In Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Gaspar, M. S.; Trinh, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    New technique based on old discovery used to control orientation of object levitated acoustically in axisymmetric chamber. Method does not require expensive equipment like additional acoustic drivers of precisely adjustable amplitude, phase, and frequency. Reflecting object acts as second source of sound. If reflecting object large enough, close enough to levitated object, or focuses reflected sound sufficiently, Rayleigh torque exerted on levitated object by reflected sound controls orientation of object.

  17. Stable And Oscillating Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    Sample stability or instability determined by levitating frequency. Degree of oscillation of acoustically levitated object along axis of levitation chamber controlled by varying frequency of acoustic driver for axis above or below frequency of corresponding chamber resonance. Stabilization/oscillation technique applied in normal Earth gravity, or in absence of gravity to bring object quickly to rest at nominal levitation position or make object oscillate in desired range about that position.

  18. Study Acoustic Emissions from Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James; Workman,Gary

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work will be to develop techniques for monitoring the acoustic emissions from carbon epoxy composite structures at cryogenic temperatures. Performance of transducers at temperatures ranging from ambient to cryogenic and the characteristics of acoustic emission from composite structures will be studied and documented. This entire effort is directed towards characterization of structures used in NASA propulsion programs such as the X-33.

  19. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2011-01-01

    In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electro-absorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by the electric field of a single-cycle THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth and with free-space peak electric field reaching 220 kV/cm. The transient modulation of QD...

  20. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported. PMID:26661473

  1. An acoustic study of Deg Xinag fricatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Richard; Hargus, Sharon; Miller, Julia

    2005-04-01

    Few studies have looked at the acoustic properties of fricatives in Native American languages. Notable exceptions are McDonough (2003) on Navajo, and Gordon, Barthmaier, and Sands (2002), which examined a variety of languages, including several Native American ones. In Deg Xinag, an endangered Athabaskan language spoken in Alaska, there are eight places of articulation for voiceless fricatives [a relatively large phonetic inventory, according to Maddieson (1984)], including some rarely studied place contrasts (e.g. alveolar versus retroflex). In this study, pre- and post-vocalic fricatives were digitally recorded in the field from eight speakers (two males, six females) using a head-mounted mic to control for distance from the source. The segmental context was also controlled for, the neighboring vowel being [a] in all cases. Each speaker produced four repetitions of each word. The first four spectral moments, lowest spectral peak, and the three loudest spectral peaks were measured at the midpoint of each fricative, and each speaker's average for each of the measures was calculated. In this poster, qualitative results in the form of spectrographic analysis will be presented. Repeated measures ANOVA for each of the quantitative measures will also be presented. [Work supported by NSF.

  2. Baryon Acoustic Oscillations reconstruction with pixels

    CERN Document Server

    Obuljen, Andrej; Castorina, Emanuele; Viel, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational non-linear evolution induces a shift in the position of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak together with a damping and broadening of its shape that bias and degrades the accuracy with which the position of the peak can be determined. BAO reconstruction is a technique developed to undo part of the effect of non-linearities. We present a new reconstruction method that consists in displacing pixels instead of galaxies and whose implementation is easier than the standard reconstruction method. We show that our method is equivalent to the standard reconstruction technique in the limit where the number of pixels becomes very large. This method is particularly useful in surveys where individual galaxies are not resolved, as in 21cm intensity mapping observations. We validate our method by reconstructing mock pixelated maps, that we build from the distribution of matter and halos in real- and redshift-space, from a large set of numerical simulations. We find that our method is able to decrease ...

  3. Prediction of acoustic comfort and acoustic silence in Goan Catholic churches

    OpenAIRE

    Menino A. S. M. P. Tavares; S. Rajagopalan; Satish J. Sharma; António P. O. Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Comfort and Acoustic Silence are determinants of tranquility in a worship space. The results presented here are part of a study that investigates the behaviour of acoustically constituted worship parameters in six Catholic churches (Goa, India). Acoustic comfort is quantified through an Acoustic Comfort Impression Index which measures the net comfort induced through the optimization of the desired subjective acoustic impressions for different types of music and different music source...

  4. Chemical Absorption Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Chemical absorption materials that potentially can be used for post combustion carbon dioxide capture are discussed. They fall into five groups, alkanolamines, alkali carbonates, ammonia, amino acid salts, and ionic liquids. The chemistry of the materials is discussed and advantages and drawbacks...

  5. Absorption driven focus shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  6. ZINC ABSORPTION BY INFANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc is a vital mineral in human nutrition, and rare cases of overt zinc deficiency are well described in term and preterm infants. A variety of methods have been developed to assess zinc absorption, retention, and balance in humans, either using mass (metabolic) balance or stable isotope-based METH...

  7. HI Absorption in GPS/CSS Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Pihlström, Y M; Vermeulen, R C

    2002-01-01

    Combining our own observations with data from the literature, we consider the incidence of HI absorption in Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources. Here we present our preliminary results, where we find that the smaller GPS sources (1 kpc). Both a spherical and an axi-symmetric gas distribution, with a radial power law density profile, can be used to explain this anti-correlation between projected linear size and HI column density. Since most detections occur in galaxy classified objects, we argue that if the unified schemes apply to the GPS/CSSs, a disk distribution for the HI is more likely.

  8. Energy Absorption Capacity of Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arivalagan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Local buckling may occur in the compression flange of rectangular hollow-section beams under cyclic repeated loadingarising from earthquakes. Once a local mechanism forms, residual strength rapidly reduces within a few cycles. This is trueeven for compact sections under static bending. This paper aims to study the experimental behaviour and ultimate momentcapacity of unfilled and concrete-filled rectangular hollow sections subjected to cyclic reversible loading. Two types offiller material were used - normal mix concrete and fly ash concrete. The effect of filler materials, section slenderness, loaddeflectionresponse, moment-strain behaviour, first cycle peak load, ductility, stiffness degradation and energy absorption ofconcrete –filled RHS beams are studied.

  9. Impulse absorption by horizontal magnetic granular chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingxin Leng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The granular medium is known as a protecting material for shock mitigation. We study the impulse absorption of an alignment of magnetic spheres placed horizontally under a non-uniform magnetic field. The phenomenon of the wave dispersion is presented. This system can absorb 85% ∼ 95% (88% ∼ 98% of the incident peak force (energy under the applied magnetic field strength in 0.1 T ∼ 1.0 T. The shock attenuation capacities are enhanced by the increment of field strength. With an intelligent control system, it is conceivable that the magnetic granular chain may offer possibilities in developing adaptive shock protectors.

  10. Peak Load Electricity Production with Cryogenic Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Zumbo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Natural Gas is often liquefied (LNG for its transport by ships over long distances. In order to prepare it for further transport by pipelines it has to be reduced again to a gaseous state, normally by heating it with sea water. A similar technology is envisaged for long-distance transport of Hydrogen as an energy carrier. The scope of this article is the thermodynamic investigation of two power plants for peak load energy production. These two power plants use as fuel the fluids obtained by the re-gasification of the cryogenic fluids. The first proposal is a Hydrogen-fired steam power plant, while the second considers the use of LNG in an oxy-combustion arrangement with subsequent CO2 separation, which is obtained by a three-stage intercooled compression train. The power cycle performance was verified in both cases by exergy analysis. Since the size of these power plants is relatively small (10 MWe, they can be easily built inside the area of LNG gasifiers, or inside the area of the plant producing liquid Hydrogen; the cryogenic fuel and oxidizer are thus considered available, and the purpose of the power plant is peak load energy production rather than obtaining high values of conversion efficiency.

    • This paper is an updated version of a paper published in the ECOS'08 proceedings. 

  11. Peak heart rates at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    We have measured maximal heart rate during a graded maximal bicycle exercise test to exhaustion in five healthy climbers before and during an expedition to Mt. Everest. Maximal heart rates at sea level were 186 (177-204) beats/min(-1) at sea level and 170 (169-182) beats/min(-1) with acute hypoxia....... After 1, 4 and 6 weeks of acclimatization to 5400 m, maximal heart rates were 155 (135-182), 158 (144-182), and 155 (140-183) beats/min(-1), respectively. Heart rates of two of the climbers were measured during their attempt to reach the summit of Mt. Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen....... The peak heart rates at 8,750 m for the two climbers were 142 and 144 beats/min(-1), which were similar to their maximal heart rates during exhaustive bicycle exercise at 5,400 m, the values being 144 and 148 beats/min(-1), respectively. The peak heart rates at 8,750 m are in agreement with other field...

  12. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  13. , Recorded at Ladron Peak, Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, J. W.; Kelley, S.; Read, A. S.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Ladron Peak, situated on the western flank of the Rio Grande rift ~30 miles NW of Socorro, NM, is composed of Precambrian granitic and metamorphic assemblages that have been faulted and uplifted during the late Tertiary formation of the rift. The area is bounded on three sides by normal faults, including the anomalously low-angle (~26°) Jeter fault to the east, which places Precambrian rocks in the footwall against Paleozoic and Mesozoic fault slivers, and mainly Cenozoic Santa Fe Group basin fill in the hanging wall. New apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronological data collected at 22 locations along the NE and SE margins of Ladron Peak give a range of ages from 10.9 ± 1.9 to 20.4 ± 8.6 Ma. Samples within the footwall include granitic and metasedimentary rocks that have mean track lengths of 13.1 to 14.1 μm; one quartzite sample has a mean track length of 12.5 μm, suggesting time in the partial annealing zone. Within the hanging wall block, new AFT ages from the Permian Bursum and Abo Formations give cooling ages of 23.1 ± 3.3 Ma. and 59.9 ± 12.4 Ma., respectively. The Bursum Formation sample, with a track length of 13.7 μm, cooled below the 110°C isotherm during the Miocene, while the Abo Formation sample, with a track length of 11.2 μm, was only partially reset prior to rift-related deformation. Mylonitized granitic and metamorphic rocks in the immediate footwall preserve dip-slip lineations that are parallel to slip on the Jeter fault. This suggests that strain associated with exhumation was recorded by both brittle and ductile deformation. Although this type of deformation is common within metamorphic core complexes in highly extended terranes, ductile normal faulting has not been recognized within the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico, though there is some suggestion of ductile deformation around Blanca Peak in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. These observations imply one or both of the following: (1) Ductile deformation at Ladron Peak was

  14. Exposure to seismic survey alters blue whale acoustic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Lucia; Clark, Christopher W

    2010-02-23

    The ability to perceive biologically important sounds is critical to marine mammals, and acoustic disturbance through human-generated noise can interfere with their natural functions. Sounds from seismic surveys are intense and have peak frequency bands overlapping those used by baleen whales, but evidence of interference with baleen whale acoustic communication is sparse. Here we investigated whether blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) changed their vocal behaviour during a seismic survey that deployed a low-medium power technology (sparker). We found that blue whales called consistently more on seismic exploration days than on non-exploration days as well as during periods within a seismic survey day when the sparker was operating. This increase was observed for the discrete, audible calls that are emitted during social encounters and feeding. This response presumably represents a compensatory behaviour to the elevated ambient noise from seismic survey operations. PMID:19776059

  15. Development of Adaptive Acoustic Impedance Control Technologies of Acoustic Duct Liner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kobayashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of adaptive acoustic impedance control (AAC technologies to achieve a larger fan noise reduction, by adaptively adjusting reactance and resistance of the acoustic liner impedance. For the actual proof of the AAC technology III performance, the advanced fan noise absorption control duct liner II was made on trial basis, with the simple control system and the plain device. And, then, the duct liner II was examined for the AAC technology I, II, and III models, using the high speed fan test facility. The test results made clear that the duct liner II of the AAC technology III model could achieve the fan noise reduction higher than O.A. SPL 10 dB (A at the maximum fan speed 6000 rpm, containing the reduction of fundamental BPF tone of 18 dB and 2nd BPF tone of 10 dB in response to the fan peed change from 3000 to 6000 rpm.

  16. Frequency-Modulated Magneto-Acoustic Detection and Imaging: Challenges, Experimental Procedures, and B-Scan Images

    CERN Document Server

    Aliroteh, Miaad S; Arbabian, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Magneto-acoustic tomography combines near-field radio-frequency (RF) and ultrasound with the aim of creating a safe, high resolution, high contrast hybrid imaging technique. We present continuous-wave magneto-acoustic imaging techniques, which improve SNR and/or reduce the required peak-to-average excitation power ratio, to make further integration and larger fields of view feasible. This method relies on the coherency between RF excitation and the resulting ultrasound generated through Lorentz force interactions, which was confirmed by our previous work. We provide detailed methodology, clarify the details of experiments, and explain how the presence of magneto-acoustic phenomenon was verified. An example magneto-acoustic B-scan image is acquired in order to illustrate the capability of magneto-acoustic tomography in highlighting boundaries where electrical conductivity alters, such as between different tissues.

  17. Simple model of photo acoustic system for greenhouse effect

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuhara, Akiko; Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Ogawa, Naohisa

    2010-01-01

    The green house effect is caused by the gases which absorb infrared ray (IR) emitted by the earth. It is worthwhile if we can adjudicate on which gas causes the greenhouse effect in our class. For this purpose, one of our authors, Kaneko has designed an educational tool for testing greenhouse effect \\cite{Kaneko}. This system (hereafter abbreviated PAS) is constructed based on photo acoustic effect. Without difficulty and high cost, we can build PAS and check the IR absorption of gas. In this...

  18. Dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves: an asymptotic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere and long-range propagation of infrasound are strongly affected by air viscosity and thermal conductivity. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider idealized environments, which admit plane-wave solutions. Here, an asymptotic approach is developed that relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. It is found that realistic assumptions about the atmosphere lead to rather different predictions for wave damping than do the plane-wave solutions. A modification to the Sutherland-Bass model of infrasound absorption is proposed. PMID:25480091

  19. Acoustic Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, William M.; Candy, James V.

    Signal processing refers to the acquisition, storage, display, and generation of signals - also to the extraction of information from signals and the re-encoding of information. As such, signal processing in some form is an essential element in the practice of all aspects of acoustics. Signal processing algorithms enable acousticians to separate signals from noise, to perform automatic speech recognition, or to compress information for more efficient storage or transmission. Signal processing concepts are the building blocks used to construct models of speech and hearing. Now, in the 21st century, all signal processing is effectively digital signal processing. Widespread access to high-speed processing, massive memory, and inexpensive software make signal processing procedures of enormous sophistication and power available to anyone who wants to use them. Because advanced signal processing is now accessible to everybody, there is a need for primers that introduce basic mathematical concepts that underlie the digital algorithms. The present handbook chapter is intended to serve such a purpose.

  20. Acoustics of the Intonarumori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2005-04-01

    The Intonarumori were a family of musical instruments invented by the Italian futurist composer and painter Luigi Russolo. Each Intonarumori was made of a wooden parallelepiped sound box, inside which a wheel of different sizes and materials was setting into vibration a catgut or metal string. The pitch of the string was varied by using a lever, while the speed of the wheel was controlled by the performer using a crank. At one end of the string there was a drumhead that transmitted vibrations to the speaker. Unfortunately, all the original Intonarumori were destroyed after a fire during World War II. Since then, researchers have tried to understand the sound production mechanism of such instruments, especially by consulting the patents compiled by Russolo or by reading his book ``The art of noise.'' In this paper we describe the acoustics of the Intonarumori. Based on such description, we propose physical models that simulate such instruments. The intonarumori's string is modeled using a one dimensional waveguide, which is excited either by an impact or a friction model. The body of the instrument is modeled using a 3-D rectangular mesh, while the horn is considered as an omnidirectional radiator.