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Sample records for acinar cells implication

  1. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Li; Qiang Li

    2008-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor which is defined as a carcinoma that exhibits pancreatic enzyme production by neoplastic cells. This review includes re-cent developments in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of ACC, imaging and pathological diagnosis and ap-proaches to treatment with reference to the literature.

  2. Papillocystic Variant of Acinar Cell Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Radhi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar cell pancreatic carcinoma is a rare solid malignant neoplasm. Recent review of the literature showed occasional cases with papillary or papillocystic growth patterns, ranging from 2 to 5 cm in diameter. We report a large 10 cm pancreatic tumor with papillocystic pathology features involving the pancreatic head. The growth pattern of these tumors could be mistaken for intraductal papillary mucinous tumors or other pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  3. Inflammatory role of the acinar cells during acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Isabel; De; Dios

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are secretory cells whose main function is to synthesize, store and f inally release digestive enzymes into the duodenum. However, in response to noxious stimuli, acinar cells behave like real inflammatory cells because of their ability to activate signalling transduction pathways involved in the expression of inflammatory mediators. Mediated by the kinase cascade, activation of Nuclear factor-κB, Activating factor-1 and Signal transducers and activators of transcription transcription factors has been demonstrated in acinar cells, resulting in overexpression of inflammatory genes. In turn, kinase activity is down-regulated by protein phosphatases and the f inal balance between kinase and phosphatase activity will determine the capability of the acinar cells to produce inflammatory factors. The kinase/ phosphatase pair is a redox-sensitive system in which kinase activation overwhelms phosphatase activity under oxidant conditions. Thus, the oxidative stress developed within acinar cells at early stages of acute pancreatitis triggers the activation of signalling pathways involved in the up-regulation of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In this way, acinar cells trigger the release of the f irst inflammatory signals which can mediate the activation and recruitment of circulating inflammatorycells into the injured pancreas. Accordingly, the role of acinar cells as promoters of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis may be considered. This concept leads to amplifying the focus from leukocyte to acinar cells themselves, to explain the local inflammation in early pancreatitis.

  4. Acinar Cell Cyst adenoma (Acinar Cystic Transformation) of the Pancreas: the Radiologic-Pathologic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumus, Mehmet; Algin, Oktay; Gundogdu, Haldun [Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Ugras, Serdar [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Medical Faculty, Konya (Turkmenistan)

    2011-02-15

    Acinar cystic transformation of the pancreas is also known as acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC), and this is an extremely rare benign lesion that was first described in April 2002. We report here on a case of a previously asymptomatic patient with pancreatic ACC and this was diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the CT or MRI features of ACC in the medical literature. We present here the CT, MRI and pathological findings of pancreatic ACC

  5. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A; Washburn, William K; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  6. Nitric oxide-induced signalling in rat lacrimal acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia Karen; Tritsaris, K.; Dissing, S.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological role of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating secretory processes in rat lacrimal acinar cells. In addition, we wanted to determine whether the acinar cells possess endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring NO productio...... not by itself causing fast transient increases in [Ca2+]i. In addition, we suggest that endogenously produced NO activated by ß-adrenergic receptor stimulation, plays an important role in signalling to the surrounding tissue.......The aim of the present study was to investigate the physiological role of nitric oxide (NO) in mediating secretory processes in rat lacrimal acinar cells. In addition, we wanted to determine whether the acinar cells possess endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity by measuring NO production......-adrenergic stimulation and not by a rise in [Ca2+]i alone.   We show that in rat lacrimal acinar cells, NO and cGMP induce Ca2+ release from intracellular stores via G kinase activation. However, the changes in [Ca2+]i are relatively small, suggesting that this pathway plays a modulatory role in Ca2+ signalling, thus...

  7. Ca2+ signaling in pancreatic acinar cells: physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Petersen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic acinar cell is a classical model for studies of secretion and signal transduction mechanisms. Because of the extensive endoplasmic reticulum and the large granular compartment, it has been possible - by direct measurements - to obtain considerable insights into intracellular Ca2+ handling under both normal and pathological conditions. Recent studies have also revealed important characteristics of stimulus-secretion coupling mechanisms in isolated human pancreatic acinar cells. The acinar cells are potentially dangerous because of the high intra-granular concentration of proteases, which become inappropriately activated in the human disease acute pancreatitis. This disease is due to toxic Ca2+ signals generated by excessive liberation of Ca2+ from both the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory granules.

  8. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands. PMID:27445812

  9. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p < 0.05). Midazolam administered with pilocarpine (MP60) induced an increase in the proliferation of acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands.

  10. File list: DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pancreas Pancreatic acinar c...ells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic acina...r cells SRX327163,SRX327162,SRX327160,SRX327161 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 TFs and others Pancreas Pancreatic aci...nar cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 All antigens Pancreas Pancreatic acina...r cells SRX327161,SRX327160,SRX327162,SRX327163 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pancreas Pancreatic aci...nar cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pancreas Pancreatic aci...nar cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  16. Salivary gland homeostasis is maintained through acinar cell self-duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aure, Marit H; Konieczny, Stephen F; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2015-04-20

    Current dogma suggests that salivary gland homeostasis is stem cell dependent. However, the extent of stem cell contribution to salivary gland maintenance has not been determined. We investigated acinar cell replacement during homeostasis, growth, and regeneration, using an inducible CreER(T2) expressed under the control of the Mist1 gene locus. Genetic labeling, followed by a chase period, showed that acinar cell replacement is not driven by the differentiation of unlabeled stem cells. Analysis using R26(Brainbow2.1) reporter revealed continued proliferation and clonal expansion of terminally differentiated acinar cells in all major salivary glands. Induced injury also demonstrated the regenerative potential of pre-labeled acinar cells. Our results support a revised model for salivary gland homeostasis based predominantly on self-duplication of acinar cells, rather than on differentiation of stem cells. The proliferative capacity of differentiated acinar cells may prove critical in the implementation of cell-based strategies to restore the salivary glands.

  17. Adrenoceptor-activated nitric oxide synthesis in salivary acinar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Dagnia; Dissing, Steen; Tritsaris, Katerina;

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the cellular regulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in isolated acinar cells from rat parotid and human labial salivary glands, using the newly developed fluorescent nitric oxide (NO) indicator, DAF-2. We found that sympathetic stimulation with norepinephrine (NE) caused...... a strong increase in NO synthesis that was not seen after parasympathetic stimulation with acetylcholine. In rat parotid acinar cells, we furthermore investigated to which extent the NOS activity was dependent on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by simultaneously measuring NO synthesis...... not cause significant NO synthesis. We furthermore found that activating adrenoceptors with NE causes synthesis of cGMP by activating a guanylyl cyclase, and that an enhanced [cGMP] evoked by use of caged cGMP causes Ca2+ release from internal stores. Thus, upon sympathetic stimulation, salivary gland acini...

  18. Ultrastructural morphometry of parotid acinar cells following fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grehn, A.-L.; Gustafsson, H.; Franzen, L.; Thornell, L.-E.; Henriksson, R. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden)

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects on the ultrastructure of parotid glands after fractionated irradiation. The method implemented involved 5 x 6 Gy and 5 x 8 Gy, Monday to Friday 6 MV photons. By unilateral irradiation, the contralateral parotid gland served as a control. Although irradiation diminished the acinar cell density in light microscopic sections from 75 to 32% after 5 x 8 Gy of irradiation, ultrastructural morphometry could not detect any statistically significant differences in acinar cell size, nuclear size, nuclear density, granule area, mean granule size, or granule density. In general, greater differences were seen between rats receiving 30 or 40 Gy, on both the irradiated and the control side, than between the irradiated side and the control side. This was interpreted as due to differences in the nutritional state of the animals. This analysis concluded that individual acinar cells that survive irradiation seem not to be damaged in the long term when evaluated at the ultrastructural level. The study further stresses the importance of adequate sampling sizes and the use of adequate controls. (author).

  19. Nicotine as a mitogenic stimulus for pancreatic acinar cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parimal Chowdhury; Kodetthoor B Udupa

    2006-01-01

    Cell proliferation is an important process in life for growth of normal and cancer cells. The signal transduction pathways activated during this process are strictly regulated. This editorial focuses on the role of nicotine,a mitogen, in the induction of signaling pathways resulting in proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells and compares these events with those in normal acinar cells isolated from the rat pancreas. The data shows striking similarities between these two cellular systems.In addition, the editorial reviews very recent literature of the contribution of MAPK signaling in cell lines associated with human diseases. A prospective cellular model of nicotine induced activation of MAPK cascade is presented.

  20. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Raimondo M; Krishna M; Nguyen J; Scolapio J; Aqel B

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors pre...

  1. Recurrent Pancreatitis Due to a Cystic Pancreatic Tumor: A Rare Presentation of Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondo M

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acinar cell carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy of the pancreas. It has characteristic histomorphology, immunohistochemistry profile, and clinicopathological behavior. CASE REPORT: We report a rare case of recurrent pancreatitis secondary to acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas. We describe the endoscopic ultrasound characteristic, treatment and the surgical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Acinar cell carcinoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic tumors presenting with recurrent pancreatitis.

  2. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of 125I-[Tyr11]Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 ± 20 fmol/106 cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking 125I-[Tyr11]somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein Ni to inhibit adenylate cyclase

  3. Pancreatic acinar cells: molecular insight from studies of signal-transduction using transgenic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, David I

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are classical exocrine gland cells. The apical regions of clusters of coupled acinar cells collectively form a lumen which constitutes the blind end of a tube created by ductal cells - a structure reminiscent of a "bunch of grapes". When activated by neural or hormonal secretagogues, pancreatic acinar cells are stimulated to secrete a variety of proteins. These proteins are predominately inactive digestive enzyme precursors called "zymogens". Acinar cell secretion is absolutely dependent on secretagogue-induced increases in intracellular free Ca(2+). The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) has precise temporal and spatial characteristics as a result of the exquisite regulation of the proteins responsible for Ca(2+) release, Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) clearance in the acinar cell. This brief review discusses recent studies in which transgenic animal models have been utilized to define in molecular detail the components of the Ca(2+) signaling machinery which contribute to these characteristics.

  4. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Colon Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Asayama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas with colon involvement that was difficult to distinguish from primary colon cancer. A 60-year-old man was admitted with a 1-month history of diarrhea. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT revealed a large tumor (10.6×11.6 cm at the splenic flexure of the colon. Colonoscopy showed completely round ulcerative lesions, and biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Left hemicolectomy, resection of the jejunum and pancreas body and tail, and splenectomy were performed based on a diagnosis of descending colon cancer (cT4N0M0, stage IIB, and surgery was considered to be curative. Diagnosis was subsequently confirmed as moderately differentiated acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas by immunohistochemical staining (pT3N0M0, stage IIA. Multiple liver metastases with portal thrombosis were found 8 weeks postoperatively. Despite combination chemotherapy with oral S-1 and gemcitabine, the patient died of hepatic failure with no effect of chemotherapy 14 weeks postoperatively. Correct diagnosis was difficult to determine preoperatively from the clinical, CT, and colonoscopy findings. Moreover, the disease was extremely aggressive even after curative resection. Physicians should consider pancreatic cancer in the differential diagnosis of similar cases.

  5. File list: NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 No description Pancreas Pancreatic aci...nar cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Pan.20.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 Input control Pancreas Pancreatic acin...ar cells SRX327162,SRX327163 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.10.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells mm9 Input control Pancreas Pancreatic acin...ar cells SRX327162,SRX327163 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Pan.50.AllAg.Pancreatic_acinar_cells.bed ...

  8. Effects of hypothyroidism on the ultrastructure of rat pancreatic acinar cells: a stereological analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Molina, A.; González-Reyes, J. A.; Torre-Cisneros, J; López-Miranda, J.; Nicolás, M.; Pérez-Jiménez, F.

    1991-01-01

    The morphological and stereological characteristics of the exocrine pancreas subcellular organelles from healthy and thyroidectomized rats have been studied. The acinar tissue from hypothyroid rats showed an interstitial edema and evidence of degenerative processes. Stereological parameters of zymogen granules were significantly reduced in thyroidectomized rats. The hypothyroidism induced degenerative changes in the pancreatic acinar cells as well as a decr...

  9. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27290644

  10. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: A Possible Role of S-1 as Chemotherapy for Acinar Cell Carcinoma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tameyoshi Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignancy, accounting for 1-2% of pancreatic exocrine malignancies. This rarity makes it difficult to standardize a protocol of treatment for acinar cell carcinoma. Case report A 71-year-old male without any particular past history was referred to our institute with abdominal distention and mild liver dysfunction. Computed tomography (CT revealed a cystic lesion with a diameter of 3.5 cm, which originated from the neck of pancreas and had solid nodules inside. Several nodules were demonstrated surrounding the cystic tumor. Laparotomy and histological study demonstrated peritoneal dissemination of acinar cell carcinoma. The patient was treated with S-1 monotherapy (80 mg/m2 for four weeks with a two-week interval as one cycle. After one cycle of S-1 monotherapy, CT demonstrated remarkable shrinkage of the main tumor and disappearance of the nodules on the peritoneum. The patient underwent a radical distal pancreatectomy. The patient was then treated with 16 cycles of S-1 monotherapy after the radical pancreatectomy and remains without any recurrence of the disease two years later. Conclusion Initially inoperable acinar cell carcinoma was treated by monotherapy using S-1, resulting in curative operation and two years disease free survival post operation. S-1 might be more effective on acinar cell carcinoma, rather than gemcitabine

  11. Ascl3 expression marks a progenitor population of both acinar and ductal cells in mouse salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Tara; Koek, Laurie; Roztocil, Elisa; Kingsley, Paul D; Mirels, Lily; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2008-08-01

    Ascl3, also know as Sgn1, is a member of the mammalian achaete scute (Mash) gene family of transcription factors, which have been implicated in cell fate specification and differentiation. In the mouse salivary gland, expression of Ascl3 is restricted to a subset of duct cells. Salivary gland function depends on the secretory acinar cells, which are responsible for saliva formation, and duct cells, which modify the saliva and conduct it to the oral cavity. The salivary gland ducts are also the putative site of progenitor cells in the adult gland. Using a Cre recombinase-mediated reporter system, we followed the fate of Ascl3-expressing cells after the introduction of an EGFP-Cre expression cassette into the Ascl3 locus by homologous recombination. Lineage tracing shows that these cells are progenitors of both acinar and ductal cell types in all three major salivary glands. In the differentiated progeny, expression of Ascl3 is down-regulated. These data directly demonstrate a progenitor-progeny relationship between duct cells and the acinar cell compartment, and identify a population of multipotent progenitor cells, marked by expression of Ascl3, which is capable of generating both gland cell types. We conclude that Ascl3-expressing cells contribute to the maintenance of the adult salivary glands.

  12. Regeneration of parotid acinar cells after high radiation doses. A morphological study in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, H. [Depts. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Histology and Cell Biology, Umeaa Univ. (Sweden); Franzen, L. [Dept. of Oncology, Umeaa Univ. (Sweden); Henriksson, R. [Dept. of Oncology, Umeaa Univ. (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    The acute and late effects of fractionated irradiation on rat parotid gland acinar cells were studied by light and electron microscopy. At 10 days after the last irradiation session (6 Gy or 9 Gy daily during five consecutive days) no effects were seen. At 180 days, minor loss of acini was detectable after a total dose of 30 Gy. After 45 Gy a massive acinar loss was seen at that time; the number of acini had diminished and minor duct-like structures and scattered amounts of fibrous stroma dominated the slides. The remaining acini were disorganized and usually larger compared with the control side and to non-irradiated animals. The acinar cells appeared larger than in the controls. The custs were better preserved but the intercalated ducts often seemed to be larger than normal. We suggest that this phenomenon indicates a remaining capacity of the parotid gland to regenerate acinar cells even after high radiation doses. (orig.).

  13. Formation of salivary acinar cell spheroids in vitro above a polyvinyl alcohol-coated surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Huey; Chen, Yi-Jane; Liao, Chih-Chen; Chan, Yen-Hui; Lin, Chia-Yung; Chen, Rung-Shu; Young, Tai-Hong

    2009-09-15

    Tissue engineering of salivary glands offers the potential for future use in the treatment of patients with salivary hypofunction. Biocompatible materials that promote acinar cell aggregation and function in vitro are an essential part of salivary gland tissue engineering. In this study, rat parotid acinar cells assembled into three-dimensional aggregates above the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-coated surface. These aggregates developed compact acinar cell spheroids resembling in vivo physiological condition, which were different from the traditional monolayered morphology in vitro. Cells remained viable and with better functional activity in response to acetylcholine in the spheroids and could form monolayered acinar cells when they were reinoculated on tissue culture polystyrene wells. To interpret the phenomenon further, we proposed that the formation of acinar cell spheroids on the PVA is mediated by a balance between two competing forces: the interactions of cell-PVA and cell-cell. This study demonstrated the formation of functional cell spheroids above a PVA-coated surface may provide an in vitro system for investigating cell behaviors for tissue engineering of artificial salivary gland.

  14. Analysis and Optimization of Nutritional Set-up for Murine Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurup S

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pancreatic acinar cell cultivation poses a serious problem due to limitations in the in vitro survival time despite variations of dissociation protocols, culture media and nutrient supplements. OBJECTIVE: To establish a long term culture of murine pancreatic acinar cells which retain their viability, monolayer formation and responsiveness to secretagogues. In order to investigate the mechanism of the short-life of acinar cells studied in vitro, we studied their survival under the influence of different supplements on nutrient media. INTERVENTIONS: Dissociated pancreatic acini were prepared from BALB/c mice pancreata by collagenase digestion supplemented with bovine serum albumin fraction V and soybean trypsin inhibitor. A nutrient set-up was designed for their long term survival in vitro. RESULTS: It was observed that mouse pancreatic acinar cells dissociated in presence of bovine serum albumin fraction V and soybean trypsin inhibitor result in 95% viability. Further cultivation of these acinar cells in Waymouth's MB 752/1 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (v/v, soybean trypsin inhibitor, bovine serum albumin, dexamethasone, and epidermal growth factor results in their survival for more than 6 days in culture with 85% viability, retention of the secretagogue responsiveness and formation of a monolayer without any extracellular matrix coating. CONCLUSIONS: Our study clearly demonstrates that the addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor to culture medium reduces zymogen granule fragility and acinar cell death, thus increasing their viability for sufficiently long periods. The present study offers an excellent, in vitro model for the investigation of exocrine dysfunction in response to acinar cell injury.

  15. A computer-based automated algorithm for assessing acinar cell loss after experimental pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Eisses

    Full Text Available The change in exocrine mass is an important parameter to follow in experimental models of pancreatic injury and regeneration. However, at present, the quantitative assessment of exocrine content by histology is tedious and operator-dependent, requiring manual assessment of acinar area on serial pancreatic sections. In this study, we utilized a novel computer-generated learning algorithm to construct an accurate and rapid method of quantifying acinar content. The algorithm works by learning differences in pixel characteristics from input examples provided by human experts. HE-stained pancreatic sections were obtained in mice recovering from a 2-day, hourly caerulein hyperstimulation model of experimental pancreatitis. For training data, a pathologist carefully outlined discrete regions of acinar and non-acinar tissue in 21 sections at various stages of pancreatic injury and recovery (termed the "ground truth". After the expert defined the ground truth, the computer was able to develop a prediction rule that was then applied to a unique set of high-resolution images in order to validate the process. For baseline, non-injured pancreatic sections, the software demonstrated close agreement with the ground truth in identifying baseline acinar tissue area with only a difference of 1% ± 0.05% (p = 0.21. Within regions of injured tissue, the software reported a difference of 2.5% ± 0.04% in acinar area compared with the pathologist (p = 0.47. Surprisingly, on detailed morphological examination, the discrepancy was primarily because the software outlined acini and excluded inter-acinar and luminal white space with greater precision. The findings suggest that the software will be of great potential benefit to both clinicians and researchers in quantifying pancreatic acinar cell flux in the injured and recovering pancreas.

  16. THE CHANGES OF PANCREATIC ACINAR CELL FUNCTION IN ACUTE NECROTIZING PANCREATITIS OF RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余枭; 韩天权; 汤耀卿; 雷若庆; 夏宗勤

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the changes of pancreatic acinar cell functions in the rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). Methods Seventy SD rats were randomized into two groups: experimental group (n=35) and control group (n=35). To prepare the experimental model, the retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct was used for inducing ANP. Radioactive tracing by L- 3H-phenylalanine and autoradiography were performed for scoring the differences of changes of amino acid uptake, enzyme-protein synthesis and output from acinar cells in rats between both groups. Results No changes were observed in amino acid uptake and enzyme-protein synthesis in rats with dotted and haemorrhagic necrotizing foci as compared with control group. However, accumulated zymogen granules in the interstitial of acinar cells were seen in the experimental group. Conclusion It indicates that in experimental ANP rats, the functions of acinar cells in both amino acid uptake and protein synthesis were essentially normal, but the pathway of enzyme output was affected into ectopic secretion through the bottom or lateral cellular membrane of pancreatic acinar cell.

  17. Alteration of chaperonin60 and pancreatic enzyme in pancreatic acinar cell under pathological condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Yu Li; Moise Bendayan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changes of chaperonin60 (Cpn60)and pancreatic enzymes in pancreatic acinar cells, and to explore their roles in the development of experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: Two different pathological models were replicated in Sprague-Dawley rats: streptozotocininduced diabetes and sodium deoxycholate-induced AP. The contents of Cpn60 and pancreatic enzymes in different compartments of the acinar cells were measured by quantitative immunocytochemistry.RESULTS: The levels of Cpn60 significantly increased in diabetes, but decreased in AP, especially in the zymogen granules of the pancreatic acinar cells. The elevation of Cpn60 was accompanied with the increased levels of pancreatic lipase and chymotrypsinogen in diabetes.However, a decreased Cpn60 level was accompanied by high levels of lipase and chymotrypsinogen in AP.The amylase level was markedly reduced in both the pathological conditions.CONCLUSION: The equilibrium between Cpn60 and pancreatic enzymes in the acinar cells breaks in AP, and Cpn60 content decreases, suggesting an insufficient chaperone capacity. This may promote the aggregation and autoactivation of the premature enzymes in the pancreatic acinar cells and play roles in the development of AP.

  18. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ge [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wan, Rong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Hu, Yanling [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ni, Jianbo [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Tang, Maochun [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Congying [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wang, Xingpeng, E-mail: wangxingpeng@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  19. Effect of Taurine on Acinar Cell Apoptosis and Pancreatic Fibrosis in Dibutyltin Dichloride-induced Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa,Kiminari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells has not been fully elucidated. We reported that taurine had an anti-fibrotic effect in a dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC-chronic pancreatitis model. However, the effect of taurine on apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells is still unclear. Therefore, we examined apoptosis in DBTC-chronic pancreatitis and in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line with/without taurine. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced by a single administration of DBTC. Rats were fed a taurine-containing diet or a normal diet and were sacrificed at day 5. The AR42J pancreatic acinar cell line was incubated with/without DBTC with taurine chloramines. Apoptosis was determined by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of Bad and Bcl-2 proteins in the AR42J cells lysates was detected by Western blot analysis. The apoptotic index of pancreatic acinar cells in DBTC-administered rats was significantly increased. Taurine treatment inhibited pancreatic fibrosis and apoptosis of acinar cells induced by DBTC. The number of TUNEL-positive cells in the AR42J pancreatic acinar cell lines was significantly increased by the addition of DBTC. Incubation with taurine chloramines ameliorated these changes. In conclusion, taurine inhibits apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells and pancreatitis in experimental chronic pancreatitis.

  20. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway

  1. Protein kinase D1 drives pancreatic acinar cell reprogramming and progression to intraepithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Geou-Yarh; Döppler, Heike; Braun, Ursula B.; Panayiotou, Richard; Scotti Buzhardt, Michele; Radisky, Derek C.; Crawford, Howard C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.; Wang, Q. Jane; Leitges, Michael; Storz, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The transdifferentiation of pancreatic acinar cells to a ductal phenotype (acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, ADM) occurs after injury or inflammation of the pancreas and is a reversible process. However, in the presence of activating Kras mutations or persistent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signalling, cells that underwent ADM can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually pancreatic cancer. In transgenic animal models, ADM and PanINs are initiated by high-affinity ligands for EGF-R or activating Kras mutations, but the underlying signalling mechanisms are not well understood. Here, using a conditional knockout approach, we show that protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is sufficient to drive the reprogramming process to a ductal phenotype and progression to PanINs. Moreover, using 3D explant culture of primary pancreatic acinar cells, we show that PKD1 acts downstream of TGFα and Kras, to mediate formation of ductal structures through activation of the Notch pathway.

  2. A Patient of Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma with Dilated Esophagogastric Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakuni Fujii

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Left portal hypertension and splenic vein occlusion commonly occur with pancreatic tumors, however these signs are rarely observed in patients with acinar cell carcinoma. This report describes a rare left portal hypertension in a patient who presented with a dilated esophagogastric vein upon esophagogastroduodenoscopic examination of a gastric polyp. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed a pancreatic tumor, with obstruction of the splenic vein and portal-systemic shunt. The patient was diagnosed with an acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreatic tail. This patient highlights that pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with a dilated esophagogastric vein and without signs of liver disease.

  3. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  4. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  5. Acinar cell apoptosis in Serpini2-deficient mice models pancreatic insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie K Loftus

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic insufficiency (PI when left untreated results in a state of malnutrition due to an inability to absorb nutrients. Frequently, PI is diagnosed as part of a larger clinical presentation in cystic fibrosis or Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. In this study, a mouse model for isolated exocrine PI was identified in a mouse line generated by a transgene insertion. The trait is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and homozygous animals are growth retarded, have abnormal immunity, and have reduced life span. Mice with the disease locus, named pequeño (pq, exhibit progressive apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells with severe exocrine acinar cell loss by 8 wk of age, while the islets and ductal tissue persist. The mutation in pq/pq mice results from a random transgene insertion. Molecular characterization of the transgene insertion site by fluorescent in situ hybridization and genomic deletion mapping identified an approximately 210-kb deletion on Chromosome 3, deleting two genes. One of these genes, Serpini2, encodes a protein that is a member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Reintroduction of only the Serpini2 gene by bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic complementation corrected the acinar cell defect as well as body weight and immune phenotypes, showing that deletion of Serpini2 causes the pequeño phenotype. Dietary supplementation of pancreatic enzymes also corrected body size, body weight, and immunodeficiency, and increased the life span of Serpini2-deficient mice, despite continued acinar cell loss. To our knowledge, this study describes the first characterized genetic animal model for isolated PI. Genetic complementation of the transgene insertion mutant demonstrates that Serpini2 deficiency directly results in the acinar cell apoptosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition observed in pq/pq mice. The rescue of growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and mortality by either Serpini2 bacterial artificial chromosome

  6. Acinar Cell Apoptosis in Serpini2-DeficientMice Models Pancreatic Insufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic insufficiency (PI when left untreated results in a state of malnutrition due to an inability to absorb nutrients. Frequently, PI is diagnosed as part of a larger clinical presentation in cystic fibrosis or Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. In this study, a mouse model for isolated exocrine PI was identified in a mouse line generated by a transgene insertion. The trait is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and homozygous animals are growth retarded, have abnormal immunity, and have reduced life span. Mice with the disease locus, named pequeño (pq, exhibit progressive apoptosis of pancreatic acinar cells with severe exocrine acinar cell loss by 8 wk of age, while the islets and ductal tissue persist. The mutation in pq/pq mice results from a random transgene insertion. Molecular characterization of the transgene insertion site by fluorescent in situ hybridization and genomic deletion mapping identified an approximately 210-kb deletion on Chromosome 3, deleting two genes. One of these genes, Serpini2, encodes a protein that is a member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. Reintroduction of only the Serpini2 gene by bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic complementation corrected the acinar cell defect as well as body weight and immune phenotypes, showing that deletion of Serpini2 causes the pequeño phenotype. Dietary supplementation of pancreatic enzymes also corrected body size, body weight, and immunodeficiency, and increased the life span of Serpini2-deficient mice, despite continued acinar cell loss. To our knowledge, this study describes the first characterized genetic animal model for isolated PI. Genetic complementation of the transgene insertion mutant demonstrates that Serpini2 deficiency directly results in the acinar cell apoptosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition observed in pq/pq mice. The rescue of growth retardation, immunodeficiency, and mortality by either Serpini2 bacterial artificial chromosome

  7. Transdifferentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into acinar cells using a double-chamber system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gui-Lin; Zhang, Ni-Ni; Wang, Jun-Sheng; Yao, Li; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Wang, Yu-Ying

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the transdifferentiation of stem cells from human amnion tissue into functional acinar cells (ACs) using a co-culture system. Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) were isolated from amnion tissue by mechanical mincing and enzymatic digestion. After primary culture, the phenotype of the cells was identified by flow cytometry (FCM) and immunocytochemical staining. hAECs were co-cultured with submandibular gland acinar cells of SD rats using a double-chamber system. The expression of α-amylase was determined by immunocytochemical method and fluorescent real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) after induction for 1 and 2 weeks, respectively. Digestion with trypsin is an effective method for isolating hAECs from amnion tissue. These cells were positive for CD29 and CK19 and weakly positive for CD44 and α-amylase. Within 2 weeks, α-amylase in hAECs increased with induction time. The expression of α-amylase in hAECs was increased 3.38-fold after co-culturing for 1 week. This ratio increased to 6.6-fold, and these cells were positive for mucins, after co-culturing for 2 weeks. hAECs possess the potential to differentiate into ACs in vitro. They might be a stem cell resource for clinical applications of cell replacement therapy in salivary gland dysfunction diseases. PMID:22800093

  8. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  9. Epiregulin is critical for the acinar cell regeneration of the submandibular gland in a mouse duct ligation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Koichi; Arai, Hideo; Okudera, Michisato; Yamamura, Takashi; Oki, Hidero; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2014-05-01

    Acinar cell regeneration from tubular structures has been reported to occur in duct-deligated salivary glands. However, the detailed process of acinar cell regeneration has not been clarified. We have developed a mouse duct ligation model to clarify the mechanisms underlying acinar cell regeneration, and we analyzed the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands using the model. We studied these ligands expressions in the course of acinar cell regeneration using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR methods. In the duct-ligated portion of the submandibular gland (SMG) that underwent atrophy, newly formed acinar cells were observed arising from the tubular structures after the release of the duct obstruction. The constitutive expression of EGFR was observed by immunohistochemistry in both the duct-ligated and duct-deligated animals as well as in normal controls. The EGFR phosphorylation detected on the tubular structures after duct ligation paralleled the acinar cell regeneration. RT-PCR showed an increase in the epiregulin and heparin-binding EGF levels from day 0 to day 3 after the release of the duct obstruction. The EGF level was increased only after day 7. In vitro, cultured cells isolated from ligated SMGs proliferated and produced EGF ligands following the addition of epiregulin to the culture medium. These findings suggest that the tubular structures localized in an atrophic gland are the source of acinar cell regeneration of the salivary gland. The induction of EGF ligands, in particular epiregulin, may play an important role in acinar cell regeneration in this model.

  10. Analysis of changes in the expression pattern of claudins using salivary acinar cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko

    2011-01-01

    Primary saliva is produced from blood plasma in the acini of salivary glands and is modified by ion adsorption and secretion as the saliva passes through the ducts. In rodents, acinar cells of salivary glands express claudin-3 but not claudin-4, whereas duct cells express both claudins-3 and -4. The distinct claudin expression patterns may reflect differences in the permeability of tight junctions between acinar and duct cells. To analyze the role of claudins in salivary glands, we established a system for the primary culture of parotid acinar cells, where the expression patterns of claudins are remarkably changed. Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses reveal that the expression levels of claudins-4 and -6 increased, whereas claudins-3 and -10 decreased. We found that the signal to induce those changes is triggered during cell isolation and is mediated by Src and p38 MAP kinase. Here, we introduce the methods used to determine the signal pathway that induces the change in claudin expression.

  11. Different cell death modes of pancreatic acinar cells on macrophage activation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Tao; LIU Tie-fu; XUE Dong-bo; SUN Bei; SHI Li-jun

    2008-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis is complex and largely unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between modes of cell death in pancreatic acinar cells, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory response of macrophagas.Methods Our experiment included four groups: group A (the control group), group B (AR42J cells overstimulated by caerulein), group C (AR42J cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and caerulein), and group D (AR42J cells treated with octreotide and caerulein). Apoptosis and oncosis, and the release of amylase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from AR42J cells were detected. Rat macrophages were stimulated by 1 ml supematant of culture medium of AR42J cells.Finally, NF-кB activation and TNF-α and IL-1β secretion by macrophages were detected.Results Oncotlc cells in group C increased while apoptctic cells decreased (P <0.05); cells in group D had the inverse reaction. The release of amylase and LDH changed directly with the occurrence of oncosis. The transcription factor NF-кB was activated and secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly higher in group C than in group B (P <0.05); in group D, these actions were significantly lower than in group B (P<0.05). This trend was in line with changes in amylase and LDH production.Conclusion There is a close relationship between modes of pancreatic acinar cell death, the release of cell contents and the inflammatory reaction of macrophages.

  12. Modelling the transition from simple to complex Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neeraj Manhas; James Sneyd; K R Pardasani

    2014-06-01

    A mathematical model is proposed which systematically investigates complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. This model is based on calcium-induced calcium release via inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) and includes calcium modulation of inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate (IP3) levels through feedback regulation of degradation and production. In our model, the apical and the basal regions are separated by a region containing mitochondria, which is capable of restricting Ca2+ responses to the apical region. We were able to reproduce the observed oscillatory patterns, from baseline spikes to sinusoidal oscillations. The model predicts that calcium-dependent production and degradation of IP3 is a key mechanism for complex calcium oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells. A partial bifurcation analysis is performed which explores the dynamic behaviour of the model in both apical and basal regions.

  13. Regulating effects of arsenic trioxide on cell death pathways and inflammatory reactions of pancreatic acinar cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Dong-bo; ZHANG Wei-hui; YUN Xiao-guang; SONG Chun; ZHENG Biao; SHI Xing-ye; WANG Hai-yang

    2007-01-01

    Background It is accepted that inflammatory cytokines play a key role in the development of acute pancreatitis, so blocking the initiation of inflammatory reactions may alleviate pathological changes of acute pancreatitis. We studied the regulatory effect of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on apoptosis and oncosis of pancreatic acinar cells in vitro and in vivo and its therapeutic effect on acute pancreatitis.Methods Pancreatic acinar cells were isolated by collagenase digestion method. Apoptosis and oncosis of isolated pancreatic acinar cells were detected with Hoechst 33258+PI or Annexin V+PI double fluorescent staining. Amylase and lactate dehydrogenase release were measured. Acute pancreatitis was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injections of caerulein, and apoptosis was detected with terminal dUTP nick-end labeling method. Tumor necorsis factor α (TNF-α) mRNA, myeloperoxidase, nuclear factor-κB and histological grading of pancreatic damage were measured.Results There was an increased apoptosis but a decreased oncosis of pancreatic acinar cell after the treatment with As2O3. The levels of lactate dehydrogenase and amylase release were markedly decreased in As2O3 treated group.Myeloperoxidase content, TNF-α mRNA level, nuclear factor-κB activation and pathological score in As2O3 treated group were significantly lower than in the untreated group.Conclusions As2O3 can induce apoptosis and reduce oncosis of pancreatic acinar cell, thus resulting in reduced release of endocellular enzyme of acinar cells, reduced inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines, so that the outcome of alleviated pathological changes was finally achieved.

  14. Calcium signaling of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zong-Fang

    2014-11-21

    Pancreatitis is an increasingly common and sometimes severe disease that lacks a specific therapy. The pathogenesis of pancreatitis is still not well understood. Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a versatile carrier of signals regulating many aspects of cellular activity and plays a central role in controlling digestive enzyme secretion in pancreatic acinar cells. Ca(2+) overload is a key early event and is crucial in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In pancreatic acinar cells, pathological Ca(2+) signaling (stimulated by bile, alcohol metabolites and other causes) is a key contributor to the initiation of cell injury due to prolonged and global Ca(2+) elevation that results in trypsin activation, vacuolization and necrosis, all of which are crucial in the development of pancreatitis. Increased release of Ca(2+) from stores in the intracellular endoplasmic reticulum and/or increased Ca(2+) entry through the plasma membrane are causes of such cell damage. Failed mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production reduces re-uptake and extrusion of Ca(2+) by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-activated ATPase and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps, which contribute to Ca(2+) overload. Current findings have provided further insight into the roles and mechanisms of abnormal pancreatic acinar Ca(2+) signals in pancreatitis. The lack of available specific treatments is therefore an objective of ongoing research. Research is currently underway to establish the mechanisms and interactions of Ca(2+) signals in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  15. Glycosylations in demilunar and central acinar cells of the submandibular salivary gland of ferret investigated by lectin histochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Asterios; Fletcher, David; Scott, John

    2004-09-01

    'Resting' submandibular salivary glands obtained post-mortem from mature ferrets of both sexes were examined here. The binding patterns of labelled lectins applied to paraffin sections of tissue slivers fixed in an aldehyde-HgCl2 mixture and the effects of pretreatment procedures on the results were assessed lightmicroscopically. Lectins with affinity for terminal GalNAc residues (DBA, SBA) bound preferentially to demilunar acinar cells which were also strongly reactive with Fuc-directed UEA I. In contrast, lectins with affinity for neuraminic acid (SNA, WGA) bound to central acinar cells where consistent binding of DBA and SNA occurred only after neuraminidase digestion, and variation in the binding of UEA I was seen. The reactivities corresponded with the distribution of secretory granules, but staining in Golgi-like areas occurred in central acinar cells with PNA lectin. The results suggest that glycosylations are more advanced in central than demilunar acinar cells of the ferret submandibular gland. Possibly demilunar and central acinar cells reflect phenotypic changes of a single secretory cell, the 'central' acinar phenotype being influenced by incorporation of neuraminic acid in glycoprotein side chains and by increased Golgi activity.

  16. Organelle selection determines agonist-specific Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar and beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, M.; Masgrau, R.; Morgan, A. J.; Churchill, G. C.; Patel, S.; Ashcroft, S. J. H.; Galione, A

    2004-01-01

    How different extracellular stimuli can evoke different spatiotemporal Ca2+ signals is uncertain. We have elucidated a novel paradigm whereby different agonists use different Ca2+-storing organelles ("organelle seleetion") to evoke unique responses. Some agonists select the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and others select lysosome-related (acidic) organelles, evoking spatial Ca2+ responses that mirror the organellar distribution. In pancreatic acinar cells, acetylcholine and bombesin exclusively...

  17. Functional differences in the acinar cells of the murine major salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Y; Nakamoto, T; Jaramillo, Y; Choi, S; Catalan, M A; Melvin, J E

    2015-05-01

    In humans, approximately 90% of saliva is secreted by the 3 major salivary glands: the parotid (PG), the submandibular (SMG), and the sublingual glands (SLG). Even though it is known that all 3 major salivary glands secrete saliva by a Cl(-)-dependent mechanism, salivary secretion rates differ greatly among these glands. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the properties of the ion-transporting pathways in acinar cells that might account for the differences among the major salivary glands. Pilocarpine-induced saliva was simultaneously collected in vivo from the 3 major salivary glands of mice. When normalized by gland weight, the amount of saliva secreted by the PG was more than 2-fold larger than that obtained from the SMG and SLG. At the cellular level, carbachol induced an increase in the intracellular [Ca(2+)] that was more than 2-fold larger in PG and SMG than in SLG acinar cells. Carbachol-stimulated Cl(-) efflux and the protein levels of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel TMEM16A, the major apical Cl(-) efflux pathway in salivary acinar cells, were significantly greater in PG compared with SMG and SLG. In addition, we evaluated the transporter activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC1) and anion exchangers (AE), the 2 primary basolateral Cl(-) uptake mechanisms in acinar cells. The SMG NKCC1 activity was about twice that of the PG and more than 12-fold greater than that of the SLG. AE activity was similar in PG and SLG, and both PG and SLG AE activity was about 2-fold larger than that of SMG. In summary, the salivation kinetics of the 3 major glands are distinct, and these differences can be explained by the unique functional properties of each gland related to Cl(-) movement, including the transporter activities of the Cl(-) uptake and efflux pathways, and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization.

  18. Constitutive IKK2 activation in acinar cells is sufficient to induce pancreatitis in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Bernd; Wagner, Martin; Aleksic, Tamara; von Wichert, Götz; Weber, Christoph K.; Adler, Guido; Wirth, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Activation of the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase/NF-κB (IKK/NF-κB) system and expression of proinflammatory mediators are major events in acute pancreatitis. However, the in vivo consequences of IKK activation on the onset and progression of acute pancreatitis remain unclear. Therefore, we modulated IKK activity conditionally in pancreatic acinar cells. Transgenic mice expressing the reverse tetracycline-responsive transactivator (rtTA) gene under the control of the rat elastase promoter were gene...

  19. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  1. Cannabinoid receptors in submandibular acinar cells: functional coupling between saliva fluid and electrolytes secretion and Ca2+ signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopach, Olga; Vats, Juliana; Netsyk, Olga; Voitenko, Nana; Irving, Andrew; Fedirko, Nataliya

    2012-04-15

    Cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, and activation of CBRs in salivary cells inhibits agonist-stimulated salivation and modifies saliva content. However, the role of different CBR subtypes in acinar cell physiology and in intracellular signalling remains unclear. Here, we uncover functional CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in acinar cells of rat submandibular gland and their essential role in saliva secretion. Pharmacological activation of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in the submandibular gland suppressed saliva outflow and modified saliva content produced by the submandibular gland in vivo. Using Na(+)-selective microelectrodes to record secretory Na(+) responses in the lumen of acini, we observed a reduction in Na(+) transport following the activation of CBRs, which was counteracted by the selective CB(1)R antagonist AM251. In addition, activation of CB(1)Rs or CB Rs caused inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) 2 -ATPase activity in microsomes derived from the gland tissue as well as in isolated acinar cells. Using a Ca(2+) imaging technique, we showed that activation of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs alters [Ca(2+)](cyt) signalling in acinar cells by distinct pathways, involving Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), respectively. Our data demonstrate the expression of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in acinar cells, and their involvement in the regulation of salivary gland functioning.

  2. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D.

  3. Up-regulation of Store-operated Ca2+ Entry and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Promote the Acinar Phenotype of the Primary Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Alevizos, Ilias; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2016-04-15

    The signaling pathways involved in the generation and maintenance of exocrine gland acinar cells have not yet been established. Primary human salivary gland epithelial cells, derived from salivary gland biopsies, acquired an acinar-like phenotype when the [Ca(2+)] in the serum-free medium (keratinocyte growth medium, KGM) was increased from 0.05 mm (KGM-L) to 1.2 mm (KGM-H). Here we examined the mechanism underlying this Ca(2+)-dependent generation of the acinar cell phenotype. Compared with cells in KGM-L, those in KGM-H display enhancement of Orai1, STIM1, STIM2, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression together with an increase in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), SOCE-dependent nuclear translocation of pGFP-NFAT1, and NFAT-dependent but not NFκB-dependent gene expression. Importantly, AQP5, an acinar-specific protein critical for function, is up-regulated in KGM-H via SOCE/NFAT-dependent gene expression. We identified critical NFAT binding motifs in the AQP5 promoter that are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent up-regulation of AQP5. These important findings reveal that the Ca(2+)-induced switch of salivary epithelial cells to an acinar-like phenotype involves remodeling of SOCE and NFAT signaling, which together control the expression of proteins critically relevant for acinar cell function. Our data provide a novel strategy for generating and maintaining acinar cells in culture.

  4. Antigen-presenting cells in parotid glands contain cystatin D originating from acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashida, Tomoko; Sato, Ritsuko; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Yoshimura, Ken; Imai, Akane; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2013-02-01

    Cystatin D encoded by Cst5 is a salivary classified type II cystatin. We investigated the dynamism of cystatin D by examining the distribution of cystatin D protein and mRNA in rats, to identify novel functions. The simultaneous expression of Cst5 and cystatin D was observed in parotid glands, however in situ hybridization showed that only acinar cells produced cystatin D. Synthesized cystatin D was localized in small vesicles and secreted from the apical side to the saliva, and from the basolateral side to the extracellular region, a second secretory pathway for cystatin D. We also identified antigen-presenting cells in the parotid glands that contained cystatin D without the expression of Cst5, indicating the uptake of cystatin D from the extracellular region. Cystatin D was detected in blood serum and renal tubular cells with megalin, indicating the circulation of cystatin D through the body and uptake by renal tubular cells. Thus, the novel dynamism of cystatin D was shown and a function for cystatin D in the regulation of antigen-presenting cell activity was proposed.

  5. A tetanus toxin sensitive protein other than VAMP 2 is required for exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padfield, P J

    2000-11-01

    The neurotoxin sensitivity of regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell was investigated using streptolysin-O permeabilized pancreatic acini. Treatment of permeabilized acini with botulinum toxin B (BoNT/B) or botulinum toxin D (BoNT/D) had no detectable effect on Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion but did result in the complete cleavage of VAMP 2. In comparison, tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment both significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion and cleaved VAMP 2. These results indicate that regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell requires a tetanus toxin sensitive protein(s) other than VAMP 2.

  6. Whole exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in BRCA2 and FAT genes in acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Toru Furukawa; Hitomi Sakamoto; Shoko Takeuchi; Mitra Ameri; Yuko Kuboki; Toshiyuki Yamamoto; Takashi Hatori; Masakazu Yamamoto; Masanori Sugiyama; Nobuyuki Ohike; Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Michio Shimizu; Noriyuki Shibata; Kyoko Shimizu; Keiko Shiratori

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, its molecular features are poorly known. We studied a total of 11 acinar cell carcinomas, including 3 by exome and 4 by target sequencing. Exome sequencing revealed 65 nonsynonymous mutations and 22 indels with a mutation rate of 3.4 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. By accounting for not only somatic but also germline mutations with loss of the wild-type allele, we ide...

  7. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  8. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells.

  9. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells. PMID:26235267

  10. β-catenin is selectively required for the expansion and regeneration of mature pancreatic acinar cells in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Keefe

    2012-07-01

    The size of the pancreas is determined by intrinsic factors, such as the number of progenitor cells, and by extrinsic signals that control the fate and proliferation of those progenitors. Both the exocrine and endocrine compartments of the pancreas undergo dramatic expansion after birth and are capable of at least partial regeneration following injury. Whether the expansion of these lineages relies on similar mechanisms is unknown. Although we have shown that the Wnt signaling component β-catenin is selectively required in mouse embryos for the generation of exocrine acinar cells, this protein has been ascribed various functions in the postnatal pancreas, including proliferation and regeneration of islet as well as acinar cells. To address whether β-catenin remains important for the maintenance and expansion of mature acinar cells, we have established a system to follow the behavior and fate of β-catenin-deficient cells during postnatal growth and regeneration in mice. We find that β-catenin is continuously required for the establishment and maintenance of acinar cell mass, extending from embryonic specification through juvenile and adult self-renewal and regeneration. This requirement is not shared with islet cells, which proliferate and function normally in the absence of β-catenin. These results make distinct predictions for the relative role of Wnt–β-catenin signaling in the etiology of human endocrine and exocrine disease. We suggest that loss of Wnt–β-catenin activity is unlikely to drive islet dysfunction, as occurs in type 2 diabetes, but that β-catenin is likely to promote human acinar cell proliferation following injury, and might therefore contribute to the resolution of acute or chronic pancreatitis.

  11. A systems biology approach identifies a regulatory network in parotid acinar cell terminal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Metzler

    Full Text Available The transcription factor networks that drive parotid salivary gland progenitor cells to terminally differentiate, remain largely unknown and are vital to understanding the regeneration process.A systems biology approach was taken to measure mRNA and microRNA expression in vivo across acinar cell terminal differentiation in the rat parotid salivary gland. Laser capture microdissection (LCM was used to specifically isolate acinar cell RNA at times spanning the month-long period of parotid differentiation.Clustering of microarray measurements suggests that expression occurs in four stages. mRNA expression patterns suggest a novel role for Pparg which is transiently increased during mid postnatal differentiation in concert with several target gene mRNAs. 79 microRNAs are significantly differentially expressed across time. Profiles of statistically significant changes of mRNA expression, combined with reciprocal correlations of microRNAs and their target mRNAs, suggest a putative network involving Klf4, a differentiation inhibiting transcription factor, which decreases as several targeting microRNAs increase late in differentiation. The network suggests a molecular switch (involving Prdm1, Sox11, Pax5, miR-200a, and miR-30a progressively decreases repression of Xbp1 gene transcription, in concert with decreased translational repression by miR-214. The transcription factor Xbp1 mRNA is initially low, increases progressively, and may be maintained by a positive feedback loop with Atf6. Transfection studies show that Xbp1 activates the Mist1 promoter [corrected]. In addition, Xbp1 and Mist1 each activate the parotid secretory protein (Psp gene, which encodes an abundant salivary protein, and is a marker of terminal differentiation.This study identifies novel expression patterns of Pparg, Klf4, and Sox11 during parotid acinar cell differentiation, as well as numerous differentially expressed microRNAs. Network analysis identifies a novel stemness arm, a

  12. Tmem16A encodes the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel in mouse submandibular salivary gland acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Victor G; Catalán, Marcelo A; Brown, David A; Putzier, Ilva; Hartzell, H Criss; Marmorstein, Alan D; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Rock, Jason R; Harfe, Brian D; Melvin, James E

    2010-04-23

    Activation of an apical Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channel (CaCC) is the rate-limiting step for fluid secretion in many exocrine tissues. Here, we compared the properties of native CaCC in mouse submandibular salivary gland acinar cells to the Ca(2+)-gated Cl(-) currents generated by Tmem16A and Best2, members from two distinct families of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels found in salivary glands. Heterologous expression of Tmem16A and Best2 transcripts in HEK293 cells produced Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents with time and voltage dependence and inhibitor sensitivity that resembled the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current found in native salivary acinar cells. Best2(-/-) and Tmem16A(-/-) mice were used to further characterize the role of these channels in the exocrine salivary gland. The amplitude and the biophysical footprint of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current in submandibular gland acinar cells from Best2-deficient mice were the same as in wild type cells. Consistent with this observation, the fluid secretion rate in Best2 null mice was comparable with that in wild type mice. In contrast, submandibular gland acinar cells from Tmem16A(-/-) mice lacked a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current and a Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonist failed to stimulate Cl(-) efflux, requirements for fluid secretion. Furthermore, saliva secretion was abolished by the CaCC inhibitor niflumic acid in wild type and Best2(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that both Tmem16A and Best2 generate Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current in vitro with similar properties to those expressed in native cells, yet only Tmem16A appears to be a critical component of the acinar Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel complex that is essential for saliva production by the submandibular gland.

  13. Cleavage of SNAP-25 and VAMP-2 impairs store-operated Ca2+ entry in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Juan A; Redondo, Pedro C; Salido, Ginés M; Sage, Stewart O; Pariente, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in nonexcitable cells is likely to be mediated by a reversible interaction between Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, a mechanism known as "secretion-like coupling." As for secretion, in this model the actin cytoskeleton plays a key regulatory role. In the present study we have explored the involvement of the secretory proteins synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP-25) and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) in SOCE in pancreatic acinar cells. Cleavage of SNAP-25 and VAMPs by treatment with botulinum toxin A (BoNT A) and tetanus toxin (TeTx), respectively, effectively inhibited amylase secretion stimulated by the physiological agonist CCK-8. BoNT A significantly reduced Ca(2+) entry induced by store depletion using thapsigargin or CCK-8. In addition, treatment with BoNT A once SOCE had been activated reduced Ca(2+) influx, indicating that SNAP-25 is needed for both the activation and maintenance of SOCE in pancreatic acinar cells. VAMP-2 and VAMP-3 are expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Both proteins associate with the cytoskeleton upon Ca(2+) store depletion, although only VAMP-2 seems to be sensitive to TeTx. Treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with TeTx reduced the activation of SOCE without affecting its maintenance. These findings support a role for SNAP-25 and VAMP-2 in the activation of SOCE in pancreatic acinar cells and show parallels between this process and secretion in a specialized secretory cell type.

  14. Variations in the expression and distribution pattern of AQP5 in acinar cells of patients with sialadenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Wiegand, Susanne; Borkeloh, Martin; Bette, Michael; Ramaswamy, Annette; Steinbach-Hundt, Silke; Neff, Andreas; Werner, Jochen A; Mandic, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we pointed out on a possible role of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in the development of sialadenosis. The goal of the present study was to further assess the association of AQP5 in the development of this salivary gland disease. The acinar diameter and mean surface area appeared elevated in sialadenosis tissues, which is a typical observation in this disease. AQP5 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using tissue samples derived from salivary glands of patients with confirmed sialadenosis either as a primary diagnosis or as a secondary diagnosis within the framework of other salivary gland diseases. Normal salivary gland tissue served as a control. In sialadenosis tissues, the AQP5 signal at the apical plasma membrane of acinar cells frequently appeared stronger compared with that in normal salivary glands. In addition, the distribution of AQP5 at the apical region seemed to differ between normal and sialadenosis tissues, where AQP5 frequently was diffusely distributed near or at the apical plasma membrane of the acinar cells in contrast to normal controls where the AQP5 signal was strictly confined to the apical plasma membrane. These observations suggest that sialadenosis is associated with a different AQP5 expression and distribution pattern in salivary acinar cells.

  15. Long-term dexamethasone treatment alters the histomorphology of acinar cells in rat parotid and submandibular glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighetti, Bruna B; d Assis, Gerson F; Vieira, Danilo C; Violato, Natalia M; Cestari, Tania M; Taga, Rumio; Bosqueiro, José R; Rafacho, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) induce insulin resistance (IR), a condition known to alter oral homeostasis. This study investigated the effects of long-term dexamethasone administration on morphofunctional aspects of salivary glands. Male Wistar rats received daily injections of dexamethasone [0.1 mg/kg body weight (b.w.), intraperitoneally] for 10 days (DEX), whereas control rats received saline. Subsequently, glycaemia, insulinaemia, insulin secretion and salivary flow were analysed. The parotid and submandibular glands were collected for histomorphometric evaluation and Western blot experiments. The DEX rats were found to be normoglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic, insulin resistant and glucose intolerant (P glands (P salivary flux rate. The hypotrophy in both glands observed in the DEX group was associated with marked reduction in the volume of the acinar cells in these glands of 50% and 26% respectively (P acinar cells was increased in the submandibular glands of the DEX rats (P glands. The levels of proteins related to insulin and survival signalling in both glands did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, the long-term administration of dexamethasone caused IR, which was associated with significant reductions in both mass and flux rate of the salivary glands. The parotid and submandibular glands exhibited reduced acinar cell volume; however, the submandibular glands displayed acinar hyperplasia, indicating a gland-specific response to GCs. Our data emphasize that GC-based therapies and insulin-resistant states have a negative impact on salivary gland homeostasis.

  16. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  17. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca(2+) signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca(2+) overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  18. A resected case of symptomatic acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas displacing the main pancreatic duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Haruyoshi; Hatsuno, Tsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Ishihara, Hiromasa; Takano, Nao; Shimoyama, Satofumi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Masato; Ichihara, Shu; Kanda, Mitsuro; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Ken

    2016-12-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACA) of the pancreas has been newly recognized as an entity by the World Health Organization (WHO) definition (2010), and its pathogenesis has not been known adequately because of the rarity. Here, we report a case of a 22-year-old female who had been followed up for a cystic lesion at the tail of the pancreas pointed out by a screening computed tomography (CT) scan 7 years ago. The tumor grew in size from 3.3 to 5.1 cm in diameter for 6 years (0.3 cm per year). Particularly, it rapidly grew up to 6.3 cm in the latest 3 months in concurrence with the emergence of epigastralgia. A contrasted CT scan revealed the irregularly formed, multilocular cystic tumor having thin septum and calcification. The intratumoral magnetic resonance imaging intensity in the T1 and T2 weighted images were low and high, respectively. No communications between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) were found, but the tumor displaced the MPD. She underwent surgical resection because the tumor was growing, turned symptomatic, and it seemed difficult to be diagnosed correctly until totally biopsied. Spleen-preserved distal pancreatectomy was performed. It was pathologically diagnosed as ACA; the cyst was lined by cells with normal acinar differentiation; cuboidal cells with round, basally oriented nuclei and eosinophilic granules in its apical cytoplasm. The abdominal pain has disappeared, and no recurrences have been found during a 5-year follow-up. Clinicians are recommended to consider an ACA as one of differential diagnoses of cystic tumors of the pancreas to provide appropriate diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:27108123

  19. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljona Gaiko-Shcherbak

    Full Text Available The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  20. Uptake and metabolism of D-glucose in isolated acinar and ductal cells from rat submandibular glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetik, Sibel; Rzajeva, Aigun; Hupkens, Emeline; Malaisse, Willy J; Sener, Abdullah

    2014-07-01

    The present study deals with the possible effects of selected environmental agents upon the uptake and metabolism of d-glucose in isolated acinar and ductal cells from the rat submandibular salivary gland. In acinar cells, the uptake of d-[U-(14) C]glucose and its non-metabolised analogue 3-O-[(14) C-methyl]-d-glucose was not affected significantly by phloridzin (0.1 mM) or substitution of extracellular NaCl (115 mM) by an equimolar amount of CsCl, whilst cytochalasin B (20 μM) decreased significantly such an uptake. In ductal cells, both phloridzin and cytochalasin B decreased the uptake of d-glucose and 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Although the intracellular space was comparable in acinar and ductal cells, the catabolism of d-glucose (2.8 or 8.3 mM) was two to four times higher in ductal cells than in acinar cells. Phloridzin (0.1 mM), ouabain (1.0 mM) and cytochalasin B (20 μM) all impaired d-glucose catabolism in ductal cells. Such was also the case in ductal cells incubated in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or in media in which NaCl was substituted by CsCl. It is proposed that the ductal cells in the rat submandibular gland are equipped with several systems mediating the insulin-sensitive, cytochalasin B-sensitive and phloridzin-sensitive transport of d-glucose across the plasma membrane.

  1. TNF-α inhibits aquaporin 5 expression in human salivary gland acinar cells via suppression of histone H4 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Yoshiko; Motegi, Katsumi; Kani, Kouichi; Takano, Hideyuki; Momota, Yukihiro; Aota, Keiko; Yamanoi, Tomoko; Azuma, Masayuki

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by reductions in salivary and lacrimal secretions. The mechanisms underlying these reductions remain unclear. We have previously shown that TNF-α plays an important role in the destruction of acinar structures. Here we examined TNF-α's function in the expression of aquaporin (AQP) 5 in human salivary gland acinar cells. Immortalized human salivary gland acinar (NS-SV-AC) cells were treated with TNF-α, and then the expression levels of AQP5 mRNA and protein were analysed. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the reduction of AQP5 expression by TNF-α treatment were investigated. TNF-α-treatment of NS-SV-AC cells significantly suppressed the expression levels of AQP5 mRNA and protein, and reduced the net fluid secretion rate. We examined the expression and activation levels of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) in NS-SV-AC cells treated with TNF-α. However, no significant changes were observed in the expression or activation levels of Dnmt1, Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b. Although we also investigated the role of NF-κB activity in the TNF-α-induced suppression of AQP5 expression in NS-SV-AC cells, we detected similar TNF-α suppression of AQP5 expression in non-transfected cells and in a super-repressor form of IκBα cDNA-transfected cell clones. However, interestingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated a remarkable decrease in levels of acetylated histone H4 associated with the AQP5 gene promoter after treatment with TNF-α in NS-SV-AC cells. Therefore, our results may indicate that TNF-α inhibition of AQP5 expression in human salivary gland acinar cells is due to the epigenetic mechanism by suppression of acetylation of histone H4.

  2. Increase in muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) response by adenovirus-mediated Stim1-mKO1 gene transfer to rat submandibular acinar cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Takao; Nezu, Akihiro; Tojyo, Yosuke; Tanimura, Akihiko

    2013-10-01

    Adenoviruses have been used for gene transfer to salivary gland cells in vivo. Their use to study the function of salivary acinar cells was limited by a severe inflammatory response and by the destruction of fluid-secreting acinar cells. In the present study, low doses of adenovirus were administered to express Stim1-mKO1 by retrograde ductal injection to submandibular glands. The approach succeeded in increasing muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) responses in acinar cells without inflammation or decreased salivary secretions. This increased Ca(2+) response was notable upon weak muscarinic stimulation and was attributed to increased Ca(2+) release from internal stores and increased Ca(2+) entry. The basal Ca(2+) level was higher in Stim1-mKO1-expressing cells than in mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. Exposure of permeabilized submandibular acinar cells, where Ca(2+) concentration was fixed at 50 nM, to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) produced similar effects on the release of Ca(2+) from stores in Stim1-mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. The low toxicity and relative specificity to acinar cells of the mild gene transfer method described herein are particularly useful for studying the molecular functions of salivary acinar cells in vivo, and may be applied to increase salivary secretions in experimental animals and human in future.

  3. Rab27A Is Present in Mouse Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Is Required for Digestive Enzyme Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Hou

    Full Text Available The small G-protein Rab27A has been shown to regulate the intracellular trafficking of secretory granules in various cell types. However, the presence, subcellular localization and functional impact of Rab27A on digestive enzyme secretion by mouse pancreatic acinar cells are poorly understood. Ashen mice, which lack the expression of Rab27A due to a spontaneous mutation, were used to investigate the function of Rab27A in pancreatic acinar cells. Isolated pancreatic acini were prepared from wild-type or ashen mouse pancreas by collagenase digestion, and CCK- or carbachol-induced amylase secretion was measured. Secretion occurring through the major-regulated secretory pathway, which is characterized by zymogen granules secretion, was visualized by Dextran-Texas Red labeling of exocytotic granules. The minor-regulated secretory pathway, which operates through the endosomal/lysosomal pathway, was characterized by luminal cell surface labeling of lysosomal associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1. Compared to wild-type, expression of Rab27B was slightly increased in ashen mouse acini, while Rab3D and digestive enzymes (amylase, lipase, chymotrypsin and elastase were not affected. Localization of Rab27B, Rab3D and amylase by immunofluorescence was similar in both wild-type and ashen acinar cells. The GTP-bound states of Rab27B and Rab3D in wild-type and ashen mouse acini also remained similar in amount. In contrast, acini from ashen mice showed decreased amylase release induced by CCK- or carbachol. Rab27A deficiency reduced the apical cell surface labeling of LAMP1, but did not affect that of Dextran-Texas Red incorporation into the fusion pockets at luminal surface. These results show that Rab27A is present in mouse pancreatic acinar cells and mainly regulates secretion through the minor-regulated pathway.

  4. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  5. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  6. [Thapsigargin-sensitive and insensitive intracellular calcium stores in acinar cells of the submandibular salivary gland in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopach, O V; Kruhlykov, I A; Voĭtenko, N V; Fedirko, N V

    2005-01-01

    Acinar cells of rat submandibular salivary gland are characterized by heterogeneity of intracellular Ca2+ stores. In the present work we have studied this heterogeneity using Arsenazo III dye to measure a cellular total calcium content and Fura-2/AM, to determine free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). We have found that the amount of Ca2+ released by inhibition of Ca2+ ATPase of the ER with thapsigargin comprises approximately 30% of total ER calcium. This result was obtained in experiments on both intact and permeabilized acinar cells. We have also shown that both Ca2+ ATPase inhibition with thapsigargin and emptying the stores with acetylcholine (ACh) led to activation of store-operated Ca2+ influx (an increase in total calcium content of approximately 14%). In permeabilized cells application of ACh after preincubation with thapsigargin led to a further decrease in total cellular calcium content (approximately 38%). At the same time in intact cells it resulted in generation of [Ca2+]i transients with gradually decreasing amplitudes. Thus, ACh is capable of producing an additional release of Ca2+ from thapsigargin-insensitive stores. This additional release is IP3-dependent since it was completely blocked by heparin. We conclude that in acinar cells of rat submandibular gland thapsigargin-sensitive and thapsigargin-insensitive Ca2+ stores could exist.

  7. Mutant KRas-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Acinar Cells Upregulates EGFR Signaling to Drive Formation of Pancreatic Precancerous Lesions

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    Geou-Yarh Liou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of pancreatic cancer requires the acquisition of oncogenic KRas mutations and upregulation of growth factor signaling, but the relationship between these is not well established. Here, we show that mutant KRas alters mitochondrial metabolism in pancreatic acinar cells, resulting in increased generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS. Mitochondrial ROS then drives the dedifferentiation of acinar cells to a duct-like progenitor phenotype and progression to PanIN. This is mediated via the ROS-receptive kinase protein kinase D1 and the transcription factors NF-κB1 and NF-κB2, which upregulate expression of the epidermal growth factor, its ligands, and their sheddase ADAM17. In vivo, interception of KRas-mediated generation of mROS reduced the formation of pre-neoplastic lesions. Hence, our data provide insight into how oncogenic KRas interacts with growth factor signaling to induce the formation of pancreatic cancer.

  8. Ca²⁺ signaling and regulation of fluid secretion in salivary gland acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambudkar, Indu S

    2014-06-01

    Neurotransmitter stimulation of plasma membrane receptors stimulates salivary gland fluid secretion via a complex process that is determined by coordinated temporal and spatial regulation of several Ca(2+) signaling processes as well as ion flux systems. Studies over the past four decades have demonstrated that Ca(2+) is a critical factor in the control of salivary gland function. Importantly, critical components of this process have now been identified, including plasma membrane receptors, calcium channels, and regulatory proteins. The key event in activation of fluid secretion is an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) triggered by IP3-induced release of Ca(2+) from ER via the IP3R. This increase regulates the ion fluxes required to drive vectorial fluid secretion. IP3Rs determine the site of initiation and the pattern of [Ca(2+)]i signal in the cell. However, Ca(2+) entry into the cell is required to sustain the elevation of [Ca(2+)]i and fluid secretion. This Ca(2+) influx pathway, store-operated calcium influx pathway (SOCE), has been studied in great detail and the regulatory mechanisms as well as key molecular components have now been identified. Orai1, TRPC1, and STIM1 are critical components of SOCE and among these, Ca(2+) entry via TRPC1 is a major determinant of fluid secretion. The receptor-evoked Ca(2+) signal in salivary gland acinar cells is unique in that it starts at the apical pole and then rapidly increases across the cell. The basis for the polarized Ca(2+) signal can be ascribed to the polarized arrangement of the Ca(2+) channels, transporters, and signaling proteins. Distinct localization of these proteins in the cell suggests compartmentalization of Ca(2+) signals during regulation of fluid secretion. This chapter will discuss new concepts and findings regarding the polarization and control of Ca(2+) signals in the regulation of fluid secretion.

  9. Apical Ca2+-activated potassium channels in mouse parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassy, Janos; Won, Jong Hak; Begenisich, Ted B; Yule, David I

    2012-02-01

    Ca(2+) activation of Cl and K channels is a key event underlying stimulated fluid secretion from parotid salivary glands. Cl channels are exclusively present on the apical plasma membrane (PM), whereas the localization of K channels has not been established. Mathematical models have suggested that localization of some K channels to the apical PM is optimum for fluid secretion. A combination of whole cell electrophysiology and temporally resolved digital imaging with local manipulation of intracellular [Ca(2+)] was used to investigate if Ca(2+)-activated K channels are present in the apical PM of parotid acinar cells. Initial experiments established Ca(2+)-buffering conditions that produced brief, localized increases in [Ca(2+)] after focal laser photolysis of caged Ca(2+). Conditions were used to isolate K(+) and Cl(-) conductances. Photolysis at the apical PM resulted in a robust increase in K(+) and Cl(-) currents. A localized reduction in [Ca(2+)] at the apical PM after photolysis of Diazo-2, a caged Ca(2+) chelator, resulted in a decrease in both K(+) and Cl(-) currents. The K(+) currents evoked by apical photolysis were partially blocked by both paxilline and TRAM-34, specific blockers of large-conductance "maxi-K" (BK) and intermediate K (IK), respectively, and almost abolished by incubation with both antagonists. Apical TRAM-34-sensitive K(+) currents were also observed in BK-null parotid acini. In contrast, when the [Ca(2+)] was increased at the basal or lateral PM, no increase in either K(+) or Cl(-) currents was evoked. These data provide strong evidence that K and Cl channels are similarly distributed in the apical PM. Furthermore, both IK and BK channels are present in this domain, and the density of these channels appears higher in the apical versus basolateral PM. Collectively, this study provides support for a model in which fluid secretion is optimized after expression of K channels specifically in the apical PM.

  10. Atp2c2 Is Transcribed From a Unique Transcriptional Start Site in Mouse Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Melissa A; Sullivan, Caitlin M; Ferreira, Lucimar T; Mehmood, Rashid; MacDonald, William A; Stathopulos, Peter B; Pin, Christopher L

    2016-12-01

    Proper regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is critical for pancreatic acinar cell function. Disruptions in normal Ca(2+) concentrations affect numerous cellular functions and are associated with pancreatitis. Membrane pumps and channels regulate cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis by promoting rapid Ca(2+) movement. Determining how expression of Ca(2+) modulators is regulated and the cellular alterations that occur upon changes in expression can provide insight into initiating events of pancreatitis. The goal of this study was to delineate the gene structure and regulation of a novel pancreas-specific isoform for Secretory Pathway Ca(2+) ATPase 2 (termed SPCA2C), which is encoded from the Atp2c2 gene. Using Next Generation Sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq), chromatin immunoprecipitation for epigenetic modifications and promoter-reporter assays, a novel transcriptional start site was identified that promotes expression of a transcript containing the last four exons of the Atp2c2 gene (Atp2c2c). This region was enriched for epigenetic marks and pancreatic transcription factors that promote gene activation. Promoter activity for regions upstream of the ATG codon in Atp2c2's 24th exon was observed in vitro but not in in vivo. Translation from this ATG encodes a protein aligned with the carboxy terminal of SPCA2. Functional analysis in HEK 293A cells indicates a unique role for SPCA2C in increasing cytosolic Ca(2+) . RNA analysis indicates that the decreased Atp2c2c expression observed early in experimental pancreatitis reflects a global molecular response of acinar cells to reduce cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. Combined, these results suggest SPCA2C affects Ca(2+) homeostasis in pancreatic acinar cells in a unique fashion relative to other Ca(2+) ATPases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2768-2778, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27017909

  11. Directed pancreatic acinar differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells via embryonic signalling molecules and exocrine transcription factors.

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    Fabien Delaspre

    Full Text Available Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESC are a promising cellular system for generating an unlimited source of tissue for the treatment of chronic diseases and valuable in vitro differentiation models for drug testing. Our aim was to direct differentiation of mouse ESC into pancreatic acinar cells, which play key roles in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. To that end, ESC were first differentiated as embryoid bodies and sequentially incubated with activin A, inhibitors of Sonic hedgehog (Shh and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways, fibroblast growth factors (FGF and retinoic acid (RA in order to achieve a stepwise increase in the expression of mRNA transcripts encoding for endodermal and pancreatic progenitor markers. Subsequent plating in Matrigel® and concomitant modulation of FGF, glucocorticoid, and folllistatin signalling pathways involved in exocrine differentiation resulted in a significant increase of mRNAs encoding secretory enzymes and in the number of cells co-expressing their protein products. Also, pancreatic endocrine marker expression was down-regulated and accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of hormone-expressing cells with a limited presence of hepatic marker expressing-cells. These findings suggest a selective activation of the acinar differentiation program. The newly differentiated cells were able to release α-amylase and this feature was greatly improved by lentiviral-mediated expression of Rbpjl and Ptf1a, two transcription factors involved in the maximal production of digestive enzymes. This study provides a novel method to produce functional pancreatic exocrine cells from ESC.

  12. Gramicidin-perforated Patch Recording Revealed the Oscillatory Nature of Secretory Cl− Movements in Salivary Acinar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sugita, Makoto; Hirono, Chikara; Shiba, Yoshiki

    2004-01-01

    Elevations of cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) evoked by cholinergic agonists stimulate isotonic fluid secretion in salivary acinar cells. This process is driven by the apical exit of Cl− through Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, while Cl− enters the cytoplasm against its electrochemical gradient via a loop diuretic-sensitive Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC) and/or parallel operations of Cl−-HCO3 − and Na+-H+ exchangers, located in the basolateral membrane. To characterize the con...

  13. Differences in claudin synthesis in primary cultures of acinar cells from rat salivary gland are correlated with the specific three-dimensional organization of the cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bing; Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko; Michikawa, Hiromi; Satoh, Keitaro; Katsumata, Osamu; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Tight junctions are essential for the maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. We have previously established a system for the primary culture of salivary parotid acinar cells that retain their ability to generate new secretory granules and to secrete proteins in a signal-dependent manner. Because cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion are prerequisites for the formation of epithelial tissues, we have investigated the structure of the tight junctions in these cultures. We have found two types of cellular organization in the culture: monolayers and semi-spherical clusters. Electron microscopy has revealed tight junctions near the apical region of the lateral membranes between cells in the monolayers and cells at the surface of the clusters. The cells in the interior of the clusters also have tight junctions and are organized around a central lumen. These interior cells retain more secretory granules than the surface or monolayer cells, suggesting that they maintain their original character as acinar cells. The synthesis of claudin-4 increases during culture, although it is not detectable in the cells immediately after isolation from the glands. Immunofluorescence microscopy has shown that claudin-4 is synthesized in the monolayers and at the surface of the clusters, but not inside the clusters. Only claudin-3, which is present in the original acinar cells following isolation and in the intact gland, has been detected inside the clusters. These results suggest that differences in claudin expression are related to the three-dimensional structures of the cell cultures and reflect their ability to function as acinar cells.

  14. Human salivary gland acinar cells spontaneously form three-dimensional structures and change the protein expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yen-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Young, Tai-Horng; Lou, Pei-Jen

    2011-11-01

    Applying tissue engineering principles to design an auto-secretory device is a potential solution for patients suffering loss of salivary gland function. However, the largest challenge in implementing this solution is the primary culture of human salivary gland cells, because the cells are highly differentiated and difficult to expand in vitro. This situation leads to the lack of reports on the in vitro cell biology and physiology of human salivary gland cells. This study used a low-calcium culture system to selectively cultivate human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells from tissues with high purity in cell composition. This condition enables PGAC cells to continuously proliferate and retain the phenotypes of epithelial acinar cells to express secreting products (α-amylase) and function-related proteins (aquaporin-3, aquaporin-5, and ZO-1). Notably, when the cells reached confluence, three-dimensional (3D) cell aggregates were observed in crowded regions. These self-formed cell spheres were termed post-confluence structures (PCSs). Unexpectedly, despite being cultured in the same media, cells in PCSs exhibited higher expression levels and different expression patterns of function-related proteins compared to the two-dimensional (2D) cells. Translocation of aquoporin-3 from cytosolic to alongside the cell boundaries, and of ZO-1 molecules to the boundary of the PCSs were also observed. These observations suggest that when PGAC cells cultured on the 2D substrate would form PCSs without the help of 3D scaffolds and retain certain differentiation and polarity. This phenomenon implies that it is possible to introduce 2D substrates instead of 3D scaffolds into artificial salivary gland tissue engineering.

  15. Postnatal Pancreas of Mice Contains Tripotent Progenitors Capable of Giving Rise to Duct, Acinar, and Endocrine Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazalli, Nadiah; Mahdavi, Alborz; Feng, Tao; Jin, Liang; Kozlowski, Mark T; Hsu, Jasper; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2015-09-01

    Postnatal pancreas is a potential source for progenitor cells to generate endocrine β-cells for treating type 1 diabetes. However, it remains unclear whether young (1-week-old) pancreas harbors multipotent progenitors capable of differentiating into duct, acinar, and endocrine cells. Laminin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein important for β-cells' survival and function. We established an artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) protein that contains the functional IKVAV (Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val) sequence derived from laminin (designated aECM-lam). Whether IKVAV is necessary for endocrine differentiation in vitro is unknown. To answer these questions, we cultured single cells from 1-week-old pancreas in semi-solid media supplemented with aECM-lam, aECM-scr (which contains a scrambled sequence instead of IKVAV), or Matrigel. We found that colonies were generated in all materials. Individual colonies were examined by microfluidic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunostaining, and electron microscopy analyses. The majority of the colonies expressed markers for endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, demonstrating tri-lineage potential of individual colony-forming progenitors. Colonies grown in aECM-lam expressed higher levels of endocrine markers Insulin1, Insulin2, and Glucagon compared with those grown in aECM-scr and Matrigel, indicating that the IKVAV sequence enhances endocrine differentiation. In contrast, Matrigel was inhibitory for endocrine gene expression. Colonies grown in aECM-lam displayed the hallmarks of functional β-cells: mature insulin granules and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Colony-forming progenitors were enriched in the CD133(high) fraction and among 230 micro-manipulated single CD133(high) cells, four gave rise to colonies that expressed tri-lineage markers. We conclude that young postnatal pancreas contains multipotent progenitor cells and that aECM-lam promotes differentiation of β-like cells in vitro. PMID

  16. Roles of AQP5/AQP5-G103D in carbamylcholine-induced volume decrease and in reduction of the activation energy for water transport by rat parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keitaro; Seo, Yoshiteru; Matsuo, Shinsuke; Karabasil, Mileva Ratko; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Nakahari, Takashi; Hosoi, Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    In order to assess the contribution of the water channel aquaporin-5 (AQP5) to water transport by salivary gland acinar cells, we measured the cell volume and activation energy (E (a)) of diffusive water permeability in isolated parotid acinar cells obtained from AQP5-G103D mutant and their wild-type rats. Immunohistochemistry showed that there was no change induced by carbamylcholine (CCh; 1 μM) in the AQP5 detected in the acinar cells in the wild-type rat. Acinar cells from mutant rats, producing low levels of AQP5 in the apical membrane, showed a minimal increase in the AQP5 due to the CCh. In the wild-type rat, CCh caused a transient swelling of the acinus, followed by a rapid agonist-induced cell shrinkage, reaching a plateau at 30 s. In the mutant rat, the acinus did not swell by CCh challenge, and the agonist-induced cell shrinkage was delayed by 8 s, reaching a transient minimum at around 1 min, and recovered spontaneously even though CCh was persistently present. In the unstimulated wild-type acinar cells, E (a) was 3.4 ± 0.6 kcal mol(-1) and showed no detectable change after CCh stimulation. In the unstimulated mutant acinar cells, high E (a) value (5.9 ± 0.1 kcal mol(-1)) was detected and showed a minimal decrease after CCh stimulation (5.0 ± 0.3 kcal mol(-1)). These results suggested that AQP5 was the main pathway for water transport in the acinar cells and that it was responsible for the rapid agonist-induced acinar cell shrinkage and also necessary to keep the acinar cell volume reduced during the steady secretion in the wild-type rat.

  17. Ae4 (Slc4a9) Anion Exchanger Drives Cl- Uptake-dependent Fluid Secretion by Mouse Submandibular Gland Acinar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; Catalán, Marcelo A; Kondo, Yusuke; Jaramillo, Yasna; Liu, Frances; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E

    2015-04-24

    Transcellular Cl(-) movement across acinar cells is the rate-limiting step for salivary gland fluid secretion. Basolateral Nkcc1 Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters play a critical role in fluid secretion by promoting the intracellular accumulation of Cl(-) above its equilibrium potential. However, salivation is only partially abolished in the absence of Nkcc1 cotransporter activity, suggesting that another Cl(-) uptake pathway concentrates Cl(-) ions in acinar cells. To identify alternative molecular mechanisms, we studied mice lacking Ae2 and Ae4 Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchangers. We found that salivation stimulated by muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptor agonists was normal in the submandibular glands of Ae2(-/-) mice. In contrast, saliva secretion was reduced by 35% in Ae4(-/-) mice. The decrease in salivation was not related to loss of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter or Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity in Ae4(-/-) mice but correlated with reduced Cl(-) uptake during β-adrenergic receptor activation of cAMP signaling. Direct measurements of Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity revealed that HCO3 (-)-dependent Cl(-) uptake was reduced in the acinar cells of Ae2(-/-) and Ae4(-/-) mice. Moreover, Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity was nearly abolished in double Ae4/Ae2 knock-out mice, suggesting that most of the Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity in submandibular acinar cells depends on Ae2 and Ae4 expression. In conclusion, both Ae2 and Ae4 anion exchangers are functionally expressed in submandibular acinar cells; however, only Ae4 expression appears to be important for cAMP-dependent regulation of fluid secretion.

  18. Involvement of M3 Cholinergic Receptor Signal Transduction Pathway in Regulation of the Expression of Chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 Genes in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海; 陈道达; 张景輝; 田原

    2004-01-01

    Whether M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway is involved in regulation of the activation of NF-κB and the expression of chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells was investigated. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, atropine and PDTC in vitro. The MOB-1 and MCP-1 mRNA expression was detected by using RT-PCR. The activation of NF-κB was monitored by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay.The results showed that as compared with control group, M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (103mol/L, 104-4ol/L carbachol) could induce a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA in pancreatic acinar cells. After treatment with 10 -3mol/L carbachol for 2 h, the expression of MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA was strongest. The activity of NF-κB in pancreatic acinar cells was significantly increased (P<0.01) after treated with M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (10-3 mol/L carbachol) in vitro for 30 min. Either M3 cholinergic receptor antagonist (10-5 mol/L atropine) or NF-κB inhibitor (10-2 mol/L PDTC) could obviously inhibit the activation of NF-κB and the chemokine MOB-1, MCP-1 mRNA expression induced by carbachol (P <0.05). This inhibitory effect was significantly increased by atropine plus PDTC (P<0.01). The results of these studies indicated that M3 cholinergic receptor signal transduction pathway was likely involved in regulation of the expression of chemokine MOB-1 and MCP-1genes in pancreatic acinar cells in vitro through the activation of NF-κB.

  19. Formation of post-confluence structure in human parotid gland acinar cells on PLGA through regulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yen-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Chou, Ya-Shuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Su, Wei-Fang; Lou, Pei-Jen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2012-01-01

    As a potential solution for patients to retrieve their lost salivary gland functions, tissue engineering of an auto-secretory device is profoundly needed. Under serum-free environment, primary human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells can be obtained. After reaching confluence, PGAC cells spontaneously form three-dimension (3D) cell aggregations, termed post-confluence structure (PCS), and change their behaviors. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been widely used in the field of biomedical applications because of its biodegradable properties for desired functions. Nonetheless, the role of PLGA in facilitating PGAC cells to form PCS has seldom been explored to recover epithelial characteristics. In this study, PGAC cells were found to have a greater tendency to form PCS on PLGA than on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). By tracing cell migration paths and modulating E-cadherin activity with specific inhibitor or antibody, we demonstrated that the static force of homophilic interaction on surfaces of individual cells, but not the dynamics of cell migration, played a more important role in PCS formation. Thus, PLGA was successfully confirmed to support PGAC cells to form more PCS through the effects on enhancing E-cadherin expression, which is associated with FAK/ILK/Snail expression in PGAC cells. This result indicates that selective appropriate biomaterials may be potentially useful in generating 3D PCS on two-dimension (2D) substrate without fabricating a complex 3D scaffold.

  20. Effects of Baicalin on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis in rats with sever acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zhang xiping

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: To investigate the effects of Baicalin and Octreotide on inflammatory mediators and pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis of rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP.
    • METHODS: SD rats were randomly divided into sham operated group (I group, model control group (II group, Baicalin treated group (III group and Octreotide treated group (IV group. Each group was also divided into subgroup of 3, 6 and 12 h (n = 15. The mortality rate, ascites/body weight ratio as well as the level of endotoxin, NO and ET-1 in blood were measured. The pathological severity score of pancreas, apoptotic indexes, and expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins in each group were investigated.
    • RESULTS: The survival rate of III and IV group has a significant difference compared with II group (P12 h < 0.05. The ascites volume, contents of inflammatory mediators in blood and pathological severity score of pancreas of III and IV group declined at different degrees compared to II group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 or P < 0.001. Apoptotic index in III group was significantly higher than that in II group at 3 and 6 h (P3, 6 h < 0.05. Apoptotic index in IV group was significantly higher than that in II group at pancreatic tail at 6 h (P6 h < 0.05. Expression level of Bax in III group was significantly higher than that in II group (pancreatic head P3 h,6 h < 0.01, pancreatic tail P3 h < 0.001.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Compared with Octreotide in the treatment of SAP, the protective mechanisms of Baicalin include reducing the excessive inflammatory mediators’ release, inducing the pancreatic acinar cells apoptosis.
    • KEY WORDS: Severe acute pancreatitis, baicalin, octreotide, inflammatory mediators, apoptosis, tissue microarrays.

  1. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Qingbing Wang,1,2 Xiaolin Wang,1,2 Rongfang Guo,2,3 Guoping Li1,2 1Department of Interventional Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, 2Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, 3Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14 of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14 had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14 and 7.1% (1/14, respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. Keywords: acinar cell carcinoma, computed tomography, pancreatic ductal carcinoma, pancreas

  2. Adenovirus-mediated hAQP1 expression in irradiated mouse salivary glands causes recovery of saliva secretion by enhancing acinar cell volume decrease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teos, L Y; Zheng, C-Y; Liu, X; Swaim, W D; Goldsmith, C M; Cotrim, A P; Baum, B J; Ambudkar, I S

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck irradiation (IR) during cancer treatment causes by-stander effects on the salivary glands leading to irreversible loss of saliva secretion. The mechanism underlying loss of fluid secretion is not understood and no adequate therapy is currently available. Delivery of an adenoviral vector encoding human aquaporin-1 (hAQP1) into the salivary glands of human subjects and animal models with radiation-induced salivary hypofunction leads to significant recovery of saliva secretion and symptomatic relief in subjects. To elucidate the mechanism underlying loss of salivary secretion and the basis for AdhAQP1-dependent recovery of salivary gland function we assessed submandibular gland function in control mice and mice 2 and 8 months after treatment with a single 15-Gy dose of IR (delivered to the salivary gland region). Salivary secretion and neurotransmitter-stimulated changes in acinar cell volume, an in vitro read-out for fluid secretion, were monitored. Consistent with the sustained 60% loss of fluid secretion following IR, a carbachol (CCh)-induced decrease in acinar cell volume from the glands of mice post IR was transient and attenuated as compared with that in cells from non-IR age-matched mice. The hAQP1 expression in non-IR mice induced no significant effect on salivary fluid secretion or CCh-stimulated cell volume changes, except in acinar cells from 8-month group where the initial rate of cell shrinkage was increased. Importantly, the expression of hAQP1 in the glands of mice post IR induced recovery of salivary fluid secretion and a volume decrease in acinar cells to levels similar to those in cells from non-IR mice. The initial rates of CCh-stimulated cell volume reduction in acinar cells from hAQP1-expressing glands post IR were similar to those from control cells. Altogether, the data suggest that expression of hAQP1 increases the water permeability of acinar cells, which underlies the recovery of fluid secretion in the salivary glands

  3. Adenovirus-mediated hAQP1 expression in irradiated mouse salivary glands causes recovery of saliva secretion by enhancing acinar cell volume decrease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teos, L Y; Zheng, C-Y; Liu, X; Swaim, W D; Goldsmith, C M; Cotrim, A P; Baum, B J; Ambudkar, I S

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck irradiation (IR) during cancer treatment causes by-stander effects on the salivary glands leading to irreversible loss of saliva secretion. The mechanism underlying loss of fluid secretion is not understood and no adequate therapy is currently available. Delivery of an adenoviral vector encoding human aquaporin-1 (hAQP1) into the salivary glands of human subjects and animal models with radiation-induced salivary hypofunction leads to significant recovery of saliva secretion and symptomatic relief in subjects. To elucidate the mechanism underlying loss of salivary secretion and the basis for AdhAQP1-dependent recovery of salivary gland function we assessed submandibular gland function in control mice and mice 2 and 8 months after treatment with a single 15-Gy dose of IR (delivered to the salivary gland region). Salivary secretion and neurotransmitter-stimulated changes in acinar cell volume, an in vitro read-out for fluid secretion, were monitored. Consistent with the sustained 60% loss of fluid secretion following IR, a carbachol (CCh)-induced decrease in acinar cell volume from the glands of mice post IR was transient and attenuated as compared with that in cells from non-IR age-matched mice. The hAQP1 expression in non-IR mice induced no significant effect on salivary fluid secretion or CCh-stimulated cell volume changes, except in acinar cells from 8-month group where the initial rate of cell shrinkage was increased. Importantly, the expression of hAQP1 in the glands of mice post IR induced recovery of salivary fluid secretion and a volume decrease in acinar cells to levels similar to those in cells from non-IR mice. The initial rates of CCh-stimulated cell volume reduction in acinar cells from hAQP1-expressing glands post IR were similar to those from control cells. Altogether, the data suggest that expression of hAQP1 increases the water permeability of acinar cells, which underlies the recovery of fluid secretion in the salivary glands

  4. Protein kinase C expression in salivary gland acinar epithelial cells in non-obese diabetic mice, an experimental model for Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tensing, E-K; Ma, J; Hukkanen, M; Fox, H S; Li, T-F; Törnwall, J; Konttinen, Y T

    2005-01-01

    We planned to investigate the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in acinar epithelial cells of salivary glands in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse to find out if they develop changes of the PKC system like those seen in the human counterpart, i.e. in Sjögren's syndrome. Parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands from NOD and control BALB/c mice were stained with a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against conventional (alpha, beta, and gamma), novel (delta, epsilon, and theta), and atypical (lambda and iota) PKC isoforms using the streptavidin/HRP method. Similarly to human labial salivary glands, acinar epithelial cells of the healthy control BALB/c mice contained two of the conventional PKC isoforms, alpha and beta. Acinar and ductal epithelial cells also contained the atypical PKC isoforms lambda and iota. PKC isoforms gamma, delta, epsilon, and theta were not found. NOD mice which displayed focal sialadenitis contained the same conventional and atypical PKC isoforms. The acinar cells in NOD mice, in contrast to the Sjögren's syndrome patients, did not lack PKC alpha or beta. On the contrary, PKC alpha and beta staining was stronger than in the control BALB/c mice. The present results demonstrate that both conventional and atypical PKC isoforms participate in the salivary epithelial cell biology and that there are mouse strain-associated and/or disease state-associated changes in their expression. The lack of PKC alpha and beta isoforms found in Sjögren's syndrome was not reproduced in NOD mice, which discloses one more difference between the human disease and its NOD mouse model.

  5. 鼻中隔涎腺腺泡细胞癌1例%Salivary gland acinar cell carcinoma at nasal septum:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland acinar cell carcinoma is a rare low grade malignant tumor,which always occurs in the parotid,submandibular and sublingual salivary glands,but extremely rare occurs in the nasal septum.This paper reports a case of the salivary gland acinar cell carcinoma that located in the nasal septum.%涎腺腺泡细胞癌是一种临床上少见的低度恶性肿瘤,多发生于腮腺、颌下腺、舌下腺及小唾液腺等涎腺。发生于鼻中隔的极为罕见,本文报道一例近期发现的位于鼻中隔的涎腺腺泡细胞癌。

  6. Leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of prostaglandin and constitutive nitric oxide synthase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2008-04-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic cytokine secreted by adipocytes but also identified in salivary glands and saliva, is recognized as an important element of oral mucosal defense. Here, we report that in sublingual salivary glands leptin protects the acinar cells of against ethanol cytotoxicity. We show that ethanol- induced cytotoxicity, characterized by a marked drop in the acinar cell capacity for NO production, arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin generation, was subject to suppression by leptin. The loss in countering capacity of leptin on the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity was attained with cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin and nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, as well as PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase. Indomethacin, while not affecting leptin-induced arachidonic acid release, caused the inhibition in PGE2 generation, pretreatment with L-NAME led to the inhibition in NO production, whereas PP2 exerted the inhibitory effect on leptin-induced changes in NO, arachidonic acid, and PGE2. The leptin-induced changes in arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation were blocked by ERK inhibitor, PD98059, but not by PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin. Further, leptin suppression of ethanol cytotoxicity was reflected in the increased Akt and cNOS phosphorylation that was sensitive to PP2. Moreover, the stimulatory effect of leptin on the acinar cell cNOS activity was inhibited not only by PP2, but also by Akt inhibitor, SH-5, while wortmannin had no effect. Our findings demonstrate that leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of MAPK/ERK and Akt that result in up-regulation of the respective prostaglandin and nitric oxide synthase pathways.

  7. Successful Salvage Chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX for Recurrent Mixed Acinar Cell Carcinoma and Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas in an Adolescent Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfrommer, Sarah; Weber, Achim; Dutkowski, Philipp; Schäfer, Niklaus G; Müllhaupt, Beat; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Breitenstein, Stefan; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Stenner, Frank; Renner, Christoph; D'Addario, Giannicola; Graf, Hans-Jörg; Knuth, Alexander; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are rare in children and adolescents. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a mixed acinar cell carcinoma/ductal adenocarcinoma with blastomatous components. He received multimodal treatment including various chemotherapy regimens and multistep surgery including liver transplantation. Introduction of FOLFIRINOX after relapse repeatedly achieved a durable metabolic and clinical response with good quality of life. PMID:24163668

  8. Successful Salvage Chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX for Recurrent Mixed Acinar Cell Carcinoma and Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas in an Adolescent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pfrommer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic tumors are rare in children and adolescents. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a mixed acinar cell carcinoma/ductal adenocarcinoma with blastomatous components. He received multimodal treatment including various chemotherapy regimens and multistep surgery including liver transplantation. Introduction of FOLFIRINOX after relapse repeatedly achieved a durable metabolic and clinical response with good quality of life.

  9. Pancreatic panniculitis in a patient with pancreatic-type acinar cell carcinoma of the liver – case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Zundler, Sebastian; Erber, Ramona; Agaimy, Abbas; Hartmann, Arndt; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Strobel, Deike; Neurath, Markus F; Wildner, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare condition, which has only been described in relation with pancreatic diseases up to now. It is characterized by necrotizing subcutaneous inflammation and is thought to be triggered by adipocyte necrosis due to systemic release of pancreatic enzymes with consecutive infiltration of neutrophils. We present the first case of a patient with pancreatic panniculitis caused by pancreatic-type primary acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of the liver and without un...

  10. The natural history of pancreatic acinar cell cystadenoma: Is resection better than surveillance? An update to a case report from 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Darcy, David G.; Dominique Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are a rare entity, and few reports have described their natural history in children. A previously published report described a 9-year-old boy with an acinar cell cystadenoma, discovered during a laparoscopic appendectomy. Initially asymptomatic and followed by serial MRI, this patient presented to our institution several years later with chronic obstructive symptoms that required surgical intervention. Planning for resection included multidisciplinary input from...

  11. E-cadherin-negative acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: report of a case showing a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Shogo; Waki, Michihiko; Azuma, Masaki; Koda, Kenji; Ohata, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    E-cadherin expression patterns in acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) of the pancreas have not been well documented. Herein, we present a hitherto undescribed case of E-cadherin-negative ACC with a solid pseudopapillary growth pattern in a 65-year-old man. We used an antibody against the extracellular domain of E-cadherin. As a further unusual status in ACC, faint β-catenin expression was observed in the cytoplasm of carcinoma cells. Morphological distinction from a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas might be problematic in such a case, because of their similarities concerned with the growth pattern and E-cadherin negativity. Without nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, a diagnosis of SPN was almost excluded. Immunoreactivity for trypsin and BCL10 made an accurate diagnosis of ACC to this case. The tumor recurred 10 months post-surgery as rapidly enlarging masses in the liver, presumably indicating the aggressiveness of the E-cadherin-negative phenotype among ACCs. PMID:25600280

  12. SGLT1 protein expression in plasma membrane of acinar cells correlates with the sympathetic outflow to salivary glands in diabetic and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Alves-Wagner, Ana B T; Burgi, Katia; Okamoto, Maristela M; Alves, Adilson S; Lima, Guilherme A; Freitas, Helayne S; Antunes, Vagner R; Machado, Ubiratan F

    2010-12-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a feature in diabetes and hypertension. We hypothesized that sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) participates in salivary dysfunctions through a sympathetic- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. In Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), diabetic WKY (WKY-D), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and diabetic SHR (SHR-D) rats, PKA/SGLT1 proteins were analyzed in parotid and submandibular glands, and the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to the glands was monitored. Basal SNA was threefold higher in SHR (P acinar cells were regulated in parallel to the SNA. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic branch to salivary glands increased (∼30%, P acinar cells. Taken together, our results show highly coordinated regulation of sympathetic activity upon PKA activity and plasma membrane SGLT1 content in salivary glands. Furthermore, the present findings show that diabetic- and/or hypertensive-induced changes in the sympathetic activity correlate with changes in SGLT1 expression in basolateral membrane of acinar cells, which can participate in the salivary glands dysfunctions reported by patients with these pathologies.

  13. Early events of secretory granule formation in the rat parotid acinar cell under the influence of isoproterenol. An ultrastructural and lectin cytochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F D’Amico

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The events involved in the maturation process of acinar secretory granules of rat parotid gland were investigated ultrastructurally and cytochemically by using a battery of four lectins [Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I, Glycine max agglutinin (SBA, Arachys hypogaea agglutinin (PNA]. In order to facilitate the study, parotid glands were chronically stimulated with isoproterenol to induce secretion. Specimens were embedded in the Lowicryl K4M resin. The trans-Golgi network (TGN derived secretory granules, which we refer to as immature secretory granules, were found to be intermediate structures in the biogenesis process of the secretory granules in the rat parotid acinar cell. These early structures do not seem to be the immediate precursor of the mature secretory granules: in fact, a subsequent interaction process between these early immature granule forms and TGN elements seems to occur, leading, finally, to the mature granules. These findings could explain the origin of the polymorphic subpopulations of the secretory granules in the normal acinar cells of the rat parotid gland. The lectin staining patterns were characteristic of each lectin. Immature and mature secretory gran- ules were labelled with WGA, SBA, PNA, and lightly with UEA-I. Cis and intermediate cisternae of the Golgi apparatus were labelled with WGA, and trans cisternae with WGA and SBA.

  14. CT and MR imaging of multilocular acinar cell cystadenoma: comparison with branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMNs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delavaud, Christophe; Assignies, Gaspard d' ; Vilgrain, Valerie; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre [Hopital Beaujon, Service de Radiologie, Clichy (France); Cros, Jerome [Hopital Beaujon, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Clichy (France); Ruszniewski, Philippe; Hammel, Pascal; Levy, Philippe [Hopital Beaujon, Service de Pancreato-Gastro-Enterologie, Clichy (France); Couvelard, Anne [Hopital Bichat, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Paris (France); Sauvanet, Alain; Dokmak, Safi [Hopital Beaujon, Service de Chirurgie Hepato-Pancreato-Biliaire, Clichy (France)

    2014-09-15

    To describe CT and MR imaging findings of acinar cell cystadenoma (ACC) of the pancreas and to compare them with those of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (BD-IPMN) to identify distinctive elements. Five patients with ACC and the 20 consecutive patients with histologically proven BD-IPMN were retrospectively included. Clinical and biological information was collected and histological data reviewed. CT and MR findings were analysed blinded to pathological diagnosis in order to identify imaging diagnostic criteria of ACC. Patients with ACC were symptomatic in all but one case and were younger than those with BD-IPMN (p = 0.006). Four radiological criteria allowed for differentiating ACC from IPMN: five or more cysts, clustered peripheral small cysts, presence of cyst calcifications and absence of communication with the main pancreatic duct (p < 0.05). Presence of at least two or three of these imaging criteria had a strong diagnostic value for ACC with a sensitivity of 100 % and 80 % and a specificity of 85 % and 100 %, respectively. Preoperative differential diagnosis between ACC and BD-IPMN can be achieved using a combination of four CT and/or MR imaging criteria. Recognition of ACC patients could change patient management and lead to more conservative treatment. (orig.)

  15. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho, E-mail: sangho@snu.ac.kr

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. - Highlights: • ADSCs could transdifferentiate into acinar cells (ACs) using ACs co-culture (CCA). • Transdifferentiated ADSCs expressed ACs markers such as α-amylase and aquaporin5. • High proliferation and low senescence were presented in CCA at Day 14. • Transdifferentiation of ADSCs into ACs using CCA may be an appropriate method for cell-based therapy.

  16. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage. - Highlights: • ADSCs could transdifferentiate into acinar cells (ACs) using ACs co-culture (CCA). • Transdifferentiated ADSCs expressed ACs markers such as α-amylase and aquaporin5. • High proliferation and low senescence were presented in CCA at Day 14. • Transdifferentiation of ADSCs into ACs using CCA may be an appropriate method for cell-based therapy

  17. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated memb

  18. Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Yoshihisa; Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2008-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by gamma-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment.

  19. Characteristics and mechanism of enzyme secretion and increase in [ Ca2+ ]i in Saikosaponin(I) stimulated rat pancreatic acinar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Yu; Wen-Xiu Yang; Hui Wang; Wen-Zheng Zhang; Bao-Hua Liu; Zhi-Yong Dong

    2002-01-01

    AIM: This investigation was to reveal the characteristics andmechanism of enzyme secretion and increase in [ Ca2+ ]1stimulated by saikosaponin(I) [ SA(I) ] in rat pancreatic acini.METHODS: Pancreatic acini were prepared from male Wistarrats. Isolated acinar cells were suspended in Eagle's MEMsolution. After adding drugs, the incubation was performedat 37 ℃ for a set period of time. Amylase of supernatant wasassayed using starch-iodide reaction. Isolated acinar singlecell was incubated with Fura-2/AMat 37 ℃, then cells werewashed and resuspended in fresh solution and attached tothe chamber. Cytoplasm [ Ca2+ ]i of a single cell wasexpressed by fluorescence ratio F340/F380 recorded in aNikon PI Ca2+ measurement system.RESULTS: Rate course of amylase secretion stimulated bySA(I) in rat pancreatic acini appeared in bell-like shape. Thepeak amplitude increased depended on SA(I) concentration.The maximum rate responded to 1 × 10-5 mol/L SA(I) was 13.1-fold of basal and the rate decreased to basal level at 30min. CCK-8 receptor antagonist Bt2-cGMP markedly inhibitedamylase secretion stimulated by SA (I) and the dose-effectrelationship was similar to that by CCK-8. [Ca2+ ]i in a singleacinar cell rose to the peak st 5 min after adding 5 × l06 mol/LSA(I) and was 5. 1-fold of basal level. In addition, there was asecondary increase after the initial peak. GDP could inhibitboth the rate of amylase secretion and rising of [Ca2+ ]istimulated by SA(I) in a single pancreatic acinar cell.CONCLUSION: SA (I) is highly efficient in promoting thesecretion of enzymes synthesized in rat pancreatic acini andraising intracellular [Ca2+ ]i. Signaling transduction pathwayof SA(I) involves activating special membrane receptor andincrease in cytoplasm [Ca2+ ]i sequentially.

  20. Regulation of Ca²⁺ release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors by adenine nucleotides in parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung Seo; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Zhang, Yu; Yule, David I

    2012-01-01

    Secretagogue-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) signals are fundamentally important for initiating the secretion of the fluid and ion component of saliva from parotid acinar cells. The Ca(2+) signals have characteristic spatial and temporal characteristics, which are defined by the specific properties of Ca(2+) release mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)R). In this study we have investigated the role of adenine nucleotides in modulating Ca(2+) release in mouse parotid acinar cells. In permeabilized cells, the Ca(2+) release rate induced by submaximal [InsP(3)] was increased by 5 mM ATP. Enhanced Ca(2+) release was not observed at saturating [InsP(3)]. The EC(50) for the augmented Ca(2+) release was ∼8 μM ATP. The effect was mimicked by nonhydrolysable ATP analogs. ADP and AMP also potentiated Ca(2+) release but were less potent than ATP. In acini isolated from InsP(3)R-2-null transgenic animals, the rate of Ca(2+) release was decreased under all conditions but now enhanced by ATP at all [InsP(3)]. In addition the EC(50) for ATP potentiation increased to ∼500 μM. These characteristics are consistent with the properties of the InsP(3)R-2 dominating the overall features of InsP(3)R-induced Ca(2+) release despite the expression of all isoforms. Finally, Ca(2+) signals were measured in intact parotid lobules by multiphoton microscopy. Consistent with the release data, carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+) signals were reduced in lobules exposed to experimental hypoxia compared with control lobules only at submaximal concentrations. Adenine nucleotide modulation of InsP(3)R in parotid acinar cells likely contributes to the properties of Ca(2+) signals in physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) limits senescence and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia formation during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Hehl, Adrian B; Seleznik, Gitta M; Saponara, Enrica; Schlesinger, Kathryn; Zuellig, Richard A; Dittmann, Anja; Bain, Martha; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-02-01

    Trans-differentiation of pancreatic acinar cells into ductal-like lesions, a process defined as acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), is observed in the course of organ regeneration following pancreatitis. In addition, ADM is found in association with pre-malignant PanIN lesions and correlates with an increased risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Human PDAC samples show down-regulation of p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) , a key regulator of cell cycle and cell differentiation. Here we investigated whether p21 down-regulation is implicated in controlling the early events of acinar cell trans-differentiation and ADM formation. p21-mediated regulation of ADM formation and regression was analysed in vivo during the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis, using wild-type (WT) and p21-deficient (p21(-/-) ) mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate disease progression over 2 weeks of the disease and during a recovery phase. We found that p21 was strongly up-regulated in WT acinar cells during pancreatitis, while it was absent in ADM areas, suggesting that p21 down-regulation is associated with ADM formation. In support of this hypothesis, p21(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in number and size of metaplasia. In addition, p21 over-expression in acinar cells reduced ADM formation in vitro, suggesting that the protein regulates the metaplastic transition in a cell-autonomous manner. p21(-/-) mice displayed increased expression and relocalization of β-catenin both during pancreatitis and in the subsequent recovery phase. Finally, loss of p21 was accompanied by increased DNA damage and development of senescence. Our findings are consistent with a gate-keeper role of p21 in acinar cells to limit senescence activation and ADM formation during pancreatic regeneration. PMID:25212177

  2. Using pancreas tissue slices for in situ studies of islet of Langerhans and acinar cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Anja; Cohrs, Christian M; Tsata, Vasiliki; Chouinard, Julie A; Selck, Claudia; Stertmann, Julia; Reichelt, Saskia; Rose, Tobias; Ehehalt, Florian; Weitz, Jürgen; Solimena, Michele; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Speier, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Studies on the cellular function of the pancreas are typically performed in vitro on its isolated functional units, the endocrine islets of Langerhans and the exocrine acini. However, these approaches are hampered by preparation-induced changes of cell physiology and the lack of an intact surrounding. We present here a detailed protocol for the preparation of pancreas tissue slices. This procedure is less damaging to the tissue and faster than alternative approaches, and it enables the in situ study of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cell physiology in a conserved environment. Pancreas tissue slices facilitate the investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying the function, pathology and interaction of the endocrine and exocrine components of the pancreas. We provide examples for several experimental applications of pancreas tissue slices to study various aspects of pancreas cell biology. Furthermore, we describe the preparation of human and porcine pancreas tissue slices for the validation and translation of research findings obtained in the mouse model. Preparation of pancreas tissue slices according to the protocol described here takes less than 45 min from tissue preparation to receipt of the first slices.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  4. Suppression by Ghrelin of Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Constitutive Nitric Oxide Synthase S-Nitrosylation and Apoptosis in Salivary Gland Acinar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw L. Slomiany

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucosal inflammatory responses to periodontopathic bacterium, P. gingivalis, and its key virulence factor, LPS, are characterized by a massive rise in epithelial cell apoptosis and the disturbances in NO signaling pathways. Here, we report that the LPS-induced enhancement in rat sublingual salivary gland acinar cell apoptosis and NO generation was associated with the suppression in constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS activity and a marked increase in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. We demonstrate that the detrimental effect of the LPS on cNOS was manifested by the enzyme protein S-nitrosylation, that was susceptible to inhibition by iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. Further, we show that a peptide hormone, ghrelin, countered the LPS-induced changes in apoptosis and cNOS activity. This effect of ghrelin was reflected in the decrease in cNOS S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation. Our findings imply that P. gingivalis-induced disturbances in the acinar cell NO signaling pathways result from upregulation in iNOS-derived NO that causes cNOS S-nitrosylation that interferes with its activation through phosphorylation. We also show that ghrelin protection against P. gingivalis-induced disturbances involves cNOS activation associated with a decrease in its S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation.

  5. Suppression by Ghrelin of Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Constitutive Nitric Oxide Synthase S-Nitrosylation and Apoptosis in Salivary Gland Acinar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, Bronislaw L; Slomiany, Amalia

    2010-01-01

    Oral mucosal inflammatory responses to periodontopathic bacterium, P. gingivalis, and its key virulence factor, LPS, are characterized by a massive rise in epithelial cell apoptosis and the disturbances in NO signaling pathways. Here, we report that the LPS-induced enhancement in rat sublingual salivary gland acinar cell apoptosis and NO generation was associated with the suppression in constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity and a marked increase in the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We demonstrate that the detrimental effect of the LPS on cNOS was manifested by the enzyme protein S-nitrosylation, that was susceptible to inhibition by iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. Further, we show that a peptide hormone, ghrelin, countered the LPS-induced changes in apoptosis and cNOS activity. This effect of ghrelin was reflected in the decrease in cNOS S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation. Our findings imply that P. gingivalis-induced disturbances in the acinar cell NO signaling pathways result from upregulation in iNOS-derived NO that causes cNOS S-nitrosylation that interferes with its activation through phosphorylation. We also show that ghrelin protection against P. gingivalis-induced disturbances involves cNOS activation associated with a decrease in its S-nitrosylation and the increase in phosphorylation.

  6. Quantitative characterization of the protein contents of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell by soft x-ray microscopy and advanced digital imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo Jr., Billy W.

    2000-06-09

    The study of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell has been central to the development of models of many cellular processes, especially of protein transport and secretion. Traditional methods used to examine this system have provided a wealth of qualitative information from which mechanistic models have been inferred. However they have lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements, particularly of the distribution of protein in the cell, information critical for grounding of models in terms of magnitude and relative significance. This dissertation describes the development and application of new tools that were used to measure the protein content of the major intracellular compartments in the acinar cell, particularly the zymogen granule. Soft x-ray microscopy permits image formation with high resolution and contrast determined by the underlying protein content of tissue rather than staining avidity. A sample preparation method compatible with x-ray microscopy was developed and its properties evaluated. Automatic computerized methods were developed to acquire, calibrate, and analyze large volumes of x-ray microscopic images of exocrine pancreatic tissue sections. Statistics were compiled on the protein density of several organelles, and on the protein density, size, and spatial distribution of tens of thousands of zymogen granules. The results of these measurements, and how they compare to predictions of different models of protein transport, are discussed.

  7. Effects of a diet high in fish oil (MaxEPA) on the formation of micronucleated erythrocytes in blood and on the number of atypical acinar cell foci induced in rat pancreas by Azaserine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appel, M.J.; Woutersen, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the influence of fish oil on the genotoxic effects of azaserine, using the formation of micronucleated erythrocytes as a measure for the degree of initiating potency and the number and size of putative preneoplastic pancreatic atypical acinar cell foci

  8. Fractionated irradiation and late changes in rat parotid gland: effects on the number of acinar cells, potassium efflux, and amylase secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzen, L.; Gustafsson, H.; Sundstroem, S.; Karlsson, M.; Littbrand, B.; Henriksson, R. (Umeaa Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Otorhinolaryngology, Histology and Cell Biology)

    1993-07-01

    The authors used different in vitro secretory models and quantitative morphological characterization of rat parotid gland following fractionated unilateral irradiation to one gland on a 5-day fraction schedule with 6 MV photons (total dose 30, 35, 40 and 45 Gy) or a two-fractions regimen in 5 days with total dose of 24 and 32 Gy. The contralateral shielded gland served as control, and parallel analyses of irradiated and control glands were performed 180 days following the last irradiation. The relative noradrenaline stimulated electrolyte secretion ([sup 86]rubidium tracer for potassium) was decreased in the irradiated compared with control glands. The noradrenaline-stimulated exocytotic amylase release was not significantly affected by irradiation, but the gland content of amylase was decreased dose-dependently. The quantitative morphological analysis revealed a dose-dependent decline in the number of acinar cells; the other parenchymal cells were unaffected by irradiation compared with controls. (author).

  9. Fractionated irradiation and late changes in rat parotid gland: effects on the number of acinar cells, potassium efflux, and amylase secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors used different in vitro secretory models and quantitative morphological characterization of rat parotid gland following fractionated unilateral irradiation to one gland on a 5-day fraction schedule with 6 MV photons (total dose 30, 35, 40 and 45 Gy) or a two-fractions regimen in 5 days with total dose of 24 and 32 Gy. The contralateral shielded gland served as control, and parallel analyses of irradiated and control glands were performed 180 days following the last irradiation. The relative noradrenaline stimulated electrolyte secretion (86rubidium tracer for potassium) was decreased in the irradiated compared with control glands. The noradrenaline-stimulated exocytotic amylase release was not significantly affected by irradiation, but the gland content of amylase was decreased dose-dependently. The quantitative morphological analysis revealed a dose-dependent decline in the number of acinar cells; the other parenchymal cells were unaffected by irradiation compared with controls. (author)

  10. Slug inhibits pancreatic cancer initiation by blocking Kras-induced acinar-ductal metaplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Kazumi Ebine; Chow, Christina R.; DeCant, Brian T.; Hattaway, Holly Z.; Grippo, Paul J.; Krishan Kumar; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the pancreas that have undergone acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM) can transform into premalignant cells that can eventually become cancerous. Although the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulator Snail (Snai1) can cooperate with Kras in acinar cells to enhance ADM development, the contribution of Snail-related protein Slug (Snai2) to ADM development is not known. Thus, transgenic mice expressing Slug and Kras in acinar cells were generated. Surprisingly, Slug attenuated Kras-induced...

  11. Transdifferentiation of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells into acinar cells of the submandibular gland using a co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jingu; Park, Sangkyu; Roh, Sangho

    2015-05-15

    A loss of salivary gland function often occurs after radiation therapy in head and neck tumors, though secretion of saliva by the salivary glands is essential for the health and maintenance of the oral environment. Transplantation of salivary acinar cells (ACs), in part, may overcome the side effects of therapy. Here we directly differentiated mouse adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into ACs using a co-culture system. Multipotent ADSCs can be easily collected from stromal vascular fractions of adipose tissues. The isolated ADSCs showed positive expression of markers such as integrin beta-1 (CD29), cell surface glycoprotein (CD44), endoglin (CD105), and Nanog. The cells were able to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and neural-like cells after 14 days in culture. ADSCs at passage 2 were co-cultured with mouse ACs in AC culture medium using the double-chamber (co-culture system) to avoid mixing the cell types. The ADSCs in this co-culture system expressed markers of ACs, such as α-amylases and aquaporin5, in both mRNA and protein. ADSCs cultured in AC-conditioned medium also expressed AC markers. Cellular proliferation and senescence analyses demonstrated that cells in the co-culture group showed lower senescence and a higher proliferation rate than the AC-conditioned medium group at Days 14 and 21. The results above imply direct conversion of ADSCs into ACs under the co-culture system; therefore, ADSCs may be a stem cell source for the therapy for salivary gland damage.

  12. Direct imaging of RAB27B-enriched secretory vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal acinar cells reveals origins on a nascent vesicle budding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Chiang

    Full Text Available This study uses YFP-tagged Rab27b expression in rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells, which are polarized secretory epithelial cells, to characterize early stages of secretory vesicle trafficking. Here we demonstrate the utility of YFP-Rab27b to delineate new perspectives on the mechanisms of early vesicle biogenesis in lacrimal gland acinar cells, where information is significantly limited. Protocols were developed to deplete the mature YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle pool in the subapical region of the cell, and confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to track vesicle replenishment. This analysis revealed a basally-localized organelle, which we termed the "nascent vesicle site," from which nascent vesicles appeared to emerge. Subapical vesicular YFP-Rab27b was co-localized with p150(Glued, a component of the dynactin cofactor of cytoplasmic dynein. Treatment with the microtubule-targeted agent, nocodazole, did not affect release of mature secretory vesicles, although during vesicle repletion it significantly altered nascent YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicle localization. Instead of moving to the subapical region, these vesicles were trapped at the nascent vesicle site which was adjacent to, if not a sub-compartment of, the trans-Golgi network. Finally, YFP-Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles which reached the subapical cytoplasm appeared to acquire the actin-based motor protein, Myosin 5C. Our findings show that Rab27b enrichment occurs early in secretory vesicle formation, that secretory vesicles bud from a visually discernable nascent vesicle site, and that transport from the nascent vesicle site to the subapical region requires intact microtubules.

  13. Constitutive nitric oxide synthase-mediated caspase-3 S-nitrosylation in ghrelin protection against Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced salivary gland acinar cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2010-06-01

    Recent advances in identifying the salivary constituents capable of influencing the oral mucosal inflammatory responses have brought to focus the importance of a peptide hormone, ghrelin. Here, we report on the involvement of ghrelin in controlling the apoptotic processes induced in sublingual salivary gland acinar cells by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of a periodontopathic bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis. We show that the countering effect of ghrelin on the LPS-induced acinar cell apoptosis was associated with the increase in constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity, and the reduction in caspase-3 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The loss in countering effect of ghrelin on the LPS-induced changes in apoptosis and caspase-3 activity was attained with Src kinase inhibitor, PP2, as well as Akt inhibitor, SH-5, and cNOS inhibitor, L-NAME, but not the iNOS inhibitor, 1400W. The effect of ghrelin on the LPS-induced changes in cNOS activity, moreover, was reflected in the increased cNOS phosphorylation that was sensitive to PP2 as well as SH-5. Furthermore, the ghrelin-induced up-regulation in cNOS activity was associated with the increase in caspase-3 S-nitrosylation that was susceptible to the blockage by SH-5 and L-NAME. The findings point to the involvement of ghrelin in Src/Akt kinase-mediated cNOS activation and the apoptogenic signal inhibition through the NO-induced caspase-3 S-nitrosylation.

  14. The effect of irradiation on the intracellular transportation of the parotid gland acinar cells in the mouse. Localization of monosaccharides studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Hajime (Nippon Dental Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of radiation on the ability to ingest monosaccharides and intracellular transportation in the parotid gland in mice. The submandibular regions, including the parotid gland, was exposed to 10 Gy of X-rays. Three days after irradiation, the localization of reducing silver grains in organelles was determined, using electron microscopic autoradiography with H-3 labeled galactosamine, glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. In the non-irradiated group, the proportion of reducing silver grains in the acinar cells began to increase 15 min after administration of monosaccharides, reached a peak at 180 min, and thereafter decreased. Similar findings were observed in the irradiated group, although the values were lower than the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the endoplasmic reticulum reached a peak at 15 min in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, and gradually decreased until 120 min. Thereafter, it became almost constant and low, but the proportion in the irradiated group was slightly higher than in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the Golgi apparatus was maximum at 60 min in the non-irradiated group, and gradually decreased until 360 min. A similar tendency was seen in the irradiated group, although its variation was not so marked as in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the condensing vacuoles was maximum at 120 min, and thereafter, it decreased; the decrease was only slight in the irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in secretory granules increased with time in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, although this was only slight in the irradiated group, and reached a peak at 360 min. Transportation of monosaccharides in an acinar cell was found to be delayed by irradiation. (N.K.).

  15. Role of epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation in the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) in leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2009-06-01

    A pleiotropic hormone, leptin, secreted into saliva by the acinar cells of salivary glands is an important mediator of the processes of oral mucosal defense. Here, we report on the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation in the signaling events that mediate leptin protection of sublingual salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity. We show that the protective effect of leptin against ethanol cytotoxicity was associated with the increased EGFR protein tyrosine kinase and cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) activity, and characterized by a marked increase in matrix metalloproteinase MMP-9 and arachidonic acid (AA) release, and PGE(2) generation. The loss in countering capacity of leptin against ethanol cytotoxicity was attained with JAK inhibitor AG490, Src inhibitor PP2, and EGFR inhibitor AG1478, as well as ERK inhibitor PD98059. Moreover, the agents evoked also the inhibition in leptin-induced up-regulation in cPLA(2) activity, AA release, and PGE(2) generation. The changes caused by leptin in EGFR phosphorylation, MMP-9, and cPLA(2) activation were susceptible to suppression by metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001, but the production of MMP-9 was not affected by EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or PKC inhibitor Ro318220. These findings point to the involvement of MMP-9 in the event of leptin-induced EGFR transactivation that results in the signaling cascade leading to cPLA(2) activation and up-regulation in PGE(2) generation, thus providing new insights into the mechanism of oral mucosal protection against ethanol toxicity.

  16. The effect of irradiation on the intracellular transportation of the parotid gland acinar cells in the mouse. Localization of monosaccharides studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of radiation on the ability to ingest monosaccharides and intracellular transportation in the parotid gland in mice. The submandibular regions, including the parotid gland, was exposed to 10 Gy of X-rays. Three days after irradiation, the localization of reducing silver grains in organelles was determined, using electron microscopic autoradiography with H-3 labeled galactosamine, glucosamine, fucose, and mannose. In the non-irradiated group, the proportion of reducing silver grains in the acinar cells began to increase 15 min after administration of monosaccharides, reached a peak at 180 min, and thereafter decreased. Similar findings were observed in the irradiated group, although the values were lower than the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the endoplasmic reticulum reached a peak at 15 min in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, and gradually decreased until 120 min. Thereafter, it became almost constant and low, but the proportion in the irradiated group was slightly higher than in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the Golgi apparatus was maximum at 60 min in the non-irradiated group, and gradually decreased until 360 min. A similar tendency was seen in the irradiated group, although its variation was not so marked as in the non-irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in the condensing vacuoles was maximum at 120 min, and thereafter, it decreased; the decrease was only slight in the irradiated group. The proportion of reducing silver grains in secretory granules increased with time in both the non-irradiated and irradiated groups, although this was only slight in the irradiated group, and reached a peak at 360 min. Transportation of monosaccharides in an acinar cell was found to be delayed by irradiation. (N.K.)

  17. Adult pancreatic acinar cells give rise to ducts but not endocrine cells in response to growth factor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Blaine, Stacy A.; Ray, Kevin C.; Anunobi, Reginald; Gannon, Maureen A.; Washington, Mary K.; Means, Anna L.

    2010-01-01

    Studies in both humans and rodents have found that insulin+ cells appear within or near ducts of the adult pancreas, particularly following damage or disease, suggesting that these insulin+ cells arise de novo from ductal epithelium. We have found that insulin+ cells are continuous with duct cells in the epithelium that makes up the hyperplastic ducts of both chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that both hyperplastic ductal cells and their...

  18. Melatonin induces the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes via PKC and Ca2+ influx activation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Clea Ruy, Deborah; Garcia-Sanchez, Lourdes; Jimenez-Blasco, Daniel; Fernandez-Bermejo, Miguel; Bolaños, Juan P; Salido, Gines M; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor and the antioxidant-responsive element (Nrf2-ARE) signaling pathway in response to melatonin in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Changes in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were followed by fluorimetric analysis of fura-2-loaded cells. The activations of PKC and JNK were measured by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes. Immunocytochemistry was employed to determine nuclear location of phosphorylated Nrf2, and the cellular redox state was monitored following MitoSOX Red-derived fluorescence. Our results show that stimulation of fura-2-loaded cells with melatonin (1 µM to 1 mM), in the presence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium, induced a slow and progressive increase of [Ca(2+)](c) toward a stable level. Melatonin did not inhibit the typical Ca(2+) response induced by CCK-8 (1 nM). When the cells were challenged with indoleamine in the absence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular solution (medium containing 0.5 mM EGTA) or in the presence of 1 mM LaCl(3), to inhibit Ca(2+) entry, we could not detect any change in [Ca(2+)](c). Nevertheless, CCK-8 (1 nM) was able to induce the typical mobilization of Ca(2+). When the cells were incubated with the PKC activator PMA (1 µM) in the presence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium, we observed a response similar to that noted when the cells were challenged with melatonin 100 µM. However, in the presence of Ro31-8220 (3 µM), a PKC inhibitor, stimulation of cells with melatonin failed to evoke changes in [Ca(2+)]c. Immunoblots, using an antibody specific for phospho-PKC, revealed that melatonin induces PKCα activation, either in the presence or in the absence of external Ca(2+). Melatonin induced the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor Nrf2, and

  19. Knockdown of GRP78 promotes apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells and attenuates the severity of cerulein and LPS induced pancreatic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potentially lethal disease characterized by inflammation and parenchymal cell death; also, the severity of AP correlates directly with necrosis and inversely with apoptosis. However, mechanisms of regulating cell death in AP remain unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperone protein GRP78 has anti-apoptotic properties, in addition to modulating ER stress responses. This study used RNA interference (RNAi approach to investigate the potential role of GRP78 in regulating apoptosis during AP. In vitro models of AP were successfully developed by treating AR42J cells with cerulein or cerulein plus lipoplysaccharide (LPS. There was more pancreatic inflammation and less apoptosis with the cerulein plus LPS treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of GRP78 expression markedly promoted apoptosis and reduced necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells. This was accomplished by enhancing the activation of caspases and inhibiting the activity of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP, as well as a receptor interacting protein kinase-1(RIPK1, which is a key mediator of necrosis. This attenuated the severity of pancreatic inflammation, especially after cerulein plus LPS treatment. In conclusion, these findings indicate that GRP78 plays an anti-apoptotic role in regulating the cell death response during AP. Therefore, GRP78 is a potential therapeutic target for AP.

  20. Pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion: challenge of the acinar acid load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eHegyi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinar and ductal cells of the exocrine pancreas form a close functional unit. Although most studies contain data either on acinar or ductal cells, an increasing number of evidence highlights the importance of the pancreatic acinar-ductal functional unit. One of the best examples for this functional unit is the regulation of luminal pH by both cell types. Protons co-released during exocytosis from acini cause significant acidosis, whereas, bicarbonate secreted by ductal cells cause alkalization in the lumen. This suggests that the first and probably one of the most important role of bicarbonate secretion by pancreatic ductal cells is not only to neutralize the acid chyme entering into the duodenum from the stomach, but to neutralize acidic content secreted by acinar cells. To accomplish this role, it is more than likely that ductal cells have physiological sensing mechanisms which would allow them to regulate luminal pH. To date, four different classes of acid-sensing ion channels have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract (transient receptor potential ion channels, two-pore domain potassium channel, ionotropic purinoceptor and acid-sensing ion channel, however, none of these have been studied in pancreatic ductal cells. In this mini-review, we summarize our current knowledge of these channels and urge scientists to characterize ductal acid-sensing mechanisms and also to investigate the challenge of the acinar acid load on ductal cells.

  1. Tissue microarrays in pathological examination of apoptotic acinar cells induced by dexamethasone in the pancreas of rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Ping Zhang; Hua Tian; Bei Lu; Li Chen; Ru-Jun Xu; Ke-Yi Wang; Zhi-Wei Wang; Qi-Hui Cheng; Hai-Ping Shen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The good therapeutic effects of large dose of dexamethasone on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients have been proved. This study was designed to investigate the inlfuence of dexamethasone on apoptosis of acinar cells in the pancreas of rats with SAP and the protein expression of the apoptosis-regulating genes Bax and Bcl-2. METHODS: Ninety Sprague-Dawley rats with SAP were randomly divided into a model group and a dexamethasone treated group (45 rats in each group), and another 45 rats formed the sham operation group. Survival rates were calculated and gross pathological changes in the pancreas of each group were observed under a light microscope 3, 6 and 12 hours after operation. Tissue microarray technology was applied to prepare pancreatic tissue sections. The changes in Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression levels of pancreatic tissues from each group were assessed by immunohistochemical staining, and TUNEL staining was used to evaluate changes in apoptosis index. RESULTS: The model and treated groups did not differ in mortality at each time point. The pathological score for the pancreas in the treated group was signiifcantly lower than that in the model group at 3 and 6 hours. The positive rates of Bax protein expression in the head and tail of the pancreas in the treated group at all time points were all markedly higher than those of the model group. The positive rate of Bcl-2 protein expression in the head of the pancreas in the treated group was signiifcantly higher than that of the model group at 3 hours. TUNEL staining showed that the pancreas head and tail apoptosis indices of the treated group were markedly higher than those of the model group after 6 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Apoptosis may be a protective response to pancreatic cell injury. The mechanism of action of dexamethasone in treating SAP may be related to the apoptosis of acinar cells in the pancreas induced by apoptosis-regulating genes such as Bax and Bcl-2. The advantages of tissue

  2. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Ming; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  3. Activation of ERK1/2 by store-operated calcium entry in rat parotid acinar cells.

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    Stephen P Soltoff

    Full Text Available The regulation of intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]i plays a critical role in a variety of cellular processes, including transcription, protein activation, vesicle trafficking, and ion movement across epithelial cells. In many cells, the activation of phospholipase C-coupled receptors hydrolyzes membrane phosphoinositides and produces the depletion of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ stores, followed by the sustained elevation of [Ca(2+]i from Ca(2+ entry across the plasma membrane via store-operated Ca(2+ entry (SOCE. Ca(2+ entry is also increased in a store-independent manner by arachidonate-regulated Ca(2+ (ARC channels. Using rat parotid salivary gland cells, we examined multiple pathways of Ca(2+ entry/elevation to determine if they activated cell signaling proteins and whether this occurred in a pathway-dependent manner. We observed that SOCE activates extracellular signal-related kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 to ∼3-times basal levels via a receptor-independent mechanism when SOCE was initiated by depleting Ca(2+ stores using the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (TG. TG-initiated ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased as rapidly as that initiated by the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol, which promoted an increase to ∼5-times basal levels. Notably, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not increased by the global elevation of [Ca(2+]i by Ca(2+ ionophore or by Ca(2+ entry via ARC channels in native cells, although ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased by Ca(2+ ionophore in Par-C10 and HSY salivary cell lines. Agents and conditions that blocked SOCE in native cells, including 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB, SKF96363, and removal of extracellular Ca(2+, also reduced TG- and carbachol-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. TG-promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation was blocked when SRC and Protein Kinases C (PKC were inhibited, and it was blocked in cells pretreated with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. These observations demonstrate

  4. Nonenzymatic cryogenic isolation of therapeutic cells: novel approach for enzyme-free isolation of pancreatic islets using in situ cryopreservation of islets and concurrent selective freeze destruction of acinar tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael J; Baicu, Simona C

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapies, which all involve processes for procurement and reimplantation of living cells, currently rely upon expensive, inconsistent, and even toxic enzyme digestion processes. A prime example is the preparation of isolated pancreatic islets for the treatment of type 1 diabetes by transplantation. To avoid the inherent pitfalls of these enzymatic methods, we have conceptualized an alternative approach based on the hypothesis that cryobiological techniques can be used for differential freeze destruction of the pancreas (Px) to release islets that are selectively cryopreserved in situ. Pancreata were procured from juvenile pigs using approved procedures. The concept of cryoisolation is based on differential processing of the pancreas in five stages: 1) infiltrating islets in situ preferentially with a cryoprotectant (CPA) cocktail via antegrade perfusion of the major arteries; 2) retrograde ductal infusion of water to distend the acinar; 3) freezing the entire Px solid to dithizone for identification of intact islets and with Syto 13/PI for fluorescence viability testing and glucose-stimulated insulin release assessment. As predicted, the cryoisolate contained small fragments of residual tissue comprising an amorphous mass of acinar tissue with largely intact and viable (>90%) embedded islets. Islets were typically larger (range 50-500 µm diameter) than their counterparts isolated from juvenile pigs using conventional enzyme digestion techniques. Functionally, the islets from replicate cryoisolates responded to a glucose challenge with a mean stimulation index = 3.3 ± 0.7. An enzyme-free method of islet isolation relying on in situ cryopreservation of islets with simultaneous freeze destruction of acinar tissue is feasible and proposed as a new and novel method that avoids the problems associated with conventional collagenase digestion methods. PMID:23992741

  5. Mechanism of Cytosolic Phospholipase A(2) Activation in Ghrelin Protection of Salivary Gland Acinar Cells against Ethanol Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, Bronislaw L; Slomiany, Amalia

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone, newly identified in oral mucosal tissues, has emerged recently as an important mediator of the processes of mucosal defense. Here, we report on the mechanism of ghrelin protection against ethanol cytotoxicity in rat sublingual salivary gland cells. The protective effect of ghrelin was associated with the increase in NO and PGE2, and upregulation in cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) activity and arachidonic acid (AA) release. The loss in countering effect of ghrelin occurred with cNOS inhibitor, L-NAME, as well as indomethacin and COX-1 inhibitor, SC-560, while COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, and iNOS inhibitor, 1400W, had no effect. The effect of L-NAME was reflected in the inhibition of ghrelin-induced cell capacity for NO production, cPLA(2) activation and PGE2 generation, whereas indomethacin caused only the inhibition in PGE2. Moreover, the ghrelin-induced up-regulation in AA release was reflected in the cPLA(2) phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation. Inhibition in ghrelin-induced S-nitrosylation was attained with L-NAME, whereas the ERK inhibitor, PD98059, caused the blockage in cPLA(2) protein phosphorylation as well as S-nitrosylation. Thus, ghrelin protection of salivary gland cells against ethanol involves cNOS-derived NO induction of cPLA(2) activation through S-nitrosylation for the increase in AA release at the site of COX-1 action for PGE2 synthesis.

  6. Mechanism of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Activation in Ghrelin Protection of Salivary Gland Acinar Cells against Ethanol Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislaw L. Slomiany

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin, a peptide hormone, newly identified in oral mucosal tissues, has emerged recently as an important mediator of the processes of mucosal defense. Here, we report on the mechanism of ghrelin protection against ethanol cytotoxicity in rat sublingual salivary gland cells. The protective effect of ghrelin was associated with the increase in NO and PGE2, and upregulation in cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 activity and arachidonic acid (AA release. The loss in countering effect of ghrelin occurred with cNOS inhibitor, L-NAME, as well as indomethacin and COX-1 inhibitor, SC-560, while COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, and iNOS inhibitor, 1400W, had no effect. The effect of L-NAME was reflected in the inhibition of ghrelin-induced cell capacity for NO production, cPLA2 activation and PGE2 generation, whereas indomethacin caused only the inhibition in PGE2. Moreover, the ghrelin-induced up-regulation in AA release was reflected in the cPLA2 phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation. Inhibition in ghrelin-induced S-nitrosylation was attained with L-NAME, whereas the ERK inhibitor, PD98059, caused the blockage in cPLA2 protein phosphorylation as well as S-nitrosylation. Thus, ghrelin protection of salivary gland cells against ethanol involves cNOS-derived NO induction of cPLA2 activation through S-nitrosylation for the increase in AA release at the site of COX-1 action for PGE2 synthesis.

  7. Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia accompanies c-myc-induced exocrine pancreatic cancer progression in transgenic rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippo, Paul J; Sandgren, Eric P

    2012-09-01

    Several important characteristics of exocrine pancreatic tumor pathogenesis remain incompletely defined, including identification of the cell of origin. Most human pancreatic neoplasms are ductal adenocarcinomas. However, acinar cells have been proposed as the source of some ductal neoplasms through a process of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The oncogenic transcription factor c-myc is associated with human pancreatic neoplasms. Transgenic mice overexpressing c-myc under control of acinar cell-specific elastase (Ela) gene regulatory elements not only develop acinar cell carcinomas but also mixed neoplasms that display both acinar-like neoplastic cells and duct-like neoplastic cells. In this report, we demonstrate that, first, c-myc is sufficient to induce acinar hyperplasia, though neoplastic lesions develop focally. Second, cell proliferation remains elevated in the neoplastic duct cell compartment of mixed neoplasms. Third, the proliferation/apoptosis ratio in cells from all lesion types remains constant, suggesting that differential regulation of these processes is not a feature of cancer progression in this model. Fourth, before the development of mixed neoplasms, there is transcriptional activation of the duct cell-specific cytokeratin-19 gene promoter in multicellular foci of amylase-positive acinar neoplasms. This observation provides direct evidence for metaplasia as the mechanism underlying development of ductal neoplastic cells within the context of an acinar neoplasm and suggests that the stimulus for this transformation acts over a multicellular domain or field within a neoplasm. Finally, focal ductal elements develop in some acinar cell carcinomas in Ela-c-myc transgenic rats, indicating that myc-associated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia is not restricted to the mouse.

  8. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer. PMID:26877198

  9. Clinicopathologic analyses of salivary gland acinar cell carcinoma and review of the literature%涎腺腺泡细胞癌临床病理分析并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘畅; 许春伟; 王晶晶; 张立英

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinicopathological features and diagnostic criteria of salivary gland acinar cell carcinoma.Methods:Retrospectively analyzed the features of clinicopathology and immunohistochemistry of a case of salivary gland acinar cell carcinoma, and combined together the review of the literatures.Results: Under light microscope, the tumor cell body was wide, and basophilic cytoplasm was ifne granular, nuclear round tumor cell growth was gland bubbly or slice solid growth, area of tumor was the papillary change, this case showed positive immunostaining for AE1/AE3, CK8/18, CK7, AAT and S-100.Conclusion: Salivary gland acinar cell carcinoma has a low incidence, but its frequent position of invasion and typical histology shape, combining together immunohistochemistry methods, will make for diagnosis and differential diagnosis possible.%目的:探讨涎腺腺泡细胞癌的临床病理学特点及诊断要点。方法:对1例涎腺腺泡细胞癌进行临床资料、病理形态学及免疫组织化学观察,并结合文献对其诊断及鉴别诊断进行探讨。结果:镜下瘤细胞胞体宽大,胞浆嗜碱性呈细颗粒状,核圆形瘤细胞生长呈腺泡状或实性片状生长,部分区域呈乳头状改变,免疫组化显示AE1/AE3(+)、CK8/18(+)、CK7(+)、AAT(+)、S-100(+)。结论:涎腺腺泡细胞癌发病率低,但根据其常见的发病部位及特征性的组织形态,结合免疫组织化学方法,有助于其诊断及鉴别诊断。

  10. FDG PET imaging of Ela1-myc mice reveals major biological differences between pancreatic acinar and ductal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abasolo, Ibane [Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Hospital del Mar, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Departament de Ciencies Experimentals i de la Salut, Barcelona (Spain); Institut d' Alta Tecnologia - CRC, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Pujal, Judit; Navarro, Pilar [Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Hospital del Mar, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Rabanal, Rosa M.; Serafin, Anna [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animals, Barcelona (Spain); Millan, Olga [Institut d' Alta Tecnologia - CRC, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Real, Francisco X. [Institut Municipal d' Investigacio Medica-Hospital del Mar, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona, Departament de Ciencies Experimentals i de la Salut, Barcelona (Spain); Programa de Patologia Molecular, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    The aim was to evaluate FDG PET imaging in Ela1-myc mice, a pancreatic cancer model resulting in the development of tumours with either acinar or mixed acinar-ductal phenotype. Transversal and longitudinal FDG PET studies were conducted; selected tissue samples were subjected to autoradiography and ex vivo organ counting. Glucose transporter and hexokinase mRNA expression was analysed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR); Glut2 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Transversal studies showed that mixed acinar-ductal tumours could be identified by FDG PET several weeks before they could be detected by hand palpation. Longitudinal studies revealed that ductal - but not acinar - tumours could be detected by FDG PET. Autoradiographic analysis confirmed that tumour areas with ductal differentiation incorporated more FDG than areas displaying acinar differentiation. Ex vivo radioactivity measurements showed that tumours of solely acinar phenotype incorporated more FDG than pancreata of non-transgenic littermates despite the fact that they did not yield positive PET images. To gain insight into the biological basis of the differential FDG uptake, glucose transporter and hexokinase transcript expression was studied in microdissected tumour areas enriched for acinar or ductal cells and validated using cell-specific markers. Glut2 and hexokinase I and II mRNA levels were up to 20-fold higher in ductal than in acinar tumours. Besides, Glut2 protein overexpression was found in ductal neoplastic cells but not in the surrounding stroma. In Ela1-myc mice, ductal tumours incorporate significantly more FDG than acinar tumours. This difference likely results from differential expression of Glut2 and hexokinases. These findings reveal previously unreported biological differences between acinar and ductal pancreatic tumours. (orig.)

  11. Establishment of functional acinar-like cultures from human salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, S I; Ong, H L; Gallo, A; Liu, X; Illei, G; Alevizos, I

    2015-02-01

    Disorders of human salivary glands resulting from therapeutic radiation treatment for head and neck cancers or from the autoimmune disease Sjögren syndrome (SS) frequently result in the reduction or complete loss of saliva secretion. Such irreversible dysfunction of the salivary glands is due to the impairment of acinar cells, the major glandular cells of protein, salt secretion, and fluid movement. Availability of primary epithelial cells from human salivary gland tissue is critical for studying the underlying mechanisms of these irreversible disorders. We applied 2 culture system techniques on human minor salivary gland epithelial cells (phmSG) and optimized the growth conditions to achieve the maintenance of phmSG in an acinar-like phenotype. These phmSG cells exhibited progenitor cell markers (keratin 5 and nanog) as well as acinar-specific markers-namely, α-amylase, cystatin C, TMEM16A, and NKCC1. Importantly, with an increase of the calcium concentration in the growth medium, these phmSG cells were further promoted to acinar-like cells in vitro, as indicated by an increase in AQP5 expression. In addition, these phmSG cells also demonstrated functional calcium mobilization, formation of epithelial monolayer with high transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and polarized secretion of α-amylase secretion after β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Taken together, suitable growth conditions have been established to isolate and support culture of acinar-like cells from the human salivary gland. These primary epithelial cells can be useful for study of molecular mechanisms involved in regulating the function of acinar cells and in the loss of salivary gland function in patients.

  12. Postmortem acinar autolysis in rat sublingual gland: a morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Rodrigues Nery

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To analyze and to quantify morphological acinar postmortem changes in rat sublingual glands (SLG. MATERIAL AND METHODSs: Fifty rats were divided into two groups of 25 animals each. Group I was used for morphological and morphometric evaluations and group II for the determination of gland density and processed gland volume. Acinar autolytic changes were studied at 0 (control group, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h postmortem periods. The morphometric analysis of the volume density (Vv and total volume (Vt of intact (ia and autolyzed (aa acini was performed under light microscopy using a Zeiss II integration grid with 100 symmetrically distributed points. RESULTS: Morphologically, temporal progressive nuclear alterations and gradual loss of the structural architecture of acinar cells were found. Regarding quantitative results, both the Vvaa and the Vvia showed statistically significant differences among all postmortem periods (p0.05, respectively. Vtaa increased from 0.18 mm³ at 0 h to 38.17 mm³ at 12 h, while Vtia showed a decrease from 33.47 mm³ to 0 mm³ between 3-24 h postmortem. Data concerning Vtaa were adjusted by two-variable linear regression, obtaining the equation: y=-3.54 + 3.38x (r²=0.90. The Vtaa growth rate calculated by this equation was 3.38 mm³/h between 0-12 h. CONCLUSION: Acinar autolysis on rat SLG demonstrated the most significant signs during the first 6 h postmortem and was widely spread through the gland at 12 h.

  13. Induction of C-FOS, C-MYC and P53 by US -adrenergic receptor (US -AR) stimulation of rat parotid acinar cells (RPAC)

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    Kousvelari, E.E.; Louis, J.; Curran, T.; Baum, B.J.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of rats with the US -agonist isoproterenol (ISO) results in dramatically increased parotid gland protein synthesis, processing and cell proliferation. The authors have shown that in RPAC in vitro, US -AR stimulation has similar effect on protein synthesis and processing. Proto-oncogenes have been implicated in growth regulation, differentiation and in mediating some extracellular stimulated events at the level of gene expression. To understand the regulation of cellular events after US -AR stimulation, the expression of c-fos, c-myc and p53 was investigated. RPAC were incubated with or without 10 VM ISO for 15, 30, 60 min. mRNA was isolated from cells and hybridization analysis was performed on nitrocellulose paper-transferred mRNA using TSP-labeled DNA probes. At early time points, the levels of c-fos gene activation in ISO-treated and control cells were comparable. After 60 min of ISO treatment, a sharp 20-30 fold induction of c-fos expression occurred. Similar increases in c-myc and p53 gene expression were observed after 60 min of ISO treatment. The authors data indicate that early effects of US -AR stimulation of RPAC include induction of c-fos, c-myc and p53 gene expression as well as enhanced protein synthesis and processing.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody 16D10 to the C-Terminal Domain of the Feto-Acinar Pancreatic Protein Binds to Membrane of Human Pancreatic Tumoral SOJ-6 Cells and Inhibits the Growth of Tumor Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Panicot-Dubois

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Feto-acinar pancreatic protein (FAPP characterized by mAbJ28 reactivity is a specific component associated with ontogenesis and behaves as an oncodevelopment-associated antigen. We attempted to determine whether pancreatic tumoral SOJ-6 cells are expressed at their surface FAPP antigens and to examine if specific antibodies directed against these FAPP epitopes could decrease the growth of pancreatic tumors in a mice model. For this purpose, we used specific antibodies against either the whole FAPP, the O-glycosylated C-terminal domain, or the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our results indicate that SOJ-6 cells expressed at their surface a 32-kDa peptide corresponding to the C-terminal domain of the FAPP. Furthermore, we show, by using endoproteinase Lys-C or geldanamycin, a drug able to impair the FAPP secretion, that this 32-kDa peptide expressed on the SOJ-6 cell surface comes from the degradation of the FAPP. Finally, an in vivo prospective study using a preventative tumor model in nude mice indicates that targeting this peptide by the use of mAb16D10 inhibits the growth of SOJ-6 xenografts. The specificity of mAb16D10 for pancreatic tumors and the possibility to obtain recombinant structures of mucin-like peptides recognized by mAb16D10 and mAbJ28 are promising tools in immunologic approaches to cure pancreatic cancers.

  15. Root bark extracts of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa protect salivary gland acinar cells from apoptotic cell death induced by cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukudai, Yoshiki; Kondo, Seiji; Shiogama, Sunao; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Li, Chunnan; Yazawa, Kazunaga; Shintani, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    Cis-platinum (II) diammine dichloride (CDDP) is a platinum-based anticancer agent, and is often used for chemotherapy for malignant tumors, albeit CDDP has serious side-effects, including xerostomia (dry mouth). Since patients with xerostomia have reduced quality of life, it is urgent and important to identify nontoxic and natural agents capable of reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy on salivary gland function. Therefore, we commenced an institutional collaborative project in which candidates of herbal extracts were selected from more than 400 bioactive herbal products for their potential therapeutic effects not only on xerostomia, but also on oral diseases. In the present study, we report on two Chinese medical herbal extracts from the root barks of Juncus effusus and Paeonia suffruticosa. The two extracts showed a protective effect in NS-SV-Ac cells from the cytotoxicity and apoptosis caused by CDDP. The effect was dependent on the p53 pathway, protein kinase B/Akt 1 and mitochondrial apoptosis-related proteins (i.e. Bcl-2 and Bax), but was not dependent on nuclear factor κB. Notably, the apoptosis-protective effect of the extracts was not observed in adenocystic carcinoma cell lines. Although these extracts have been utilized in traditional Chinese medicine for hundreds of years, there are no reports to our knowledge, on their therapeutic effects on xerostomia. Thus, in the present study, we elucidated the potency of these herbal extracts as novel candidates for xerostomia to improve the quality of life of patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  16. Research of TAP Induction The Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Release HMGB1 in Rat%TAP诱导大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞释放HMGB1的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国良; 兑丹华; 白亮; 刘尧; 田飞; 魏巍

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨人胰蛋白酶原激活肽(TAP)诱导大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞高迁移率族蛋白1(HMGB1)的分泌规律和丙酮酸乙酯(EP)对其释放的影响.方法 将12只SD大鼠处死后,取出胰腺分离胰腺腺泡细胞,将所得细胞悬液按抽签法随机分为3组,对照组、TAP组及EP组.TAP组及EP组加入相同剂量的TAP(终浓度3 nmol/L),EP组同时加入EP(终浓度28 mmol/L),在3、6、12及24 h分别取细胞样本.采用实时定量逆转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)检测HMGB1 mRNA的表达,蛋白印迹法(Western blot)检测HMGB1蛋白的表达;并进行HMGB1 mRNA及蛋白的表达与TAP作用时间的Spearman秩相关分析.结果 与对照组比较,TAP组及EP组的HMGB1 mRNA及蛋白的表达均随TAP作用时间的延长而上调(P<0.05);与TAP组比较,EP组的HMGB1mRNA及蛋白表达则下调(P<0.05).TAP组组内比较显示,HMGB1 mRNA及蛋白的表达随TAP作用时间延长而逐渐升高(P<0.05),且以12h及24 h时升高明显(P<0.01),HMGB1 mRNA及蛋白的表达与TAP作用时间呈正相关(rs=0.971,P<0.01;rs=0.966,P<0.01).结论 TAP可诱导大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞内HMGB1的释放.急性胰腺炎早期的TAP与晚期的HMGB1之间存在着时间的正向联系.EP可抑制HMGB1的释放.%Objective To explore the secretion law of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in rat pancreatic acinar cells induced by trypsin activation peptide (TAP) and release of HMGB1 affected by ethyl pyruvate (EP) . Methods The experiment was performed in 12 SD rats. The pancreatic acinar cells of rats were taken out and then separated into three groups: control group, TAP group, and EP group. TAP was added into TAP group and EP group (keep TAP at a final concentration of 3 nmol/L), respectively, but EP was added into EP group only (keep EP at a final concentration of 28 mmol/L). The expressions of HMGB1 mRNA and protein were detected by using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or

  17. Loss of the BRCA1-interacting helicase BRIP1 results in abnormal mammary acinar morphogenesis.

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    Kazuhiro Daino

    Full Text Available BRIP1 is a DNA helicase that directly interacts with the C-terminal BRCT repeat of the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA1 and plays an important role in BRCA1-dependent DNA repair and DNA damage-induced checkpoint control. Recent studies implicate BRIP1 as a moderate/low-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene. However, the phenotypic effects of BRIP1 dysfunction and its role in breast cancer tumorigenesis remain unclear. To explore the function of BRIP1 in acinar morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells, we generated BRIP1-knockdown MCF-10A cells by short hairpin RNA (shRNA-mediated RNA interference and examined its effect in a three-dimensional culture model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR were performed to identify alterations in gene expression in BRIP1-knockdown cells compared with control cells. The microarray data were further investigated using the pathway analysis and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA for pathway identification. BRIP1 knockdown in non-malignant MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells by RNA interference induced neoplastic-like changes such as abnormal cell adhesion, increased cell proliferation, large and irregular-shaped acini, invasive growth, and defective lumen formation. Differentially expressed genes, including MCAM, COL8A1, WIPF1, RICH2, PCSK5, GAS1, SATB1, and ELF3, in BRIP1-knockdown cells compared with control cells were categorized into several functional groups, such as cell adhesion, polarity, growth, signal transduction, and developmental process. Signaling-pathway analyses showed dysregulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways, involving LPA receptor, Myc, Wnt, PI3K, PTEN as well as DNA damage response, in BRIP1-knockdown cells. Loss of BRIP1 thus disrupts normal mammary morphogenesis and causes neoplastic-like changes, possibly via dysregulating multiple cellular signaling pathways functioning in the normal development of mammary glands.

  18. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study

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    Luciana Reis AZEVEDO-ALANIS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated.Objective The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death.Material and Methods 186 cadavers’ glands were allocated to age groups: I (0–30 years; II (31–60, and III (61–90. Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (p<0.05.Results There was correlation between age and acinar autolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001. However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis.Conclusion Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death.

  19. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    AZEVEDO-ALANIS, Luciana Reis; TOLENTINO, Elen de Souza; de ASSIS, Gerson Francisco; CESTARI, Tânia Mary; LARA, Vanessa Soares; DAMANTE, José Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG) found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated. Objective The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death. Material and Methods 186 cadavers’ glands were allocated to age groups: I (0–30 years); II (31–60), and III (61–90). Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results There was correlation between age and acinar autolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001). However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis. Conclusion Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death. PMID:26537715

  20. Impact of PI3Kγ gene knockout on acinar cells in mice with acute pancreatitis%磷脂酰肌醇3-激酶γ基因敲除对急性胰腺炎小鼠腺泡细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾文焯; 孙建华; 余涛; 肖刚

    2012-01-01

    injections of cerulean and mice of the control group were subjected to exactly the same regimen of saline injections. In addition, the pancreatic acini were isolated from another two different sets of mice (8 per set), and then the acinar cells were stimulated with CCK-8 to prepare an in vitro AP model. Control cells were treated with DMSO instead of CCK-8. Pathological changes of the pancreatic tissues were assessed, and the serum level of amylase, trypsin activity in pancreatic tissues and acinar cells, and level amylase release from the acinar cells were measured. The HSP70 protein expressions in pancreatic tissues and acinar cells were determined by Western blot analysis.Results: In pathological observation, the pancreatic tissues from the control groups of both types of mice showed no abnormality, while both AP groups presented varying degrees of edema, necrosis and hemorrhage. The quantitative analysis showed that the number of necrotic acinar cells and vacuoles of the KO mice were significantly less than those of the WT mice (both P0.05), but the trypsin activity of the pancreatic tissues and isolated acinar cells of the KO mice were significantly lower than those of the WT mice in the AP groups (in vivo and in vitro) (both P0.05). Compared with the control groups, the HSP70 protein expressions in both pancreatic tissues and acinar cells increased obviously in AP groups (in vivo and in vitro), in which the HSP70 expression levels of the KO mice were significantly higher than those of the WT mice (both P<0.05).Conclusion: PI3Kγ may promote acinar necrosis in acute pancreatitis by down-regulating HSP70 protein expressions and enhancing activation of trypsinogen, but it has no obvious effect on amylase secretion.

  1. Hypoxic vasoconstriction of partial muscular intra-acinar pulmonary arteries in murine precision cut lung slices

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    Goldenberg Anna

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute alveolar hypoxia causes pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV which serves to match lung perfusion to ventilation. The underlying mechanisms are not fully resolved yet. The major vascular segment contributing to HPV, the intra-acinar artery, is mostly located in that part of the lung that cannot be selectively reached by the presently available techniques, e.g. hemodynamic studies of isolated perfused lungs, recordings from dissected proximal arterial segments or analysis of subpleural vessels. The aim of the present study was to establish a model which allows the investigation of HPV and its underlying mechanisms in small intra-acinar arteries. Methods Intra-acinar arteries of the mouse lung were studied in 200 μm thick precision-cut lung slices (PCLS. The organisation of the muscle coat of these vessels was characterized by α-smooth muscle actin immunohistochemistry. Basic features of intra-acinar HPV were characterized, and then the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers, inhibitors of the respiratory chain and Krebs cycle metabolites was analysed. Results Intra-acinar arteries are equipped with a discontinuous spiral of α-smooth muscle actin-immunoreactive cells. They exhibit a monophasic HPV (medium gassed with 1% O2 that started to fade after 40 min and was lost after 80 min. This HPV, but not vasoconstriction induced by the thromboxane analogue U46619, was effectively blocked by nitro blue tetrazolium and diphenyleniodonium, indicating the involvement of ROS and flavoproteins. Inhibition of mitochondrial complexes II (3-nitropropionic acid, thenoyltrifluoroacetone and III (antimycin A specifically interfered with HPV, whereas blockade of complex IV (sodium azide unspecifically inhibited both HPV and U46619-induced constriction. Succinate blocked HPV whereas fumarate had minor effects on vasoconstriction. Conclusion This study establishes the first model for investigation of basic characteristics of HPV

  2. 姜黄素对长期摄入酒精和不同量蛋白质的大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞损伤的保护作用研究%Effects of Curcumin on Pancreatic Acinar Cell Injury in Rats with Long-term Alcohol Intake and Different Amount of Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周旭春

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究姜黄素对长期摄入酒精和不同量蛋白质的大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞损伤的保护作用.方法:实验分为5组,即正常对照(正常饲养)、高蛋白、低蛋白、高蛋白+姜黄素、低蛋白+姜黄素(以25%酒精代替饮水自由饮用,高、低蛋白质占总热量供给的32%、6%,喂饲6个月)组.在光镜和电镜下观察大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞结构变化,用比色法检测胰腺组织匀浆淀粉酶和脂肪酶的含量,TUNEL法检测腺泡细胞凋亡情况,免疫组化检测胰腺组织切片中环氧化酶-2(COX-2)的变化.结果:与高、低蛋白组比较,高、低蛋白+姜黄素组大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞髓样结构减少,线粒体肿胀减轻;淀粉酶和脂肪酶含量均显著升高(P<0.05);胰腺腺泡细胞凋亡显著减少(P<0.05);COX-2的表达降低.结论:姜黄素可预防摄入酒精联合过高或过低蛋白质的大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞损伤,延缓酒精性胰腺损伤的进程.%OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective effects of curcumin on pancreatic acinar cell injury in rats with long-term alcohol intake and protein consumption. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups, I.e. Normal control group (the group fed with normal feed) ,high protein group, low protein group, high protein+curcumin group, low protein+curcumin group (those groups fed with diet containing 25% ethanol instead of drinking water for 6 months). High and low protein accounted for 32% and 6 % of total heat quantity. The structure change of pancreatic acinar cell was observed under light microscope and electron microscope. The contents of amylase and lipase in pancreatic tissue homogenate were determined by colorimetry. Apoptosis and expression of cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) in acinar cell were detected by TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with no application of curcumin, myelin figure and enlarged mitochondria were reduced in curcumin treatment groups. Lipase and amylase

  3. KLF4 Is Essential for Induction of Cellular Identity Change and Acinar-to-Ductal Reprogramming during Early Pancreatic Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Daoyan; Wang, Liang; Yan, Yongmin; Jia, Zhiliang; Gagea, Mihai; Li, Zhiwei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Kong, Xiangyu; Huang, Suyun; Xie, Keping

    2016-03-14

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of tumor initiation has significant impact on early cancer detection and intervention. To define the role of KLF4 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) initiation, we used molecular biological analyses and mouse models of klf4 gain- and loss-of-function and mutant Kras. KLF4 is upregulated in and required for acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. Klf4 ablation drastically attenuates the formation of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia induced by mutant Kras(G12D), whereas upregulation of KLF4 does the opposite. Mutant KRAS and cellular injuries induce KLF4 expression, and ectopic expression of KLF4 in acinar cells reduces acinar lineage- and induces ductal lineage-related marker expression. These results demonstrate that KLF4 induces ductal identity in PanIN initiation and may be a potential target for prevention of PDA initiation.

  4. A Microfluidic Model of Biomimetically Breathing Pulmonary Acinar Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying respiratory flow characteristics in the pulmonary acinar depths and how they influence inhaled aerosol transport is critical towards optimizing drug inhalation techniques as well as predicting deposition patterns of potentially toxic airborne particles in the pulmonary alveoli. Here, soft-lithography techniques are used to fabricate complex acinar-like airway structures at the truthful anatomical length-scales that reproduce physiological acinar flow phenomena in an optically accessible system. The microfluidic device features 5 generations of bifurcating alveolated ducts with periodically expanding and contracting walls. Wall actuation is achieved by altering the pressure inside water-filled chambers surrounding the thin PDMS acinar channel walls both from the sides and the top of the device. In contrast to common multilayer microfluidic devices, where the stacking of several PDMS molds is required, a simple method is presented to fabricate the top chamber by embedding the barrel section of a syringe into the PDMS mold. This novel microfluidic setup delivers physiological breathing motions which in turn give rise to characteristic acinar air-flows. In the current study, micro particle image velocimetry (µPIV) with liquid suspended particles was used to quantify such air flows based on hydrodynamic similarity matching. The good agreement between µPIV results and expected acinar flow phenomena suggest that the microfluidic platform may serve in the near future as an attractive in vitro tool to investigate directly airborne representative particle transport and deposition in the acinar regions of the lungs. PMID:27214269

  5. Epiplakin deficiency aggravates murine caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and favors the formation of acinar keratin granules.

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    Karl L Wögenstein

    Full Text Available Epiplakin, a member of the plakin protein family, is exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues and was shown to bind to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (EPPK-/- mice showed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, however, EPPK-/- keratinocytes displayed faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in pancreas, a tissue with abundant keratin expression, was not yet known. We analyzed epiplakin's expression in healthy and inflamed pancreatic tissue and compared wild-type and EPPK-/- mice during caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. We found that epiplakin was expressed primarily in ductal cells of the pancreas and colocalized with apicolateral keratin bundles in murine pancreatic acinar cells. Epiplakin's diffuse subcellular localization in keratin filament-free acini of K8-deficient mice indicated that its filament-associated localization in acinar cells completely depends on its binding partner keratin. During acute pancreatitis, epiplakin was upregulated in acinar cells and its redistribution closely paralleled keratin reorganization. EPPK-/- mice suffered from aggravated pancreatitis but showed no obvious regeneration phenotype. At the most severe stage of the disease, EPPK-/- acinar cells displayed more keratin aggregates than those of wild-type mice. Our data propose epiplakin to be a protective protein during acute pancreatitis, and that its loss causes impaired disease-associated keratin reorganization.

  6. The research of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into salivary gland acinar-like cells%诱导大鼠骨髓间充质干细胞分化为唾液腺腺泡样细胞的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁亮; 孙沫逸; 李建虎; 杨永勤; 申志远; 苏忠平

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the possibility of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) differentiation intosalivary gland acinar-like cells induced by co-culture with salivary gland acinar cells (SGCS) in vitro. Methods SGCsof passage 1 and MSCs of passage 3 were taken as subject investigated.Following groups were allocated:co-culturewith salivary gland medium group;co-culture with 10% FBS DMEM/F12 group;salivary gland medium group;group with10% FBS DMEM/F12.MSCs of every group were identified by immunohistochemiscal analysis withα -amylase After amonth cultivation.MSCs conversion rate is attained by calculation of the number of positive cells.By the opticalmicroscope and scanning electron microscope observes the morphological changes of cells. Results Compared withnone-co-cultured groups,Most cells in co-culture groups were stained by α-amylase(P<0.05). Conclusions The cellsof success induction morphology which similar to salivary gland acinar cells at the optical microscope and scanningelectron microscope display.MSCs could differentiate into SGs at phenotype and molecule level by co-culture of SGs invitro.Changing the experimental conditions and can improve induction efficiency.%目的:探讨在共培养系统下大鼠骨髓间充质干细胞分化为唾液腺腺泡样细胞的实验.方法:以纯化1代SD大鼠颌下腺腺泡细胞和3代骨髓间充质干细胞作为共培养实验对象.实验分组:含唾液腺培养液的共培养组;含10%FBS、DMEM/F12的共培养组;含唾液腺培养液的非共培养组;含10%FBS、DMEM/F12的非共培养组.培养1个月经α-淀粉酶(α-amylase)免疫组化染色各组的MSCs,计算阳性细胞数得出MSCs的转化率,并且通过光镜和电镜鉴定细胞形态变化.结果:各组诱导的MSCs经α-amylase染色,共培养组阳性细胞数较非共培养组多(P<0.05),且诱导成功的细胞在镜下形态类似于唾液腺腺泡细胞.结论:在共培养条件下成功实现了MSCs向 SGCs的形态学转

  7. Pituitary stem cells: candidates and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Farshad; Cusimano, Michael; Zuccato, Jeff A; Mohammed, Safraz; Rotondo, Fabio; Horvath, Eva; Syro, Luis V; Kovacs, Kalman; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2013-09-01

    The pituitary is the master endocrine gland of the body. It undergoes many changes after birth, and these changes may be mediated by the differentiation of pituitary stem cells. Stem cells in any tissue source must display (1) pluripotent capacity, (2) capacity for indefinite self-renewal, and (3) a lack of specialization. Unlike neural stem cells identified in the hippocampus and subventricular zone, pituitary stem cells are not associated with one specific cell type. There are many major candidates that are thought to be potential pituitary stem cell sources. This article reviews the evidence for each of the major cell types and discuss the implications of identifying a definitive pituitary stem cell type. PMID:23423660

  8. Inhibition of proliferation by PERK regulates mammary acinar morphogenesis and tumor formation.

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    Sharon J Sequeira

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling can be mediated by the ER kinase PERK, which phosphorylates its substrate eIF2alpha. This in turn, results in translational repression and the activation of downstream programs that can limit cell growth through cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. These responses can also be initiated by perturbations in cell adhesion. Thus, we hypothesized that adhesion-dependent regulation of PERK signaling might determine cell fate. We tested this hypothesis in a model of mammary acini development, a morphogenetic process regulated in part by adhesion signaling. Here we report a novel role for PERK in limiting MCF10A mammary epithelial cell proliferation during acinar morphogenesis in 3D Matrigel culture as well as in preventing mammary tumor formation in vivo. We show that loss of adhesion to a suitable substratum induces PERK-dependent phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and selective upregulation of ATF4 and GADD153. Further, inhibition of endogenous PERK signaling during acinar morphogenesis, using two dominant-negative PERK mutants (PERK-DeltaC or PERK-K618A, does not affect apoptosis but results instead in hyper-proliferative and enlarged lumen-filled acini, devoid of proper architecture. This phenotype correlated with an adhesion-dependent increase in translation initiation, Ki67 staining and upregulation of Laminin-5, ErbB1 and ErbB2 expression. More importantly, the MCF10A cells expressing PERKDeltaC, but not a vector control, were tumorigenic in vivo upon orthotopic implantation in denuded mouse mammary fat pads. Our results reveal that the PERK pathway is responsive to adhesion-regulated signals and that it is essential for proper acinar morphogenesis and in preventing mammary tumor formation. The possibility that deficiencies in PERK signaling could lead to hyperproliferation of the mammary epithelium and increase the likelihood of tumor formation, is of significance to the understanding of breast cancer.

  9. PTD-NBD polypeptide down-regulates expression of NF-κB p65 in inflammatory pancreatic acinar cell injury in rats%PTD-NBD多肽对大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞炎症损伤中NF-κB表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢文瑞; 杨元生; 杨新魁; 陈垦; 陈婧华; 崔淑兰; 王晖

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of PTD-NBD polypeptide on the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 in inflammatory pancreatic acinar cell injury in rats.METHODS:Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated,cultured,and divided into a normal control group,an acute pancreatitis (AP) group and a PTD-NBD polypeptides group.An in vitro model of AP was induced by treating rat pancreatic acinar cells with lipopolysaccharide (10 mg/L).Cell morphological changes were observed,and the contents of amylase,superoxide dismutase (SOD) and IL-1β in culture medium were tested.Expression of NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein in cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot 6 and 12 h after modeling,respectively.RESULTS:Compared to the control group,pancreatic acinar cell swelling and death were increased (6 h:8.9 ± 0.34 vs 1.1 ± 0.13; 12 h:9.4 ± 0.26 vs 1.2 ± 0.15,both P < 0.05),the contents of amylase (6 h:2135.8 ± 347.2 vs 873.5 ± 91.6; 12 h:3299.6 ± 217.7 vs 917.7 ± 101.9,both P < 0.05) and IL-1β (6 h:84.9 ± 15.7 vs 39.3 ± 7.9; 12 h:95.6 ± 17.1 vs 38.9 ± 5.2,both P < 0.05) were increased and the contents of SOD were decreased in culture medium (6 h:116.3 ± 30.3 vs 176.2 ± 21.6; 12h:101.5 ± 25.6 vs 173.6 ± 27.9,P < 0.05),and the expression of NF-kB p65 in pancreatic acinar ceils was increased (P < 0.05) in the AP group at 6 and 12 h after modeling.Compared to the AP group,pancreatic acinar cell swelling and death were lessened (6 h:6.8 ± 0.23 vs 8.9 ± 0.34; 12 h:7.5 ± 0.19 vs 9.4 ± 0.26,both P < 0.05),the contents of SOD were raised (6 h:137.6 ± 27.4 vs 116.3 ± 30.3; 12 h:144.3 ± 23.6 vs 101.5 ± 25.6,both P < 0.05)and the contents of amylase (6 h:1951.5 ± 211.7 vs 2135.8 ± 347.2; 12 h:1761.3 ± 231.5 vs 3299.6 ± 217.7,both P < 0.05) and IL-1β (6 h:66.8 ± 11.6 vs 84.9 ± 15.7; 12 h:54.8 ± 21.2 vs 95.6 ± 17.1,both P < 0.05) were decreased in culture medium,and the expression of NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein was down-regulated in the PAT

  10. Cytotoxic effect of desoxycholic acid on pancreatic acinar cells and its influence on the activity of nuclear transcription factors%脱氧胆酸对胰腺腺泡细胞的损伤及核转录因子活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张桂信; 陈海龙; 曹传海; 林小洋; 张利; 纪军; 王永鹏

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察脱氧胆酸(DCA)对AR42J胰腺腺泡细胞的损伤作用并探讨其对核转录因子(TF)活性的影响。方法 应用噻唑蓝(MTT)比色法检测DCA作用下细胞存活率改变,流式细胞术AV/PI双染法检测细胞的凋亡/坏死率。细胞经0.4mmoL/L DCA分别作用15 min、30 min、4h后收集培液上清,收集细胞并提取细胞质和细胞核蛋白,分别检测培液上清和胞质淀粉酶的活性,利用Luminex检测细胞核TF的DNA结合活性。结果 DCA对AR42J胰腺腺泡细胞的损伤作用呈浓度和时间依赖性,对细胞质内和培液中的淀粉酶水平无明显影响。在检测的40种TF活性变化中,DCA诱导ATF2、AR33、STAT5、NFAT、FKHR和NKX-2.5这6种TF活性明显升高,而RUNX/AML、NF-Y、MEF2和E2F1这4种TF活性则明显下降,其余30种TF活性无明显变化。结论 DCA对腺泡细胞的损伤作用主要表现为凋亡和坏死,对细胞内酶的合成和分泌功能没有明显影响。DCA诱导细胞核TF活性的变化,可能是其诱导细胞损伤的分子生物学基础。%Objective To study the cytotoxic effect of desoxycholic acid (DCA) on pancreatic acinar cells AR42J, its impact on the synthesis and secretion function of amylase, and the influence on the activity of nuclear transcription factor (TF). MethodsThe cytotoxic effect of DCS was detected in rat AR42J cells by using methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The rate of apoptosis or necrosis was determined by flow cytometry. After the cells were incubated with DCA (0. 4 mmol/L) for 15 min, 30 min, or 4 h, the medium was collected to detect the activity of amylase. The cytoplamic protein was extracted to detect the activity of amylase, and nuclear protein was extracted to detect the DNA binding activity of 40 TFs by Luminex. Results DCA exerted cytotoxic effects on AR42J cells in a time-and dose-dependent manner, and induced cell apoptosis and necrosis. DCA had no significant influence on the amylase synthesis and secretion

  11. Genetic ablation of Smoothened in pancreatic fibroblasts increases acinar-ductal metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Pitarresi, Jason R; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Woelke, Sarah A; Sizemore, Gina M; Nayak, Sunayana G; Egriboz, Onur; Schweickert, Patrick G; Yu, Lianbo; Trela, Stefan; Schilling, Daniel J; Halloran, Shannon K; Li, Maokun; Dutta, Shourik; Fernandez, Soledad A; Rosol, Thomas J; Lesinski, Gregory B; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of the microenvironment to pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a preneoplastic transition in oncogenic Kras-driven pancreatic cancer progression, is currently unclear. Here we show that disruption of paracrine Hedgehog signaling via genetic ablation of Smoothened (Smo) in stromal fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D) mouse model increased ADM. Smo-deleted fibroblasts had higher expression of transforming growth factor-α (Tgfa) mRNA and secreted higher levels of TGFα, leading to activation of EGFR signaling in acinar cells and increased ADM. The mechanism involved activation of AKT and noncanonical activation of the GLI family transcription factor GLI2. GLI2 was phosphorylated at Ser230 in an AKT-dependent fashion and directly regulated Tgfa expression in fibroblasts lacking Smo Additionally, Smo-deleted fibroblasts stimulated the growth of Kras(G12D)/Tp53(R172H) pancreatic tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. These results define a non-cell-autonomous mechanism modulating Kras(G12D)-driven ADM that is balanced by cross-talk between Hedgehog/SMO and AKT/GLI2 pathways in stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27633013

  12. A fluid secretion pathway unmasked by acinar-specific Tmem16A gene ablation in the adult mouse salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Marcelo A; Kondo, Yusuke; Peña-Munzenmayer, Gaspar; Jaramillo, Yasna; Liu, Frances; Choi, Sooji; Crandall, Edward; Borok, Zea; Flodby, Per; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E

    2015-02-17

    Activation of an apical Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CaCC) triggers the secretion of saliva. It was previously demonstrated that CaCC-mediated Cl(-) current and Cl(-) efflux are absent in the acinar cells of systemic Tmem16A (Tmem16A Cl(-) channel) null mice, but salivation was not assessed in fully developed glands because Tmem16A null mice die within a few days after birth. To test the role of Tmem16A in adult salivary glands, we generated conditional knockout mice lacking Tmem16A in acinar cells (Tmem16A(-/-)). Ca(2+)-dependent salivation was abolished in Tmem16A(-/-) mice, demonstrating that Tmem16A is obligatory for Ca(2+)-mediated fluid secretion. However, the amount of saliva secreted by Tmem16A(-/-) mice in response to the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (IPR) was comparable to that seen in controls, indicating that Tmem16A does not significantly contribute to cAMP-induced secretion. Furthermore, IPR-stimulated secretion was unaffected in mice lacking Cftr (Cftr(∆F508/∆F508)) or ClC-2 (Clcn2(-/-)) Cl(-) channels. The time course for activation of IPR-stimulated fluid secretion closely correlated with that of the IPR-induced cell volume increase, suggesting that acinar swelling may activate a volume-sensitive Cl(-) channel. Indeed, Cl(-) channel blockers abolished fluid secretion, indicating that Cl(-) channel activity is critical for IPR-stimulated secretion. These data suggest that β-adrenergic-induced, cAMP-dependent fluid secretion involves a volume-regulated anion channel. In summary, our results using acinar-specific Tmem16A(-/-) mice identify Tmem16A as the Cl(-) channel essential for muscarinic, Ca(2+)-dependent fluid secretion in adult mouse salivary glands.

  13. 糖尿病/星型胶质细胞富集磷蛋白酶-15的表达对急性胰腺炎腺泡细胞凋亡的影响%Effects of diabetes mellitus/astrocyte enriched phosphorus protease 15 expression on the apoptosis of acinar cells in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡明星; 王玉柱; 刘传江; 秦涛

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察糖尿病/星型胶质细胞富集磷蛋白酶-15(PED/PEA-15)的表达对蛙皮素诱导的体外急性胰腺炎(AP)模型腺泡细胞凋亡的影响.方法 建立体外AP模型:用10 nmol/L的蛙皮素处理胰腺腺泡细胞株(AR42J细胞)建立AP模型,4h后检测培养液淀粉酶水平,实时荧光定量反转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)检测PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达,吖啶橙/溴乙锭(AO/EB)法检测AR42J细胞的凋亡.构建PED/PEA-15的真核表达载体pcDNA3和空载体,利用脂质体转染AR42J细胞,72 h后加入10 nmol/L的蛙皮素处理,RT-PCR检测PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达水平,AO/EB法检测AR42J细胞的凋亡.结果 蛙皮素处理的AR42J细胞培养液淀粉酶水平较未处理细胞明显升高[(748.75±42.90) U/L较(249.75±27.16) U/L,P<0.05],PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达降低(5.24±0.66)倍(P<0.05),细胞凋亡率[(78.75±0.03)%]较未处理组[(17.50±0.04)%]升高(P<0.05).PED/PEA-15-pcDNA组AR42J细胞较空载体组PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达升高(4.27±0.78)倍(P<0.05),淀粉酶水平[(528.71±34.92) U/L]较空载体组[(856.29±52.39) U/L]明显下降(P<0.05),细胞凋亡率[(22.19±1.21)%]较空载体组[(68.92±1.83)%]降低(P<0.05),转染空载体组各项指标与未转染组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 PED/PEA-15蛋白在胰腺腺泡细胞的表达升高,能够抑制蛙皮素诱导的AR42J胰腺腺泡细胞凋亡.%Objective To investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus/astrocyte enriched phosphorus protease 15 (PED/PEA-15) expression on the apoptosis of acinar cells in bombesin-induced acute pancreatitis.Methods A model of acute pancreatitis with bombesin of 10 nmol/L was established.Amylase was determined 4 h later.The real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of PED/PEA-15 mRNA.The pcDNA or empty vehicle was created and transfected into AR42J cells.After the AR42J cells were treated with 10 nmol/L bombesin for 72 h, the

  14. Cell therapy for salivary gland regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C-Y; Chang, F-H; Chen, C-Y; Huang, C-Y; Hu, F-C; Huang, W-K; Ju, S-S; Chen, M-H

    2011-03-01

    There are still no effective therapies for hyposalivation caused by irradiation. In our previous study, bone marrow stem cells can be transdifferentiated into acinar-like cells in vitro. Therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation with bone marrow stem cells or acinar-like cells may help functional regeneration of salivary glands. Bone marrow stem cells were labeled with nanoparticles and directly co-cultured with acinar cells to obtain labeled acinar-like cells. In total, 140 severely combined immune-deficiency mice were divided into 4 groups for cell therapy experiments: (1) normal mice, (2) mice receiving irradiation around their head-and-neck areas; (3) mice receiving irradiation and intra-gland transplantation with labeled stem cells; and (4) mice receiving irradiation and intra-gland transplantation with labeled acinar-like cells. Our results showed that salivary glands damaged due to irradiation can be rescued by cell therapy with either bone marrow stem cells or acinar-like cells for recovery of saliva production, body weight, and gland weight. Transdifferentiation of bone marrow stem cells into acinar-like cells in vivo was also noted. This study demonstrated that cell therapy with bone marrow stem cells or acinar-like cells can help functional regeneration of salivary glands, and that acinar-like cells showed better therapeutic potentials than those of bone marrow stem cells.

  15. Protein kinase D regulates cell death pathways in experimental pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhen eYuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and acinar cell necrosis are two major pathological responses of acute pancreatitis, a serious disorder with no current therapies directed to its molecular pathogenesis. Serine/threonine protein kinase D family, which includes PKD/PKD1, PKD2, and PKD3, has been increasingly implicated in the regulation of multiple physiological and pathophysiological effects. We recently reported that PKD/PKD1, the predominant PKD isoform expressed in rat pancreatic acinar cells, mediates early events of pancreatitis including NF-kappaB activation and inappropriate intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In current studies, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PKD/PKD1 in the regulation of necrosis in pancreatic acinar cells by using two novel small molecule PKD inhibitors CID755673 and CRT0066101 and molecular approaches in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of acute pancreatitis. Our results demonstrated that both CID755673 and CRT0066101 are PKD-specific inhibitors and that PKD/PKD1 inhibition by either the chemical inhibitors or specific PKD/PKD1 siRNAs attenuated necrosis while promoting apoptosis induced by pathological doses of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK in pancreatic acinar cells. Conversely, upregulation of PKD expression in pancreatic acinar cells increased necrosis and decreased apoptosis. We further showed that PKD/PKD1 regulated several key cell death signals including inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs, caspases, receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1 to promote necrosis. PKD/PKD1 inhibition by CID755673 significantly ameliorated necrosis and severity of pancreatitis in an in vivo experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Thus, our studies indicate that PKD/PKD1 is a key mediator of necrosis in acute pancreatitis and that PKD/PKD1 may represent a potential therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis.

  16. Stem cell terminology: practical, theological and ethical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanner, Laura

    2002-01-01

    Stem cell policy discussions frequently confuse embryonic and fetal sources of stem cells, and label untested, non-reproductive cloning as "therapeutic." Such misnomers distract attention from significant practical and ethical implications: accelerated research agendas tend to be supported at the expense of physical risks to women, theological implications in a multi-faith community, informed consent for participation in research, and treatment decisions altered by unrealistic expectations.

  17. Collective cell migration: Implications for wound healing and cancer invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic morphogenesis, wound repair and cancer invasion, cells often migrate collectively via tight cell-cell junctions, a process named collective migration. During such migration, cells move as coherent groups, large cell sheets, strands or tubes rather than individually. One unexpected finding regarding collective cell migration is that being a "multicellular structure" enables cells to better respond to chemical and physical cues, when compared with isolated cells. This is important because epithelial cells heal wounds via the migration of large sheets of cells with tight intercellular connections. Recent studies have gained some mechanistic insights that will benefit the clinical understanding of wound healing in general. In this review, we will briefly introduce the role of collective cell migration in wound healing, regeneration and cancer invasion and discuss its underlying mechanisms as well as implications for wound healing.

  18. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T cell – tumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T cell – tumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  19. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  20. Unsteady diffusional screening in 3D pulmonary acinar structures: from infancy to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Shachar-Berman, Lihi; Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-07-26

    Diffusional screening in the lungs is a physical phenomenon where the specific topological arrangement of alveolated airways of the respiratory region leads to a depletion, or 'screening', of oxygen molecules with increasing acinar generation. Here, we revisit diffusional screening phenomena in anatomically-inspired pulmonary acinar models under realistic breathing maneuvers. By modelling 3D bifurcating alveolated airways capturing both convection and diffusion, unsteady oxygen transport is investigated under cyclic breathing motion. To evaluate screening characteristics in the developing lungs during growth, four representative stages of lung development were chosen (i.e. 3 months, 1 year and 9 months, 3 years and adulthood) that capture distinct morphological acinar changes spanning alveolarization phases to isotropic alveolar growth. Numerical simulations unveil the dramatic changes in O2 transport occurring during lung development, where young infants exhibit highest acinar efficiencies that rapidly converge with age to predictions at adulthood. With increased ventilatory effort, transient dynamics of oxygen transport is fundamentally altered compared to tidal breathing and emphasizes the augmented role of convection. Resolving the complex convective acinar flow patterns in 3D acinar trees allows for the first time a spatially-localized and time-resolved characterization of oxygen transport in the pulmonary acinus, from infancy to adulthood.

  1. 0Adipose-derived stem cells: Implications in tissue regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wakako; Tsuji; J; Peter; Rubin; Kacey; G; Marra

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells(ASCs) are mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) that are obtained from abundant adipose tissue, adherent on plastic culture flasks, can be expanded in vitro, and have the capacity to differ-entiate into multiple cell lineages. Unlike bone marrow-derived MSCs, ASCs can be obtained from abundant adipose tissue by a minimally invasive procedure, which results in a high number of cells. Therefore, ASCs are promising for regenerating tissues and organs dam-aged by injury and diseases. This article reviews the implications of ASCs in tissue regeneration.

  2. DOG1: a novel marker of salivary acinar and intercalated duct differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chênevert, Jacinthe; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Chiosea, Simion; Dacic, Sanja; Cieply, Kathleen; Kim, Jean; Shiwarski, Daniel; Seethala, Raja R

    2012-07-01

    Anoctamin-1 (ANO1) (DOG1, TMEM16a) is a calcium-activated chloride channel initially described in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, but now known to be expressed in a variety of normal and tumor tissues including salivary tissue in murine models. We herein perform a comprehensive survey of DOG1 expression in 156 cases containing non-neoplastic human salivary tissues and tumors. ANO1 mRNA levels were significantly higher (8-fold increase, Pcells, striated and excretory ducts were invariably negative. All acinic cell carcinomas (n=28) were DOG1 positive demonstrating a complex mixture of intense (3+) apical membranous, cytoplasmic and complete membranous staining. Most ductal tumor types were negative or only showed a subset of positive cases. Within the biphasic tumor category, adenoid cystic carcinomas (18/24 cases) and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas (8/15 cases) were frequently positive, often showing a distinctive combined apical ductal and membranous/cytoplasmic myoepithelial staining profile. Thus, DOG1 staining is a marker of salivary acinar and to a lesser extent intercalated duct differentiation. Strong staining can be used to support the diagnosis of acinic cell carcinoma. DOG1 may also be a marker of a 'transformed' myoepithelial phenotype in a subset of biphasic salivary gland malignancies.

  3. Implications of shorter cells in PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further studies on the beam-stay-clear requirements in PEP led to the conclusion that the vertical aperture needed to be enlarged. There are two main reasons for that: Observations at SPEAR indicate that the aperture should be large enough for a fully coupled beam. Full coupling of the horizontal and vertical betatron oscillations occurs not only occasionally when the energy, tune or betatron function at the interaction point is changed but also due to the beam/endash/beam effect of two strong colliding beams. The second reason for an increased aperture requirement is the nonlinear perturbation of the particle trajectories by the sextupoles. This perturbation increases a fully coupled beam by another 50% to 80%. Both effects together with a +-5 mm allowance for closed orbit perturbation result in a vertical beam-stay-clear in the bending magnets of +-4.8 to +-5.6 cm, compared to the present +-2.0 cm. This beam-stay-clear, together with additional space for vacuum chamber, etc., leads to very costly bending magnets. In this note, a shorter cell length is proposed which would reduce considerably the vertical beam-stay-clear requirements in the bending magnets. 7 figs

  4. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal carcinoma of the pancreas: a tale of three lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark J; Kwong, Christina A; Atieh, Mohammed; Pappas, Sam G

    2016-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancers arise from a single cell type, although mixed pancreatic carcinomas represent a rare exception. The rarity of these aggressive malignancies and the limitations of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) pose significant barriers to diagnosis and appropriate management. We report a case of a 54-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and a hypodense lesion within the uncinate process on CT. FNA suggested poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was subsequently resected via pancreaticoduodenectomy. Pathological analysis yielded diagnosis of invasive mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal pancreatic carcinoma. Given the rare and deadly nature of these tumours, clinicians must be aware of their pathophysiology and do practice with a high degree of clinical suspicion, when appropriate. Surgical resection and thorough pathological analysis with immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy remain the standards of care for mixed pancreatic tumours without gross evidence of metastasis. Diligent characterisation of the presentation and histological findings associated with these neoplasms should continue in order to promote optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27257019

  5. New Developments in Mast Cell Biology: Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Greer; Bradding, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are present in connective tissue and at mucosal surfaces in all classes of vertebrates. In health, they contribute to tissue homeostasis, host defense, and tissue repair via multiple receptors regulating the release of a vast stockpile of proinflammatory mediators, proteases, and cytokines. However, these potentially protective cells are a double-edged sword. When there is a repeated or long-term stimulus, MC activation leads to tissue damage and dysfunction. Accordingly, MCs are implicated in the pathophysiologic aspects of numerous diseases covering all organs. Understanding the biology of MCs, their heterogeneity, mechanisms of activation, and signaling cascades may lead to the development of novel therapies for many diseases for which current treatments are lacking or are of poor efficacy. This review will focus on updates and developments in MC biology and their clinical implications, with a particular focus on their role in respiratory diseases.

  6. Alternative materials for crystalline silicon solar cells - Risks and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kwapil, Wolfram

    2010-01-01

    This thesis considers the use of alternative silicon materials for photovoltaics – often termed “upgraded metallurgical grade” silicon – from different angles and evaluates the risks and implications for the wafer and solar cell properties at selected steps along the entire process chain.The properties of the alternative, upgraded metallurgical grade silicon materials analyzed in the course of this thesis were governed by the simultaneous presence of boron and phosphorus in high concentration...

  7. Breast cancer stem cells: current advances and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ming; Clouthier, Shawn G; Deol, Yadwinder; Liu, Suling; Nagrath, Sunitha; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that many cancers, including breast cancer, are driven by a population of cells that display stem cell properties. These cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells, not only drive tumor initiation and growth but also mediate tumor metastasis and therapeutic resistance. In this chapter, we summarize current advances in CSC research with a major focus on breast CSCs (BCSCs). We review the prevailing methods to isolate and characterize BCSCs and recent evidence documenting their cellular origins and phenotypic plasticity that enables them to transition between mesenchymal and epithelial-like states. We describe in vitro and clinical evidence that these cells mediate metastasis and treatment resistance in breast cancer, the development of novel strategies to isolate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that contain CSCs and the use of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models in preclinical breast cancer research. Lastly, we highlight several signaling pathways that regulate BCSC self-renewal and describe clinical implications of targeting these cells for breast cancer treatment. The development of strategies to effectively target BCSCs has the potential to significantly improve the outcomes for patients with breast cancer.

  8. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri O Maruyama

    Full Text Available The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts.

  9. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Eri O; Aure, Marit H; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts.

  10. The Implications of Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jiang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are universally recognized as the most effective anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances directed towards elucidating molecular mechanisms and developing clinical trials, cancer still remains a major public health issue. Recent studies have showed that cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subpopulation of tumor cells, can generate bulk populations of nontumorigenic cancer cell progeny through the self-renewal and differentiation processes. As CSCs are proposed to persist in tumors as a distinct population and cause relapse and metastasis by giving rise to new tumors, development of CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies holds new hope for improving survival and quality of life in patients with cancer. Therapeutic innovations will emerge from a better understanding of the biology and environment of CSCs, which, however, are largely unexplored. This review summarizes the characteristics, evidences and development of CSCs, as well as implications and challenges for cancer treatment.

  11. The pattern of fibrosis in the acinar zone 3 areas in early alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Jette; Horn, T; Vyberg, M;

    1991-01-01

    The degree of fibrosis and the pattern of collagen distribution in the acinar zone 3, as well as the thickness of the terminal hepatic vein walls (THV) were analyzed in 48 consecutive liver needle biopsies from 48 alcoholics with preserved liver architecture. The fibrosis occurred to more or less...

  12. Ectrodactyly and Lethal Pulmonary Acinar Dysplasia Associated with Homozygous FGFR2 Mutations Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Christopher P; Nataren, Nathalie J; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Schwarz, Quenten; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young K; Bruno, Damien L; Lipsett, Jill; McPhee, Andrew J; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-09-01

    Ectrodactyly/split hand-foot malformation is genetically heterogeneous with more than 100 syndromic associations. Acinar dysplasia is a rare congenital lung lesion of unknown etiology, which is frequently lethal postnatally. To date, there have been no reports of combinations of these two phenotypes. Here, we present an infant from a consanguineous union with both ectrodactyly and autopsy confirmed acinar dysplasia. SNP array and whole-exome sequencing analyses of the affected infant identified a novel homozygous Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) missense mutation (p.R255Q) in the IgIII domain (D3). Expression studies of Fgfr2 in development show localization to the affected limbs and organs. Molecular modeling and genetic and functional assays support that this mutation is at least a partial loss-of-function mutation, and contributes to ectrodactyly and acinar dysplasia only in homozygosity, unlike previously reported heterozygous activating FGFR2 mutations that cause Crouzon, Apert, and Pfeiffer syndromes. This is the first report of mutations in a human disease with ectrodactyly with pulmonary acinar dysplasia and, as such, homozygous loss-of-function FGFR2 mutations represent a unique syndrome. PMID:27323706

  13. Geometrical influence of pulmonary acinar models on respiratory flows and particle deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Sznitman, Josue

    2012-11-01

    Due to experimental challenges in assessing respiratory flows in the deep regions of the lungs, computational simulations are typically sought to quantify inhaled aerosol transport and deposition in the acinus. Most commonly, simulations are performed using generic geometries of alveoli, including spheres, toroids and polyhedra to mimic the acinar region. However, local respiratory flows and ensuing particle trajectories are anticipated to be highly influenced by the specific geometrical structures chosen. To date, geometrical influences have not yet been thoroughly quantified. Knowing beforehand how geometries affect acinar flows and particle transport is critical in translating simulated data to predictions of aerosol deposition in real lungs. Here, we conduct a systematic investigation on a number of generic acinar models. Simulations are conducted for simple alveolated airways featuring a selection of geometries. Deposition patterns and efficiencies are quantified both for massless particles, highlighting details of the local flow, and micron-scale aerosols. This latter group of particles represents an important class of inhaled aerosols known to reach and deposit in the acinus. Our work emphasizes the subtleties of acinar geometry in determining the fate of inhaled aerosols.

  14. Inhibition of eIF2α dephosphorylation inhibits ErbB2-induced deregulation of mammary acinar morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avivar-Valderas Alvaro

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ErbB2/Her2/Neu receptor tyrosine kinase is amplified in ~30% of human breast cancers. Phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor, eIF2α inhibits global protein synthesis and activates a stress signaling and growth suppressive program. We have shown that forced phosphorylation of eIF2α can suppress head and neck, colorectal carcinoma and multiple myeloma tumor growth and/or survival. Here we explore whether ErbB2 modulates eIF2α phosphorylation and whether forced phosphorylation of the latter can antagonize ErbB2 deregulation of mammary acinar morphogenesis. Results We tested whether ErbB2 signaling influenced eIF2α signaling and whether enhanced phosphorylation of the latter affected ErbB2-deregulated mammary acinar development. We obtained stable MCF10A cells overexpressing wild-type (Wt Neu/ErbB2 or a constitutively active (CA variant via retroviral delivery or mammary tumor cells from MMTV-Neu tumors. Western blotting, RT-PCR and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the effects of ErbB2 activation on eIF2α signaling and the effect of the GADD34-PP1C inhibitor salubrinal. Wt- and MMTV-Neu cells formed aberrant acini structures resembling DCIS, while CA-ErbB2 overexpression induced invasive lesions. In these structures we found that CA-ErbB2 but not the Wt variant significantly down-regulated the pro-apoptotic gene CHOP. This occurred without apparent modulation of basal phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α or induction of its downstream target ATF4. However, inhibition of eIF2α dephosphorylation with salubrinal was sufficient to inhibit Wt- and CA-ErbB2- as well as MMTV-Neu-induced deregulation of acinar growth. This was linked to enhanced CHOP expression, inhibition of proliferation, induction of apoptosis and luminal clearing in Wt-ErbB2 and to inhibition of cyclin D1 levels and subsequent proliferation in CA-ErbB2 cells. Conclusion Depending on the strength of ErbB2 signaling there is a differential

  15. Acinus-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for pulmonary acinar flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Mulligan, Molly; Sznitman, Josue; Sznitman Biofluids Team

    2013-11-01

    Convective respiratory flows in the pulmonary acinus and their influence on the fate of inhaled particles are typically studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or scaled-up experimental models. However, current experiments generally capture only flow dynamics, without inhaled particle dynamics, due to difficulties in simultaneously matching flow and particle dynamics. In an effort to overcome these limitations, we have designed a novel microfluidic device mimicking acinar flow conditions directly at the physiological scale. The model features an anatomically-inspired acinar geometry with five dichotomously branching airway generations lined with periodically expanding and contracting alveoli. Using micro-particle image velocimetry (PIV), we reveal experimentally a gradual transition of alveolar flow patterns along the acinar tree from recirculating to radial streamlines, in support of previous predictions from CFD simulations. We demonstrate the applicability of the device for studying the mechanisms of particle deposition in the pulmonary acinus by mapping deposition sites of airborne fluorescent micro-particles (0.1-1 μm) and visualizing trajectories of airborne incense particles inside the system.

  16. Coupling of guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein to somatostatin receptors on pancreatic acinar membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guanine nucleotides and pertussis toxin were used to investigate whether somatostatin receptors interact with the guanine nucleotide inhibitory protein (NI) on pancreatic acinar membranes in the rat. Guanine nucleotides reduced 125I-[Tyr1]somatostatin binding to acinar membranes up to 80%, with rank order of potency being 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]>GTP>TDP>GMP. Scatchard analysis revealed that the decrease in somatostatin binding caused by Gpp(NH)p was due to the decrease in the maximum binding capacity without a significant change in the binding affinity. The inhibitory effect of Gpp(NH)p was partially abolished in the absence of Mg2+. When pancreatic acini were treated with 1 μg/ml pertussis toxin for 4 h, subsequent 125I-[Tyr1]somatostatin binding to acinar membranes was reduced. Pertussis toxin treatment also abolished the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on vasoactive intestinal peptide-stimulated increase in cellular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the acini. The present results suggest that 1) somatostatin probably functions in the pancreas to regulate adenylate cyclase enzyme system via Ni, 2) the extent of modification of Ni is correlated with the ability of somatostatin to inhibit cAMP accumulation in acini, and 3) guanine nucleotides also inhibit somatostatin binding to its receptor

  17. Implications of epigenetic variability within a cell population for cell type classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna eTabansky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we propose a new approach to defining nerve ‘cell types’ in reaction to recent advances in single cell analysis. Among cells previously thought to be equivalent, considerable differences in global gene expression and biased tendencies among differing developmental fates have been demonstrated within multiple lineages. The model of classifying cells into distinct types thus has to be revised to account for this intrinsic variability. A ‘cell type’ could be a group of cells that possess similar, but not necessarily identical properties, variable within a spectrum of epigenetic adjustments that permit its developmental path toward a specific function to be achieved. Thus, the definition of a cell type is becoming more similar to the definition of a species: sharing essential properties with other members of its group, but permitting a certain amount of deviation in aspects that do not seriously impact function. This approach accommodates, even embraces the spectrum of natural variation found in various cell populations and consequently avoids the fallacy of false equivalence. For example, developing neurons will react to their microenvironments with epigenetic changes resulting in slight changes in gene expression and morphology. Addressing the new questions implied here will have significant implications for developmental neurobiology.

  18. Salivary Glands: Stem Cells, Self-duplication, or Both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aure, M H; Arany, S; Ovitt, C E

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the intrinsic potential for renewal and regeneration within a tissue is critical for the rational design of reparative strategies. Maintenance of the salivary glands is widely thought to depend on the differentiation of stem cells. However, there is also new evidence that homeostasis of the salivary glands, like that of the liver and pancreas, relies on self-renewal of differentiated cells rather than a stem cell pool. Here, we review the evidence for both modes of turnover and consider the implications for the process of regeneration. We propose that the view of salivary glands as postmitotic and dependent on stem cells for renewal be revised to reflect the proliferative activity of acinar cells and their role in salivary gland homeostasis.

  19. Aristaless related homeobox gene, Arx, is implicated in mouse fetal Leydig cell differentiation possibly through expressing in the progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Miyabayashi

    Full Text Available Development of the testis begins with the expression of the SRY gene in pre-Sertoli cells. Soon after, testis cords containing Sertoli and germ cells are formed and fetal Leydig cells subsequently develop in the interstitial space. Studies using knockout mice have indicated that multiple genes encoding growth factors and transcription factors are implicated in fetal Leydig cell differentiation. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arx gene is implicated in this process. However, how ARX regulates Leydig cell differentiation remained unknown. In this study, we examined Arx KO testes and revealed that fetal Leydig cell numbers largely decrease throughout the fetal life. Since our study shows that fetal Leydig cells rarely proliferate, this decrease in the KO testes is thought to be due to defects of fetal Leydig progenitor cells. In sexually indifferent fetal gonads of wild type, ARX was expressed in the coelomic epithelial cells and cells underneath the epithelium as well as cells at the gonad-mesonephros border, both of which have been described to contain progenitors of fetal Leydig cells. After testis differentiation, ARX was expressed in a large population of the interstitial cells but not in fetal Leydig cells, raising the possibility that ARX-positive cells contain fetal Leydig progenitor cells. When examining marker gene expression, we observed cells as if they were differentiating into fetal Leydig cells from the progenitor cells. Based on these results, we propose that ARX acts as a positive factor for differentiation of fetal Leydig cells through functioning at the progenitor stage.

  20. Regulation of mucous acinar exocrine secretion with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, D J; Richardson, L A

    1996-01-01

    Denny and co-workers (Navazesh et al., 1992) recently reported decreased concentrations of MG1 and MG2 mucins in resting and stimulated whole human saliva with age. The current study was therefore conducted to examine whether there is a corresponding attenuation with age in stimulus secretion coupling regulating mucous cell exocrine secretion. We utilized an in vitro model system, isolated rat sublingual acini, to evaluate the regulation of mucous cell exocrine secretion. Rat sublingual glands are similar to human sublingual and minor mucous glands, both histologically and in terms of their pattern of innervation, which is predominantly parasympathetic. Mucin secretion is thus activated primarily by muscarinic cholinergic agonist and to a lesser extent by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which is co-localized with acetylcholine in parasympathetic nerve terminals. We isolated sublingual mucous acini from five-month-old and 24-month-old rats and compared the concentration responses for mucin secretion induced by VIP and the muscarinic agonist, arecaidine propargyl ester (APE). Concentration-response curves for VIP were nearly identical for mucous acini from the five-month-old and 24-month-old animals. Values for basal secretion, maximal secretion, and EC50 (approximately equal to 200 nmol/L VIP) were statistically equivalent between both age groups. Concentration-response curves for APE were also very similar between age groups, with no statistically significant difference in basal secretion or EC50 values (approximately equal to 50 nmol/L APE). Maximal secretion was slightly less but statistically different for 24-month-old vs. five-month-old animals, 158% vs. 169% above basal secretion, respectively. Collectively, we found no substantial age-related changes in the secretory responsiveness of salivary mucous cells.

  1. Rare amplicons implicate frequent deregulation of cell fate specification pathways in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Antoine M; Schmidt, Brian L; Fridlyand, Jane; Dekker, Nusi; Pinkel, Daniel; Jordan, Richard C K; Albertson, Donna G

    2005-06-16

    Genomes of solid tumors are characterized by gains and losses of regions, which may contribute to tumorigenesis by altering gene expression. Often the aberrations are extensive, encompassing whole chromosome arms, which makes identification of candidate genes in these regions difficult. Here, we focused on narrow regions of gene amplification to facilitate identification of genetic pathways important in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development. We used array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) to define minimum common amplified regions and then used expression analysis to identify candidate driver genes in amplicons that spanned LAMA3, MMP7), as well as members of the hedgehog (GLI2) and notch (JAG1, RBPSUH, FJX1) pathways to be amplified and overexpressed. Deregulation of these and other members of the hedgehog and notch pathways (HHIP, SMO, DLL1, NOTCH4) implicates deregulation of developmental and differentiation pathways, cell fate misspecification, in oral SCC development. PMID:15824737

  2. Inhibition of pancreatic acinar mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate uptake by the cigarette smoke component 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Thrower, Edwin C; Gorelick, Fred S; Said, Hamid M

    2016-05-15

    Thiamin is essential for normal metabolism in pancreatic acinar cells (PAC) and is obtained from their microenvironment through specific plasma-membrane transporters, converted to thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) in the cytoplasm, followed by uptake of TPP by mitochondria through the mitochondrial TPP (MTPP) transporter (MTPPT; product of SLC25A19 gene). TPP is essential for normal mitochondrial function. We examined the effect of long-term/chronic exposure of PAC in vitro (pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells) and in vivo (wild-type or transgenic mice carrying the SLC25A19 promoter) of the cigarette smoke toxin, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), on the MTPP uptake process. Our in vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that NNK negatively affects MTPP uptake and reduced expression of MTPPT protein, MTPPT mRNA, and heterogenous nuclear RNA, as well as SLC25A19 promoter activity. The effect of NNK on Slc25a19 transcription was neither mediated by changes in expression of transcriptional factor NFY-1 (known to drive SLC25A19 transcription), nor due to changes in methylation profile of the Slc25a19 promoter. Rather, it appears to be due to changes in histone modifications that involve significant decreases in histone H3K4-trimethylation and H3K9-acetylation (activation markers). The effect of NNK on MTPPT function is mediated through the nonneuronal α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), as indicated by both in vitro (using the nAChR antagonist mecamylamine) and in vivo (using an α7-nAchR(-/-) mouse model) studies. These findings demonstrate that chronic exposure of PAC to NNK negatively impacts PAC MTPP uptake. This effect appears to be exerted at the level of Slc25a19 transcription, involve epigenetic mechanism(s), and is mediated through the α7-nAchR. PMID:26999808

  3. Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slice Culture Facilitates Long-Term Studies of Exocrine and Endocrine Cell Physiology in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Speier, Stephan; Marciniak, Anja; Selck, Claudia; Friedrich, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Studies on pancreatic cell physiology rely on the investigation of exocrine and endocrine cells in vitro. Particularly, in the case of the exocrine tissue these studies have suffered from a reduced functional viability of acinar cells in culture. As a result not only investigations on dispersed acinar cells and isolated acini were limited in their potential, but also prolonged studies on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine cells in an intact pancreatic tissue environment were unfeasible. To ove...

  4. Restricted diffusion in a model acinar labyrinth by NMR: Theoretical and numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Guillot, G.; Sapoval, B.

    2007-01-01

    A branched geometrical structure of the mammal lungs is known to be crucial for rapid access of oxygen to blood. But an important pulmonary disease like emphysema results in partial destruction of the alveolar tissue and enlargement of the distal airspaces, which may reduce the total oxygen transfer. This effect has been intensively studied during the last decade by MRI of hyperpolarized gases like helium-3. The relation between geometry and signal attenuation remained obscure due to a lack of realistic geometrical model of the acinar morphology. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations of restricted diffusion in a realistic model acinus to compute the signal attenuation in a diffusion-weighted NMR experiment. We demonstrate that this technique should be sensitive to destruction of the branched structure: partial removal of the interalveolar tissue creates loops in the tree-like acinar architecture that enhance diffusive motion and the consequent signal attenuation. The role of the local geometry and related practical applications are discussed.

  5. Regulation of cell death in cancer - possible implications for immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Simone eFulda

    2013-01-01

    Since most anticancer therapies including immunotherapy trigger programmed cell death in cancer cells, defective cell death programs can lead to treatment resistance and tumor immune escape. Therefore, evasion of programmed cell death may provide one possible explanation as to why cancer immunotherapy has so far only shown modest clinical benefits for children with cancer. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate sensitivity and resistance to programmed cell death is e...

  6. Cell survival, cell death and cell cycle pathways are interconnected: Implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Ande, SR; Panigrahi, S;

    2007-01-01

    both for their apoptosis-regulating capacity and also for their effect on the cell cycle progression. The PI3-K/Akt cell survival pathway is shown as regulator of cell metabolism and cell survival, but examples are also provided where aberrant activity of the pathway may contribute to the induction...... of apoptosis. Myc/Mad/Max proteins are shown both as a powerful S-phase driving complex and as apoptosis-sensitizers. We also discuss multifunctional proteins like p53 and Rb (RBL1/p107, RBL2/p130) both in the context of G(1)-S transition and as apoptotic triggers. Finally, we reflect on novel therapeutic...

  7. Cellular pressure and volume regulation and implications for cell mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X

    2013-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death, and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of cells and tissues. Here, we develop a mathematical model of cellular volume and pressure regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechanosensitive channels, active ion pumps, and active stresses in the cortex. The model can fully explain recent experimental data, and it predicts cellular volume and pressure for several models of cell cortical mechanics. Moreover, we show that when cells are subjected to an externally applied load, such as in an atomic force microscopy indentation experiment, active regulation of volume and pressure leads to a complex cellular response. Instead of the passive mechanics of the cortex, the observed cell stiffness depends on several factors working together. This provides a mathematical explanation of rate-dependent response of cells under force. PMID:23931309

  8. Plasticity of Cancer Cell Invasion-Mechanisms and Implications for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Boekhorst, V; Friedl, P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is a plastic and adaptive process integrating cytoskeletal dynamics, cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion, as well as tissue remodeling. In response to molecular and physical microenvironmental cues during metastatic dissemination, cancer cells exploit a versatile repertoire of invasion and dissemination strategies, including collective and single-cell migration programs. This diversity generates molecular and physical heterogeneity of migration mechanisms and metastatic routes, and provides a basis for adaptation in response to microenvironmental and therapeutic challenge. We here summarize how cytoskeletal dynamics, protease systems, cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion pathways control cancer cell invasion programs, and how reciprocal interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment contributes to plasticity of invasion and dissemination strategies. We discuss the potential and future implications of predicted "antimigration" therapies that target cytoskeletal dynamics, adhesion, and protease systems to interfere with metastatic dissemination, and the options for integrating antimigration therapy into the spectrum of targeted molecular therapies. PMID:27613134

  9. Cancer stem cell markers in common cancers - therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klonisch, Thomas; Wiechec, Emilia; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine;

    2008-01-01

    Rapid advance in the cancer stem cell field warrants optimism for the development of more reliable cancer therapies within the next 2-3 decades. Below, we characterize and compare the specific markers that are present on stem cells, cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in selected tissues......, the last part of the review discusses future directions of this intriguing new research field in the context of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities....

  10. Aging and the Dendritic Cell System: Implications for Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.; Chatta, Gurkamal S.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system shows a decline in responsiveness to antigens both with aging, as well as in the presence of tumors. The malfunction of the immune system with age can be attributed to developmental and functional alterations in several cell populations. Previous studies have shown defects in humoral responses and abnormalities in T cell function in aged individuals, but have not distinguished between abnormalities in antigen presentation and intrinsic T cell or B cell defects in aged indivi...

  11. Clinical implications of immunologic phenotyping in cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderheid, E C; Tan, E; Sobel, E L; Schwab, E; Micaily, B; Jegasothy, B V

    1987-07-01

    The composition of cutaneous lesions from 158 patients with confirmed cutaneous T cell lymphoma, 91 patients with suspected cutaneous T cell lymphoma, and 145 patients with lymphoid disorders other than cutaneous T cell lymphoma was quantitated in situ with the use of commercially available murine monoclonal antibodies that identify the Pan T, T-helper/inducer (Th), T cytotoxic/suppressor (Ts), and Pan B lymphocyte subsets. On average, cutaneous infiltrates of confirmed cutaneous T cell lymphoma were found to contain significantly more Th and less Ts or Pan B cells compared to benign lymphoid disorders. Moreover, when analyzed in terms of the type of lesion examined by biopsy, the absolute amount of Th cells progressively expands with increasing magnitudes of infiltrate in the dermis while the amount of Ts and Pan B cells remains relatively constant among lesions. A useful diagnostic criterion (anti-Leu 1/4 greater than or equal to 70% and anti-Leu 3a/anti-Leu 2a ratio greater than or equal to 6) correctly discriminated between cutaneous T cell lymphoma and non-cutaneous T cell lymphoma in 87.5% of cases. A positive immunodiagnostic result also may be useful for the prediction of subsequent histopathologic confirmation of cutaneous T cell lymphoma in patients who have suspect lymphoid infiltrates, such as alopecia mucinosis or idiopathic generalized erythroderma, when first seen. With the use of multivariate analysis, stage and possibly the percentage of Th cells within the T cell component in cutaneous infiltrates were covariates with significant relationships to survival in patients with confirmed cutaneous T cell lymphoma. In addition, Ts cells in infiltrates did not correlate significantly with observed responses to topical treatment and subsequent course in pretumorous mycosis fungoides. These results indicate that Ts cells play little biologic role in modifying the natural history of cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

  12. Cellular Pressure and Volume Regulation and Implications for Cell Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hongyuan; Sun, Sean X.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, small changes in cell volume can serve as important signals for cell proliferation, death, and migration. Volume and shape regulation also directly impacts the mechanics of cells and tissues. Here, we develop a mathematical model of cellular volume and pressure regulation, incorporating essential elements such as water permeation, mechanosensitive channels, active ion pumps, and active stresses in the cortex. The model can fully explain recent experimental data, and it pr...

  13. Apoptosis and cancer stem cells : Implications for apoptosis targeted therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Frank A. E.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating showing that cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells are key drivers of tumor formation and progression. Successful therapy must therefore eliminate these cells, which is hampered by their high resistance to commonly used treatment modalities. Thus far, only a limited nu

  14. Invited article: inhibition of B cell functions: implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-06-01

    B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. B cells are clonally expanded in various CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), paraneoplastic CNS disorders, or stiff-person syndrome, and are activated to produce pathogenic autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies and myasthenia. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferating inducing ligand (APRIL), key cytokines for B cell survival, are strongly unregulated in MS brain and in muscles of inflammatory myopathies. Modulation of B cell functions using a series of monoclonal antibodies against CD20+ B cells or the molecules that increase B cell survival, such as BAFF/APRIL and their receptors BAFF-R, TACI, and BCMA, provide a rational approach to the treatment of the aforementioned neurologic disorders. In controlled studies, rituximab, a B cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, has been encouraging in MS and paraproteinemic anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, exerting long-lasting remissions. In uncontrolled series, benefit has been reported in several disorders. B cell depletion is a well-tolerated therapeutic option currently explored in the treatment of several autoimmune neurologic disorders.

  15. The secretome of mesenchymal stem cells: potential implications for neuroregeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Gesine; Anisimov, Sergey V

    2013-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have shown regenerative properties in many tissues. This feature had originally been ascribed to their multipotency and thus their ability to differentiate into tissue-specific cells. However, many researchers consider the secretome of mesenchymal stem cells the most important player in the observed reparative effects of these cells. In this review, we specifically focus on the potential neuroregenerative effect of mesenchymal stem cells, summarize several possible mechanisms of neuroregeneration and list key factors mediating this effect. We illustrate examples of mesenchymal stem cell treatment in central nervous system disorders including stroke, neurodegenerative disorders (such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple system atrophy and cerebellar ataxia) and inflammatory disease (such as multiple sclerosis). We specifically highlight studies where mesenchymal stem cells have entered clinical trials.

  16. Mast cells in allergy and autoimmunity: implications for adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Gregory D; Brown, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    As in the fashion industry, trends in a particular area of scientific investigation often are fleeting but then return with renewed and enthusiastic interest. Studies of mast cell biology are good examples of this. Although dogma once relegated mast cells almost exclusively to roles in pathological inflammation associated with allergic disease, these cells are emerging as important players in a number of other physiological processes. Consequently, they are quickly becoming the newest "trendy" cell, both within and outside the field of immunology. As sources of a large array of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, mast cells also express cell surface molecules with defined functions in lymphocyte activation and trafficking. Here, we provide an overview of the traditional and newly appreciated contributions of mast cells to both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  17. Clinical implications of basic science discoveries: janus resurrected--two faces of B cell and plasma cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, E S; Rothstein, D M

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a complex role in the immune response. In addition to giving rise to plasma cells (PCs) and promoting T cell responses via antigen presentation, they perform immunoregulatory functions. This knowledge has created concerns regarding nonspecific B cell depletional therapy because of the potential to paradoxically augment immune responses. Recent studies now indicate that PCs have immune functions beyond immunoglobulin synthesis. Evidence for a new role for PCs as potent regulatory cells (via IL-10 and IL-35 production) is discussed including the implications for PC-targeted therapies currently being developed for clinical transplantation.

  18. Asthma in Sickle Cell Disease: Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Blake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review issues related to asthma in sickle cell disease and management strategies. Data Source. A systematic review of pertinent original research publications, reviews, and editorials was undertaken using MEDLlNE, the Cochrane Library databases, and CINAHL from 1947 to November 2010. Search terms were [asthma] and [sickle cell disease]. Additional publications considered relevant to the sickle cell disease population of patients were identified; search terms included [sickle cell disease] combined with [acetaminophen], [pain medications], [vitamin D], [beta agonists], [exhaled nitric oxide], and [corticosteroids]. Results. The reported prevalence of asthma in children with sickle cell disease varies from 2% to approximately 50%. Having asthma increases the risk for developing acute chest syndrome , death, or painful episodes compared to having sickle cell disease without asthma. Asthma and sickle cell may be linked by impaired nitric oxide regulation, excessive production of leukotrienes, insufficient levels of Vitamin D, and exposure to acetaminophen in early life. Treatment of sickle cell patients includes using commonly prescribed asthma medications; specific considerations are suggested to ensure safety in the sickle cell population. Conclusion. Prospective controlled trials of drug treatment for asthma in patients who have both sickle cell disease and asthma are urgently needed.

  19. Circulating osteogenic cells: implications for injury, repair, and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pignolo, Robert J; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a critical reading of recent literature pertaining to the presence of circulating, fluid-phase osteoblastic cells and their possible contribution to bone formation. We have termed this group of cells collectively as circulating osteogenic precursor (COP) cells....... We present evidence for their existence, methods used for their isolation and identification, possible physiological and pathophysiological roles, cellular origins, and possible mechanisms for their migration to target tissues....

  20. Cell cycle deregulation by methyl isocyanate: Implications in liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Hariom; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Jain, Deepika; Ahirwar, Alok K; Khan, Saba; Jain, Subodh K; Pathak, Neelam; Banerjee, Smita; Maudar, Kewal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2014-03-01

    Liver is often exposed to plethora of chemical toxins. Owing to its profound physiological role and central function in metabolism and homeostasis, pertinent succession of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells is of prime importance to maintain cellular proliferation. Although recent evidence has displayed a strong association between exposures to methyl isocyanate (MIC), one of the most toxic isocyanates, and neoplastic transformation, molecular characterization of the longitudinal effects of MIC on cell cycle regulation has never been performed. Here, we sequentially delineated the status of different proteins arbitrating the deregulation of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells treated with MIC. Our data reaffirms the oncogenic capability of MIC with elevated DNA damage response proteins pATM and γ-H2AX, deregulation of DNA damage check point genes CHK1 and CHK2, altered expression of p53 and p21 proteins involved in cell cycle arrest with perturbation in GADD-45 expression in the treated cells. Further, alterations in cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 levels along with overexpression of mitotic spindle checkpoints proteins Aurora A/B, centrosomal pericentrin protein, chromosomal aberrations, and loss of Pot1a was observed. Thus, MIC impacts key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability as a possible mechanism of developmental basis of liver carcinogenesis. PMID:22223508

  1. T-Cell Costimulatory Molecules in Acute-Graft-Versus Host Disease: Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Briones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is a major complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although this process is thought to consist of several phases, T-cell activation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute GVHD. To become efficient effectors, T-cells require additional costimulation after T-cell receptor signaling. A number of molecules are involved in costimulation of T-cells such as CD28, CD40L, CD30, OX40, 4-1BB, ICOS, and LIGHT. The system is regulated by inhibitory molecules, CTLA-4, and PD-1. There is experimental evidence that those molecules are implicated in the pathogenesis of GHVD. We describe how these molecules are involved in acute GVHD and how the blockade of costimulatory molecules may have potential implications for the treatment of patients with acute GVHD.

  2. Metabolic alterations in cancer cells and therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naima Hammoudi; Kausar Begam Riaz Ahmed; Celia Garcia-Prieto; Peng Huang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an important area of research in recent years. Elucidation of the metabolic differences between cancer and normal cells and the underlying mechanisms will not only advance our understanding of fundamental cancer cell biology but also provide an important basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and novel compounds to selectively eliminate cancer cells by targeting their unique metabolism. This article reviews several important metabolic alterations in cancer cells, with an emphasis on increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) and glutamine addiction, and discusses the mechanisms that may contribute to such metabolic changes. In addition, metabolic alterations in cancer stem cells, mitochondrial metabolism and its influence on drug sensitivity, and potential therapeutic strategies and agents that target cancer metabolism are also discussed.

  3. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  4. The Cell Biology of Cytomegalovirus: Implications for Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, H; Fishman, J A

    2016-08-01

    Interpretation of clinical data regarding the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on allograft function is complicated by the diversity of viral strains and substantial variability of cellular receptors and viral gene expression in different tissues. Variation also exists in nonspecific (monocytes and dendritic cells) and specific (NK cells, antibodies) responses that augment T cell antiviral activities. Innate immune signaling pathways and expanded pools of memory NK cells and γδ T cells also serve to amplify host responses to infection. The clinical impact of specific memory T cell anti-CMV responses that cross-react with graft antigens and alloantigens is uncertain but appears to contribute to graft injury and to the abrogation of allograft tolerance. These responses are modified by diverse immunosuppressive regimens and by underlying host immune deficits. The impact of CMV infection on the transplant recipient reflects cellular changes and corresponding host responses, the convergence of which has been termed the "indirect effects" of CMV infection. Future studies will clarify interactions between CMV infection and allograft injury and will guide interventions that may enhance clinical outcomes in transplantation.

  5. Glioma-initiating cells and molecular pathology: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Atsushi; Kinjo, Sayano; Yuki, Kanako; Kato, Takenori; Ohno, Masasuke; Motomura, Kazuya; Iwami, Kenichiro; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2011-02-01

    There is now compelling evidence that gliomas harbor a small population of cells, termed glioma-initiating cells (GICs), characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and initiate tumorigenesis. The development of therapeutic strategies targeted toward GIC signaling may improve the treatment of malignant gliomas. The characterization of GICs provides a clue to elucidating histological heterogeneity and treatment failure. The role of the stem cell marker CD133 in the initiation and progression of brain tumors is still uncertain. Here, we review some of the signaling mechanisms involved in GIC biology, such as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), sonic hedgehog, Notch, and WNT signaling pathways, maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), BMI1, and Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling. In addition, we discuss the role of microRNAs in GICs by focusing on microRNA-21 regulation by type I interferon.

  6. Liver cancer stem cell markers: Progression and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Hui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Song, Guan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation in cancer, have been proposed to be cancer-initiating cells, and have been shown to be responsible for chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. The identification of CSC subpopulations inside a tumor presents a new understanding of cancer development because it implies that tumors can only be eradicated by targeting CSCs. Although advances in liver cancer detection and treatment have increased the possibility of curing the disease at early stages, unfortunately, most patients will relapse and succumb to their disease. Strategies aimed at efficiently targeting liver CSCs are becoming important for monitoring the progress of liver cancer therapy and for evaluating new therapeutic approaches. Herein, we provide a critical discussion of biological markers described in the literature regarding liver cancer stem cells and the potential of these markers to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:27053846

  7. Cancer stem cells: therapeutic implications and perspectives in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Han

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC theory is gaining increasing attention from researchers and has become an important focus of cancer research. According to the theory, a minority population of cancer cells is capable of self-renewal and generation of differentiated progeny, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Understanding the properties and characteristics of CSCs is key to future study on cancer research, such as the isolation and identification of CSCs, the cancer diagnosis, and the cancer therapy. Standard oncology treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection, can only shrink the bulk tumor and the tumor tends to relapse. Thus, therapeutic strategies that focus on targeting CSCs and their microenvironmental niche address the ineffectiveness of traditional cancer therapies to eradicate the CSCs that otherwise result in therapy resistance. The combined use of traditional therapies with targeted CSC-specific agents may target the whole cancer and offer a promising strategy for lasting treatment and even cure.

  8. Anaesthetic implications of laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, R.

    2010-04-01

    With the increasing immigrant population in the Republic of Ireland, the number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) seen in the paediatric hospitals is climbing. In this case report, we review the anaesthetic implications and outcome of the first two paediatric patients with SCD to have a laparoscopic splenectomy due to repeated splenic infarcts in the Republic of Ireland.

  9. Anaesthetic implications of laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with sickle cell anaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doodnath, R

    2012-02-01

    With the increasing immigrant population in the Republic of Ireland, the number of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) seen in the paediatric hospitals is climbing. In this case report, we review the anaesthetic implications and outcome of the first two paediatric patients with SCD to have a laparoscopic splenectomy due to repeated splenic infarcts in the Republic of Ireland.

  10. Hypergravity as a Tool for Cell Stimulation: : Implications in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Graziana Genchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gravity deeply influences numerous biological events in living organisms. Variations in gravity values induce adaptive reactions that have been shown to play important roles, for instance in cell survival, growth, and spatial organization. In this paper, we summarize effects of gravity values higher than that one experienced by cells and tissues on Earth, i.e., hypergravity, with particular attention to the nervous and the musculoskeletal systems. Besides the biological consequences that hypergravity induces in the living matter, we will discuss the possibility of exploiting this augmented force in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and thus hypergravity significance as a new therapeutic approach both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides perturb lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells: Implications for inflammatory demyelinating disease

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Clayton W.; Foster, Scott C.; Itakura, Asako; Matsumoto, Steven G.; Asari, Akira; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Sherman, Larry S.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the central nervous system. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan and its receptor, CD44, are implicated in the initiation and progression of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Digestion of hyaluronan tethered to brain vascular endothelial cells by a hyaluronidase blocks the slow rolling of lymphocytes along activated brain vascular ...

  12. The Implication of Aberrant GM-CSF Expression in Decidual Cells in the Pathogenesis of Preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, S. Joseph; Zenclussen, Ana C.; Chen, Chie-Pein; Basar, Murat; Yang, Hui; Arcuri, Felice; Min LI; Kocamaz, Erdogan; Buchwalder, Lynn; Rahman, Mizanur; Kayisli, Umit; Schatz, Frederick; Toti, Paolo; Lockwood, Charles J.

    2010-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by an exaggerated systemic inflammatory state as well as shallow placentation. In the decidual implantation site, preeclampsia is accompanied by an excessive number of both macrophages and dendritic cells as well as their recruiting chemokines, which have been implicated in the impairment of endovascular trophoblast invasion. Granulocyte-macrophage colony–stimulating factor is known to regulate the differentiation of both macrophages and dendritic cells, promptin...

  13. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic and...

  14. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic...

  15. Senescence in adipose-derived stem cells and its implications in nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Mantovani; Giorgio Terenghi; Valerio Magnaghi

    2014-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cells, specifically adipose-derived stem cells have self-renewal and multiple differentiation potentials and have shown to be the ideal candidate for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine, particularly in peripheral nerve regeneration. Adipose-de-rived stem cells are easily harvested, although they may show the effects of aging, hence their potential in nerve repair may be limited by cellular senescence or donor age. Cellular senescence is a complex process whereby stem cells grow old as consequence of intrinsic events (e.g., DNA damage) or environmental cues (e.g., stressful stimuli or diseases), which determine a permanent growth arrest. Several mechanisms are implicated in stem cell senescence, although no one is exclusive of the others. In this review we report some of the most important factors modulating the senescence process, which can inlfuence adipose-derived stem cell morphology and function, and compromise their clinical application for peripheral nerve regenerative cell therapy.

  16. Circulating mesenchymal stem cells and their clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is a new cell source for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. The characteristics of circulating MSCs are similar to those of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, but they exist at a very low level in healthy individuals. It has been demonstrated that MSCs are able to migrate to the sites of injury and that they have some distinct genetic profiles compared to BM-MSCs. The current review summaries the basic knowledge of circulating MSCs and their potential clinical applications, such as mobilizing the BM-MSCs into circulation for therapy. The application of MSCs to cure a broad spectrum of diseases is promising, such as spinal cord injury, cardiovascular repair, bone and cartilage repair. The current review also discusses the issues of using of allogeneic MSCs for clinical therapy.

  17. c-Met in pancreatic cancer stem cells: Therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Aizpea Zubia-Olascoaga; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the deadliest solid cancer and currently the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths.Emerging evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a crucial role in the development and progression of this disease.The identification of CSC markers could lead to the development of new therapeutic targets.In this study,the authors explore the functional role of c-Met in pancreatic CSCs,by analyzing self-renewal with sphere assays and tumorigenicity capacity in NOD SCID mice.They concluded that c-Met is a novel marker for identifying pancreatic CSCs and c-Methigh in a higher tumorigenic cancer cell population.Inhibition of c-Met with XL184 blocks self-renewal capacity in pancreatic CSCs.In pancreatic tumors established in NOD SCID mice,c-Met inhibition slowed tumor growth and reduced the population of CSCs,along with preventing the development of metastases.

  18. Primary alveolar capillary dysplasia (acinar dysplasia) and surfactant protein B deficiency: a clinical, radiological and pathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugosson, Claes O.; Khoumais, Nuha [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Radiology MBC 28, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Salama, Husam M.; Kattan, Abdul H. [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Paediatrics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Dayel, Fouad [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Pathology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-03-01

    Full-term infants with severe and prolonged respiratory distress represent a diagnostic challenge. Plain radiographic findings may be nonspecific or similar to classic surfactant deficiency disease for infants with surfactant protein B deficiency and acinar dysplasia. Objectives: To describe the similar clinical-radiolgical patterns of two rare neonatal conditions. Six newborn babies with severe respiratory distress at birth demonstrated clinical and radiographically prolonged and progressive diffuse pulmonary opacification. All infants demonstrated hyperinflation of the lungs. The diffuse hazy opacification, which varied from mild (n=3) to moderate (n=3), progressed to severe diffuse opacification preceding death, which occurred at 12-36 days of life. Open lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of primary alveolar acinar dysplasia (AD) in four infants and surfactant protein B deficiency (SPBD) in two infants. In full-term babies with unexplained progressive respiratory distress from birth and progress of radiological changes, both AD and SPBD should be considered. (orig.)

  19. Primary alveolar capillary dysplasia (acinar dysplasia) and surfactant protein B deficiency: a clinical, radiological and pathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-term infants with severe and prolonged respiratory distress represent a diagnostic challenge. Plain radiographic findings may be nonspecific or similar to classic surfactant deficiency disease for infants with surfactant protein B deficiency and acinar dysplasia. Objectives: To describe the similar clinical-radiological patterns of two rare neonatal conditions. Six newborn babies with severe respiratory distress at birth demonstrated clinical and radiographically prolonged and progressive diffuse pulmonary opacification. All infants demonstrated hyperinflation of the lungs. The diffuse hazy opacification, which varied from mild (n=3) to moderate (n=3), progressed to severe diffuse opacification preceding death, which occurred at 12-36 days of life. Open lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of primary alveolar acinar dysplasia (AD) in four infants and surfactant protein B deficiency (SPBD) in two infants. In full-term babies with unexplained progressive respiratory distress from birth and progress of radiological changes, both AD and SPBD should be considered. (orig.)

  20. Spermatogonial Stem Cells: Implications for Genetic Disorders and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Makiko; De Chiara, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) propagate mammalian spermatogenesis throughout male reproductive life by continuously self-renewing and differentiating, ultimately, into sperm. SSCs can be cultured for long periods and restore spermatogenesis upon transplantation back into the native microenvironment in vivo. Conventionally, SSC research has been focused mainly on male infertility and, to a lesser extent, on cell reprogramming. With the advent of genome-wide sequencing technology, however, human studies have uncovered a wide range of pathogenic alleles that arise in the male germ line. A subset of de novo point mutations was shown to originate in SSCs and cause congenital disorders in children. This review describes both monogenic diseases (eg, Apert syndrome) and complex disorders that are either known or suspected to be driven by mutations in SSCs. We propose that SSC culture is a suitable model for studying the origin and mechanisms of these diseases. Lastly, we discuss strategies for future clinical implementation of SSC-based technology, from detecting mutation burden by sperm screening to gene correction in vitro. PMID:27596369

  1. Sarcomatoid differentiation in renal cell carcinoma: prognostic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall'Oglio

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid differentiation is a tumor with aggressive behavior that is poorly responsive to immunotherapy. The objective of this study is to report our experience in the treatment of 15 patients with this tumor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 15 consecutive cases of renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid differentiation diagnosed between 1991 and 2003. The clinical presentation and the pathological stage were assessed, as were the tumor's pathological features, use of adjuvant immunotherapy and survival. The study's primary end-point was to assess survival of these individuals. RESULTS: The sample included 8 women and 7 men with mean age of 63 years (44 - 80; follow-up ranged from 1 to 100 months (mean 34. Upon presentation, 87% were symptomatic and 4 individuals had metastatic disease. Mean tumor size was 9.5 cm (4 - 24 with the following pathological stages: 7% pT1, 7% pT2, 33% pT3, and 53% pT4. The pathological features showed high-grade tumors with tumoral necrosis in 87% of the lesions and 80% of intratumoral microvascular invasion. Disease-free and cancer-specific survival rates were 40 and 46% respectively, with 2 cases responding to adjuvant immunotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with sarcomatoid tumors of the kidney have a low life expectancy, and sometimes surgical resection associated with immunotherapy can lead to a long-lasting therapeutic response.

  2. Downregulation of CXCR4 in Metastasized Breast Cancer Cells and Implication in Their Dormancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nobutani

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanism of cancer dormancy is emerging, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we analyzed mouse xenograft tumors derived from human breast cancer tissue and the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 to identify the molecules associated with cancer dormancy. In immunohistological examination using the proliferation marker Ki-67, the tumors included both proliferating and dormant cancer cells, but the number of dormant cells was remarkably increased when they metastasized to the lung. In the gene expression analysis of the orthotopic cancer cells by a single-cell multiplex real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR followed by flow cytometric analysis, restrained cellular proliferation was associated with downregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. In the immunohistological and flow cytometric analyses, the expression level of CXCR4 in the metastasized cancer cells was decreased compared with that in the cancer cells in orthotopic tumors, although the expression level of the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 was not reduced in the lung. In addition, the proliferation of the metastasized cancer cells was further decreased by the CXCR4 antagonist administration. In the ex vivo culture of the metastasized cancer cells, the expression level of CXCR4 was increased, and in the xenotransplantation of ex vivo cultured cancer cells, the expression level of CXCR4 was again decreased in the metastasized cancer cells in the lung. These findings indicate that CXCR4 is downregulated in metastasized breast cancer cells and implicated in their dormancy.

  3. Implications of irradiating the subventricular zone stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for brain tumor patients. However, it comes with side effects, such as neurological deficits. While likely multi-factorial, the effect may in part be associated with the impact of radiation on the neurogenic niches. In the adult mammalian brain, the neurogenic niches are localized in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where the neural stem cells (NSCs reside. Several reports showed that radiation produces a drastic decrease in the proliferative capacity of these regions, which is related to functional decline. In particular, radiation to the SVZ led to a reduced long-term olfactory memory and a reduced capacity to respond to brain damage in animal models, as well as compromised tumor outcomes in patients. By contrast, other studies in humans suggested that increased radiation dose to the SVZ may be associated with longer progression-free survival in patients with high-grade glioma. In this review, we summarize the cellular and functional effects of irradiating the SVZ niche. In particular, we review the pros and cons of using radiation during brain tumor treatment, discussing the complex relationship between radiation dose to the SVZ and both tumor control and toxicity.

  4. Implications of irradiating the subventricular zone stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Bonsu, Janice M; Redmond, Kristin J; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for brain tumor patients. However, it comes with side effects, such as neurological deficits. While likely multi-factorial, the effect may in part be associated with the impact of radiation on the neurogenic niches. In the adult mammalian brain, the neurogenic niches are localized in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where the neural stem cells (NSCs) reside. Several reports showed that radiation produces a drastic decrease in the proliferative capacity of these regions, which is related to functional decline. In particular, radiation to the SVZ led to a reduced long-term olfactory memory and a reduced capacity to respond to brain damage in animal models, as well as compromised tumor outcomes in patients. By contrast, other studies in humans suggested that increased radiation dose to the SVZ may be associated with longer progression-free survival in patients with high-grade glioma. In this review, we summarize the cellular and functional effects of irradiating the SVZ niche. In particular, we review the pros and cons of using radiation during brain tumor treatment, discussing the complex relationship between radiation dose to the SVZ and both tumor control and toxicity.

  5. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Mulvihill

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recently, advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury. In this review, we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer development. The implications of a stem cell origin of lung cancer are reviewed, and the importance of ongoing research to identify novel therapeutic and prognostic targets is reiterated.

  6. Connexin implication in the control of the murine beta-cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Philippe; Lamprianou, Smaragda; Charollais, Anne; Caille, Dorothée; Sarro, Rossella; Cederroth, Manon; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    Diabetes develops when the insulin needs of peripheral cells exceed the availability or action of the hormone. This situation results from the death of most beta-cells in type 1 diabetes, and from an inability of the beta-cell mass to adapt to increasing insulin needs in type 2 and gestational diabetes. We analyzed several lines of transgenic mice and showed that connexins (Cxs), the transmembrane proteins that form gap junctions, are implicated in the modulation of the beta-cell mass. Specifically, we found that the native Cx36 does not alter islet size or insulin content, whereas the Cx43 isoform increases both parameters, and Cx32 has a similar effect only when combined with GH. These findings open interesting perspectives for the in vitro and in vivo regulation of the beta-cell mass. PMID:21527868

  7. Cell survival following alpha particle irradiation: critical sites and implications for carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments in which mammalian cells were irradiated with 5.6 MeV alpha particles from a Tandem Van de Graaff machine we have confirmed the finding of others that the mean lethal dose (D0) is about 100 rad, but by measurements of the area of the cell nuclei as irradiated we found that this mean lethal dose corresponds not to 1, as expected, but to about 27 alpha particles per cell nucleus. (The exact number appears to change slightly with cell passage number.) This allows for the possibility that the direct action of alpha particles on the nucleus may be the important event in carcinogenesis, a theory which was previously difficult to accept if a single particle hitting the nucleus anywhere was considered to be lethal. Evidence is presented to implicate the nucleolus as a possible critical site for the inhibition of reproductive integrity of the cell

  8. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael S.Mulvihill; Johannes R.Kratz; Patrick Pham; David M.Jablons; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide.Recently,advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis.Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury.In this review,we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer development.The implications of a stem cell origin of lung cancer are reviewed,and the importance of ongoing research to identify novel therapeutic and prognostic targets is reiterated.

  9. Melanoma-Derived BRAFV600E Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V.; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell’s phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAFV600E melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAFV600E protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAFV600E with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAFV600E mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAFV600E mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAFWT melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome. PMID:27338362

  10. Melanoma-Derived BRAFV600E Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Kurgyis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell’s phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAFV600E melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAFV600E protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAFV600E with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAFV600E mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAFV600E mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAFWT melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome.

  11. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  12. Human embryonic stem cell research: implications from an ethical and legal standpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepagnier, D M

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ethical and legal implications of one of the newest and most controversial medical breakthroughs. Stem cell research has been performed on mice for many years, but human embryonic stem cells are believed by scientists to be the basis for possible treatments and/or cures to many diseases affecting millions of people around the world. In order to perform research on human embryonic stem cells, numerous ethical issues must be addressed. Guidelines and protocols can be established in order to allow scientists to pursue new medical advances while maintaining the highest ethical standards in the use of human embryos. An alternative to using embryos is adult stem cells which have recently proven to be more versatile than previously believed. Opposing views will always be encountered when facing new science technologies. Where should the ethical line be drawn?

  13. Macro-management of microRNAs in cell cycle progression of tumor cells and its implications in anti-cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-hui LIANG; Xiang-huo HE

    2011-01-01

    The cell cycle,which is precisely controlled by a number of regulators,including cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs),is crucial for the life cycle of mammals.Cell cycle dysregulation is implicated in many diseases,including cancer.Recently,compelling evidence has been found that microRNAs play important roles in the regulation of cell cycle progression by modulating the expression of cyclins,CDKs and other cell cycle regulators.Herein,the recent findings on the regulation of the cell cycle by microRNAs are summarized,and the potential implications of miRNAs in anti-cancer therapies are discussed.

  14. Cell Wall Microstructure Analysis Implicates Hemicellulose Polysaccharides in Cell Adhesion in Tomato Fruit Pericarp Parenchyma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose J. Ordaz-Ortiz; Susan E. Marcus; J. Paul Knox

    2009-01-01

    Methods developed to isolate intact cells from both unripe and ripe tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma have allowed the cell biological analysis of polysaccharide epitopes at the surface of separated cells. The LM7 pectic homoga-lacturonan epitope is a marker of the junctions of adhesion planes and intercellular spaces in parenchyma systems. The LM7 epitope persistently marked the former edge of adhesion planes at the surface of cells separated from unripe and ripened tomato fruit and also from fruits with the Cnr mutation. The LM 11 xylan epitope was associated, in sections, with cell walls lining intercellular space but the epitope was not detected at the surface of isolated cells, being lost during cell isolation. The LM15 xyloglucan epitope was present at the surface of cells isolated from unripe fruit in a pattern reflecting the former edge of cell adhesion planes/intercellular space but with gaps and apparent breaks, An equivalent pattern ofLM15 epitope occurrence was revealed at the surface of cells isolated by pectate lyase action but was not present in cells isolated from ripe fruit or from Cnr fruit. In contrast to wild-type cells, the LM5 galactan and LM21 mannan epitopes oc-curred predominantly in positions reflecting intercellular space in Cnr, suggesting a concerted alteration in cell wall mi-crostructure in response to this mutation. Galactanase and mannanase, along with pectic homogalacturonan-degrading enzymes, were capable of releasing cells from unripe fruit parenchyma. These observations indicate that hemicellulose polymers are present in architectural contexts reflecting cell adhesion and that several cell wall polysaccharide classes are likely to contribute to cell adhesion/cell separation in tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma.

  15. Implications of Time Bomb model of ookinete invasion of midgut cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yeon Soo; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    In this review, we describe the experimental observations that led us to propose the Time Bomb model of ookinete midgut invasion and discuss potential implications of this model when considering malaria transmission-blocking strategies aimed at arresting parasite development within midgut cells. A detailed analysis of the molecular interactions between Anopheles stephensi midgut epithelial cells and Plasmodium berghei parasites, as they migrate through midgut cells, revealed that ookinetes induce nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and characteristic morphological changes in the invaded epithelial cells. Parasites inflict extensive damage that ultimately leads to genome fragmentation and cell death. During their migration through the cytoplasm, ookinetes release a subtilisin-like protease (PbSub2) and the surface protein (Pbs21). The model proposes that ookinetes must escape rapidly from the invaded cells, as the responses mediating cell death could be potentially lethal to the parasites. In other words, the physical and/or chemical damage triggered by the parasite can be thought of as a 'lethal bomb'. Once this cascade of events is initiated, the parasite must leave the cellular compartment within a limited time to escape unharmed from the 'bomb' it has activated. The midgut epithelium has the ability to heal rapidly by 'budding off' the damaged cells to the midgut lumen without losing its integrity. PMID:12225921

  16. Implications of Stem Cells and Cancer Stem Cells for Understanding Fomation and Therapy of Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Li; Donglin Wang

    2005-01-01

    Most cancers are heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. There is increasing evidence suggesting that only a minority of cancer cells, tumorigenic or tumor initiating cells, possess the capacity to proliferate extensively and form new hematopoietic cancer or solid tumors. Tumor initiating cells share characteristics required for normal stem cells. The dysregulation of self-renewal and proliferation of stem cells is a likely requirement for cancer development. This review formulates a model for the origin of cancer stem cells and regulating self-renewal which influences the way we study and treat cancer.

  17. Biopsy follow-up in patients with isolated atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP in prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Leone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of prostate cancer (PCA was evaluated in 155 patients with isolated Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation (ASAP found on initial prostate biopsy, after a medium-term follow-up (40 months with at least one re-biopsy. Clinical and histological data were analysed. Cancer was detected in 81 of 155 (52.3%. The cancer detection rate was 71.6%, 91.3%, 97.5%, 100% at the 1st re-biopsy, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th rebiopsy respectively. At the uni- and multivariate analyses, prostate volume (≤ 30 cc, transition zone volume (≤ 10 cc, small core length at the initial biopsy (≤ 10 mm and few number of cores at initial biopsy (≤ 8 are predictive of cancer. Furthermore, tumour characteristics on the whole surgical specimens was assessed in 30 men: 13 of 30 (43 % had clinically relevant cancer (volume > 0.5 ml or/and Gleason score ≥ 7, or pT3. Most of relevant cancers were detected in the distal apex, anterior gland and midline. These anatomical sites could be under-sampled at the initial biopsy using the transrectal approach. Our data suggest that follow-up biopsy is recommended in all cases of isolated ASAP detected after biopsy using endfire transrectal probe. The re-biopsy strategy should increase the number of cores (or a saturation biopsy, focusing on area of ASAP in the initial biopsy, but also including the under-sampled areas (anterior gland, distal apex and midline to detect clinically relevant cancers.

  18. Role of AQP2 in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity: implications in cell volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galizia, L; Flamenco, M P; Rivarola, V; Capurro, C; Ford, P

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported in a rat cortical collecting duct cell line (RCCD(1)) that the presence of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the cell membrane is critical for the rapid activation of regulatory volume decrease mechanisms (RVD) (Ford et al. Biol Cell 97: 687-697, 2005). The aim of our present work was to investigate the signaling pathway that links AQP2 to this rapid RVD activation. Since it has been previously described that hypotonic conditions induce intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in different cell types, we tested the hypothesis that AQP2 could have a role in activation of calcium entry by hypotonicity and its implication in cell volume regulation. Using a fluorescent probe technique, we studied [Ca(2+)](i) and cell volume changes in response to a hypotonic shock in WT-RCCD(1) (not expressing aquaporins) and in AQP2-RCCD(1) (transfected with AQP2) cells. We found that after a hypotonic shock only AQP2-RCCD(1) cells exhibit a substantial increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase is strongly dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and is partially inhibited by thapsigargin (1 muM) indicating that the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) reflects both influx from the extracellular medium and release from intracellular stores. Exposure of AQP2-RCCD(1) cells to 100 muM gadolinium reduced the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) suggesting the involvement of a mechanosensitive calcium channel. Furthermore, exposure of cells to all of the above described conditions impaired rapid RVD. We conclude that the expression of AQP2 in the cell membrane is critical to produce the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) which is necessary to activate RVD in RCCD(1) cells. PMID:18094031

  19. The initial slope of cell survival curves. Its implications in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of the initial slope of the cell survival curves can be approached in 2 ways: a straightforward approach is the direct and acurate measurement of the cell survival at low dose. This method is practically restricted to experiments in vitro; an indirect approach is the determination of the initial slope of the single cell survival curves from the shape of the ''isoeffect curves'' for fractionated irradiations. This method can be applied to ''non-quantitative'' reactions. Implications in radiotherapy of the existence of a significant initial slope are presented with respect to the 3 following problems: importance of the fraction number N for fractionated irradiations with small doses per fraction and differential effect related to fraction number; variation of the total dose as a function of dose rate for low dose rate irradiation; RBE of high LET radiation and RBE/dose relationship

  20. β-Cell regeneration through the transdifferentiation of pancreatic cells: Pancreatic progenitor cells in the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic progenitor cell research has been in the spotlight, as these cells have the potential to replace pancreatic β-cells for the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetic patients with the absence or reduction of pancreatic β-cells. During the past few decades, the successful treatment of diabetes through transplantation of the whole pancreas or isolated islets has nearly been achieved. However, novel sources of pancreatic islets or insulin-producing cells are required to provide sufficient amounts of donor tissues. To overcome this limitation, the use of pancreatic progenitor cells is gaining more attention. In particular, pancreatic exocrine cells, such as duct epithelial cells and acinar cells, are attractive candidates for β-cell regeneration because of their differentiation potential and pancreatic lineage characteristics. It has been assumed that β-cell neogenesis from pancreatic progenitor cells could occur in pancreatic ducts in the postnatal stage. Several studies have shown that insulin-producing cells can arise in the duct tissue of the adult pancreas. Acinar cells also might have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. The present review summarizes recent progress in research on the transdifferentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, especially duct and acinar cells. PMID:27330712

  1. Dysregulation of complement system and CD4+ T cell activation pathways implicated in allergic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexessander Couto Alves

    Full Text Available Allergy is a complex disease that is likely to involve dysregulated CD4+ T cell activation. Here we propose a novel methodology to gain insight into how coordinated behaviour emerges between disease-dysregulated pathways in response to pathophysiological stimuli. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells of allergic rhinitis patients and controls cultured with and without pollen allergens, we integrate CD4+ T cell gene expression from microarray data and genetic markers of allergic sensitisation from GWAS data at the pathway level using enrichment analysis; implicating the complement system in both cellular and systemic response to pollen allergens. We delineate a novel disease network linking T cell activation to the complement system that is significantly enriched for genes exhibiting correlated gene expression and protein-protein interactions, suggesting a tight biological coordination that is dysregulated in the disease state in response to pollen allergen but not to diluent. This novel disease network has high predictive power for the gene and protein expression of the Th2 cytokine profile (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13 and of the Th2 master regulator (GATA3, suggesting its involvement in the early stages of CD4+ T cell differentiation. Dissection of the complement system gene expression identifies 7 genes specifically associated with atopic response to pollen, including C1QR1, CFD, CFP, ITGB2, ITGAX and confirms the role of C3AR1 and C5AR1. Two of these genes (ITGB2 and C3AR1 are also implicated in the network linking complement system to T cell activation, which comprises 6 differentially expressed genes. C3AR1 is also significantly associated with allergic sensitisation in GWAS data.

  2. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and sup...

  3. Rapid selection and proliferation of CD133+ cells from cancer cell lines: chemotherapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Kelly

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133+] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB (Celdyne, Houston, TX. For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133+ cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a +15-fold proliferation of the CD133+ cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (-4.8-fold decrease in the CD133+cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133+ cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates.

  4. Mechanisms of Enhanced Cell Killing at Low Doses: Implications for Radiation Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Peter J. Johnston; Dr. George D. Wilson

    2003-10-15

    We have shown that cell lethality actually measured after exposure to low-doses of low-LET radiation, is markedly enhanced relative to the cell lethality previously expected by extrapolation of the high-dose cell-killing response. Net cancer risk is a balance between cell transformation and cell kill and such enhanced lethality may more than compensate for transformation at low radiation doses over a least the first 10 cGy of low-LET exposure. This would lead to a non-linear, threshold, dose-risk relationship. Therefore our data imply the possibility that the adverse effects of small radiation doses (<10 cGy) could be overestimated in specific cases. It is now important to research the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of low-dose hypersensitivity to cell killing, in order to determine whether this can be generalized to safely allow an increase in radiation exposure limits. This would have major cost-reduction implications for the whole EM program.

  5. Stress, Glucocorticoid Hormones and Hippocampal Neural Progenitor Cells: Implications to Mood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoshige eKino

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and its end-effectors glucocorticoid hormones play central roles in the adaptive response to numerous stressors that can be either internal or external. Thus, this system has a strong impact on the brain hippocampus and its major functions, such as cognition, memory as well as behavior and mood. The hippocampal area of the adult brain contains neural stem cells or more committed neural progenitor cells, which retain throughout the human life the ability of self-renewal and to differentiate into multiple neural cell lineages, such as neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. Importantly, these characteristic cells contribute significantly to the above-indicated functions of the hippocampus, while various stressors and glucocorticoids influence proliferation, differentiation and fate of these cells. This review offers an overview of the current understanding on the interactions between the HPA axis/glucocorticoid stress-responsive system and hippocampal neural progenitor cells by focusing on the actions of glucocorticoids. Also addressed is a further discussion on the implications of such interactions to the pathophysiology of mood disorders.

  6. Coupling between the circadian clock and cell cycle oscillators: implication for healthy cells and malignant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine eFeillet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumour growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer.

  7. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje;

    2012-01-01

    with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape (‘rounding up’). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated...

  8. Coupling between the Circadian Clock and Cell Cycle Oscillators: Implication for Healthy Cells and Malignant Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feillet, Celine; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Levi, Francis; Rand, David A.; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumor growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer. PMID:26029155

  9. Population genetics of cancer cell clones: possible implications of cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naugler Christopher T

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population dynamics of the various clones of cancer cells existing within a tumour is complex and still poorly understood. Cancer cell clones can be conceptualized as sympatric asexual species, and as such, the application of theoretical population genetics as it pertains to asexual species may provide additional insights. Results The number of generations of tumour cells within a cancer has been estimated at a minimum of 40, but high cancer cell mortality rates suggest that the number of cell generations may actually be in the hundreds. Such a large number of generations would easily allow natural selection to drive clonal evolution assuming that selective advantages of individual clones are within the range reported for free-living animal species. Tumour cell clonal evolution could also be driven by variation in the intrinsic rates of increase of different clones or by genetic drift. In every scenario examined, the presence of cancer stem cells would require lower selection pressure or less variation in intrinsic rates of increase. Conclusions The presence of cancer stem cells may result in more rapid clonal evolution. Specific predictions from theoretical population genetics may lead to a greater understanding of this process.

  10. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  11. Senescence in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Functional Changes and Implications in Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinetto, Valentina; Vitale, Emanuela; Giachino, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is extensively interested in developing cell therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), with applications to several aging-associated diseases. For successful therapies, a substantial number of cells are needed, requiring extensive ex vivo cell expansion. However, MSC proliferation is limited and it is quite likely that long-term culture evokes continuous changes in MSCs. Therefore, a substantial proportion of cells may undergo senescence. In the present review, we will first present the phenotypic characterization of senescent human MSCs (hMSCs) and their possible consequent functional alterations. The accumulation of oxidative stress and dysregulation of key differentiation regulatory factors determine decreased differentiation potential of senescent hMSCs. Senescent hMSCs also show a marked impairment in their migratory and homing ability. Finally, many factors present in the secretome of senescent hMSCs are able to exacerbate the inflammatory response at a systemic level, decreasing the immune modulation activity of hMSCs and promoting either proliferation or migration of cancer cells. Considering the deleterious effects that these changes could evoke, it would appear of primary importance to monitor the occurrence of senescent phenotype in clinically expanded hMSCs and to evaluate possible ways to prevent in vitro MSC senescence. An updated critical presentation of the possible strategies for in vitro senescence monitoring and prevention constitutes the second part of this review. Understanding the mechanisms that drive toward hMSC growth arrest and evaluating how to counteract these for preserving a functional stem cell pool is of fundamental importance for the development of efficient cell-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:27447618

  12. Efficient lysis of rhabdomyosarcoma cells by cytokine-induced killer cells: implications for adoptive immunotherapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuçi, Selim; Rettinger, Eva; Voß, Bernhard; Weber, Gerrit; Stais, Miriam; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Willasch, Andre; Kuçi, Zyrafete; Koscielniak, Ewa; Klöss, Stephan; Laer, Dorothee von; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in childhood and has a poor prognosis. Here we assessed the capability of ex vivo expanded cytokine-induced killer cells to lyse both alveolar and embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and investigated the mechanisms involved. Design and Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from six healthy donors were used to generate and expand cytokine-induced killer cells. The phenotype and composition of these cells were deter...

  13. Emerging role of microRNAs in cancer stem cells:Implications in cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minal; Garg

    2015-01-01

    A small subset of cancer cells that act as tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells(CSCs) maintain self-renewal and growth promoting capabilities of cancer and are responsible for drug/treatment resistance,tumor recurrence and metastasis. Due to their potential clinical importance,many researchers have put their efforts over decades to unravel the molecular mechanisms that regulate CSCs functions. Micro RNAs(mi RNAs) which are 21-23 nucleotide long,endogenous noncoding RNAs,regulate gene expression through gene silencing at post-transcriptional level by binding to the 3’-untranslated regions or the open reading frames of target genes,thereby result in target mR NA degradation or its translational repression and serve important role in several cellular,physiological and developmental processes. Aberrant mi RNAs expression and their implication in CSCs regulation by controlling asymmetric cell division,drug/treatment resistance and metastasis make mi RNAs a tool of great therapeutic potential against cancer. Recent advancements on the biological complexities of CSCs,modulation in CSCs properties by mi RNA network and development of mi RNA based treatment strategies specifically targeting the CSCs as an attractive therapeutic targets for clinical application are being critically analysed.

  14. Overview of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and mechanisms of their regulation: implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Bin; Ahmad, Aamir; Azmi, Asfar S; Ali, Shadan; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2013-06-01

    The identification of small subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) from blood mononuclear cells in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 1997 was a landmark observation that recognized the potential role of CSCs in tumor aggressiveness. Two critical properties contribute to the functional role of CSCs in the establishment and recurrence of cancerous tumors: their capacity for self-renewal and their potential to differentiate into unlimited heterogeneous populations of cancer cells. These findings suggest that CSCs may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment and/or prevention of tumor progression, since they appear to be involved in cell migration, invasion, metastasis, and treatment resistance-all of which lead to poor clinical outcomes. The identification of CSC-specific markers, the isolation and characterization of CSCs from malignant tissues, and targeting strategies for the destruction of CSCs provide a novel opportunity for cancer research. This overview describes the potential implications of several common CSC markers in the identification of CSC subpopulations that are restricted to common malignant diseases, e.g., leukemia, and breast, prostate, pancreatic, and lung cancers. The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of CSC function is also discussed, as are several methods commonly used in CSC research. The potential role of the antidiabetic drug metformin- which has been shown to have effects on CSCs, and is known to function as an antitumor agent-is discussed as an example of this new class of chemotherapeutics. PMID:23744710

  15. White and brown adipose stem cells: from signaling to clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algire, Carolyn; Medrikova, Dasa; Herzig, Stephan

    2013-05-01

    Epidemiological studies estimate that by the year 2030, 2.16 billion people worldwide will be overweight and 1.12 billion will be obese [1]. Besides its now established function as an endocrine organ, adipose tissue plays a fundamental role as an energy storage compartment. As such, adipose tissue is capable of extensive expansion or retraction depending on the energy balance or disease state of the host, a plasticity that is unparalleled in other organs and - under conditions of excessive energy intake - significantly contributes to the afore mentioned obesity pandemic. Expansion of adipose tissue is driven by both hypertrophy and hyperplasia of adipocytes, which can renew frequently to compensate for cell death. This underlines the importance of adipocyte progenitor cells within the distinct adipose tissue depots to control both energy storage and endocrine functions of adipose tissue. Here we summarize recent findings on the identity and plasticity of adipose stem cells, the involved signaling cascades, and potential clinical implications of these cells for the treatment of metabolic dysfunction in obesity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brown and White Fat: From Signaling to Disease.

  16. Coupling between the circadian clock and cell cycle oscillators: Implication for healthy cells and malignant growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Feillet (Céline); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); F.A. Lévi (Francis); D.A. Rand (David); F. Delaunay (Franck)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractUncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift wor

  17. Prognostic Implication of Predominant Histologic Subtypes of Lymph Node Metastases in Surgically Resected Lung Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kenichi Suda; Katsuaki Sato; Shigeki Shimizu; Kenji Tomizawa; Toshiki Takemoto; Takuya Iwasaki; Masahiro Sakaguchi; Tetsuya Mitsudomi

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) proposed a new classification for lung adenocarcinoma (AD) based on predominant histologic subtypes, such as lepidic, papillary, acinar, solid, and micropapillary; this system reportedly reflects well outcomes of patients with surgically resected lung AD. However, the prognostic implication of predominant histologic subtypes in lymph nodes metastases is uncle...

  18. Tumor-altered dendritic cell function: implications for anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Michael Hargadon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity, and the array of immunoregulatory functions exhibited by these cells is dictated by their differentiation, maturation, and activation status. Although a major role for these cells in the induction of immunity to pathogens has long been appreciated, data accumulated over the last several years has demonstrated that DC are also critical regulators of anti-tumor immune responses. However, despite the potential for stimulation of robust anti-tumor immunity by DC, tumor-altered DC function has been observed in many cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals and is often associated with tumor immune escape. Such dysfunction has significant implications for both the induction of natural anti-tumor immune responses as well as the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies that target endogenous DC in situ or that employ exogenous DC as part of anti-cancer immunization maneuvers. In this review, the major types of tumor-altered DC function will be described, with emphasis on recent insights into the mechanistic bases for the inhibition of DC differentiation from hematopoietic precursors, the altered programming of DC precursors to differentiate into myeloid-derived suppressor cells or tumor-associated macrophages, the suppression of DC maturation and activation, and the induction of immunoregulatory DC by tumors, tumor-derived factors, and tumor-associated cells within the milieu of the tumor microenvironment. The impact of these tumor-altered cells on the quality of the overall anti-tumor immune response will also be discussed. Finally, this review will also highlight questions concerning tumor-altered DC function that remain unanswered, and it will address factors that have limited advances in the study of this phenomenon in order to focus future research efforts in the field on identifying strategies for interfering with tumor-associated DC dysfunction and improving DC-mediated anti

  19. Recruitment of natural killer cells in advanced stages of endogenously arising B-cell lymphoma: implications for therapeutic cell transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewoznik, Margarethe; Hömberg, Nadine; Naujoks, Marcella; Pötzl, Johann; Münchmeier, Niklas; Brenner, Christoph D; Anz, David; Bourquin, Carole; Nelson, Peter J; Röcken, Martin; Mocikat, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    During inflammation and in transplantable tumor models, natural killer (NK) cells are recruited to pathologic tissues and activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines favoring adaptive immune responses of the T-helper type 1 (Th1) type. Interferon (IFN)-γ is needed to induce chemokines that attract NK cells in transplanted tumors. Nothing, however, is known on NK-cell migration in spontaneous tumors. As effective recruitment is a prerequisite for therapeutic NK-cell transfer, we investigated the cytokine milieu and the mechanisms that are instrumental for NK-cell accumulation in an endogenous tumor model. We make use of λ-myc transgenic mice that harbor the c-myc oncogene and develop spontaneous B-cell lymphoma. In contrast to lymphomas induced by tumor cell injection, virtually no IFN-γ produced by NK or by other cells was present in the tumor environment, particularly in advanced stages. Dendritic cells showed an impaired expression of interleukin-12, which is suggestive of deficient Th1 priming. The IFN-γ-dependent chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 were pivotal for NK-cell migration in the endogenous lymphoma model. Although IFN-γ was absent in late tumor stages, there was still expression of CXCL9 and CXCL10 with an ongoing influx of NK cells. The results demonstrate that transplantable tumor models do not reflect the situation as found in endogenously arising neoplasia, because in the latter, effective Th1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are presumably not induced because of impaired IFN-γ production. The data also suggest that CXCL9 and CXCL10 production and NK-cell migration become independent of IFN-γ during tumor progression, and therefore support approaches of adoptive NK-cell transfer that hold promise for treatment of cancer. PMID:22421939

  20. Clinical implications of microRNAs in liver cancer stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stella Chai; Stephanie Ma

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often dismal,mainly due to late presentation,high recurrence rate,and frequent resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.Accumulating evidence on the differential microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns between non-tumor and HCC tissues or between liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-CSC subsets and the significant clinical implications of these differences suggest that miRNAs are a promising,non-invasive marker for the prognosis and diagnosis of the disease.This perspective article summarizes the current knowledge of miRNAs in liver CSCs and highlights the need for further investigations of the role of miRNAs in regulating liver CSC subsets for possible future clinical applications.

  1. An evolutionary recent neuroepithelial cell adhesion function of huntingtin implicates ADAM10-Ncadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sardo, Valentina; Zuccato, Chiara; Gaudenzi, Germano; Vitali, Barbara; Ramos, Catarina; Tartari, Marzia; Myre, Michael A; Walker, James A; Pistocchi, Anna; Conti, Luciano; Valenza, Marta; Drung, Binia; Schmidt, Boris; Gusella, James; Zeitlin, Scott; Cotelli, Franco; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-05-01

    The Huntington's disease gene product, huntingtin, is indispensable for neural tube formation, but its role is obscure. We studied neurulation in htt-null embryonic stem cells and htt-morpholino zebrafish embryos and found a previously unknown, evolutionarily recent function for this ancient protein. We found that htt was essential for homotypic interactions between neuroepithelial cells; it permitted neurulation and rosette formation by regulating metalloprotease ADAM10 activity and Ncadherin cleavage. This function was embedded in the N terminus of htt and was phenocopied by treatment of htt knockdown zebrafish with an ADAM10 inhibitor. Notably, in htt-null cells, reversion of the rosetteless phenotype occurred only with expression of evolutionarily recent htt heterologues from deuterostome organisms. Conversely, all of the heterologues that we tested, including htt from Drosophila melanogaster and Dictyostelium discoideum, exhibited anti-apoptotic activity. Thus, anti-apoptosis may have been one of htt’s ancestral function(s), but, in deuterostomes, htt evolved to acquire a unique regulatory activity for controlling neural adhesion via ADAM10-Ncadherin, with implications for brain evolution and development. PMID:22466506

  2. Effects of radiation on T regulatory cells in normal states and cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Sun, Xiangdong; Luo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Guo, Qing; Song, Yaqi; Sun, Xinchen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation remains an important component of cancer treatment. In addition to inducing tumor cell death through direct cytotoxic effects, radiation can also promote the regression of tumor via augment of immune response. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a unique subpopulation of CD4 positive cells, which are characterized by expression of the forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) transcription factor and high levels of CD25. Mounting evidence has shown that Tregs are implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, which makes Tregs an important target in cancer therapeutics. Generally, lymphocytes are regarded as radiosensitive. However, Tregs have been demonstrated to be relatively resistant to radiotherapy, which is partly mediated by downregulation of pro-apoptotic proteins and upregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Moreover, radiotherapy can increase the production of Tregs and the recruitment of Tregs to local tumor microenvironment. Tregs can attenuate radiation-induced tumor death, which cause the resistance of tumor to radiotherapy. Recent experimental studies and clinical trails have demonstrated that the combination of radiation with medications that target Tregs is promising in the treatment of several types of neoplasms. In this review, we discussed the effect of radiation on Tregs in physiological states and cancer. Further, we presented an overview of therapies that target Tregs to enhance the efficacy of radiation in cancer therapeutics. PMID:26807310

  3. The Role of TAM Family Receptors in Immune Cell Function: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolino, Magdalena; Penninger, Josef M.

    2016-01-01

    The TAM receptor protein tyrosine kinases—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—are essential regulators of immune homeostasis. Guided by their cognate ligands Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1), these receptors ensure the resolution of inflammation by dampening the activation of innate cells as well as by restoring tissue function through promotion of tissue repair and clearance of apoptotic cells. Their central role as negative immune regulators is highlighted by the fact that deregulation of TAM signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Importantly, TAM receptors have also been associated with cancer development and progression. In a cancer setting, TAM receptors have a dual regulatory role, controlling the initiation and progression of tumor development and, at the same time, the associated anti-tumor responses of diverse immune cells. Thus, modulation of TAM receptors has emerged as a potential novel strategy for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TAM receptors control immunity, with a particular focus on the regulation of anti-tumor responses and its implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27775650

  4. An evolutionary recent neuroepithelial cell adhesion function of huntingtin implicates ADAM10-Ncadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sardo, Valentina; Zuccato, Chiara; Gaudenzi, Germano; Vitali, Barbara; Ramos, Catarina; Tartari, Marzia; Myre, Michael A; Walker, James A; Pistocchi, Anna; Conti, Luciano; Valenza, Marta; Drung, Binia; Schmidt, Boris; Gusella, James; Zeitlin, Scott; Cotelli, Franco; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-05-01

    The Huntington's disease gene product, huntingtin, is indispensable for neural tube formation, but its role is obscure. We studied neurulation in htt-null embryonic stem cells and htt-morpholino zebrafish embryos and found a previously unknown, evolutionarily recent function for this ancient protein. We found that htt was essential for homotypic interactions between neuroepithelial cells; it permitted neurulation and rosette formation by regulating metalloprotease ADAM10 activity and Ncadherin cleavage. This function was embedded in the N terminus of htt and was phenocopied by treatment of htt knockdown zebrafish with an ADAM10 inhibitor. Notably, in htt-null cells, reversion of the rosetteless phenotype occurred only with expression of evolutionarily recent htt heterologues from deuterostome organisms. Conversely, all of the heterologues that we tested, including htt from Drosophila melanogaster and Dictyostelium discoideum, exhibited anti-apoptotic activity. Thus, anti-apoptosis may have been one of htt’s ancestral function(s), but, in deuterostomes, htt evolved to acquire a unique regulatory activity for controlling neural adhesion via ADAM10-Ncadherin, with implications for brain evolution and development.

  5. The biology of cancer stem cells and its clinical implication in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung Kew

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant tumor with limited treatment options in its advanced state. The molecular mechanisms underlying HCC remain unclear because of the complexity of its multi-step development process. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are defined as a small population of cells within a tumor that possess the capability for self-renewal and the generation of heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. To date, there have been two theories concerning the mechanism of carcinogenesis, i.e., the stochastic (clonal evolution) model and the hierarchical (cancer stem cell-driven) model. The concept of the CSC has been established over the past decade, and the roles of CSCs in the carcinogenic processes of various cancers, including HCC, have been emphasized. Previous experimental and clinical evidence indicated the existence of liver CSCs; however, the potential mechanistic links between liver CSCs and the development of HCC in humans are not fully understood. Although definitive cell surface markers for liver CSCs have not yet been found, several putative markers have been identified, which allow the prospective isolation of CSCs from HCC. The identification and characterization of CSCs in HCC is essential for a better understanding of tumor initiation or progression in relation to signaling pathways. These markers could be used along with clinical parameters for the prediction of chemoresistance, radioresistance, metastasis and survival and may represent potential targets for the development of new molecular therapies against HCC. This review describes the current evidence for the existence and function of liver CSCs and discuss the clinical implications of CSCs in patients demonstrating resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies, as well as clinical outcomes. Such data may provide a future perspective for targeted therapy in HCC.

  6. Biology and clinical implications of CD133+ liver cancer stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the liver, accounting for 80%–90% of all liver cancers. The disease ranks as the fifth most common cancer worldwide and is the third leading cause of all cancer-associated deaths. Although advances in HCC detection and treatment have increased the likelihood of a cure at early stages of the disease, HCC remains largely incurable because of late presentation and tumor recurrence. Only 25% of HCC patients are deemed suitable for curative treatment, with the overall survival at just a few months for inoperable patients. Apart from surgical resection, loco-regional ablation and liver transplantation, current treatment protocols include conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. But due to the highly resistant nature of the disease, the efficacy of the latter regimen is limited. The recent emergence of the cancer stem cell (CSC) concept lends insight into the explanation of why treatment with chemotherapy often may seem to be initially successful but results in not only a failure to eradicate the tumor but also possibly tumor relapse. Commonly used anti-cancer drugs in HCC work by targeting the rapidly proliferating and differentiated liver cancer cells that constitute the bulk of the tumor. However, a subset of CSCs exists within the tumor, which are more resistant and are able to survive and maintain residence after treatment, thus, growing and self-renewing to generate the development and spread of recurrent tumors in HCC. In the past few years, compelling evidence has emerged in support of the hierarchic CSC model for solid tumors, including HCC. And in particular, CD133 has drawn significant attention as a critical liver CSC marker. Understanding the characteristics and function of CD133+ liver CSCs has also shed light on HCC management and treatment, including the implications for prognosis, prediction and treatment resistance. In this review, a detailed summary of the recent progress in CD

  7. Prevalence and clinical implications of cyclin D1 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with immunochemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ok, Chi Young; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Tzankov, Alexandar;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cyclin D1 expression has been reported in a subset of patients with diffuse large B-cell leukemia (DLBCL), but studies have been few and generally small, and they have demonstrated no obvious clinical implications attributable to cyclin D1 expression. METHODS: The authors reviewed 143...

  8. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  9. Cell and molecular biology of simian virus 40: implications for human infections and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butel, J. S.; Lednicky, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus of rhesus macaque origin, was discovered in 1960 as a contaminant of polio vaccines that were distributed to millions of people from 1955 through early 1963. SV40 is a potent DNA tumor virus that induces tumors in rodents and transforms many types of cells in culture, including those of human origin. This virus has been a favored laboratory model for mechanistic studies of molecular processes in eukaryotic cells and of cellular transformation. The viral replication protein, named large T antigen (T-ag), is also the viral oncoprotein. There is a single serotype of SV40, but multiple strains of virus exist that are distinguishable by nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of the viral genome and in the part of the T-ag gene that encodes the protein's carboxyl terminus. Natural infections in monkeys by SV40 are usually benign but may become pathogenic in immunocompromised animals, and multiple tissues can be infected. SV40 can replicate in certain types of simian and human cells. SV40-neutralizing antibodies have been detected in individuals not exposed to contaminated polio vaccines. SV40 DNA has been identified in some normal human tissues, and there are accumulating reports of detection of SV40 DNA and/or T-ag in a variety of human tumors. This review presents aspects of replication and cell transformation by SV40 and considers their implications for human infections and disease pathogenesis by the virus. Critical assessment of virologic and epidemiologic data suggests a probable causative role for SV40 in certain human cancers, but additional studies are necessary to prove etiology.

  10. Prognostic implications of ezrin and phosphorylated ezrin expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytoskeletal organizer ezrin is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family and plays important roles in not only cell motility, cell adhesion, and apoptosis, but also in various cell signaling pathways. Phosphorylation at Thr-567 and Tyr-353 are key regulatory events in the transition of the dormant to active form of ezrin. This study investigated the prognostic implications of ezrin and phosphorylated ezrin (p-ezrin) expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Ezrin and p-ezrin protein expressions were examined by immunohistochemistry in 150 NSCLC and adjacent non-tumor tissues and 14 normal lung tissues. qRT-PCR was used to determine ezrin mRNA expression levels in fresh tissues. The correlations between overexpression of ezrin and p-ezrin and the clinicopathological features of NSCLC were analyzed. The survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method for 108 NSCLC cases. Ezrin and ezrinThr-567 proteins showed cytosolic and membranous staining patterns; however, ezrinTyr-353 protein only showed cytosolic staining. Ezrin and p-ezrin were significantly upregulated in NSCLC compared with the normal counterparts. Increased ezrin, ezrinThr-567, and ezrinTyr-353 levels were correlated with the late stage and poor differentiation of NSCLC. However, only ezrinThr-567 was correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis. In regard to survival, only ezrinThr-567 was related with the overall survival time of patients with NSCLC, and both ezrin and ezrinThr-567 were associated with shortened survival time for patients with early stage NSCLC. Ezrin and p-ezrin, especially ezrinThr-567, may prove to be useful as a novel prognostic biomarker of NSCLC

  11. Integrative analysis of epigenetic modulation in melanoma cell response to decitabine: clinical implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Halaban

    Full Text Available Decitabine, an epigenetic modifier that reactivates genes otherwise suppressed by DNA promoter methylation, is effective for some, but not all cancer patients, especially those with solid tumors. It is commonly recognized that to overcome resistance and improve outcome, treatment should be guided by tumor biology, which includes genotype, epigenotype, and gene expression profile. We therefore took an integrative approach to better understand melanoma cell response to clinically relevant dose of decitabine and identify complementary targets for combined therapy. We employed eight different melanoma cell strains, determined their growth, apoptotic and DNA damage responses to increasing doses of decitabine, and chose a low, clinically relevant drug dose to perform whole-genome differential gene expression, bioinformatic analysis, and protein validation studies. The data ruled out the DNA damage response, demonstrated the involvement of p21(Cip1 in a p53-independent manner, identified the TGFbeta pathway genes CLU and TGFBI as markers of sensitivity to decitabine and revealed an effect on histone modification as part of decitabine-induced gene expression. Mutation analysis and knockdown by siRNA implicated activated beta-catenin/MITF, but not BRAF, NRAS or PTEN mutations as a source for resistance. The importance of protein stability predicted from the results was validated by the synergistic effect of Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing the growth arrest of decitabine in otherwise resistant melanoma cells. Our integrative analysis show that improved therapy can be achieved by comprehensive analysis of cancer cells, identified biomarkers for patient's selection and monitoring response, as well as targets for improved combination therapy.

  12. Matrigel improves functional properties of primary human salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Ola M; Zeitouni, Anthony; Gologan, Olga; Tran, Simon D

    2011-05-01

    Currently, there is no effective treatment available to patients with irreversible loss of functional salivary acini caused by Sjogren's syndrome or after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. A tissue-engineered artificial salivary gland would help these patients. The graft cells for this device must establish tight junctions in addition to being of fluid-secretory nature. This study analyzed a graft source from human salivary glands (huSG) cultured on Matrigel. Cells were obtained from parotid and submandibular glands, expanded in vitro, and then plated on either Matrigel-coated (2 mg/mL) or uncoated culture dish. Immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and transepithelial electrical resistance were employed. On Matrigel, huSG cells adopted an acinar phenotype by forming three-dimensional acinar-like units (within 24 h of plating) as well as a monolayer of cells. On uncoated surfaces (plastic), huSG cells only formed monolayers of ductal cells. Both types of culture conditions allowed huSG cells to express tight junction proteins (claudin-1, -2, -3, -4; occludin; JAM-A; and ZO-1) and adequate transepithelial electrical resistance. Importantly, 99% of huSG cells on Matrigel expressed α-amylase and the water channel protein Aquaporin-5, as compared to cells on plastic. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed an acinar phenotype with many secretory granules. Matrigel increased the secretion of α-amylase two to five folds into the media, downregulated certain salivary genes, and regulated the translation of acinar proteins. This three-dimensional in vitro serum-free cell culture method allows the organization and differentiation of huSG cells into salivary cells with an acinar phenotype.

  13. Prognostic implication of PTPRH hypomethylation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takashi; Soejima, Kenzo; Arai, Eri; Hamamoto, Junko; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Arai, Daisuke; Ishioka, Kota; Ohgino, Keiko; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Kohno, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Kanai, Yae; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-09-01

    PTPRH is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase thought to be a potential regulator of tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to clarify the significance of PTPRH expression and its regulation by DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). PTPRH mRNA expression was examined in 89 NSCLC and corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The correlation between DNA methylation and PTPRH gene expression was investigated in another cohort that consisted of 145 patients with LADC, a major NSCLC subtype. Gene regulation by DNA methylation was assessed using a DNA methylation inhibitor. PTPRH mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in NSCLC. PTPRH DNA methylation was reduced in LADC samples and inversely correlated with mRNA expression. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of lung cancer cell lines with low PTPRH expression, restored mRNA PTPRH expression levels. Furthermore, low PTPRH methylation was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival (P=1.64x10(-4)) and overall survival (P=5.54x10(-5)). Multivariate analysis revealed that PTPRH DNA methylation was an independent prognostic factor (P=6.88x10(-3)). It was confirmed that PTPRH is overexpressed in NSCLC. Furthermore, we determined that PTPRH is epigenetically regulated by DNA hypomethylation, with prognostic implications for LADC. PMID:26134684

  14. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism and its implication on cell proliferation and tumour-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, C A C; Missailidis, S

    2009-06-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites have recently generated a heightened interest due to growing evidence of their significant role in cancer biology. Thus, inhibitors of the AA cascade, first and foremost COX inhibitors, which have originally been of interest in the treatment of inflammatory conditions and certain types of cardiovascular disease, are now attracting attention as an arsenal against cancer. An increasing number of investigations support their role in cancer chemoprevention, although the precise molecular mechanisms that link levels of AA, and its metabolites, with cancer progression have still to be elucidated. This article provides an overview of the AA cascade and focuses on the roles of its inhibitors and their implication in cancer treatment. In particular, emphasis is placed on the inhibition of cell proliferation and neo-angiogenesis through inhibition of the enzymes COX-2, 5-LOX and CYP450. Downstream effects of inhibition of AA metabolites are analysed and the molecular mechanisms of action of a selected number of inhibitors of catalytic pathways reviewed. Lastly, the benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids and their mechanisms of action leading to reduced cancer risk and impeded cancer cell growth are mentioned. Finally, a proposal is put forward, suggesting a novel and integrated approach in viewing the molecular mechanisms and complex interactions responsible for the involvement of AA metabolites in carcinogenesis and the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and tumour prevention. PMID:19239926

  15. Biology and clinical implications of CD133{sup +} liver cancer stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Stephanie, E-mail: stefma@hku.hk [Department of Clinical Oncology, State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2013-01-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the liver, accounting for 80%–90% of all liver cancers. The disease ranks as the fifth most common cancer worldwide and is the third leading cause of all cancer-associated deaths. Although advances in HCC detection and treatment have increased the likelihood of a cure at early stages of the disease, HCC remains largely incurable because of late presentation and tumor recurrence. Only 25% of HCC patients are deemed suitable for curative treatment, with the overall survival at just a few months for inoperable patients. Apart from surgical resection, loco-regional ablation and liver transplantation, current treatment protocols include conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. But due to the highly resistant nature of the disease, the efficacy of the latter regimen is limited. The recent emergence of the cancer stem cell (CSC) concept lends insight into the explanation of why treatment with chemotherapy often may seem to be initially successful but results in not only a failure to eradicate the tumor but also possibly tumor relapse. Commonly used anti-cancer drugs in HCC work by targeting the rapidly proliferating and differentiated liver cancer cells that constitute the bulk of the tumor. However, a subset of CSCs exists within the tumor, which are more resistant and are able to survive and maintain residence after treatment, thus, growing and self-renewing to generate the development and spread of recurrent tumors in HCC. In the past few years, compelling evidence has emerged in support of the hierarchic CSC model for solid tumors, including HCC. And in particular, CD133 has drawn significant attention as a critical liver CSC marker. Understanding the characteristics and function of CD133{sup +} liver CSCs has also shed light on HCC management and treatment, including the implications for prognosis, prediction and treatment resistance. In this review, a detailed summary of the recent progress

  16. Stressor-dependent Alterations in Glycoprotein 130: Implications for Glial Cell Reactivity, Cytokine Signaling and Ganglion Cell Health in Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, FD; Walker, CC; Abella, SK; Won, M; Sappington, RM

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and glial reactivity in glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glaucoma-related changes in glycoprotein-130 (gp130), the common signal transducer of the IL-6 family of cytokines, as they relate to RGC health, glial reactivity and expression of IL-6 cytokine family members. Methods: For all experiments, we examined healthy retina (young C57), aged retina (aged C57), retina predisposed to glaucoma (young DBA/2) and retina with IOP-induced glaucoma (aged DBA/2). We determined retinal gene expression of gp130 and IL-6 family members, using quantitative PCR, and protein expression of gp130, using multiplex ELISA. For protein localization and cell-specific expression, we performed co-immunolabeling for gp130 and cell type-specific markers. We used quantitative microscopy to measure layer-specific expression of gp130 and its relationships to astrocyte and Müller glia reactivity and RGC axonal transport, as determined by uptake and transport of cholera toxin β-subunit (CTB). Results: Gene expression of gp130 was elevated with all glaucoma-related stressors, but only normal aging increased protein levels. In healthy retina, gp130 localized primarily to the inner retina, where it was expressed by astrocytes, Müller cells and RGCs. Layer-specific analysis of gp130 expression revealed increased expression in aging retina and decreased expression in glaucomatous retina that was eccentricity-dependent. These glaucoma-related changes in gp130 expression correlated with the level of GFAP and glutamine synthetase expression, as well as axonal transport in RGCs. The relationships between gp130, glial reactivity and RGC health could impact signaling by many IL-6 family cytokines, which exhibited overall increased expression in a stressor-dependent manner. Conclusions: Glaucoma-related stressors, including normal aging, glaucoma predisposition and IOP

  17. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  18. Brüstle v. Greenpeace: Implications for Commercialisation of Translational Stem Cell Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-04-01

    The lack of consensus on a common definition of the term 'embryo' has resulted in legal uncertainty affecting the permissibility of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research and the commercialisation prospects and patenting of inventions of hESC origin in the EU. The Brüstle v. Greenpeace case, which by providing a very broad definition of a human embryo restricts the patentability of hESC-based inventions, aims at harmonising the patenting practices regarding interpretation of Article 6.2.c of Directive 98/44/ EC. It fills the gaps in national laws by providing binding interpretation guidelines for national courts. As currently no marketing authorisations have been granted to hESC-based products, implications of this judgment for translational hESC research together with other barriers to commercialisation of such research need to be analysed. In addition, whether the main obstacles relate to patenting restrictions or whether something else in the innovation system is impeding the market entry of these innovative products is discussed.

  19. Ankylosing spondylitis patients display altered dendritic cell and T cell populations that implicate pathogenic roles for the IL-23 cytokine axis and intestinal inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Pamela B.; McEntegart, Anne; McCarey, David; McInnes, Iain B.; Siebert, Stefan; Milling, Simon W F

    2015-01-01

    Objective. AS is a systemic inflammatory disease of the SpA family. Polymorphisms at loci including HLA-B27, IL-23R and ERAP-1 directly implicate immune mechanisms in AS pathogenesis. Previously, in an SpA model, we identified HLA-B27–mediated effects on dendritic cells that promoted disease-associated Th17 cells. Here we extend these studies to AS patients using deep immunophenotyping of candidate pathogenic cell populations. The aim of our study was to functionally characterize the immune p...

  20. Impurity of stem cell graft by murine embryonic fibroblasts – implications for cell-based therapy of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eMolcanyi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells have been demonstrated to possess a therapeutic potential in experimental models of various central nervous system disorders, including stroke. The types of implanted cells appear to play a crucial role. Previously, groups of the stem cell network NRW implemented a feeder-based cell line within the scope of their projects, examining the implantation of stem cells after ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Retrospective evaluation indicated the presence of spindle-shaped cells in several grafts implanted in injured animals, which indicated potential contamination by co-cultured feeder cells (murine embryonic fibroblasts – MEFs. Because feeder-based cell lines have been previously exposed to a justified criticism with regard to contamination by animal glycans, we aimed to evaluate the effects of stem cell/MEF co-transplantation. MEFs accounted for 5.33% ± 2.81 of all cells in the primary FACS-evaluated co-culture. Depending on the culture conditions and subsequent purification procedure, the MEF-fraction ranged from 0.9 to 9.9% of the cell suspensions in vitro. MEF survival and related formation of extracellular substances in vivo were observed after implantation into the uninjured rat brain. Impurity of the stem cell graft by MEFs interferes with translational strategies, which represents a threat to the potential recipient and may affect the graft microenvironment. The implications of these findings are critically discussed.

  1. Controlled 3D culture in Matrigel microbeads to analyze clonal acinar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolega, Monika E; Abeille, Fabien; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Gidrol, Xavier

    2015-06-01

    3D culture systems are a valuable tool for modeling morphogenesis and carcinogenesis of epithelial tissue in a structurally appropriate context. We present a novel approach for 3D cell culture based on a flow-focusing microfluidic system that encapsulates epithelial cells in Matrigel beads. As a model we use prostatic and breast cells and assay for development of acini, polarized cellular spheres enclosing lumen. Each individual bead on average acts as a single 3D cell culture compartment generating one acinus per bead. Compared to standard protocols microfluidics provides increased control over the environment leading to more a uniform acini population. The increased facility of bead manipulation allowed us to isolate single cells which are self-sufficient to fully develop into acini in presence of Matrigel. Furthermore, combination of our microfluidic approach with large particle FACS opens new avenues in high throughput screening on single acini or spheroids.

  2. Implications of Parkinson's disease pathophysiology for the development of cell replacement strategies and drug discovery in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan-Montojo, Francisco; Funk, Richard H W

    2012-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder traditionally characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) at the midbrain. The potential use of adult or embryonic stem cells, induced pluriputent stem (iPS) cells and endogenous neurogenesis in cell replacement strategies has lead to numerous studies and clinical trials in this direction. It is now possible to differentiate stem cells into dopaminergic neurons in vitro and clinical trials have shown an improvement in PD-related symptoms after intra-striatal embryonic transplants and acceptable cell survival rates on the mid term. However, clinical improvement is transitory and associated with a strong placebo effect. Interestingly, recent pathological studies in PD patients who received embryonic stem cells show that in PD patients, grafted neurons show PD-related pathology. In this manuscript we review the latest findings regarding PD pathophysiology and give an outlook on the implications of these findings in how cell replacement strategies for PD treatment should be tested. These include changes in the type of animal models used, the preparation/conditioning of the cells before intracerebral injection, specially regarding backbone chronic diseases in iPS cells and determining the optimal proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration capacity of the grafted cells.

  3. Cervical cancer cell lines expressing NKG2D-ligands are able to down-modulate the NKG2D receptor on NKL cells with functional implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez-Perez Miriam I

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer represents the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Natural killer (NK cells play an important role in the defense against viruses, intracellular bacteria and tumors. NKG2D, an activating receptor on NK cells, recognizes MHC class I chain-related molecules, such as MICA/B and members of the ULBP/RAET1 family. Tumor-derived soluble NKG2D-ligands have been shown to down-modulate the expression of NKG2D on NK cells. In addition to the down-modulation induced by soluble NKG2D-ligands, it has recently been described that persistent cell-cell contact can also down-modulate NKG2D expression. The goal of this study was to determine whether the NKG2D receptor is down-modulated by cell-cell contact with cervical cancer cells and whether this down-modulation might be associated with changes in NK cell activity. Results We demonstrate that NKG2D expressed on NKL cells is down-modulated by direct cell contact with cervical cancer cell lines HeLa, SiHa, and C33A, but not with non-tumorigenic keratinocytes (HaCaT. Moreover, this down-modulation had functional implications. We found expression of NKG2D-ligands in all cervical cancer cell lines, but the patterns of ligand distribution were different in each cell line. Cervical cancer cell lines co-cultured with NKL cells or fresh NK cells induced a marked diminution of NKG2D expression on NKL cells. Additionally, the cytotoxic activity of NKL cells against K562 targets was compromised after co-culture with HeLa and SiHa cells, while co-culture with C33A increased the cytotoxic activity of the NKL cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that differential expression of NKG2D-ligands in cervical cancer cell lines might be associated with the down-modulation of NKG2D, as well as with changes in the cytotoxic activity of NKL cells after cell-cell contact with the tumor cells.

  4. The Quest for Tissue Stem Cells in the Pancreas and Other Organs, and their Application in Beta-Cell Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Houbracken, Isabelle; Bouwens, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cell research has drawn a lot of attention by many researchers, due to its medical hope of cell replacement or regenerative therapy for diabetes patients. Despite the many research efforts to date, there is no consensus on the existence of stem cells in adult pancreas. Genetic lineage tracing experiments have put into serious doubt whether β-cell neogenesis from stem/progenitor cells takes place postnatally. Different in vitro experiments have suggested centroacinar, ductal, acinar...

  5. E2f1-deficient NOD/SCID mice have dry mouth due to a change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keitaro; Narita, Takanori; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Okabayashi, Ken; Ito, Tatsuro; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice have been used as a model for dry mouth. NOD mice lacking the gene encoding E2f1, a transcription factor, develop hyposalivation more rapidly progressively than control NOD mice. However, the model mice are associated with an underlying disease such as diabetes. We have now established E2f1-deficient NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency disease (NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-)) mice to avoid the development of diabetes (Matsui-Inohara et al., Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 234(12):1525-1536, 2009). In this study, we investigated the pathophysiological features of dry mouth using NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. In NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice, the volume of secreted saliva stimulated with pilocarpine is about one third that of control NOD/SCID mice. In behavioral analysis, NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice drank plenty of water when they ate dry food, and the frequency and time of water intake were almost double compared with control NOD/SCID mice. Histological analysis of submandibular glands with hematoxylin-eosin stain revealed that NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice have more ducts than NOD/SCID mice. In western blot analysis, the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5), a marker of acinar cells, in parotid and in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice was lower than in NOD/SCID mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of parotid and submandibular acini revealed that the localization of AQP5 in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice differs from that in NOD/SCID mice; AQP5 was leaky and diffusively localized from the apical membrane to the cytosol in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. The ubiquitination of AQP5 was detected in submandibular glands of NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice. These findings suggest that the change of acinar/duct structure and the down-regulation of AQP5 in the salivary gland cause the pathogenesis of hyposalivation in NOD/SCID.E2f1(-/-) mice.

  6. Perlecan domain IV peptide stimulates salivary gland cell assembly in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Swati; Zhang, Chu; Jia, Xinqiao; Carson, Daniel D; Witt, Robert; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2009-11-01

    Treatment of xerostomia would benefit from development of a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. Salivary gland tissue from surgical patients was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Ductal and acinar cells were identified in tissue and cultured cells from dispersed tissue. High levels of laminin and perlecan/HSPG2 (heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2) were noted in basement membranes, and perlecan also was secreted and organized by cultured acinar populations, which formed lobular structures that mimicked intact glands when cultured on Matrigel or a bioactive peptide derived from domain IV of perlecan. On either matrix, large acini-like lobular structures grew and formed connections between the lobes. alpha-Amylase secretion was confirmed by staining and activity assay. Biomarkers, including tight junction protein E-cadherin and water channel protein aquaporin 5 found in tissue, were expressed in cultured acinar cells. Cells cultured on Matrigel or domain IV of perlecan peptide organized stress fibers and activated focal adhesion kinase. We report a novel technique to isolate acinar cells from human salivary gland and identify a human peptide sequence in perlecan that triggers differentiation of salivary gland cells into self-assembling acini-like structures that express essential biomarkers and which secrete alpha-amylase.

  7. Computational prediction of Mycoplasma hominis proteins targeting in nucleus of host cell and their implication in prostate cancer etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahanavaj; Zakariah, Mohammed; Palaniappan, Sellappan

    2016-08-01

    Cancer has long been assumed to be a genetic disease. However, recent evidence supports the enigmatic connection of bacterial infection with the growth and development of various types of cancers. The cause and mechanism of the growth and development of prostate cancer due to Mycoplasma hominis remain unclear. Prostate cancer cells are infected and colonized by enteroinvasive M. hominis, which controls several factors that can affect prostate cancer growth in susceptible persons. We investigated M. hominis proteins targeting the nucleus of host cells and their implications in prostate cancer etiology. Many vital processes are controlled in the nucleus, where the proteins targeting M. hominis may have various potential implications. A total of 29/563 M. hominis proteins were predicted to target the nucleus of host cells. These include numerous proteins with the capability to alter normal growth activities. In conclusion, our results emphasize that various proteins of M. hominis targeted the nucleus of host cells and were involved in prostate cancer etiology through different mechanisms and strategies.

  8. Ascl3 marks adult progenitor cells of the mouse salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugel-Stahl, Anastasia; Elliott, Marilyn E; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2012-05-01

    The Ascl3 transcription factor marks a subset of salivary gland duct cells present in the three major salivary glands of the mouse. In vivo, these cells generate both duct and secretory acinar cell descendants. Here, we have analyzed whether Ascl3-expressing cells retain this multipotent lineage potential in adult glands. Cells isolated from mouse salivary glands were cultured in vitro as non-adherent spheres. Lineage tracing of the Ascl3-expressing cells within the spheres demonstrates that Ascl3+ cells isolated from adult glands remain multipotent, generating both duct and acinar cell types in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the progenitor cells characterized by Keratin 5 expression are an independent population from Ascl3+ progenitor cells. We conclude that the Ascl3+ cells are intermediate lineage-restricted progenitor cells of the adult salivary glands.

  9. LOXL2 induces aberrant acinar morphogenesis via ErbB2 signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Chang (Jufang); M.M. Nicolau (Monica); T.R. Cox (Thomas); D. Wetterskog (Daniel); J.W.M. Martens (John); H. E Barker (Holly); J.T. Erler (Janine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is a matrix-remodeling enzyme that has been shown to play a key role in invasion and metastasis of breast carcinoma cells. However, very little is known about its role in normal tissue homeostasis. Here, we investigated the effects of LOXL2 expr

  10. Optical Metrology for CIGS Solar Cell Manufacturing and its Cost Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkoju, Sravan Kumar

    conducting oxide (TCO) bi-layer, thus derived were used in a fiber optic-based spectroscopic reflectometry optical monitoring system installed in the pilot line at the PVMC's Halfmoon facility. Results obtained from this study show that the use of regular fiber optics, instead of polarization-maintaining fiber optics, is sufficient for the purpose of process monitoring. Also, the technique does not need to be used "in-situ", but the measurements can be taken in-line, and are applicable to a variety of deposition techniques used for different functional layers deposited on rigid or flexible substrates. In addition, effect of Cu concentration on the CIGS optical properties has been studied. Mixed CIGS/Cu2-xSe phase was observed at the surface at the end of the second stage of 3-stage deposition process, under Cu-rich conditions. A significant change in optical behavior of CIGS due to Cu2-xSe at the surface was observed under Cu-rich conditions, which can be used as end-point detection method to move from 2nd stage to 3rd stage in the deposition process. Developed optical functions were applied to in-line reflectance measurements not only to identify the Cu2-xSe phase at the surface but also to measure the thickness of the mixed CIGS/Cu2-xSe layer. This spectroscopic reflectometry based in-line process control technique can be used for end-point detection as well as to control thickness during the preparation of large area CIGS films. These results can assist in the development of optical process-control tools for the manufacturing of high quality CIGS based photovoltaic cells, increasing the uptime and yield of the production line. Finally, to understand the cost implications, low cost potential of two different deposition technologies has been studied on both rigid and flexible substrates with the help of cost analysis. Cost advantages of employing a contactless optics based process control technique have been investigated in order to achieve a low cost of thin-film module

  11. Recent advances in stem cell research for the treatment of diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2009-01-01

    The success achieved over the last decade with islet transplantation has intensified interest in treating diabetes, not only by cell transplantation, but also by stem cells. The formation of insulin-producing cells from pancreatic duct, acinar, and liver cells is an active area of investigation. Protocols for the in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells based on normal developmental processes, have generated insulin-producing cells, though at low efficiency and without full respo...

  12. Effects of Hemodynamic Forces on the Vascular Differentiation of Stem Cells: Implications for Vascular Graft Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Rokhaya; Li, Song

    Although the field of vascular tissue engineering has made tremendous advances in the past decade, several complications have yet to be overcome in order to produce biocompatible small-diameter vascular conduits with long-term patency. Stem cells and progenitor cells represent potential cell sources in the development of autologous (or allogeneic), nonthrombogenic vascular grafts with mechanical properties comparable to native blood vessel. However, a better understanding of the effects of mechanical forces on stem cells and progenitor cells is needed to properly utilize these cells for tissue engineering applications. In this chapter, we discuss the current understanding of the effects of hemodynamic forces on the differentiation and function of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and progenitor cells. We also review the use of stem cells and progenitor cells in vascular graft engineering.

  13. Estrategias para la diferenciación in vitro de células ES de ratón a células acinares pancreáticas

    OpenAIRE

    Rovira Clusellas, Meritxell

    2007-01-01

    Las patologías más importantes del páncreas exocrino, como la pancreatitis crónica (PC) o el cáncer de páncreas, representan un gran problema de salud pública en Europa. En la PC, el tejido acinar es substituido por complejos ductales. Además, es difícil mantener el fenotipo diferenciado de las células acinares en cultivo ya que sufren una transdiferenciación acinar-ductal.Las células madre embrionarias (ES) de ratón han sido utilizadas en la última década para generar in vitro células comple...

  14. Colorectal cancer stem cells : regulation of the phenotype and implications for therapy resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Emmink, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer are discribed. We focus on the therapy resistance of cancer stem cells and the effect that reactive oxygen species and hypoxia have on the cancer stem cell phenotype. For this purpose a novel culture method to propagate cancer stem cells form resected tumor specimens was used.

  15. Increased cyclooxygenase-2 and thromboxane synthase expression is implicated in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in human erythroleukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailleteau, C; Liagre, B; Battu, S; Jayat-Vignoles, C; Beneytout, J L

    2008-09-01

    Differentiation induction as a therapeutic strategy has, so far, the greatest impact in hematopoietic malignancies, most notably leukemia. Diosgenin is a very interesting natural product because, depending on the specific dose used, its biological effect is very different in HEL (human erythroleukemia) cells. For example, at 10 microM, diosgenin induced megakaryocytic differentiation, in contrast to 40 microM diosgenin, which induced apoptosis in HEL cells previously demonstrated using sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF). The goal of this work focused on the correlation between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and thromboxane synthase (TxS) and megakaryocytic differentiation induced by diosgenin in HEL cells. Furthermore, the technique of SdFFF, having been validated in our models, was used in this new study as an analytical tool that provided us with more or less enriched differentiated cell fractions that could then be used for further analyses of enzyme protein expression and activity for the first time. In our study, we showed the implication of COX-2 and TxS in diosgenin-induced megakaryocytic differentiation in HEL cells. Furthermore, we showed that the analytical technique of SdFFF may be used as a tool to confirm our results as a function of the degree of cell differentiation.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of non-lymphoid cells by Bisphenol-A, a model endocrine disrupter: Potential Implications for Immunoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deena eKhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC abound in the environment since many compounds are released from chemical, agricultural, pharmaceutical and consumer product industries. Many of the EDCs such as Bisphenol A (BPA have estrogenic activity or interfere with endogenous sex hormones. Experimental studies have reported a positive correlation of BPA with reproductive toxicity, altered growth and immune dysregulation. Although the precise relevance of these studies to the environmental levels is unclear, nevertheless, their potential health implications remain a concern. One possible mechanism by which BPA can alter genes is by regulating epigenetics, including microRNA, alteration of methylation and histone acetylation. There is now wealth of information on BPA effects on non-lymphoid cells and by comparison, paucity of data on effects of BPA on the immune system. In this mini review, we will highlight BPA regulation of estrogen receptor-mediated immune cell functions and in different inflammatory conditions. In addition, BPA-mediated epigenetic regulation of non-lymphoid cells is emphasized. We recognize that most of these studies are on non-lymphoid cells, and given that BPA also affects the immune system, it is plausible that BPA could have similar epigenetic regulation in immune cells. It is hoped that this review will stimulate studies in this area to ascertain whether or not BPA epigenetically regulates the cells of the immune system.

  17. Recent Progress on Tissue-Resident Adult Stem Cell Biology and Their Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of the stem cell research has given new hopes to treat and even cure diverse degenerative disorders and incurable diseases in human. Particularly, the identification of a rare population of adult stem cells in the most tissues/organs in human has emerged as an attractive source of multipotent stem/progenitor cells for cell replacement-based therapies and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine. The tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells offer the possibil...

  18. Platelets increase survival of adenocarcinoma cells challenged with anticancer drugs: mechanisms and implications for chemoresistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Radomski, Marek; MEDINA MARTIN, CARLOS; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cancer cells grow without the restraints of feedback control mechanisms, leading to increased cancer cell survival. The treatment of cancer is often complicated by the lack of response to chemotherapy leading to chemoresistance and persistent survival of tumour cells. In this work we studied the role of platelets in chemotherapy-induced cancer cell death and survival. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Human adenocarcinoma cells, colonic (Caco-2) and ovaria...

  19. Relationship between pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities in sickle cell disease: implications for the management of patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Christina Paixão Maioli; Andrea Ribeiro Soares; Ricardo Bedirian; Ursula David Alves; Cirlene de Lima Marinho; Agnaldo José Lopes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the association between clinical, pulmonary, and cardiovascular findings in patients with sickle cell disease and, secondarily, to compare these findings between sickle cell anemia patients and those with other sickle cell diseases. Methods: Fifty-nine adults were included in this cross-sectional study; 47 had sickle cell anemia, and 12 had other sickle cell diseases. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, and echocardiogr...

  20. Relationship between pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities in sickle cell disease: implications for the management of patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maioli, Maria Christina Paixão; Soares, Andrea Ribeiro; Bedirian, Ricardo; Alves, Ursula David; de Lima Marinho, Cirlene; Lopes, Agnaldo José

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between clinical, pulmonary, and cardiovascular findings in patients with sickle cell disease and, secondarily, to compare these findings between sickle cell anemia patients and those with other sickle cell diseases. Methods Fifty-nine adults were included in this cross-sectional study; 47 had sickle cell anemia, and 12 had other sickle cell diseases. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, and echocardiography. Results...

  1. Relationship between pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities in sickle cell disease: implications for the management of patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Christina Paixão Maioli; Andrea Ribeiro Soares; Ricardo Bedirian; Ursula David Alves; Cirlene de Lima Marinho; Agnaldo José Lopes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the association between clinical, pulmonary, and cardiovascular findings in patients with sickle cell disease and, secondarily, to compare these findings between sickle cell anemia patients and those with other sickle cell diseases. Methods: Fifty-nine adults were included in this cross-sectional study; 47 had sickle cell anemia, and 12 had other sickle cell diseases. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, and echocardiogr...

  2. The zinc finger transcription factor Gfi1, implicated in lymphomagenesis, is required for inner ear hair cell differentiation and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Deeann; Hamblen, Melanie; Zhou, Yi; Venken, Koen J T.; Schumacher, Armin; Grimes, H. Leighton; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2003-01-01

    Gfi1 was first identified as causing interleukin 2-independent growth in T cells and lymphomagenesis in mice. Much work has shown that Gfi1 and Gfi1b, a second mouse homolog, play pivotal roles in blood cell lineage differentiation. However, neither Gfi1 nor Gfi1b has been implicated in nervous system development, even though their invertebrate homologues, senseless in Drosophila and pag-3 in C. elegans are expressed and required in the nervous system. We show that Gfi1 mRNA is expressed in many areas that give rise to neuronal cells during embryonic development in mouse, and that Gfi1 protein has a more restricted expression pattern. By E12.5 Gfi1 mRNA is expressed in both the CNS and PNS as well as in many sensory epithelia including the developing inner ear epithelia. At later developmental stages, Gfi1 expression in the ear is refined to the hair cells and neurons throughout the inner ear. Gfi1 protein is expressed in a more restricted pattern in specialized sensory cells of the PNS, including the eye, presumptive Merkel cells, the lung and hair cells of the inner ear. Gfi1 mutant mice display behavioral defects that are consistent with inner ear anomalies, as they are ataxic, circle, display head tilting behavior and do not respond to noise. They have a unique inner ear phenotype in that the vestibular and cochlear hair cells are differentially affected. Although Gfi1-deficient mice initially specify inner ear hair cells, these hair cells are disorganized in both the vestibule and cochlea. The outer hair cells of the cochlea are improperly innervated and express neuronal markers that are not normally expressed in these cells. Furthermore, Gfi1 mutant mice lose all cochlear hair cells just prior to and soon after birth through apoptosis. Finally, by five months of age there is also a dramatic reduction in the number of cochlear neurons. Hence, Gfi1 is expressed in the developing nervous system, is required for inner ear hair cell differentiation, and its loss

  3. Cardiac glycoside-induced cell death and Rho/Rho kinase pathway: Implication of different regulation in cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Aysun; Şimay, Yaprak Dilber; İbişoğlu, Burçin; Yaren, Biljana; Bülbül, Döne; Ark, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the Rho/ROCK pathway is involved in ouabain-induced apoptosis in HUVEC. In the current work, we investigated whether the Rho/ROCK pathway is functional during cardiac glycosides-induced cytotoxic effects in cancer cell lines, as well as in non-tumor cells. For that purpose, we evaluated the role of ROCK activation in bleb formation and cell migration over upstream and downstream effectors in addition to ROCK cleavage after cardiac glycosides treatment. All three cardiac glycosides (ouabain, digoxin and bufalin) induced cell death in HeLa and HepG2 cells and increased the formation of blebbing in HeLa cells. In contrast to our previous study, ROCK inhibitor Y27632 did not prevent bleb formation. Observation of ROCK II cleavage after ouabain, digoxin and oxaliplatin treatments in HeLa and/or HepG2 cells suggested that cleavage is independent of cell type and cell death induction. While inhibiting cleavage of ROCK II by the caspase inhibitors z-VAD-fmk, z-VDVAD-fmk and z-DEVD-fmk, evaluation of caspase 2 siRNA ineffectiveness on this truncation indicated that caspase-dependent ROCK II cleavage is differentially regulated in cancer cell lines. In HeLa cells, ouabain induced the activation of ROCK, although it did not induce phosphorylation of ERM, an upstream effector. While Y27632 inhibited the migration of HeLa cells, 10nM ouabain had no effect on cell migration. In conclusion, these findings indicate that the Rho/ROCK pathway is regulated differently in cancer cell lines compared to normal cells during cardiac glycosides-induced cell death.

  4. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit : implications for cell wall adhesion and fruit softening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, W.G.T.; Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Schols, H.A.; Seymour, G.B.; Knox, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic

  5. Killing multiple myeloma cells with the small molecule 3-bromopyruvate: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Augustyniak, Daria; Lis, Paweł; Bartkowiak, Anna; Gonchar, Mykhailo; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2014-07-01

    The small molecule 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), which has emerged recently as the first member of a new class of potent anticancer agents, was tested for its capacity to kill multiple myeloma (MM) cancer cells. Human MM cells (RPMI 8226) begin to lose viability significantly within 8 h of incubation in the presence of 3-BP. The Km (0.3 mmol/l) for intracellular accumulation of 3-BP in MM cells is 24 times lower than that in control cells (7.2 mmol/l). Therefore, the uptake of 3-BP by MM cells is significantly higher than that by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Further, the IC50 values for human MM cells and control peripheral blood mononuclear cells are 24 and 58 µmol/l, respectively. Therefore, specificity and selectivity of 3-BP toward MM cancer cells are evident on the basis of the above. In MM cells the transcription levels of the gene encoding the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 is significantly amplified compared with control cells. The level of intracellular ATP in MM cells decreases by over 90% within 1 h after addition of 100 µmol/l 3-BP. The cytotoxicity of 3-BP, exemplified by a marked decrease in viability of MM cells, is potentiated by the inhibitor of glutathione synthesis buthionine sulfoximine. In addition, the lack of mutagenicity and its superior capacity relative to Glivec to kill MM cancer cells are presented in this study. PMID:24557015

  6. Interleukin 2 receptors on human B cells. Implications for the role of interleukin 2 in human B cell function

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the expression of interleukin 2 (IL- 2) receptors on normal human B cells as well as established B cell lines. Anti-Tac monoclonal antibody did not bind to freshly separated normal human B cells. Unexpectedly, with the appropriate activation of the normal B cells by anti-mu antibody, phorbol myristate acetate, or Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC), Tac antigen was induced on the activated B cells. Anti-Tac antibody showed consistent reactivity with two B cel...

  7. Epigenetic modulation of dental pulp stem cells: implications for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, H F; Smith, A J; Fleming, G J P; Cooper, P R

    2016-05-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) offer significant potential for use in regenerative endodontics, and therefore, identifying cellular regulators that control stem cell fate is critical to devising novel treatment strategies. Stem cell lineage commitment and differentiation are regulated by an intricate range of host and environmental factors of which epigenetic influence is considered vital. Epigenetic modification of DNA and DNA-associated histone proteins has been demonstrated to control cell phenotype and regulate the renewal and pluripotency of stem cell populations. The activities of the nuclear enzymes, histone deacetylases, are increasingly being recognized as potential targets for pharmacologically inducing stem cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. Depending on cell maturity and niche in vitro, low concentration histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) application can promote dedifferentiation of several post-natal and mouse embryonic stem cell populations and conversely increase differentiation and accelerate mineralization in DPSC populations, whilst animal studies have shown an HDACi-induced increase in stem cell marker expression during organ regeneration. Notably, both HDAC and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors have also been demonstrated to dramatically increase the reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for use in regenerative therapeutic procedures. As the regulation of cell fate will likely remain the subject of intense future research activity, this review aims to describe the current knowledge relating to stem cell epigenetic modification, focusing on the role of HDACi on alteration of DPSC phenotype, whilst presenting the potential for therapeutic application as part of regenerative endodontic regimens. PMID:26011759

  8. Effect of leukemia inhibitory factor on embryonic stem cell differentiation: implications for supporting neuronal differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao HE; Jing-jing LI; Chang-hong ZHEN; Lin-ying FENG; Xiao-yan DING

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a pleiotropic cytokine, has been used extensively in the maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cell pluripotency. In this current work, we examined the effect of the LIF signaling pathway in embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation to a neural fate. Methods: In the presence of LIF (1000 U/mL), the production of neuronal cells derived from embryoid bodies (EB)was tested under various culture conditions. Inhibition of the LIF pathway was examined with specific inhibitors. The effects of cell apoptosis and proliferation on neural differentiation were examined. ES cell differentiation into three-gem layers was compared. Results: Under various culture conditions, neuronal differentiation was increased in the presence of LIF. Blocking the LIF-activated STAT3signaling pathway with specific inhibitors abolished the neuronal differentiation of ES cells, whereas inhibition of the LIF-activated MEK signaling pathway impaired the differentiation of ES cells toward a glial fate. LIF suppressed cell apoptosis and promoted cell proliferation during ES cell differentiation. LIF inhibited the differentiation of ES cells to both mesoderm and extraembryonic endoderm fates, but enhanced the determination of neural progenitors. Conclusion:These results suggest that LIF plays a positive role during the differentiation of ES cells into neuronal cells.

  9. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic.

  10. Decidual cell regulation of natural killer cell-recruiting chemokines: implications for the pathogenesis and prediction of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles J; Huang, S Joseph; Chen, Chie-Pein; Huang, Yingqun; Xu, Jie; Faramarzi, Saeed; Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit; Koopman, Louise; Smedts, Dineke; Buchwalder, Lynn F; Schatz, Frederick

    2013-09-01

    First trimester human decidua is composed of decidual cells, CD56(bright)CD16(-) decidual natural killer (dNK) cells, and macrophages. Decidual cells incubated with NK cell-derived IFN-γ and either macrophage-derived TNF-α or IL-1β synergistically enhanced mRNA and protein expression of IP-10 and I-TAC. Both chemokines recruit CXCR3-expressing NK cells. This synergy required IFN-γ receptor 1 and 2 mediation via JAK/STAT and NFκB signaling pathways. However, synergy was not observed on neutrophil, monocyte, and NK cell-recruiting chemokines. Immunostaining of first trimester decidua localized IP-10, I-TAC, IFN-γR1, and -R2 to vimentin-positive decidual cells versus cytokeratin-positive interstitial trophoblasts. Flow cytometry identified high CXCR3 levels on dNK cells and minority peripheral CD56(bright)CD16(-) pNK cells and intermediate CXCR3 levels on the majority of CD56(dim)CD16(+) pNK cells. Incubation of pNK cells with either IP-10 or I-TAC elicited concentration-dependent enhanced CXCR3 levels and migration of both pNK cell subsets that peaked at 10 ng/mL, whereas each chemokine at a concentration of 50 ng/mL inhibited CXCR3 expression and pNK cell migration. Deciduae from women with preeclampsia, a leading cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, displayed significantly lower dNK cell numbers and higher IP-10 and I-TAC levels versus gestational age-matched controls. Significantly elevated IP-10 levels in first trimester sera from women eventually developing preeclampsia compared with controls, identifying IP-10 as a novel, robust early predictor of preeclampsia. PMID:23973270

  11. Time-resolved metabolomics analysis of β-cells implicates the pentose phosphate pathway in the control of insulin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spégel, Peter; Sharoyko, Vladimir V; Goehring, Isabel; Danielsson, Anders P H; Malmgren, Siri; Nagorny, Cecilia L F; Andersson, Lotta E; Koeck, Thomas; Sharp, Geoffrey W G; Straub, Susanne G; Wollheim, Claes B; Mulder, Hindrik

    2013-03-15

    Insulin secretion is coupled with changes in β-cell metabolism. To define this process, 195 putative metabolites, mitochondrial respiration, NADP+, NADPH and insulin secretion were measured within 15 min of stimulation of clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells with glucose. Rapid responses in the major metabolic pathways of glucose occurred, involving several previously suggested metabolic coupling factors. The complexity of metabolite changes observed disagreed with the concept of one single metabolite controlling insulin secretion. The complex alterations in metabolite levels suggest that a coupling signal should reflect large parts of the β-cell metabolic response. This was fulfilled by the NADPH/NADP+ ratio, which was elevated (8-fold; P2.5-fold; Ppentose phosphate pathway by trans-dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) suppressed ribose 5-phosphate levels and production of reduced glutathione, as well as insulin secretion in INS-1 832/13 β-cells and rat islets without affecting ATP production. Metabolite profiling of rat islets confirmed the glucose-induced rise in ribose 5-phosphate, which was prevented by DHEA. These findings implicate the pentose phosphate pathway, and support a role for NADPH and glutathione, in β-cell stimulus-secretion coupling.

  12. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arias-González

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5, also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas.

  13. Targeting the Neddylation Pathway to Suppress the Growth of Prostate Cancer Cells: Therapeutic Implication for the Men’s Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neddylation pathway has been recognized as an attractive anticancer target in several malignancies, and its selective inhibitor, MLN4924, has recently advanced to clinical development. However, the anticancer effect of this compound against prostate cancer has not been well investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that the neddylation pathway was functional and targetable in prostate cancer cells. Specific inhibition of this pathway with MLN4924 suppressed the proliferation and clonogenic survival of prostate cancer cells. Mechanistically, MLN4924 treatment inhibited cullin neddylation, inactivated Cullin-RING E3 ligases (CRLs, and led to accumulation of tumor-suppressive CRLs substrates, including cell cycle inhibitors (p21, p27, and WEE1, NF-κB signaling inhibitor IκBα, and DNA replication licensing proteins (CDT1 and ORC1. As a result, MLN4924 triggered DNA damage, G2 phase cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of targeting the neddylation pathway with MLN4924 in suppressing the growth of prostate cancer cells, implicating a potentially new therapeutic approach for the men’s cancer.

  14. LIM kinase1 modulates function of membrane type matrix metalloproteinase 1: implication in invasion of prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti Ratna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1 is an actin and microtubule cytoskeleton modulatory protein that is overexpressed in a number of cancerous tissues and cells and also promotes invasion and metastasis of prostate and breast cancer cells. Membrane type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP is a critical modulator of extracellular matrix (ECM turnover through pericellular proteolysis and thus plays crucial roles in neoplastic cell invasion and metastasis. MT1-MMP and its substrates pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 are often overexpressed in a variety of cancers including prostate cancer and the expression levels correlate with the grade of malignancy in prostate cancer cells. The purpose of this study is to determine any functional relation between LIMK1 and MT1-MMP and its implication in cell invasion. Results Our results showed that treatment with the hydroxamate inhibitor of MT1-MMP, MMP-2 and MMP-9 ilomastat inhibited LIMK1-induced invasion of benign prostate epithelial cells. Over expression of LIMK1 resulted in increased collagenolytic activity of MMP-2, and secretion of pro-MMP2 and pro-MMP-9. Cells over expressing LIMK1 also exhibited increased expression of MT1-MMP, transcriptional activation and its localization to the plasma membrane. LIMK1 physically associates with MT1-MMP and is colocalized with it to the Golgi vesicles. We also noted increased expression of both MT1-MMP and LIMK1 in prostate tumor tissues. Conclusion Our results provide new information on regulation of MT1-MMP function by LIMK1 and showed for the first time, involvement of MMPs in LIMK1 induced cell invasion.

  15. Implication of Cord Blood for Cell-Based Therapy in Refractory Childhood Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Since cord blood (CB) contains hematopoietic stem cells as well as a mixture of multipotent stem cells, CB has the ability to give rise to hematopoietic, epithelial, endothelial and neural tissues. Recently, the application of cell-based therapy using CB has expanded its clinical utility, particularly, by using autologous CB in children with refractory diseases. This review focuses clinical and pre-clinical application of CB cell-based therapy for inherited metabolic diseases as well as tissu...

  16. Colorectal cancer stem cells : regulation of the phenotype and implications for therapy resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmink, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer are discribed. We focus on the therapy resistance of cancer stem cells and the effect that reactive oxygen species and hypoxia have on the cancer stem cell phenotype. For this purpose a novel culture method to propagate cance

  17. Microcarrier culture of lepidopteran cell lines: implications for growth and recombinant protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonomou, Laertis; Drugmand, Jean-Christophe; Bastin, Georges; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Agathos, Spiros N

    2002-01-01

    Several microcarrier systems were screened with Sf-9 and High-Five cell lines as to their ability to support cell growth and recombinant (beta-galactosidase) protein production. Growth of both cell lines on compact microcarriers, such as Cytodex-1 and glass beads, was minimal, as cells detached easily from the microcarrier surface and grew as single cells in the medium. Cell growth was also problematic on Cytopore-1 and -2 porous microcarriers. Cells remained attached for several days inside the microcarrier pores, but no cell division and proliferation were observed. On the contrary, insect cells grew well in the interior of Fibra-Cel disks mainly as aggregates at points of fiber intersection, reaching final (plateau) densities of about 4 x 10(6) (Sf-9) and 2.7 x 10(6) (High-Five) cells mL(-1) (8 x 10(6) and 5.5 x 10(6) cells per cm(2) of projected disk area, respectively). Their growth was described well by the logistic equation, which takes into account possible inhibition effects. Beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) production of Sf-9 cells on Fibra-Cel disks (infected at 3.3 x 10(6) cells mL(-1)) was prolonged (192 h), and specific protein production was similar to that of high-density free cell infection. Cultispher-S microcarriers were found to be a very efficient system for the growth of High-Five cells, whereas no growth of Sf-9 cells took place for the same system. Concentrations of about 9 x 10(6) cells mL(-1) were reached within 120 h, with cell growth in both microcarriers and aggregates, appearance of cellular bridges between microcarriers and aggregates, and eventual formation of macroaggregates incorporating several microcarriers. Specific protein productions after beta-gal baculovirus infection at increasing cell concentrations were almost constant, thus leading to elevated volumetric protein production: final beta-gal titers of 946, 1728, and 1484 U mL(-1) were obtained for infection densities of 3.4, 7.2, and 8.9 x 10(6) cells mL(-1), respectively

  18. Microcarrier culture of lepidopteran cell lines: implications for growth and recombinant protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonomou, Laertis; Drugmand, Jean-Christophe; Bastin, Georges; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Agathos, Spiros N

    2002-01-01

    Several microcarrier systems were screened with Sf-9 and High-Five cell lines as to their ability to support cell growth and recombinant (beta-galactosidase) protein production. Growth of both cell lines on compact microcarriers, such as Cytodex-1 and glass beads, was minimal, as cells detached easily from the microcarrier surface and grew as single cells in the medium. Cell growth was also problematic on Cytopore-1 and -2 porous microcarriers. Cells remained attached for several days inside the microcarrier pores, but no cell division and proliferation were observed. On the contrary, insect cells grew well in the interior of Fibra-Cel disks mainly as aggregates at points of fiber intersection, reaching final (plateau) densities of about 4 x 10(6) (Sf-9) and 2.7 x 10(6) (High-Five) cells mL(-1) (8 x 10(6) and 5.5 x 10(6) cells per cm(2) of projected disk area, respectively). Their growth was described well by the logistic equation, which takes into account possible inhibition effects. Beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) production of Sf-9 cells on Fibra-Cel disks (infected at 3.3 x 10(6) cells mL(-1)) was prolonged (192 h), and specific protein production was similar to that of high-density free cell infection. Cultispher-S microcarriers were found to be a very efficient system for the growth of High-Five cells, whereas no growth of Sf-9 cells took place for the same system. Concentrations of about 9 x 10(6) cells mL(-1) were reached within 120 h, with cell growth in both microcarriers and aggregates, appearance of cellular bridges between microcarriers and aggregates, and eventual formation of macroaggregates incorporating several microcarriers. Specific protein productions after beta-gal baculovirus infection at increasing cell concentrations were almost constant, thus leading to elevated volumetric protein production: final beta-gal titers of 946, 1728, and 1484 U mL(-1) were obtained for infection densities of 3.4, 7.2, and 8.9 x 10(6) cells mL(-1), respectively.

  19. Therapeutic implications of an enriched cancer stem-like cell population in a human osteosarcoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is a bone-forming tumor of mesenchymal origin that presents a clinical pattern that is consistent with the cancer stem cell model. Cells with stem-like properties (CSCs) have been identified in several tumors and hypothesized as the responsible for the relative resistance to therapy and tumor relapses. In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize CSCs populations in a human osteosarcoma cell line and to explore their role in the responsiveness to conventional therapies. CSCs were isolated from the human MNNG/HOS cell line using the sphere formation assay and characterized in terms of self-renewal, mesenchymal stem cell properties, expression of pluripotency markers and ABC transporters, metabolic activity and tumorigenicity. Cell's sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and to irradiation was analyzed and related with cell cycle-induced alterations and apoptosis. The isolated CSCs were found to possess self-renewal and multipotential differentiation capabilities, express markers of pluripotent embryonic stem cells Oct4 and Nanog and the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP, exhibit low metabolic activity and induce tumors in athymic mice. Compared with parental MNNG/HOS cells, CSCs were relatively more resistant to both chemotherapy and irradiation. None of the treatments have induced significant cell-cycle alterations and apoptosis in CSCs. MNNG/HOS osteosarcoma cells contain a stem-like cell population relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and irradiation. This resistant phenotype appears to be related with some stem features, namely the high expression of the drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP and their quiescent nature, which may provide a biological basis for resistance to therapy and recurrence commonly observed in osteosarcoma

  20. Canine Mesenchymal Stem Cell Potential and the Importance of Dog Breed: Implication for Cell-Based Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Steffen, Frank; Malonzo-Marty, Cherry; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    The study of canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has a prominent position in veterinary cell-based applications. Yet the plethora of breeds, their different life spans, and interbreed variations provide unclearness on what can be achieved specifically by such therapies. In this study, we compared a set of morphological, physiological, and genetic markers of MSCs derived from large dog breeds, namely, Border collie, German shepherd, Labrador, Malinois, Golden retriever, and Hovawart. We compared colony-forming units (CFUs) assay, population doubling time (PDT), senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, telomere length, and gene expression of MSCs, as well as the ability of cells to differentiate to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic phenotypes. The influence of the culture media α-MEM, low-glucose DMEM, and high-glucose DMEM, used in cell isolation and expansion, was investigated in the presence and absence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Initial cell yield was not affected by culturing medium, but MSCs expanded best in α-MEM supplemented with bFGF. After isolation, the number of MSCs was similar among breeds--as shown by equivalent CFUs--except in the Hovawart samples, which had fivefold less CFU. Telomere lengths were similar among breeds. MSCs divided actively only for 4 weeks in culture (PDT = ∼50 h/division), except Border collie cells divided for a longer time than cells from other groups. The percentage of senescent cells increased linearly in all breeds with time, with a faster rate in German shepherd, Labrador, and Golden retriever. Border collie cells underwent efficient osteogenic differentiation, Hovawart cells performed the best in chondrogenic differentiation, and Labrador cells in both, while German shepherd cells had the lower differentiation potential. MSCs from all breeds preserved the same adipogenic differentiation potential. In conclusion, despite variations, isolated MSCs can be

  1. Therapeutic implications of an enriched cancer stem-like cell population in a human osteosarcoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins-Neves Sara R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is a bone-forming tumor of mesenchymal origin that presents a clinical pattern that is consistent with the cancer stem cell model. Cells with stem-like properties (CSCs have been identified in several tumors and hypothesized as the responsible for the relative resistance to therapy and tumor relapses. In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize CSCs populations in a human osteosarcoma cell line and to explore their role in the responsiveness to conventional therapies. Methods CSCs were isolated from the human MNNG/HOS cell line using the sphere formation assay and characterized in terms of self-renewal, mesenchymal stem cell properties, expression of pluripotency markers and ABC transporters, metabolic activity and tumorigenicity. Cell's sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and to irradiation was analyzed and related with cell cycle-induced alterations and apoptosis. Results The isolated CSCs were found to possess self-renewal and multipotential differentiation capabilities, express markers of pluripotent embryonic stem cells Oct4 and Nanog and the ABC transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP, exhibit low metabolic activity and induce tumors in athymic mice. Compared with parental MNNG/HOS cells, CSCs were relatively more resistant to both chemotherapy and irradiation. None of the treatments have induced significant cell-cycle alterations and apoptosis in CSCs. Conclusions MNNG/HOS osteosarcoma cells contain a stem-like cell population relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and irradiation. This resistant phenotype appears to be related with some stem features, namely the high expression of the drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein and BCRP and their quiescent nature, which may provide a biological basis for resistance to therapy and recurrence commonly observed in osteosarcoma.

  2. Protein C inhibitor (PCI binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rieger

    Full Text Available Protein C Inhibitor (PCI is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells. PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  3. A Study of Cell-to-Cell Interactions and Degradation in Parallel Strings: Implications for the Battery Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Fernández, C.; Bruen, T.; Widanage, W. D.; Gama-Valdez, M. A.; Marco, J.

    2016-10-01

    Vehicle battery systems are usually designed with a high number of cells connected in parallel to meet the stringent requirements of power and energy. The self-balancing characteristic of parallel cells allows a battery management system (BMS) to approximate the cells as one equivalent cell with a single state of health (SoH) value, estimated either as capacity fade (SoHE) or resistance increase (SoHP). A single SoH value is however not applicable if the initial SoH of each cell is different, which can occur when cell properties change due to inconsistent manufacturing processes or in-homogeneous operating environments. As such this work quantifies the convergence of SoHE and SoHP due to initial differences in cell SoH and examines the convergence factors. Four 3 Ah 18650 cells connected in parallel at 25 °C are aged by charging and discharging for 500 cycles. For an initial SoHE difference of 40% and SoHP difference of 45%, SoHE converge to 10% and SoHP to 30% by the end of the experiment. From this, a strong linear correlation between ΔSoHE and ΔSoHP is also observed. The results therefore imply that a BMS should consider a calibration strategy to accurately estimate the SoH of parallel cells until convergence is reached.

  4. miR-17-92 expression in differentiated T cells - implications for cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinson Jeremy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type-1 T cells are critical for effective anti-tumor immune responses. The recently discovered microRNAs (miRs are a large family of small regulatory RNAs that control diverse aspects of cell function, including immune regulation. We identified miRs differentially regulated between type-1 and type-2 T cells, and determined how the expression of such miRs is regulated. Methods We performed miR microarray analyses on in vitro differentiated murine T helper type-1 (Th1 and T helper type-2 (Th2 cells to identify differentially expressed miRs. We used quantitative RT-PCR to confirm the differential expression levels. We also used WST-1, ELISA, and flow cytometry to evaluate the survival, function and phenotype of cells, respectively. We employed mice transgenic for the identified miRs to determine the biological impact of miR-17-92 expression in T cells. Results Our initial miR microarray analyses revealed that the miR-17-92 cluster is one of the most significantly over-expressed miR in murine Th1 cells when compared with Th2 cells. RT-PCR confirmed that the miR-17-92 cluster expression was consistently higher in Th1 cells than Th2 cells. Disruption of the IL-4 signaling through either IL-4 neutralizing antibody or knockout of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT6 reversed the miR-17-92 cluster suppression in Th2 cells. Furthermore, T cells from tumor bearing mice and glioma patients had decreased levels of miR-17-92 when compared with cells from non-tumor bearing counterparts. CD4+ T cells derived from miR-17-92 transgenic mice demonstrated superior type-1 phenotype with increased IFN-γ production and very late antigen (VLA-4 expression when compared with counterparts derived from wild type mice. Human Jurkat T cells ectopically expressing increased levels of miR-17-92 cluster members demonstrated increased IL-2 production and resistance to activation-induced cell death (AICD. Conclusion The type-2-skewing

  5. Effects of blood transportation on human peripheral mononuclear cell yield, phenotype and function: implications for immune cell biobanking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Posevitz-Fejfár

    Full Text Available Human biospecimen collection, processing and preservation are rapidly emerging subjects providing essential support to clinical as well as basic researchers. Unlike collection of other biospecimens (e.g. DNA and serum, biobanking of viable immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and/or isolated immune cell subsets is still in its infancy. While certain aspects of processing and freezing conditions have been studied in the past years, little is known about the effect of blood transportation on immune cell survival, phenotype and specific functions. However, especially for multicentric and cooperative projects it is vital to precisely know those effects. In this study we investigated the effect of blood shipping and pre-processing delay on immune cell phenotype and function both on cellular and subcellular levels. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 9: at a distal location (shipped overnight and in the central laboratory (processed immediately. PBMC were processed in the central laboratory and analyzed post-cryopreservation. We analyzed yield, major immune subset distribution, proliferative capacity of T cells, cytokine pattern and T-cell receptor signal transduction. Results show that overnight transportation of blood samples does not globally compromise T- cell subsets as they largely retain their phenotype and proliferative capacity. However, NK and B cell frequencies, the production of certain PBMC-derived cytokines and IL-6 mediated cytokine signaling pathway are altered due to transportation. Various control experiments have been carried out to compare issues related to shipping versus pre-processing delay on site. Our results suggest the implementation of appropriate controls when using multicenter logistics for blood transportation aiming at subsequent isolation of viable immune cells, e.g. in multicenter clinical trials or studies analyzing immune cells/subsets. One important conclusion might

  6. Molecular response of chorioretinal endothelial cells to complement injury: implications for macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shemin; Whitmore, S Scott; Sohn, Elliott H; Riker, Megan J; Wiley, Luke A; Scheetz, Todd E; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, blinding disease of the elderly in which macular photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris endothelial cells ultimately degenerate. Recent studies have found that degeneration of the choriocapillaris occurs early in this disease and that endothelial cell drop-out is concomitant with increased deposition of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC) at the choroidal endothelium. However, the impact of MAC injury to choroidal endothelial cells is poorly understood. To model this event in vitro, and to study the downstream consequences of MAC injury, endothelial cells were exposed to complement from human serum, compared to heat-inactivated serum, which lacks complement components. Cells exposed to complement components in human serum showed increased labelling with antibodies directed against the MAC, time- and dose-dependent cell death, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay and increased permeability. RNA-Seq analysis following complement injury revealed increased expression of genes associated with angiogenesis including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and -9, and VEGF-A. The MAC-induced increase in MMP9 RNA expression was validated using C5-depleted serum compared to C5-reconstituted serum. Increased levels of MMP9 were also established, using western blot and zymography. These data suggest that, in addition to cell lysis, complement attack on choroidal endothelial cells promotes an angiogenic phenotype in surviving cells.

  7. Osteoarticular cells tolerate short-term exposure to nitisinone-implications in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, J B; Jackson, D J; Bukhari, M; Taylor, A M

    2016-02-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease resulting in severe, rapidly progressing, early onset multi-joint osteoarthropathy. A potential therapy, nitisinone, is being trialled that reduces the causative agent; homogentisic acid (HGA) and in a murine model has shown to prevent ochronosis. Little is currently known about the effect nitisinone has on osteoarticular cells; these cells suffer most from the presence of HGA and its polymeric derivatives. This led us to investigate nitisinone's effect on chondrocytes and osteoblast-like cells in an in vitro model. Human C20/A4 immortalized chondrocytes, and osteosarcoma cells MG63 cultured in DMEM, as previously described. Confluent cells were then plated into 24-well plates at 4 × 10(4) cells per well in varying concentrations of nitisinone. Cells were cultured for 7 days with medium changes every third day. Trypan blue assay was used to determine viability and the effect of nitisinone concentration on cells. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance, and differences between groups were determined by Newman-Keuls post-test. Analysis of C20/A4 chondrocyte and MG63 osteoblast-like cell viability when cultured in different concentrations of nitisinone demonstrates that there is no statistically significant difference in cell viability compared to control cultures. There is currently no literature surrounding the use of nitisinone in human in vitro models, or its effect on chondrocytes or osteoblast like cells. Our results show that nitisinone does not appear detrimental to cell viability of chondrocytes or osteoblast-like cells, which adds to the evidence that this therapy could be useful in treating AKU. PMID:26024586

  8. Mode of dendritic cell activation: the decisive hand in Th2/Th17 cell differentiation. Implications in asthma severity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroman, Heleen; van den Blink, Bernt; Kool, Mirjam

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, with reversible airflow limitations and airway remodeling. The classification of asthma phenotypes was initially based on different combinations of clinical symptoms, but they are now unfolding to link biology to phenotype. As such, patients can suffer from a predominant eosinophilic, neutrophilic or even mixed eosinophilic/neutrophilic inflammatory response. In adult asthma patients, eosinophilic inflammation is usually seen in mild-to-moderate disease and neutrophilic inflammation in more severe disease. The underlying T cell response is predominated by T helper (Th) 2, Th17, or a mixed Th2/Th17 cell immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are "professional" antigen presenting cells (APCs), since their principal function is to present antigens and induce a primary immune response in resting naive T cells. DCs also drive the differentiation into distinctive Th subsets. The expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines by DCs and surrounding cells determines the outcome of Th cell differentiation. The nature of DC activation will determine the expression of specific co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines, specifically needed for induction of the different Th cell programs. Thus DC activation is crucial for the subsequent effector Th immune responses. In this review, we will discuss underlying mechanisms that initiate DC activation in favor of Th2 differentiation versus Th1/Th17 and Th17 differentiation in the development of mild versus moderate to severe asthma. PMID:25245013

  9. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit: implications for cell adhesion and fruit softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, William George Tycho;

    2002-01-01

    The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic...... polysaccharides to the non-softening and altered cell adhesion phenotype. Cell wall material (CWM) and solubilised fractions of mature green and red ripe fruit were analysed by chemical, enzymatic and immunochemical techniques. No major differences in CWM sugar composition were detected although differences were...... found in the solubility and composition of the pectic polysaccharides extracted from the CWM at both stages of development. In comparison with the wild type, the ripening-associated solubilisation of homogalacturonan-rich pectic polysaccharides was reduced in Cnr. The proportion of carbohydrate...

  10. Acute Stress-Induced Changes in Follicular Dermal Papilla Cells and Mobilization of Mast Cells: Implications for Hair Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyoseung; Choi, Soon-Jin; Cho, A-Ri; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress is a known cause of hair loss in many species. Objective In this study, we investigated the role of acute stress on hair growth using a rat model. Methods Rats were immobilized for 24 hours and blood samples, and skin biopsies were taken. The effect of stress-serum on the in vitro proliferation of rat and human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs), as well as serum cortisol and corticotropin-releasing hormone levels, were measured. Mast cell staining was performed on the biopsied tissue. In addition, Western blot and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction were used to assess mast cell tryptase and cytokine expression, respectively in rat skin biopsies. Results Stress-serum treatment reduced significantly the number of viable hDPCs and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase, compared to serum from unrestrained rats (phair growth via cortisol release in addition to substance P-mast cell pathway.

  11. Proliferation and survival molecules implicated in the inhibition of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cells harbouring different genetic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seca Hugo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid carcinomas show a high prevalence of mutations in the oncogene BRAF which are inversely associated with RAS or RET/PTC oncogenic activation. The possibility of using inhibitors on the BRAF pathway as became an interesting therapeutic approach. In thyroid cancer cells the target molecules, implicated on the cellular effects, mediated by inhibition of BRAF are not well established. In order to fill this lack of knowledge we studied the proliferation and survival pathways and associated molecules induced by BRAF inhibition in thyroid carcinoma cell lines harbouring distinct genetic backgrounds. Methods Suppression of BRAF pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, TPC1 and C643 was achieved using RNA interference (RNAi for BRAF and the kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. Proliferation analysis was performed by BrdU incorporation and apoptosis was accessed by TUNEL assay. Levels of protein expression were analysed by western-blot. Results Both BRAF RNAi and sorafenib inhibited proliferation in all the cell lines independently of the genetic background, mostly in cells with BRAFV600E mutation. In BRAFV600E mutated cells inhibition of BRAF pathway lead to a decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 levels and an increase in p27Kip1. Specific inhibition of BRAF by RNAi in cells with BRAFV600E mutation had no effect on apoptosis. In the case of sorafenib treatment, cells harbouring BRAFV600E mutation showed increase levels of apoptosis due to a balance of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2. Conclusion Our results in thyroid cancer cells, namely those harbouring BRAFV600Emutation showed that BRAF signalling pathway provides important proliferation signals. We have shown that in thyroid cancer cells sorafenib induces apoptosis by affecting Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 in BRAFV600E mutated cells which was independent of BRAF. These results suggest that sorafenib may prove useful in the treatment of thyroid carcinomas, particularly

  12. Superior control of HIV-1 replication by CD8+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes: implications for HIV vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Kunwar

    Full Text Available A successful HIV vaccine will likely induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, however, the enormous diversity of HIV has hampered the development of a vaccine that effectively elicits both arms of the adaptive immune response. To tackle the problem of viral diversity, T cell-based vaccine approaches have focused on two main strategies (i increasing the breadth of vaccine-induced responses or (ii increasing vaccine-induced responses targeting only conserved regions of the virus. The relative extent to which set-point viremia is impacted by epitope-conservation of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early HIV-infection is unknown but has important implications for vaccine design. To address this question, we comprehensively mapped HIV-1 CD8(+ T cell epitope-specificities in 23 ART-naïve individuals during early infection and computed their conservation score (CS by three different methods (prevalence, entropy and conseq on clade-B and group-M sequence alignments. The majority of CD8(+ T cell responses were directed against variable epitopes (p<0.01. Interestingly, increasing breadth of CD8(+ T cell responses specifically recognizing conserved epitopes was associated with lower set-point viremia (r = - 0.65, p = 0.009. Moreover, subjects possessing CD8(+ T cells recognizing at least one conserved epitope had 1.4 log10 lower set-point viremia compared to those recognizing only variable epitopes (p = 0.021. The association between viral control and the breadth of conserved CD8(+ T cell responses may be influenced by the method of CS definition and sequences used to determine conservation levels. Strikingly, targeting variable versus conserved epitopes was independent of HLA type (p = 0.215. The associations with viral control were independent of functional avidity of CD8(+ T cell responses elicited during early infection. Taken together, these data suggest that the next-generation of T-cell based HIV-1 vaccines should focus

  13. Aberrant, ectopic expression of VEGF and VEGF receptors 1 and 2 in malignant colonic epithelial cells. Implications for these cells growth via an autocrine mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Jones, Michael K. [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Szabo, Sandor [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Pathology, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tarnawski, Andrzej S., E-mail: amrita.ahluwalia@va.gov [Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Department of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Malignant colonic epithelial cells express VEGF and its receptors. •Cultured colon cancer cells secrete VEGF into the medium. •Inhibition of VEGF receptor significantly decreases colon cancer cell proliferation. •VEGF is critical for colon cancer cell growth. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor A (referred to as VEGF) is implicated in colon cancer growth. Currently, the main accepted mechanism by which VEGF promotes colon cancer growth is via the stimulation of angiogenesis, which was originally postulated by late Judah Folkman. However, the cellular source of VEGF in colon cancer tissue; and, the expression of VEGF and its receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in colon cancer cells are not fully known and are subjects of controversy. Material and methods: We examined and quantified expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in three different human colonic tissue arrays containing sections of adenocarcinoma (n = 43) and normal mucosa (n = 41). In human colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 and normal colon cell lines NCM356 and NCM460, we examined expression of VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 mRNA and protein, VEGF production and secretion into the culture medium; and, the effect of a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGF receptors, AL-993, on cell proliferation. Results: Human colorectal cancer specimens had strong expression of VEGF in cancer cells and also expressed VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2.In vitro studies showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and HT29, but not normal colonic cell lines, express VEGF, VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 and secrete VEGF into the medium up to a concentration 2000 pg/ml within 48 h. Furthermore, we showed that inhibition of VEGF receptors using a specific VEGF-R inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation (by >50%) of cultured colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our findings support the contention that VEGF generated by colon cancer cells stimulates their growth directly through an autocrine mechanism that is

  14. Impaired clearance of apoptotic cells in chronic inflammatory diseases: therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsa eSzondy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In healthy individuals billions of cells die by apoptosis every day. Removal of the dead cells by phagocytosis (a process called efferocytosis must be efficient to prevent secondary necrosis and the consequent release of proinflammatory cell contents that damages the tissue environment and provokes autoimmunity. In addition, detection and removal of apoptotic cells generally induces an anti-inflammatory response. As a consequence improper clearance of apoptotic cells, being the result of either genetic anomalies and /or a persistent disease state, contributes to the establishment and progression of a number of human chronic inflammatory diseases such as autoimmune and neurological disorders, inflammatory lung diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes or atherosclerosis. During the past decade our knowledge about the mechanism of efferocytosis has significantly increased, providing therapeutic targets through which impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and the consequent inflammation could be influenced in these diseases.

  15. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules.

  16. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  17. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail...

  18. Clinicopathological prognostic implicators of oral squamous cell carcinoma: Need to understand and revise

    OpenAIRE

    Jadhav, Kiran B; Nidhi Gupta

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the vast amount of research and the advances, oral squamous cell carcinoma implies quite significant mortality and morbidity rates. This has motivated the search of factors with prognostic relevance. A web based search was initiated for all published articles by using Medline/PubMed, Google Scholar with key words such as prognosis, survival rate, risk factors associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma, prognosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. The search was restricted to artic...

  19. Implications of the Cancer Stem-Cell Hypothesis for Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research in breast biology has provided support for the cancer stem-cell hypothesis. Two important components of this hypothesis are that tumors originate in mammary stem or progenitor cells as a result of dysregulation of the normally tightly regulated process of self-renewal. As a result, tumors contain and are driven by a cellular subcomponent that retains key stem-cell properties including self-renewal, which drives tumorigenesis and differentiation that contributes to cellular het...

  20. Role of Epigenetics in Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation: Implications for Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinageshwar, Bhairavi; Maiti, Panchanan; Dunbar, Gary L; Rossignol, Julien

    2016-02-02

    The main objectives of this review are to survey the current literature on the role of epigenetics in determining the fate of stem cells and to assess how this information can be used to enhance the treatment strategies for some neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Some of these epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which have a direct impact on the way that genes are expressed in stem cells and how they drive these cells into a mature lineage. Understanding how the stem cells are behaving and giving rise to mature cells can be used to inform researchers on effective ways to design stem cell-based treatments. In this review article, the way in which the basic understanding of how manipulating this process can be utilized to treat certain neurological diseases will be presented. Different genetic factors and their epigenetic changes during reprogramming of stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have significant potential for enhancing the efficacy of cell replacement therapies.

  1. Role of Epigenetics in Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation: Implications for Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhairavi Srinageshwar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this review are to survey the current literature on the role of epigenetics in determining the fate of stem cells and to assess how this information can be used to enhance the treatment strategies for some neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Some of these epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which have a direct impact on the way that genes are expressed in stem cells and how they drive these cells into a mature lineage. Understanding how the stem cells are behaving and giving rise to mature cells can be used to inform researchers on effective ways to design stem cell-based treatments. In this review article, the way in which the basic understanding of how manipulating this process can be utilized to treat certain neurological diseases will be presented. Different genetic factors and their epigenetic changes during reprogramming of stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have significant potential for enhancing the efficacy of cell replacement therapies.

  2. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte;

    2014-01-01

    there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...... is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring....

  3. The role of stem cells in airway repair: implications for the origins of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvihill, Michael S.; Kratz, Johannes R.; Patrick Pham; Jablons, David M.; Biao He

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Recently, advancements in our ability to identify and study stem cell populations in the lung have helped researchers to elucidate the central role that cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. Much of this research has focused on the use of the airway repair model to study response to injury. In this review, we discuss the primary evidence of the role that cancer stem cells play in lung cancer de...

  4. Expression of WNT genes in cervical cancer-derived cells: Implication of WNT7A in cell proliferation and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Solano, Moisés, E-mail: mrsolano84@gmail.com [División de Inmunología, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente (CIBO)-Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Biomédica, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud (CUCS), Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Meza-Canales, Ivan D., E-mail: imezacanales@ice.mpg.de [Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Torres-Reyes, Luis A., E-mail: torres_reyes_88@hotmail.com [División de Inmunología, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente (CIBO)-Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Biomédica, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud (CUCS), Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Alvarez-Zavala, Monserrat, E-mail: monse_belan@hotmail.com [División de Inmunología, Centro de Investigación Biomédica de Occidente (CIBO)-Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Biomédica, Centro Universitario de Ciencias de la Salud (CUCS), Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); and others

    2015-07-01

    According to the multifactorial model of cervical cancer (CC) causation, it is now recognized that other modifications, in addition to Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, are necessary for the development of this neoplasia. Among these, it has been proposed that a dysregulation of the WNT pathway might favor malignant progression of HPV-immortalized keratinocytes. The aim of this study was to identify components of the WNT pathway differentially expressed in CC vs. non-tumorigenic, but immortalized human keratinocytes. Interestingly, WNT7A expression was found strongly downregulated in cell lines and biopsies derived from CC. Restoration of WNT7A in CC-derived cell lines using a lentiviral gene delivery system or after adding a recombinant human protein decreases cell proliferation. Likewise, WNT7A silencing in non-tumorigenic cells markedly accelerates proliferation. Decreased WNT7A expression was due to hypermethylation at particular CpG sites. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting reduced WNT7A levels in CC-derived cells and that ectopic WNT7A restoration negatively affects cell proliferation and migration. - Highlights: • WNT7A is expressed in normal keratinocytes or cervical cells without lesion. • WNT7A is significantly reduced in cervical cancer-derived cells. • Restoration of WNT7A expression in HeLa decreases proliferation and cell migration. • Silencing of WNT7A in HaCaT induces an increased proliferation and migration rate. • Decreased WNT7A expression in this model is due to hypermethylation.

  5. Expression of WNT genes in cervical cancer-derived cells: Implication of WNT7A in cell proliferation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the multifactorial model of cervical cancer (CC) causation, it is now recognized that other modifications, in addition to Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, are necessary for the development of this neoplasia. Among these, it has been proposed that a dysregulation of the WNT pathway might favor malignant progression of HPV-immortalized keratinocytes. The aim of this study was to identify components of the WNT pathway differentially expressed in CC vs. non-tumorigenic, but immortalized human keratinocytes. Interestingly, WNT7A expression was found strongly downregulated in cell lines and biopsies derived from CC. Restoration of WNT7A in CC-derived cell lines using a lentiviral gene delivery system or after adding a recombinant human protein decreases cell proliferation. Likewise, WNT7A silencing in non-tumorigenic cells markedly accelerates proliferation. Decreased WNT7A expression was due to hypermethylation at particular CpG sites. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting reduced WNT7A levels in CC-derived cells and that ectopic WNT7A restoration negatively affects cell proliferation and migration. - Highlights: • WNT7A is expressed in normal keratinocytes or cervical cells without lesion. • WNT7A is significantly reduced in cervical cancer-derived cells. • Restoration of WNT7A expression in HeLa decreases proliferation and cell migration. • Silencing of WNT7A in HaCaT induces an increased proliferation and migration rate. • Decreased WNT7A expression in this model is due to hypermethylation

  6. Pathologic bladder microenvironment attenuates smooth muscle differentiation of skin derived precursor cells: implications for tissue regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Tolg

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cell containing organs (bladder, heart, blood vessels are damaged by a variety of pathological conditions necessitating surgery or organ replacement. Currently, regeneration of contractile tissues is hampered by lack of functional smooth muscle cells. Multipotent skin derived progenitor cells (SKPs can easily be isolated from adult skin and can be differentiated in vitro into contractile smooth muscle cells by exposure to FBS. Here we demonstrate an inhibitory effect of a pathologic contractile organ microenvironment on smooth muscle cell differentiation of SKPs. In vivo, urinary bladder strain induces microenvironmental changes leading to de-differentiation of fully differentiated bladder smooth muscle cells. Co-culture of SKPs with organoids isolated from ex vivo stretched bladders or exposure of SKPs to diffusible factors released by stretched bladders (e.g. bFGF suppresses expression of smooth muscle markers (alpha SMactin, calponin, myocardin, myosin heavy chain as demonstrated by qPCR and immunofluorescent staining. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR signalling, previously observed to prevent bladder strain induced de-differentiation of fully differentiated smooth muscle cells in vitro, inhibits FBS-induced smooth muscle cell differentiation of undifferentiated SKPs. These results suggest that intended precursor cell differentiation may be paradoxically suppressed by the disease context for which regeneration may be required. Organ-specific microenvironment contexts, particularly prevailing disease, may play a significant role in modulating or attenuating an intended stem cell phenotypic fate, possibly explaining the variable and inefficient differentiation of stem cell constructs in in vivo settings. These observations must be considered in drafting any regeneration strategies.

  7. Clinical Implications of Phosphorylated STAT3 Expression in de novo Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ok, Chi Y; Chen, Jiayu; Xu-Monette, Ziju;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) regulates tumor growth, invasion, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, immune response, and survival. Data regarding expression of phosphorylated (activated) STAT3 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the impact of...

  8. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsang JJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jovian J Tsang,1,2 Harold L Atkins2,3 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 2Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 3Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation (HSCT to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologous HSC grafts may contain cancer cells and purging could further improve treatment outcomes. Similarly, allogeneic HSCT may be improved by selectively purging alloreactive effector cells from the graft rather than wholesale immune cell depletion. Viral agents that selectively replicate in specific cell populations are being studied in experimental models of cancer and immunological diseases and have potential applications in the context of HSC graft engineering. This review describes preclinical studies involving oncolytic virus strains of adenovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, myxoma virus, and reovirus as ex vivo purging agents for HSC grafts, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental studies using oncolytic coxsackievirus, measles virus, parvovirus, vaccinia virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus to eradicate hematopoietic malignancies. Alternative ex vivo oncolytic virus strategies are also outlined that aim to reduce the risk of relapse following autologous HSCT and mitigate morbidity and mortality due to graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Keywords: hematopoietic stem cells, oncolytic virus, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, stem cell graft purging, hematopoietic malignancy, graft vs host disease

  9. Paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability in cells with dysfunctional telomeres: Implication in multinucleation and chemosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Eun [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Seon Rang [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang-Mo [Laboratory of Cytogenetics and Tissue Regeneration, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun Ran; Park, In-chul; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Kee [Department of Life Science and Genetic Engineering, Paichai University, Daejeon 302-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Kwon [Department of Biotechnology, Seoul Woman' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-74-2 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Paclitaxel serves as a stimulator of chromosomal fusion in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. {yields} Typical fusions involve p-arms, but paclitaxel-induced fusions occur between both q- and p-arms. {yields} Paclitaxel-stimulated fusions in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional evoke prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest and delay multinucleation. {yields} Upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel promotes chromosomal instability and subsequent apoptosis. {yields} Chromosomal fusion enhances paclitaxel chemosensitivity under telomere dysfunction. -- Abstract: The anticancer effect of paclitaxel is attributable principally to irreversible promotion of microtubule stabilization and is hampered upon development of chemoresistance by tumor cells. Telomere shortening, and eventual telomere erosion, evoke chromosomal instability, resulting in particular cellular responses. Using telomerase-deficient cells derived from mTREC-/-p53-/- mice, here we show that, upon telomere erosion, paclitaxel propagates chromosomal instability by stimulating chromosomal end-to-end fusions and delaying the development of multinucleation. The end-to-end fusions involve both the p- and q-arms in cells in which telomeres are dysfunctional. Paclitaxel-induced chromosomal fusions were accompanied by prolonged G2/M cell cycle arrest, delayed multinucleation, and apoptosis. Telomere dysfunctional cells with mutlinucleation eventually underwent apoptosis. Thus, as telomere erosion proceeds, paclitaxel stimulates chromosomal fusion and instability, and both apoptosis and chemosensitization eventually develop.

  10. Implication of unfolded protein response in resveratrol-induced inhibition of K562 cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Gao, Yan-Yan; Niu, Xiao-Fang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xie, Ji-Sheng [Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities, Guangxi 533000 (China); Meng, Xin; Guan, Yifu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Wang, Hua-Qin, E-mail: wanghq_doctor@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a natural plant polyphenol, is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, RES has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventive and anti-tumor agent in vivo. The chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties associated with resveratrol offer promise for the design of new chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms by which RES mediates its effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we showed that RES caused cell cycle arrest and proliferation inhibition via induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) in human leukemia K562 cell line. Treatment of K562 cells with RES induced a number of signature UPR markers, including transcriptional induction of GRP78 and CHOP, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2{alpha} (eIF2{alpha}), ER stress-specific XBP-1 splicing, suggesting the induction of UPR by RES. RES inhibited proliferation of K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that K562 cells were arrested in G1 phase upon RES treatment. Salubrinal, an eIF2{alpha} inhibitor, or overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PERK or eIF2{alpha}, effectively restored RES-induced cell cycle arrest, underscoring the important role of PERK/eIF2{alpha} branch of UPR in RES-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  11. Non-human primate regulatory T cells: Current biology and implications for transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Dons (Eefje); G. Raimondi (Giorgio); D.K.C. Cooper; A.W. Thomson (Angus)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractRegulatory T cells (Treg) offer potential for improving long-term outcomes in cell and organ transplantation. The non-human primate model is a valuable resource for addressing issues concerning the transfer of Treg therapy to the clinic. Herein, we discuss the properties of non-human pri

  12. Rapid kinetic labeling of Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures: Implications for models of lipid export from plastids

    Science.gov (United States)

    T-87 suspension cell cultures are increasingly used in Arabidopsis research, but there are no reports describing their lipid composition or biosynthesis. To evaluate if T-87 cell cultures as a model system for analysis of lipid metabolism, including tests of gene candidate functions, we have deter...

  13. T-Cell Traffic Jam in Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Pathogenetic and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Fozza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In hematologic malignancies, the microenvironment is often characterized by nonneoplastic cells with peculiar phenotypic and functional features. This is particularly true in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL, in which T lymphocytes surrounding Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cells are essentially polarized towards a memory T-helper type 2 phenotype. In this paper we will first evaluate the main processes modulating T-cell recruitment towards the lymph node microenvironment in HL, especially focusing on the role played by cytokines. We will then consider the most relevant mechanisms of immune escape exerted by neoplastic cells in order to evade antitumor immunity. The potential pathogenetic and prognostic impact of regulatory T cells in such a context will be also described. We will finally overview some of the strategies of cellular immunotherapy applied in patients with HL.

  14. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

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    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  15. Global characteristics of CSIG-associated gene expression changes in human HEK293 cells and the implications for CSIG regulating cell proliferation and senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei eMa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence-inhibited gene (CSIG, also named ribosomal_L1 domain-containing 1 (RSL1D1, is implicated in various processes including cell cycle regulation, cellular senescence, apoptosis, and tumor metastasis. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism underlying its functions. To screen important targets and signaling pathways modulated by CSIG, we compared the gene expression profiles in CSIG-silencing and control HEK293 cells using Affymetrix microarray Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChips. A total of 590 genes displayed statistically significant expression changes, with 279 genes up-regulated and 311 down-regulated, respectively. These genes are involved in a broad array of biological processes, mainly in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle, signal transduction, oxidation reduction, development, and cell adhesion. The differential expression of genes such as ZNF616, KPNA5, MAP3K3 were further validated by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the correlated expression patterns of ESCO1, KPNA5, MAP3K3 and CSIG during cell cycle and senescence progression, which imply the important pathways CSIG regulating cell cycle and senescence. The mechanism study showed that CSIG modulated the mRNA half-life of Cdc14B, CASP7 and CREBL2. This study shows that expression profiling can be used to identify genes that are transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally modified following CSIG knockdown and to reveal the molecular mechanism of cell proliferation and senescence regulated by CSIG.

  16. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

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    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  17. Ionizing Particle Radiation as a Modulator of Endogenous Bone Marrow Cell Reprogramming: Implications for Hematological Cancers.

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    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Sasi, Sharath P; Zuriaga, Maria A; Hirschi, Karen K; Porada, Christopher D; Coleman, Matthew A; Walsh, Kenneth X; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of individuals to ionizing radiation (IR), as in the case of astronauts exploring space or radiotherapy cancer patients, increases their risk of developing secondary cancers and other health-related problems. Bone marrow (BM), the site in the body where hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation to mature blood cells occurs, is extremely sensitive to low-dose IR, including irradiation by high-charge and high-energy particles. Low-dose IR induces DNA damage and persistent oxidative stress in the BM hematopoietic cells. Inefficient DNA repair processes in HSC and early hematopoietic progenitors can lead to an accumulation of mutations whereas long-lasting oxidative stress can impair hematopoiesis itself, thereby causing long-term damage to hematopoietic cells in the BM niche. We report here that low-dose (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR significantly decreased the hematopoietic early and late multipotent progenitor (E- and L-MPP, respectively) cell numbers in mouse BM over a period of up to 10 months after exposure. Both (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR increased the expression of pluripotent stem cell markers Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4 in L-MPPs and 10 months post-IR exposure. We postulate that low doses of (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR may induce endogenous cellular reprogramming of BM hematopoietic progenitor cells to assume a more primitive pluripotent phenotype and that IR-induced oxidative DNA damage may lead to mutations in these BM progenitors. This could then be propagated to successive cell lineages. Persistent impairment of BM progenitor cell populations can disrupt hematopoietic homeostasis and lead to hematologic disorders, and these findings warrant further mechanistic studies into the effects of low-dose IR on the functional capacity of BM-derived hematopoietic cells including their self-renewal and pluripotency. PMID:26528440

  18. Prevention and control of reciprocal T-B cell diversification: implications for lupus-like autoimmunity.

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    Singh, Ram Raj

    2004-02-01

    Autoimmunity is fundamentally a continuously evolving process. The autoimmune responses shift, drift and diversify with time not only to other epitopes in the original antigen but also to other related and sometimes to unrelated antigens. We have described a form of immune diversification--reciprocal T-B epitope spreading--where the activation of first T cells by epitopes from an autoantibody molecule could lead to help provided to a variety of B cells displaying a cross-reactive version of the original epitope. The response spreads in this way until large cohorts of T and B cells have expanded in lupus-prone mice. Such reciprocal T-B cell response can also be induced in normal animals, its extent is limited by the emergence of inhibitory T cells. The induction of such inhibitory T cells is generally impaired in lupus mice. The delivery of T cell epitopes via plasmid DNA vectors, however, can overcome this impairment in lupus mice. The inhibitory T cells thus induced can suppress autoantibody production and lupus disease by ablating or inhibiting autoreactive B cells. Thus, T-B diversification that develops spontaneously in lupus mice could be curtailed in normal animals by inhibitory T cells that emerge whenever there is an impending 'danger' of pathologic autoimmunity. We have successfully exploited this regulatory potential of the normal immune response to inhibit clinical autoimmunity. Understanding the mechanisms of autoimmune diversification in lupus mice and of its down-regulation in normal animals may pave the way for developing novel treatments for autoantibody-mediated diseases such as lupus.

  19. Relationship between pulmonary and cardiac abnormalities in sickle cell disease: implications for the management of patients

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    Maria Christina Paixão Maioli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the association between clinical, pulmonary, and cardiovascular findings in patients with sickle cell disease and, secondarily, to compare these findings between sickle cell anemia patients and those with other sickle cell diseases. Methods: Fifty-nine adults were included in this cross-sectional study; 47 had sickle cell anemia, and 12 had other sickle cell diseases. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography, and echocardiography. Results: Abnormalities on computed tomography, echocardiography, and pulmonary function tests were observed in 93.5%, 75.0%; and 70.2% of patients, respectively. A higher frequency of restrictive abnormalities was observed in patients with a history of acute chest syndrome (85% vs. 21.6%; p-value < 0.0001 and among patients with increased left ventricle size (48.2% vs. 22.2%; p-value = 0.036, and a higher frequency of reduced respiratory muscle strength was observed in patients with a ground-glass pattern (33.3% vs. 4.3%; p-value = 0.016. Moreover, a higher frequency of mosaic attenuation was observed in patients with elevated tricuspid regurgitation velocity (61.1% vs. 24%; p-value = 0.014. Compared to patients with other sickle cell diseases, sickle cell anemia patients had suffered increased frequencies of acute pain episodes, and acute chest syndrome, and exhibited mosaic attenuation on computed tomography, and abnormalities on echocardiography. Conclusion: A significant interrelation between abnormalities of the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems was observed in sickle cell disease patients. Furthermore, the severity of the cardiopulmonary parameters among patients with sickle cell anemia was greater than that of patients with other sickle cell diseases.

  20. Ionizing Particle Radiation as a Modulator of Endogenous Bone Marrow Cell Reprogramming: Implications for Hematological Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha eMuralidharan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of individuals to ionizing radiation (IR, as in the case of astronauts exploring space or radiotherapy cancer patients, increases their risk of developing secondary cancers and other health-related problems. Bone marrow (BM, the site in the body where hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal and differentiation to mature blood cells occurs, is extremely sensitive to low dose IR, including irradiation by high-charge and high-energy particles (HZE. Low dose IR induces DNA damage and persistent oxidative stress in the BM hematopoietic cells. Inefficient DNA repair processes in HSC and early hematopoietic progenitors can lead to an accumulation of mutations whereas long-lasting oxidative stress can impair hematopoiesis itself, thereby causing long term damage to hematopoietic cells in the BM niche. We report here that low dose 1H- and 56Fe-IR significantly decreased the hematopoietic early and late multipotent progenitor (E- and L-MPP, respectively cell numbers in mouse BM over a period of up to 10 months after exposure. Both 1H- and 56Fe-IR increased the expression of pluripotent stem cell markers Sox2, Nanog and Oct-4 in Late-MPPs 2 and 10 months post-IR exposure. We postulate that low doses of 1H- and 56Fe-IR may induce endogenous cellular reprogramming of BM hematopoietic progenitor cells to assume a more primitive pluripotent phenotype; IR-induced oxidative DNA damage may lead to mutations in these BM progenitors. This could then be propagated to successive cell lineages. Persistent impairment of BM progenitor cell populations can disrupt hematopoietic homeostasis and lead to hematologic disorders and these findings warrant further mechanistic studies into the effects of low dose IR on the functional capacity of BM-derived hematopoietic cells including their self-renewal and pluripotency.

  1. Soluble fibrin inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells: implications for cancer metastasis

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    Patel Shonak

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble fibrin (sFn is a marker for disseminated intravascular coagulation and may have prognostic significance, especially in metastasis. However, a role for sFn in the etiology of metastatic cancer growth has not been extensively studied. We have reported that sFn cross-linked platelet binding to tumor cells via the major platelet fibrin receptor αIIbβ3, and tumor cell CD54 (ICAM-1, which is the receptor for two of the leukocyte β2 integrins (αLβ2 and aMβ2. We hypothesized that sFn may also affect leukocyte adherence, recognition, and killing of tumor cells. Furthermore, in a rat experimental metastasis model sFn pre-treatment of tumor cells enhanced metastasis by over 60% compared to untreated cells. Other studies have shown that fibrin(ogen binds to the monocyte integrin αMβ2. This study therefore sought to investigate the effect of sFn on β2 integrin mediated monocyte adherence and killing of tumor cells. Methods The role of sFn in monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity against tumor cells was initially studied using static microplate adherence and cytotoxicity assays, and under physiologically relevant flow conditions in a microscope perfusion incubator system. Blocking studies were performed using monoclonal antibodies specific for β2 integrins and CD54, and specific peptides which inhibit sFn binding to these receptors. Results Enhancement of monocyte/tumor cell adherence was observed when only one cell type was bound to sFn, but profound inhibition was observed when sFn was bound to both monocytes and tumor cells. This effect was also reflected in the pattern of monocyte cytotoxicity. Studies using monoclonal blocking antibodies and specific blocking peptides (which did not affect normal coagulation showed that the predominant mechanism of fibrin inhibition is via its binding to αMβ2 on monocytes, and to CD54 on both leukocytes and tumor cells. Conclusion sFn inhibits monocyte adherence and cytotoxicity of

  2. Implication of stem cells in the biology and therapy of head and neck cancer [

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    Wollenberg, Barbara

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] The progress which has been made in the therapy of patients with head and neck cancer in recent years mainly concern the HPV associated HNSCC and the quality of life. The overall survival of patients carrying non HPV associated HNSCC during the last thirty years has not experienced any significant improvement and must be referred to as static , . The problem of the illness remains unchanged in the frequent and poorly controllable relapse situation. The locoregionally originating tumours or lymph node metastases show a considerably poorer response towards current therapies. Likewise for a number of patients a formation of distant metastases seems to develop during the course of the illness. Those distant metastases are also therapeutically rather difficult to control. Therefore the mortality of the non HPV induced head and neck cancer remains unchanged. The term “stem cell” describes the entity cell, which acts as a reservoir for new cells in order to replace defective or necrotic cells. A fundamental characteristic of stem cells is the constant ability to multiply into different type of cells, which subsequently do not proliferate. With the insight of new knowledge within the regenerative medicine and the ability of stem cells of self regenerating proliferation and their multipotency in the differentiation, the origin of cancer attains a new distinction. If you look on the tumour as a malignant wound it becomes obvious, that the regeneration or the composition of additional tissue depends on the presence and differentiation of stem cells. The wound healing, which is a regeneration of tissue depends not only on stationary stem cells. In fact stem cells are attracted for “homing” in the defective areas by despatch of various messengers, which then form and replace the vascular tree or other tissue , .Next to those stem cells, which functionally help to form tumour tissue, a small entity of “real cancer stem cells” in solid

  3. GABA A receptor π subunit promotes apoptosis of HTR-8/SVneo trophoblastic cells: Implications in preeclampsia.

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    Lu, Junjie; Zhang, Qian; Tan, Dongmei; Luo, Wenping; Zhao, Hai; Ma, Jing; Liang, Hao; Tan, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) functions primarily as an inhibitory neurotransmitter through its receptors in the mature central nervous system. The GABA type A receptor π subunit (GABRP) has been identified in the tissues of the reproductive system, particularly in the uterus. In addition, we have previously detected GABRP expression in both human and mouse placentas. To examine the role of GABRP in trophoblastic cell invasion, we constructed a pIRES2-GABRP-EGFP plasmid which was used for the transfection of a human placental cell line derived from first trimester extravillous trophoblasts (HTR-8/SVneo). The number of invaded cells was decreased by GABRP overexpression. Notably, the decrease in the invasive cell number may be due to the increased apoptosis of the HTR-8/SVneo cells following GABRP transfection, which was further confirmed by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis. Based on the increased apoptosis of trophoblastic cells in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (PE) and the fact that GABRP promotes the apoptosis of trophoblastic cells, we hypothesized that GABRP expression is increased in the placental tissues from patients with PE compared with that in the normal groups and this hypothesis was confirmed by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis. Taken together, these findings imply that GABRP plays an important role in placentation and this pathway may be a promising molecular target for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for PE. PMID:27221053

  4. Alteration of lymphocyte phenotype and function in sickle cell anemia: Implications for vaccine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandya, Emmanuel; Reynolds, Teri; Obaro, Stephen; Makani, Julie

    2016-09-01

    Individuals with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have increased susceptibility to infections, secondary to impairment of immune function. Besides the described dysfunction in innate immunity, including impaired opsonization and phagocytosis of bacteria, evidence of dysfunction of T and B lymphocytes in SCA has also been reported. This includes reduction in the proportion of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, reduction of CD4+ helper: CD8+ suppressor T cell ratio, aberrant activation and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg ), skewing of CD4+ T cells towards Th2 response and loss of IgM-secreting CD27 + IgM(high) IgD(low) memory B cells. These changes occur on the background of immune activation characterized by predominance of memory CD4+ T cell phenotypes, increased Th17 signaling and elevated levels of C-reactive protein and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, which may affect the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines available to prevent infections in SCA. Thus, in order to optimize the use of vaccines in SCA, a thorough understanding of T and B lymphocyte functions and vaccine reactivity among individuals with SCA is needed. Studies should be encouraged of different SCA populations, including sub-Saharan Africa where the burden of SCA is highest. This article summarizes our current understanding of lymphocyte biology in SCA, and highlights areas that warrant future research. Am. J. Hematol. 91:938-946, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27237467

  5. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G W; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E; Barrett, David A; Davies, Martyn C; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-08-16

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture 'hits' that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment. PMID:27466628

  6. Drug exposure in a metastatic human lung adenocarcinoma cell line gives rise to cells with differing adhesion, proliferation, and gene expression: Implications for cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiling; He, Jianxing; Zhong, Nanshan; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The Am1010 cell line was previously established from a metastatic deposit in an arm muscle from a patient with lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone four cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin and taxol. Am1010 cells were labeled with red fluorescent protein or green fluorescent protein. A total of eight sublines were isolated following in vitro exposure to cisplatin or taxol. The sublines differed with regard to their adhesion and proliferation properties, with certain sublines exhibiting an increased proliferation rate and/or decreased surface adhesion. Gene expression assays demonstrated that tenascin C; cyclin D1; collagen, type 1, α2; integrin α1; related RAS viral (r‑ras) oncogene homolog 2; platelet‑derived growth factor C; and Src homolog 2 domain containing in the focal adhesion pathway, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, F11 receptor, claudin 7 and cadherin 1 in the cell adhesion pathway, varied in expression among the sublines. The results of the present study suggested that drug exposure may alter the aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancer cells, which has important implications for cancer chemotherapy.

  7. Post-thaw viability of cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) does not guarantee functional activity: important implications for quality assurance of stem cell transplant programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Daniel A; Ahsan, Gulrukh; Brocklesby, Margaret; Ings, Stuart; Balsa, Carmen; Veys, Paul; Brock, Penelope; Anderson, John; Amrolia, Persis; Goulden, Nicholas; Cale, Catherine M; Watts, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Standard quality assurance (QA) of cryopreserved peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) uses post-thaw viable CD34(+) cell counts. In 2013, concerns arose at Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) about 8 patients with delayed engraftment following myeloablative chemotherapy with cryopreserved cell rescue, despite adequate post-thaw viable cell counts in all cases. Root cause analysis was undertaken; investigations suggested the freeze process itself was a contributing factor to suboptimal engraftment. Experiments were undertaken in which a single PBSC product was divided into three and cryopreserved in parallel using a control-rate freezer (CRF) or passive freezing method (-80°C freezer) at GOSH, or the same passive freezing at another laboratory. Viable CD34(+) counts were equivalent and adequate in each. Granulocyte-monocyte colony-forming unit assays demonstrated colonies from the products cryopreserved using passive freezing (both laboratories), but no colonies from products cryopreserved using the CRF. The CRF was shown to be operating within manufacturer's specifications with freeze-profile within acceptable limits. This experience has important implications for quality assurance for all transplant programmes, particularly those using cryopreserved products. The failure of post-thaw viable CD34(+) counts, the most widely used routine QA test available, to ensure PBSC function is of great concern and should prompt reassessment of protocols and QA procedures. PMID:27291859

  8. Biosignatures of Kerala red rain cells: Implications in understanding their origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangappa, R.; Thomas, M.; Hogg, S.

    2013-09-01

    The red rain that fell over Kerala, southern India (2001-2012) was characterised by the red pigmented particles. Earlier proposal claiming that these are known algal bloom blown from trees (Sampath et al, 2001; DiGregorio, 2007) has been studied by us and disproved. Also, further investigation reporting their extraordinary properties including a suggestion that they lack DNA (Louis and Kumar 2003; 2006; 2008) has been invalidated (Gangappa and Hogg, 2013). However, their claim regarding the growth and replication of these cells at 300ºC needs more investigation if it is to gain acceptance. Current study provide evidences regarding the biological properties of Kerala red rain cells to gain insights into environmental conditions from which they may have originated. Combined with various research strategies and high resolution instruments, we have demonstrated the following interesting properties of Kerala red rain cells: (1) unusually thick external envelope enclosing the central core; (2)stability of red pigment at temperatures about 100ºC and pH variations; (3) absence of eukaryotic ultrastructures; (4) possible replication at 121ºC with nanostructures (possible daughter cells) having similar morphological features inside the large mother cells at such high temperature. They contain high percentage of carbon, iron, silicon and aluminum and often enclosed in a silicon rich biofilms. Further investigation shows that the positive detection of DNA in these cells was possible only after the complete removal of red pigment, thereby providing an explanation for the negative outcome of earlier studies in this regard. Moreover, evidences are shown to support that these cells contain high amounts of UV absorbing compounds, porphyrin complexes and possible scytonemin. Kerala red rain cells may prove to be polyextermophiles belonging to prokaryotes and may have possibly originated from the environment containing above mentioned chemical elements, high energy UV exposure and

  9. δ-Tocotrienol treatment is more effective against hypoxic tumor cells than normoxic cells: potential implications for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Akira; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2015-08-01

    Tocotrienols, unsaturated forms of vitamin E, inhibit the proliferation of a variety of cancer cells and suppress angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying those effects on cancer cell growth remain unclear especially under hypoxic conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that δ-tocotrienol (δ-T3) could be used as a novel anticancer agent against human colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. δ-T3 inhibited the growth of DLD-1 cells in a dose-dependent fashion by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This effect was more potent under hypoxic than normoxic conditions. The anticancer effect of δ-T3 was achieved by its up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27), the activation of caspases and the suppression of phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) at Thr(308) and Ser(473). In in vivo studies, oral administration of rice bran tocotrienol (RBT3, mainly γ-T3) (10 mg/mouse/day) significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. In tumor analyses, RBT3 activated p21, p27, caspase-3 and caspase-9 and decreased Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, immunostaining revealed that RBT3 decreased the number of cells positive for CD31/platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 in microvessels in the tumor. Taken together, these data suggest that tocotrienols are potent antitumor agents capable of inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Tocotrienols could have significant therapeutic potential in the clinical treatment of tumors. PMID:25979648

  10. Establishment and characterization of multicellular spheroids from a human glioma cell line; Implications for tumor therapy

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    Arya MB

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicellular spheroids, an appropriate in vitro system for simulating 3-D tumor micro-milieu can be used for evaluating and predicting tumor response to therapeutic agents including metabolic inhibitors. However, detailed understanding of the nature, distribution and sensitivity/responses of cellular sub-populations to potential therapeutic agents/strategies is required for using this unique model with optimal precision. Spheroid characteristics may also vary considerably with the origin and type of cell line used, and thorough characterization of viable and dissociated glioma cell spheroids is not yet completely known. In order to evaluate in vivo responses of gliomas to various therapeutic strategies, especially the metabolic inhibitors capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier, we have characterized continuously growing spheroids of a human glioma cell line (BMG-1 with respect to organization, growth, viability, cell survival, cell death, metabolic and mitochondrial status, oxidative stress and radiation response using microscopy, flow cytometry and enzymatic assays. Spheroids were fed daily with fresh medium in order to maintain nutrient supply to outer cellular layers while hypoxia/necrosis developed in the innermost cells of enlarging spheroids. Results Volume of spheroids, fed daily with fresh medium, increased exponentially during 7–28 days of growth through three population doublings. Proportion of G1-phase cells was higher (~60% than exponentially growing monolayer cells (~48%. A significant fraction of S-phase cells turned metabolically inactive (disengaged in DNA synthesis with increasing age of the spheroids, unlike in quiescent monolayer cultures, where the fraction of S-phase cells was less than 5%. With increasing spheroid size, increasing sub-populations of cells became non-viable and entered apoptosis or necrosis revealed by Annexin-V-FITC/PI staining. PI positive (necrotic cells were not confined to

  11. Morphine induces expression of platelet-derived growth factor in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: implication for vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiu Wen

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy, complications of HIV-1 infection with concurrent drug abuse are an emerging problem. Morphine, often abused by HIV-infected patients, is known to accelerate neuroinflammation associated with HIV-1 infection. Detailed molecular mechanisms of morphine action however, remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, primarily due to its potent mitogenic and permeability effects. Whether morphine exposure results in enhanced vascular permeability in brain endothelial cells, likely via induction of PDGF, remains to be established. In the present study, we demonstrated morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, an effect that was abrogated by the opioid receptor antagonist-naltrexone. Pharmacological blockade (cell signaling and loss-of-function (Egr-1 approaches demonstrated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, PI3K/Akt and the downstream transcription factor Egr-1 respectively, in morphine-mediated induction of PDGF-BB. Functional significance of increased PDGF-BB manifested as increased breach of the endothelial barrier as evidenced by decreased expression of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in an in vitro model system. Understanding the regulation of PDGF expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for intervention of morphine-mediated neuroinflammation.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of adult neural stem cells: implications for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P. Fitzsimons; E. van Bodegraven; M. Schouten; R. Lardenoije; K. Kompotis; G. Kenis; M. van den Hurk; M.P. Boks; C. Biojone; S. Joca; H.W. Steinbusch; K. Lunnon; D.F. Mastroeni; J. Mill; P.J. Lucassen; P.D. Coleman; D.L. Van den Hove; B.P.F. Rutten

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidence has demonstrated that several aspects of adult neural stem cells (NSCs), including their quiescence, proliferation, fate specification and differentiation, are regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. These control the expression of specific sets of genes, often including those enco

  13. Skeletal muscle satellite cells: mediators of muscle growth during development and implications for developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-11-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are the muscle stem cells responsible for longitudinal and cross-sectional postnatal growth and repair after injury and which provide new myonuclei when needed. We review their morphology and contribution to development and their role in sarcomere and myonuclear addition. SCs, similar to other tissue stem cells, cycle through different states, such as quiescence, activation, and self-renewal, and thus we consider the signaling mechanisms involved in maintenance of these states. The role of the SC niche and their interactions with other cells, such as fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, are all emerging as major factors that affect aging and disease. Interestingly, children with cerebral palsy appear to have a reduced SC number, which could play a role in their reduced muscular development and even in muscular contracture formation. Finally, we review the current information on SC dysfunction in children with muscular dystrophy and emerging therapies that target promotion of myogenesis and reduction of fibrosis.

  14. Hepatic Leukemia Factor Promotes Resistance To Cell Death: Implications For Therapeutics and Chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation.

  15. Modelling chemical composition in electric systems ? implications to the dynamics of dye-sensitised solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kovanen, T.; Tarhasaari, T.; Kettunen, L.; Korppi-Tommola, J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Classical electromagnetism provides limited means to model electric generators. To extend the classical theory in this respect, additional information on microscopic processes is required. In semiconductor devices and electrochemical generators such information may be obtained by modelling chemical composition. Here we use this approach for the modelling of dye-sensitised solar cells. We simulate the steady-state current-voltage characteristics of such a cell, as well as i...

  16. Role of Epigenetics in Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation: Implications for Treating Neurodegenerative Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bhairavi Srinageshwar; Panchanan Maiti; Gary L. Dunbar; Julien Rossignol

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of this review are to survey the current literature on the role of epigenetics in determining the fate of stem cells and to assess how this information can be used to enhance the treatment strategies for some neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Some of these epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation and histone modifications, which have a direct impact on the way that genes are expressed in stem cells and...

  17. Ionizing Particle Radiation as a Modulator of Endogenous Bone Marrow Cell Reprogramming: Implications for Hematological Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Sharath P. Sasi; Zuriaga, Maria A.; Hirschi, Karen K.; Porada, Christopher D.; Matthew A. Coleman; Kenneth X Walsh; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of individuals to ionizing radiation (IR), as in the case of astronauts exploring space or radiotherapy cancer patients, increases their risk of developing secondary cancers and other health-related problems. Bone marrow (BM), the site in the body where hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation to mature blood cells occurs, is extremely sensitive to low-dose IR, including irradiation by high-charge and high-energy particles. Low-dose IR induces DNA damage and per...

  18. Ionizing Particle Radiation as a Modulator of Endogenous Bone Marrow Cell Reprogramming: Implications for Hematological Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha eMuralidharan; Sharath ePankajavihar Sasi; Zuriaga, Maria A.; Hirschi, Karen K.; Porada, Christopher D.; Matthew A. Coleman; Kenneth X Walsh; Xinhua eYan; Goukassian, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of individuals to ionizing radiation (IR), as in the case of astronauts exploring space or radiotherapy cancer patients, increases their risk of developing secondary cancers and other health-related problems. Bone marrow (BM), the site in the body where hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation to mature blood cells occurs, is extremely sensitive to low dose IR, including irradiation by high-charge and high-energy particles (HZE). Low dose IR induces DNA damage a...

  19. Osteoarticular cells tolerate short-term exposure to nitisinone-implications in alkaptonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Mistry, J. B.; Jackson, D. J.; Bukhari, Marwan; Taylor, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease resulting in severe, rapidly progressing, early onset multi-joint osteoarthropathy. A potential therapy, nitisinone, is being trialled that reduces the causative agent; homogentisic acid (HGA) and in a murine model has shown to prevent ochronosis. Little is currently known about the effect nitisinone has on osteoarticular cells; these cells suffer most from the presence of HGA and its polymeric derivatives. This led us to investigate nitisinone’s e...

  20. Evidence implicating the Ras pathway in multiple CD28 costimulatory functions in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit V Janardhan

    Full Text Available CD28 costimulation is a critical event in the full activation of CD4(+ T cells that augments cytokine gene transcription, promotes cytokine mRNA stability, prevents induction of anergy, increases cellular metabolism, and increases cell survival. However, despite extensive biochemical analysis of the signaling events downstream of CD28, molecular pathways sufficient to functionally replace the diverse aspects of CD28-mediated costimulation in normal T cells have not been identified. Ras/MAPK signaling is a critical pathway downstream of T cell receptor stimulation, but its role in CD28-mediated costimulation has been controversial. We observed that physiologic CD28 costimulation caused a relocalization of the RasGEF RasGRP to the T cell-APC interface by confocal microscopy. In whole cell biochemical analysis, CD28 cross-linking with either anti-CD28 antibody or B7.1-Ig augmented TCR-induced Ras activation. To determine whether Ras signaling was sufficient to functionally mimic CD28 costimulation, we utilized an adenoviral vector encoding constitutively active H-Ras (61L to transduce normal, Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR transgenic CD4(+ T cells. Like costimulation via CD28, active Ras induced AKT, JNK and ERK phosphorylation. In addition, constitutive Ras signaling mimicked the ability of CD28 to costimulate IL-2 protein secretion, prevent anergy induction, increase glucose uptake, and promote cell survival. Importantly, we also found that active Ras mimicked the mechanism by which CD28 costimulates IL-2 production: by increasing IL-2 gene transcription, and promoting IL-2 mRNA stability. Finally, active Ras was able to induce IL-2 production when combined with ionomycin stimulation in a MEK-1-dependent fashion. Our results are consistent with a central role for Ras signaling in CD28-mediated costimulation.

  1. Metabolic Control of Dendritic Cell Activation and Function: Recent Advances and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart eEverts

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are key regulators of both immunity and tolerance by controlling activation and polarization of effector T helper cell and regulatory T cell responses. Therefore, there is a major focus on developing approaches to manipulate DC function for immunotherapy. It is well known that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. Over the past decade there is a growing appreciation that these metabolic changes also underlie the capacity of immune cells to perform particular functions. This has led to the concept that the manipulation of cellular metabolism can be used to shape innate and adaptive immune responses. While most of our understanding in this area has been gained from studies with T cells and macrophages, evidence is emerging that the activation and function of DCs are also dictated by the type of metabolism these cells commit to. We here discuss these new insights and explore whether targeting of metabolic pathways in DCs could hold promise as a novel approach to manipulate the functional properties of DCs for clinical purposes.

  2. The dendritic cell response to classic, emerging, and homeostatic danger signals. Implications for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Paul M; Gallucci, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) initiate and control immune responses, participate in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and are pivotal players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In patients with autoimmune disease and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, DCs show abnormalities in both numbers and activation state, expressing immunogenic levels of costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Exogenous and endogenous danger signals activate DCs to stimulate the immune response. Classic endogenous danger signals are released, activated, or secreted by host cells and tissues experiencing stress, damage, and non-physiologic cell death; and are therefore referred to as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Some DAMPs are released from cells, where they are normally sequestered, during necrosis (e.g., heat shock proteins, uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, mitochondria-derived molecules). Others are actively secreted, like Type I Interferons. Here we discuss important DAMPs in the context of autoimmunity. For some, there is a clear pathogenic link (e.g., nucleic acids and lupus). For others, there is less evidence. Additionally, we explore emerging danger signals. These include inorganic materials and man-made technologies (e.g., nanomaterials) developed as novel therapeutic approaches. Some nanomaterials can activate DCs and may trigger unintended inflammatory responses. Finally, we will review "homeostatic danger signals," danger signals that do not derive directly from pathogens or dying cells but are associated with perturbations of tissue/cell homeostasis and may signal pathological stress. These signals, like acidosis, hypoxia, and changes in osmolarity, also play a role in inflammation and autoimmunity.

  3. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  4. Concise Review: Stem Cells and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Cancer: Biological Implications and Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ryo; Semba, Takashi; Saya, Hideyuki; Arima, Yoshimi

    2016-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) constitute a small subpopulation of cancer cells with stem-like properties that are able to self-renew, generate differentiated daughter cells, and give rise to heterogeneous tumor tissue. Tumor heterogeneity is a hallmark of cancer and underlies resistance to anticancer therapies and disease progression. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a reversible phenomenon that is mediated by EMT-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs) and plays an important role in normal organ development, wound healing, and the invasiveness of cancer cells. Recent evidence showing that overexpression of several EMT-TFs is associated with stemness in cancer cells has suggested the existence of a link between EMT and CSCs. In this review, we focus on the roles of CSCs and EMT signaling in driving tumor heterogeneity. A better understanding of the dynamics of both CSCs and EMT-TFs in the generation of tumor heterogeneity may provide a basis for the development of new treatment options for cancer patients. Stem Cells 2016;34:1997-2007. PMID:27251010

  5. Hemolytic potential of miltefosine is dependent on cell concentration: Implications for in vitro cell cytotoxicity assays and pharmacokinetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Lais; Alonso, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Miltefosine possesses antiparasitic, antibacterial, antifungal and antitumor activities; however, its mechanism of action is not well established. In the current work, the miltefosine concentrations required to achieve 50% hemolysis in PBS were shown to vary from 600 μM using 5×10(9) cells/mL to ~2.9 μM for ~5×10(6) cells/mL. This cell concentration-dependent hemolytic potential was described using an equation that included the membrane-water partition coefficient (K) and miltefosine concentrations in the cell membrane (cm) and aqueous medium (cw) as variables. The best-fit values for the 50% hemolysis data were log K=4.68, cm=110.8 mM, and cw=2.3 μM. Hemolysis measurements in whole blood were used to determine the erythrocyte membrane-plasma partition coefficient of miltefosine (Log KM/P=1.77). Additionally, miltefosine concentration in whole blood was found to be ~86% of that in plasma. Previously reported clinical pharmacokinetics data indicate that the plasma concentration of miltefosine peaks at ~90 μg/mL when treating visceral leishmaniasis. Using this concentration, which corresponds to ~77 μg/mL miltefosine in whole blood, we found only 2.8% hemolysis. Significant hemolysis (5.4%) was observed only after doubling the concentration to 180 μg/mL. Recently reported data indicate that miltefosine inhibitory concentrations in Leishmania are also dependent on cell concentration. The biophysical parameters assessed in the current study indicated that this type of response is associated with the accumulation of the drug in the cell membrane, which becomes damaged when critical drug concentrations are reached. PMID:26947181

  6. Deletion of genes implicated in protecting the integrity of male germ cells has differential effects on the incidence of DNA breaks and germ cell loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catriona Paul

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infertility affects approximately 20% of couples in Europe and in 50% of cases the problem lies with the male partner. The impact of damaged DNA originating in the male germ line on infertility is poorly understood but may increase miscarriage. Mouse models allow us to investigate how deficiencies in DNA repair/damage response pathways impact on formation and function of male germ cells. We have investigated mice with deletions of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementing gene 1, MSH2 (MutS homolog 2, involved in mismatch repair pathway, and p53 (tumour suppressor gene implicated in elimination of germ cells with DNA damage. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate for the first time that depletion of ERCC1 or p53 from germ cells results in an increased incidence of unrepaired DNA breaks in pachytene spermatocytes and increased numbers of caspase-3 positive (apoptotic germ cells. Sertoli cell-only tubules were detected in testes from mice lacking expression of ERCC1 or MSH2 but not p53. The number of sperm recovered from epididymes was significantly reduced in mice lacking testicular ERCC1 and 40% of sperm contained DNA breaks whereas the numbers of sperm were not different to controls in adult Msh2 -/- or p53 -/- mice nor did they have significantly compromised DNA. CONCLUSIONS: These data have demonstrated that deletion of Ercc1, Msh2 and p53 can have differential but overlapping affects on germ cell function and sperm production. These findings increase our understanding of the ways in which gene mutations can have an impact on male fertility.

  7. Selective functionalization of nanofiber scaffolds to regulate salivary gland epithelial cell proliferation and polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantara, Shraddha I; Soscia, David A; Sequeira, Sharon J; Jean-Gilles, Riffard P; Castracane, James; Larsen, Melinda

    2012-11-01

    Epithelial cell types typically lose apicobasal polarity when cultured on 2D substrates, but apicobasal polarity is required for directional secretion by secretory cells, such as salivary gland acinar cells. We cultured salivary gland epithelial cells on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofiber scaffolds that mimic the basement membrane, a specialized extracellular matrix, and examined cell proliferation and apicobasal polarization. Although cells proliferated on nanofibers, chitosan-coated nanofiber scaffolds stimulated proliferation of salivary gland epithelial cells. Although apicobasal cell polarity was promoted by the nanofiber scaffolds relative to flat surfaces, as determined by the apical localization of ZO-1, it was antagonized by the presence of chitosan. Neither salivary gland acinar nor ductal cells fully polarized on the nanofiber scaffolds, as determined by the homogenous membrane distribution of the mature tight junction marker, occludin. However, nanofiber scaffolds chemically functionalized with the basement membrane protein, laminin-111, promoted more mature tight junctions, as determined by apical localization of occludin, but did not affect cell proliferation. To emulate the multifunctional capabilities of the basement membrane, bifunctional PLGA nanofibers were generated. Both acinar and ductal cell lines responded to signals provided by bifunctional scaffolds coupled to chitosan and laminin-111, demonstrating the applicability of such scaffolds for epithelial cell types.

  8. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Perazzoli

    Full Text Available The use of temozolomide (TMZ has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR complex, P-glycoprotein, and/or the presence of cancer stem cells may also be implicated.Four nervous system tumor cell lines were used to analyze the modulation of MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation by TMZ treatment. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine was used to demethylate the MGMT promoter and O(6-benzylguanine to block GMT activity. In addition, MMR complex and P-glycoprotein expression were studied before and after TMZ exposure and correlated with MGMT expression. Finally, the effect of TMZ exposure on CD133 expression was analyzed.Our results showed two clearly differentiated groups of tumor cells characterized by low (A172 and LN229 and high (SF268 and SK-N-SH basal MGMT expression. Interestingly, cell lines with no MGMT expression and low TMZ IC50 showed a high MMR complex expression, whereas cell lines with high MGMT expression and high TMZ IC50 did not express the MMR complex. In addition, modulation of MGMT expression in A172 and LN229 cell lines was accompanied by a significant increase in the TMZ IC50, whereas no differences were observed in SF268 and SK-N-SH cell lines. In contrast, P-glycoprotein and CD133 was found to be unrelated to TMZ resistance in these cell lines.These results may be relevant in understanding the phenomenon of TMZ resistance, especially in glioblastoma multiforme patients laking MGMT expression, and may also aid in the design of new therapeutic strategies to improve the efficacy of TMZ in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

  9. Cancer stem cells in Helicobacter pylori infection and aging: Implications for gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edi; Levi; Paula; Sochacki; Nabiha; Khoury; Bhaumik; B; Patel; Adhip; PN; Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrated the combined effects of aging and carcinogen treatment on cancer stem/stem-like cells(CSCs) of gastric mucosa in an animal model. METHODS: In this study we investigated the effects of aging and Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) inflammation as a model for inflammation induced carcinogenesis in human and rat gastric mucosa samples. In aging studies, we compared 4-mo old(young) with 22 mo(aged) old Fischer-344 rats. For human studies, gastric biop-sies and resection specimens representing normal mucosa or different stages of H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas were used for determining the expression of stem cell markers CD166, ALDH1 and LGR5. In addition we performed immunofluorescent double labeling for B-catenin and Lgr5 in both rat and human gastric tissues to examine the status of Wnt signaling in these cells. RESULTS: CSC markers ALDH1, LGR5, and CD166 were expressed in very low levels in normal human gastric mucosa or young rat gastric mucosa. In contrast, level of expression for all three markers significantly increased in H. pylori gastritis and gastric adenocarcinomas as well as in normal gastric mucosa in aged rats. We also observed cytoplasmic B-catenin staining in both aged rat and human H. pylori inflamed gastric mucosa, which were found to be colocalized with Lgr5 immunoreactive cells. The increased number of ALDH1, CD166 and LGR5 positive cells in H. pylori gastritis indicates that increased number of stem-like cells in gastric mucosa is an early event, and may constitute an important step in the progression to neoplasia. CONCLUSION: Our observation of the age-related increase in cancer stem/stem-like cells in the gastric mucosa may explain the increased incidence of gastric cancer during aging. Combination of aging and H. pylori infection may have additive effects in progression to neoplasia.

  10. Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Ewing Sarcoma Patients. Pathogenetic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Ana Teresa; Manara, Maria Cristina; Berghuis, Dagmar; Ordóñez, José Luis; Biscuola, Michele; Lopez-García, Maria Angeles; Osuna, Daniel; Lucarelli, Enrico; Alviano, Francesco; Lankester, Arjan; Scotlandi, Katia; de Álava, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Background Ewing Sarcoma (EWS) is a mesenchymal-derived tumor that generally arises in bone and soft tissue. Intensive research regarding the pathogenesis of EWS has been insufficient to pinpoint the early events of Ewing sarcomagenesis. However, the Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) is currently accepted as the most probable cell of origin. Materials and Methods In an initial study regarding a deep characterization of MSC obtained specifically from EWS patients (MSC-P), we compared them with MSC derived from healthy donors (MSC-HD) and EWS cell lines. We evaluated the presence of the EWS-FLI1 gene fusion and EWSR1 gene rearrangements in MSC-P. The presence of the EWS transcript was confirmed by q-RT-PCR. In order to determine early events possibly involved in malignant transformation, we used a multiparameter quantitative strategy that included both MSC immunophenotypic negative/positive markers, and EWS intrinsic phenotypical features. Markers CD105, CD90, CD34 and CD45 were confirmed in EWS samples. Results We determined that MSC-P lack the most prevalent gene fusion, EWSR1-FLI1 as well as EWSR1 gene rearrangements. Our study also revealed that MSC-P are more alike to MSC-HD than to EWS cells. Nonetheless, we also observed that EWS cells had a few overlapping features with MSC. As a relevant example, also MSC showed CD99 expression, hallmark of EWS diagnosis. However, we observed that, in contrast to EWS cells, MSC were not sensitive to the inhibition of CD99. Conclusions In conclusion, our results suggest that MSC from EWS patients behave like MSC-HD and are phenotypically different from EWS cells, thus raising important questions regarding MSC role in sarcomagenesis. PMID:24498265

  11. The Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 in stress-induced signal transduction: implications for cell proliferation and cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Falsig

    2006-01-01

    The ubiquitous plasma membrane Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is highly conserved across vertebrate species and is extensively characterized as a major membrane transport mechanism in the regulation of cellular pH and volume. In recent years, the understanding of the role of NHE1 in regulating cell functi...

  12. Embryonic origins of hull cells in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano through cell lineage analysis : developmental and phylogenetic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Maxime; Egger, Bernhard; Wolff, Carsten; Mouton, Stijn; Houthoofd, Wouter; Fonderie, Pamela; Couvreur, Marjolein; Artois, Tom; Borgonie, Gaetan

    2009-01-01

    The development of macrostomid flatworms is of interest for evolutionary developmental biology research because these taxa combine characteristics of the canonical spiral cleavage pattern with significant deviations from this pattern. One such deviation is the formation of hull cells, which surround

  13. [Implication of integrin alpha5beta1 signal pathways in proliferation and apoptosis of MCF-7/Dox human breast carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, N I; Morozevich, G E; Ushakova, N A; Gevorkian, N M; Berman, A E

    2016-03-01

    In MCF-7/Dox human breast carcinoma cells, down-regulation of integrin alpha5beta1 and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) markedly reduced rates of cell proliferation. Mitotic cycle analysis showed that alpha5beta1 down-regulation resulted in cell cycle arrest at the S phase, followed by a significant increase in the population of apoptotic cells (subG1 population). Inhibition of EGFR activity also caused cell cycle arrest at the S-phase but without any increase in the subG1 population. Down-regulation of alpha5beta1 and EGFR inhibition resulted in a significant decrease of cell content of the active (phosphorylated) forms of FAK and Erk protein kinases. The data obtained suggest that alpha5beta1 integrin is implicated in cell growth control via inhibition of apoptotic cell death and through EGFR activation. PMID:27420618

  14. Molecular and Cellular Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Human Lung Cancer Cells: Potential Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has a very high mortality-to-incidence ratio, representing one of the main causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Therefore, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Several diseases including lung cancer have been associated with the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most studied. Despite the fact that H2O2 may have opposite effects on cell proliferation depending on the concentration and cell type, it triggers several antiproliferative responses. H2O2 produces both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions, increases the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and increases p53 activity and other transcription factors orchestrating cancer cell death. In addition, H2O2 facilitates the endocytosis of oligonucleotides, affects membrane proteins, induces calcium release, and decreases cancer cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the MAPK pathway and the expression of genes related to inflammation including interleukins, TNF-α, and NF-κB are also affected by H2O2. Herein, we will summarize the main effects of hydrogen peroxide on human lung cancer leading to suggesting it as a potential therapeutic tool to fight this disease. Because of the multimechanistic nature of this molecule, novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer based on the use of H2O2 may help to decrease the mortality from this malignancy. PMID:27375834

  15. Understanding and targeting cancer stem cells:therapeutic implications and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke CHEN; Ying-hui HUANG; Ji-long CHEN

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified as rare cell populations in many cancers,including leukemia and solid tumors.Accumulating evidence has suggested that CSCs are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into various types of cancer cells.Aberrant regulation of gene expression and some signaling pathways has been observed in CSCs compared to other tumor cells.CSCs are thought to be responsible for cancer initiation,progression,metastasis,recurrence and drug resistance.The CSC hypothesis has recently attracted much attention due to the potential for discovery and development of CSC-related therapies and the identification of key molecules involved in controlling the unique properties of CSC populations.Over the past several years,a tremendous amount of effort has been invested in the development of new drugs,such as nanomedicines,that can take advantage of the "Achilles'heel" of CSCs by targeting cell-surface molecular markers or various signaling pathways.Novel compounds and therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs have been identified,some of which have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies.In this article,we review new findings related to the investigation of the CSC hypothesis,and discuss the crucial pathways involved in regulating the development of CSC populations and the advances in studies of drug resistance.In addition,we review new CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aiming to eradicate malignancies.

  16. Comprehensive Review of Adipose Stem Cells and Their Implication in Distraction Osteogenesis and Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina W. Morcos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone is one of the most dynamic tissues in the human body that can heal following injury without leaving a scar. However, in instances of extensive bone loss, this intrinsic capacity of bone to heal may not be sufficient and external intervention becomes necessary. Several techniques are available to address this problem, including autogenous bone grafts and allografts. However, all these techniques have their own limitations. An alternative method is the technique of distraction osteogenesis, where gradual and controlled distraction of two bony segments after osteotomy leads to induction of new bone formation. Although distraction osteogenesis usually gives satisfactory results, its major limitation is the prolonged duration of time required before the external fixator is removed, which may lead to numerous complications. Numerous methods to accelerate bone formation in the context of distraction osteogenesis have been reported. A viable alternative to autogenous bone grafts for a source of osteogenic cells is mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow. However, there are certain problems with bone marrow aspirate. Hence, scientists have investigated other sources for mesenchymal stem cells, specifically adipose tissue, which has been shown to be an excellent source of mesenchymal stem cells. In this paper, the potential use of adipose stem cells to stimulate bone formation is discussed.

  17. HIF-mediated innate immune responses: cell signaling and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris AJ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alison J Harris, AA Roger Thompson, Moira KB Whyte, Sarah R Walmsley Academic Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Leukocytes recruited to infected, damaged, or inflamed tissues during an immune response must adapt to oxygen levels much lower than those in the circulation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs are key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia and, as in other cell types, HIFs are critical for the upregulation of glycolysis, which enables innate immune cells to produce adenosine triphosphate anaerobically. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that hypoxia also regulates many other innate immunological functions, including cell migration, apoptosis, phagocytosis of pathogens, antigen presentation and production of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic and antimicrobial factors. Many of these functions are mediated by HIFs, which are not only stabilized posttranslationally by hypoxia, but also transcriptionally upregulated by inflammatory signals. Here, we review the role of HIFs in the responses of innate immune cells to hypoxia, both in vitro and in vivo, with a particular focus on myeloid cells, on which the majority of studies have so far been carried out. Keywords: hypoxia, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages

  18. Cell membrane integrity in myotonic dystrophy type 1: implications for therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchel González-Barriga

    Full Text Available Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is a multisystemic disease caused by toxic RNA from a DMPK gene carrying an expanded (CTG•CAGn repeat. Promising strategies for treatment of DM1 patients are currently being tested. These include antisense oligonucleotides and drugs for elimination of expanded RNA or prevention of aberrant binding to RNP proteins. A significant hurdle for preclinical development along these lines is efficient systemic delivery of compounds across endothelial and target cell membranes. It has been reported that DM1 patients show elevated levels of markers of muscle damage or loss of sarcolemmal integrity in their serum and that splicing of dystrophin, an essential protein for muscle membrane structure, is abnormal. Therefore, we studied cell membrane integrity in DM1 mouse models commonly used for preclinical testing. We found that membranes in skeletal muscle, heart and brain were impermeable to Evans Blue Dye. Creatine kinase levels in serum were similar to those in wild type mice and expression of dystrophin protein was unaffected. Also in patient muscle biopsies cell surface expression of dystrophin was normal and calcium-positive fibers, indicating elevated intracellular calcium levels, were only rarely seen. Combined, our findings indicate that cells in DM1 tissues do not display compromised membrane integrity. Hence, the cell membrane is a barrier that must be overcome in future work towards effective drug delivery in DM1 therapy.

  19. DNA damage responses in cancer stem cells: Implications for cancer therapeutic strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-En; Wang

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cancer stem cells(CSCs) that are responsible for tumor initiation, growth, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance might lead to a new thinking on cancer treatments. Similar to stem cells,CSCs also display high resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy with genotoxic agents. Thus, conventional therapy may shrink the tumor volume but cannot eliminate cancer. Eradiation of CSCs represents a novel therapeutic strategy. CSCs possess a highly efficient DNA damage response(DDR) system, which is considered as a contributor to the resistance of these cells from exposures to DNA damaging agents. Targeting of enhanced DDR in CSCs is thus proposed to facilitate the eradication of CSCs by conventional therapeutics. To achieve this aim, a better understanding of the cellular responses to DNA damage in CSCs is needed. In addition to the protein kinases and enzymes that are involved in DDR, other processes that affect the DDR including chromatin remodeling should also be explored.

  20. Pro-apoptotic NOXA is implicated in atmospheric-pressure plasma-induced melanoma cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) has been successfully used to treat several types of cancers in vivo and in vitro, with the effect being primarily attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanisms by which APP induces apoptosis in cancer cells require further elucidation. In this study, the effects of APP on the expression of 500 genes in melanoma Mel007 cancer cells were examined. Pro-apoptotic phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein (PMAIP1), also known as NOXA, was highly expressed as a result of APP treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking of ROS using scavenger NAC or silencing of NOXA gene by RNA interference inhibited the APP-induced NOXA genes upregulation and impaired caspases 3/7 mediated apoptosis, confirming the important role plasma-generated ROS species and pro-apoptotic NOXA play in APP-induced cancer cell death.

  1. DNA damage and repair in relation to mammalian cell survival implications for microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number and dose dependence of DSBs, measured with greatly improved precision in mammalian cells, are in accord with the Chadwick-Leenhouts model and suggest that approximately one DSB per cell causes reproductive death. The rate and activation energy for SSB repair agree with those measured for the critical sublesion by studies of survival at low dose rate. The data indicate that SSBs may interact in the cell to yield a DSB at up to approximately 250 base pairs separation. These findings may provide a basis for bringing the theory of dual radiation action, the Chadwick-Leenhouts molecular model, and survival and stand break measurements into mutual agreement, a development which may greatly benefit the study of radiobiology, and particularly of microdosimetry

  2. Homogentisate 1,2 Dioxygenase is Expressed in Human Osteoarticular Cells: Implications in Alkaptonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschi, Marcella; Tinti, Laura; Braconi, Daniela; Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Amato, Loredana; Selvi, Enrico; Spreafico, Adriano; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) results from defective homogentisate1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), causing degenerative arthropathy. The deposition of ochronotic pigment in joints is so far attributed to homogentisic acid produced by the liver, circulating in the blood and accumulating locally. Human normal and AKU osteoarticular cells were tested for HGD gene expression by RT-PCR, mono- and 2D-Western blotting. HGD gene expression was revealed in chondrocytes, synoviocytes, osteoblasts. Furthermore, HGD expression was confirmed by Western blotting, that also revealed the presence of five enzymatic molecular species. Our findings indicate that AKU osteoarticular cells produce the ochronotic pigment in loco and this may strongly contribute to induction of ochronotic arthropathy. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3254–3257, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22105303

  3. Onconase responsive genes in human mesothelioma cells: implications for an RNA damaging therapeutic agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maizel Jacob V

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Onconase represents a new class of RNA-damaging drugs. Mechanistically, Onconase is thought to internalize, where it degrades intracellular RNAs such as tRNA and double-stranded RNA, and thereby suppresses protein synthesis. However, there may be additional or alternative mechanism(s of action. Methods In this study, microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression profiles in untreated human malignant mesothelioma (MM cell lines and cells exposed to 5 μg/ml Onconase for 24 h. A total of 155 genes were found to be regulated by Onconase that were common to both epithelial and biphasic MM cell lines. Some of these genes are known to significantly affect apoptosis (IL-24, TNFAIP3, transcription (ATF3, DDIT3, MAFF, HDAC9, SNAPC1 or inflammation and the immune response (IL-6, COX-2. RT-PCR analysis of selected up- or down-regulated genes treated with varying doses and times of Onconase generally confirmed the expression array findings in four MM cell lines. Results Onconase treatment consistently resulted in up-regulation of IL-24, previously shown to have tumor suppressive activity, as well as ATF3 and IL-6. Induction of ATF3 and the pro-apoptotic factor IL-24 by Onconase was highest in the two most responsive MM cell lines, as defined by DNA fragmentation analysis. In addition to apoptosis, gene ontology analysis indicated that pathways impacted by Onconase include MAPK signaling, cytokine-cytokine-receptor interactions, and Jak-STAT signaling. Conclusions These results provide a broad picture of gene activity after treatment with a drug that targets small non-coding RNAs and contribute to our overall understanding of MM cell response to Onconase as a therapeutic strategy. The findings provide insights regarding mechanisms that may contribute to the efficacy of this novel drug in clinical trials of MM patients who have failed first line chemotherapy or radiation treatment.

  4. The Dendritic Cell Response to Classic, Emerging, and Homeostatic Danger Signals. Implications for Autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Matthew Gallo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs initiate and control immune responses, participate in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and are pivotal players in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. In patients with autoimmune disease and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, DCs show abnormalities in both numbers and activation state, expressing immunogenic levels of costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Exogenous and endogenous danger signals activate DCs to stimulate the immune response. Classic endogenous danger signals are released, activated, or secreted by host cells and tissues experiencing stress, damage, and non-physiologic cell death; and are therefore referred to as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Some DAMPs are released from cells, where they are normally sequestered, during necrosis (e.g. heat shock proteins, uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, mitochondria-derived molecules. Others are actively secreted, like Type I Interferons. Here we discuss important DAMPs in the context of autoimmunity. For some, there is a clear pathogenic link (e.g. nucleic acids and lupus. For others, there is less evidence. Additionally, we explore emerging danger signals. These include inorganic materials and man-made technologies (e.g. nanomaterials developed as novel therapeutic approaches. Some nanomaterials can activate DCs and may trigger unintended inflammatory responses. Finally, we will review homeostatic danger signals, danger signals that do not derive directly from pathogens or dying cells but are associated with perturbations of tissue/cell homeostasis and may signal pathological stress. These signals, like acidosis, hypoxia and changes in osmolarity, also play a role in inflammation and autoimmunity.

  5. Molecular characteristics of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors and comparison with testicular counterparts: implications for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraggerud, Sigrid Marie; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Skotheim, Rolf I; Abeler, Vera M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Lothe, Ragnhild A

    2013-06-01

    This review focuses on the molecular characteristics and development of rare malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (mOGCTs). We provide an overview of the genomic aberrations assessed by ploidy, cytogenetic banding, and comparative genomic hybridization. We summarize and discuss the transcriptome profiles of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), and biomarkers (DNA methylation, gene mutation, individual protein expression) for each mOGCT histological subtype. Parallels between the origin of mOGCT and their male counterpart testicular GCT (TGCT) are discussed from the perspective of germ cell development, endocrinological influences, and pathogenesis, as is the GCT origin in patients with disorders of sex development. Integrated molecular profiles of the 3 main histological subtypes, dysgerminoma (DG), yolk sac tumor (YST), and immature teratoma (IT), are presented. DGs show genomic aberrations comparable to TGCT. In contrast, the genome profiles of YST and IT are different both from each other and from DG/TGCT. Differences between DG and YST are underlined by their miRNA/mRNA expression patterns, suggesting preferential involvement of the WNT/β-catenin and TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathways among YSTs. Characteristic protein expression patterns are observed in DG, YST and IT. We propose that mOGCT develop through different developmental pathways, including one that is likely shared with TGCT and involves insufficient sexual differentiation of the germ cell niche. The molecular features of the mOGCTs underline their similarity to pluripotent precursor cells (primordial germ cells, PGCs) and other stem cells. This similarity combined with the process of ovary development, explain why mOGCTs present so early in life, and with greater histological complexity, than most somatic solid tumors. PMID:23575763

  6. Onconase responsive genes in human mesothelioma cells: implications for an RNA damaging therapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onconase represents a new class of RNA-damaging drugs. Mechanistically, Onconase is thought to internalize, where it degrades intracellular RNAs such as tRNA and double-stranded RNA, and thereby suppresses protein synthesis. However, there may be additional or alternative mechanism(s) of action. In this study, microarray analysis was used to compare gene expression profiles in untreated human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cell lines and cells exposed to 5 μg/ml Onconase for 24 h. A total of 155 genes were found to be regulated by Onconase that were common to both epithelial and biphasic MM cell lines. Some of these genes are known to significantly affect apoptosis (IL-24, TNFAIP3), transcription (ATF3, DDIT3, MAFF, HDAC9, SNAPC1) or inflammation and the immune response (IL-6, COX-2). RT-PCR analysis of selected up- or down-regulated genes treated with varying doses and times of Onconase generally confirmed the expression array findings in four MM cell lines. Onconase treatment consistently resulted in up-regulation of IL-24, previously shown to have tumor suppressive activity, as well as ATF3 and IL-6. Induction of ATF3 and the pro-apoptotic factor IL-24 by Onconase was highest in the two most responsive MM cell lines, as defined by DNA fragmentation analysis. In addition to apoptosis, gene ontology analysis indicated that pathways impacted by Onconase include MAPK signaling, cytokine-cytokine-receptor interactions, and Jak-STAT signaling. These results provide a broad picture of gene activity after treatment with a drug that targets small non-coding RNAs and contribute to our overall understanding of MM cell response to Onconase as a therapeutic strategy. The findings provide insights regarding mechanisms that may contribute to the efficacy of this novel drug in clinical trials of MM patients who have failed first line chemotherapy or radiation treatment

  7. Whole genome amplification from a single cell: implications for genetic analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, L; Cui, X.; Schmitt, K.; R.; Hubert; Navidi, W.; Arnheim, N

    1992-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro method for amplifying a large fraction of the DNA sequences present in a single haploid cell by repeated primer extensions using a mixture of 15-base random oligonucleotides. We studied 12 genetic loci and estimate that the probability of amplifying any sequence in the genome to a minimum of 30 copies is not less than 0.78 (95% confidence). Whole genome amplification beginning with a single cell, or other samples with very small amounts of DNA, has significant im...

  8. Homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase is expressed in human osteoarticular cells: implications in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschi, Marcella; Tinti, Laura; Braconi, Daniela; Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Amato, Loredana; Selvi, Enrico; Spreafico, Adriano; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) results from defective homogentisate1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), causing degenerative arthropathy. The deposition of ochronotic pigment in joints is so far attributed to homogentisic acid produced by the liver, circulating in the blood and accumulating locally. Human normal and AKU osteoarticular cells were tested for HGD gene expression by RT-PCR, mono- and 2D-Western blotting. HGD gene expression was revealed in chondrocytes, synoviocytes, osteoblasts. Furthermore, HGD expression was confirmed by Western blotting, that also revealed the presence of five enzymatic molecular species. Our findings indicate that AKU osteoarticular cells produce the ochronotic pigment in loco and this may strongly contribute to induction of ochronotic arthropathy.

  9. Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Binds to Phosphatidylserine Exposing Cells with Implications in the Phagocytosis of Apoptotic Cells and Activated Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Rieger; Alice Assinger; Katrin Einfinger; Barbora Sokolikova; Margarethe Geiger

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marke...

  10. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Bautista-Ortín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution.

  11. Osmotic cell shrinkage activates ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins : activation mechanisms and physiological implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, M.; Alexander, R.T.; Darborg, B.V.; Mobjerg, N.; Hoffmann, E.K.; Kapus, A.; Pedersen, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperosmotic shrinkage induces multiple cellular responses, including activation of volume-regulatory ion transport, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell death. Here we investigated the possible roles of ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins in these events. Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich Lettre ascite

  12. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Ben Abdallah, Rim; Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Jiménez-Martínez, María Dolores; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-01-01

    The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose) and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution. PMID:26797601

  13. Cycloastragenol Is a Potent Telomerase Activator in Neuronal Cells: Implications for Depression Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny C.F. Ip

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cycloastragenol (CAG is an aglycone of astragaloside IV. It was first identified when screening Astragalus membranaceus extracts for active ingredients with antiaging properties. The present study demonstrates that CAG stimulates telomerase activity and cell proliferation in human neonatal keratinocytes. In particular, CAG promotes scratch wound closure of human neonatal keratinocyte monolayers in vitro. The distinct telomerase-activating property of CAG prompted evaluation of its potential application in the treatment of neurological disorders. Accordingly, CAG induced telomerase activity and cAMP response element binding (CREB activation in PC12 cells and primary neurons. Blockade of CREB expression in neuronal cells by RNA interference reduced basal telomerase activity, and CAG was no longer efficacious in increasing telomerase activity. CAG treatment not only induced the expression of bcl2, a CREB-regulated gene, but also the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase in primary cortical neurons. Interestingly, oral administration of CAG for 7 days attenuated depression-like behavior in experimental mice. In conclusion, CAG stimulates telomerase activity in human neonatal keratinocytes and rat neuronal cells, and induces CREB activation followed by tert and bcl2 expression. Furthermore, CAG may have a novel therapeutic role in depression. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Extracellular components implicated in the stationary organization of the actin cytoskeleton in mesophyll cells of Vallisneria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J H; Mizuno, K; Takagi, S; Nagai, R

    1997-04-01

    In mesophyll cells of Vallisneria gigantea Graebner, an aquatic angiosperm, the association of the plasma membrane with the cell wall at the end wall has been reported to be indispensable for the mechanism that maintains the stationary organization of the bundles of microfilaments (MFs) [Masuda et al. (1991) Protoplasma 162: 151]. To identify putative extracellular components that might play a crucial role in this mechanism, we examined the effects of two exogenously applied synthetic hexapeptides, GRGDSP and ARYDEI, which include an RGD and an RYD motif, respectively. The RGD motif is known as a recognition site in molecules required for adhesion to the substratum at sites of focal contacts. Within 24 h, both peptides (at concentrations of 1-15 mM) induced extremely abnormal patterns of cytoplasmic streaming, as well as the striking disruption of the arrangement of bundles of MFs. GRGESP and ARYEEI peptides, used as controls, had no detectable effects. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that polyclonal antibodies against the ARYDEI peptide bound to the cell walls of mesophyll cells while a preimmune serum did not. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that the antibodies recognized polypeptides of 54 kDa and 27 kDa in an extract of total proteins from the leaves of Vallisneria. The results suggest that some extracellular proteins(s), with a conserved RGD or RYD motif in its amino acid sequence, might be involved in the maintenance of the stationary organization of the bundles of MFs. PMID:9177028

  15. Targeting natural killer cell reactivity by employing antibody to NKp46: implications for type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Yossef

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells belong to the innate lymphoid cells. Their cytotoxic activity is regulated by the delicate balance between activating and inhibitory signals. NKp46 is a member of the primary activating receptors of NK cells. We previously reported that the NKp46 receptor is involved in the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D. Subsequently, we hypothesized that blocking this receptor could prevent or hinder disease development. To address this goal, we developed monoclonal antibodies for murine NKp46. One mAb, named NCR1.15, recognizes the mouse homologue protein of NKp46, named Ncr1, and was able to down-regulate the surface expression of NKp46 on primary murine NK cells following antibody injection in vivo. Additionally, NCR1.15 treatments were able to down-regulate cytotoxic activity mediated by NKp46, but not by other NK receptors. To test our primary assumption, we examined T1D development in two models, non-obese diabetic mice and low-dose streptozotocin. Our results show a significantly lower incidence of diabetic mice in the NCR1.15-treated group compared to control groups. This study directly demonstrates the involvement of NKp46 in T1D development and suggests a novel treatment strategy for early insulitis.

  16. Cationic cell-penetrating peptides induce ceramide formation via acid sphingomyelinase: implications for uptake.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdurmen, W.P.R.; Thanos, M.; Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Gulbins, E.; Brock, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are receiving increasing attention as molecular transporters of membrane-impermeable molecules. Import of cationic CPP occurs both via endocytosis and - at higher peptide concentrations - in an endocytosis-independent manner via localized regions of the plasm

  17. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  18. Molecular mechanism implicated in Pemetrexed-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buqué Aitziber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastatic melanoma is a lethal skin cancer and its incidence is rising every year. It represents a challenge for oncologist, as the current treatment options are non-curative in the majority of cases; therefore, the effort to find and/or develop novel compounds is mandatory. Pemetrexed (Alimta®, MTA is a multitarget antifolate that inhibits folate-dependent enzymes: thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase, required for de novo synthesis of nucleotides for DNA replication. It is currently used in the treatment of mesothelioma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and has shown clinical activity in other tumors such as breast, colorectal, bladder, cervical, gastric and pancreatic cancer. However, its effect in human melanoma has not been studied yet. Results In the current work we studied the effect of MTA on four human melanoma cell lines A375, Hs294T, HT144 and MeWo and in two NSCLC cell lines H1299 and Calu-3. We have found that MTA induces DNA damage, S-phase cell cycle arrest, and caspase- dependent and –independent apoptosis. We show that an increment of the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and p53 is required for MTA-induced cytotoxicity by utilizing N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC to blockage of ROS and p53-defective H1299 NSCLC cell line. Pretreatment of melanoma cells with NAC significantly decreased the DNA damage, p53 up-regulation and cytotoxic effect of MTA. MTA was able to induce p53 expression leading to up-regulation of p53-dependent genes Mcl-1 and PIDD, followed by a postranscriptional regulation of Mcl-1 improving apoptosis. Conclusions We found that MTA induced DNA damage and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human melanoma cells in vitro and that the associated apoptosis was both caspase-dependent and –independent and p53-mediated. Our data suggest that MTA may be of therapeutic relevance for the future treatment of human malignant melanoma.

  19. Modulation of the Pasteur effect in retinal cells: implications for understanding compensatory metabolic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Barry S; Sauer, Michael W; Starnes, Catherine A

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the present experiments was to enhance understanding of the factors that are critical for the survival of retinal cells exposed to mitochondrial inhibition. Confluent cultures of Müller cells (rMC-1) and human retinal pigment epithelial cells (hRPE) were incubated in Dulbecco's minimal essential medium in the presence and absence of 1x10(-5)M Antimycin A, an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport. To modulate the rates of aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis, cells were incubated in media containing varying concentrations of glucose and 1-100 micro M of iodoacetic acid (IAA), an inhibitor of glyceraldehdye-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH). Measurements were made of G3PDH, lactic acid production, and cellular ATP levels, along with an examination of cellular morphology, the latter providing an index of cellular viability. Control rMC-1 and hRPE produced lactate aerobically, respectively, at 0.48 and 1.50 micro molhr(-1)/10(6) cells. Anaerobically, lactate production increased 2-fold in rMC-1 and 3-fold in hRPE. Anaerobic ATP levels in both types of cells were maintained at control levels over 8hr. Experimental conditions were sought that would modulate only the capacity of rMC-1 and hRPE to increase glycolysis following mitochondrial inhibition, i.e. alter their Pasteur effect. We used low concentrations of IAA to partially inhibit G3PDH. Incubation of rMC-1 with IAA for 6hr caused a graded inhibition of G3PDH: 70% inhibition with 1 micro M, 90% with 5 micro M, 97% with 10 micro M, and 100% with 100 micro M. While the aerobic and anaerobic rates of lactic acid production were not altered by 1 micro M IAA, both were suppressed completely by 100 micro M IAA. However, incubation of rMC-1 with 5 micro M IAA caused a decrease of 30% in the rate of anaerobic lactic acid production but no change in the rate of aerobic glycolysis. Moreover, with 5 micro M IAA, rMC-1 incubated aerobically maintained ATP levels, but anaerobic ATP content decreased to a low

  20. TP53inp1 Gene Is Implicated in Early Radiation Response in Human Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolett Sándor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein-1 (TP53inp1 is expressed by activation via p53 and p73. The purpose of our study was to investigate the role of TP53inp1 in response of fibroblasts to ionizing radiation. γ-Ray radiation dose-dependently induces the expression of TP53inp1 in human immortalized fibroblast (F11hT cells. Stable silencing of TP53inp1 was done via lentiviral transfection of shRNA in F11hT cells. After irradiation the clonogenic survival of TP53inp1 knockdown (F11hT-shTP cells was compared to cells transfected with non-targeting (NT shRNA. Radiation-induced senescence was measured by SA-β-Gal staining and autophagy was detected by Acridine Orange dye and microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3B immunostaining. The expression of TP53inp1, GDF-15, and CDKN1A and alterations in radiation induced mitochondrial DNA deletions were evaluated by qPCR. TP53inp1 was required for radiation (IR induced maximal elevation of CDKN1A and GDF-15 expressions. Mitochondrial DNA deletions were increased and autophagy was deregulated following irradiation in the absence of TP53inp1. Finally, we showed that silencing of TP53inp1 enhances the radiation sensitivity of fibroblast cells. These data suggest functional roles for TP53inp1 in radiation-induced autophagy and survival. Taken together, we suppose that silencing of TP53inp1 leads radiation induced autophagy impairment and induces accumulation of damaged mitochondria in primary human fibroblasts.

  1. Melanoma: Stem cells, sun exposure and hallmarks for carcinogenesis, molecular concepts and future clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrgidis Athanassios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background :The classification and prognostic assessment of melanoma is currently based on morphologic and histopathologic biomarkers. Availability of an increasing number of molecular biomarkers provides the potential for redefining diagnostic and prognostic categories and utilizing pharmacogenomics for the treatment of patients. The aim of the present review is to provide a basis that will allow the construction-or reconstruction-of future melanoma research. Methods: We critically review the common medical databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane CENTRAL for studies reporting on molecular biomarkers for melanoma. Results are discussed along the hallmarks proposed for malignant transformation by Hanahan and Weinberg. We further discuss the genetic basis of melanoma with regard to the possible stem cell origin of melanoma cells and the role of sunlight in melanoma carcinogenesis. Results: Melanocyte precursors undergo several genome changes -UV-induced or not- which could be either mutations or epigenetic. These changes provide stem cells with abilities to self-invoke growth signals, to suppress anti-growth signals, to avoid apoptosis, to replicate without limit, to invade, proliferate and sustain angiogenesis. Melanocyte stem cells are able to progressively collect these changes in their genome. These new potential functions, drive melanocyte precursors to the epidermis were they proliferate and might cause benign nevi. In the epidermis, they are still capable of acquiring new traits via changes to their genome. With time, such changes could add up to transform a melanocyte precursor to a malignant melanoma stem cell. Conclusions : Melanoma cannot be considered a "black box" for researchers anymore. Current trends in the diagnosis and prognosis of melanoma are to individualize treatment based on molecular biomarkers. Pharmacogenomics constitute a promising field with regard to melanoma patients′ treatment. Finally, development of novel

  2. Nrf2 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer: implications for cell proliferation and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neoptolemos John P

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nrf2 is a key transcriptional regulator of a battery of genes that facilitate phase II/III drug metabolism and defence against oxidative stress. Nrf2 is largely regulated by Keap1, which directs Nrf2 for proteasomal degradation. The Nrf2/Keap1 system is dysregulated in lung, head and neck, and breast cancers and this affects cellular proliferation and response to therapy. Here, we have investigated the integrity of the Nrf2/Keap1 system in pancreatic cancer. Results Keap1, Nrf2 and the Nrf2 target genes AKR1c1 and GCLC were detected in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mutation analysis of NRF2 exon 2 and KEAP1 exons 2-6 in these cell lines identified no mutations in NRF2 and only synonomous mutations in KEAP1. RNAi depletion of Nrf2 caused a decrease in the proliferation of Suit-2, MiaPaca-2 and FAMPAC cells and enhanced sensitivity to gemcitabine (Suit-2, 5-flurouracil (FAMPAC, cisplatin (Suit-2 and FAMPAC and gamma radiation (Suit-2. The expression of Nrf2 and Keap1 was also analysed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n = 66 and 57, respectively and matching normal benign epithelium (n = 21 cases. Whilst no significant correlation was seen between the expression levels of Keap1 and Nrf2 in the tumors, interestingly, Nrf2 staining was significantly greater in the cytoplasm of tumors compared to benign ducts (P Conclusions Expression of Nrf2 is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and ductal adenocarcinomas. This may reflect a greater intrinsic capacity of these cells to respond to stress signals and resist chemotherapeutic interventions. Nrf2 also appears to support proliferation in certain pancreatic adenocarinomas. Therefore, strategies to pharmacologically manipulate the levels and/or activity of Nrf2 may have the potential to reduce pancreatic tumor growth, and increase sensitivity to therapeutics.

  3. Melatonin alters the glycolytic profile of Sertoli cells: implications for male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cátia S; Martins, Ana D; Rato, Luís; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F; Alves, Marco G

    2014-11-01

    Melatonin co-operates with insulin in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Within the testis, glucose metabolism in the somatic Sertoli cells (SCs) is pivotal for spermatogenesis. Since the effects of melatonin on male reproductive physiology remain largely unknown, we hypothesized that melatonin may affect spermatogenesis by modulating SC metabolism, interacting with insulin. To test our hypothesis, rat SCs were maintained in culture for 24 h in the presence of insulin, melatonin or both and metabolite production/consumption was determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). Protein levels of glucose transporters (GLUT1 and GLUT3), phosphofructokinase 1, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and monocarboxylate transporter 4 were determined by western blot. LDH activity was also assessed. SCs treated with melatonin showed an increase in glucose consumption via modulation of GLUT1 levels, but decreased LDH protein expression and activity, which resulted in lower lactate production. Moreover, SCs exposed to melatonin produced and accumulated less acetate than insulin-exposed cells. The combined treatment (insulin plus melatonin) increased acetate production by SCs, but intracellular acetate content remained lower than in insulin exposed cells. Finally, the intracellular redox state, as reflected by intracellular lactate/alanine ratio, was maintained at control levels in SCs by melatonin exposure (i.e. melatonin, alone or with insulin, increased the lactate/alanine ratio versus cells treated with insulin). Furthermore, SCs exposed to insulin plus melatonin produced more lactate and maintained the protein levels of some glycolysis-related enzymes and transporters at control levels. These findings illustrate that melatonin regulates SCs metabolism, and thus may affect spermatogenesis. Since lactate produced by SCs provides nutritional support and has an anti-apoptotic effect in developing germ cells, melatonin supplementation may be an effective therapy for

  4. Implication of scavenger receptors in the interactions between diesel exhaust particles and immature or mature dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassalle Philippe

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exposure to pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP is associated with an increased incidence of respiratory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which DEP have an effect on human health are not completely understood. In addition to their action on macrophages and airway epithelial cells, DEP also modulate the functions of dendritic cells (DC. These professional antigen-presenting cells are able to discriminate unmodified self from non-self thanks to pattern recognition receptors such as the Toll like Receptors (TLR and Scavenger Receptors (SR. SR were originally identified by their ability to bind and internalize modified lipoproteins and microorganisms but also particles and TLR agonists. In this study, we assessed the implication of SR in the effects of DEP associated or not with TLR agonists on monocyte-derived DC (MDDC. For this, we studied the regulation of CD36, CXCL16, LOX-1, SR-A1 and SR-B1 expression on MDDC treated with DEP associated or not with TLR2, 3 and 4 ligands. Then, the capacity of SR ligands (dextran sulfate and maleylated-ovalbumin to block the effects of DEP on the function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated DC has been evaluated. Results Our data demonstrate that TLR2 agonists mainly augmented CXCL16, LOX-1 and SR-B1 expression whereas DEP alone had only a weak effect. Interestingly, DEP modulated the action of TLR2 and TLR4 ligands on the expression of LOX-1 and SR-B1. Pretreatment with the SR ligand maleylated-ovalbumin but not dextran sulfate inhibited the endocytosis of DEP by MDDC. Moreover, this SR ligand blocked the effect by DEP at low dose (1 μg/ml on MDDC phenotype (a decrease of CD86 and HLA-DR expression and on the secretion of CXCL10, IL-12 and TNF-α. In contrast, the decrease of IL-12 and CXCL10 secretion and the generation of oxygen metabolite induced by DEP at 10 μg/ml was not affected by SR ligands Conclusion Our results show for the first time that the modulation of

  5. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network. PMID:26391451

  6. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network.

  7. Molecular spectrum of BRAF, NRAS and KRAS gene mutations in plasma cell dyscrasias: implication for MEK-ERK pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionetti, Marta; Barbieri, Marzia; Todoerti, Katia; Agnelli, Luca; Marzorati, Simona; Fabris, Sonia; Ciceri, Gabriella; Galletti, Serena; Milesi, Giulia; Manzoni, Martina; Mazzoni, Mara; Greco, Angela; Tonon, Giovanni; Musto, Pellegrino; Baldini, Luca; Neri, Antonino

    2015-09-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous plasma cell (PC) malignancy. Whole-exome sequencing has identified therapeutically targetable mutations such as those in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which are the most prevalent MM mutations. We used deep sequencing to screen 167 representative patients with PC dyscrasias [132 with MM, 24 with primary PC leukemia (pPCL) and 11 with secondary PC leukemia (sPCL)] for mutations in BRAF, NRAS and KRAS, which were respectively found in 12%, 23.9% and 29.3% of cases. Overall, the MAPK pathway was affected in 57.5% of the patients (63.6% of those with sPCL, 59.8% of those with MM, and 41.7% of those with pPCL). The majority of BRAF variants were comparably expressed at transcript level. Additionally, gene expression profiling indicated the MAPK pathway is activated in mutated patients. Finally, we found that vemurafenib inhibition of BRAF activation in mutated U266 cells affected the expression of genes known to be associated with MM. Our data confirm and extend previous published evidence that MAPK pathway activation is recurrent in myeloma; the finding that it is mediated by BRAF mutations in a significant fraction of patients has potentially immediate clinical implications. PMID:26090869

  8. Store-operated Ca2+ channels in airway epithelial cell function and implications for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Krishna; Parekh, Anant B

    2016-08-01

    The epithelial cells of the lung are at the interface of a host and its environment and are therefore directly exposed to the inhaled air-borne particles. Rather than serving as a simple physical barrier, airway epithelia detect allergens and other irritants and then help organize the subsequent immune response through release of a plethora of secreted signals. Many of these signals are generated in response to opening of store-operated Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane. In this review, we describe the properties of airway store-operated channels and their role in regulating airway epithelial cell function.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377718

  9. Neural stem cells, the subventricular zone and radiotherapy: implications for treating glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew W; Mehta, Minesh P; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, advances in neuroscience have suggested that neural stem cells resident in specific regions of the adult brain may be involved in development of both primary and recurrent glioblastoma. Neurogenesis and malignant transformation occurs in the subventricular zone adjacent to the lateral ventricles. This region holds promise as a potential target for therapeutic intervention with radiotherapy. However, irradiation of a larger brain volume is not without risk, and significant side effects have been observed. The current literature remains contradictory regarding the efficacy of deliberate intervention with radiation to the subventricular zone. This critical review discusses the connection between neural stem cells and development of glioblastoma, explores the behavior of tumors associated with the subventricular zone, summarizes the discordant literature with respect to the effects of irradiation, and reviews other targeted therapies to this intriguing region. PMID:27108274

  10. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action: mitochondrial bioenergetics and neurological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2008-10-01

    The 'healthy cell bias of estrogen action' hypothesis examines the role that regulating mitochondrial function and bioenergetics play in promoting neural health and the mechanistic crossroads that lead to divergent outcomes following estrogen exposure. Estrogen-induced signaling pathways in hippocampal and cortical neurons converge upon the mitochondria to enhance aerobic glycolysis coupled to the citric acid cycle, mitochondrial respiration and ATP generation. Convergence of estrogen-induced signaling onto mitochondria is also a point of vulnerability when activated in diseased neurons which exacerbates degeneration through increased load on dysregulated calcium homeostasis. As the continuum of neurological health progresses from healthy to unhealthy so too do the benefits of estrogen or hormone therapy. The healthy cell bias of estrogen action hypothesis provides a lens through which to assess disparities in outcomes across basic and clinical science and on which to predict outcomes of estrogen interventions for sustaining neurological health and preventing age-associated neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

  11. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  12. The ex vivo purge of cancer cells using oncolytic viruses: recent advances and clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang JJ; Atkins HL

    2015-01-01

    Jovian J Tsang,1,2 Harold L Atkins2,3 1Department of Biochemistry, University of Ottawa, 2Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 3Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Hematological malignancies are treated with intensive high-dose chemotherapy, with or without radiation. This is followed by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) to rescue or reconstitute hematopoiesis damaged by the anticancer therapy. Autologo...

  13. Effects of Reduced Oxygen and Glucose Levels on Ocular Cells in vitro: Implications for Tissue Models

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Edward A.; Nauman, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    An important goal of tissue engineering is the development of better in vitro tissue models for the study and treatment of diseases, especially those that are difficult to model in animals, such as glaucoma. In order to properly interpret experimental results designed to mimic in vivo conditions, it is necessary to characterize the metabolic state of the in vitro culture. The goal of this study was to determine how porcine lamina cribrosa cells (PLC), porcine scleral fibroblasts (PSC) and rat...

  14. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity in fetal calf serum: implications for cell culture research

    OpenAIRE

    Lubel, J. S.; Herath, C. B.; Velkoska, E.; Casley, D. J.; Burrell, L. M.; Angus, P. W.

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture experiments often employ the use of culture media that contain fetal calf serum (FCS). The angiotensin peptides angiotensin II and angiotensin 1–7 have opposing effects with angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) being the enzyme predominantly responsible for generating angiotensin 1–7 from angiotensin II. The effect of FCS on angiotensin peptides has not previously been described. We have shown that FCS has ACE2 enzyme activity capable of degrading angiotensin II and generating ...

  15. Prognostic implication of PTPRH hypomethylation in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Takashi; Soejima, Kenzo; Arai, Eri; HAMAMOTO, JUNKO; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Arai, Daisuke; Ishioka, Kota; Ohgino, Keiko; Naoki, Katsuhiko; Kohno, Takashi; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Kanai, Yae; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    PTPRH is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase thought to be a potential regulator of tumorigenesis. The aim of the present study was to clarify the significance of PTPRH expression and its regulation by DNA methylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). PTPRH mRNA expression was examined in 89 NSCLC and corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The correlation between DNA methylation and PTPRH gene expression was investigated in another cohort ...

  16. Molecular Characteristics of Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors and Comparison With Testicular Counterparts: Implications for Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kraggerud, Sigrid Marie; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Skotheim, Rolf I; Vera M. Abeler; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Ragnhild A Lothe

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the molecular characteristics and development of rare malignant ovarian germ cell tumors (mOGCTs). We provide an overview of the genomic aberrations assessed by ploidy, cytogenetic banding, and comparative genomic hybridization. We summarize and discuss the transcriptome profiles of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA), and biomarkers (DNA methylation, gene mutation, individual protein expression) for each mOGCT histological subtype. Parallels between the origin of mOGCT and their...

  17. Effects of low-level radiation upon the hematopoietic steam cell: implications for leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Bond, V.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Miller, M.E.; Bullis, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    These studies have addressed firstly the effect of single small doses of x-ray upon murine hematopoietic stem cells to obtain a better estimate of the D/sub q/. It is small, of the order of 20 rads. Secondly, a dose fractionation schedule tht does not kill or perturb the kinetics of hemopoietic cell proliferation was sought in order to investigate the leukemogenic potential of low level radiation upon an unperturbed hemopoietic system. The studies reported herein show tht 1.25 rads every other day decrease the CFU-S content of bone marrow by the time 40 rads are accumulated. Studies on the effect of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 rads 3 times per week are under way. Two rads 3 times per week produced a modest decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow after an accumulation of 68 rads. With 3.0 rads 3 times per week an accumulation of 102 rads produces a significant decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow. Dose fractionation at 0.5 and 1.0 rad 3 times per week has not produced a CFU-S depression after accumulation of 17 and 34 rads. Radiation leukemogenesis studies published to date have utilized single doses and chronic exposure schedules that probably have significantly perturbed the kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells. Whether radiation will produce leukemia in animal models with dose schedules that do not perturb kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells remains to be seen.

  18. Cinnamon Ameliorates Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice via Regulatory T Cells: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Susanta Mondal; Kalipada Pahan

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Cinnamon is a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material used for centuries throughout the world. Here, we have explored a novel use of cinnamon powder in protecting Tregs and treating the disease process of experiment...

  19. Cell Membrane Integrity in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1: Implications for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Anchel González-Barriga; Julia Kranzen; Croes, Huib J. E.; Suzanne Bijl; van den Broek, Walther J. A. A.; van Kessel, Ingeborg D. G.; Van Engelen, Baziel G M; Judith C T van Deutekom; Bé Wieringa; Susan A M Mulders; Derick G Wansink

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a multisystemic disease caused by toxic RNA from a DMPK gene carrying an expanded (CTG*CAG)n repeat. Promising strategies for treatment of DM1 patients are currently being tested. These include antisense oligonucleotides and drugs for elimination of expanded RNA or prevention of aberrant binding to RNP proteins. A significant hurdle for preclinical development along these lines is efficient systemic delivery of compounds across endothelial and target cell me...

  20. Hydrogel limits stem cell dispersal in the deaf cochlea: implications for cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Bryony A.; Backhouse, Steven S.; Cimenkaya, Cengiz; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2012-12-01

    Auditory neurons provide the critical link between a cochlear implant and the brain in deaf individuals, therefore their preservation and/or regeneration is important for optimal performance of this neural prosthesis. In cases where auditory neurons are significantly depleted, stem cells (SCs) may be used to replace the lost population of neurons, thereby re-establishing the critical link between the periphery (implant) and the brain. For such a therapy to be therapeutically viable, SCs must be differentiated into neurons, retained at their delivery site and damage caused to the residual auditory neurons minimized. Here we describe the transplantation of SC-derived neurons into the deaf cochlea, using a peptide hydrogel to limit their dispersal. The described approach illustrates that SCs can be delivered to and are retained within the basal turn of the cochlea, without a significant loss of endogenous auditory neurons. In addition, the tissue response elicited from this surgical approach was restricted to the surgical site and did not extend beyond the cochlear basal turn. Overall, this approach illustrates the feasibility of targeted cell delivery into the mammalian cochlea using hydrogel, which may be useful for future cell-based transplantation strategies, for combined treatment with a cochlear implant to restore function.

  1. Reactive oxygen species and angiotensin II signaling in vascular cells: implications in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touyz R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are associated with vascular functional and structural changes including endothelial dysfunction, altered contractility and vascular remodeling. Cellular events underlying these processes involve changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC growth, apoptosis/anoikis, cell migration, inflammation, and fibrosis. Many factors influence cellular changes, of which angiotensin II (Ang II appears to be amongst the most important. The physiological and pathophysiological actions of Ang II are mediated primarily via the Ang II type 1 receptor. Growing evidence indicates that Ang II induces its pleiotropic vascular effects through NADPH-driven generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS function as important intracellular and intercellular second messengers to modulate many downstream signaling molecules, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases, protein tyrosine kinases, transcription factors, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and ion channels. Induction of these signaling cascades leads to VSMC growth and migration, regulation of endothelial function, expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, and modification of extracellular matrix. In addition, ROS increase intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, a major determinant of vascular reactivity. ROS influence signaling molecules by altering the intracellular redox state and by oxidative modification of proteins. In physiological conditions, these events play an important role in maintaining vascular function and integrity. Under pathological conditions ROS contribute to vascular dysfunction and remodeling through oxidative damage. The present review focuses on the biology of ROS in Ang II signaling in vascular cells and discusses how oxidative stress contributes to vascular damage in cardiovascular disease.

  2. Age-related changes in brain support cells: Implications for stroke severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabji, Farida; Bake, Shameena; Lewis, Danielle K

    2013-10-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of adult disability and the fourth leading cause of mortality in the US. Stroke disproportionately occurs among the elderly, where the disease is more likely to be fatal or lead to long-term supportive care. Animal models, where the ischemic insult can be controlled more precisely, also confirm that aged animals sustain more severe strokes as compared to young animals. Furthermore, the neuroprotection usually seen in younger females when compared to young males is not observed in older females. The preclinical literature thus provides a valuable resource for understanding why the aging brain is more susceptible to severe infarction. In this review, we discuss the hypothesis that stroke severity in the aging brain may be associated with reduced functional capacity of critical support cells. Specifically, we focus on astrocytes, that are critical for detoxification of the brain microenvironment and endothelial cells, which play a crucial role in maintaining the blood brain barrier. In view of the sex difference in stroke severity, this review also discusses studies of middle-aged acyclic females as well as the effects of the estrogen on astrocytes and endothelial cells.

  3. Prognostic implications of cell kinetics, histopathology and pathologic stage in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrini, R; Costa, A; Giardini, R; Boracchi, P; Del Bino, G; Marubini, E; Rilke, F

    1989-01-01

    Cell kinetics ([3H]-thymidine labelling index, [3H]-Thy LI) were determined on pathologic lymph nodes from 175 untreated adult patients. [3H]-Thy LI significantly differed in low-grade and high-grade malignancy groups according to the Kiel classification (median values, 1.8 per cent and 10.4 per cent, respectively) and in low, intermediate, high grade according to the Working Formulation (median values: 1.7 per cent, 4.8 per cent and 14.2 per cent, respectively) but was unrelated to pathologic stage or patient's age. Cell kinetics, histopathology, pathologic stage and patient's age were significant discriminants of 6-year survival. Multivariate analysis was performed by Cox's proportional hazard model to investigate the role of [3H]-Thy LI after making allowance for the other prognostic factors. When [3H]-Thy LI was added to the model, a large increase (chi square = 29.94) contributed by the cell kinetic variable in identifying patients at different risk was revealed.

  4. Occurrence and implications of voltage reversal in stacked microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Junyeong; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2014-06-01

    Voltage reversal in stacked microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is a significant challenge that must be addressed, and the information on its definite cause and occurrence process is still obscure. In this work, we first demonstrated that different anodic reaction rates caused voltage reversal in a stacked MFC. Sluggish reaction rates on the anode in unit 1 of the stacked MFC resulted in a significantly increased anode overpotential of up to 0.132 V, as compared to negligible anode overpotential (0.0247 V) in unit 2. This work clearly verified the process of voltage reversal in the stacked MFC. As the current was gradually increased in the stacked MFC, the voltage in the stacked unit 1 decreased to 0 V prior to that of the stacked unit 2. Then, when the voltage in unit 1 became 0 V, it was converted from a galvanic cell to an electrochemical cell powered by unit 2. We found that the stacked unit 2 provided electrical energy for the stacked unit 1 as a power supply. Finally, the anode potential of the stacked unit 1 significantly increased over cathode potential as current increased further, which caused voltage reversal in unit 1. Voltage reversal occurs in stacked MFCs as a result of non-spontaneous anode overpotential in a unit MFC that has sluggish anode kinetics compared to the other unit MFCs.

  5. MET Expression in Primary and Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Implications of Correlative Biomarker Assessment to MET Pathway Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Shuch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Inhibitors of the MET pathway hold promise in the treatment for metastatic kidney cancer. Assessment of predictive biomarkers may be necessary for appropriate patient selection. Understanding MET expression in metastases and the correlation to the primary site is important, as distant tissue is not always available. Methods and Results. MET immunofluorescence was performed using automated quantitative analysis and a tissue microarray containing matched nephrectomy and distant metastatic sites from 34 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Correlations between MET expressions in matched primary and metastatic sites and the extent of heterogeneity were calculated. The mean expression of MET was not significantly different between primary tumors when compared to metastases (P=0.1. MET expression weakly correlated between primary and matched metastatic sites (R=0.5 and a number of cases exhibited very high levels of discordance between these tumors. Heterogeneity within nephrectomy specimens compared to the paired metastatic tissues was not significantly different (P=0.39. Conclusions. We found that MET expression is not significantly different in primary tumors than metastatic sites and only weakly correlates between matched sites. Moderate concordance of MET expression and significant expression heterogeneity may be a barrier to the development of predictive biomarkers using MET targeting agents.

  6. Synchronous clear cell renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma: genetic evidence of independent ontogenesis and implications of chromosomal imbalances in tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiroga-Garza Gabriela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Seven percent of renal cell carcinoma (RCC cases are diagnosed as "unclassified" RCC by morphology. Genetic profiling of RCCs helps define renal tumor subtypes, especially in cases where morphologic diagnosis is inconclusive. This report describes a patient with synchronous clear cell RCC (ccRCC and a tubulocystic renal carcinoma (TCRC in the same kidney, and discusses the pathologic features and genetic profile of both tumors. A 67 year-old male underwent CT scans for an unrelated medical event. Two incidental renal lesions were found and ultimately removed by radical nephrectomy. The smaller lesion had multiple small cystic spaces lined by hobnail cells with high nuclear grade separated by fibrous stroma. This morphology and the expression of proximal (CD10, AMACR and distal tubule cell (CK19 markers by immunohistochemistry supported the diagnosis of TCRC. The larger lesion was a typical ccRCC, with Fuhrman's nuclear grade 3 and confined to the kidney. Molecular characterization of both neoplasms using virtual karyotyping was performed to assess relatedness of these tumors. Low grade areas (Fuhrman grade 2 of the ccRCC showed loss of 3p and gains in chromosomes 5 and 7, whereas oncocytic areas displayed additional gain of 2p and loss of 10q; the high grade areas (Fuhrman grade 3 showed several additional imbalances. In contrast, the TCRC demonstrated a distinct profile with gains of chromosomes 8 and 17 and loss of 9. In conclusion, ccRCC and TCRC show distinct genomic copy number profiles and chromosomal imbalances in TCRC might be implicated in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Second, the presence of a ccRCC with varying degrees of differentiation exemplifies the sequence of chromosomal imbalances acquired during tumor progression. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1790525735655283

  7. Latent and persistent lethal injury in mouse salivary gland cells following gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.

    1976-07-01

    Newly synthesized DNA in previously irradiated and isoproterenol-stimulated mouse salivary gland cells was found to be quickly degraded when the stimulation for DNA synthesis was given 10 days after a dose of 1000 rad ..gamma.. radiation. The degradation of the DNA was due to degeneration of acinar cells prior to mitosis. When the stimulation with isoproterenol was given 1 or 3 months after irradiation, DNA degradation in parotids was not detectable. An autoradiographic analysis revealed, however, that about half of the acinar cells labeled with tritiated thymidine were eliminated from irradiated parotids in a few days, even when the stimulation with isoproterenol was given 3 months after irradiation. This indicates that irradiation of mouse salivary gland cells produced latent lethal damage and that this damage is unmasked by the stimulation for DNA synthesis and cell division.

  8. Analyzing Ca(2+) dynamics in intact epithelial cells using spatially limited flash photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassy, Janos; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    The production of saliva by parotid acinar cells is stimulated by Ca(2+) activation of Cl(-) and K(+) channels located in the apical plasma membrane of these polarized cells. Here we describe a paradigm for the focal photorelease of either Ca(2+) or an inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (InsP(3)) analog. The protocol is designed to be useful for investigating subcellular Ca(2+) dynamics in polarized cells with minimal experimental intervention. Parotid acinar cells are loaded with cell-permeable versions of the caged precursors (NP-EGTA-AM or Ci-InsP(3)/PM). Photolysis is accomplished using a spatially limited, focused diode laser, but the experiment can be readily modified to whole-field photolysis using a xenon flash lamp.

  9. Clinical implications and histological correlation of atypical glandular cells found in cervicovaginal smears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beliza Loos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Atypical glandular cells (AGC are carriers of insufficient nuclear abnormalities for the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma, but exceed the criteria for classification as reactive glandular cells. This is an uncommon diagnosis, which may be associated with neoplastic lesions. Objective: To evaluate the clinical significance of primary cytological diagnosis of AGC through correlation with results of subsequent cyto-histologic examination. Materials and methods: 10 years retrospective study based on cervical cytologic results indicating AGC, classified as "possibly non-neoplastic" or "cannot exclude high-grade intraepithelial lesion". It was performed cyto-histopathological correlation in cases that were submitted to subsequent histopathological examination up to two years after cervical cytology analysis. Results: AGC were reported in 380 (0.06% exams, providing 160 cases with subsequent biopsy. 85 (53.1% of these, presented benign changes and 75 (46.9% neoplastic lesions. From 114 "possibly non-neoplastic" cytological results, 71 (62.3% had benign histological changes, and 43 (37.7% neoplastic lesions, corresponding to a negative predictive value (NPV of 62.3%. In contrast, among the 46 AGC "cannot exclude high-grade intraepithelial lesion" results, 14 (30.4% presented benign changes and 32 (69.6% neoplastic lesions (positive predictive value [PPV] = 69.6%. Discussion: The high rate of cancer associated with the diagnosis of AGC reassures the importance of recognizing these atypical cells in pap smears. The classification of "possibly non-neoplastic" and "cannot exclude high-grade intraepithelial lesion" may suggest the origin of cytological changes. Conclusion: Our results reinforce the importance of adequate follow-up of patients with AGC diagnosis on cervical cytology.

  10. Radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Results and Implications of a national patterns-of-care study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This patterns-of-care study was performed to define the current clinical experience with radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in adults in Germany and to define open questions resulting from this study. Material and Methods: A standardized questionnaire was sent to 198 German radiotherapy institutions. Data about patient characteristics, stage of disease, practice and fractionation of radiotherapy, outcome of therapy, etc. were systematically evaluated. 123 of 198 institutions answered the complete questionnaire (62.1%). Results: Only 23 of the 123 institutions (18.7%) reported experience with radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis of adults. 18 institutions with 98 patients were evaluable. The majority of patients (72 of 98) was treated on a linear accelerator. The median single dose of radiotherapy was 2 Gy, while the median total dose was 24 Gy. 81 of 89 evaluable patients (91%) reached a local control of the treated lesion(s), 69 of those had a complete remission. Eight of 89 patients (9%) developed an in-field recurrence. 87.8% of patients experienced no acute and 97% of patients no late side effects of radiotherapy. Conclusion: Clinical experience with radiotherapy of Langerhans' cell histiocytosis in adults in Germany is still very limited. Nevertheless, the clinical results - with high remission and local control rates - confirm the effectiveness of radiotherapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of this disease. Due to the small number of patients in this study despite higher incidence rates, the knowledge of this disease has to be multiplied in Germany. Future patients should be systematically included into a prospective radiotherapy registry. (orig.)

  11. Suboptimal porcine endogenous retrovirus infection in non-human primate cells: implication for preclinical xenotransplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Mattiuzzo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV poses a potential risk of zoonotic infection in xenotransplantation. Preclinical transplantation trials using non-human primates (NHP as recipients of porcine xenografts present the opportunity to assess the zoonosis risk in vivo. However, PERV poorly infects NHP cells for unclear reasons and therefore NHP may represent a suboptimal animal model to assess the risk of PERV zoonoses. We investigated the mechanism responsible for the low efficiency of PERV-A infection in NHP cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two steps,